O

ne is at a downtown restaurant, another
is in a quiet studio tucked in the woods,
a third meets in a college classroom.
The locations are quite different, but the pur-
pose is the same—to inspire kids to create art
this summer.
Richard Monteleone, an adjunct art professor
at Atlantic Cape Community College, is running
a Mural Workshop for kids that meets at the
Classic Bistro Restaurant in Millville. Thirteen
8- to 12-year-olds have been meeting a couple of
days each week under the theme of “Our Visions
of Peace.” Monteleone says the students are
investigating and drawing about peace topics.
They take walks, make observations and head
back to the restaurant to paint.
“It’s about progressive creativity,” says
Monteleone. “They saw other murals around
Millville. Now that have incredible ideas about
what it [their mural] could include. They want
it to be bright and airy, have rainbows, show
people holding hands. They are working collec-
tively as a group.”
Monteleone let them pick their own medium.
“The kids finally decided yesterday that it is going
to be two-dimensional and will probably be
acrylic paint.” They have also decided to make it
portable, allowing themto work during inclement
weather and to allow it to move. “We are going
to go into each of the kids’ schools. We already
have two schools lined up, a car dealership and
VOLUME 4 | ISSUE 27 | AUGUST 17, 2011
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Continued on page 14
Continued on page 10
Kids Create...
Rains Cause Flooding, Damage
Throughout Cumberland County
From left: Jessica Tola, Julia Tola, and Mikayla Gatier show off their soft sculpture
aliens, created during "Cosmos" week at Magnolia Hill Studios.
Everything from clay sculpture to murals to aliens.
{ STORY AND PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE FARRELL }
{ STORY AND PHOTOS BY RYAN DINGER }
This past weekend, Cumberland County was
pounded by multiple storm fronts, which dumped
more than 10 inches of rain on the region—more
than the County saw for the entirety of June and
July, combined. The rains started in the late after-
noon on Saturday, and continued into Monday, with
very few breaks in between.
The onslaught of accumulated precipitation had Portions of Bridgeton’s W. Park Drive were dam-
aged by flooding at Sunset Lake on Sunday.
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Letters to the Editor
I
Thanks from the Mayor’s
Blue Ribbon Committee
First as a member of the Mayor’s Blue
Ribbon Committee, I would like to thank
everyone who had a part in organizing and
running the 150th Birthday celebration
weekend. I may miss some names, but there
are a few that need absolute recognition. The
Vineland Board of Education and Bill Romer,
City of Vineland Public Works, Police, Fire,
EMT, Electric Utility, L&I Departments. A
special thank you to Mimi Bernard for field-
ing the many phone calls, messages and sep-
arating mail in addition to her regular duties
as Mayor’s Secretary.
Another important part was the North
Vineland Fire Company # 3 for asking to be
part of the festivities with a carnival to
enhance the celebration. This provided work
to some of our local teenagers and it allowed
local charities to make money by manning
some of the gaming booths. All celebrations
need food; Debbie Casazza and her mighty
cooks &staff prepared super chicken, pork and
beef platters with veggies, salad and local corn.
Thanks to The Daily Journal, The Grapevine,
WVLT 92.1 Radio, Vineland’s web site and
VPS Ch. 9 (our own T.V. station) along with
Millville’s Quinn Broadcasting, we were able
to get the word out.
Mayor Robert Romano selected a great
team for the Blue Ribbon Committee who
worked long & hard hours preparing for the
Birthday weekend and other events leading
up to it. With Dr. Frank DeMaio as
Chairman, Kevin Kirchner as Vice-Chair,
and Rosanne Hughes as secretary, we contin-
ue to plan activities.
The Parade committee headed by Donata
Dalesandro brought in over 800 participants;
local church groups, companies, individuals,
horses for the Mayor and Dr. DeMaio, and
floats and bands. Speaking of bands, Mr. Bill
McDevitt did an excellent job of bringing in
a first-ever Vineland High School alumni
band not only for the parade, but they pre-
sented a concert, too.
I am sure I speak for the entire Blue
Ribbon Committee that we have great talent
in the City of Vineland and all of the stage
performances by singers, dancers and bands
were excellent. Thank you to these perform-
ers for asking to be part of the celebration.
The car show and the tractor show were
other highlights that brought in more partic-
ipation to the celebration. Miss Vineland,
Laura Huffman, even presented a trophy to
her choice in the car show.
We were promised the best firework dis-
play ever and we thank Pyrotecnico & the
Vitale family for keeping their promise—it
was the best ever!
Putting all the planned events together
takes money; it was the committee’s decision
that no tax money be used, so our plan to put
a commemorative history book together as a
fundraiser started off as a committee project,
but since most of the people involved work
full time and have family commitments, tak-
ing time to visit with businesses to get spon-
sorships was out of the question. So we
moved on to contract with a local (Millville)
company to help get sponsors and advertis-
ers along with design and printing of the
official commemorative book.
The committee’s role was to provide all the
history that would encompass about one third
of the book, so a small subcommittee of four—
Shirley Burke, President of the Women’s Club;
Gloria Urban, Director of the Vineland
Library; Nancy Steelman and I went on a quest
to summarize the old and update new history
that has never been in print before. With the
help of Vineland resident Jon Gerner, our his-
tory book designer hired by Paragon Printing,
we are making history of today alive in print.
A BIG Thank you to our main sponsors of
the 150th celebrations: Ace Plumbing &
Electrical Supplies, Allen Associates,
Colonial Bank, Cornerstone Music & Books,
Cruisin’ 92.1 WVLT, The Daily Journal,
The Grapevine, NFI, South Jersey Healthcare,
Vineland Construction Company, Vineland
Municipal Electric Utility, Walmart, Wawa
and The City of Vineland.
As Chairman of fundraising, this com-
memorative book became my project to coor-
dinate. I want to thank all the people and
businesses that assisted us at the most diffi-
cult economic time in the last 50 years for
sponsorship and advertising monies to com-
plete this project. All the money raised is pay-
ing for the events of the 150th and the print-
ing of the commemorative book that will be
free to the public. We want it to be a col-
lectible to pass down to future generations.
Now, let’s get the commemorative book
rumor straight! Yes the book will be printed.
Also within the past year a few history
books emerged that might have confused
some people; the Vineland Historical and
Antiquarian society had a book published
titled Images of America: VINELAND.
The Friends of Historic Vineland com-
piled a book with no advertisers or sponsors:
So Rash an Enterprise… The Founding &
History of Vineland, New Jersey.
Then The Daily Journal published a 150th
edition, which again confused people that
may have sponsored or advertised or put a
message in our commemorative book.
The Commemorative book will be avail-
able throughout Vineland; Sponsors and
other businesses that have advertised will
get a supply to be distributed for free.
We are not done. There are more activi-
ties through 2011.
That being said; if anyone or business would
like to be included in the extended portion,
please notify me by e-mail at JProfetto@com-
cast.net for further information.
—Joe Profetto, Mayor’s Blue Ribbon Commitee
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Coaches Award Goes to Lagona
At the Suburban Swimming Association of South Jersey (SSASJ)
Championships, held recently at Collingwood’s Roberts Pool, the 2011 Coaches
Award went to Michael Lagona, of Hammonton. Coaches from throughout the 15-
team SSASJ
League vote for
the winner of this
award. Lagona
thanked his cur-
rent and past
coaches, including
Dawn Deluca and
John Casadia.
Lagona trained
with Casadia in
another swim
league, to which
the Mighty Marlins
belong. Casadia
has also coached
Vineland’s SSASJ
team, the Dolphin
Swim, since it
joined the League in 1971. Besides that, Casadia is legendary in Vineland swim
circles, having coached at Vineland High for many years before he retired. This
summer, Dolphin won its 27th League Title by defeating Larchmont and ending
the season with a record of 4-0. At the two-day SSASJ Championships, Dolphin
proved to be the strongest team in the League.
From left: Hammonton Stingrays Coach Dawn Deluca, Michael Lagona with Coaches
Award, Vineland Dolphin Coach John Casadia.
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Faces in the News
I
Birthday Wishes
To Janaya L. Bullock, who turns 18 on
August 17th and becomes a lovely
young lady. You have been a joy in my
life and a blessing. My wish is for all
your dreams to come true. Work hard
and have faith that God has control of
your destiny.
Love,
Mom
Caulford Advances
Congratulations to our son, Richard A.
Caulford, for advancing to Vineland High
School 9th grade. We are very proud of you!
Love,
Mommy, Daddy, Steph and Nessa
xoxoxoxoxoxo
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News in Brief
OLMA Names New Head
Basketball Coach
Our Lady of Mercy Academy, the all-girls
Catholic high school in Newfield, Gloucester
County, has announced that Charles
“Chip” Reitano, a resident of Somerdale,
has been named head basketball coach.
Reitano has more than 20 years experi-
ence in high school athletics, both as an
administrator/athletic director and, most
recently, as head coach for a progressive
and successful girls basketball program in
Philadelphia.
Reitano comes to OLMA after a success-
ful 10-year stint as head basketball coach at
Saints Neumann-Goretti High School, end-
ing with six straight Catholic League play-
off appearances, from 2005 through 2010.
Reitano will be assisted by a trio of
assistant coaches, including Tom
McCarville, Jerry Covella and Scott Reale.
All three assistants served on the OLMA
staff last season. Together with Reitano, the
OLMA staff boasts more than 80 years of
coaching experience.
New Counselor at Abbey
Bradway Associates
Melanie Garrison, L.A.C., is joining the
counseling staff at Abbey Bradway
Associates, located at 2630 E. Chestnut
Ave., Suite D-4, Vineland. She will be avail-
able to see children, age 6 and over, adoles-
cents, and their families. She graduated
from Wilmington University and has
worked in various school systems in south-
ern New Jersey.
Garrison joins four other experienced
professional counselors, all of whom are
licensed and trained to deal with a multi-
tude of issues, including anxiety, depres-
sion, grief and loss, marital issues, stress,
and transitions of all types.
Referrals are welcome but not necessary.
Appointments can be set up by calling 856-
696-5690. No insurances are accepted but
sessions can be paid by credit card, check or
cash. Insurance forms will be given if the
client has out-of-network coverage.
Open Application for Assistance
to Firefighters Grants Program
After hosting a fire grant workshop for
2nd Congressional District fire and rescue
departments in July, U.S. Congressman
Frank A. LoBiondo (NJ-02) has announced
the open period for local fire and rescue
departments to apply for federal funding
under the Department of Homeland
Security’s Assistance to Firefighters Grants
Program (AFGP). The application period
will begin on Monday, August 15 and will
run through Friday, September 9, with
awards being announced later this year.
“Day in and day out, the men and
women of our fire and rescue units are the
first responders to emergency events in our
communities. In addition to our deep grati-
tude, they deserve our support and avail-
able federal resources to assist them in
their efforts to keep us safe,” said
LoBiondo, a member of the Congressional
Fire Caucus. “Particularly in these difficult
economic times, I strongly encourage the
fire and rescue departments of South
Jersey to take advantage of this critical
funding source.”
AFGP competitive funding is used by
the nation’s fire and rescue departments to
increase the effectiveness of firefighting
and emergency response operations and to
improve personnel health and safety pro-
grams. The Fiscal Year 2011 program will
distribute $404 million to first responder
organizations across the country.
Since the program began in 2001, 118 of
New Jersey’s 2nd Congressional District
fire organizations have received more than
$23.7 million under AFGP. Applications can
be found at www.fema.gov/firegrants.
Salem County Presents Arts and
History Grant Workshops
The New Jersey State Council on the
Arts honored the Salem County Cultural
and Heritage Commission with a Citation
for Excellence at its annual meeting in
Trenton recently. The Commission was
among five county cultural and heritage
agencies to receive the award this year.
Freeholders and Commissioners will be
invited to attend a gathering in Trenton
later this year to receive a certificate mark-
ing this designation.
In addition to the citation, the Council
approved a grant of $45,041 to the
Commission, a 3.5 percent increase over last
year’s award.
Reviewers praised the agency’s progress
and especially noted the successful linkage
between cultural programming and the
growth of tourism in the County.
Both the Arts Council and Historical
Commission grants provide funding for the
Cultural and Heritage Commission’s Arts
and History Re-Grant Programs.
Organizations, municipalities and schools
are eligible to apply for grants funding
organizations and projects focusing on the
arts and NewJersey history in Salem
County. The Commission is presenting a
grantwriting workshop to help potential
applicants learn about the application
process on Tuesday, August 23, at the
Ware Complex, 51 Cheney Rd., Woodstown.
The History Grant Workshop begins at
6:30 p.m.; the Arts Grant Workshop begins
at 8 p.m. The program is free, but advance
registration is requested. Registration and
application forms are available by phone or
e-mail (856-935-7510 x 8532; irene.wan-
ner@salemcountynj.com). Proposals will
be due at the Cultural and Heritage
Commission office, 94 Market St., Salem,
by 4 p.m. on September 30.
{
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}
{
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MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher
DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor
LORI GOUDIE Art Director
GAIL EPIFANIO Controller
SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive
MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive
TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer
RYAN DINGER Editorial/Sales Assistant
The Grapevine
3638 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361
PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816
EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com
WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com
The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by
Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2011. All
rights reserved.
Continued on page 11
1 Kids Create
Summertime arts programs keep
kids’ imaginations active.
STEPHANIE FARRELL
3,8,34 Faces in the News
4,10 News in Brief
6 A Lifelong Bond
Friends receive kidney transplant
from same donor.
12-13 PET CARE
16 The Value of Volunteers
Volunteering locally can earn you
Presidential recognition.
TODD NOON
17 Landscapes in History
See them at Vineland Public
Library through the end of this
month. VINCE FARINACCIO
18-21 HOME AND GARDEN
22 Recipe Corner
A peachy treat, plus a sauce.
LISA DINUNZIO
23 DINING: Cosmopolitan
Dining
Our columnist recalls summertime
food memories. FRANK GABRIEL
26 Crossword
27 Let the Games Stop
The politicians have had us on
one rollercoaster too many.
PAUL J. DOE
28 Entertainment
30 REAL ESTATE
32 Community Calendar
35 CLASSIFIEDS
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On Sunday, July 31, Michael Santiago and
Vanessa Coursey each received phone calls
from Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center
with news that a donor kidney was available.
Their surgeries were set to take place the
following day. Having each waited several
years on the transplant list, it appeared their
prayers had finally been answered.
Santiago, 49 and Coursey, 54, had first met
20 years ago when Santiago, a police officer at
the time, responded to a 911 call in Coursey’s
neighborhood in Millville. Both residents of
the town, they would occasionally run into one
another and over time their acquaintanceship
turned into a friendship as both developed kid-
ney disease—Coursey fromchronic high blood
pressure and Santiago froma serious infection
caused by the E. coli bacteria.
Both Santiago and Coursey were on dialy-
sis and had spoken just two weeks prior
regarding their hopes for transplants. Each
has a rare O-negative blood type, which
increases wait time on the transplant list to an
average of eight years.
The similarities continued as they both
received a kidney transplant from the same
donor at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center
on August 1.
“It’s special both of our kidneys came from
the same donor and we know each other,”
said Santiago. “We had the same problem and
now we have the same solution.”
Lourdes is currently the only hos-
pital in central and southern New
Jersey licensed to performkidney,
pancreas and liver transplants.
The Lourdes surgeon who per-
formed the transplantations, Dr. Ely
M. Sebastian, was amazed by the
coincidence.
“It’s not unusual for several organs
to come from one donor,” said Dr.
Sebastian. “It is uncommon, however,
for two friends to each get a kidney
from the same donor.”
Having heard from a close friend that the
other recipient was a woman from Millville,
Santiago decided to scope out the floor to see
if the patient was in fact Vanessa. As he
approached her room, Santiago saw Coursey
and her family. They soon began putting the
missing pieces together and discovered that
both had received kidneys from the same
donor on the same day.
The coincidences surrounding Santiago
and Coursey are something that even science
can’t explain.
“This is truly a gift,” said Dr. Chakravarty, a
Lourdes transplant nephrologist. “We often
take the credit as doctors, but there’s some-
thing else to explain this.”
It will take an estimated six months for
Santiago, a Cumberland County College secu-
rity guard, and Coursey, a former housekeep-
er, to fully recover from the transplants.
Lourdes staff will monitor them for the rest of
their lives.
Santiago and Coursey look forward to cele-
brating their new “birthdays” next year, as the
day they each received a second chance at life.
Both have high hopes and look forward to
doing things they couldn’t do before. Santiago
plans on running a marathon a year from now
and Coursey looks forward to caring for her
newborn granddaughter—born the same day
she received her new kidney.
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Specializing in spider and varicose vein treatment
2950 College Dr., Suite 2B, Vineland
www.VeinVascular.com
Veins?
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Long-time friends receive kidney transplant
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Michael Santiago and
Vanessa Coursey
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Faces in
the News
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Young Marines Attend
Leadership School
Ian Parr, left, and Raul Ortiz, both
members of South Jersey Young
Marines, attended Leadership school
recently in Michigan, and everyone at
South Jersey Young Marines is very
proud of them. The Young Marines do
some great things in keeping the kids
busy all the time by teaching them
important life skills.
Trinity Episcopal Holds
Vacation Bible School
Trinity Episcopal Church of Vineland
recently held their annual Vacation
Bible School. The event, which was
attended by children and adults alike,
featured crafts, games and snacks, as
well as Bible lessons.
Grapevine 1-7 081711:Layout 1 8/15/11 6:58 PM Page 7
Generations of Vineland YMCA Swimmers Race In
Ocean City Masters
Recently, YMCA of Vineland
swimmers and coaches, both
past and present, swam the
one-mile Ocean City Masters
race. The water temperature
was between 58 and 60
degrees for the competition
as more than 400 swimmers
competed in the ocean swim.
From left: Trevor Blauth,
Kelsey DeMatte, Coach
Dennis DeMatte, and Coach
Lisa Iori-Trabuchi gather for a
photo before the race. All
four swam on the Seals team.
Boys and Girls Club of Vineland at WheatonArts
The Boys & Girls Club of Vineland's Summer Program took a trip to WheatonArts
(formerly Wheaton Village), a national cultural treasure. Located on 65 wooded
acres in Millville, New Jersey, WheatonArts is home to the Museum of American
Glass, the Creative Glass Center of America International Fellowship Program, the
largest folklife center in the Garden State, a hot glass studio, several traditional
craft studios, five museum stores, a 13,000 sq. ft. event center and a beautiful
pond-side picnic grove—a true Pineland Sanctuary! Club members (shown here)
were treated to a presentation by master woodworker, Hoppy Edwards.
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Faces in the News
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Grapevine 8-13 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:01 PM Page 8
VHS Class of 1956 Reunites, Celebrates 55 Years
Several members of the 1956 class of Vineland High School, pictured here, traveled
from all over the country to the Ramada Inn in Vineland to attend the 55-year class
reunion. In addition to the usual program of events, guests also enjoyed looking through
scrapbooks of articles and photos gleaned from past editions of local newspapers, which
added just the right amount of nostalgia.
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SEND US YOUR FACES. IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The Grapevine... birthdays, engagements, weddings,
anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them to the address listed on p. 4.
More Faces in the News on pages 3 and 34
Vineland High AFROTC Cadets Get Flight Time
Cadets in the Vineland High
School Air Force Junior
Reserve Officer Training
Corps (AFROTC) recently
participated in Civil Air
Patrol orientation/incentive
flights, according to Major
Robert Simpson, U.S. Air
Force (Ret.), Senior
Aerospace Science
Instructor at the school.
For some of the cadets,
who had never been on an
aircraft before, it was "the
thrill of their lives," said
Maj. Simpson.
Each flight accommo-
dated two cadets and consisted of a departure from Millville Airport to Cape May
where the cadets switched positions and flew back to Millville. During the flight,
each cadet had approximately 15 minutes at the controls and were even given
the chance to perform various banking maneuvers.
Cadet Jeimy Lopez (front seat) and Cadet Christian Muller (rear) in the cockpit with
Pilot Wasim Baig.
Grapevine 8-13 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:01 PM Page 9
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a detrimental effect on the area, causing
dams to be breached, and serious flooding
to occur on several roadways. According
to Public Works Director, Donald Olbrich,
at least three bridges have also been
washed out, and a number of cars have
been reported abandoned in high water
pouring across roadways.
In light of the flooding and damage to
roadways, and with the storms showing
no signs of relent, Cumberland County
Emergency Management Officials met late
Sunday evening and declared a state of
emergency—a move that allowed them to
open up county and state resources not
normally available to townships and
municipalities.
The torrential downpour hit the west-
ern part of the county hardest, with the
worst flooding occurring in Hopewell,
Stow Creek and
Deerfield
Townships.
The emergency
response, which
began with the first
call early Sunday
morning, involved
scores of first
responders, emer-
gency management,
law enforcement,
elected officials and
others from both
the county and the
involved townships
and municipalities.
Emergency teams reported four water
rescues on Sunday, including a swift water
rope evacuation of residents who live
along Sunset Lake just off of West Park
Drive. Seabrook Fire & Rescue Stations 32
and 33 were involved in that rescue.
Station 32 was also involved in three other
rescues on Finley Road, Silver Lake Road,
and Route 77.
The state Department of
Environmental Protection sent an on-call
dam repair coordinator to assess the area
dams. A team of inspectors was expected
to arrive on Monday morning. The county
was, and remains, particularly concerned
about breaches at Seeley Lake in Upper
Deerfield, and Centerton Lake, which is in
Salem County but has a direct impact on
adjoining Cumberland County. As of press
time, there has been no word on just how
severe the damages to those dams were.
Also in Bridgeton, emergency manage-
ment officials were forced to evacuate res-
idents along some sections of the
Cohansey River because of flood condi-
tions. A shelter was set up at the
Buckshutem Avenue School. In order to
better notify the residents of the evacua-
tion, the city employed its reverse 911
phone system to send recorded messages
to residents alerting them of the news.
The Cohansey River wasn’t the only
body of water to overflow and cause
flooding in Bridgeton on Sunday. Water
from Sunset Lake breached its banks
sending water into the Bridgeton raceway
(canal). Water also breached the raceway
in the City Park, site of the Cohanzick
Zoo. Officials at the zoo stated that the
animals there are fine and have been
moved into shelters.
Structural damage also occurred in
Bridgeton. Due to the mass flooding, a
section of the city’s boat ramp broke away
in swift moving currents and was consid-
ered a hazard as it was drawn down river.
No causalities have been reported due to
incidents involving the structure
In order to deal with damage done to
numerous roadways throughout the region,
Cumberland County had subcontractor
crews working overnight Sunday into
Monday to set up heavy-duty barriers and
coordinate detour routes at some 14 county
roads that were damaged by the storms.
The most serious damage, according to
Olbrich, was on West Park Drive, which suf-
fered major structure problems along Sunset
Lake, and Finley Road at Seeley Lake. Both
roads were completely washed out. Officials
continue to warn drivers to heed all barri-
cades and warning signs. Roads throughout
the western half of the county have suffered
damage, some of it below the road surface.
They say even if it looks safe, use caution
and obey all detour signs.
“We know that the infrastructure
beneath some of the flooded roadways has
been damaged,” said William Whelan,
Freeholder Director. “Driving on the dam-
aged roadways could cause a terrible acci-
dent. A vehicle could drop several feet.”
Officials also stressed the importance
of abstaining from driving into areas
where water covers the roadway, even if
the road hasn’t been closed officially. The
water depth may be too great to allow
your car to cross safely. I
Flooding
Continued from cover
Damage to the roadway along West Park Drive in Bridgeton was
caused by surging floodwaters from Sunset Lake on Sunday.
Grapevine 8-13 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:01 PM Page 10
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Mobile Food Pantry is New
Method to Distribute Food Items
Emphasizing the need for food pantry
donations 12 months a year, New Jersey
Secretary of Agriculture Douglas H.
Fisher has joined the Food Bank of South
Jersey at St. Paul’s United Methodist
Church in Thorofare for a local food dis-
tribution with the Hope Mobile, the food
bank’s mobile food pantry. The Hope
Mobile is an 18-wheel tractor trailer that
serves between 100 and 150 people.
“There are many areas of the state
where residents having trouble making
ends meet do not have access to nutri-
tious food,” said Fisher. “The Hope
Mobile and others like it around the state
are bringing the food directly to those in
need and also providing fresh produce
from New Jersey farmers during the sum-
mer months.”
The Hope Mobile distributes to 15 sites
monthly throughout Camden, Gloucester,
Burlington and Salem counties and reach-
es more than 21,000 families faced with
food insecurity issues. To date, the Hope
Mobile has distributed more than 156,000
pounds of food each month since it went
on the road in July 2010.
The tractor trailer used as the Hope
Mobile can hold 45,000 pounds of food
and also provides cooking classes, nutri-
tion education, food stamp outreach and
other services to improve nutrition and
self-reliance. Summer traditionally is a
time when food pantries report less
donated food items to stock their shelves.
The Food Bank of South Jersey serves
170,000 people annually; nearly a third of
that total is children. In 1985, the food
bank distributed 175,000 pounds of food
annually as compared to 9 million pounds
distributed in 2010.
The Department of Agriculture serves
six state-contracted food banks with a
network of 793 food pantries, soup
kitchens and homeless shelters. In 2009,
more than 20 million pounds of United
States Department of Agriculture-donat-
ed food were distributed to the food
banks through The Emergency Food
Assistance Program and 7 million pounds
through the State Food Purchase
Program, the state-funded program that
requires food banks to purchase nutrient-
dense foods with an emphasis on buying
fresh produce from New Jersey’s farmers.
To find ways to donate, visit www.end-
hungernj.org. To find out more about the
Department’s food distribution programs:
www.nj.gov/agriculture/divisions/fn/food
distrib/.
To become a volunteer at an emergency
food distribution agency, visit
www.state.nj.us/state/ programs/dos_pro-
gram_volunteerism.html.
I
NewsinBrief
Continued from page 4
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Any dog owner will tell you that a pet
dog becomes like a member of the fam-
ily rather easily. You watch your dog
grow from the time it’s very young, tak-
ing care of all its needs, and learning all
of the quirks and mannerisms unique to
it. This experience facilitates a feeling of
love and kinship. Because of this, the
decision to board a dog for a few days
or longer, though necessary from time
to time, can be a very difficult one.
Luckily, for residents of the greater
Vineland area faced with this tough
decision, there is a beacon of hope.
Pampered Pup Kennels, of Millville, is
a family-owned kennel that has been in
operation for more than 30 years,
according to owner/operator Danielle
Ford, who inherited the business from
her aunt and uncle in 2010. Resting on a
60-acre farm property surrounded by
woods, Pampered Pup, despite its long
history, strives to be a cutting-edge
operation, catering to the budding trend
of dog owners who want nothing but the
most posh of conditions for their pup.
The grounds boast one Luxury Suite
kennel, four Junior Suite kennels, and
numerous standard kennels, along with
a 50 ft. by 50 ft. play area, and the
vast farm land, which is used to take
the dogs on three walks of varying
lengths each day.
The employees are also very receptive
to special requests made by patrons.
“Compared to the 1980s, when
comfort wasn’t as crucial, we’ve found
that the trends have changed,” said
Ford, who graduated from Delaware
Valley College with a degree in Animal
Care. “People really want the suite with
the bed. We try to cater to any
requests as much as we can. The dogs
are treated like they’re our own.”
The rates at Pampered Pup are
remarkably affordable. One day in the
standard kennel is $22; a day in the
Junior Suite is $26; and a day in the
Luxury Suite, which sports a bed large
enough for a child to sleep on, is $35.
Those prices include the dogs’ meals
for each day, their three walks, play-
time, and all of the other amenities.
In order to help their customers
save even more money, Pampered Pup
offers Boarding Bundle specials, such
as the “Dogs Just Wanna Have Fun”
bundle, which includes three play-
times, two extra walks, and a daily
treat. The “Party Animal” bundle
includes two playtimes, a stuffed kong
toy, and a daily treat. Those bundles
are priced at $35 and $20, respective-
ly; any bundle package is also avail-
able for a $60 five-day special.
With affordable rates, and activities
geared solely toward ensuring their
canine cliental have a great time while
their owners are away, owner peace of
mind is of the utmost importance at
Pampered Pup.
“We understand that a lot of people
do worry, when they leave their dog,
what’s going to be going on,” said Ford.
“A lot of people will call just to see how
‘Fido’s’ doing, which is fine. We encour-
age that. We’re more than happy to talk
about how well a particular dog is
doing at any point during their stay.”
Pampered Pup Kennels, 2709 Mays
Landing Rd., Millville. 856-327-3880.
www.pamperedpupkennels.com.
Open 9 a.m.–6 p.m., Mon.–Fri.;
9 a.m.–5 p.m. on Sat.; and 10 a.m.–
5 p.m. on Sun. After-hours drop-off
and pick-up options are available.
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Dog Obedience Classes
Dog obedience instructor and dog
handler for over 30 years, Pam
Demmy of Vineland, leader of the
Tailwaggers 4-H Club, is now
accepting registrations for begin-
ner dog obedience classes for
puppies and dogs aged nine
weeks to adult.
This six-week course will be
held on Wednesday evenings,
starting on September 7 and end-
ing on October 19. Classes will be
held in the 4-H Exhibit Building at
the Cumberland County
Fairgrounds located at 3001
Carmel Road in Millville.
To register or for more informa-
tion, call Mrs. Demmy at 856-697-
0930. These classes are open to
the public but class size is limited.
The 4-H Youth Development
Program of Rutgers Cooperative
Extension, a unit of the Rutgers
New Jersey Agricultural
Experiment station, is open to all
youth in grades K-13 (one year out
of high school).
V.I.P. DAIRY FARM CONTEST
Ever wonder where the milk on your breakfast cereal comes from or how it
gets from the farm to your refrigerator? The Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association is
answering those questions and offering dairy fans a chance to experience
the farming lifestyle with a contest that will give six winners a once-in-a-life-
time opportunity to be a V.I.P. guest on a working dairy farm.
Winners of the contest will be treated like a cow. That’s right, treated like
a cow. (It’s okay to laugh.) Here’s what it means:
What many people might not realize is that today’s dairy cows lead a
pretty pampered life. They’re well taken care of, they’re comfortable, and
they eat a more balanced diet than most humans do! Winners of the VIP
Dairy Farm Experience will be given that same cushy treatment. They’ll sleep
in comfortable beds at a nice hotel (many cows sleep on specially designed
cow mattresses), they might even be given manicure, massage or other type
of pampering at the end of the day (cow’s receive similar treatment on a reg-
ular basis), and they’ll receive a balanced mid-morning snack consisting of a
variety of dairy goodies. Suddenly being “treated like a cow” doesn’t seem
so bad, does it?
Aspiring farmers can enter the V.I.P. Dairy Farm Experience contest by
describing, in 50 words or less, why they should be chosen as a dairy farm
V.I.P. Entries can be submitted via Mid-Atlantic Dairy’s Facebook page (face-
book.com/midatlanticdairyassociation). The deadline for applications is
August 31. The contest is open to entrants 18 years and older.
Winners will be whisked away, with a friend, to a local restaurant to be
treated to dinner, including an overnight stay. The following morning, they’ll
be transported to the farm, where they’ll receive a behind-the-scenes tour
and have an opportunity to help out with everything daily farm chores.
After a leisurely lunch with the farm family, the local winner will embark
on an experience at Creamy Acres farm in Mullica Hill, that includes a tour
of the farm’s greenhouse (among the region’s largest), corn maze and pump-
kin patch.
The contest is part of a recent Mid-Atlantic Dairy campaign designed to
help the public learn more about the organization’s 7,200 dairy farm fami-
lies. The 2011 campaign, under the tagline of “Your Milk Comes from a Good
Place,” also includes sampling events and social media outreach throughout
the region. The Mid-Atlantic Dairy Association is one of 19 state and regional
promotion organizations working under the umbrella of the United Dairy
Industry Association.
Owner/operator Danielle
Ford plays with Duke at
Pampered Pup Kennels.
PET
CARE
Pampered Pup Kennels Offers Affordable Care
By Ryan Dinger
Grapevine 8-13 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:01 PM Page 12
Limited Time Oer!
$
200
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Fully Installed & Trained Outdoor System
Keep your dog...
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Invisible Fence of
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866-634-DOGS (3647)
*Offer valid for $100 off equipment and
$100 off basic training package for a new
fully installed outdoor system with Invisible
Fence of the Jersey Shore. Must purchase
both to be eligible for $200 discount.
Previous purchases excluded. Non transfer-
able and can not be combined with other of-
fers. No cash value. Discount applied
before taxes. Price and availability subject to
change without notice. Certain restrictions
may apply. © 2010 Invisible Fence of the
Jersey Shore. © 2010 Invisible Fence, Inc.
HI! I’m Pandora and I’m here to tell you about
Tip Top Kennel in Buena. We received the honor
of Best Kennel in the 2011 “Best of the Best”
Readers Choice contest! We also received One
of the Best Groomers and my Mom, Pam
Demmy, received Best Pet Trainer! Stop in
and see what makes us “The Best of the Best”!
TIP TOP KENNEL
Where your pet’s care is a family aair
www.tiptopkennel.com
565 Forest Grove Rd., Buena • 856-697-0930
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Bud’s Pet
Home Care, LLC
Bud Sulzman
• Care For Your Pets
• Check Your House Daily
• Take In Your Mail
• Water Your Plants
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2981 N. DELSEA DR. • VINELAND, NJ 08360
www.alottaluv.com
Mon.-Fri. 9 am - 6 pm • Sat. 9 am - 4 pm
Sun. 9 am - 11 am & 3 pm - 6 pm
ALOTTA LUV
• ANIMAL LODGE •
Ag Department Emphasizes
Horse Health Regulations
In response to reports of horses being
moved on the roads of New Jersey
and/or being imported and sold in New
Jersey without the medical testing
required for transport and to enter the
state and, with an eye toward protecting
well-intentioned horse buyers from
unwittingly helping to spread equine
infectious diseases, the New Jersey
Department of Agriculture has strongly
reminded horse owners and dealers of
the longstanding regulations adopted to
protect the health of horses in the state
and to protect prospective buyers.
Those regulations require a negative
Coggins test, the official test for equine
infectious anemia, for transport of hors-
es on public roads and also require a
veterinary-signed health certificate for
horses brought into New Jersey. Both
requirements help ensure equine health.
Similar regulations governing transfer of
horses (sell, exchange, barter, or give
away) require a negative Coggins test
within 90 days before the sale or trans-
fer of a horse to protect the animals
and the prospective buyer.
The regulations protect New Jersey
horses from illnesses that can be
caused by exposure to untested horses
in the state and entering the state. The
Department has followed with concern
the movement of horses in-state and
entry of numerous horses into the state
as owners who are unable to keep their
animals seek other options for these
animals. Some options allow, and there-
fore can encourage, transport without
the required testing, but those options
do not include selling the horse to a
new owner for the horse to reside in
New Jersey.
All horses traveling in and/or enter-
ing New Jersey must have a negative
Coggins test and, if imported from
another state, a valid interstate health
certificate signed by a licensed veteri-
narian from the state of origin, prior to
entry to New Jersey. To sell, exchange,
barter, or give away a horse, a negative
Coggins test within 90 days before the
transfer of the horse is required to pro-
tect the animals and the prospective
buyer. The requirement for both a nega-
tive Coggins test result and a health
certificate (for imported horses) pro-
vides the minimum requirements for
the movement and/or importation of
healthy horses to minimize the risk of
subsequent disease transmission.
Horse owners or prospective horse
owners who have questions about these
regulations may call the Division of
Animal Health at 609-292-3965.
Grapevine 8-13 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:01 PM Page 13
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the Hammonton Art Center. It has legs. It
can be a number of places. The kids can be
proud of it and talk about it. They are small
advocates of change.”
Monteleone’s workshop, in addition to
building artistic skills, seeks to guide the
kids to creating peace in their communi-
ties. His inspiration for the workshop
comes from the 1992 book A Million Visions
of Peace: Wisdom from the Friends of the
Old Turtle and an international peace proj-
ect that followed. Guest speakers and
artists have taught the kids as well.
“This week we had a conchologist who
brought in her shell collection so the kids
could see art in shells. We’ve had a woman
doing pottery, a printing workshop—keep-
ing ideas fresh and open.”
This is Monteleone’s first time running a
summer workshop for kids, but he would
like to make it a regular offering and has
been working on a concept to open a chil-
dren’s art and music center.
TUCKED INTO THE WOODS in south-
east Vineland is Magnolia Hill Studios
(MHS), where Director Sandy Smith is
running her fifth summer of workshops.
MHS also has year-round art
and dance classes and many
of her summer students
become year-long artists or
dancers. Smith says that
mural making is always a hit.
“We use large canvases to
create our murals. Kids find
it fascinating to create large
canvases using a team
approach and the patience
and understanding needed
for this.”
She also ran “Terra,” a
week-long pottery making
workshop. “In Jedi and
Cosmos [two other art work-
shops], the kids loved diving
into soft sculpture, creating
aliens and wookies with var-
ious fabrics and embellish-
ments. In Seussland our lit-
tlest students enjoyed mak-
ing 3D Whoville creations.”
Smith says that summer
is a perfect time to supple-
ment a child’s art curricu-
lum. “With the change in
the normal schedule, stu-
dents are ready and willing
to try new things and get
busy with creative pursuits.
They find the non-competi-
tive atmosphere of MHS a
great place to study art.
While we strive to provide
the best in technique, we
uphold a sense of freedom
of choice and style and
preference when it comes
to end results. We concen-
trate on the process more
Kids Create...
Continued from cover
RIGHT: Jessica Tola holds a creation she made
at “Terra” week at Magnolia Hill Studios as
Gianna Saglia (behind) works on hers.
BELOW: Clay College allows young artists to
experiment with the pottery wheel.
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than the product. Children thrive in this
atmosphere.”
Smith says art builds fine motor skills,
focus, patience, critical thinking, ability to
process, and confidence. Even beyond that,
“Art has been called our first language. Art
teaches us to seek beauty,” says Smith. “It
gives them personal insight into many cul-
tures and worldviews. We live in a world
with very grave global problems. We need
big thinkers, creative problem solvers, stu-
dents full of innovative ideas and divergent
thinkers, along with people who recognize
what is good, what is true and what is
beautiful. Art experiences in the studio,
whether visual or dance, provide a means
to exercise and develop creativity…the cre-
ative muscles. “
For Vineland’s 150th, Smith encouraged
her year-round students to submit art for
the Landscapes of Vineland display at
Vineland Public Library (see “Landscapes
in History” on page 17). She also ran an art
day at an inner-city church and invited
neighborhood children to create a land-
scape for the exhibit.
ACROSS TOWN IN A COLLEGIATE
SETTING, all the age groups at the
Summer Academy for Kids (SAFK) are
being treated to instruction from Clay
College artists. Clay College, though run by
Cumberland County College, has its home
on High Street in Millville. Director
Jacqueline Sandro says the ceramic art pro-
gram is almost 10 years old and has a wide
offering—credit and non-credit courses; all
age groups; and day, evening and weekend
choices. For the last several years, artists
head back to the college setting to teach.
“The SAFKis challenging for us to teach,
because everything has to be dried, glazed
and fired within five days,” says Sandro.
“Anyone who is familiar to the process of
ceramics will knowthis is against all the
rules. So we have to be a little creative with
our schedule. Usually all the clay projects
and activities, including the pottery wheel,
take place early in the week to allowfor
force drying. The rest of the week we do
polymer clay, plaster, mosaic and sculpture
projects. These projects still involve clay,
they just do not need to be fired in the kiln.
The children learn hand building methods
like pinch, coil and slab, and also do the pot-
tery wheel. They learn howto use the spe-
cific equipment and tools that are used in
the pottery making process. They also paint
and glaze their pieces.”
Sandro says Clay College offers a sup-
plement to a child’s art education. “It is
so important for children to have a part
in their day to express themselves
through creativity. Art and ceramic art
allows the students to not only express
themselves but also makes the student
problem solve through creative means.
When this happens, the student feels
self-esteem and pride in their work. Plus
it’s just plain fun to get messy and dirty
playing in the mud!” I
For More Information
• Upcoming MHS Summer or Year
Round Workshops:
www.magnoliahillstudios.com or
856-981-0418.
• Clay College: 108 High Street,
Millville, 856-765-0988,
www.cccnj.edu/claycollege/.
At Magnolia Hill Studios, young artists take
a moment to pose with some of their art.
Grapevine 14-21 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:03 PM Page 15
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WŽŶ ĐĂƐĞ ďĞĨŽƌĞ uŶŝƚĞĚ SƚĂƚĞƐ SƵƉƌĞŵĞ CŽƵƌƚ
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Inclusion in New Jersey Super Lawyers and Best Lawyers in America is based upon peer review rankings by other attorneys and is not a designation by the New Jersey Supreme Court.
I
n past columns, I have written
about the important role that vol-
unteers play in Main Street
Vineland. Volunteers are the back-
bone of our organization. They make up
the four committees that carry out our
programs and initiatives, plan and work
at our events and festivals, do various
clerical tasks at our office, help out at
Landis MarketPlace, and more. Without
the power of volunteerism, Main Street
Vineland—and other Main Streets across
the country—could not function. We can
always use more volunteers.
The work of volunteers is so valuable
that the United States Department of
Labor has assigned a per-hour dollar
value for volunteer work. Main Street
Vineland has a proud record in number of
volunteer hours contributed to downtown
revitalization.
Volunteer service is so valuable that
President George W. Bush created the
Council on Service and Civic Participation
in 2002 to recognize volunteers throughout
the country. The Council created, for this
purpose, the President’s Volunteer Service
Award and Main Street Vineland volun-
teers can qualify to receive this award.
For the award, an individual, family, or
group can receive Presidential recognition
for volunteer hours earned and reported to
Main Street Vineland over a 12-month peri-
od. The levels are Bronze, Silver, and Gold,
with the criteria as follows:
Bronze: Kids (age 5-14): 50-74 hours;
Young Adults (age 15-25): 100-174 hours;
Adults: (age 26+); 100-249 hours; Family
and Groups: 200-499 hours.
Silver: Kids: 75-99 hours; Young Adults:
175-249 hours; Adults: 250-499 hours;
Family and Groups: 500-999 hours.
Gold: Kids: 100+ hours or more; Young
Adults: 250+ hours; Adults: 500+hours;
Family and Groups: 1,000+ hours.
If the figures seem daunting, just think
of how fast the volunteer hours can accu-
mulate over a year’s time and you can see
that these goals are attainable. In fact, we
gave out four bronze awards and one silver
award at our Volunteer Recognition
Brunch in April. Each winner received an
official President’s Volunteer Service
Award lapel pin, a personalized certificate
of achievement, and a congratulatory letter
from President Obama.
For students and young people entering
the job market or applying to college, this
award can reinforce their record and be
something that they can add to their
resume. For everyone, it is recognition on a
national level that your volunteer service is
valued and appreciated.
We have other ways of recognizing our
volunteers and at our recognition brunch
we give out a variety of awards, including
Volunteer of the Year.
The biggest incentive to join us and vol-
unteer your services for Main Street
Vineland, however, is knowing that you are
making an important difference—whether
your task is large or small—in helping in
the revitalization of downtown Vineland as
a destination for food, culture, and enter-
tainment.
We need your help. Whether you can
help out in planning events, working with
downtown businesses, setting up and
breaking down at events and festivals,
handing out literature, working at Landis
MarketPlace, or other tasks, we can find
the place for you. We provide you an
opportunity each month to report your vol-
unteer hours, so they will add up. Call us or
stop in for more information.
***
There’ll be plenty of great eatin’ in store
at the fifth annual BBQ ‘n Chili ‘n
Cheesesteaks Cook-Off, sponsored by
Susquehanna Bank and supported by
Comcast, to take place on Saturday,
September 24 (rain date is September 25)
from 4 to 9 p.m., on the 600 block of Landis
Avenue. Vendors will vie for prizes for the
best BBQ and chili—all this plus live music
and lots more. I
For more information on Main Street
Vineland, visit the office at 603 E. Landis Ave.,
call 794-8653, visit
www.mainstreetvineland.org, or check out on
Facebook.
I
Downtown Vineland
{ TODD NOON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VDID / MAINSTREET VINELAND }
An individual, family, or group can receive
Presidential recognition for volunteering locally.
The Value
of Volunteers
Grapevine 14-21 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:03 PM Page 16
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I
Vintage Vineland { BY VINCE FARINACCIO }
Landscapes
in History
A Vineland Public Library exhibit through August 31
is a fitting tribute to 150 years of Vineland history.
I
f, as they say, a picture is worth a
thousand words, then the current
exhibit on display at the Vineland
Public Library is a book-length histo-
ry of the town well worth a look.
Sponsored by the Friends of Historic
Vineland, coordinated by the organization’s
Kathryn Ross and presented by the library,
the exhibition, entitled Landscapes of
Vineland History, features a selection of his-
torical and recent photos provided by
townsfolk, a quilt commemorating the city’s
150th anniversary, and a collection of origi-
nal artwork from the students of Magnolia
Hill Studios.
The centerpiece of the exhibit is the
quilt, prominently displayed at the center of
the back wall. Created by the Garden Patch
Quilters, this patchwork celebration of
Vineland captures many of the images that
have defined the town in its century-and-a-
half existence. Grapes fill each of the cor-
ners while the slogan “Honor the past,
embrace the future” is displayed above 16
panels, each containing a facet of Vineland.
Represented are the Dandelion Festival, the
old railroad station, the Landis Theater, a
chicken farm, the glass industry, Landis
Park, Charles K. Landis, the original
Vineland Public Library, the Vineland
Sewing Company, the Delsea Drive-in
movie theater, the Palace of Depression,
John Landis Mason, the town’s houses of
worship, the Vineland trolley, the produce
auction and the poultry industry.
Flanking the quilt are two photographs
that capture similar events 100 years
apart. To the left hangs the 1911 Maypole
photo taken during Vineland’s Old Home
Week semi-centennial celebration. The
black-and-while picture, shot in Landis
Park at the conclusion of a doll carriage
parade, features children with their car-
riages and some adults posed in front of a
Maypole.
To the quilt’s right, a color photo of the
2011 restaging of the moment, taken during
Founder’s Day at the Elwyn Grounds in
May, contains a colorfully attired group of
children and adults standing before a
Maypole. In this modern shot, a lone doll
in a carrier sits in the foreground in con-
trast to its 100-year-old ancestor. Only sev-
eral youth are dressed in vintage clothing
in 2011, but some members of the Friends
of Historic Vineland, who arranged the re-
enactment, are clothed in the garb of yes-
teryear.
The rest of the photos that comprise this
month-long exhibit are a journey through
the past. There’s the Vineland High School
1949 wrestling team, the 1955 installation of
Catholic Daughters of America officers, the
notated score of “The Vineland Centennial
Song” written by Arthur H. Leschke, a shot
of Lily Lee, a Vineland-born vaudeville star
of the early 20th century and a vestige of
the town’s cycling days in a photo of Claude
Ingraham posing with a bicycle in front of a
Vineland Historical and Antiquarian Society
backdrop. A photo of a Civil War soldier is
accompanied by his later self at the
Veterans Home. Several Hammonton resi-
dents are seen enjoying a visit to the Palace
of Depression.
In one set of pictures, Vineland’s egg and
poultry industries are treated to a black-
and-white tribute, a reminder of a healthy
and thriving local business. Martin Berwin,
the founder of the Poultryman’s Club of
Vineland, is featured in these selections.
But across the room, several modern
photographs by Violet Brown Photography
capture the demise of this local livelihood.
A collage of images common to the poultry
trade reaches back through time to show us
the tools that have been long abandoned.
And in a striking photo whose composition
and colors could be mistaken for an Andrew
Wyeth painting, the empty interior of a for-
saken chicken coop, the majesty of its con-
struction outlasting the local business it
once housed, waits, “looking as though the
chickens are all just out in the yard and
expected back at any time” as the photo’s
card caption reads.
A wall of Magnolia Hill Studios contri-
butions collects images and impressions of
Vineland from the perspective of its stu-
dents. Its inclusion is the embodiment of
the 150th Anniversary Quilt’s edict to
“embrace the future.”
Landscapes of Vineland History is
another reminder that the sesquicentennial
is far from over. The exhibit will be around
until August 31, so make it a point to spend
some time visiting the library before the
end of the month. I
Grapevine 14-21 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:03 PM Page 17
Rhododendrons and
Azaleas: Injuries, Diseases
and Insect Damage
By Edith Wallace, Ph.D., Master Gardener,
Passaic County and Elaine Fogerty Barbour,
Passaic County Agricultural Assistant
Botanically, rhododendrons and azaleas
belong to the same genus, Rhododendron,
and are affected by the same problems.
These plants require well-drained,
light, acidic soil and need adequate mois-
ture during the growing months. Winter
winds and late afternoon sun can increase
environmental stress on rhododendrons
and azaleas, so proper site selection is
important.
Weeds should be hand pulled, not
hoed, as azalea and rhododendron roots
grow close to the soil surface.
WINTER INJURY
Winter injury is commonly seen in the
landscape and is a result of environmen-
tal factors. Temperature fluctuations, late
season fertilization, drying winds, late
spring frosts, or lack of snow cover can all
contribute to winter injury. The most
common symptom of winter injury in
rhododendrons/azaleas is leaves turning
brown. Leaf tips or margins may turn
brown, branches may exhibit dieback on
their tips, or on the entire branch, or the
leaves may roll. Part or all of the plants
may be affected.
Damage may not be apparent until
spring growth begins, or it may appear in
late summer. Injured leaves can be
picked off.
There is no way to reverse the damage
so prevention is paramount.
Shrubs should be planted in locations
protected from the wind or provided with
windbreaks. Watering is important in late
fall and early winter before the ground is
frozen. Plants should be mulched after they
are dormant to reduce water loss from the
soil and decrease the depth of frost pene-
tration. Loose, coarse mulches (wood chips,
shredded bark, oak leaves or pine needles)
can be applied to a depth of no more than 3
inches, keeping the mulch a few inches
away from the main stem to prevent rodent
damage. Mulch that is too deep may lead to
severe root damage and death.
SUNBURN
Rhododendrons and azaleas are shade
plants in their native environments. When
planted in full sun scalding may occur,
killing the leaf tissue. Injury, usually to the
center portion of the leaf, is unsightly but
does not increase in size. Affected leaves
may be removed. To prevent this injury,
keep plants well watered during hot
weather. Plants may have to be moved to a
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Grapevine 14-21 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:03 PM Page 18
shaded area if shade cannot be provided.
The partial shade provided by deciduous
trees in both summer and winter protects
from sunburn. An eastern or northern
exposure is best to prevent sunburn.
SALT BURN
Salt burn occurs in areas of low rainfall,
poor drainage, or excess application of fer-
tilizer. Leaf edges may become brown and
die. Older leaves are affected first.
Damaged leaves will not recover. To pre-
vent salt injury provide adequate water,
improve drainage, use fertilizers as recom-
mended on soil tests and avoid exposure of
plants to sodium based de-icing salts.
IRON DEFICIENCY-YELLOWING OF
LEAVES
When rhododendron or azalea leaves
turn yellow while the veins remain green,
the condition is a result of iron deficiency.
It is most commonly seen in plants
grown close to masonry walls or where
lime has been used in excess. In these situ-
ations, the soil pH is elevated above the
optimal range of 4.5 to 5.5 for these acid-
loving plants. A soil test should be used to
determine the soil pH. The roots cannot
absorb iron from the soil when the pH is
too high. Soil acidifiers such as iron sulfate
or ammonium sulfate may be used to
reduce the pH. Iron chelates may be used
as a foliar and/or soil application as a tem-
porary measure to quickly correct the con-
dition. Also excess cultivation or lack of
mulch may damage the feeding roots so
iron cannot be absorbed.
DIEBACK
The first symptom of this fungal dis-
ease (most commonly Phytophthora) is the
appearance of dark brown spots on young
leaves, followed by leaf curl. Cankers will
develop on the stems and leaves and stems
above the canker will wilt and die. The
remainder of the plant will appear
healthy. Leaves may turn reddish brown
and remain attached to the stem. The
stem shrivels. Older branches may be
more affected. Wilted or cankered branch-
es should be pruned by cutting a few inch-
es below the canker to where no brown
discoloration can be seen in the wood.
Discard damaged tissue.
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Continued on next page
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LEAF SPOTS
Leaf spots caused by various fungi
may be seen on rhododendrons and azal-
eas. The color may be yellow, brown or
black and the size may range from ¼
inch to 1 inch in diameter depending on
the causative agent. Inspect older leaves
anytime during the year and new foliage
as it emerges for presence of the disease.
Rake away and destroy fallen leaves.
Avoid overhead watering that may
spread the disease by splashing. These
diseases are minor, and affect only the
appearance of the plant. Application of a
preventative fungicide may protect new
foliage.
PETAL (FLOWER) BLIGHT
Mid- to late-blooming rhododendron
flowers may turn to a brown, slimy mass
in two or three days during warm wet
weather. Infected (brown) flowers
remain on the plant longer than normal,
presenting an unattractive appearance.
The cause is a fungus whose black
spore cases may be seen on infected flow-
ers a month later. Petal blight fungus may
over-winter on diseased flower petals and
spread the next spring by wind and rain
splash. The best control for this problem
is complete dead-heading of all flowers,
infected and/or healthy. Deadheading
will increase the bloom next year. To
deadhead rhododendrons, simply twist
and pull the cluster of seeds located at
the terminal of each stem.
WEEVILS
Black vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sp.) is
a common insect pest of rhododendrons.
Adults chew on leaves resulting in C-
shaped notches, while the grubs live in
the soil chewing on the crown and roots
of the plants. Other weevils infect both
rhododendrons and azaleas. The damage
done and control measures are similar
for all weevils infecting these plants.
Contact the local Extension Office for
treatment methods.
LACEBUGS
When the upper surface of rhododen-
drons or azalea leaves have a graying
mottled appearance, there is probably a
heavy infestation of lacebugs, Stephanitis
sp. Lacebugs feed by sucking chlorophyll
from the leaves of many plants. These
insects may be seen on the lower surface
of a leaf. The adults are c” long, flat-
tened, and dark brown or black.
Their lace-like wings are held over
their backs. The young are dark and may
look spiny.
Varnish-like spots of excrement are
usually seen on leaf surfaces. The lace-
bug overwinters as eggs in the upper leaf
surface. There may be several genera-
tions each year. The lacebug problem is
most often seen on azaleas stressed by
being grown in full sun. Contact the local
Extension Office for treatment methods.
LEAFMINER
Azalea leaf miner, (Gracillaria azaleel-
la) or leaf roller damage begins shortly
after azaleas bloom as miners eat near
the tip or margin of the leaf. The larvae
soon emerge and roll up the tip or mar-
gin of the leaf and continue feeding.
Control measures for lacebug also con-
trol leaf miner.
Tips for Visiting a
Pick-Your-Own Farm
DO:
• Remember that when you visit a
farm, you are a welcome visitor. Like
many farms, it is both the family's
home and business. Respect their
property;
• Read and obey all signs. Follow
directions about where and what to
pick;
• Supervise children at all times and
be careful around ponds and other
bodies of water;
• Wear shoes, shirts and other prop-
er clothing at all times;
• Protect yourself from the sun by
wearing a sunscreen and a hat;
• Leave all pets at home;
• Be sure to place all litter in the
proper trash receptacles;
• Keep head, arms, hands and legs
inside when riding in farm wagons.
Remain seated until the wagon
stops;
• Enjoy yourself and have fun!
DO NOT:
• Enter buildings that are not open
to the public;
• Throw or damage produce;
• Climb on or touch farm tools and
equipment. Many machines have
sharp edges and moving parts;
• Climb trees or step on fruits and
vegetables in the field;
• Frighten or hurt farm animals.
Bridgeton Outdoor Market
at the Riverfront
• 59 East Commerce Street, Bridgeton
(Riverfront Parking Lot)
Phone: (856) 575-5582
Email: carolahartley@aol.com
• Open: June 17 - Aug. 26, 2011
Fridays, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
• Community Farmers Market:
Variety of fruits and vegetables
• Also Available: Hot food, crafts,
cooking demonstrations, flowers, and
entertainment on certain days
• WIC and Senior FMNP checks
accepted by some farmers
Continued from previous page
Grapevine 14-21 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:03 PM Page 20
MITES
Mites, like lacebugs, feed on the lower
surface of leaves by sucking sap from the
leaf. This feeding causes the upper sur-
face to lose color, becoming speckled,
gray-green, brown or bronze. If mites are
suspected, shake the leaves over a piece
of white paper and look for small spots
on the paper. If the spots of the paper
begin to crawl, they are mites. Mites can
be removed by a blast of water from the
garden hose.
ROOT AND CROWN ROTS
Various soil-inhabiting fungi known as
water molds cause root rot that gets into
the stem, blocking water movement.
Quickly or slowly, young leaves turn yel-
low or dull green and wilt, then the
entire plant wilts and dies even though
the plant is well watered. The leaves
remain wilted in the early morning while
leaves wilted due to heat or low soil
moisture usually recover overnight. If
the bark is peeled back close to ground
level the wood will be dark where it is
diseased, white where it is healthy.
Rhododendrons and azaleas must be
planted in well-drained soil. Use raised
beds if necessary. Purchase healthy, dis-
ease-free plants and wilt resistant vari-
eties. Do not plant rhododendrons or
azaleas in contaminated soils for several
years after diseased plants have been
removed.
SCALE
Scale insects feed on bark or leaves,
producing red or yellow spotting on the
leaf or bark of twigs. Scale insects appear
as small raised bumps on the twig or leaf.
Scale produces a waxy coating that
makes them difficult to kill. Small infes-
tations may be scraped off and discarded.
Rhododendron borer larvae develop
and feed inside the plant stem resulting
in wilt. Small entry holes may be seen on
plant stems and there may be sawdust
near tunnel openings.
Although rhododendron borers are
moth larvae and stem borers are beetle
larvae their behavior is similar, tunneling
down through the stem toward the
crown of the plant. This tunneling can
kill large branches. Mechanical control
for both borers is the same. Cut off the
infected branch below the end of the
tunnel to include the borer; destroy the
branch.
FAILURE TO FLOWER
While rhododendrons and azaleas
grow well in dappled shade they must
have adequate light for flower bud for-
mation. Sometimes plants must be
moved, trees removed or lower tree
limbs removed to gain optimal light. A
soil test may indicate the need for phos-
phorus fertilizer. Apply as directed by
the soil test to stimulate flowering. I
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© 2010 EP Henry
www.recumminesinc.com
856-691-4040
67 CHESTNUT AVENUE VINELAND, NJ 08360
3.5%
SALES TAX
Oet youz )5((
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Beach Plum Contest
Hosted by: Cape May County
Board of Agriculture and Beach
Plum Association of Cape May
County.
If you know a secret beach
plum bush laden with sweet
berries, pluck a half-cup and
take them to the Rutgers
Cooperative Extension Office,
care of Jenny Carleo, Agricultural
Agent of Cape May County. 355
Court House-S. Dennis Rd. Cape
May Court House N.J. 08210.
From now until September 15, the Cape May County Board of Agriculture and
Beach Plum Association of Cape May County will be conducting its annual beach
plum tasting contest.
Beach plums are judged for sweetness and size. Their finder will earn $100 and a
trophy awarded at the Cape May County Board of Agriculture’s Annual dinner.
It is important to keep track of the tree’s location for future propagation.
There is no limit to the number of times a person may enter.
Beach plums are sought to make delicious, jams, juices and preserves, which
many believe are unique in flavor.
Grapevine 14-21 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:03 PM Page 21
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Best Wedding
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G
reetings! Peaches are as nutritious as
they are delicious, high in a variety of
nutrients such as niacin, thiamine,
potassium, calcium and fiber. They are also
high in beta carotene, an antioxidant that can
be converted into vitamin A, which is essential
for a healthy heart and eyes. The best way to
eat a peach is raw, but they maintain some of
their nutritional value if used in baked goods,
and even in savory dishes such as the peach
sauce recipe in today’s column. The sauce goes
perfectly over grilled chicken.
Fresh Peach & Blueberry Crumble:
5 - 6 ripe peaches, peeled and sliced
1/2 cup raw sugar
2 - 3 tbs. unbleached all-purpose flour
1 cup fresh blueberries
Crumble Topping:
1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1/3 cup raw sugar
1 1/2 tsp. non-aluminum baking powder
5 tbs. cold butter
1/2 cup rice, almond or organic milk
1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
Preheat the oven to 350°. In a large bowl
add peaches, 1/2 cup rawsugar and flour, mix
well. Gently add in the blueberries. Allowthe
mixture to sit for 5 minutes then add mixture
to a 9-inch square baking dish greased with non-
stick cooking spray and bake for 15 minutes.
In a separate bowl, combine flour, 1/3 cup
sugar, baking powder and the butter, mix until
the butter and flour mixture forms the size of
peas. Stir in milk and vanilla extract, then drop
batter by large spoonfuls over the fruit (it will
spread when baking). Place the baking dish
back into the oven for 20-25 minutes or until
the topping is golden brown and crisp and the
juices of the fruit are bubbly. Serve warm with
or without ice cream.
Peach BBQ Sauce
1 - 2 tbs. extra virgin olive oil
2 garlic cloves, crushed
3/4 cup organic ketchup
2 tbs. organic yellow mustard
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 tbs. organic brown sugar
2 tbs. unsulphured black strap molasses
1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper (optional)
Sea salt, to taste
Black pepper, to taste
2 cups fresh peaches, peeled and diced
In a saucepan over mediumheat add olive
oil and garlic cloves, cook for 40 – 60 seconds,
then discard garlic. Add all other ingredients to
the garlic-infused olive oil except the peaches,
and simmer over lowheat for 10 minutes.
While the sauce is simmering, puree the 2 cups
of peaches; after the sauce has cooked, add the
pureed peaches and stir until sauce is com-
bined well with peach puree. Spoon sauce over
grilled chicken, fish or steak before serving. I
Lisa Ann is author of Seasoned With Love,
Treasured Recipes and Lisa Ann’s Seasoned
With Love II. Send recipes for publication to
lapd1991@aol.com or The Grapevine,
3638 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08361.
Life is Peachy
This week, recipes based on the fuzzy,
perfect summer time fruit are presented.
I
Recipe Corner { LISA ANN DiNUNZIO }
Grapevine 22-29 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:05 PM Page 22

DJ-8810532001
8t. rzdre rlø rzrlrh
9th Annuzl
rzdre rlø Iertlvzl
8undzv. 8eetemher t$. t0ll
Caċdinal Peħeċ 1Ľċkđon
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Pċoceđđion and Mađđ
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and fċiend Ōho liŋed Ōiħh Padċe Pio
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FolloŌing moċning Mađđ Ōill be bleđđingđ Ōiħh
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calling ħhe paċiđh omce.
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W
ebster's Seventh New
Collegiate Dictionary
defines cosmopolitan as
“having worldwide rather
than limited or provincial scope or bear-
ing” and “wide international sophistica-
tion, composed of persons, constituents
or elements from all or many parts of the
world.”
This is also about as far from an accu-
rate depiction of Vineland during my
youth—the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s—as this
writer could possibly imagine.
But with our region’s rising cultural
diversity and the accompanying introduc-
tion of people from far-flung lands like
Eastern Europe, Asia and Latin America,
it’s currently become an entirely plausible
characterization. Which only makes the
existence of an upscale restaurant called
“The Cosmopolitan” locally logical.
Situated on
Delsea Drive in the
southern outskirts
of Vineland, close in
proximity to both
the retail centers of
Route 47 and edu-
cational hub
Cumberland County
College, The
Cosmopolitan
opened for business two and half years
ago.
Its proprietors, three partners with
decades of restaurant experience, are
Nick Isihos, Gus Hionas and Bill Kontas.
Isihos, along with brothers Mike and
Louie, ran local favorite Pegasus I, at the
other end of Delsea Drive in Malaga
while Hionas operated the Midtown II
Diner on 11th Street in Philadelphia.
(Another sibling, Eric, still owns a suc-
cessful eponymous restaurant at the
intersection of West and Chestnut
avenues in Vineland.)
But it’s the next generation of those
Greek-born entrepreneurs who are
responsible for day-to-day management
at The Cosmopolitan. That would be
sons, and co-managers/owners Peter
Isihos and Nick Hionas.
I
Gabriel’s Horn { BY FRANK BASILE }
A second generation of restaurateurs
brings sophisticated dining to the area.
Cosmopolitan Dining
Continued on next page
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NOW ACCEPTING
NEW ITEMS!
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Peter, during a lengthy interview,
explained their relationship with those
restaurant-veteran parental figures, allow-
ing “We work under their footsteps.”
He continues, describing The
Cosmopolitan’s concept: “We wanted to
get something that you might see in
Deptford, something alive, something this
town deserves.”
With just a quick glance at the sprawl-
ing complex from its massive parking lot,
you pretty much get that idea. The
Mediterranean construct is truly first-
class, ornate metalwork on the exterior
and soaring ceilings set off by a quartet of
two-story pillars tucked within.
Isihos credits third partner Kontas for
those exquisite design features, adding that
the restaurant was “built from scratch.”
Included inside are huge, hanging
chandeliers, colorful mobiles, wide ceiling
fans plus an extensive mural on the far
wall nearest the kitchen.
The restaurant is divided into three
separate spaces. That aforementioned
main dining room, open, airy and full of
light. But for those seeking a bit more inti-
macy, a secondary area abuts with pleas-
ant, more private seating.
Immediately to the right as one enters,
a lively bar and lounge also beckons. Not
bad for a family—the Isihos—who humbly
began their culinary careers running a
delicatessen in, of all places, Harlem.
Queried about his personal menu rec-
ommendations, Peter is quick to suggest
popcorn shrimp, mussels, wings and a
steam pot of mixed seafood- clams, mus-
sels, shrimp and crablegs in an Italian
sauce—as apps.
From the entree list, he lauds steak
Nola, a charcoal-grilled, 12-ounce New
York strip topped with jumbo lump crab-
meat, plated atop stripes of sherry cream
sauce and seafood bruschetta, whole clams,
mussels, shrimp, scallops and crabmeat
with fresh diced tomato, garlic and basil in
a white wine sauce served over capellini.
But the panoply of offerings here,
requiring a dozen pages to list on their
take-out menu, cover all imaginable gen-
res of food. Or, as Isihos refers to it, “a
variety of everything.”
We were particularly taken with their
creatively composed salads, ideal season-
al fare at this time of year. Like the
Beverly Hills, with grilled chicken breast,
Virginia ham and roasted turkey served
over fresh greens, tomatoes, cucumbers,
red onions, tri-color bell peppers, sweet
cranberry raisins, candied walnuts and
mozzarella cheese bites with a garlic
crostini. Or the Mediterranean, a spring
mix with grilled zucchini, eggplant, buf-
falo mozzarella, roasted red peppers, red
onions, kalamata olives, assorted pep-
pers, hard-boiled egg and grilled chicken
finished with vinaigrette.
While not open until 11 a.m. most days,
The Cosmopolitan still offers full break-
fast service through lunch time. On
Sundays, they provide a breakfast buffet
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Among the many
items available are eggs, pancakes, French
toast, sausage, home fries, beef brisket,
Virginia ham and cooked shrimp.
The restaurant is open daily from 11 a.m.
Monday through Thursday and from 10
a.m. on Friday and Saturday.
Further worthy of mention are their
large number of made-in-house baked
goods, the first thing a customer notices
upon entry. Three refrigerated cases,
actually, each filled by sexy-looking
sweets like various cheesecakes and pies,
carrot cake, eclairs, cannolis, cookies, bis-
cotti and rugula.
Additional key personnel mentioned by
Isihos include Chef Kosta Anastadopoulous
and Banquet Manager Lisa Azeglio.
With a burgeoning bar trade, The
Cosmopolitan provides different enter-
tainment options most evenings.
Tuesday’s feature is karaoke, Wednesday
is Latin Night, Thursday brings Trivia and
Friday-Saturday music from DJ Tony
Morris. I
Continued from previous page
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A FULL SERVICE BUTCHER SHOP
We Carry Groceries & Fresh Produce
Stop In & Check Out
This Week’s Specials
Prices Valid From Aug 17th - Aug 23rd
Familiar Faces…Friendly Service
Welcome To
JOE’S
Butcher Shop
SAVE $$$
CHECK OUT OUR PRICES!
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Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy.,
Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea
Covino serves up Italian specialties in
atmosphere of fine dining.
Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave,
Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served
tapas style, catering, private parties.
Extensive wine list. Live music Thurs.
night.
Babe's Village Inn, Martinelli Avenue,
Minotola, NJ 856-697-1727. Famous crabs,
seafood, Italian cuisine. Eat in or Take out.
Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 691-0909. Breakfast and lunch
spot offering sandwiches named for col-
leges near and far.
Bain's Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland,
563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or
dinner. Daily specials, coffee of the day.
Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S.
Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998.
Homemade chocolates and candies, cus-
tom gift baskets.
Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis
Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees,
desserts, drink specials. Take-out. Happy
Hour Mon-Fri 3pm-7pm, Sun-Thu 10pm-cl.
MLB Extra Innings.
Bernardi’s Restaurant & Lounge, 140 E.
Wheat Rd., Vineland, 696-1461. Lunch and
dinner specials. Open 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
(until 11 p.m. on Friday). Closed Sunday.
Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland,
697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes.
Meet friends at bar. Daily lunch and dinner.
Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring “Gutbuster”
a 21-oz. burger, pizza, wings, subs, dinners.
Black Olive Restaurant. 782 S. Brewster
Rd, Vineland. 457-7624. 7 a.m. - 10 p.m
daily. Entrees, desserts. Take out available.
Bruno's Family Restaurant, Cape May Ave.
and Tuckahoe Rd., Dorothy, 609-476-4739.
Breakfast, lunch, dinner, pizza. Open Mon-
Sat. 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
Buena Tavern, 761 Harding Hwy. (Rts.
40/54), Buena, 697-9848. Seafood, home-
made Italian, Wednesday specials, half-
price meals to volunteers Thursday nights.
Chow’s Garden 1101 N. 2nd St., Millville,
327-3259. Sushi Bar, All-you-can-eat buffet.
Cosmopolitan Restaurant Lounge, Bakery,
3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 765-5977.
Happy hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. free buffet,
reduced drinks.
Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main/Magnolia
rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies,
breads, doughnuts, custom wedding cakes.
CrepeMaker Cafe, 607 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 205-0027. Crepes any way you
like them—veggie, chicken, steak, dessert.
Dakota Steakhouse & Sushi Bar at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 692-8600. Steaks, seafood,
sushi.
Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for
lunch, dinner specials. Soft ice cream and
cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.–8 p.m.
Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland,
696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-
out, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m.
Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat.
Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave.,
Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored
recipes, fresh ingredients.
Dori’s Italian, 16 N. High St., Millville, 765-
9799. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.
Elmer Diner, 41 Chestnut St., Elmer. 358-
3600. Diverse menu of large portions at
reasonable prices.
Esposito's Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea
Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood
and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant.
Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-
9800. Greek and American cuisine, pizza.
Fat Jack's BBQ. Cumberland Mall, next to
Starbucks, 825-0014. Open 7 days a week,
11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Eat in or take out.
Serving ribs, wings, sandwiches, salads
and sides.
Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian
cuisine and dinner buffets to savor. Family-
owned.
Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli,
527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says
it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sun.
Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd.,
Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and din-
ner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza.
Golden Palace Diner Restaurant. 2623 S
Delsea Dr, Vineland, 692-5424. Serving
breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.
The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course,
4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558.
Restaurant and lounge open to the public
for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
High Street Chinese Buffet, High St.,
Millville, 825-2288. All-you-can-eat buffet.
Jersey Jerry's. 1362 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 362-5978. Serving subs, sand-
wiches, and take-out platters.
Joe's Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens,
homemade sides, catering.
Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St.
(Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and
Japanese cuisine. BYOB.
Larry's II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily.
Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners.
La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal,
chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun.
Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cui-
sine, seafood and veal. Open daily for
lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet.
Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/
wedding facility and intimate restaurant.
Dungeness Crabs every Tues. Gourmet
Pizza Nite on Wed.
Millville Queen Diner, 109 E. Broad Street,
Millville. 327-0900. Open 7 Days, 24 Hours.
Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head
rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches
and dinners, casual setting.
Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St.,
Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos,
catering.
Mori’s, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 690-
0300. Adjacent to the Landis Theater
Performing Arts Center. Includes a “casual,
upscale” restaurant with a banquet facility
and lounge on site. Lunch and dinner.
MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-
9825. Full bar menu, drink specials.
Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge,
1554 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2800.
Live lobsters, seafood, prime rib, steak,
cocktails.
Old Oar House Irish Pub, 123 N. High
Street Millville, 293-1200. New menu,
kitchen open until 1 a.m. Smoker friendly
outdoor beer garden.
Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cui-
sine—lamb dishes and salads.
Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-
0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials;
convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials.
Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland,
205-9998. Pizza (including whole wheat),
subs, wings. Open daily 11 a.m-10 p.m.
The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland,
697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily
drink specials and lunch specials.
Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-
8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle
soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian.
Speedway Cafe at Ramada, W. Landis Ave.
and Rt. 55, Vineland, 692-8600. Open
daily 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Dinner specials $7 and
up.
Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club,
1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-3325.
Lunch and dinner. Steaks, reserve wines,
upscale casual.
Sweet Life Bakery, 601 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery.
Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee.
Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat
Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken,
fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take
out. Live music Saturday & Sunday night.
Dungeness Crab All You Can Eat.
Villa Fazzolari, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena
Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled
meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily.
Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland,
691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches,
wings.
Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-
0909. Continental cuisine and spirits
served in a casually upscale setting.
EATING OUT
From fine dining to lunch spots to
bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy
any appetite. Call for hours.
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The Grapevine’s
Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1. Cudgel
5. Wanes
9. Capital of Morocco
14. Glass in a window or
door
15. A pellet of medicine
16. Era
17. Friends (French)
18. The content of cognition
19. Reverence
20. Evian or Perrier
23. Violent public disorder
24. Photograph (slang)
25. Picket fence
28. Internal support
structure
33. Was in debt to
34. Old festival
35. Wrath
36. Nostrils
38. Option key
39. Plastic wrap brand
41. Data executive
42. Motorsports company
44. At an advanced time
45. Makes an effort
47. Des __, Iowa
49. The sheltered side
50. An open skin infection
51. Am. N.W. mountains
56. 1st Hindu calendar
month
58. Ballpoint pen
59. Swiss river
61. Thomas __, American
patriot
62. 50010 IA
63. Tectona grandis
64. One who avoids others
65. Used esp. of dried up
vegetation
66. Make less difficult
DOWN
1. Accountant certified
by the state
2. A young sheep
3. Pearly shelled mussel
genus
4. Mount a horse
5. Concluding speech
6. Fr. bathroom basin
7. Emitted blood
8. Shredded cabbage
9. Lizards
10. To each one
11. Dutch colonist
12. Behave in a certain
manner
13. Old word for "your"
21. Metal food container
22. One who copies the
behavior of another
25. 68770 NE
26. Be ready for, expect
27. Dormouse of So. Europe
28. The act of selling
29. Young foxes
30. Straits between the
Sinai & Arabian
Peninsula
31. Speak
32. Hawaiian geese
34. Abstain from food
37. Part of an academic
year
40. Estrange
43. Detailed design criteria
for a piece of work
46. __ May, actress
47. Having a cheerless
aspect
48. Mouths or openings
50. More dried-up
51. Abel's brother (Bible)
52. Son of Lynceus
53. Coin worth 1/10 of a
dollar
54. Mother of Cronus
55. Geological times
56. Corporal (abbr.)
57. Vietnamese currency
unit
60. Supplement with
difficulty
Solution to last week’s puzzle
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I
Doe’s and Don’ts
{ PAUL J. DOE, FORMER PUBLISHER OF THE CUMBERLAND NEWS }
Let the
Games Stop
L
eave it to the politicians to ruin a
perfectly good summer. When my
sister and her grandchildren were
here earlier this summer, one of
the places we visited was Storybook Land.
Her grandchildren—and mine—got a big
kick out of all the rides, especially the
rollercoaster.
Storybook Land’s version is a mini-
coaster designed for little children, and it
was the first thing the kids wanted to ride.
We were escorting two fives, one three and
one aged two; so it was perfect.
In fact, I don’t know who had a better
time—me or the kids. It put a summer
smile on my face that’s lasted pretty much
until the politicians put us on the roller-
coaster stock market.
You might say that’s it’s not fair to blame
the politicians, but you would be wrong.
The fat cats on Wall Street are the ones
grinning through the ride but it’s the politi-
cians (all party affiliations included) who
told us to climb on board and then pulled
the lever to send us on our way.
Let’s recap: U.S. troops are committed
overseas in a misadventure that costs us
billions weekly; we’re sending more billions
overseas to prop up Middle East govern-
ments that don’t like us; once stable coun-
tries (Italy, Greece, and France, to name a
few) are floundering in debt.
Our politicians’ response has been to
keep borrowing money: which, as soon as
we get, we send overseas.
Back in the middle of July (just weeks
before the August 2 deadline) the media (at
the urging of politicians) began a national
scare campaign over increasing the amount
the United States could borrow.
It was the worst kind of summer rerun—
we’d seen it before and we hadn’t particu-
larly liked it the first time.
So, for a couple of weeks, we listened to
the media’s talking heads lie to us, and
worse. The worse was their threatening
those most dependent upon government—
the poor, the disadvantaged and the seniors.
Horror of horrors, the politicians said, if
a compromise can’t be reached the govern-
ment would have to suspend welfare and
Social Security checks. Call your local con-
gressman and state’s senators and tell them
to save the poor speckled chickadee (or
whatever), they urged.
Well, you know what happened—a last
minute deal that nobody liked but every-
body signed off on. The politicians put a
band-aid on a bullet wound and blamed
everyone but themselves when the bleed-
ing got worse.
Turns out the government wouldn’t have
shut down (although I’mnot sure that was a
good thing) and there was/is enough money
coming in to pay the debt and keep sending
the welfare and Social Security checks. (A
quick aside: Welfare and Social Security
checks have no business in the same sen-
tence. The welfare checks are a societal
obligation to care for the less fortunate;
Social Security is money that you con-
tributed for your entire working life.)
The politicians’ band-aid didn’t fool the
big, big money guys. Let the games begin:
• We’re already on the Stock Market
Rollercoaster.
• Next, the Inflation Tilt-a-whirl (that’s
the one where the bottom drops out).
• Then, a couple of trips through the Fun
House (you better watch your every step).
• Then a ride through the Tunnel of
Love (provided by your local elected repre-
sentative as he/she seeks reelection).
• Last but not least, the Dodge-Um cars
(where “we the people” try in November to
elect the least objectionable candidates.
I’m sorry, but this just isn’t fun anymore.
• • •
Speaking of “no fun,” how about all that
fuss over Vineland’s birthday cake.
Whenever there is that kind of fuss I ask
myself “cui bono” (who benefits). Turns out
no one in that case.
The public: Nope, they missed a chance
for a free celebrity cake.
The local bakeries: Nope, they looked a
little too self-serving.
The committee: Nope, they looked inde-
cisive, as did the mayor.
That can’t be right. Somebody always
benefits. The more I thought about it, the
more it seemed to me the only possible
beneficiaries might be those people who
want to run against the mayor in the next
election.
I wonder, hmmm. I
The rollercoaster rides we’ve been on lately with the
state and federal governments are not fun.
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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

AUGUST 17 THROUGH 24
Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W.
Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Karaoke
Thursdays with Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-
close, $3 Heinekens, DJ/Dance Party
Fridays 9 p.m.-Close, $3 Coronas. All
Sports Packages: MLB Extra Innings,
NBA League Pass, NHL Center Ice, and
NFL Sunday Ticket. $3 23-oz. Coors Light
& $5 23-oz. Blue Moon during ALL
Phillies games! Call for reservations and
infomation.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Nightlife at Neptune Restaurant. 1554
S. Delsea Drive, Vineland. Live DJ and
Trivia. 692-2800.
Karaoke Night. Old Oar House Irish Pub.
123 North High St., Millville, 293-1200. 8 p.m.
Juicy Wednesday Dance Party. The
Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club.
1022 Almond Rd, Pittsgrove Township, 358-
3325. 8 p.m.
Salsa Night. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr,, Vineland. Free dance lesson with
DJ Slick Rick. $4 Sangria and Corona and
Corona light bottles. 9 p.m. 765-5977.
Bike Nite. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High
St., Millville. 7 p.m. For more info., call 327-
8011.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17
The Bob Ferris Orchestra. Michael
Debbi Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. The
Buena Vista Concert Series continues
with swingin’ standards from the big
band era, featuring vocalists singing
songs made popular by Frank Sinatra,
Bobby Darin, Helen Forrest, and the
Andrews Sisters. The family-friendly
event is free to the public. Hot dogs,
deserts, and beverages will be sold.
Seating is available, but bringing a lawn
chair is recommended. There will be a
dance floor if weather permits. Concert
scheduled, rain or shine. 7 p.m.
EVERY THURSDAY
Jazz Duos. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue
Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Live Jazz
featuring area's best jazz duos. 6:30-9:30
pm. No cover. Reservations recommended.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 19
Third Friday in Millville. The Millville
Arts District. High St., Millville. 6 p.m.
Free. The Riverfront Renaissance Center
for the Arts is honored to present an
exhibition celebrating the life and work
of Chun-Yan Hilyard. Hilyard, an RRCA
Associate Artist, tragically lost her life in
November 2009. Since her untimely
death, Chun-Yan’s family and friends
have collaborated to make sure that her
spirit and artistic talent are never forgot-
ten. Thirty artists who are friends and
colleagues of Chun-Yan’s were invited to
exhibit works. Artists participating have
generously agreed to donate a portion if
not all of their commission to Chun
Yan’s three boys. In addition to the invit-
ed artists, a selection of Chun-Yan’s orig-
inals will be on display (pictured) and
for sale with their entire proceeds bene-
fitting Hilyard’s boys.
Also planned: July’s guest artistic per-
former, John Gowdy, created two large
portraits of New Jersey celebrities, Frank
Sinatra, aka “Chairman of the Board” and
Bruce Springsteen, aka “The Boss” (pic-
tured). You will have the opportunity to
bid on each painting at 7:30 p.m. at the
Glasstown Plaza. All proceeds will go to
the programs of Main Street Millville.
Bidding will start at $100 on each paint-
ing. Glasstown Art Glass Studio will fea-
ture glass flowers, freeform bowls (pic-
tured) and will demonstrate marble mak-
ing during Third Friday. A summer sale
of 30 – 50% off of art glass and antiques
is taking place throughout the month of
August. A plethora of musical acts are
scheduled to perform throughout the
night, and other great events are planned.
OLGA KACZAJ, MD
Bonnu Cvn1:v:vu
IN1vnNn: Mvu:c:Nv
Dr. Kaczaj is proud to announce the
opening of her solo practice on
October 3rd, 2011, located at
1317 S. Main Rd.,
Suite 2C
Vineland, NJ 08360
856-213-6080
Oce hours by appointment.
Accepting patients 16 and older.

SERVICES INCLUDE:
Primary Care For Adults • Immunizations/
Vaccinations • Preventative Care
Physical Exams (ages 16 and older)
Pre-Operative Clearance
Accepting most insurances,
except Medicaid.
Grapevine 22-29 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:05 PM Page 24
AUGUST 19 THROUGH 21
Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 696-3800. Wed.: Ladies Night,
1/2 price appetizers all night. Happy Hour
Mon.-Sat, 4-6 p.m. $1 off alcoholic drinks.
Fri. and Sat., live entertainment.
Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Singalong. Fri.:
Maines Street. Sat: Karaoke.
Sun.: Phillies/Nascar..
Nightlife at Villa Fazzolari. Villa
Fazzolari Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding
Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies
Night, Mike Yacovelli Project, 7 p.m. Fri.:
Jazz Night. Sat.: Italian accordian.
EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Top 40 Dance Party w/ DJ Tony
Morrison. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr,, Vineland. A dance party featuring
all of the most popular mainstream dance
music. 765-5977.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 18
Third Thursday. Hammonton Arts Center.
107 Bellevue Ave., Hammonton. 6–9 p.m.
Free. Featuring the Stockton Faculty Jazz
Band. Sip wine and cheese as you enjoy
poetry and live jazz. Stroll the street and
shop "al fresco" for Back to School specials.
AUGUST 19, 20, 21, 25, 26 AND 27
Cabaret. Eagle Theater. 208 Vine St.,
Hammonton. 8 p.m. on every date except
8/21; 2 p.m. on 8/21. $20, general admis-
sion or $30 for reserved seats at cabaret
style tables. Set in Berlin against the back-
drop of pre-WW2 Germany, Cabaret (cast
pictured) is centered on the love affair
between a young American writer and a
British singer. Tickets can be purchased at
TheEagleTheatre.com
FRIDAY, AUGUST 19
Pop/punk/rock/rap local showcase
Hangar 84. 20 S. 6th St, Vineland. 7:30
p.m. $12. Local musicians from varying
genres show off their skills in this eclectic
showcase. For more info., visit
hangar84music.com.
Adelante. The Gazebo (next to the Oar
House), High St., Millville. 7 -9 p.m.
Chris and Patty Lax, Back Together
Again. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210 N. High
St., Millville. Folk duo. Free. 7 p.m.
Book Signing. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210 N.
High St., Millville. Authors Katherine
Williams (Prince of Windemere) and
George Campbell (What’s Next George?)
will sign copies of their books. Free admis-
sion. 6 - 8 p.m.
Trivia Night. The Rail. 1252 Harding Hwy.,
Richland. Flex your trivial knowledge with
this competition. 697-RAIL. 7 p.m.
Ken Monacchio. Fuel House Coffee Co.
6636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m.
Also scheduled to perform: Shelia Arden,
Josh Bonanno, Tim Austen, and more.
563-1400.
Revolver. Old Oar House Irish Pub. 127
North High St., Millville. 9 p.m. 293-1200.
Lowdown. The Watering Hole 6494
Weymouth Rd., Mays Landing. 7 p.m.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 20
Sounds of Mule Train, Parkin Lot
Picker, Scott Perlot. Bogart’s Bookstore.
210 N. High St., Millville. Folk. Admission
is free. 7 p.m.
No Clue Band. The Rail. 1252 Harding
Hwy., Richland, 697-RAIL. 7 p.m.
Torn and Frayed. The Watering Hole
6494 Weymouth Rd., Mays Landing. 7 p.m.
Unforgiven. Hangar 84. 20 S. 6th St,
Vineland. 7:30 p.m. $10-12. For more
details, visit hangar84music.com.
Joe Kozak. Old Oar House Irish Pub. 127
North High St., Millville. 9 p.m. 293-1200.
Match by Match. Fuel House Coffee Co.
6636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m.
More TBA. For more information, call
563-1400.
Comedy Night. Village on High. 501 N.
High St., Millville. 8 p.m. Featuring Steven
Lerner, Mollie Sperduto, Mike Cerrachio,
Matt Pepe, Rich Gonzalez. 563-1400.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 21
Chuck Boone. The Watering Hole 6494
Weymouth Rd., Mays Landing. 3 p.m.
JTJ Fry. The Beer Garden at Old Oar
House Irish Pub. 127 North High St.,
Millville. 4 p.m For more info., call 293-
1200.
Poetry on High. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210
N. High St., Millville. Original poetry and
music. All local poets welcome to read
some of their work. Hosted by Rita Lyman.
Admission is free. 2 - 4:30 p.m.
Fire Apparatus Show and Muster.
WheatonArts. 1501 Glasstown Rd.,
Millville. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. $10 for adults,
$9 for seniors, free for children under 17.
Featuring over 80 antique fire trucks.
Special trucks include models dating back
to the Revolutionary War Era, as well as a
Ward LaFrance once used by Trenton
Psychiatric Hospital. Antique firefighting
apparatus/memorabilia also on display.
One Love. Hangar 84. 20 S. 6th St,
Vineland. 7:30 p.m. $10-15. For more info.,
visit hangar84music.com.
Adelante. The Bistro on Broad. 400
Broad St., Elmer. 10:30 - 1:30 p.m. www.
thebistroonbroad.com or call 358-8978.
MONDAY, AUGUST 22
Tony Mascara. Giampietro Park, Enrico
Serra band shell. East Landis Ave,
Vineland. The last of Vineland’s 2011 park
concerts. A night of music and dancing.
Free admission. 7 p.m.
EVERY TUESDAY
Silver Strike Bowling. Bojo’s Ale House,
222 N. High St., Millville. 7 p.m. For more
info., call 327-8011.
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Back to
School Savings!
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AUGUST 19-21
School House Rock Live! Jr. The
Landis Theater. 830 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland. 7:30 p.m. on 8/19 and 8/20;
3 p.m. on 8/21. $13 for adults, $10 for
children under 17. Schoolhouse Rock
Live! is one of musical theatre’s brightest
and most innovative
shows. Based on the
Emmy Award-winning
1970s educational
animated TV series,
Schoolhouse uses
the familiar songs
such as "Just a Bill"
and "Conjunction
Junction" to teach
grammar, math, sci-
ence, history, social studies and political
science while telling the story of Tom, a
young teacher nervously anticipating his
first day on the job. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the Landis Theater Box Office
or online at www.landistheater.com. For
more information, call 691-1121.
THIRD THURSDAY (HAMMONTON) AND FRIDAY (MILLVILLE), TOP 40 DANCE PARTY, OUTDOOR CONCERTS,
POETRY ON HIGH, SALSA DANCE LESSONS, AND NIGHTLIFE AROUND THE REGION.
Grapevine 22-29 081711-de:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:05 PM Page 25
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YI’S KARATE OF VINELAND
Lincoln Plaza • 3722 E. Landis Ave.
Vineland, NJ 08361
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xEarly Learning Center (K3-1st)
x Academic Program
x K3 - 2-5 days options
xElementary School (2nd-5th)
xMiddle School (6th-8th)
xHigh School (9th-12th)
x Extended Care Available
x Bus Service provided
for local area
1080 E. Landis Ave. • 856-696-CALL
(2255)
www.MaturoRealty.com
Why You
Should Choose
When Buying or Selling Real Estate
1. More Sales Than Any Other Cumb. County Office for All of 2010 and First Half of 2011.
2. One of the Largest Inventories of Listings Available to Choose From.
3. 51 Knowledgeable and Professional Agents.
4. Family Owned & Operated for Over 33 Years.
5. A Member of All Southern New Jersey MLS Services.
All Phases of Residential and Commercial Sales & Leasing
TOP 5
REASONS
REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
BRIDGETON
21 Monroe St., Ellen Russell to Elia
Aragon-Garcia on 5/11/11 for
$122,000
9 Sherman Ave., Raymond H Maier
(Exec.) to Qian Chen on 5/12/11 for
$75,000
779 Chestnut Ave., Merrily Brandt to
Doris M Debellis on 5/12/11 for
$120,000
18 Suncrest Ave., Mary Ellen
MacMahan to Patricio M Ruiz Ruiz on
5/16/11 for $127,000
20 Bank St., Helen D Riley-Brown to
Rafaela Felipe on 5/19/11 for $55,000
9 Twin Oaks Dr., Sherwood at Twin
Oaks LLC to Karla Ott on 5/25/11 for
$178,000
COMMERCIAL TWP
6211 Whittier Dr., Sec. of Housing &
Urban Development to Thomas
DiGuiseppi on 5/12/11 for $28,750
1308 Spring Garden Rd., Salt & Light
Co. Inc. to Marshall Davenport on
5/26/11 for $67,000
1211 Bacon St., Richard Henderson to
Edward Doyle on 5/31/11 for $50,000
FAIRFIELD TWP
Bridgeton-Fairton Rd., Joann Holton
to Felipe D Matis on 5/23/11 for
$70,000
HOPEWELL TWP
390 West Park Dr., Lynx Asset
Services LLC to Lance W Hayes on
5/16/11 for $57,500
50 Westwood Ave., Kristy M Lasko to
Cody K Casper on 5/18/11 for
$125,000
280 Seeley Cohansey Rd., Brent
DeJohn to Down To Earth Farms LLC
on 5/25/11 for $350,000
52 Lakeside Dr., Margaret Lundgren
to Elizabeth Silverman on 5/26/11 for
$166,000
LAWRENCE TWP
394 Main St., Eleanor Moore (by
Atty.) to Roxane Williams on on
5/12/11 for $55,000
3822 Cedarville Rd., Marco A Pagan
to John Baldasarre, III on 5/23/11 for
$167,500
815 Buck Rd., Just Wood & Stone
Investments to Larry J Evans on
5/27/11 for $187,500
MAURICE RVR TWP
Delsea Dr., Nancy Bailey to David
Ludlam on 5/11/11 for $33,000
MILLVILLE
11 N 4th St., Ecumenical Inc.
Affordable Homes Of Millville to
Justin A Andrews on 5/11/11 for
$85,000
419 Mulberry St., Sec. of Housing &
Urban Development to Kerry Ogren
on 5/12/11 for $34,000
831 S 2nd St., Robert J Laird to
Brian L Wagner on 5/16/11 for
$53,000
8 Lisa Marie Terr., RPJ Properties
LLC to Devon Dzierwinski on 5/16/11
for $194,900
312 E Oak St., David E Airey to Mary
J Messeck on 5/20/11 for $32,000
2414 Shelburn Rd., Etta C Shannon
to Patrick L Pinder on 5/20/11 for
$130,000
The following transactions of $20,000 or more were filed with Cumberland County in
the month of May 2011 (transactions may have occurred in an earlier month). Names
listed may, in some cases, be those of buyers’ or sellers’ representatives.
Grapevine 30-36 081711:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:13 PM Page 30
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5 Ettie Dr., Steven O’Malley to Steven
Bowen on 5/20/11 for $291,000
413 E Main St., Anthony F Cannizzaro
to Michele Kelly on 5/23/11 for $32,500
34 NE Lake Shore Rd., Rachel
Stanger to Edward V Gulla on
5/23/11 for $72,000
2233 Mistletoe Ln., Richard Murray,
Jr. to Yulinda L Gilmore on 5/26/11
for $175,000
SHILOH
West Ave., Andrea Dobin (Trust in
Bkpt.) to Likanchuk A&A Enterprises
on 5/27/11 for $95,000
STOW CREEK TWP
Old Cohansey Rd., Richard Dawson
to Ben English on 5/11/11 for
$32,000
UPPER DEERFIELD
58 Husted Station Rd., Angela M
Gandy to Alissha Hummell on
5/19/11 for $149,000
VINELAND
1155 Almond Rd., David Fiamingo to
Joseph Munson on 5/11/11 for
$100,000
2102 E Oak Rd. N5, NVR Inc. (DBA)
to Diane L Coleman on 5/11/11 for
$164,990
1964 E Oak Rd., Robert Carolla to
Mark E Homiak on 5/12/11 for
$118,500
230 W Elmer Rd., Fuller Associates
LLC to BD&M Properties LLC on
5/12/11 for $576,000
740 Westmont Ln., Kristine Andeloro
to Christina Whilden on 5/16/11 for
$130,000
2130 Rudolph Dr., Timmy J Roberson
(Ind. Atty.) to Danielle K Leech on
5/16/11 for $199,900
711 S Myrtle St., Juan B Boneta to
Diana Andujar on 5/17/11 for
$144,000
1405 Garry Ave., Dominic C Marshall
to John J St Clair on 5/19/11 for
$126,000
907 N Main Rd., Main Realty
Associates LLC to South Jersey
Hospital Inc. on 5/19/11 for
$2,100,000
3063 Swan Dr., Andres J DiMacale to
Rebecca Vazquez on 5/23/11 for
$204,500
2467 Concetta Ln., NVR Inc. (DBA)
to Brian J Murray on 5/24/11 for
$297,645
2518 Simonelli Rd., Tradition Homes
at Vineland LLC to NVR Inc. (DBA)
on 5/26/11 for $70,000
1740 Venus Dr., Nancy Heidler to
Brenda Herbert on 5/26/11 for
$140,000
1009 Spruce St., Daniel S McKeon to
Michael W Salcedo on 5/26/11 for
$156,000
Mays Landing Rd., John D Braidi to
Brian Barsuglia on 5/26/11 for
$184,000
814 Foxmoor Dr., NVR Inc. (DBA) to
Clarence B Hughes on 5/26/11 for
$229,820
2475 Loretta Ln., NVR Inc. (DBA) to
Lia Ann Russo on 5/26/11 for
$249,030
2388 Washington Ave., William J
Deliberis to Angel M Alicea, Jr. on
5/27/11 for $225,000
146 Foster Ave., Thomas R Lesosky
to Timothy Davidson on 5/31/11 for
$155,000
1568 W Chestnut Ave., Raul Lopez to
Richard Suarez, Jr. on 5/31/11 for
$190,000
1717 Garwood Ln., Dorothy W
Gardam (Est. by Exec.) to Jeffrey W
Sautter on 5/31/11 for $220,000
Grapevine 30-36 081711:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:13 PM Page 31
COMMUNITY CALENDAR

HAPPENINGS
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17
Get Behind The Wheel Racing Class.
New Jersey Motorsports Park Racing
School. 8000 Dividing Creek Rd.,
Millville. If you've ever dreamed of being a
race car driver; if you've ever wanted to
hold an event that your guests will never
forget; or if you simply want to learn how
to drive a car faster than you can safely
drive on the highway, this is the class for
you. Registration required. Register at
www.njmpracingschool.com.
AUGUST 18 AND 19
AARP Driver Safety Program. South
Jersey Healthcare Fitness Connection,
1430 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland. 9:30
a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Participants will get
instruction on how to operate their vehi-
cles more safely in today’s challenging
driving environment. They’ll get advice on
adjusting to common age-related changes
in vision, hearing and reaction time.
Participants must attend both days. Space
in the classes is limited, and registration is
required. To register, call: 453-2220.
AUGUST 18 AND 25
Composers On Vacation. (8/18) Margate
Public Library, Bloom Pavillion, 8100
Atlantic Ave., Margate. 6:30 p.m. (8/25)
The Avalon Public Library, 235 32nd St.,
Avalon. 7 p.m. The August Installment of
the Bay-Atlantic Summer Lecture Series
features Paul M. Somers (pictured above)
and will explore what happens when a
composer leaves home for a very different
place and how they reflect this musically.
Free. For more info., call 451-1169.
FRIDAY AUGUST 19
SJH Senior Class Luncheon. SJH
Fitness Connection. 1430 W. Sherman
Ave., Vineland. Noon. All area seniors are
invited to attend Senior Class, a luncheon
and educational session sponsored by
South Jersey Healthcare. The program is
offered to seniors who are looking to make
new friends, learn about healthy living and
enjoy an educational luncheon with fellow
senior citizens. To register or for more
info., call Suzanne Bauer at 575-4214.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 20
Roar At The Shore. Blue Water Grill,
3320 Atlantic Ave., Wildwood. 10 a.m - 6
p.m. $10 per person, free for children
under 10. Includes Breakfast Buffet 10 a.m.
- Noon and Happy Hour 3 - 6 p.m., $5.00
Food/Drink Voucher. Honoring Fr. Ed
Namiotka and Mrs. Linda Snyder. RSVP by
August 10th. For reservations, send to St.
Joseph’s Society, SHHS, 15 N. East Ave,
Vineland, NJ 08360 or contact Anne
Hartman 691-4491 X1113.
VHS Soccer Car Wash. Veterans
Memorial School, 424 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland. 8 a.m - 3 p.m. $5 for cars and
$8 for trucks and SUVs. All proceeds will
benefit the VHS boys soccer team.
Cruisin’ the Delsea Drive-In. The
Delsea Drive-In Theater, 2203 South
Delsea Dr., Vineland. 5 p.m. Hosted by
Larry Lazareff and Ben Notaro, the event
will feature its standard four movies for
the evening. The first film is the classic
“Bullet” and the three other movies will be
current features. Open to all classic cars,
including muscle cars, street rods, clas-
sics, rat rods and specialty cars. WVLT
92.1 disc-jockey Pepper Paul will be play-
ing cruisin’ oldies music before the feature
presentations start at dusk. For more infor-
mation, call 297-5012.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 21
Chicken Barbeque. North Italy Club, The
Lodge Grounds, So. East Ave. and Virano
Ln., Vineland. Noon - 6 p.m. $9. North
Italy Club’s 56th annual Chicken Barbeque
will feature a live band and a platter which
includes 1/2 chicken, macroni salad, toma-
toes, corn on the cob, hot or sweet pep-
pers and a roll.
Newfield Library Peach Social On
Newfield Day. The Peach Grove.,
Newfield. $5 for adults, $3 for children 6-
12 and $2 for children 5 and under. Top off
your chicken bbq with a delicious desert of
peach pie, peach cobbler, or assorted
other homemade goodies with ice cream
and topped with fresh Jersey peaches.
Takeouts are available. For more info., call
697-0415.
Explosive Service. Rock of Salvation
Church, 513 E. Grape St., Vineland. Free.
Afternoon English service. Evangelist
Hector “Pochey” Ciares, from Fitchburg,
Massachusetts, will be delivering a dynam-
ic word from god. For more info., call 794-
8898.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 23
Victorian Tea Party. Cumberland Mall
Center Court, 100 Cumberland Mall,
Vineland. 10:30 a.m. For kids of all ages.
Free. Part of Miss Kathy’s Tale Spin Stories
Series. In this installment, the end of sum-
mer brings the annual Victorian Tea Party
where Miss Kathy serves Talespinners tea
time treats featuring real china cups and
saucers, lace tablecloths, napkins and
fancy tea treats. Auntie Anne’s is lined up
for the snack parade.
Public Input Session. University of
Medicine and Dentistry of NJ (UMDNJ),
Academic Center Auditorium,
1 Medical Center Drive, Stratford. 6 - 8
p.m. Free. Hosted by the Alzheimer’s
Association Delaware Valley Chapter, this
provides an opportunity to solicit views,
comments and perspectives from stake-
holders in the Alzheimer’s community to
inform the development of a successful
National Alzheimer’s Plan. Recommendations
and comments expressed during these
sessions will be collected and shared this
fall with officials from the U.S. Department
of Health and Human Services. For more
info., visit www.alz.org/desjsepa or call
800-272-3900.
Family Fun Night. Penguin Solar Ice
Cream. 1008 Harding Hwy., Newfield. 7 -
10 p.m. Rain date 8/24. Sponsored by
Newfield Volunteer Fire Co. Free Pony
rides for 1 hour, clown, face painting, car-
toon characters, music, good food and
friends, fun for all. Bring a chair/ blanket.
A special showing at dusk. Please Park in
rear of property and see the new solar
array. For more info., email njpurplepen-
guin@comcast.net.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24
Presentation on Breast Cancer
Awareness, Education, and Screening
Initiative. The Southwest Council, Inc.,
1405 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland. Noon. Free. A
luncheon with a goal of helping spread
Breast Cancer awareness and getting
women aged 40 and over in Cumberland,
Salem and Gloucester counties to com-
plete annual mammography screenings.
Bring a friend and receive a special gift.
Seating is limited. RSVP by 8/15 by calling
Amie at 794-1011 x306 or by email at
amie@southwestcouncil.org.
How to Prevent, Control, Eliminate
Type II Diabetes Workshop. Cooper
Wellness Center, 6 LaSalle St., Vineland. 7
- 8 p.m. Free. Heidi Shelley from the
Foundation for Wellness Professionals will
be speaking about natural methods to pre-
vent, control or eliminate Type II Diabetes.
Limited to the first 20 callers. Registration
required. Call 691-1313.
Pizza Hut Fundraiser Night. Pizza Hut,
301 South Main Rd., Vineland. 5 - 8 p.m.
$10 for adults and $5 for children (12 and
under). To benefit the Parvin State Park
Appreciation Committee, Pizza Hut will
donate $2 for each adult and $1 for each
child’s buffet sold. For more info., call 691-
0399.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 20
Hershey Park Bus Trip.
Sponsored by Accion Social
Puertorriquena, Inc., this trip costs
$57 for ages 3 to 8, and $66 for ages
9 and over. The price includes the
leisure bus trip, movies, and admis-
sion to the park. The bus will depart
from the Walmart parking lot at 7:30
a.m. and arrive at Hershey around 10
a.m. For more info. or tickets, contact
Margie Custodio at 503-7547 or Nancy
Afanador at 609-501-7403.
LOVE THY NEIGHBOR
Word of Life Pantry, 425 N. 6th St.,
Vineland. Word of Life "Love Thy
Neighbor" Food Pantry supplies
families with food and household
items throughout the year. Our
pantry is open on the third and
fourth Sunday of each month from
1:30 p.m.–2 p.m. Families are allot-
ted one (1) food pick up per month.
For more info., call 507-0005.
PARTICIPANTS NEEDED
The Kiwanis Club of Vineland is
looking for vendors, crafters and
yard salers to join us in our 1st
Annual Flea Market and Yard Sale
to be held on September 10th.
Spot size is 8' x 8' and are avail-
able for $15 per spot. Location is
between Parrish Sign Company
and Parrish Storage on Delsea
Drive in Vineland (across from the
Salvation Army and Delsea Drive-
In. Reserve your spot now. Call
856-696-1062 or e-mail cel-
lis@shorememorial.org.
ICE HOCKEY SIGN-UPS.
High school age skaters from
Vineland, Millville, Bridgeton,
Delsea Regional, Cumberland
Christian, Sacred Heart High
Schools and home-schooled
skaters from those areas are invit-
ed to skate in the South Jersey
High School Ice Hockey League.
This is a Varsity level division with
home games based out of the
Canlan Ice sports Arena in
Vineland. Contact vinelandicehock-
eyalumni@comcast.net for informa-
tion on the 2011-2012 season.
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FRIDAY, AUGUST 26
Worship and Empowerment Service.
New Bethel African Methodist Episcopal
Church, 414 N. 7th St., Vineland. 7 p.m.
Free. Service theme is “Women Living With
Joy”. Special guest preacher Rev. Rosetta
Brown, of Greater Holy Trinity Baptist
Church in Atlantic City.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 27
Semper Marine Annual Pig Roast.
Semper Marine Detachment #205, 2041
W. Landis Ave. 5 - 11 p.m. $15 for adults,
$3 for children under 12, and free for chil-
dren under 5. Dinner includes Pulled pork,
rolls, salads, baked beans, desserts, bever-
age and beer. There will be a DJ for danc-
ing. Tickets sold by members or at the
door. Childrens tickets are only available at
the door. Hamburger or hotdog available
for children on request. If you bring a new
unwrapped toy for TOYS FOR TOTS, your
name will be entered in a special drawing
for a door prize. For more info., call 692-
4300.
Sub Sale. Dorothy Fire Co., 70 Tuckahoe
Rd., Dorothy. 10 a.m. until subs sold out.
$5.50 per sub. Sponsored by The Dorothy
Fire Company Ladies Auxiliary. This is
their second sub sale within a month. Last
time, they sold out by 12:00 (900 subs).
This month they will make additional subs
(1,000) to help meet the demand. To place
large orders or for more information, call
609-476-2436.
Women living with joy workshop. New
Bethel African Methodist Episcopal
Church, 414 N. 7th St., Vineland. 8:30 a.m.
- 1 p.m. $25. Workshop presenters include
Evangelists Tracey Lynn Wells-Huggins and
Iris Waters. Includes a continental break-
fast, a light lunch and a workshop kit.
Registration is required. To register or for
more info., call 691-1349 or 609-805-2292.
Thunder in the Park. Giampietro Park,
600 E. Park Ave., Vineland. 9 a.m. The
event is a fun-filled, family event with a
twist -- a motorcycle poker run, bands,
vintage cars, various vendors and other
interesting activities -- will be on hand that
day all to benefit the Boys & Girls Club of
Vineland. Cat Country 107.3FM will be on
hand playing music, spinning its prize
wheel for prizes and promoting the event.
For more info., call 896-0244.
AUGUST 28, 29 AND 31
Open Auditions for The Sound of
Music. Trinity United Methodist Church,
14 Fayette St., Bridgeton. Hosted by The
Off Broad Street Players Theatre Company,
auditions for children 6 to 17 will be 8/28
from 3 - 6 p.m.; auditions for adults will be
8/29 and 8/31, at 7:30 p.m. The director,
Walter A. Webster of Bridgeton, asks that
all planning to audition should prepare any
song from a Broadway musical other than
"The Sound of Music". The doors will open
for registration at 2:30 pm on Sunday and
7:00 pm on both Monday and Wednesday.
For more info., call 451 -5437.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 28
Nutcracker Auditions. South Jersey
Ballet School, 415 Commerce Lane, Unit 6-
7, West Berlin. South Jersey Ballet Theatre
will hold open auditions for its annual pro-
duction of “The Nutcracker” to be per-
formed in Voorhees, Camden County in
December. Auditions for boys and girls,
ages 5 to 18. For additional info. and audi-
tion times, call 856-768-1740 or send an
email to sjballet@gmail.com.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 30
Texas Roadhouse Night. Texas
Roadhouse, 2299 North 2nd St., Millville.
3:30 - 10 p.m. Hosted by The Friends of
Vineland Public Library, 10 percent of all
food purchases during this time will be
donated to the VPL. Stop in the library for
a coupon and enjoy a wonderful meal
while helping your local library. For more
info., call 794-4244.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31
Five Secrets To Permanent Weight
Loss. Cooper Wellness Center, 6 LaSalle
St., Vineland. 7–8 p.m. Class will focus on
methods to lose weight naturally and be
healthier without the use of drugs or
“dieting”. Workshop participants will gain
understanding of the cause of their
weight gain and fatigue, the role of toxici-
ty in weight gain, and learn about non-
drug solutions. Seating is limited to 20
callers. Make your reservation today by
calling 691-1313.
ONE YEAR FREE
LESSONS FOR BOYS
Kimberly Chapman; Artistic Co-
Director/Co- Owner Maxine’s Studio
of Dance is making boys realize that
dance can improve their sports. From
football to swimming, and everything
between, boys from around the area
are taking notice that dance can help
their performance. The class is for
boys only; ages 4 to 7 meet on
Thursday from 4:00 – 4:45 p.m. and
ages 8 – 12 meet on Thursday 4:45 –
5:30 p.m. The free hip hop, jazz,
stretch, mat, class is being offered
once again. It is for one year only,
and boys can wear comfortable
clothing. No dance equipment is nec-
essary. This class is offered to afford
boys the opportunity to understand
and appreciate the art of dance while
improving their agility, flexibility,
coordination, memorization and ath-
leticism. Students who remain with
lessons the following year, receive a
half scholarship for the entire year. If
you are interested in signing your
child up for this class, please phone
Maxine’s Studio of Dance at 691-
6059 or stop by for the “open house”
August 8th – 12th from 9 – 10:30
a.m. at 2388 N. East Ave. Vineland.
SACRED HEART SUB
SALE Sacred Heart Church,
Vineland, is holding a sub ticket
sale, redeemable for subs at
Gardella's or Giovanni's. Tickets
are $6.00 each and proceeds will
benefit the Sacred Heart Capital
Campaign Fund. Tickets are valid
through August 31, 2011. For tick-
ets and information, contact the
Sacred Heart Rectory at 856-691-
0420.
VPL EVENT CALENDAR.
All events held at Vineland Public
Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland. Registration required for
all events.
August 17th: 10:30 – 11:15 a.m.
Preschool Story Time, ages 3-5;
2 – 3:30 p.m. Reading Club, ages 9
and up;
4 – 6:30 p.m. Teen Potluck, ages
13-18
August 18th: 2 – 3 p.m. Reading
Club, ages 6-8;
5 – 7:30 p.m. Writer’s Society
(Community Event Room);
6 – 7:30 p.m. Play Scrabble (Doris
Tripp Room)
August 19th: 10:30 – 11 a.m. Baby
Time, ages 6-23 months;
1 – 2:30 p.m. Pokemon Club, ages
7 and up
August 24th: 2 – 3 p.m. Book Club
for Adults (Community Event
Room)
August 25th: 5:30 p.m. Library
Board of Trustees meeting
(Community Event Room)
FEDS FEED FAMILIES
FOOD DRIVE
The USDA Service Center located
in Vineland is collecting canned
food, paper products, baby prod-
ucts and other non-perishable
items for the Feds Feed Families
program. Items can be dropped
off until 8/31 at the USDA
Service Center located at 1318 S.
Main Rd Bldg 5A, Vineland.
Please call 856-205-1225 for
more information.
MILLVILLE HS REUNION
BEING PLANNED. Millville
High School Class of 1966 Reunion
Weekend will be held Sept. 30-Oct.
2, 2011. If you'd like to attend or
want further information, call or e-
mail Eileen Wickward 327-3323,
ewickward@msn.com, or Betty
Gleeson Darmstadter, 691-9038,
egd0819@hotmail.com. Addresses
are needed for the following:
Bernice Aderholdt Johnson,
Margaret Brewster White, Paula
Chambers Connington, Charles
Davis, Shirleen Dixon, Pat Wilson
Harris, Kathryn Jeffers, Michael L.
Jones, Robert Kierniesky, Connie
Lewis, Jim McFadden, Carolan
Miletta Sherman, Barry Oberfirst,
John A. Reed (Leesburg), William
J. Robinson, Deborah Scarlett
Thomas, Mary Slimmer(Woodbine),
Robert D. Smith, Richard C. Stites,
Ruth Taylor Perkins, Billie Jeanne
Thorson Perry, Patsy Ann Warner,
Bonnie Reynolds Williams Beattie.
NYC BUS TRIP!
On Saturday, September 17th, a
bus trip to NYC is scheduled to
see the new musical, Priscilla
Queen of the Desert. Bus leaves at
8:15 am from Veteran's Memorial
School and 8:30 am from the
Buena Borough Hall (Minotola).
The show time is 2 p.m. $208.
Price includes transportation, a
full-course dinner at Tony
DiNapoli's in Times Square, and
an orchestra seat for the show.
This show features dance and
disco tunes from the likes of
Madonna, Cyndi Lauper and
Donna Summer. Priscilla is filled
with incredibly imaginative and
over-the-top costumes, drag make-
up and dance numbers that main-
tain an energetic pulse throughout
the story. Call Rusty at 692-8573
to reserve your seat today.
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Faces in the News
I
Robotics Team Demonstrates For Freeholder Board
The South Jersey Robotics Inc. Team 316, known as the LuNaTeCs, presented
a demonstration of their award-winning robot, S.A.M., to the Salem County
Board of Chosen Freeholders at the regular freeholder meeting on June 22.
The team of students, mentors, and parents from across Salem County
attended the demonstration. Their robot named S.A.M. (Salem’s Awesome
Machine) competed in the yearly FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of
Science and Technology) Robotics Competitions. The team won 2nd place in the
regional competition in Philadelphia in April and advanced to the international
competition in St. Louis the following month where they faced teams from 60
countries.
FIRST was founded over 20 years ago by inventor Dean Kamen to encourage
young people to discover and develop a passion for science, engineering, tech-
nology, and math. This year the program involved over 210,000 students and
90,000 mentors from 60 countries.
From left: (front row) Gain O’Connell, Penns Grove Engineering Academy, Shannon Kirk,
Salem County Vocational/Technical School; (middle row) Freeholder Julie Acton,
Samantha Kirk, alumna, now attending Tulane University, Freeholder Beth Timberman;
(back row) Freeholder Director Lee Ware, Freeholder Ben Laury, Freeholder Dale Cross,
Domenic Rodriquez, home school student, Scott George, PolyOne mentor, Jakob
Davenport, Penns Grove Engineering Academy, Josh Brosvic, home school student,
Freeholder Bruce Bobbitt, and Freeholder David Lindenmuth.
In Memory of Luis M. Rivera, Sr.
Moments are forever...
Luis, our first year without you.
If God brings you to it; He will bring you through it.
This happened the day God decided to call you home, and take you away
from all of us.
Happy moments; praise God.
It was that wonderful day, I became your
wife, and we became a family.
Difficult moments; seek God.
For all of us, but mostly me! Getting through
a day without you.
Quiet moments; worship God.
When we look through hundreds of pictures
of all of us together.
Painful moments; trust God.
It was that awful day, August 10, 2010, when
we remember you were no longer with us.
PLC Students Help Women In Darfur
Pineland Learning Center students in grades nine and ten raised $1420 in
support of the Jewish World Watch efforts to purchase solar cookers for the
women of Darfur. The students first studied how World War II and the Holocaust
led to the creation of international organizations to protect human rights in their
US History II classes which is one of the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards.
The goal of the project is to protect refugee women and girls from rape and
violence while performing the critical task of collecting firewood for cooking. The
refugees must search for wood outside of the camp thereby subjecting them to
attack by the Sudanese-supported Janjaweed militia. The Jewish World Watch
provides women in the refugee camps with an alternative cooking option: the
solar cooker. Solar cookers enable women to remain within the relative safety of
the camp by reducing their dependence on wood.
Students at Pineland Learning Center held a car wash, yard sale, and bake
sale to raise enough funds to provide about 72 solar cookers for the women in
the Oure Cassoni Refugee camp. Each family will receive 2 solar cookers and
training. One is used for sorghum, the grain staple distributed meal and the
other for sauce, or vegetables.
Front left: (front row) Mary Lou Pierce, Curriculum Supervisor 9-12; Sergio Rivera,
Vineland, Kay Delp, School Director; Tyreek Gravely, Bridgeton; Charlotte Bartee, Grade
9-10 Classroom Teacher; Chris Mulholland, Washington Township; and Darwyn Minor,
Assistant School Director. (back row) Cavan Eccleston, Assistant Director; Lamont
Daniels, Delsea Regional; Shawn Duffey, Pittsgrove; Dean DiPietropolo, Grade 9-10
Classroom Teacher, Linda Vorsa, Environmental Science Teacher; and Lori Zorzi, Grade
9-10 Classroom Teacher
Campers Show Their American Spirit
Notre Dame Regional School has officially transformed into a Summer Camp
and the campers were eager to show their American Spirit during the week of
Independence Day. From painting ornamental stars, face painting, and singing
patriotic songs, the campers enjoyed their week and finished it off with a parade
and watermelon eating contest.
Grapevine 30-36 081711:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:14 PM Page 34
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Requirements: should be com-
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Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m.
To order your classified call, 856-457-7815 or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To order your classified, call 856-457-7815 or
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Only $10 per ad, per week, up to 20 words; over 20 words,
$0.50 per word. $0.30 for bold—per word/per issue, $3 for a
Border/per issue. Add a photo for $15. Mail Ad & payment or go
online to www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds.
Not responsible for typographical errors. • Once an ad is placed, it cannot be cancelled or charged. The Grapevine does not in any way
imply approval or endorsement. Those interested in goods or services always use good judgment and take appropriate precautions.
Acct. No. ___________________________________Exp. Date________ 3 Digit # on back
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Vineland, NJ 08361
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CLASSIFIEDS
Need work? Have a business and need more
customers? Why not get the word out through
The Grapevine’s Classified section?
Advertize your skills and business in the
Classifieds by calling 856-457-7815.
Caretaker Wanted
REDUCED RENT TO CARETAKER
Includes full use of House in Franklinville area. 1 Bdrm,
Lvrm, Dinrm, Kt, 1 Ba, Deck, Bkyd., Washer/Dryer,
Heat, Cable & elect incl. Duties are to be there in the
evening on a needs only basis for 53-year-old women
with MS Multiple Sclerosis. Must have referrals, quali-
fications and can lift 110-lb. women from bed to scoot-
er. Must have own vehicle and valid drivers license, and
work full time or part time. Duties include light shop-
ping, letting small dog in and out, light housekeeping
and other minimal household chores, No Smoking, No
Alcohol or Drugs permitted. Christian person or couple
preferred. Perfect for elderly couple or college student,
$100 per week. Send info to MS Caretaker,
430 E. Forest Grove Rd., Vineland, NJ 08360.
Having a Yard Sale or Garage Sale?
It’s time for spring cleaning, and there’s no better
way to get the word out than to advertise your
yard sale in The Grapevine’s Classifieds.
Use the form below, or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Deadline is Friday for the following Wednesday’s paper.
Credit Cards
Accepted:
Micro Electric LLC.
Residential repair, addi-
tions, and services.
Bonded and insured. “no
job is too small.”
NJ LIC #14256.
Call 609-501-7777
Eugene’s Lawn Service.
Perfecting lawns one at a
time. Mowing. Leaves.
Mulch. Shrubs. Pressure
Washing. Call for free esti-
mate. 856-305-1682
Customer service rep.
needed to work for our
aid. 18 years and above
needed; must possess
good typing skills and
speak English fluently.
Will earn $3,000 monthly.
Email me at
sp7777777@blumail.org. If
interested, contact me.
BARBER/STYLIST
MALE/FEMALE. FOR EAST
VINELAND SHOP. 609-774-
5359
Need to raise money? Earn
up to 40% with an Avon
fundraiser. Call 856-332-
6446 for details!
Spaces For Rent! Jess’s
Bazaar, 537 Landis Ave.
Spaces for beauty salons
and hair-braiding. Call
856-507-9500 or visit
jesssbridal.com/bazaar.
For Sale: Retired piano
teacher has collection of
music for sale. Must take
all. Will mail you inventory
sheets. 856-697-1140.
Pool For Sale: 27 foot
round Landi pool, com-
plete with all accessories,
including deck. Five years
old. $2,200. Call
609-381-3680
Steelman's Drywall.
Hanging, finishing and
repairs. No job too big or
small. Free estimate. Call
Joe 609-381-3814.
Turk's Pressure Clean.
Property maintenance.
Vinyl and aluminum sid-
ing, concrete, brick, roof
cleaning, gutter clean-out.
Over 25 years in busi-
ness, fully insured.
(856) 692-7470.
Electrical
Contractor
Health & Fitness
Body and Mind
Massage: professional
therapeutic massage.
New clients $45.00
for 50-minute mas-
sage. Reg. $65.00 +
tax. 856-205-2626.
Outcalls only.
For Sale: Brand new
wedding gown, blush-
er, vail, tiara, candle
set, cake set, and
photo album. Prices
negotiable. Call
Wendy 856-982-7079
White Sweet Corn,
home grown and
picked fresh, hourly.
Sunny Meadow Farm.
Bridgeton on Landis
Ave. 1/2 mile from
Carll's Corner.
Jersey Corn For Sale!
Our own fresh Jersey
yellow sweet corn.
Orders welcomed.
13 ears for $5.
856-297-3277
LIKE NEW!!! 20"
Electric Caloric
Range! Perfect for
efficiency apt., lake
house, or RV. ONLY
$185.00 OBO! Call
214-277-2450 or 972-
304-1861.
Redefined Spaces
Painting, drywall,
kitchens, bathrooms,
decks, siding,
windows, and doors.
Fully licensed, bond-
ed, and insured.
Great service, afford-
able prices. Free esti-
mates available.
Owner/operator John
Donoffio. If interested
in services, call 609-
670-0604. Call today!
For Rent
Business
Help Wanted
A CUT ABOVE LAWN
CARE. LAWN MAIN-
TANCE, LEAF CLEAN
UPS, PAVERS,
PATIOS, WALK WAYS,
POOLS & MORE.
FREE ESTIMATE.
ALEX 609-381-8586
Landscaping
Pete Construction.
Specializing in decks,
roofs, and home
remodeling. State
licensed and insured.
Call for a free esti-
mate. 856-507-1456.
Sales Person Wanted!
Yellow page experi-
ence preferred. Salary
plus commission. Call
856-881-1225 or
email resume to
theweeklyjournal@
comcast.net
Home
Improvement
Miscellaneous
Do you have a car or boat that is
taking up space in your driveway?
Are you hoping to sell your
vehicle for some extra cash?
Publicize the sale of your vehicle
by advertising in The Grapevine’s
Classifieds section. Make your
junk someone else’s treasures.
Selling your Car?
KAYAK/TOURYAK—
Prijon
1 owner, garaged, 1
1/2 yr old, vg/exc
cond. Inc balanced
wing rudder, nylon
spray skirt w/
adjustable tunnel.
Color yellow. $1200.
Werner Camano pad-
dle, amber, exc cond.,
$175. 609-742-6647
No Math Left
Behind! Tutoring in
math for all ages.
Tuesday and
Thursday currently
open. Call 691-5534
to get your child
ahead of the curve.
Services
Need Computer Help?
PC Troubleshooting,
Wireless Networking,
Email Setup, PC Tune
Up, Internet
Connection Help,
Virus Removal, New
PC Setup etc. Fast,
friendly service.
Reasonable rates.
Call 856-558-9812
Help Wanted
For Sale
Grapevine 30-36 081711:Layout 1 8/15/11 7:14 PM Page 35
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