CONDUCTORS

TECHNICAL CATALOGUE

INDEX

CONDUCTORS
Foreword............................................................................................................................................ 03
Profile ................................................................................................................................................ 05
Conversion Factors & Formulae ...................................................................................................... 13
Various Types of Conductors ........................................................................................................... 19
Manufacturing Process of AAAC & ACSR ..................................................................................... 23
Comparison of AAAC & ACSR......................................................................................................... 31
Technical Data & Information about Conductors .......................................................................... 43
Configuration drawings for AAC, AAAC & ACSR .......................................................................... 69
Various Indian Standards ................................................................................................................ 75
Various International Standards ................................................................................................... 103

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B K Ghoda Director 3 . by which we had put our best possible efforts to lucify the technical assistance to all Government/Public sector corporates by providing all important technical parameters keeping in view Indian as well as International standards for achieving proper selection aspects as far as overhead conductor selection / usage is concerned. we take this opportunity to put forward “Revised-updated-conductor Manual” for your reference and parting further more technical updated details with inclusion of more technical parameters as regards conductor field. The publication of this revised-updated conductor-manual. is dedicated to our esteemed customer consultants and all Government/ Private Sector /Public Sector Corporate as a reference guide – which will help all those who are associated and involved in development of overhead transmission and distribution field. Consultants and valued customers. We have had overwhelming response for our earlier conductor – manual.Dear Fellow Power Engineer & Esteemed Customers With our best regards to all our fellow power Engineers.

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PROFILE 5 .

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We adopted a modern approach in terms of technology and capability. We are the country's first and only integrated Cable manufacturer with Rod to Insulation facility under one roof and have delivered more than 10.500 MT. Our endeavour to continuously improve has translated into innovative technologies and products that have broken new ground in the industry. Control and Aerial Bunch Cables Backward integration.000 MT. Forward thinking. The Company was established with an objective of catering to the escalating demand of the Indian industry for high-performance Cables and Conductors. per annum for ACSR. In doing this.Small beginnings. The state-of-the-art Research & Development centre at Vadodara is equipped with sophisticated equipments to facilitate extensive research and generate revolutionary technologies. This would result in reduced losses and improved voltage regulations in transmission system. AAAC & AAC Conductors Installed capacity to make 11. increasing capacity three times the conventional furnace • Stranding Machines provided with automatic loading / unloading system and auto wire brakes stop etc. suitable to work in high temperatures with better creep. 7 .500 kms.00. DCL Innovates • Improved Lubrication and Cooling Cycles and superior designs of Wire Drawing Dyes to suit High Tensile Aluminum Alloy Drawing at very high speeds • Heat Treatment Furnace redesigned to reduce heat loss. We believe that if the basics are right. Big dreams Back in 1971.000 kms. DCL became the country's only integrated manufacturer of Cables and Conductors. of products to over 150 clients worldwide. fatigue and other mechanical properties. 2.5 billion Company with end to end manufacturing facilities for comprehensive range of Transmission & Distribution Conductors. progress is inevitable. Our R&D centre has also patented a superior HSHC (High Strength High Conductivity) conductor with better technical and physical characteristics than conventional conductors for transmission systems. As part of our endeavor to be fully integrated. • • Installed capacity of 50. Presently. we went in for backward integration way back in 1999 by setting up an Aluminium Wire Rods manufacturing unit. the R&D centre is developing a High Conductivity High Strength Aluminum Alloy. per annum of Power. because the foresight necessary to become a leader comes from the ability to build on hindsight. per annum for Rods. right from day one. Today. To underscore this ethos. enabling us to deliver global standards of quality. Diamond Cables Ltd. Diamond Cables Ltd. Power & Control Cables. is a Rs. resulting in better quality delivered to our clients. we have indigenized several quality-relevant processes and operations to enable a better control over the parameters that define our product characteristics. began with just one product and one customer in the portfolio. Fast Facts • • • • • Established in 1971 Manufacturing facilities at Baroda & Silvassa First Indian Company to develop the Alloy Conductor indigenously in 1989 ISO 9001 : 2000 certified One of the first manufacturers in the world to use a SAP-ERP System • Installed capacity of 32. DCL became the first company to indigenously develop Alloy Conductors. In 1989.

Chennai Govt. Govt.00.Cutting-edge technology. of Power. AAAC and ACSR Conductors and 11. 400 kms. in 1994 and expanded in 1999. Bangalore Electrical Research and Development Association. Our products have been type tested at: a. for back-up purposes Silvassa Plant The second plant. Quality Policy We firmly believe that quality leads to customer delight. Control and Aerial Bunch Cables. along with Wire Drawing. each integrated with online solution heat treatment plant & Rod mill • 10 very high speed fully Automatic Wire Drawing Machines • 10 stranding machines of 1+6 strands and 06 of multi strands including 3 lines facility to make 61 and 90 stranding conductors for EHV applications in one process • The Cables division is equipped with 3 extrusion machines. which also include the Warehouse and the R&D centre of the Company. DCL implements a structured Quality Policy with well-defined objectives and goals. d.000 sq. from India's commercial capital of Mumbai. The facilities are spread over 5.500 MT. of Haryana Bureau of Indian Standards labs . New-age facilities Our infrastructural base comprises two state-of-the-art manufacturing plants. feet. of Rods. Testing Laboratory. 200 kms. 50. from Mumbai. 2 laying machines & other allied machines • Two DG sets of 500 KW each.000 MT. timely delivery. b. of AAC. and services Encouraging participation of employees in improving quality and efficiency Safe and healthy work environments and optimized utilization of energy resources Continual employee training Quality Certifications Third party validation of products is a significant way of measuring quality in the market place. Power and Control cables. Vadodara The Company's present manufacturing facility was set up at village Vadadala. c. Dist. Vadodara TAG Corporation. Stranding and Extrusion facility & Stand-by generating facilities. which is why we have developed stringent quality measures and standards. established in 1999 at the Tax Free Zone at UT of Silvassa. is an Integrated manufacturing facility for Transmission and Distribution Conductors. 8 Central Power Research Institute.500 kms. The key equipments are: • Two oil fired furnaces with a capacity of 20 MT. Integrated Plant: Vadadala. e. Vadodara. Savli. Quality Objectives • • • • Maintaining consistency in product attributes. The facility at present manufactures 32. Ta.

IS:694 • PVC Insulated Armoured and Unarmoured Cables with Aluminium & Copper Conductor (Multicore) • PVC Insulated Control Cables with Copper Conductor upto 61 Cores • PVC Insulated flexible Single and Multicore Cables as per IS:694 &1554 • PVC Insulated and Sheathed Cables in flat formation for Submersible Pumps Speciality Cables • FRLS (Fire Retardant Low Smoke) Cables. Bombay • Dalal Consulting Eng.Quality Highlights • Implemented the Quality Management System as per the ISO 9002:1994 • ISO 9001:2000 certified for Manufacturing and Marketing of Distribution . both for Power and Control application as per ASTM/IEC/SWEDISH SPECIFICATIONS • Various Controls & Instrumentation Cables • Aerial Bunched Cables (ABC) for L. in 1991 Major Approvals & Registrations • Bureau of Indian Standards (ISI).1 KV LT XLPE Cables as per IS:7098 • PVC Cables upto 1. Part-5 • Maharashtra State Electricity Board • Llyods Ind. Vadodara & Bombay • Surat Electricity Supply Company Ltd. Aluminium & Steel reinforced overhead conductors for speciality use 9 . New Delhi • GESCOM Gulbarga Transmission and Distribution Conductors • All Aluminium Alloy Conductors (AAAC) upto 61 strands for overhead transmission of power • Aluminium Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR) upto 61 strands for overhead electrical power transmission • All Aluminium Conductors (AAC) upto 61 strands for overhead transmission of power Power and Control Cables • 1.S. Register of Services Ltd. Pune • Andhra Pradesh State Electricity Board • ICB Limited. Mark and establish commercial production for Alloy Conductors in India with indigenously developed technology • Awarded the International gold star for product quality by Business Initiative Directions (BID). State Electricity Board • Tata Consulting Engineers. Spain. Bombay & Bangalore • CIDCO.Transmission Conductors & Power . Part-4. Bombay • KPTCL Bangalore • Fluor Daniel India Inc.1 KV grade as per IS:1554 (Part I & II)..Control Cables • Amongst the first to be accorded B...P. • Gujarat Electricity Board • M.T. IS:1554 and IS:694. • Department of Atomic Energy. IS:398 Part-2. Ltd. Bombay & Ahmedabad • FIS Ahmedabad • Davy Power Gas Ltd. Lines • Various types of Speciality Cables • Shielding Wire and Staywires • PVC Insulated Copper.I.

) Chennai.E. Mumbai B.Plastics LTD Shree Shyam filaments Limited. Nasik Purvanchal Vij Vitran Nigam Limited Cimmco International (Birla Group) Pachimanchal Vij Vitran Nigam LTD Chattisgarh State Electricity Board Prerna Syntex LTD Enercon (I) limited Railway Electrification Grasim Industries LTD. (Tisco) Jamshedpur Kirloskar Electric Company LTD Banglore TATA PROJECT LTD Kudermukh Iron Ore Company LTD. Shree Precoated Steels LTD.VALUABLE CUSTOMERS AEG-NGEF (GE-D) L & T Chiyoda LTD Asea Brown Boveri Ltd. Banglore Karnataka Power Transmission Co.(ECC Const. Calcutta Rubamin Limited Guajrat State Electricity Board Shree Rajasthan Syntex Limited G. Corpn. (TATA Project) TATA Iron & Steel Co. Banglore & Hyderabad Mangalore Refinery & Petrochemicals LTD Maradia Chemicals LTD Maharastra state Electricity Board Mohan Exports(I) Pvt LTD Naval Dockyard. Pune Information Technology Park LTD. LTD (Birla Copper) Shree Benzophen Industries LTD Sardar Sarovar Narmada Nigam LTD Sanghi Industries LTD JCT Electricals LTD Suzlon Energy Limited Jitco Overseas PVT LTD Siemens Limited Jindal vijaynagar Streels LTD Jain Chemical & Plastic LTD ( Jalgaon) TATA Honeywell LTD. ACC LTD Alembic Chemical Works LTD Asian Paints(i) LTD.S. Banglore Indo Gulf Fertilizers & chem. Surat.LTD Rites. Jaipur Garden Silk Mills limited.E..S LTD.. Gujarat Industries Power Co. L & T limited . Ankleshwar Birla Periclasse ( A unit of Indian Rayon ) Bajaj Electricals limited. limited 10 Vardhman Wires & Polymers LTD ... Mumbai National Hydro Power Corporation Limited Crompton Greeves limited. Bombay Ahmedabad.

Wire Cables PVC insulated Cables / Power Cables armoured / unarmoured XLPE Cables FRLS Cables Flexible multicore Round Cables Flat Submersible Cables Various Cantrol and Insulation Cables Speciality Cables Services Over-head Lines Consultation Uprating and ugrading of transmission and distribution lines Marketing Conductors to private parties / Co-orporates / State Electricity Board Cables of various ranges to private parties / private corporate bodies / public sectors 11 .OUR PRODUCTS RANGE & SERVICES OUR BUSINESS Manufacturing Rods Conductors AAC AAAC ACSR ABC Speciality Wires/Rods Alloy Ingots Stay .

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CONVERSION FACTORS & FORMULAE 13 .

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02357 0.684 x 106 B. Pounds per sq.7958 Ampere-turns Gilbert per centimeter 2.202 0.3937 6.03281 Feet per sec Per sec 42.233 x 105 Pound-feet Grams Centimeter per sec 1.6813 Knots Miles per hour 56. foot Pounds per sq.t. Pounds per sq.7854.378 x 10-8 1. inches Sq.7 1.0063497 Pounds per sq.83 29.665 x 10-3 2. per min Centimeters -5 Cubic Centimeters 3. Kilometer 0.t.205 x 10-3 Ounces (troy) Pounds Horsepower Circular mils 7.378? 10-8 107 British thermal units Foot pounds Joules 5. Pounds per sq.202 0.427 x 104 737.t.481 59.778 x 10-4 B. Horsepower Watts.03613 Ounce per sq.422.248 x 10 Ergs (dyne. mils Cms Per sec Per sec 0. Inches of water 0. Pounds per sq.42 33.u.3 Pounds per sq.540 Ampere-turns per in British thermal units 778.1667 Cubic meters Revolutions per minute -6 Dynes 2.341 x 10-10 10-10 B.t. in. units per minute Horse power Kilowatts Foot-pounds per sec Horsepower Kilowatts Watts Gallons U S 0. mm. Watts.804 B.285 x 103 1.8 1.7378 2.03613 Ounces per sq.094 x 10-2 Feet Inches Miles Miles Yards Gausses 6.257 Gilbert Ampere-turns per cm 2.61 3.CONVERSION FACTORS AND FORMULAE CONVERSION FACTORS TABLE These units Multiplied by Equal These units Multiplied by Equal Foot-pounds 1.01667 0.223 0.356 3. inch.280.281 x 10-2 0.531 x10 3. units per minute Foot-pounds per minute Foot-pounds per sec Horsepower Kilowatts Kilogram per sq.t.854 x 10-7 0. cm 6. inch Kilolines 103 Maxwells Kilowatts Feet per minute 0. in.5921 0.31 61. ft.98 x 106 2.427 x 10-6 7.5781 5. mm.u.03215 2.050 x 10-7 1.341 103 B.766 x 10-7 British thermal units Ergs horsepower hours joules kilowatt hours Foot-pounds per sec 7.093.01136 Feet per seconds Miles per hour Feet per sec 0.021.03527 Dynes Grains Ounces Centimeter-grams 7. 14.356 x 107 5.376 x 10-8 Pound-feet 980. Yds Ft.308 264.Centimeters) 9.228 imp. in. inch. Horsepower (boiler) 33. Kilowatts.t.205 1.1337 231 Cubic feet Cubic inches Gallons per minute 2.818 x 10-3 1. Pounds Tons (short) Kilogram per sq.356 x 10-3 B. in.01758 17. Tons per sq.7457 745. units per minute Foot-pounds per minute Foot-pounds per second Horsepower (metric).250 9. Units Ergs Foot-pounds.102 x 10-2 Cubic feet Cubic inches Cubic feet 7.S.759 imperial) pints (liquid) (879 imperial) quarts (liquid) Degrees (angle) 0.728 x 10-4 Feet per minute Feet per sec Miles per hour Miles per minute 0.t.) 9.014 0.452 Lines per sq.2 2113 1057 Cubic feet Cubic inches Cubic yards Gallons US (1. Joules (Int. Feet of Water 62. Kilograms 980.055 2.228 x 10-3 Cubic feet per sec 3.58 B.01745 Radians Degrees per sec 0./6.4335 Pounds per sq. Inches of water 0.7 15. Sq.930 x 10 1. per hour.97 0.03281 0. inch Gilbert 0. Kilowatts. Foot pounds per sec. Watt-hours. Ergs per sec Pounds 15 . ft. Amperes per sq.545 1. Ampere-turns per inch Grams Centimeter-dynes 7.000 550 1. Horsepower hours 2.688 x 10-9 4.t.709 x 10-2 1.84 Miles.5781 5. inch.214 x 10-6 393. units per min Foot-pounds per min.915 Gallons U.024 x 103 1.92 49. 1. gal Pints (liquid) US Quarts (liquid) US Pints (imperial) Quarts (imperial) 35.83 24.969 0. in Ampere-turns 1. units Foot-Pounds Joules.7 B.480 x 10-11 7.452 Amperes per sq.931 x 10-4 Foot pounds Horsepower hours Joules Kilowatt hours 12.102 x 10-3 Dynes.02237 3.43 0.62137 1.3 -4 3.88 4.480 x 10-4 107 0.43 0.

Square mils. Inches.438 0.281 39.000 Pounds per square inch.75 Cubic feet.273 x 106 6.03937 6. 88 52. Pounds per mil-foot. Per sec.1047 0. in. Miles. Temp. Ounces 0. 1.000 0.03728 Feet per second.) + 273 1 Abs.467 Feet per min. Square mils 1.37 6. Tons (short) per sq.76 1. Mils. 157. Feet per second.t.8 3. in. 1 Footcandles. Tons (short) Pounds per cubic inch. Inches. Feet per second. Pounds of water 0. Square feet.861 x 10-7 Acres Square feet Square inches.833 x 10-4 144 Acres.) -32 0. Gallons U.1550 Circular mils. (degs.333 x 10-5 103 Seconds (angle) 4. Square metres 2. Pounds per mil-foot. Tons (metric). Tons (short) per sq.30 3.214 x 10-7 39. Per min. mm.467 Feet per sec.68 0.8 Temp. Square inches. Pounds of water per min. Revs.240 1. Minutes (angle) Ohms 2. in.273 106 Circular mils.656 x 106 1.37 Feet. Miles Henries.) + 460 1 Abs. Metres per sec.5556 Temp. Two (degs. Square mils. Radians.8229 Pounds (av.9144 0. Square foot 2.0625 Pounds per sq. 196.1198 Cubic feet Cubic inches.90719 Pounds. units per min.600 60 Radians per sec. Temp. Megohms. Mil-foot 9. Lumens per sq.6366 Degrees Minutes Quadrants. Quarts (dry) 67.These units Kilowatt-hours Multiplied by Equal These units Multiplied by Equal 3. Tonnes per sq. Pounds per square inch 2.760 5.03728 Feet per min.787 x 10 5.88 0.307 144 Feet of water.488 1.) Fahr. Miles per hour. Inches.281 2. Tons (long) 2.09842 Pounds. Radians per sec.6093 1. (degs. Tons (longs). Cubic inches.237 0. Square inches 1. Pounds (troy) 0.400 1.823 16 Dynes. Miles per hour. in. Joules.281 x 10-3 0.S. Revs.88 x 106 3. Microhms. 2. Kilogram per sq. C. Square yards. C. Millihenries Radians -5 Temp. Square inches. Square feet. 360 6.000568 Metres. Circular mils. Radians Megalines 106 Maxwells 57. Ounces. Pounds per cubic inch 9.05468 0. Ohms. Per sec. Miles.973 x 103 Circular mils. (degs.) + 17. Square inches.157488 Kilogram per sq. ft. Revolutions per sec. Per min.01602 6.8 x 10-6 Mils Feet. . Pounds per sq. cm.6 0. Miles per hour. (degs. Foot-pounds Horsepower hours. Revolutions per sec.01605 Pounds Tons (metric) Tons (metric) 2. Metre 3.0625 Pounds. (degs. Temp.076 x 10-3 0.283 4 Degrees Radians Quandrants.909 x 10-4 106 106 Radians. Per sec.342 x 10-2 57. Webers 108 Maxwells.456 x 10-9 -4 Square centimetres 1.425 x 10 Pounds per square foot 0. per sec. Quarts (liq.341 3. Fahr. 0.360 Kilometres. Temp.296 x 10-5 1. Revolutions per min.01602 27. Revs.).204. 6.20 Cubic inches. Cubic inches.549 0. Per sec. Fahr. Megohms 106 Ohms. Miles. cm. 3. ft. Square miles 640 27.30 9. per sec. (degs. Radians per second.01667 Degrees per second. 57.) C.550 3.574.).10 60 Feet per second. Fahr. inch.413 2. Square millimetres 1.89 Pounds per square inch.944 x 103 106 Circular mils.425 x 10 -6 3 10 Milimetres 3. Knots. Pounds per square foot. Pounds per cubic foot -4 5. 2. Miles per hr.S. 8.214 x 10-4 Feet. Yds.471 x 10-4 10.8 1. Tons (long) per sq. Microhms 1012 104 Megohms.) U.944 x 10-3 Feet of water. Miles per min. Miles per min. 2. Miles per hour 88 1.6 x 106 B. 13.1592 Degrees per second. Pounds 44. Inches. Cubic feet per sec. 1.280 63. Revolutions per minute 6 0. Yards 0.).098 x 106 Acres Square feet. (degs. per min.973 x 10 1. Revolutions Metres per minute 0. Ft. Minutes.283 3.571 16 -4 Degrees.669 x 10 Quadrants (angle) 90 5. Ounces per sq.

................................................................0......7645549 Horsepower into kilowatts ................16......................................................................01387 Gallons into cubic metres ...........4046856 Square miles into hectares.............0.................01604 Cubic inches into cubic centimetres .............................................................4 Grains into milligrams.....................................................................................................60479 Cubic feet into cubic metres .....9144 Ounces troy into metric carats........468564 Acres into hectares...........................................................................0283168 POWER Cubic feet into litres..........................168 Stones into kilograms ..............1....................................................555174 Feet into millimetres ............................................................48 Ounces into grams .........................1....................7457 Gallons into litres....0...3502932 Miles..103477 Yards into metres ...........................0.............1168 Pounds into kilograms ...................................................................................................................28...1..............................................0................0283495 Chains into metres....................16 Square inches into square centimetres ......................25..................092903 Square yards into square metres ..................................................745.......................0254 Penny weights into grams ....1019 X 1000 Square inches into square millimetres ................8 Drams into grams ................................................836123 Acres into ares ............................................589988 17 ...........0............................................................0.1...................................................................6......................................1019 kg AREA 1 KN = 0...............31......................802345 Miles.............................387064 Tahils into grams ......4.............................................................................................................064799 Inches into metres .......................645........0......................35582 Pints into litres ........................852 Tons into kilograms....................28................................323995 Inches into centimetres ...................................0........................5682613 Horsepower into watts.....................................54609 Horsepower into metric horsepower....................................0...............6.................2........................................................................................................20.....CONVERSION FORMULAE To Convert Multiply by To Convert................37...0............3048 Ounces troy into grams .......................0.......................................1016.............................4516 Square feet into square centimetres .......4535924 Furlongs into metres...........................81 N Fluid ounces into cubic centimetres .........30.......................................................25............................................................................0..............316847 Foot pounds-force per second into watts ..............799 Cubic inches into litres ...........9988 Square miles into square kilometres ............................................................0................1.......................................016387 Kati into kilograms .....413063 1 N = 0...........................0304 Square feet into square metres ............1......................................258................1............40........1365225 Foot pounds-force per second into kilowatts.155...001356 Cubic yards into cubic metres .........................................54 Grains into grams ............50..........929...............................79891 inches into millimetres .............77185 Feet into centimetres......................................5174 Fathoms into metres........0..................................................609344 Hundred weights into kilograms ..............................................8288 Ounces into kilograms....................................Multiply by LENGTH MASS Milli-inches into micrometers ..........64.............349523 Feet into metres ...............................0469 VOLUME & CAPACITY Tons into metric tonnes ............................1......28.......................................................7 Quarts into litres ...... statute into kilometres ...................0..4 Grains into metric carats .........................0.......... nautical into kilometres ........................1........................0.......201.....................304.0045461 1 Kgf = 9.........2.

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VARIOUS TYPES OF CONDUCTORS 19 .

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better performance under tension and compression. high fatigue resistance and superior structural stability even at varying temperature. there is no magnetic and eddy current effect resulting in low line loss.HS AAAC-HS comprises heat treatable Aluminium Alloy wires like AA 6201 (IS designation 64401) with UTS higher than 30 kg / mm2. ABC etc. Even for distribution voltage class of 33kV and 11kV AAAC conductors have been proving technically most successful and superior to AAC and ACSR conductors. Alloy strands have high creep resistance. For the above data sheets. it is possible to increase the length of span. are about 25% lighter than ACSR conductors of equivalent strength. even high silicon content Aluminium with controlled impurities. resulting in reduction in number of towers and hardware. bare / insulated high strength Aluminium Alloy conductor as a neutral messenger wire bunched with three to five insulated EC grade Aluminium phase conductors and lighting conductors.5%.. AAAC. it can be said that Tensile strength of drawn Aluminium Alloy wire is about two times more than that of EC aluminium wires. Because of low strength weight ratio of new conductors for specific value of sag. The most commonly adopted alloy in the country designated as 6201 has following nominal percentage of composition as per IS 9997 / 1991 (First Revision) with other technical parameters are given at Annexure 'B' for mechanical and electrical properties. Ductalex EEE etc. which is largely available in India may be used. Alloy strands have surface hardness twice that of EC grade Aluminium strands thereby having high abrasion resistance and better surface finish resulting in low corona loss. The group generally includes AAAC-HS. AAAC. which are free from steel core. AACSR. less radio interference (RIV).HC AAAC-HC comprises that treatable over aged Alloy wires like AA6201 (IS designation 64401) or of non heat treatable alloy wires like AA 5005 (IS designation 51000 A). ACAR. with UTS ranging between 20-25 kg/mm2. AACSR: (Aluminium Alloy Conductor Steel Reinforced) AACSR comprises high strength Aluminium Alloy wires reinforced with high tensile galvanized steel core with very high mechanical strength and adequate electrical conductivity.HC. Alloy suitable for Aluminium conductors belongs to AL-MG. which impart much more life as compared to ACSR and are particularly useful in severe marine. The typical data sheets covering basic properties of above types are put-up here with as Annexure 'A'. For production of conductor alloy. Aluminium Alloy Conductors have been in use for over last four decades in most of the developing countries for overhead transmission lines. ABC: (Aerial Bunched Cables) ABC comprises compacted. Alloy Rod has high ductility. particularly for extra high voltage and high voltage transmission ranging from 66kV to 400kV voltage class transmission and in coastal areas. elongation more than 4% and conducting higher than 52. AAC. It is therefore the Alloy conductors. 21 .VARIOUS TYPES OF CONDUCTORS TYPES The most innovative and revolutionary new technical concept has now taken concrete shape in the form of 'Aluminium Alloy Conductor' in the "Transmission and distribution field" a most effective break through for energy conservation through improved conductor design. The electrical conductivity of Alloy conductor is about 10% higher than the equivalent ACSR conductor. Alloy conductors have high resistance to corrosion. Moreover because of elimination of steel core wires. industrial and tropical environment. ACAR: (Aluminium Conductor Alloy Reinforced) ACAR comprises EC grade Aluminium wires and high strength Aluminium Alloy wires with adequate mechanical strength and overall electrical conductivity between 56% to 60%.Si system with varied composition. elongation between 2% to 4% and conductivity ranging between 56% to 59%. which enables it to draw in fine size wires. Aluminium Alloy Conductor is a Generic name.

The larger diameter is useful in very high voltage lines as the corona losses are less./in2. The factor 85% and 95% allows for the stranding. And the weight only three quarters as much (one half due to Aluminium and a quarter to steel).ACSR CONDUCTORS The Aluminium conductors galvanized steel reinforced briefly called as ACSR comprises of seven or more Aluminium and galvanized steel wires.Aluminium conductors have been widely adopted for high voltage transmission lines specially for long spans. ANNEXURE 'A' AAAC .5 l Higher 2 MODULI OF ELASTICITY (kg/mm ) value of scrap SURFACE HARDNESS twice that of Aluminium strands. BS 0215 (P II) / 1970 and other international standards. per sq.Mechanically Equivalent ACSR) 30.19 upto 3. inch (for larger wires) to 28000 lb.HS TECHNICAL ADVANTAGES 2 ULTIMATE TENSILE STRENGTH (kg/mm ) Minimum Average (Over Electro .3 ULTIMATE ELONGATION (percent in 200 mm) l Easier tension.7 Above 3. l Homogeneous conductors: l Even distribution of stresses across the section. safer and economical joints Typical 5.HS BASIC PROPERTIES AAAC .0 Above 3.00 Typical MECHANICAL STRENGTH TO WEIGHT ratio is sufficient high to avoid steel core. There are many types of such composite conductors which are covered in IS 398 (P II) / 1976-1996. even allowing for increased wind and ice loads due to the increased diameter as compared with that of the equivalent copper conductor. inch (for small wires) and of steel from 179000 lb.05% 80 CHEMICAL RESISTANCE l In AAAC. The strength is taken as 85 percent of the sum of steel wires plus 95% of the sum of the strength of the Aluminium wires. . hence: l Light Wire Diameter Range (mm) conductors l Smaller From 1.80 upto 4.00360 TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENT OF LINEAR EXPANSION per ? C (Between 10 and 100? C) 23? 10-6 CREEP (10 year typical) BRINELL HARDNESS (BHN) 0. The strength of Aluminium wires varies from 23000 lb. smaller loads on angle and dead end towers handling and transportation on site./in2 to 200000 lb. hence: Initial modulus (average) 5200 to 5600 l Less prone to damage and scratches during running out Final modulus (average) 6250 to 6450 l Smaller corona losses and radio interference TEMPERATURE COEFFICIENT OF RESISTANCE per ? C at (20? C) 0. l Smaller gyration. It is claimed that the result is a conductor with smaller ratio of loading to strength than any other conductor.80 32.70 ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY at 20? C (% IACS) absence of steel / zinc / Aluminium cell hence corrosion resistance in sea coast or industrial areas ELONGATION almost equal to that of steel (4%) l In AACSR. The sag is therefore the least so that supporting towers may be shorter or the span length greater for given sag than for any other conductor. As such steel cored .30 32. The Centre wire or wires are of galvanized steel and the outer layer or layers are of Aluminium.3 22 performance under splicing and compression reliability in service. The total strength of steel cored Aluminium conductor is normally 50% greater than that of equivalent copper conductors. RESISTIVITY at 20? C (? -mm2 / m ) SPECIFIC WEIGHT (gram / cubic centimeters) l Better strength for long spans . easier running out under tension Minimum 4. The conductivity of steel cored Aluminium conductor is taken as that of Aluminium portion alone as the steel wires have high resistance to alternating currents.0325 Typical 0. easier erection l Greater ELECTRICAL VOL. l Excellent for lines in mountains and estuaries: mechanical homogeneous l High breaking Standard 52. per sq. built up in concentric layers.30 31. l Better Standard 0.0320 2.5 Typical 53.30 upto 3. It has high tensile strength but it reduces with rise of temperature above 65? C.0 l Simpler.

MANUFACTURING PROCESS OF AAAC & ACSR 23 .

24 .

UTS Test On Stranded Conductor Corona Extinction Voltage Test (Dry) DC Resistance Test On Stranded Conductor ACCEPTANCE TESTS: a. f. c. DRAWING Aluminium Alloy rod can well be drawn in slip type wire drawing machine having hardened and ground capstans with 450mm minimum diameter arranged in line. 25 . Capstans. and lengths of conductors by rewinding Dimensional check on steel and Aluminum strands Check for lay ratios of various layers Breaking load test on Aluminum strands Wrap test on Aluminum strands DC resistance test on Aluminum strands Procedure qualification test on welded joint of Aluminum strands Note: All the above tests except (h) shall be carried out on Aluminum Alloy Strands after standing only. In addition. constant drafting procedure is adopted for EC grade Aluminum (constant 25% elongation per dye) and Alloys (constant 20% elongation per dye). AGING TREATMENT Artificial aging is the heat treatment to stabilize the structure of Alloy wire at desired hardness. The winding unit should have provision for cooling and separately driven by Torque motor or Eddy Current drive having taper tension characteristics. dyes and wires are submerged in lubricant.7mm diameter and thereafter it is solution treated. There are two methods generally adopted (1) Almelec process of France and (2) Aldrey process of Germany. The coil is then rinsed to dry the surface of the rod completely. c. b. The correct aging time and temperature will have to be established by actual practice to achieve the desired properties of the strands. SOLUTION TREATMENT Solution treatment is the process by which super-saturated solid solution of Alloy structure is produced to take advantages of its precipitation hardening characteristics. g.5mm diameter) in coil is drawn to 6 mm intermediate wire drawing and charged in a large electrically heat and air circulated solution treatment furnace at a temperature of 535 degree centigrade (? 5%) with boiling time of 45 to 60 minutes thereafter immediately (within 30 sec) quenched in water (at room temperature). fresh. In Almelec process of Alloy rod (9. STRANDING Stranding of finally drawn and aged wire are ideally done on floating type stranding but conventional rigid type tandem wire stranding machines having provision for pre-forming and post forming arrangement. The wire is then redrawn to the required size which is finally aged and stranded. While tapered drafting is adopted for copper. Alloy rod (9. Visual and dimensional check on drum Visual check for joints scratches etc. e. b. TESTING TYPE TESTS: The following test shall be conducted once on a sample / samples of conductor to every 750 kms of production from each manufacturing facility: a. The solutionised rod has to be drawn within 24-72 hours after solution treatment otherwise the rod will become harder due to natural aging and there will be difficulty in drawing operation. h. with special measures such as proper tensioning and largest possible radius of curvature of wires and stranded conductors are normally used for high productivity. Whereas in Aldrey process.MANUFACTURING PROCESS OF AAAC & ACSR ALL ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTOR (AAAC) Manufacturing process involves special Thermo-mechanical treatment to obtain the desired properties of conductor. This drawn wire accommodated in the perforated bobbins and coils is changed in electrically heated furnace at a period of 4-5 hours at temperature of 150 to 165 degree centigrade for further aging of the wire.5mm) is drawn to the intermediate size (6. d. cool lubricant is sprayed under pressure into the dye approach thus additionally increasing the coming lubricating and cleaning effect. the alloy rod is initially solution treated and thereafter directly drawn to required size and finally aged to obtain the desired properties.

etc.5 mm ALUMINIUM ALLOY ROD Q. to be carried out on each coil PROCESS FLOW CHART-AAA CONDUCTOR 9. TESTING AGEING TREATMENT IN ELECTRIC FURNACE TEMP : 150 .160oC TIME : 4 TO 5 HOURS WITHIN 24 TO 72 HOURS REQUIRED WIRE SIZE BLOWERS OR FORCE FAN QUENCHING IN WATER AT 50oC RINSING STRANDING OPERATION (1) 1+6 ON TUBULAR MACHINE (2) 12+18+24 ON 54 B STRANDING MACHINE Q.ROUTINE TESTS: a. testing INTERMEDIATE WIRE DRAWING ON 7 DIE BULL BLOCK LUBRICANT DRAMET 15 + SEVOCYL 460 AIR CIRCULATION SOLUTION TREATMENT IN ELECTRICAL FURNACE TEMP : 530oC TIME : 45-60 MIN WITHIN 30 SEC WIRE DRAWING ON 11 DYE SLIP TYPE WIRE DRAWING MACHINE WITH Q.C. b. fins. testing SUPPLY 26 PACKING AAA CONDUCTOR . on the strands Check that drums are as per specifications All acceptance tests as mentioned above.C. Check to ensure that the joints are as per specifications Check that there are no cuts. c.C. d.

Components & Operation Characteristics Type of Check No.QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR AAA CONDUCTOR MANUFACTURING AT DIAMOND CABLES LTD. A Raw Material Testing (a) Dimension (diameter) (b) Tensile All Aluminium Alloy Strength (c) % of Elongation (d) Resistance / Resistivity conductivity B In Process Testing (a) Dimension (diameter) Testing of Rod: Before (b) Tensile Strength Solution Treatment (c) % of Elongation (d) Resistance / Resistivity conductivity C Testing of Rod: After (a) Dimension Solution Treatment (diameter) (b) Tensile Strength (c) % of Elongation (d) Resistance / Resistivity conductivity D Testing of Rod: Before (a) Dimension Ageing Test (lot) (diameter) (b) Tensile Strength (c) % of Elongation (d) Resistance E Testing of Rod: After (a) Dimension Aging Test (lot) (diameter) (b) Tensile Strength (c) % of Elongation (d) Resistance (e) Surface finish F Stranding (1) Diameter (2) Direction (3) Lay Ratio (4) Surface finish G Finish Conductor Measurement (a) Lay Ratio Testing (b) Diameter (c) Breaking Load (d) % of Elongation (e) Resistance Reference Documents Measurement IS-9997-1991 Quantum Of Check Acceptance Norms Format Of Record Agency 100% As given in Raw material Inspection and IS-9997-1991 analysis quality control register and department test certificate 100% - Process Inspection Register 100% - Process Register Inspection Mechanical Mechanical Electrical Measurement Standard process Mechanical documents Internal testing by QA Inspector Mechanical Electrical Measurement Mechanical Mechanical Electrical Measurement IS-398 Part-IV 1994 Mechanical 100% - QA Inspection IS-9997-1991 QA Inspection As given in Lay Ratio IS-398 Part-IV Chart 1994 QA Inspection Mechanical Electrical Measurement IS-398 Part-IV 100% 1994 Mechanical Mechanical Electrical Visual Measurement Visual Measurement Visual Measurement Measurement Measurement Measurement Measurement IS-398 Part-IV Each 1994 Length Every Drum IS-398 Part-IV 100% 1994 As given in Type Test Inspection & IS-398 Part-IV Report & Test QC department 1994 Certificate counter checked by third party & BIS Electrical 27 . Sr.

ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR STEEL REINFORCED (ACSR)
WIRE DRAWING OPERATION:
9.5 mm Diameter EC Grade Aluminium Rod is tested for surface finish, Diameter, Elongation, Resistivity Test etc., 'Quality OK' material
will be taken for production. EC grade Aluminium rod is drawn into the required Diameter on Wet Type Wire Drawing Machine and it
undergoes test like Elongation, Breaking Load, Resistance, Diameter Surface Finish, Wrapping Test etc.
SPOOLING OPERATION:
HTGS wires are tested for Diameter, Surface Finish Elongation, Breaking Load, Dip Test, Torsion etc., as per relevant IS standard.
'Quality OK' material undergoes to spooling operation.
STRANDING OPERATION:
In case of small conductors i.e. conductors not having more than seven strands, center wire to HTGS wire will be stranded with six
wires of Aluminium on Tubular Machine.
In case of multi layer conductor, seven HTGS wire are stranded on Tubular Machine and the same stranded conductor is again
stranded with Aluminium wires on Multi Strand Machine in a required Wooden Drum. Packing and stenciling will be done as per IS 398
Part-II, 1996.

QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR ACSR CONDUCTORS
Sr.
No.

Characteristics

Type of
Check

Reference
Documents
Check
Measurement IS-398 Part-II
Physical

1.

Aluminium
Rods

(a) Diameter
(b) Tensile Strength
(c) Conductivity

2.

Wire
Drawing

(a) Diameter

Electrical
Measurement IS-398 Part-II
Physical
Electrical

3.

Stranding

(a) Lay Ratio
(b) Surface Check
(c) Resistance

4.

Galvanized
Steel Wires

5.

6.

28

Components
& Operation

Quantum
of
Check
100%

Acceptance
Norms

Format of
Record

Agency

As given in IS398 Part-II 1996

Raw material Inspection &
Analysis
QC department
Registration

100%

As given in IS398 Part-II 1996

Process
Control
Forms

Inspection &
QC department

Measurement IS-398 Part-II
Visual
Electrical

100%

As given in IS398 Part-II 1996

Process
Control
Forms

QC Inspection
& Production
Supervisor

(a) Diameter
(b) Mass of Zinc
coating
(c) Dip Test
(d) Torsion Test
(e) Elongation Test
(f) Wrapping Test
(g) Lay Ratio

Measurement IS:4826
Chemical
IS:4826
IS:398 Part-II
Chemical
IS:398 Part-II
Physical
IS:398 Part-II
Physical
IS:398 Part-II
Physical
measurement

10%

As given in IS398 Part-II 1996

Process
Inspection &
Control
QC department
Forms &
Raw material
Analysis
Register

Finished
Conductor

Test on Aluminium
(a) Diameter
(b) Breaking Load
(c) Lay Ratio
(d) Resistance

100%
Measurement
Physical
Measurement
Electrical

IS:398 Part-II
IS:398 Part-II
IS:398 Part-II
IS:398 Part-II

As given in IS398 Part-II 1996

ISI Records
and Test
Certificates

Inspection, QC
department &
Customer
Representative

Finished
Conductor

Test on GI Wire
(a) Diameter
(b) Breaking Load
(c) Lay Ratio
(d) Mass of Zinc
coating
(e) Dip Test
(f) Elongation
(g) Wrapping

100%
Measurement
Physical
Measurement
Chemical

IS:398 Part-II
IS:398 Part-II
IS:398 Part-II
IS:4826
IS:398 Part-II
IS:4826
IS:398 Part-II
IS:398 Part-II

As given in
IS:4826
As given in
IS:398 P-II 1996

Supplier’s
certificates
are kept in
record and
randomly
checked in
QC
department
& register is
maintained

Inspection, QC
department &
Customer
Representative.
Counter
checked by BIS
representative

Chemical
Physical
Physical

As giben in
IS:398 P-II 1996

PROCESS FLOW CHART - ACSR CONDUCTOR

RAW MATERIAL
EC GRADE 9.5 MM DIA AL WIRE ROD

H.T.G.S. CORE WIRE

LAB TEST ON 10% WIRE RODS

LAB TESTS ON 10% COILS

ACCEPT
RELEASE FOR PRODUCTION

WIRE DRAWING

REJECT

RETURN TO PARTY

REJECT

RELEASE FOR SPOOLING OPERATION

RETURN TO PARTY

RELEASE FOR 7B TUBULAR M/C.

ACCEPT
100% SURFACE CHECKING, MECHANICAL
AND ELECTRICAL TESTS
REJECT

ACCEPT

SINGLE WIRE USED AS COREWIRE IN CASE
OF 7 STRAND AND 7 WIRE STRAND USE IN
CASE OF MULTI STRAND CONDUCTOR . 7
WIRE STRANDED ON 7B TUBULAR M/C.

RELEASE FOR PRODUCTION
SCRAP

STRANDED IN 7B M/C. INCASE OF 7 STRAND CONDUCTOR AND
STRANDED IN 54/61 STRAND M/C. INCASE OF MULTISTRAND CONDUCTOR
FINISHED PRODUCT TAKEN IN WOODEN DRUMS

100% TEST FOR EACH DRUM
ACCEPT
REJECT

PACKING & STENCILING

OFFER FOR INSPECTION

REJECT

SCRAP

ACCEPT
RELEASE FOR DISPATCH

29

30

COMPARISON OF AAAC & ACSR 31 .

32 .

Corrosion Resistance: Almelec AAAC exhibits excellent corrosion resistance in corrosive atmospheres like industrial areas. Heat-treated AI-Mg-Si alloy makes AAAC totally free from bimetallic corrosion and exceptionally resistant to environmental corrosion. Higher Ampacity AAC when compared to ACSR size. Thus zero additional line losses due to electromagnetic effect. Strength of ACSR reduces with rise in temperature above 650C. Higher creep resistance AAAC stranded overhead conductors when subjected to static tensile stresses for a long period of time. Steel core induces eddy current and hysteresis losses. Maintenance costs and inherent defects make it costlier in the long run. Service life ranges between 15-30 years. Under short circuit conditions. 100 crores even by conservative estimates. Offers savings due to reduction in number of towers. dead ending is easier because AAAC is monometallic.4. requiring special procedures. Stolen ACSR till date adds up to Rs. no magnetic losses. Excellent inhibitor of theft. for equal temperature rise.4:9. lowering efficiency. Compatible thermal stability: AAAC can perform at 900C continuously for a period of one year literally with no loss of strength and it can operate safely at 1500C for 3 hours. In other words. Particularly less in industrial and sea line atmospheres. Not suitable for overloading. Its use is obsolete in developed countries due to technical and economical shortcomings.6: 11. 1. Suffers no reduction in strength on temperature rise upto 900C since it is specially heat treated at 1600C temp.5 Seconds can be easily withstood. In ACSR. AAAC can carry 10% extra current on the line. AAAC has higher strength to weight ratio ranging between 10.COMPARISON OF AAAC WITH ACSR AAAC ACSR Aluminium alloy conductor is revolutionary break-through in conductor technology. eliminating unwanted power breakdowns. hence requires lesser spans than AAAC. Service life is around 60 years-twice as durable as ACSR. 33 . splicing and dead-ending. Users all over the world are switching over to AAAC due to its technical superiority. No steel core means. Aluminium conductor steel reinforced is outdated in technology. Repairs are time consuming and frequent. ACSR has lower strength to weight ratio ranging between 88. corrosion (bi-metallic and environmental) because of steel core sets in within 2 years. possess about 10% higher conductivity. It is claimed that there is a saving of about 50% time. The higher strength to weight ratio facilitates lesser sags on larger spans. Hard to cut and impossible to recycle into utensils. 2. 2. have relatively smaller increase in sag. Reduction of cost of work at site is about 20 to 25% 3. Can be loaded to higher level of capacity. Ordinary fitting and accessories without steel inserts can be used. Easily cut and recycled overnight for making utensils. Ease of repair: AAAC being monometallic in construction lends itself to easy repairs. Works out to be economical in the long run. AAAC alloy 6201 is claimed to have better corrosion resistance and better strength to weight ratio and improved electrical conductivity than ACSR on an equal diameter basis. Characteristics of All Aluminium Alloy Conductor 1. Lower cost of ACSR is offset due to higher cost of towers etc. Many other Advantages are also claimed for AAAC as listed below: Lesser stretch AAAC stretches much less than AAC (All Aluminium Conductor) and less than ACSR under normal operating tension. temperatures upto 2000C for 0.6 on an equal diameter basis. foundations and accessories. This makes the AAAC better suited in corrosive areas like sea coast and industrial areas where high metallic corrosion sets in. Repair and replacing. Advantages of AAAC 1.

Calculations are given in Appendix-I. 92A. Observations: it can be seen from Table 3 that the savings in peak load power loss by use of AAAC equivalent conductors varies between 12% and 14.S.4 to 1. Table 2 shows the resistance value of a few commonly used ACSR conductors and their AAAC equivalents. The saving in power results from lower resistance of AAAC compared to that of ACSR conductor for equal conductor diameter. The details are enumerated in the ensuing paragraphs. ii. In a practical system percentage saving in peak load power loss was found to be about 16. The power saving by use of AAAC was quantified by CPRI. The practical feeder.S. Conclusion 1. corrosion resistance. ease of repair . 2. & 180A for Weasel. 3.5 was assumed for the loads. 3. considered is enclosed at Annexure-II.IV. 4. The increased cost of AAAC (claimed to be 15% to 20% costlier than corresponding ACSR conductors ) is offset by the saving in power loss. i. Resistance to this marine corrosion has been investigated at CPRI and it has been found that a coating of zinc on the individual strands of the conductor will improve the life of the conductor as a whole. 2.5% depending on the type of conductor considered. The details of calculations are appended in Appendix. Considering a hypothetical 100km line loaded to its full capacity i. Of course there is no possibility of galvanic corrosion since the material is not bimetallic.5% at a load factor of 0. system details are at Annexure-III. Further.2% at a load factor 1. 208 . Rabbit and Dog ACSR conductors and their AAAC equivalent respectively.e.A.1 TYPES OF ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTORS Alloy 6201 ALMELEC (AGS) SILMALEC (E91E) ALDREY ALDREY ALMELEC IGO ALMELEC (AAAC) –1979 ALLUMINIUM ALLOY STRANDED CONDUCTOR (A1 MgSi type) 34 Country U. longer service life. the savings in annual capitalised cost due to lower energy loss with AAAC is found to vary from 2. the percentage reduction in losses by use of AAAC as substitute for ACSR conductor has been computed in two ways. laboratory tests at CPRI indicate that all Aluminium alloy materials are prone to marine corrosion in chloride atmospheres (pitting corrosion). TABLE .122A. France U. Taking a practical system with typical loading and applying ACSR and its equivalents AAAC conductors. loss load factor was used (LLF+) 0.However. 3.8 ? LF2 ). For ACSR conductors the resistance have been computed using the standard hand book (Wasting Hose Fourth U. Germany Switzerland Italy Japan India IEC Standard ASTM-B-398 NEC-34125 BS-1470-1477 DIN 48200 ASE 021 UNI 3570 JEC 74 IS: (PART-IV) 1979 Recommendation No. The findings pertaining to the hypothetical system is given in Table 3.4 to 11. for calculating energy loss. AAAC is superior to ACSR conductors when used in overhead distribution system. 4.0 to study the dependence of economy on load factors. The zinc coating does not effect other properties of materials. 5. The load factor was varied from 0. A diversity factor of 1. Other advantages of AAAC are better thermal stability.3 % (See Table 4 ) Under these conditions. Edition Oxford and IBH Publishing Corporation) and suitably extrapolating to match the size to conductor used in our country. The resistances pertaining to AAAC conductors are those furnished by the manufacturers. The other advantages claimed for AAAC can be verified only after obtaining the feed back from the field after long time use. Power Saving Capability of AAAC : 1.2 ? LF +0. Similar results for practical system are show in Table 4. 6.K. less prone to pilferage as known through literature.

95 14. Dog Equiv.4 ECONOMICS FOR THE PRACTICAL SYSTEM CONSIDERED Rate per kWh Re. kW.45 Code Name Weasel Equiv. TABLE . 1.17 9. Annual capitalized cost (Rs.2 RESISTANCE OF ACSR AND AAAC EQUIVALENT CONDUCTORS Conductor Type ACSR AAAC ACSR AAAC ACSR AAAC AC resistance @ 50 Hz.093 0.81 11.6 0.9620 0.3 SAVINGS AS PERTAINING TO THE HYPOTHETICAL SYSTEM Type of conductor and code name Type ACSR AAAC ACSR AAAC ACSR AAAC Peak load Peak load Energy loss Savings in Savings current power loss annum per energy loss annum A kW Rs. Description No.TABLE . 1/- Sr.7 0.3600 0.85 _________________________ _____________________ 16. % _____________________ 11.5 4.74 122 2567 60.5 0.57 _________________________ 1.5751 0. 7397 16948 28159 41030 55563 81758 89612 % 2.9 _____________________ 72.0 _____________________ 60.8 0.71 11.4 0. Rabbit Equiv. 0.63 92 2443 57.2 35 . Type of conductor Peak load losses ACSR (kW) Load factor 0. Rate per kwh = Rs. Lakhs % 92 2775 65.85 12 122 3033 71.54 11.6792 0. Savings in annual capitalised cost Rs. Lakhs Rs. 50oC per km in W Code name Weasel Equiv. Dog Equiv. 1.78 7.4 180 3499 82. Savings in peak load losses AAAC Equiv.76 180 2994 70.) ACSR AAAC Equiv.72 _________________________ 2.8 6.3 _________________________ 3.3080 TABLE . 296357 288960 354843 337895 423500 395341 502328 461298 591328 535765 690500 612742 799842 710230 4.4 11.6.45 8.44 LF=0.03 15. Rabbit Equiv.

10522) / (0. 0.66 W /mile.344 = 0.66 ? (0.0933 ? /km.78 7.7 11.1022 = 1. 08 ? /mile. AC resistance of Weasel Conductor (Extraporaled = 1.76 / 1609.74 AAAC Equivalent 122 A 0.63 57. lakhs) Savings in energy losses per annum (Rs.85 (12% savings) COMPARISON FOR RABBIT CONDUCTOR a) AC resistance of ACSR Rabbit Conductor: Size of Rabbit ACSR 6/1/3.1327" stranded ACSR conductor at 50 Hz and 50oC + C = 1. 0. b) AC resistance of equivalent AAAC = 0.139)2 = 1.4%) . lakhs) ACSR Weasel 92 1.093 W /mile = 1.6792 3.COMPARISON FOR WEASEL CONDUCTOR a) AC resistance of ACSR Weasel Conductor Weasel ACSR Conductor Size: 6/1/0.093 Equivalent AAAC 92 0.45 / kwh (Rs. lakhs) Savings in energy losses / annum (Rs. lakhs) 36 ACSR Equivalent 122 A 0. AC resistance of Rabbit Conductor Extrapolated = 1.76 ? /mile = 1000 ? 1.344 = 1.6 LF and Rs.5751 W /km c) Economy Peak load current (A) AC resistance (W /km) Peak load losses for 100 km (kw) Energy losses per annum @ 0.1319" as per T & D hand book AC resistance of 6/1/0.35 = 6/1/0.08 ? (0.6 LF and Rs.567 60.102" As per Hand Book AC resistance of 6/1/0.5751 2.093 ? 1000 / 1609.9620 W /km c) Economy: Peak load current (A) AC resistance (W /km) Peak load losses for 100 km length (3 1 2R) Energy loss per annum @ 0.9620 2775 kw 2443 kW 65.45 / kWh (in Rs.6792 W /km.102" standard ACSR conductor at 50Hz and 50oC = 1.033 71. b) AC resistance of equivalent AAAC = 0.03 (15.132272) / (0.

76 AAAC equivalent 180 0.372 47538 1.579 ? per mile = 0.36 ? /km b) AC resistance of equivalent AAAC . 5.A. m 0 0 0 0 30 45 61/3.7 x 1.567 x (0.28 CONCLUSIONS For all operating conditions.24 N. Sags and Tensions for AAAC are less than for equivalent ACSR.72 x 6.0. AC resistance of Dog Conductor (Extrapolated) = 0.) km (W ) km (W ) 0.382 33523 COMPARISON OF AAAC VS ACSR Conductor Wind Temperature °C 32 53 75 90 0 32 Pressure Kgf / sq.44 %) CONDUCTOR .3080 ? /km c) Economy Peak load current (A) AC resistance (W /km) Peak load losses for 100 km length (3 12 R) (kW) Energy losses per annum @ 0.372 41338 0.A. 0.6 LF and Rs.1878" stranded ACSR conductor at 50 HZ and 50oC = C = 0.69 6.31 8.18782) / (0.95 (14.39 9.382 29151 0. 4362 3953 m 7.567 ? /mile.6792 0.47 8.ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND COST DETAILS: Conductor code Rabbit Weasel Type ACSR AAAC ACSR AAAC Resistance per Reactance per Cost per km (Rs.093 0.COMPARISON FOR DOG CONDUCTOR a) AC resistance of ACSR Dog Conductors: Dog ACSR Conductor size 4.18 ACSR Tension Sag Kgf 3322 2972 2686 N.18522) = 0.81 11.36 3499 82.57 = 0.5751 0.46 5.35 9. Lakhs) ACSR Dog 180 0. Also AAAC could be operated with higher Ampacity upto 90 OC without affecting ground clearance as obtained for ACSR for 75 O C conductor temperature.16 54 + 7/3.1858" x 6.45 / kwh (in lakhs) Saving in energy losses / annum (Rs.3080 2994 70.80618" As per Hand Book AC resistance of 6 x 0.962 0. 37 .11 4.19 AAC Tension Sag Kgf 3288 2819 2455 2262 4613 3990 m 6.26 7.7 x 0.

441 0.0913 0.2 REACTANCE Capacitive Inductive 0.1466" - 795.1201 860.406 RESISTANCE AC 50 °C DC 20 °C 0./1.438 0.5 446.) Equiv.412 0.1583" - - - - - 870.8 164.1012 .160 0.3 13. AAC.182 0.0309 0.298 0.1310 795.000 870.4 20.5 305. AAAC AND ACAR 1.000 795.830 .0268 0.1147 .100 476.9 584.900 24.473 0.000 795.0068 0.900 18.0430 0.4 23.429 0.420 0.0215 0.000 451. No.253 0.3006 0.0644 0.000 .8 927.1040 0.0987 0.500 35.200 .900 748.2120 0.1152 .4 30.625 30/7 7´ .0357 0.0307 0.400 26. Strength/Weight Ratio 38 ACSR Drake 26/7 AAC Arbutus 37W 26 ´ .0311 0.100 927.) AC Resistance 50° C (W /Mt.8 338.6 19.000 21.1038 . & Diameter 1350-H19 6201-T81 Steel Actual Area KCMil 1350-H19 6201-T81 TOTAL DC Resistance 20° C (W /Mt.400 927.000 751.1749" 7´ .1583" - 30 x .399 AREA KCmil CODE NAME 268.1153 902.419 0.1074 0.1284 795.880 870.1040 0.0945 0.1583" 37 ´ .800 175.1015 0.1826 0.0912 COMPARISON OF PHYSICAL & ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF 795 KCmil CONDUCTORS 26/7 ACSR DRAKE.000 750 344 1.0507 0.3792 0.129 0.094 31.4 559.1135 .1360 37 ´ .500 28.0133 0.4 746.0946 0.5 477 558 636 795 Partridge Linnet Ibis Hawk Dove Grosbeak Drake 0.000 601.0965 0.1015 0.1583" - 18 ´ .4 397.9 705.451 0.400 325.2551 0.5 465.8 394. Lbs.61% 1350 Area KCMil Weight.1176 881.6 - - 870.200 927.800 927.485 0.1583" - 927.200 .1583" 19 ´ .200 .1061 .1074 0.1290 798.0217 Aluminium Conductor Steel Reinforced RESISTANCE DC AC 20° C 50° C 0.3 - AAAC Greeley 37W 18/19 ACAR 24/13 24 ´ .0300 0.5 662.0272 0.200 .1598 0.0988 0.1284 REACTANCE Inductive Capacitive 0.000 .AAAC VERSUS ACSR ELECTRICAL COMPARISON All Aluminium Alloy Conductor (6201) CODE NAME AREA KCMil Butte Canlon Cairo Darlen Elgin Flint Creele 312.000 795.4 740.430 0.000 Ft 1350-H19 6201-T81 Steel TOTAL Rated Strength-Lbs.214 0.459 0.449 0.1583" 13 ´ .376 0.000 423.010 870.0640 0.100" DIAMETER (EXCEPT ARBUTUS) TYPE Code Word (if Any) Construction Standing.

5 21.507 $307.1176 ACAR 1.002.0 24.519 2.500 13.026" 1.81 10. Mile Over ACSR PV - -$228.268 $. Loaded Tension % RTS Final Sag at 60oF Final Sag at 120oF Final Sag at 212oF Weight per 1.3 870.3 27.29 35.3 1 7 7 -10 1 .900 10.288.766 28.57 -$62.99 30.COMPARISON OF SAG TENSION DATA FOR 795 KCMIL CONDUCTORS 26/7 ACSR DARKE.51.(1 + .4 18/19 927.9 20. AAC. AC Resistance @ 50° C W / Mile R 2.93 1.7 25.1290 ACAR 1.h/Mile) Pel 30.46 $280.6 $1.900 30.45 24.34 $312.4 ACAR 24/13 927.07 30.45 27.79 11.61 10.58 $1. Press Value of Savings/ COD.308 31.298 19.94 8.4 37.3 $1.58 10.322 39 .500 11.85 $899.1284 0.572 7.17 ($/Mile) $982.205 $.135 2. Annual Demand Charge Cost = PL ´ $500 ´ .080 52.314.205.72 $941. Max.37 $275.9 23.645 28.56 11.2 1.30 $882.2 1.108" 2./Mile) W 5776 3940 4596 4595 4596 4596 3.30 $5. AND ACAR. $1.92 29.4 ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF 795 KCMIL CONDUCTOR ACSR DRAKE.108" 1.000 Ft.108" 24/13 0.7 870. Annual Energy Loss: PL ´ 2650 (kW.71 PV W - -$.2 1.1153 1.298 20.60 $1.63 $109. Power Loss l2R=3002R KW/Mile PL 11.634 31.85 $918.4 30/7 927.983 11.14 $.108" DIAMETER (EXCEPT ARBUTUS) FACTOR OR METHOD OF CALCULATION DRAKE ARBUTUS GREELEY 795 KCMil 795 KCMil 1.06 19.200 47.354 36. Conductor Weight – (Lbs. 900-FOOT RULING SPAN-NESC HEAVY LOADING CONDUCTOR TYPE Code Word (if any) Construction Size (KCMil) Overall Diameter in inch Resultant Heavy Loading Rated Tensile Strength Init.4 870.4 30.4 32.1310 0.27 $131.87 29.67 $1.57 $83. AAAC.108" 2.10 ($/Mile) Cel $306.179.108" 18/19 0.400 11.500 50.9 870.77 23. AAAC.108" 2.07 $1.7 57.2 1.000 10.38 Cd 4. Mile $/Mile Over ACSR S - -$25. AAC.108" 30/7 0.2 21.08 10.08) .4 8 8 PV=S -$0. Annual Energy Loss Cost: = Pel ´ 0.1201 ACAR 1.294.43 7.243 6.037 27.108" 26/7 ACSR 37W AAC AAAC 0.3 $1.094 746. Annual Savings/ cond. Additional Value / Pound of Conductor $/Lb.6 31.64 9.66 $286. AND ACAR 1.15 5. ACSR AAC AAAC Drake Arbutue Greeley 26/7 37/W 37/W 795 795 927. $986.230.157.298 23.108" 2. Total Annual Loss Costs Cd + Cel ($/Mile) C $1.481.

255.000 954. AAC.$/ Mile C $1.1092 0.1069 0. Annual Energy Loss Cost: Cel = Pel ´ .0 961.8 779.000 1.92 $1.26) .500 900 896.024.165" DIAMETER (EXCEPT MAGNOLIA) CONDUCTOR TYPE Code Word (if Any) ACSR AAC Rail Magnolia Construction 45/7 ACAR - 37W 24/13 30/7 24 x.08)-10 PV =(11.8 337.000 997.65 $50.14 PV - $-100. h/Mile Pel 29.1069 .09 5.627 29.0915 . & Diameter. Ac Resistance @ 50oC – W /Mile R 2.000 974. 61% 1350 Area Cmil Weight Lbs. Over ACSR .30 $957.1100 0.44 $288.6 961.200 40 . AND ACAR 1.057 $0.500 21.49 8.1092 .0 623.ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF 954 KCMIL ACSR RAIL. Total Annual Loss Costs: Cd + Cel .8 181.400 Strength/Weight Ratio 24.95 10.500 Actual Area – omil 1350-H19 954.0971" - - - 954.34 7.1664 13 x. AAC.$Mile S - $-8.017 28.43 COMPARISON OF PHYSICAL & ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF 954 KCMIL CONDUCTORS 45/7 ACSR RAIL. 1350-H19 6201-T81 Steel TOTAL - 175 - - - 1.000 954.26 10.10 $284.110 .0937 .57 $1.300 23.830 TOTAL 954.220. Present Value of Savings/cond.839 29.246.1606" 7x .(1 + .500 1.73 4.000 664.C8 10.000 830.021 $0.1664" 30 x.1048 1.000 Ft. Cd $950. Conductor Weight – Pounds / Mile W 5676 4731 5077 5077 2 2 3. Mile Over ACSR 1 . Annual Demand Charge Cost: Cd = PL ´ $500 ´ 0. AND ACAR 1.434 6.0960 .196.100 18.82 $564.670 6201-T81 - - 360.900 16. 1350 –H19 45 x.17 $/Mile Annual Energy Loss: Pal – PL ´ 2650 – kW.155" ACAR KCmil 45/7 954 KCmil 37 24/13 1.8 DC Resistance 20oC (W /ml) o AC Resistance 50 C (W /ml) Equiv.000 193.$Mile Cel $296. Additional Value/Pound Conductor $/Pound $1.500 .075 896.0958 .10 $930.1456" 6201-T81 - Steel 37 x . No.111 9. Mile.75 $912. Annual Savings/cond.400 22.39 $290.6 Rated Strength Lbs.1664" 7 x . Power Loss l R = 320 R – kW/Mile PL 11. 25./1.010 .1048 954.600 20.165" DIAMETER (EXCEPT MAGNOLIA) FACTOR OR METHOD OF CALCULATION RAIL 954 MAGNOLIA ACAR 1.92 $25.27 $298.18 11.1664" Stranding.024.58 PV W - $-.165" 30/7 ACSR W AAC 0.

900 10.3 42.COMPARISON OF SAG TENSION DATA FOR 954 KCMIL CONDUCTORS 45/7 ACSR RAIL AAC.424 2.NESC .6 34.5 kcmil 1.000-FOOT RULING SPAN .100 20.277 43.HEAVY LOADING CONDUCTOR TYPE Code Word (if Any) Construction Size Overall Diameter Resultant Heavy Loading Rated Tensile Strength Init.0 895.124" 2.024.343 16. Max.92 43. Loaded Tension % RTS Final Sag at 60° F Final Sag at 120 ° F Final Sag at 212 ° F Weight per 1.20 37.107 9.541 25.5 30.165 2.000 Ft.7 37.075 AAC Magnolia 37W 954 kcmil 1.3 45.11 47.5 kcmil 1. ACSR Rail 45/7 954 kcmil 1.885 48.1 38.12 1. AND ACAR.2 34.69 42.4 962 962 41 .5 ACAR 24/13 30/7 1.400 10. 1.400 7.000 38.6 33.165 2.1 40.424 23.024.165 1.

42 .

TECHNICAL DATA & INFORMATION ABOUT CONDUCTORS 43 .

44 .

0211. IS 9997/1991 With latest version for Aluminium Alloy Ingots 2. Canadian Standards 9. BS 4565-1990 for Galvanized Steel wire 3. BS 183-1982 For general purpose Galvanised steel wire. DIN VDE 0210. IS 4826-1992 16. IS 7623-1985 23. REC specification 33/ 1991(R) for AAAC conductor 8. Indian Standards 1.Applicable Indian / International Standards References a. DIN 48021 11. 5. IS 1521-1991 14. IS 14255-1995 With latest version For lithium base grease Grade-II For Arial Bunch Cable b. ASTM Standard AAAC conductors 7. IS 398 (P-V) / 1982 for Extra High Voltage configuration 11. IS 398 (P-II) / 1976 and IS 398 (P-II)/1996 10. IS 5484-1978 24. BS-215 (P-1. IS 398 (P-I) / 1976 With latest version 9. BS 3288 6. IS 1841-1978 21. IS 504/1963 With latest version for Chemical Analyser 3. IS 1778/1980 20. IS 2658/1964 With latest version for Tensile test 4. BS 443-1990 for Testing of Zinc Coating 4. 46391. 57103 12. French standard sizes for all Aluminium Alloy Conductors 8. IEC-207-889-1089 25. BS 3242-1970 for ALUMINIUM Alloy Conductor 45 . IS 6745-1991 17. IS 8263-1976 18. DIN 48204 10. IS 398(P-IV) / 1979 for AAAC Conductor 6. 48303. IS 209-1992 12. IS 3635/1986 With latest version 5. International Standards 1. IS 2629-1990 15. IEC 1089-1991 19. IS 398(P-IV) / 1994 With latest version for AAAC conductor 7. IS 2633-1990 13. IS 3975 22. P-2) 1970 for ACSR / AAC Conductor 2.

The axial length of spiral of wire in layer is called a lay and is often expressed as a multiple of mean diameter of the layer containing the wire is called the lay ratio. ft of Ice) 144 Where R = Radial thickness of Ice.1 m + 2. T = permissible line Tension (w + w1)2 + ww2 W = Total force on conductor.PARAMETERS MODULES OF ELECTRICITY = 9.5D)2 x 1 x Weight of 1 cu. per IN2 = 1. T = Working Tension of conductor a = area of cross section of conductor r = radius D = Spacing between conductor L = Inductance X = Reactance f = frequency mH = mili henries Three phase : L = 0.83 Weight per ft.21 m + 3. 2 ! If the lay ratio is 'r'. / In2 . ! The strength of Aluminium wire ranges from 23000 lb. ! Generally resistance of Aluminium wire only is considered. / In2 (Small wire) and of Steel wire 179000 to 200.741 log 10 D mH / mile r X = 2p f L x 10-3 ohms LAY RATIO Ratio of the Axial Length of complete turn of helix formed by an individual wire in a standard conductor to the external diameter of helix. Tension per unit area).31 m+1 d = WI2 2T W= x 10-6 per degree F lb Where d= Sag. I = half span. 46 ? 1+(p /r) times the axial length.78 m + 18. the length of the wire is ! Lay ratio factor is often taken as 1.TERMINOLOGY . as steel wire offers very high resistance.(0.741 log 10 D mH / mile r F = Stress (T/a.IMPORTANT . w = Weight of Conductor / ft.9 m + 28 x 106 lb / IN2 (Where m = ratio of Alluminium section to steel section) m+1 ? (Coefficient of linear expansion) = 12.5 D + R)2 . / In2 (Large wire). ww = Wind pressure w1 = Weight of Ice (= p (0. D = Diameter of conductor Reactance calculation : Single phase : L = 0.0217 ! Stranding causes 2% increase in the resistance. 28000 lb.08 + 0.000 lb.

the total number of individual wires employed is N = 3n (n +1) + 1 . This method of construction is known as concentric lay.741 log10 r ) 10-3 henries. successive layers of wires containing 6. of all wires except the straight central one. but have not proved satisfactory from a mechanical point of view owing to the hemp deteriorating rapidly.083 + 0. L0 =(0. but the latter method is preferable as the spacing must be kept down to a minimum value in order to save tower costs. L0 =(0. . 97 In the process of manufacture. but in wire tables the assumption is usually made that the length. . The lay is usually expressed numerically in terms of the mean diameter of the layer containing the wire. which is based on a solid round conductor. and the surface resistance. however. L0 =(0. the inductance per mile of concentric-lay conductor is as follows:3-Strand conductor. For increasing the size of the conductors.12. This is because the individual wires being circular touch only along lines.080 + 0.741 log10 dr ) 10-3 henries.LINE CONDUCTORS AND SUPPORTING STRUCTURES Properties of Stranded Conductors All conductors employed on overhead lines are preferably stranded. . The result is that each current. 47 .125 + 0. pursues a spiral path of greater length than the length of the conductor as a whole.741 log10 dr ) 10-3 henries. stranded conductors with hemp centers have occasionally been employed. d 7-Strand conductor. on account of the increased flexibility thereby obtained.18. . has a fairly high value. This is equivalent to assuming that every twisted wire has a lay ratio of about 15.24… wires. the formula for solid conductors. . is used.089 + 0. d 37-Strand conductor. remains in its own wire throughout the length of the conductor. for all practical purposes. both measured in the same units. . another method of stranding called 'rope lay' is sometimes used as it gives a more flexible conductor.. 61-Strand conductor. . and each separate current. In stranded conductors there is generally one central wire. the effect being to bind all the layers together. The precise magnitude of this effect depends on the lay adopted for the conductor. and this offective increase of the path length correspondingly increases the resistance. Thus if there are n layers. There is no fixed lay used by all manufacturers. Another effect of stranding is to modify slightly the fundamental formula for inductance. and r is the overall radius of the conductor.085 + 0.741 log10 dr) 10-3 henries/ mile.6. Solid wires. For conductors having more than sixty-one strands. due to dirt and the formation of oxide or sulphide. meaning by this term the axial length of one complete turn of any wire. L0 =(0. d 19-Strand conductor. except in the smaller sizes.741 log10 r ) 10-3 henries. and when used for long spans tend to crystallise at the points of support due to swinging in the wind. With very large sections of conductor. and corresponding resistance. . and round this. .103 + 0. is increased by 2% above the values for the central one. are different to handle. L0 = (0. Voltage Limitations of Line The critical voltage limit of a line can be raised by increasing either the spacing or the size of the conductors.741 log10 r ) 10-3 henries. the consecutive layer of wires are twisted or spiralled in opposite directions. Where d is the interaxial distance between conductors. L0 = (0. When a current enters a stranded conductor it divides among the wires. According to Dwight1. in general. and avoid excessive reactance drop in the line.

have a fairly high value under storm conditions. Another design coming into use consists of a number of tongued and grooved rectangular copper sections. which are spiraled along the length of the conductor to form a hollow tube. however. I-beam in shape. I = steady state current. 48 . They may. Thermal Current Rating The steady state thermal rating of a conductor is calculated from the following heat balance equation according to IEEE method I2 r Ac + q = qr + qc I= qr + qc -qs r AC Where.004/0C.. one or more layer of copper strands are spiralled round a core of twisted copper.rac = AC resistance of conductor. In general. K= skin effect factor The DC resistance at the operating temperature is calculated by taking the value of temperature coefficient of resistance as 0. r dc= DC resistance at the operating temperature ohms/meter. In a special conductor construction introduced by the Anaconda Wire and Cable Co.Steel-cored aluminium conductors have a much greater diameter than copper ones of the same conductivity. Thus strength is added to the hollow conductor without the addition of dead weight or sacrifice of conductivity or durability. If the operating voltage happens to be just below this value the corona losses in fine weather will be negligible. amps . and this consideration often leads to the choice of steel-cored aluminium for systems operating near the corona limit. but. since storms are only experienced at intervals in most districts. it is not advisable to operate a line above its fair weather disruptive critical voltage E0 (determined for 250 C and average barometric conditions). ohms q8 =heat gain from the sun qr= radiation heat loss qc= convection heat loss AC Resistance of Conductor rAC=K r dc Where. it is usually more economical to pay for these losses for small parts of the year than try to eliminate them absolutely by using heavy conductors.

ta)-1. A'= Projected area of conductor.Heat gain from sun q8 = a Q8 (sin è ) A' W/meter Where a =coefficient of solar absorption (=0. W/m2. m2 per lineal meter Q= Cos-1 (cos Hc) cos (Zc.91) Q8= solar and sky radiated heat .5 (tc .178 de W/m Where d= conductor diameter.75 (tc . t f = (tc + ta) 2 49 .23 to 0. degrees Radiation Heat Loss 4 4 tc + 273 ta + 273 100 100 qr =0.cm e= coefficient of emissivity (= 0.Z1) Where.1174 d0. 0C Natural Convection (still Wind) Heat Loss At sea level qcN= 0. degrees Z1= azimuth of conductor. degrees Zc = azimuth of sun.0C ta = ambient temperature. qcN=0.2 W/m At altitudes above sea.91) tc =conductor temperature. Hc =altitude of sun.1152 pf 0.23 to 0. kg/m3 at temperature of air film.ta) W/m Where Pf = air density.

Kf= thermal conductivity of air at tf.9 27.ta) W/m. taken as 2.Forced Convection (with wind) Heat loss 0. Particulars Twin Moose Twin Bersmis Quad Zebra Quad Moose Quad Bersmis 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ( I ) No wind 698 795 1272 1397 1590 ( II ) 2. 75 C Still Wind ACSR Conductor Bundle 750C 2. conductor surface voltage gradient.7 - 13.96 18.474 Kf (tc. kg/h. km/hour .1 - 35.2.52 d pf V qc = 1. f Where V = wind velocity normal to conductor.21 - ( II ) Corona extinction voltage. Thermal Rating 0 Sl.01 +4.No. dB 61.9 - - 4 Capital cost per km (Rs) 15. m at tf. kV/cm 17.74 30.09 10.24 5 Annual operating cost/km/MW of SIL (Rs) 413 380 410 432 461 6 Annual operating cost/km/MW (Rs) at ( I ) 1000 MVA power flow 428 430 490 541 602 ( II ) 1400 MVA power flow 405 382 410 436 467 1 2 Thermal rating in MVA Surge Impedance Loading in MW 3 50 Interference Performance .2 kmph Wind Phase current Amps Power Limit MVA Phase current Amps Power Limit MVA 1 Moose' Twin 504 698 1240 1718 2 Bersmis' Twin 574 795 1432 1984 3 Zebra' Quad 918 1272 2220 3076 4 Moose' Quad 1008 1397 2480 3436 5 Bersmis' Quad 1148 1590 2864 3968 Conductor Bundle Parameters of 400 kV Double Circuit Transmission Lines SI No. kV 310 338 399 435 472 ( III ) Radio interference level. f = absolute viscosity of air.51 23.2 kmph wind 1718 1984 3076 3436 3968 1146 1158 1404 1419 1429 ( I ) Max.

R = Conductor resistance per foot. The watts per square inch dissipated by convection. and limiting temperature rise.8 E 4 T T0 1000 1000 (Watts per square inch) Where E= relative emissivity of conductor surface ( E = 1. voltage regulation. can be determined from the following equation: 4 Wr =36. ? t= (degree C) temperature rise. 51 .5 for average oxidized copper).) The watts per square inch dissipated by radiation Wr. For short tie lines or lines that must carry excessive loads under emergency conditions.0 for atmospheric pressure). d = outside diameter of conductor in inches.3 inch to 5 inches or more when the velocity of air is higher than free convection air currents (0.CONDUCTOR TEMPERATURE RISE AND CURRENT CARRYING CAPACITY. The basis of this method is that the heat developed in the conductor by I2R loss is dissipated (1) by convection in the surrounding air . Wc can be determined from the following equation : Wc = Where pv 0. V = velocity in feet per second. This can be expressed as follows : I2R = (Wc + Wr ) A watts Where I = Conductor current in amperes. T=(degrees Kelvin ) absolute temperature of conductor. This temperature affects the sag between towers or poles and determines the loss of conductor tensile strength due to annealing.5 ft/sec. it is sometimes necessary to consider the maximum continuous current carrying capacity of a conductor. T0 = (degrees Kelvin ) absolute temperature of surroundings. In distribution and transmission line design the temperature rise of conductor above ambient while carrying current is important. The following discussion presents the Scouring and Frick6 formulas for calculating the approximate current-carrying capacity of conductors under known conditions of ambient temperature. and (2) radiation to surrounding objects. Ta = (degree Kelvin) average of absolute temperatures at conductor and air.2 .0 for “black body”. stability and other factors may determine the choice of conductor for a given line. wind velocity.123 d Ta ? P = pressure in atmospheres (p=1. The maximum continuous current rating is necessary because it is determined by the maximum operating temperature of the conductor.0128 ? ? t Watts per square inch 0. Wc = Watts per square inch dissipated by convection Wr = Watts per square inch dissipated by radiation A= Conductor surface area in square inches per foot of length. the maximum continuous current-carrying capacity may be important in selecting the proper conductor. This formula is an approximation applicable to conductor diameters ranging from 0. or 0. While power loss.0.

00407 per oC 0. These conditions were used after discussion and agreement with the conductor manufacturers. 554. Description Aluminium Copper 1 Coefficient of Linear expansion 23 x 10-6 deg. The tables of Electrical Characteristics of Conductors include tabulations of the approximate maximum current carrying capacity based on 500C rise above an ambient of 250C. ft. and R. 169.694 micro W /cm3 6 Temperature Coefficient of Resistivity 0. As such weight of Aluminium conductor is half of copper conductor.26 ? V/d cycles / Sec. Density of steel is taken as 7. or to check test results. This method is. COMPARISON BETWEEN ALUMINIUM AND COPPER Sr. Tests have shown that aluminium conductors dissipate heat at about the same rate as copper conductors of the same outside diameter when the temperature rise is the same.5). The technical literature shows little variation from this condition as line design limits.By calculating (Wc + Wr).9 x 10 5 Standard resistivity at 20 oC 2.98 lb. it is then possible to determine I from Eq (75) . it should be used. and an air velocity of 2 feet per second. Where test data is available on conductors.18 lb. C 16.703 gm / cm3 8. C 2 Density 2. tarnished surface (E=0. For design purpose copper or ACSR conductor total temperature is usually assumed to be 750C as use of this value has given good conductor performance from an annealing standpoint.8735 micro W /cm3 0. The ambient air temperature is generally assumed to be 250C to 400C whereas the temperature rise is assumed to be 100C to 600C. being some 30 to 80 C. in general.004 per oC Total strength of Aluminium plus steel conductor is found to be 50% of greater than equivalent copper conductor. Where V = Wind Velocity and. applicable to both copper and aluminium conductors. The above general method can be used when test data is not available. The effect of the sun upon conductor temperature rise is generally neglected. This gives a conductor total temperature range of 350C to 1000C. A. These thermal limitations are based on continuous loading of the conductors. (750C total conductor temperature). No.6 x 10-6 deg. d = diameter of conductor 52 . 6 18 x 106 4 Modulus of elasticity 9. This small effect is less important under conditions of high temperature rise above ambient.The value of R to use is the a-c resistance at the conductor temperature (ambient temperature plus temperature rise) taking into account skin effect as discussed previously in the section on positive and negative-sequence resistances. the limit being about 1000C where annealing of copper and aluminium begins.80 gm / cm3 3 Weight of l sq.80 gm / cm3 VIBRATION DAMPER DESIGN : Damping constant for high frequency oscillation is defined by 3.

CLEARANCES AT RAILWAY CROSSING
Vertical Clearance
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)

upto and including 11 kV
above 11 kV upto 66 kV
above 66 kV upto 132 kV
above 132 kV upto 220 kV
above 220 kV upto 400 kV

10.95 Mtr (by cable)
14.10 Mtr
14.60 Mtr
15.40 Mtr
17.90 Mtr

Electrical Clearances (IS 5613)
Ground clearance- (Mtrs)
BuildingVertical - (Mtrs)
Horizontal - (Mtrs)
Between Lines:
Line to Line - (Mtrs)
ph-ph
Horizontal - (Mtrs)
Vertical - (Mtrs)

66 kV
6.1

132 kV
6.1

220 kV
7.015

400 kV
9.0

3.97
2.14

4.58
2.75

5.49
3.66

8.00
8.00

2.44

3.05

8.00

3.5
2.0

6.8
3.9

4.58
S/C
D/C
6
8.4
4.9 for both

9.00
8.00

1) Working Ground Adjustment to The tower - 5 Mtr
2) Explosive Distance - 4.5 Mtr

FOREST WAY LEAVE
kV
11
33
66
132
220
400
800

Right of Way (Mtr)
Width (Max)
7
15
18
27
35
52
85

Vertical clearance (Mtrs)
(1 tree top to conductor)
2.6
2.8
3.4
4.0
4.6
5.5
-

Power line
Crossing Angle
90o - 60 o

53

MINIMUM CLEARANCE BTW. EHV TELECOM WIRES
Line Voltage

> 36 kV £
72.5 kV

2440 mm (8’0")

> 72.5 kV £
145 kV

2740 mm (9’0")

> 145 kV £
245 kV
> 245 and above

3050 mm (10’0")
3050 (+ 305 mm for every 33 kV & part
thereof)

SPAN AND STRUCTURE HEIGHT DETAILS OF EHV LINES - GENERALLY ADOPTED
Sr.
No.
1.
2.
3.
4.

5.

6.

54

Voltage
KV
66 kV
Single Circuit
66 kV
Double Circuit
132 Kv Single /
Double Circuit
220 kV
Single / Double
Circuit
400 kV Single
Circuit

Type of
Structure
H-Frame

Span in
Meters
200

Height of Tower Ground clearance
Meters
Meter
11
6.1

Tower

260

21

6.1

Tower

350

30

6.1

Tower

350

34

7.1

Tower

38

9

400 kV Double
Circuit

Tower

400 (normal
span in open
land)
400-460 Meter

51

9

CURRENT CARRYING CAPACITY OF BARE OVERHEAD TRANSMISSION LINE CONDUCTORS
1.0

The current carrying capacity (Ampacity) of a bare, overhead transmission line conductor is that current (amps) which may flow
in it continuously while maintaining a steady maximum permissible temperature over its surface. The maximum permissible
temperature is that which does not permanently and adversely affect the physical properties of the conductor material.
The current carrying capacity of a conductor is based on the concept that under a state of thermal equilibrium, the total heat
gained by the conductor due to energy loss (PR) within itself and by solar and sky radiation equals the total heat lost by the
conductor by conduction to the metallic supporting it, by convection to the air surrounding it and by radiation to its surrounding
objects.

1.1

Factors influencing the steady state.
1.1.1

1.1.2

1.1.3

Conductor Material and its physical properties

Geographical

Meteorological

Material:

Copper, Aluminium Steel and their Alloys

Construction:

Monometal, Composite

Size:

Overall diameter

Resistance:

DC and AC resistance at supply frequency
and conductor temperature

Surface condition:

Ability to absorb and emit heat

Location:

Altitude of line above sea level
Absolute viscosity, density and thermal
conductivity of air.

Position:

Altitude of Sun,
Azimuth of Sun,
Azimuth of line.

Wind Speed:

Laminar or turbulent flow
Season of Year

Ambient temperature: Time of day
1.2

Except the conductor materials, construction and its diameter which could, perhaps be known to a fair degree of accuracy,
none of the other factors are constant at any given point of time and cannot be assessed accurately. A transmission line does
not run at the same altitude nor in same direction throughout its length of several kilometers (often in hundreds) nor the
ambient temperature and wind speed could be excepted to be same throughout its length. The speed of wind and its turbulence
as also the ambient temperature are constantly changing parameters in any given period of time of day or season of a year. So
also is the extent of radiation from Sun and Sky. On these counts, the Ampacity of a conductor is not a constant figure but varies
according to the prevailing conditions of weather, season and time of day. Ampacity is therefore calculated for certain assumed
steady state conditions on an average basis for on assumed maximum conductor temperature as a guide for safe loading of the
conductor without affecting its physical properties.

1.3

Several researchers have formulated theories and formulas, which differ from each other, though the basic concept is the
same. Many of these formulae are more of academic interest than of practical applications. The effect of Sky radiation, Altitude,
position of Sun, orientation of line etc. affect the Ampacity only marginally and many utilities neglect them for Ampacity
calculations. One such method is given below for a ACSR conductor of composite construction and a AAAC conductor of
Monometal construction, both being of same wire size & same overall diameter.

2.0

Symbols
I
D
d
A
a
e
a
Rdc/20
Rdc/tc
Rac/tc

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=

Conductor current, amps at 50 Hz
Conductor outer diameter, meters
Conductor inner diameter, meters
Projected area of conductor per meter length, Sq. m.
Coefficient of Solar absorption of conductor
Coefficient of Emissivity of conductor
Constant mass temperature coefficient of resistance of conductor per ?
C
D.C. resistance of conductor at 20 ?
C., ?
/km
D.C. resistance of conductor at temperature tc ?
C., ?
/km
A.C. resistance of conductor at 50 Hz and temperature tc ?
C., ?
/km

55

5 D0. For worst condition Sin q= 1.90 to 0. degrees Direct Solar irradiation on conductor surface. tf are taken from Table-1. The values of pf.95 for conductor above 1 year age 3.ta)1. watts/Mtr. where. m. (m) Thermal conductivity of air at temp tf watts/m (? C) -8 Stefan-Baltzman constant = 5.1 3.646 1606 (pf)0.75398 (DpfV/m f)0. ? C Average ambient temperature.4.23 to 0. Therefore. Ws = aSD watts/m.4 Heat lost by conductor by convection 3.4.2 Heat gained by conductor due to Solar irradiation Ws = a (S Sin q +S1) D Watts/m Heat gained by sky radiation (S1) is negligible and hence neglected.ta) watts/m Wc2 = {0. tf. watts/Sq. Kelvin = tc + 273 Average ambient temperature.Ws Heat lost by conductor by conduction to connected metallic parts is insignificant and therefore neglected. m. watts/Sq.45 for conductor less than 1 years age 0.75 (tc . 3.85 for conductor upto 1 year age and 0. at sea level Wc = 3.tc ta Kc Ka Tf V Pf mf Kf s q S S1 Ws Wc Wr = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = Average conductor temperature.2 Natural Convection loss (wind speed less than 2200 m/hr) Wc = 3.25 watts/m.678 ? 10 watts/ Sq. ? C Average conductor temperature.1 Fundamental Heat balance equation l2 (Rac/tc)= Wc + Wr .52} kf (tc . watts/m. meters / hour Density of air at temp.75 for conductor 1 year to 10 years age 0. 56 . Sky radiated heat on conductor surface. Kgf/hr.71272 D0.6}kf (tc . Heat gained by conductor by solar radiation per linear meter. m. kg/cu. Kelvin = ta + 273 Average air film temperature = (tc + ta)/2 Average velocity of wind. mtr Absolute viscosity of air at temp.Ka4) watts/m.25 watts/m at altitudes above sea level Forced convection loss (wind speed 2200 m/hr and above) Wc1 = {1.17838 ? 10-6 ? e ? D (Kc4 .ta) watts/m Whichever is higher of the above two equations is to be considered. e = 0. tf.35088 (DpfV/m f)0. e = 0. Heat lost by conductor by radiation per linear meter. watts/m. Heat lost by conductor by convection per linear meter.0 FORMULAE 3. m f and kf at air film temperature.3 Heat lost by conductor by radiation Wr = s e p D (Kc4 . where a= 0. 3.ta)1.75(tc .Ka4) watts/m.85 for conductor over 10 years age 3./K4 Effective angle of incidence of sun's rays on conductor surface.00531 + 1.

35 where.5. Current Carrying capacity of overhead transmission line conductor for Northern Region CBIP Publication 2. Pittsburgh 4.0094 (mr)3 K2 = 0.050133 {f/ (Rdc/tc)}1/2 = 0.15 for single aluminium layer ACSR and AACSR = 0.3. New York.1986 57 .04 (mr)2 + 0.8 (Xs)4}where = 3 p f 10-4 / (Rdc/tc) = 0.03 for three aluminium layer ACSR and AACSR = 0.0 n = 4 + 0. Current temperature characteristics of Aluminium conductors Alcoa publication. IEEE Standard for calculation of bare overhead conductor temperature and Ampacity under steady state conditionsAmerican National Standard 738 .3544938/ (Rdc/tc)1/2 = 4 0.5.8 n if mr> 2.0036 for AAAC and AACSR.8 < 5.5363 . Design and Construction guide line.004 for Aluminium (Ec grade) and ACSR a = 0.0097 (mr)2 K1 = [ cos {90 (d/D)p}]2.1 Composite (Rdc/20) Conductors (ACSR and AACSR) (Rdc/tc) = {1+a(tc .Swed Power publication 5.6 2 S Current carrying capacity of conductor l = (Wc + Wr Ws) (Rac/tc) ? 10-3 ½ Reference 1.00519 (mr)n K1+K2} where.7 + 0.0513 (mr)2 (Rac/tc) mr if mr < 2.003 for two or four aluminium layer ACSR and AACSR 3.2949 (mr) + 0.Ys) where.2 Monometal conductor (AAC and AAAC) (Rac/tc) = (Rdc/tc) (1 . resistance of conductor 3.0. a = 0.1256637 / (Rdc/tc) for f= 50 Hz X 3.20)}? /km where.11 (mr) 0. Ampacities for Aluminium and ACSR and overhead Electric conductors Aluminium Association.C.0616 + 0.5 A.0896 (mr) 0. = Rdc/tc {1+ 0. YS = (Xs)4 / {192 + 0. P = 0. 3. = 0.

00 0.95951 100.18 mm "Zebra" AC Data: Conductor construction Conductor diameter (outer) 54 (alm) + 7 (Steel) / 3.0764 60.1469 40.069497 1.94669 Intermediate Values may be interpolated EXAMPLES Example 1: Ampacity of 54 (Al) + / -7 (st) / 3.075896 0. Wind Velocity V = 2200 m/hr Thermal Conductivity of air Kf Watts/sq.00 0.1854 30.00 0.18 mm ACSR D = 0.073515 1. tf ° C Air Density at sea level Pf Abs.076640 0.00 0.024245 0.064438 1.025722 0.0941 55.029462 0.025361 0.00 0.066967 1.062650 1.027953 0.00 0.00 0.030217 0.98674 90. m.072771 1. 0.026083 0.028346 0.00 0.1101 50. tc = 75 ? C Final Conductor Temp.024606 0.AIR PARAMETERS Air film Temp.00 0.069 15 ? /km Solar absorption Coefficient a = 0.2703 10.065330 1.072027 1.02862 m Conductor diameter (inner) d = 0.00 0. Viscosity of air m 1 kg/cum kg/m. ta = 40 ? C Ambient Temp.00954 m o 58 Conductor dc resistance at 20 C Rdc/20 = 0.2254 20.077533 0.074408 1.00 0.070390 1.0156 80.031693 .00 0. Kc = 348 K Ambient Temp.1277 45.1661 35.0044 85.078277 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.029823 0.00 0.066074 1.45 Final Conductor Temp.00 0.97393 95.031234 0.026837 0.00 0.071134 1. Ka = 313 K Solar radiation S = 1164 Watts/Sq.00 0.026476 0.00 0.027231 0.061759 1.068604 1. ° C 0.075152 1.063545 1.2046 25. m.030577 0.8 Emissivity Coefficient a = 0.067860 1.0300 75.2478 15.030938 0.027592 0.025000 0.2927 5.0588 65.00 0. hr.029068 0.028707 0.0444 70.

0896 ? 1.0676 Kf = 0.5765547 + 0.40) 45.0285265 ? (75 .11 (mr) .02862 ? 1.00531 +1.399565 W/m Wc2 = = = 0.11 (1.084363 ? /km d/D = (3. tf = (tc + ta) / 2 = (75+40) / 2 = 57.02862 ? 0.650944 W/m 2 Heat lost radiation (Wr) Wr = 0.791593} ]2.399565 W/m (Higher of the two values) Therefore.5 ? C From Table 1.0.2204855)3.35088 ? (939.75398 ? (Dpf V/m Kf ? (tc .18 ? 9) =3/9 mr = 0.0616 + 0.1 Heat gained by solar irradiation (Ws) Ws = aSD = 0.18 ? 3) / (3.004 (75-20) } = 0.643584 W/m 3 Heat lost by convection (Wc) Average Temp.6 { 0.08638 Wc1 = = = { 1.0513 (1.0.0.0513 (mr)2 4 .17838? 10 ? (348 -313 ) ? 0.00519 (mr)n K1 + K2 ) = = = Rac/75 {1+0.8 ? 1164 ? 0.ta) { 1.00531 +1.9713398 p = = = 0. Wc 4 Conductor AC resistance at final temperature Rdc / tc = Rdc/75 = Rdc/20 {1 + 0.084363 {1+ 0.8 Therefore.0094 (1.06915 ? 1.08638)0.52} Kf ? (tc .5765547 K2 = 0.ta) f) }? { 0.03 (for 3 aluminium layer ACSR) Rac/tc = Rac/tc (1 + 0. by interpolation m f = 0.0715806 Pf = 1.084363)1/2 n = = = 4 .22 Therefore.7917593 K1 = = = [ Cos {90 ? (d/D)p} ]2.7+0.740731 W/m = 48.2204855 < 2.0.02862 = 26.0896 (mr) .04 (mr)2 + 0.0715806 = 939.0.00519 (mr)n K1 + K2 } 0.3544938 / (0.17838 ? 10-6 (Kc4 Ka4) ? D? e -6 4 4 = 0.45 = 11.04 (1.2204855) .35 0.0616 + 0.35088 (Dp f V/mf)0.0285265 ? (75-40) 48.52} ? 0. Rdc/75 = 0.0094 (mr)3 0.7+0.0285265 V = 2200 m/hr (from data) (Dpf V) / f = (0.00519 ? (1.6}? 0.2204855)3 0.03 } 0. Therefore Rac/75 59 .2204855)2 3.2204855 .9713398 ? 0.2204855)2+0.35 [ Cos {90 ? (3/9)0.050133 {f / (Rdc/tc)}1/2 f = 50 H3 = 0.0.0676 ? 2200)/ 0.0874508 ? /km = 1.75398 ? (939.08638)0.

AAAC has 2. At minimum temperature and 2/3 maximum wind pressure 50% b. AAAC can carry 1.392205/ (0.0114116 Rac/75 = Rdc/75 (1 + Ys ) = 1.26% lesser energy loss than ACSR of same construction and size.643584 . for the same maximum temperature.93196 or say 618 Amps.0036 ( 75-20) } 0. per meter length (kgf/m) . SAG AND TENSION IN CONDUCTORS 1 Indian Electricity Rules 1956.0845071 Ys = 4 Xs4/ {192 + 0. the same current.26. b. cm/m = a Coefficient of linear expansion of conductor (per ° C) L = Span (m) P1 = Maximum wind pressure on conductor (Kgf/ sq.13% higher current than ACSR of same construction and size. IS 802/1977 and IS 5613/1985 specify the following maximum limits of tension in conductors of transmission lines. Inference a.0854714 ? /km Current Carrying Capacity = { 33.0845071 ? /km Xs2 = 4p 10-2/(Rdc/75) = 4P10-2/0. Parabolic formula is adopted as commonly in use.18 mm Rdc/20 = 0.0874508 ? 10-3 }½ 617. 625 Amps. E.0854714 ? 10-3) }1/2 = 625. under steel wind.Ws ) / (Rac/tc ? 10-3) }1/2 { (48. a.04623 Amps or say. 2 A simple. IS 5613/85 further stipulates that the maximum sag in the ground wire (Earth wire) shall not exceed 90 percent of sag in power conductor for the entire operating temperature range.650944) / 0. Example 2 Ampacity of AAAC Conductor of Same construction 61/3. m) P2 = Wind load on conductor at minimum temperature. cm) W/A Kgf/Sq. step by step method of calculating sags and tensions in conductors and ground wires for different operating temperatures and wind conditions is given below.0705402 ? {1 + 0. At every day temperature of 32 ° C and still wind 25% I. 3 Symbols 60 D = Overall diameter of conductor (m) A = Cross sectional area of conductor (Sq.5 Current Carrying Capacity I = = = { ( Wc + WR . the PTCC Manual and The Railway Regulations 1987 for placing power lines across tracks specify the minimum clearance from the nearest power conductor to ground.399565 + 11. etc. At every day temperature of 32 ° C and maximum wind pressure 50% c. Rules 77 to 80 & 87. over telecom lines and over rail tracks. to buildings.0705402 (maximum) ? /km Rdc/75 = = 0. cm) W = Linear mass of conductor (Kgf/m) d= = Linear mass of conductor per meter per unit sectional area U = Ultimate tensile strength of conductor (Kgf) E = Modulus of Elasticity (final) of conductor (Kgf/Sq. between power lines.8 ? s } = 0.4870178 = 0.

2 4.5 Tension factors Still wind condition 2/3 full wind condition Full wind condition 4. P1= Kgf/sq. cm) T1 = Initial tension in conductor at temperature t1 = f1 ´ a (Kgf) T2 = Final tension in conductor at temperature t2 = f2 ´ a (Kgf) K = Stress Constant S1 = Sag at initial condition T1 (m) S2 = Sag at final condition T2 (m) Parameters Calculation of the following parameters before hand makes further calculations simpler and easier.7 2 L2 d E q12 24 = = = L2 d E q1 8 L2 d E q2 8 L2 d E q3 8 Stress factor 2 K = f1 = L2 d E q2 24 (f1)2 Where q represents any one of factors q1. q2. The application of the various parameters in calculation of Sags and corresponding tensions under different temperatures and wind conditions is explained in the example.cm/m) 4.3 4. and q3 depending on initial conditions assumed.m P3 = P 1 ´ d ´ 1 (kgf/m) Loading factors: Still wind q1 = 1 2/3 full wind q2 = {1+ (P2 / W)2} ½ Full wind q3 = {1+ (P3 /W)2}1/2 Temperature factors Ea t=Ea (t2 – t1) 4.4 P3 = Wind load on conductor at 32 ° C per meter length (Kgf/m) t1 = Initial conductor temperature (° C) t2 = Final conductor temperature (° C) Q1 = Still wind loading factor (1) Q2 = 2/3 Maximum wind loading factor Q3 = Maximum wind loading factor f1 = Initial stress in conductor at temperature t1 Kgf/ sq. 4.4 Wind factors (a) Wind pressure (b) Wind load 2/3 Max. m ( Tension per unit area) f2 = Final stress in conductor at temperature t2 (Kgf/Sq. P2 = 2/3 P1 ´ d ´ 1 (kgf/m) (On conductor) Max.6 = = 2 L2 d E q22 24 = 2 L2 d E q32 24 Sag factors Still wind condition 2/3 full wind condition Full wind condition 4. 61 .1 Weight Factor d = W/A (kg/sq.

m = 32° C Final conductor temperature t2 Minimum 0° C Intermediate 32 ° C Intermediate 53 ° C Maximum 75 ° C 5.345 )2}1/2 = 1.345 )2}1/2 = 1.3 62 Temperature Factors = Ea t32 0 ( Starting condition assumed at 32 ° C) Ea t0 = 0. m Coefficients of Linear Expansion a = 23´ 10-6 per ° C.55 ´ 106 Kgf/ sq.55 ´ 106 ´ 23 x 106 x (0 .875 Sq. cm.1.95 Ea t90 = 0.8613 (kgf/m ) = 45 x 0.5 50 % UTS Maximum wind pressure P1 5.80 Ea t53 = Ea t25 = 0. Limiting tension 5.55 x 106 ´ 23 x 106 x (53 .2 32 ° C full wind Initial conductor temperature t1 5.1875 = {1+(P3 / W)2}1/2 = {1+(1.1 Conductor 61/3.3866 Full wind q3 5. wind q2 = {1+ (P2/w)2}1/2 = {1+ (0.345 kg/m Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) U = 13154 Kgf Modulus of Elasticity (final ) E = 0.3 32 ° C nil wind W/A = 1.2 Parameters 5.1.1.70 .1 Weight factor = d 5.8613/ 1.2920 /1.65 0.2920 (kgf/m) b) Wind factors Still wind q1 = 1 2/3 Max.02871 m Sectional Area A = 4.32) = (-) 404. 19 mm AAAC Overall diameter D = 0.345 / 4.1. Weight W = 1.55 x 106 x 23 x 106 x (75 -32) = 543.EXAMPLE 5.2.02871 x 1 = 1. cm/m) a) Wind load on conductor At 2/3 Maximum wind pressure At Maximum wind pressure P2 P3 = 2/3 x 45 x 0.32) = 265.1 Data 5.4 25 % UTS 0° C 2/3 full wind Normal span L 5.875 = 0.1.2759 (kgf/ Sq.2.2 = 50 % UTS 350m = 45 Kgf/ sq.02871 x 1 = 0.2.55 x 106 x 23 x 106 (90 -32) = 733.

At 32 ° C still wind (Starting condition Assumed) T1 = U/4 = 13154 / 4 = 3288.5 = = 213.0417 kgf Sag S2 = (L2d q1) / 8f2 = 4224.5983 = 8.7188 = At 2/3 full wind (L2d q2) / 8 = 4224.26 m We now find stress constant K given by the formula K = = = K 5.3.2.2629 m Result T32/q1 = 3288 kgf S32/q1 = 6.5983 kgf/Sq.875 = 2819.6933 ´ 106 ´ 1. still wind is the controlling factor.6933 ´ 106 = 503.6933 ´ 106) / (674.3891 m T75/q1 = 2455 kgf f { f2 + 339.2.2914 kgf/sq.31 m At 75 ° C still wind f22 { f2 – (K – Ea t75) } f22 { f2 – (204.7188 / 578.(L2d Eq12) / 24f12 674.9950 = 5.1 3502 ´ 0.50 / 4.1705 kgf = (L2d q1) / 8f2 = 4224.875 = 2455.386662 = 410.9464 204. m T2 = F2 ´ A = 578.6933 ´ 106 ´ 1.2759 ´ 1) / 8 4224.5641 = 6.3238 ´ 106 = 213.3866 5857.39 m 63 .6933 ´ 106 By trial and error with the help of a Scientific calculator f f2 = 578.5983 ´ 4.3.5641)2 = 204.5.8535 = At full wind (L2d q3) / 8 = 4224.55 ´ 106 ´ 1/24 Sag Factors At still wind (L2d q1) / 8 5.27592 ´ 0.50 kgf f1 = T1/A = 3288.6933 ´ 106 f2 = 213.95) } 2 2 2 = (L2d Eq12) / 24 = 213.1875 5016.3055 m T53/q1 = 2819 kgf Sag S2 Result S53/q1 5.7188 / 503.875 = 674.6933 ´ 106 = 213.9464 At 53 ° C still wind f22 {f2 – (K – Ea t53)} f 2 2 {f2 – (204.9464 – 543. Hence the same is assumed as the starting condition.3 = Sags and Tensions For most conductors.7036) } 2 = (L2d Eq12) / 24 = 213.5641 – (213.18752 = 301. cm T2 = F2 ´ A = 503.2914 ´ 4.7188 ´ 1.0036 } Result S75/q1 = 8.2914 = 7.65)} 2 2 {f2 + (60. cm S1 = (L2d q1) / 8f1 = 4224.6933 ´ 106 = 213.8595 ´ 106 (3502 ´ 0. the tension limitation at 32 ° C.7188/674.3.7188 ´ 1.3 = 7.4 Tension Factors 2 At still wind ( L2 d E (q1)2) / 24 2 At 2/3 full wind (L2 d E (q2)2)/ 24 2 At full wind (L2 d E (q3)2) / 24 5.5641 = kgf/Sq.2 2 f1 .9464 – 265.

70) } f22 { f2 + 528.4 At 90 ° C NIL wind condition f22 { f2 – (K – Ea t90) } f22 { f2 – (204.345) = 32.6344) = 4.6344 degrees from vertical = S2/V =S2/d ´ Cos q = 5.00 hence OK = (L2d q ) s/8 4224.26446 ´ 4.8486) = 5.8515 > 2.1057 m T90/q1 S90/q1 4224.9624 = = tan-1 (P3/W) = tan-1 (1. cm = f2 ´ A = 818.3017 Cos (32.297 > 2.00 min.80) } f 22{f2 – 609.875 = 2261.8595 ´ 106 = 818.26446 kgf/sq.6458 kgf = U/T2 = 13154 / 3989.3238 ´ 106 = 301. Sag (deflected) S2/d angle of deflection q q Sag (Vertical) Result 64 2 = (L2d Eq12) / 24 = 213.875 = 3989.1622 m T32/q3 = 3990 kgf S32/q3 = 5.9464 + 404.7536 f2 T2 Sag S2 Result 5.4647 m T0/q2 = 4613 Kgf S0/q2 = 4.O.8535 / 946.9464 – 0) } f 22 { f2 – 204.6930 ´ 106 = 213.O.5.3.9464 – 733.3.9464) } f2 T2 F.3889 kgf/sq.5 At 0 ° C 2/3 full wind f22 { f2 – (K – Ea t0) } 2 f2 { f2 – (204.S Sag (defected) S2/d Angle of defection q Q Sag (Vertical) Result 5.345) = 43.875 = 4613.9624 ´ 4.16 m .6458 = 3.8167 kgf = (L2d q1) / 8f2 = = 9.0392 kgf = U/T2 = 13154/4613 = 2.9624 = 2262 kgf = 9.3238 ´ 106 = 946. m =f2xA = 946.46 m 2 = (L2 d E q32)/24 = 410.3889 ´ 4.7188 463.6 53.8613 / 1.9624 Kgf/Sq.1580 Cos (43. cm =f2´ A = 463.6 At 32 ° C full wind 2 f 2 {f2 – (K – Ea t32) } f 22 {f2 – (204.6930 ´ 106 = 463.74674) } f2 T2 F.7188 463.8595 ´ 106 = 410.2920 / 1.8486 degrees from vertical = S2/V = S2/d Cos q = 7.3.11 m 2 = (L2d Eq12) / 24 = 301. required = (L2 d q 3) / 8f2 = 5016.S.3017 m = tan-1(P2/W) = tan-1 (0.2645 = 5.

HS CURRENT CARRYING CAPACITY LOAD EXTENSION% LOADING CONDITIONS To avoid breaking of conductors under severe weather conditions. ambient air temperature of 40 ? C.) Wi = 1. the limited amount of annealing which will take place will be sufficient to reduce the ultimate tensile strength of the aluminium strands./square foot 65 . The temperature rise curves given in the attached graphs apply to a wide range of conductors. on bare or ice covered conductor in lbs. of conductor in lbs. For calculating the current ratings of overhead lines. The maximum safe continuous operating temperature for bare conductor is limited to 100 ? C because of the effect of high temperatures on the mechanical properties of the conductor material. i. Certain formulae are available by which ice loads and wind on conductors can be calculated.e. they must be installed with certain predetermined tensions. tensile strength and elongation./cu.. The loading on a conductor's is the resultant loading due to its weight and weight of any ice and the wind load. If aluminium wire is maintained at a constant temperature of 100 ? C for approx./lineal foot d = dia. 4 months. of conductor in inches t = radial thickness of ice in inches F = Wind pre. mm2 LOAD kg/mm2 TEMP. is usually assumed./lineal foot Vertical wt. of conductor and ice covering Wy = W + Wi lbs./lineal foot Horizontal wind load on conductor (d + 21) F Wh = -------------------------12 lbs.061 meter per second./lineal foot Resultant load on conductor We = Wy2 + Wh2 Where W = wt. The actual amount varies for different wire sizes and those. which have the most cold work.224 (d + t) t lbs. and thus the highest ultimate tensile strength will suffer the greatest reduction.ft. Weight of ice covering on conductor (Assuming ice to weight / 56 lbs.CURRENT CARRYING CAPACITY OF OVERHEAD CONDUCTORS The continuous current carrying capacity of a conductor is limited by the conductor temperature rise above ambient air temperature to a maximum value that is considered safe under continuous operating conditions. by amounts up to about 10%. RISE Co ABOVE AMBIENT OF 40o C 50 CYCLE AC CURRENT AMPERES AAAC .STRAIN CURVES AREA. These curves show current in Amperes as a function of conductor temperature rise above an ambient air temperature of 40 ? C with cross wind velocity of 0. TYPICAL STRESS .

V = actual wind velocity in miles per hour The value k is not strictly constant and depends on the shape and nature of the surface.Loading True wind velocity is very difficult to measure and hence a correction factor must be applied to the wind velocity indicated by an anemometer. The maximum wind pressure is calculated using the formula F = KV2. where F = wind pressure in lb. / sq. The following approximate values are used: For cylindrical surfaces k = 0.0025 For flat surfaces k = 0.0042 66 . ft. barometric pressure and wind velocity.

m. 6+1 6+7 26+7 30+7 42+7 54+7 3 7 7 19 37 37 61 61 Mod.5700 x 106 B) 0.6000 x 106 B) 0.0 x 10-6 23.5508 x 106 Co-Effi.0 x 10-6 23.5700 x 106 A) 0.8158 x 106 0. of Elasticity kg/sq. of linear expansion per ° C 19.0 x 10-6 23.6500 x 106 A) 0.1 x 10-6 19.6324 x 106 A) 0.0 x 10-6 (A) AAAC to IS 398 (Part 4 1979) (Second Revision) & ACAR (B) AAAC to IS 398 (Part 4 1994) (Third Revision) (2) Current Carrying Capacity: Solar Absorption Constant A = 0.5 Emissivity Constant E = 0. cm 0.5 x 10-6 19.0 x 10-6 23.8158 x 106 0. Sag . Ambient Temperature Ta = 40? C Height MSL 67 .7546 x 106 0.5500 x 106 B) 0. Wind Velocity V = 2200 M / Hr.8 x 10-6 18.0 x 10-6 23.BASIC DATA ASSUMED FOR CALCULATION 1. / Nos.8 x 10-6 21.5 Solar Irradiation S = 985 Watts / Sq.5814 x 106 A) 0.8055 x 106 0.tension Conductor Type ACSR & AACSR AAAC & ACAR Construction (AL + ST) / AAA Wire Nos.7036 x 106 B) 0.0 x 10-6 23.0 x 10-6 23.9 x 10-6 17.3 x 10-6 23.7750 x 106 0.

68 .

CONFIGURATION DRAWINGS FOR AAC. AAAC & ACSR 69 .

70 .

7 Al. All Aluminium Conductors 71 . AAAC & ACSR 19 Al. 37 Al. 61 Al.CONFIGURATION DRAWINGS FOR AAC.

61 Al. 37 Al. 7 Al.19 Al. Aluminium Alloy Conductors 72 .

4-Al. 3-Al. 15-Al. 3-Steel 4-Steel 4-Steel 7-Steel 33-Al. 42-Al. 48-Al. 30-Al. 24-Al. 18-Al. 4-Steel 7-Steel 13-Steel 19-Steel 54-Al. 12-Al. 7-Steel 13-Steel 19-Steel Aluminium Wire Steel Wires Typical Strandings for Concentric Lay-Stranded ACSR Conductors 73 .

AC Al. AC Al.Al. AC Al. AC = = = = 6 1 4 1 3 1 2 1 Compressed Aluminium Conductor Steel Reinforced and All Aluminium Conductor 74 .

VARIOUS INDIAN STANDARDS 75 .

76 .

00 40 60 4.12 5.32 0.92 4.03 1635 5 6 7 Raccoon Dog Dog ( up) 80 100 125 7/.94 8.30 345.89 79.70 22.28 10.49 5.68 5.00 28.49 5.11 9.04 10.85 5.36 7.12 8.11 9.90 10.95 5.79 1448 146.3.00 1281 136.61 0.13 8.50 36.28 10.45 570.98 1.54 5154 10 Wolf (up) 200 19/3.78 0.25 1.99 17130 19 Moose (up) Morkulla (up) 20 Morkulla (up) 640 61/3.95 1666 167.85 5.43 18195 695 61/3.58 1102 117.73 7.00 19.00 14.04 10.86 5.31 525.05 3.92 8.94 37/3.60 11.30 4.55 9.01 21721 9 Panther Panther (up) Panther (up) Kundah m Kgf 67 67 107 67 107 67 107 125 125 125 125 111 165 165 258 258 409 409 409 597 746 934 260 275 260 275 260 275 320 320 320 350 380 350 380 350 380 380 400 380 400 380 400 380 400 380 400 1109 1109 1289 1289 1496 1496 1735 2160 2590 2993 2993 3477 3477 3723 3723 4045 4045 4283 4283 4549 4549 4927 4927 5430 5430 Tension 0 oC with wind Kgf Kgf Kgf Wind pressure kg/sq.27 10.62 0. . m Nos.11 9.89 10.00 29.90 400.00 465.81 696./mm sq.13 8.95 4.69 7. ACSR Nom.39 6.50 34.00 766.94 7.71 953 101.05 704 84.96 5.41 29.58 1.20 31.05 1. spn.81 10.80 8.04 10.43 12.45 218 273 342 23. mm mm kg/km kn.15 37/3.59 0.30 4.25 19706 21 Bersimis 765 61/4.03 10.99 8.79 0.75 407 43.92 1.90 Rate: EDT = 25% of Rated Strength 77 .68 6.40 172.15 54.92 8.24 1.61 0.95 7.61 1.11 9.69 5. Stranding Section Approximate Rated Strength Span No Code Alloy and wire Area 32 oC Area diameter OD Mass sq.86 1.33 0.55 603.93 4.33 0.72 8.54 9.88 1.66 16179 18 Morkulla 605 61/3.40 6939 8638 10358 11971 15 Zebra 465 37/4.63 0.98 1.70 288.50 17.80 31.43 7.34 3.90 18.64 2387 2984 3736 8 Dog (up) Coyote Wolf 150 19/3.11 1031 4 Rabbit 55 7/3.27 10.66 5982 11 12 13 14 230 290 345 400 19/3.72 8.58 1.93 8.54 9.66 199.26 36.10 15.03 10.28 10.69 7.94 1771 178.43 8.33 0.56 1.78 14.45 37/3.08 9.89 10.76 6.50 7/2.14 8.25 160ss 0.27 9.30 6.90 0.87 1.30 549 58.45 442 658 3 Weasel 34 7/2.47 7.50 34.05 1.77 6.94 m m 0.73 21.80 32.15 148.00 474 50.73 6.99 5.81 99.34 5.47 5.33 6.29 1919 193.66 641.50 94 10.38 13907 16 Zebra (UP) 525 61/3.05 1574 158.81 7/4.50 4436 175 19/3. m 50 75 100 196 211 227 279 292 309 292 320 348 427 442 460 440 472 506 674 690 710 686 721 763 692 737 788 990 1040 1097 1226 1278 1340 1507 1561 1627 Wind pressure kg/sq.15 25.03 10. 33/1991 (R) & Sizes to IS 398 (Part IV): 1994 Mechanical Parameters Sr.03 14891 17 Moose 570 61/3.76 6.00 2116 213. EQVT. Kgf 1 2 Mole Squirrel 15 20 3/2.58 1. m 43 45 52 1743 1755 1798 1740 1753 1800 2007 2020 2065 2002 2015 2065 2306 2319 2366 2298 2312 2363 2609 2627 2693 3163 3181 3249 3754 3773 3844 4255 4277 4360 4207 4232 4324 4905 4928 5013 4844 4869 4964 5176 5200 5288 5106 5132 5231 5522 5549 5649 5472 5501 5608 5831 5858 5959 5778 5807 5914 6175 6202 6304 6117 6146 6255 6663 6690 6794 6598 6628 6738 7314 7342 7447 7241 7270 7382 Sag 53 ° C 75 ° C 90 ° C Nil wind m 0.97 637 68.13 8.45 149 16.77 124.ALL ALLUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTORS (AAAC) REC.80 8.93 8.12 8.79 1.26 19/2.71 231.05 24.33 3.05 1.89 10.98 1.

2234 b)0.05732 777 981 1217 .10779 530 660 811 0.2286 b)2.10013 0.1418 1.10015 0.00 a) 0.13420 0.55 a) 0.05865 0.ALL ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTORS (AAAC) REC Spn.9900 4.07340 16.11211 0.66 a)0.3325 266 325 394 0.5896 2.1471 12.9580 b)0.3836 0.13800 0.05980 18.05177 b) 0.2654 b)0.14450 442 548 670 0.00 a)1.12391 487 605 742 0.2301 0. Moose(up) 640 61/3.08246 623 781 963 0.09018 589 736 905 0.08550 15.7230 0.1846 382 471 575 0. Wolf(up) 200 19/3. Weasel 34 7/2./mm W /km 1.4969 b)1.3955 0.2232 0. Area And Wire a)Standard Diameter b)Maximum sq.3945 0.5410 3.6559 2. Kundah 400 37/3.3181 0.66 a) 0.4133 232 283 343 0.3299 b)0.06330 b) 0. Morkulla 605 61/3.05340 20.6034 b)0.07668 0.11510 0.06925 0.13830 0. Dog(up) 125 19/2. Bersimis 765 61/4.3279 0.1710 11.06037 0.10320 0. Morkulla (up) 695 61/3.05827 b) 0.7438 0.1918 b)0.6699 2.06150 0.8742 92 110 132 1. 33/1991/(R) & Sizes for IS 398 (Part IV)/1994 Electrical Parameters Sr.07227 676 849 1049 0.81 a) 0.89 a)0.06525 0.1664 0.6210 5.07407 663 833 1028 0.0325 W -mm2/mm and nominal diameter of wires (b) At resistivity 0.2076 354 436 532 0.4067 0.05341 0.06808 700 881 1089 0. Panther (up) 290 37/3.7556 160 194 234 0.06297 734 925 1145 0.50 a)0.07691 0.07130 b) 0.05196 0.1133 1. Rabbit 55 7/3. Zebra 465 37/4.05348 0.26 a)0.3427 262 320 389 0.5325 199 242 293 0.3087 0.8467 1.11863 0.2470 320 393 478 0.5095 0.15 a)0.0325 W -mm2/mm and minimum diameter of wires 78 AC Resistance at Current Capacity 65 ° C 75 ° C 90 ° C 65 ° C 75 ° C 90 ° C W /km W /km W /km Amps Amps Amps 2. Panther (up) 345 37/3.1987 0.2363 0. mm nos.06724 0.07008 686 862 1065 0.04778 b) 0.9950 121 146 175 1.06521 0.04920 21.40 a)0. Dog(up)/Coyote 150 19/3.1772 1.1969 10.08289 b)0.2735 8.04335 b) 0.15 a)0.08637 0.2674 0.2302 119 144 173 0.2756 0.2880 291 357 434 0.1716 0.08888 0.11500 b)0.2404 324 398 485 0.05576 788 995 1234 0.06117 745 939 1162 0.08627 0.1767 0.31 a) 0.7934 1.09840 14. ACSR code Nom Alloy Stranding DC Resistance No.1988 0.06337 0.15 a)0.5166 202 246 297 0.71 a)0.4250 229 272 338 0.05503 b) 0.09585 b)0.4795 0.3390 7.2599 0.0580 19.94 a)0.09717 0.07282 0.14230 0.11820 13.1714 0.7773 158 191 231 0.2049 0.45 a) 0.1655 b)0. Zebra (up) 525 61/3.7395 1.08383 0.08028 632 792 976 0. Squirrel 20 7/2.09281 580 725 892 0.07070 0.45 a)0.4250 6.9299 90 109 130 1. EQVT.2141 349 430 524 0.06891 0.1927 0.07601 655 822 1015 0.2800 395 362 440 0.2680 0.00 a) 0.14860 436 540 661 0.3040 2.2290 9.04460 Note: Resistance (a) At resistivity 0.7381 2.50 a)2.8616 72 87 104 1. Wolf 175 19/3. Moose 570 61/3. Raccoon 80 7/3.05697 0.06607 711 894 1106 0.06716 0.3182 0.4942 0.12069 493 613 752 0.1792 387 478 584 0.07466 0.11554 0.81 a)0.4125 b)0. Dog 100 7/4.07899 0.2293 0.06332 0.10457 538 670 824 0. Mole 15 3/2.7215 0.7013 0.1428 b)0.4943 0.06510 17.7912 1.1478 1.05864 0. Panther 232 19/3.05497 0.7902 33 88 105 2.07097 0.

77 3.34 3.51 25.41 2.81 7/4.998 10.38 6.00 7/2.26 Diameter Min.882 2.40 12.88 3.85 3.00 2.80 2.ALL ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTORS (AAAC) REC Spn-No. 33/1984 (R-1991) Distribution Conductors to REC Standards AAAC Size to Size equivalent to ACSR Code Nominal Alu-Area Stranding And Wire Diameter mm2 Mole Squirrel Weasel Rabbit Raccoon Dog 14 20 30 50 80 100 Sectional Area mm2 14.18 2.50 7/2.473 0.15 7/3.00 4.86 3.50 7/3.621 16.03 1.50 2.28 3.45 11.89 2.97 0.41 21.51 3.26 Approx.50 9.00 7. Mass kg/km 40.845 2.96 4.43 12.55 3.55 79.90 3.605 9.793 8.37 3.560 7. Resistance Calculated Breaking at 20 ° C Load (Maximum) kN W /km 2.69 2.98 4.079 9. mm (1) 2.23 24.60 2.77 3.20 218.344 ALUMINIUM ALLOY WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF STRANDED ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTORS as per IS – 398 Part IV/1994 Nom.66 3.25 17.78 Approx.92 33.044 0.677 2.17 3.19 30.187 3.04 23.72 26.73 21.52 10. mm (3) 2.48 Minimum Breaking Load Resistance at 20 ° C Before After Maximum Stranding Stranding kN kN W /km (6) (7) (8) 0.89 3.304 4.909 6.75 3.71 3.40 3.663 4.66 3.78 32.93 38.467 0.34 2.26 272.348 9.75 3.938 3.746 3.02 2.990 10.94 4.345 79 .142 4.653 1.81 11.106 0.25 3.339 29.101 3.81 3.09 3.290 2.00 149.29 4.40 4.77 mm 3/2.47 2.52 1. Overall Diameter mm 5.70 3.25 Mass kg/km (5) 8.15 3.19 12.92 3.31 3.18 3.425 23.571 3.04 4. mm (2) 1.390 3.53 2.92 10.30 Cross Sectional Area of Nominal Diameter of Wire mm2 (4) 3.67 3.58 2.45 3.43 3.24 26.86 Calculated Approx.106 2.53 3.98 2.36 54.482 13.42 3.81 99.66 2.34 3.331 1.91 3.44 6.59 3.48 3.13 94.52 3.12 3.541 6.93 5.57 14.99 34.62 3.71 21.13 60.22 Max.

60 468.00 13975 13 Drake 400 14 Kundah 400 15 Zebra 420 26/4./mm sq mm sq mm mm kg/k Rated Strength kN Kgf 1 Mole 2 Squirrel 10 20 6+1/1.37 1.5 404.00 974 89.50 14.75 26/2.73 8.50 597.40 18190 17 Moose 520 54+7/3.06 7.30 13289 16 Deer 420 30+7/4.31 7.80 29.47 4.72 105.11 10.53 844 77.00 31.50 6+1/2.31 0.36 7.25 5.69 5.57 12.33 43 85 3.20 9.71 324.40 148.40 4739 726 67.76 11.83 91.60 16275 18 Morkulla 560 19 Bersimis 690 42/4.17 9.90 14977 +7/2.52 12.30 42/4.20 12253 +7/2.79 183.00 212.10 425.24 6. Code Nom.25 1861 6+1/4.24 4.66 4.00 28.60 529.97 12.91 30+7/2.63 9.89 +7/1.70 31.96 54+7/3.20 15.43 13.37 12.97 1488 137.81 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1034 1034 1183 1183 1717 1717 1998 2286 3494 3494 3544 2264 2264 2264 3322 3322 4548 4548 4069 4069 3063 3063 3744 Wind pressure kg/sq.60 20.35 9.13 492 40.60 5.77 128 11.90 484.44 402.27 429.96 42/3.28 131.68 1781 120.89 1979 178.57 319 394 26.30 400.59 13.65 1.88 1281 88.40 226.73 1.57 688.34 0.05 8.27 6/4.95 5.52 6.77 1998 159. m 43 45 52 1612 1625 1672 1597 1611 1664 1782 1795 1845 1771 1786 1839 2428 2441 2489 2413 2427 2479 2739 2755 2815 3095 3113 3180 4628 4647 4719 4555 4576 4656 4679 4703 4794 3021 3049 3156 3082 3110 3212 3021 3049 3156 4338 4362 4454 4265 4292 4390 5841 4863 5863 5748 5772 5863 5155 5182 5283 5101 5129 5234 3947 3977 4089 3899 3929 4044 4686 4717 4834 4.70 152.44 6.91 2744 32. ACSR No.44 12.50 6.74 1.81 +7/1.48 4.17 10.12 1134 4 Rabbit 50 6+1/3.20 19.73 9.94 4.92 5.20 15.70 12.50 21.15 +7/1.97 405 7.40 35.09 78.98 12.05 214 18.54 80 6/5.93 11.70 11.80 9054 +7/1. Alum Area Stranding Sectional Area Approximate and Wire Alum Total OD Mass Diameter Alm +Steel sq m Nos.24 10.78 10.11 1628 139.53 528.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS STEEL REINFORCED (ACSR) Sizes to IS 398 (Part II) / 1976 Mechanical Parameters Sr.61 776 3 Weasel 30 6+1/2.18 428.04 2187 146.24 7.59 31.67 1.54 131.90 724.00 25.88 61.72 8.62 11.80 4.13 562.68 1.70 10.00 118.10 261.70 591.34 6867 Span Tension 32 ° C m Kgf 67 67 107 67 107 67 107 125 125 125 240 260 260 275 260 275 300 320 320 350 350 380 350 380 350 380 350 380 380 400 380 400 400 0° C Sag 53 ° C 75 ° C 90 ° C m m m 101 194 194 284 284 465 465 465 686 826 Kgf Kgf Kgf Wind pressure kg/sq.41 3305 5 Raccoon 6 Dog 80 100 7 Leopard 130 8 Coyote 130 9 Wolf 150 10 Lynx 11 Panther 12 Goat 180 200 320 30+7/2.20 26.70 4150 522 46.96 7950 30+7/3.61 36.16 4.75 4.20 8.65 9.5 158.37 24.67 9144 30+7/3.35 52.63 10.10 194.22 8.88 7.50 28. m 50 75 100 174 187 201 325 341 370 339 360 404 475 493 514 487 523 564 774 793 818 780 823 873 784 838 899 1135 1196 1267 1389 1457 1537 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.62 0.90 18.62 1621 130.64 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA .00 14175 +7/1.

+ Steel Nos.165 0. Zebra Deer Moose Morkulla 420 420 520 560 19.09 6/4.2663 0.262 0. 18.91 30+7/2.07111 0.75 26/2.1082 0.35 6+1/4.08164 0.0524 NA 791 998 NA Note: Current Capacity at a = 0.9291 0.2246 0.305 0.53 42/4./ mm 6+1/1.09217 NA 566 705 NA 0. Mole Squirrel Weasel Rabbit Raccoon Dog 10 20 30 50 80 100 7.1871 0.1909 0. s = 985.28 +7/1.139 0.07309 0.3129 NA 274 335 NA 0.79 30+7/3.06681 NA NA NA NA 590 605 667 688 737 756 836 862 NA NA NA NA 0. 10.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS STEEL REINFORCED (ACSR) Sizes to IS 398 (Part II) / 1976 Electrical Parameters Sr.777 1.50 6+1/2.05232 0.44 +3. No.96 54+7/3. Bersimis 690 Stranding DC Current Capacity in AC Resistance at in W /km and Wire Resistance amperes Diameter at 20 ° C Alm.30 42/4.394 0.54 65 ° C 75 ° C 90 ° C 65 ° C 75 ° C 90 ° C W /km W /km W /km W /km amps amps amps 2.06869 0.5216 0.5.06854 0.2226 0.59 6+1/3. 16. ACSR Code Nom. 6. 13.11 6+1/2.08709 0. v = 2200 Ambient Temperature 40oC at sea level 81 .06881 0.72 +7/1.5524 0.958 1.08699 0.5.27 54+7/3.00 30+7/3. mm 1. 11.57 +7/2.71 26/4.1974 0.3924 NA NA NA NA NA NA 58 89 114 157 200 239 70 107 138 190 244 291 NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.2754 NA 292 358 NA 0.08416 0. 4.1119 0. Wolf Lynx Panther Goat Drake 150 180 200 320 400 14.3712 0.2295 0.06467 0.05596 0.7506 0.13 +7/2. e = 0.05092 0. Kundah 400 15.09003 NA NA NA NA NA 329 361 395 510 578 405 445 487 634 721 NA NA NA NA NA 0. 17.3026 0.18 30+7/4. Coyote 130 9. 2.5044 0.2219 0.54 +7/1.57 6/5. Alum. Area sq.0844 0.45 42/3.78 1. 5.894 1.2792 3.59 30+7/2. 3.7761 0.07269 0. Leopard 130 8.161 0.5 +7/1.09106 0.1706 0.3794 3.04242 0. 12.08917 0.905 1.

50 34 2.65 82 Calculated Eq: area of Aluminium mm2 .73 230 0.0 20.0 421.0 26.13560 3381 19/3.87870 580 7/2.0 209.39 65.34220 1356 7/4.0 77.44 20.63 1343 0.66 45.22 160.0 83.79 25.90 414 0.45260 1051 7/3.0 233.18 90.32600 220 7/1.60 28.80 19.0 104. 7/1.89 1464 0./Km Resistance At 20 ° C W /Km.0 62.30090 1523 7/4.50 29.17 290 0.27 325.21520 2228 19/3.08959 4947 19/5.27150 1673 19/3.50 7.40 40. And Nominal Copper Diameter of Area wires mm mm2 Approx.95 652 0.0 52.0 148.00 1025 0. mm Kg.78 48. Overall diameter Approx.37 7.63 73 1.0 132.00 225.0 518.50 15.86 10.26 9.90 26.89 5.21 16.56 12.50 21.0 317.96 13.36620 1272 7/3.39060 1203 7/3.90 586 0.36200 385 7/2.09 300.88 58 1.99 140.5 12.67210 737 7/3.20 15.10 30.56 6.15550 2985 19/3.10880 4144 185.90 18.0 183.10 730 0.05982 7289 37/4.51 261 0.54440 892 7/3.07749 5695 19/5.19160 2484 19/3.13 11.50 23.06743 6516 37/4.25 886 0.17 60.70 11.ALL ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS (TO IS 398) No.36 260.80 1176 0.00 80.95 201 0. Wt.91 50.33 8.0 261.32 89 0.12170 3736 19/4.30 144 0.78 130.07100 485 7/2.05488 7878 19/4.0 32.20 25. Ultimate Strength of Condr.84 10.0 473.0 367.53 110.00 369 0.0 94.37 117 0.34 215 0.20 174 0.23 4.65 511 0. Kg.00 17.80 13.0 42.0 72.

66 1/3.66 12/2.15890 7950 30/3.50 55 94.79 7/2.40 26.09 48 77.99 225 366.59 20 31.21 7.18440 6880 30/2.77 1466 536 2002 0.38410 2613 6/4.87 6/3.35 1/3.0 14.50 1/1.0 69. in Kg.36 80 128.37400 771 34 106 1. Steel Kg.STRANDED STEEL-CORED ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS (TO IS: 398) No.93 1035 691 1726 0.66 227 109 336 0.50 258 124.50 7/1.11 7.09 1/4.67950 1503 52.06125 14750 54/3.58 13.60 14.45650 2207 7/2.5 604 0.21 10.34340 2983 6/4.5 10.53 497 347 844 0.95 199 334 533 0.36 1/2. diameter mm2 mm Approx.06786 18230 30/4.71 7/3.5 240. Nominal Calculated Approx.00 130 207.30 18.97 203 98 301 0.50 15.36 16 25.12230 10210 30/3.89 357 165 522 0.50 22.70 15.15 1314 492 1804 0.79 42 71.79 Resistance Ultimate strength at 20 ° C Kg.70 31.11020 11310 30/3.50 1317 887 2196 0.52 363.39770 6108 6/3.59 7/2.36560 2746 6/4.26 657 443 1100 0.35 30 6/3.82 1114 168 1282 0. Steel mm.98 173 82 255 0. mm.97 878 610 1488 0.30 29.22 50 82.0 Complete conductor Kg.71800 407 85 1.35 160 258.76 80 129. Wt. 43 6/2.18 140 232.27 260 419.50 30.91160 1137 9.33 58 27 6/2.50 7/4.83 12.50 300 465.27 215 104 319 0.0 382 0.45 651 492 1143 0.96 250 394.13750 9127 30/3.72 7/1.05 145.10 27.00 1/3.11 1/2.54490 1860 40 62.22 1/4.81 356 136 492 0.30200 3324 6/4.21930 4137 26/2.99 45 74.08989 13780 30/3.27 7/4.32 10.85 12. and Diameter of wires Alu.00 25 41./Km Alu.11 13 20.36 7/2.08 72 6/2.07 11.00 19.47 4. Copper Area Eq: area of overall mm2 Alu.53 325 515. W /Km 2.16 287 107 394 0.59 1/2.71 185 316.77 6/3.71 6.50 6.00 116 55.50 29.99 1/3.59 95 154.0 171 0. Kg.35 7/3.18 7/3.535 7/3. 6/1.07771 15910 42/3.70 31.00 21.27450 3299 6/5.54 7/1.50 25.90 80 128.10 16.09800 952 87 41 128 0.28 7/1.57 65 103.99 7/3.0 214 0.07434 9002 30/4.50 1/4.79 110 179.22140 4638 30/2.35 7/3.00 587 387 974 0.22210 5758 30/2.13 428 298 726 0.89 1163 816 1979 0.00 7/3.06110 20240 54/3.05517 16250 83 .21 13.10 23.55 300 464.

079 1.57 9. Diameter 84 Nominal Min Max Cross Sectional Area of Nominal Diameter Wire 1 2 3 4 2 Breaking Load (Min) Mass Before Stranding After Stranding 5 6 7 kg/km kN KN mm mm mm mm 1.54 0.55 1.63 0.50 3.942 21.51 2.46 3.94 3.265 1.64 Note: 1.13 3.52 1.00 3.35 3. 13.49 3.28 3.32 0.03 7.194 2.53 3.16 9.30 1.78 16.91 3.46 3.01 4.76 3.00 2.72 4.49 3.43 1.650 2.1 and 13.954 1.13 4.38 8.269 14.37 2.45 2. 13.67 4.34 30.09 2.53 4.54 2.95 10.497 9.27 4.53 3.767 4.1.17 1.ALUMINIUM WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS.11 3.17 13.97 3.1.787 76.2.60 1.15 3.86 12.621 26.89 0.60 4.21 7.99 2.069 55.45 8.14 102.814 23.36 3.30 2.85 3.09 4.29 1.94 1.5.96 1.01 3.02 4.1.60 2.47 1.151 2.12 3.017 8.20 3.27 16.09 6.56 2.70 2.62 5.92 2.80 3.09 4.15 3.40 36.59 2.64 5.06 7.46 5.51 2.98 4.269 41.18 3.57 1.60 9.50 1.6) (IS : (Part II) 1996) Diameter Nominal Min Max Cross Sectional Area of Nominal Diameter Wire 1 2 3 4 2 Breaking Load (Min) Mass Resistance 20 oC 5 6 7 8 kg/km Ohm/km kN kN Before After Stranding Stranding mm mm mm mm 1.545 1.48 1.18 3.767 13. The resistance has been calculated from the maximum value of restivity and the cross sectional based on the minimum diameter.24 5.50 1.10 2.09 4. 13.11 2.24 7.57 1.78 2.71 4.19 2.50 47. GALVANIZED STEEL-REINFORCED (Clauses 6.41 5.14 35.3.46 2.13 13.75 11.490 0.59 2.35 4.561 0.65 2.54 9.006 1.8.41 .42 8.29 8.17 13.13 9.58 11.35 3.92 6.787 26.00 3.497 27.432 0.57 3.32 3.47 3.30 1.23 3.54 1.80 1.82 3.96 1.98 3.11 2.21 2.155 32.34 1.43 9.626 1.07 2.1.814 68. STEEL WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS.237 0.78 2.25 2.34 12.48 17.00 2.47 3.84 11.11 4.77 17.017 23.53 1.942 61.83 3.05 4.13 2.22 4.069 19.08 1.57 1.936 15.

50 10.052 31 120.618 6.70 10. LAY RATIO OF ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS .59 31.68 1781 0.97 12.32 520 54/3. 85 .98 24.88 7.068 68 130.0 13 28 10 14 10 16 - - 42 7 1.96 18.88 61.91 100 6/4.74 20 6/2. Wire Layer Min Max Min Max Min Max 6 1 1.59 7/2.37 4.60 12.055 95 159.139 0 89.16 Nominal Aluminium Note : For the basis at calculation at this table (see appendix A) The Sectional area is the sum of the cross .12 50 6/3.62 1621 0.00 212.34 200 30/3.0 118.57 105.1 425. TABLE 4. the mean lay ratio shall be taken as the arithmetic mean of the relevant minimum and maximum values given in this table.05 214 0.9 18.50 43 2.371 2 26. GALVANIZED STEEL-REINFORCED 1 2 Number of wires Alu Steel 3 4 5 Rate of Alu.25 80 6/4.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS.59 158.96 404. Aluminium Steel Sectional Area of Aluminium 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 mm2 mm mm mm2 mm2 mm kg/km Ohm/km kN 10 6/1.279 2 32.11 20.2) 1996 Stranding and Wire Diameter Total Sectional Area Approximate Diameter Approximate Mass Calculated Resistance at20 oC (Max) Approximate Calculated Breaking Load.1 194.50 1/1.67 400 42/3.7 591.10 21.61 36.13 7.5 597.96 1/1.59 1/2.27 319 0.50 7/1.18 7/3. GALVANIZED STEEL-REINFORCED IS 398 (Part .0 13 28 10 14 - - - - 30 7 1.09 78.2.00 7/3.8 13 28 10 14 10 16 10 17 54 7 1.00 974 0.11 1/2.073 11 88.30 562.2 26.88 1281 0.5 14.7 31.5 21.18 428.83 91.48 6.72 7/1.33 85 1.79 420 54/3.1 261.13 726 0.15 394 0.53 528.9 484.928 9 11. Wire Lay Ratio for Steel Diameter to Core ( 6 wire Layer ) Steel Wire Diameter Min Max 6 7 8 9 10 11 Lay Ratios for Aluminium Wire Outermost Layer Layer Immediately Beneath Outermost Layer Innermost Layer of Conductors with 3 ALU.97 18 6/1.61 30 6/2.35 1/3.552 4 18.35 52.41 150 30/2.0 13 28 10 14 10 16 10 17 Note : For the purpose of calculation.5 28.0 - - 10 14 - - - - 6 7 3.0 31.09 1/4.77 128 0.sectional area of the relevant individual wires.394 7.77 1998 0.12 5.60 560 42/4.88 73 1.780 3.187 1 67.53 7/3.

032 0. 86 .90 7. Coefficients of linear expansions have been calculated from the final (Practical) moduli for the aluminium and steel components of the conductors and coefficients of linear expansion of 23 X 10-6 and 11.23 7. Moduli values quoted may be regarded as being accurate to within ± GN/m2.018 94 MODULUS OF ELASTICITY AND COEFFICIENT OF LINEAR EXPANSION Number of wires Coefficient of Linear Expansion /oC Aluminium Steel Final Modulus of Elasticity (Practical) GN/m2 1 2 3 4 6 1 79 19.091 1.3X10-6 Notes.032 0.5 X 10-6/ 0C for aluminium and steel respectively.Standing Constants Number of wires in conductor Mass Stranding Constant Electrical Resistance Aluminium Steel Aluminium Steel 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 6.032 0.1X 10-6 6 7 75 19. These values are given for information only.169 2 30 7 30.5X10-6 54 7 69 19. 1.024 32 54 7 55.034 08 42 7 42. 2.8X 10 –6 30 7 80 17.091 7.169 2 6 7 6.000 0. 4. 3.8X10-6 42 7 62 21.032 0. Moduli values quoted may be taken as applying to conductors stressed between 15 and 50 percent of the ultimate strength of the conductor.67 7.

5+7/1.72+7/1.99 203 98 301 13 Otter* 50 6+1/4.18+7/3.57+7/2.71 878 610 1488 22 Drake 400 26/4. area Size Nos.50+7/4.54 1903 284 2187 29 Bear* 250 30/3.09 215 104 319 10 Mink* 40 6+1/3.66 173 82 255 11 Horse* 42 12+7/2.0 14./mm Approximate Weight in kg/km Aluminium Steel 1 Mole 10 6+1/1.WEIGHT OF ALUMINUM.13+7/2.0 2 Squirrel 18 6+1/1.59 428 298 726 19 LYRX* 180 30+7/2.79 199 334 533 12 Bever* 45 6+1/3.53 1466 536 2002 27 Morkulla 560 42/4.18 657 443 1100 31 Sheep* 350 30/3.35+7/3.99 1035 691 1726 32 EK* 460 30/4.0 (Complete conductor) Total 43.50 258 124 382 15 Dog 100 6/4.91 357 165 522 18 Wolf 150 30+7/2.22 227 109 336 14 Cat* 55 6+1/4.00 587 387 974 21 Goat* 320 30+7/3. No.30 1523 258 1781 28 Bersimis 690 42/4.50 1317 887 2204 33 Camel* 460 54/3.35 1314 492 1806 Note: Code name and sizes marked *.35 145 69 214 9 Raccoon 80 6+1/4.75 356 136 492 17 Coyote* 130 26/2.54+7/1.35+7/3.28+7/1. Code Name Nominal Alu. STEEL AND TOTAL WEIGHT IN KG/KM FOR ACSR CONFIRMING TO IS 398(P-II) / 1996 Sr. though not appearing in IS in particular.0 3 Squirrel 20 6+1/2.5 23.45 1087 541 1628 23 Kundah 400 42/3.79 100 48 148 7 Ferret* 25 6+1/3.27 1163 816 1979 26 Moose 520 54+7/3.59 87 41 128 6 Fox* 23 6+1/2.96 49.36 72 34 106 5 Weasel 30 6+1/2.96 1114 168 1282 24 Zebra 420 54+7/3. these ranges can be supplied confirming to IS 398 (P-II) / 1996 87 .00 116 55 171 8 Rabbit 50 6+1/3.5 73.57 287 107 394 16 Leopard* 130 6/5.50 29.11 58 27 85 4 Gopher* 16 6+1/2.99+7/3.44+7/3.18 1186 435 1621 25 Deer* 420 30+7/4.79 497 347 844 20 Panther 200 30+7/3.35 651 497 1143 30 Lion* 230 30/3.

65 1. 11.2 and 11. 6. The ultimate breaking load of the specimen shall be not less than the appropriate value specified in Table 1. 12.20) Where R20 = resitance corrected at 20OC. Breaking Load Test – The breaking load of one specimen cut from each of the sample taken shall be determined by means of a suitable tensile testing machine.47 33. Resistance Test – The electrical resistance of one specimen cut from each of the samples taken shall be measured at ambient temperature. 3. RT = resitance measured at TOC.40 2. 12.2 If any selected coil fails after retest.004.322 1.29 1.23 3.50 15.80 40. 0.843 3.60 (3) mm 2.4) (IS: 398 – Part I / 1976) Diameter Nom Min Max Cross Sectional Area of Nominal Diameter Wire (1) mm 2.1. a fraction of a lot being counted as a complete lot.35 4. the number of lots being equal to the number of samples to be selected.37 20.18 3.98 1.56 Note: 1.65 (2) mm 2.194 1. 2.95 4. In respect of each failure. 4. The wire shall not break or show any crack. REJECTION AND RETEST 12. The load shall be applied gradually and the rate of separation of the jaws of the testing machine shall be not less than 25 mm/min and not greater than 100 mm/min.942 12.IS: 398 – Part I / 1978 (ALUMINIUM STRANDED CONDUCTOR) 1.1 Should any specimen not fulfil any of the test requirements. The resistance has been calculated from the maximum values of resistivity and the cross-sectional area based on the minimum diameter.10 3.712 Breaking Load Minimum Before After Standing Standing (7) (8) kN kN 0. TABLE-1: ALUMINIUM WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALUMINIUM STRANDED CONDUCTORS (Clauses 4.18 1. and ambient temperature during measurement. Maximum (6) W /km 7.14 16.21 3.mass temperature coefficient of resistance. The measured resistance shall be corrected to the value at 20oC by means of the formula: R20 = RT 1 1+a (T .43 4.68 0.1.90 Resistance at 20° C.1.548 7.836 7.15 3. The resistance corrected at 20 oC shall be not more than the maximum value specified in Table 1.39 4.553 3.21 4. One sample spool shall be selected at random from each lot. a = T = constant . two specimen shall be selected from two different coils in the lot and subjected to the test in which failure occurred.24 1.28 2.07 3.88 2. 88 .99 4. the lot shall be rejected.70 2. 2. 6.98 Mass (5) kg/km 10.13 3. If either of the two specimen fails to pass that test. The resistance of that individual wires shall be such that the completed standard conductor meets the requirements of the maximum resistance specified in the Table 2 calculated by applying the relevant stranding constants given in Table 4. Six turns shall then be unwrapped and again closely wrapped in the same direction as before. the particular coil from which the sample was taken shall be withdrawn. Spools offered for inspection shall be divided* into equal lots.91 45. the manufacturer may test each coil and submit those for further inspection.40 21.2.651 2.23 1.19 3.1.03 4.70 (4) mm2 3. Wrapping Test – One specimen cut from each of the samples taken shall be wrapped round a mandrel of diameter equal to the wire diameter to form a close helix of 8 turns.

556 1 8. Max Breaking Load 5 6 7 kg/km kN W /km 74 1.74 Note: 1. in terms of the strengths of the individual component wires. For the basis of calculation of this table.2 and A-2-3) (IS: 398 – Part I / 1976) Number of Wires in Conductor 1 7 19 Lay Ratio 6 Wire Layer Min 2 10 10 12 Wire Layer Max 3 14 16 Min 4 10 Max 5 14 NOTES ON THE CALCULATION OF TABLE 2 A-1 INCREASE IN LENGTH DUE TO STRANDING A-1.1.90 19.3 In calculating the stranding constants in Table 4. The total mass of any length of an aluminum stranded conductor is.091 71 48. is longer than the stranded conductor by an amount depending on the lay ratio of that year. A-3 CALCULATED BREAKING LOAD OF CONDUCTOR A-3. may be taken to be 95 percent of the sum of the strengths of the individual aluminium wires calculated from the specified minimum tensile strength.6 322. A-2. therefore obtained by multiplying the mass of an equal length of straight wire by an appropriate constant. and Table 1 (Note 2) (IS: 398 – Part I / 1976) Nominal Aluminium Area 1 mm2 25 50 100 150 240 300 Stranding And Wire Diameter 2 mm 7/2. each wire in any particular layer of a stranded conductor.1 above).277 0 15. as set out in Table 4. as set out in Table 4. TABLE 3 LAY RATIOS FOR ALUMINIUM STRANDED CONDUCTORS (Clauses 8. except the central wire. will be greater than that of an equal length of straight wire by an amount depending on the lay ratio of that layer (see A-1. has been assumed for each layer. that is the arithmetic mean of the relevant minimum and maximum values in Table 3.83 106.39 19/3.7 Approximate Overall Diameter 4 mm 6.195 6 23.63 9.1 When straightned out. The Sectional area of a stranded conductor has been taken as the sum of the cross sectional areas of the individual wires.99 19/4.1 The resistance of any length of a standard conductor is the resistance of the same length of any one wire multiplied by a constant.1 The breaking load of an aluminum stranded conductor containing not more than 37 wires.28 654 0.124 4 35.95 23.85 52. the mean lay ratio.2 The mass of each wire in any particular layer of stranded conductor.52 145 0. A-2. see appendix A 2.2.25 290 0.093 4.25 Approximate Calculated Approximate Mass Resistance at Calculated 20 °C. 89 . except the central wire. 6.21 7/3.74 888 0.9 237.0 150.30 131.18 19/3.65 Sectional Area 3 mm2 26.7 15.2.10 7/4.2. A-2 RESISTANCE AND MASS OF CONDUCTOR A-2.96 415 0.TABLE 2 ALUMINIUM STRANDED CONDUCTORS Clauses 6.

A-2.95 4. 3. The resistance has been calculated from the maximum values of resistivity and the cross-sectional area based on the minimum diameter.28 1.24 1.2.0 x 10-4 Note: 1.80 40.35 4. 6.1.21 3.503 0.5) (IS: 398 – Part I / 1976 – Amendment 2 / July '93) Nom mm 2. 2.18 3.1.65 3. 90 . These values are given for information only.40 2.70 mm2 3.053 57 MODULUS OF ELASTICITY AND COEFFICIENT OF LINEAR EXPANSION (Clause 0.5) (IS: 398 – Part I / 1976) No.98 Mass kg/km 10.91 45.39 4. 2.10 3. 6.1.942 12.70 2.34 1 7 19 Stranding Constants Electrical Resistance 3 0.306 1. A-2.1. TABLE 1 ALUMINIUM WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALUMINIUM STRANDED CONDUCTORS (Clauses 4.902 2.88 1.0 x 10-4 23.43 4.836 7. Moduli values quoted may be regarded as being accurate to within 3 GN/m2.144 7 0.TABLE 4: STRANDING CONSTANTS (Clauses A-2.091 19.37 20.68 0.2.47 33.818 1. of Wires Final Modulus of Elasticity (Practical) GN/m2 59 60 7 19 Coefficient of Linear Expansion/° C 23.65 Diameter Cross Sectional Minimum Maximum Area of Nominal Diameter Wire mm 2. Before After Maximum Standing Standing kN kN W /km 7.548 7.07 3.626 1.13 3. The resistance of that individual wires shall be such that the completed standard conductor meets the requirements of the maximum resistance specified in the table 2 calculated by applying the relevant stranding constants given in table 4.50 15.15 3.98 1.3 and Table 1 (Note 2)) Number of Wires In Conductor Mass 2 7.2 and 11. 11.60 mm 2.03 4.23 3.90 Resistance at Breaking Load Minimum 20 °C.700 2.56 Note: 1.1.4) (Clause 0.99 4.23 2.19 3.40 21.21 4.14 16.29 1.18 3. Moduli values quoted may be taken as applying to conductors stressed between 15 and 50 percent of the ultimate strength of the conductor.

85 52.50 Kg/km 4.23 3. The resistance has been calculated from the maximum value of resistivity and the cross sectional area based on the minimum diameter.45 30.49 3.32 0.35 3.11 21. 7.09 4.78 8.069 7.2.21 47.625 0. and Table 1 (Note 2) (IS: 398 – Part I / 1976 – Amendment 2 / July '93) Nominal Aluminium Area Stranding And Wire Diameter mm2 25 50 100 150 240 300 mm 7/2.54 3. The resistance of the individual wire shall be such that the completed stranded conductor meets the requirements of the maximum resistance specified in Table 3 calculated by applying the relevant standing constants given in table 5.21 7/3.14 13.08 1.40 17.09 2.83 106.13 4.82 26.64 Note: 1.80 4.787 11.11 2.208 2.293 0. 91 .32 3.36 3.57 1.017 3.65 Sectional Approximate Area Overall Diameter mm2 26.48 1.78 2.5 and A-32) IS: 398 (part II) 1976 Nom mm 1. 6.30 9.72 Diameter Minimum Maximum mm 1.17 4. For the basis of calculation of this table.45 14.0 150.086 4.24 19.65 35.84 4.814 9.269 7.03 3.54 0.562 1.30 Resistance at 20° C Breaking Load Before After Stranding Stranding kN kN W /km 16.09 4.16 9.34 13.47 2.55 1.25 0.661 2.15 3.25 kg/km 74 145 290 415 654 888 Calculated Approximate Resistance at Calculated 20 °C.18 3.52 1.98 2.12.52 0.77 Cross Sectional Area of Nominal Diameter Wire.1.1. see appendix A 2. Breaking Load Maximum kN W /km 1.59 3.942 8.51 36.05 4.63 0.29 1. GALVANIZED STEEL-REINFORCED (Clauses 5.974 1.275 2 15.TABLE 2 ALUMINIUM STRANDED CONDUCTORS Clauses 6.165 2.767 3.123 5 35. Mass mm2 1.49 2. ALUMINIUM WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS.98 2.026 1.53 3.194 2 23.13 2.56 2.94 2.64 mm 1.62 3.13 2.47 23.13 4.2.95 23.57 3.38 3.71 2.46 3.60 5.2.12.286 1.02 1.11 3.17 1.552 5 8.091 07 48.7 15.527 0.85 4.90 19.63 9.96 2.96 0.1.621 9.99 19/4.97 3.28 0. 2.21 3.18 19/3.30 131.2.76 4.2.01 26.1.50 1.89 0.9 237.1. The Sectional area of a stranded conductor has been taken as the sum of the cross sectional areas of the individual wires.651 1.59 8.1.50 3.6 322. 1.10 7/4.80 1.497 5.39 19/3.74 Note: 1.00 3.7 Approximate Mass mm 6.74 0.54 0.107 1.43 1.

36 26.08 1.47 26.1.006 1.8.497 4.626 1.34 13.2) (IS: 398 (Part II) 1976) Diameter Nom Min Max Cross Sectional Area of Nominal diameter Wire mm 1.60 4.91 68.8.237 0.13 2.47 1.069 7.50 3.75 11.45 2.96 2.23 23.29 8.51 2.787 13.2 and A-3.069 7.49 30.12.767 3.13 9.942 8.59 9.21 2.57 23.85 19.54 3.20 3.49 3.017 3.60 14.50 1.22 102.16 9.41 5.814 9.21 3.84 4.58 11.5.94 3.97 3.621 9.50 1.1.12 3.31.03 3.2.89 0.15 2.95 10.92 6.18 3.64 Note: The resistance has been calculated from the maximum value of resistivity and the cross sectional area based on the minimum diameter.24 5.46 5.83 61.53 4.76 4.11 2. Before After Maximum Stranding Stranding kg/km kN kN W /km 4.80 4.53 4.78 2.30 2.13 2.11 2.1.00 2.53 3.497 5.151 2.814 9.269 7.27 4.54 1.35 3.1.490 0.13.00 3.13.41 TABLE 1 ALUMINIUM WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS.17 1.14 Breaking Load Minimum Before After Mass Stranding Stranding kg/km kN kN 13.24 3. 92 .35 3.1.57 55.98 2.00 3.57 3.650 2.13 4.38 3.99 27.787 11.59 3.28 3.30 1.1.STEEL WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS GALVANIZED STEEL-REINFORCED (Clauses 6.954 1.78 16.13.70 2.50 Mass Resistance at Breaking Load Min 20 °C.13 4.52 1.32 0.48 1. GALVANIZED STEEL-REINFORCED (Clauses 6.40 17.43 1.86 12.17 mm2 1.53 1.936 3.34 12.46 4.45 8. 13.561 0.017 3.64 mm 1.01 3.09 6.155 5.545 1.8.46 3.57 1.54 0.00 76.63 0.60 2.1 and 13.05 4.78 2.60 4.96 2.71 35.265 1.65 2.77 Cross Sectional Area of Nominal Diameter Wire mm2 1.46 2.1.02 47.42 3.14 13.17 4.194 2.25 2.06 3.94 2.432 0.57 1.62 3.54 2.59 3.942 8.80 1.72 mm 1.09 2.18 3.30 8.64 3.09 4.15 3.48 17.34 15.35 2.767 1.01 mm 1.079 1.6) (IS: 398 (Part II) 1996) Diameter Nom Min Max mm 1.32 3.43 9.92 2.09 4.37 32.47 3.11 21.269 7.09 mm 1.10 2.56 2.82 3.55 1.19 41.07 2.11 4.29 1.27 16.98 36.

given in Table 3 have been calculated in accordance with (b) above and on the basis of the minimum breaking loads of the component wires given in Table 1 and 2.13.50 1.60 4.00 12.1 In aluminium conductors.78 15.92 2.83 10.TABLE 2 STEEL WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS GALVANIZED STEEL – REINFORCED (Clauses 6.54 1. The masses of the steel core and aluminium wires are calculated separately and added together.53 4.96 2.2 The values of approximate breaking load of conductors.19 6. has been assumed for each layer. A-2. the mean lay ratio.10 23.75 76.54 2.64 3. is longer than the stranded conductor by an amount depending on the lay ratio of that layer.069 7.14 Mass Kg/km 13.92 6.35 3.25 2.155 5.11 2. when taken from the stranded conductor and tested: or (b) 98 percent of the sum of the breaking loads of the aluminium wires plus 85 percent of the sum of the breaking loads of the galvanised steel wires.57 4.42 3.22 17.1.13 61.27 16.41 NOTES ON CALCULATION OF RESISTANCE.20 3. may be taken to be as follows: (a) 98 percent of the sum of the breaking loads of the aluminium wires plus 89 percent of the sum of the breaking loads of the galvanized steel wires. except the central wire.01 mm 1.2) (IS: 398 (Part II) 1996) Diameter Nom Min Max Cross Sectional Area of Nominal Diameter Wire mm 1. 93 .00 2.95 68.269 7.58 11.2 The mass of each wire in a length of stranded conductor.017 3. A-3. reinforced in terms of the sum of the strength of the individual component wires.814 9.1 When straightened out.2.47 1.8.53 1.942 8. will be greater than that of an equal length of straight wire by an amount depending on the lay ratio of the layer (see A-1. A-2.99 4.57 1. MASS AND BREAKING LOAD A-1 INCREASE IN LENGTH DUE TO STRANDING A-1.30 2.17 mm2 1. The total mass of any length of conductor is therefore.767 1. steel reinforced the conductivity of the steel core is neglected and the resistance of the conductor is calculated with reference to the resistance of the aluminium wires only.1 The breaking load of an aluminium conductor galvanised steel.28 3.86 12.1). that is.91 11. The resistance of any length of any one aluminium wire multiplied by a constant. the arithmetic mean of the relevant minimum and maximum values in Table 4.41 41.70 2.12 3. each wire in any particular layer of standard conductor.3 In calculating the stranding constant in Table 5.06 3.35 2.27 32.57 9.34 102.59 3.1.787 13.48 Breaking Load Minimum Before After Stranding Stranding kN kN 2. as set out in Table 5. A-3 CALCULATED BREAKING LOAD OF CONDUCTOR A-3. A-2 RESISTANCE AND MASS OF CONDUCTOR A-2.1.07 2.60 2.46 4. and A-3.497 4.46 2.24 3.29 8. based on the minimum breaking loads of the component wires before stranding. except the central wire.53 27.09 mm 1.00 3.46 5.15 2.60 4.94 3.18 3.37 5.43 9.936 3. that is in the coil.34 2. obtained by multiplying the mass of an equal length of straight wire by the approximate constant set out in Table 5.09 55.

Coefficient of linear expansion have been calculated from the final (practical) Moduli for the aluminium and steel components of the conductors and coefficients of linear expansion of 23.23 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 10 10 10 10 17 17 17 17 14 15 16 Standing constants Mass Elect. LAY RATIOS AND STRANDING CONSTANTS FOR NON STANDARD CONSTRUCTIONS 1 2 Number of wires in conductor 3 Ratio al. Moduli values quoted may be regarded as being accurate to within ± 3 GN/m2 3.5 x 10-6 19.032 7.50 26.61 30.02432 0.96 49. of wires Aluminium 1 6 6 30 42 54 Steel 2 1 7 7 7 7 Final Modulus of Elasticity (Practical) GN/m2 Coefficient of Linear Expansion/ °C 3 79 75 80 62 69 4 19. 4.1 x 10-6 19.06 55. Resistance 7. Moduli values quoted may be taken as applying to conductors stressed between 15 and 50 percent of the ultimate strength of the conductor. 2.02271 0.032 19.666 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 28 Min 12 12 Max 24 24 8 9 10 11 12 13 Lay ratios for Aluminium wires Outside Layer Innermost layer immediately layer of beneath outside conductors layer with 3 Aluminium wire layers Min Max Min Max Min Max Alum.0´ 10-6 and 11.15 0.01894 .04253 0.032 7.8 x 10-6 21.032 19.02129 0. wire diameter to steel wire diameter Alum Steel 24 26 28 30 42 45 49 54 94 7 7 7 19 7 7 7 19 4 5 6 7 Lay ratios for steel core 6-wire 12.90 45.125 1. Steel 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 24.800 1.56 28.15 7.3 x 10-6 NOTES 1.032 7.03928 0.8 x 10-6 17.67 42.500 1.MODULUS OF ELASTICITY AND COEFFICIENT OF LINEAR EXPANSION No.032 7.500 1.286 1.03408 0.03649 0.286 1. These values are given for information only.666 1.wire layer layer Min Max 1.5´ 10-6/° C for aluminium and steel respectively.

96 6/2.37 21.91 32.30 Sectional Total sectional area of area Aluminium (4) mm2 10.67 88.98 31.3712 0.88 6.2 484.00 7/1.10 to 0.5 562.00 26.1 428.11 6/2.77 31.5524 0.53 7/2. and 13.83 105.96 1/2.16 CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF HIGH CARBON STEEL C-1 The chemical composition of high carbon steel used in the manufacture of steel wire of ACSR conductor is given below for guidance: Element Carbon Manganese Phosphorus Sulphur Silicon Percentage composition 0.0 1. Resistance Breaking Mass load at 20 ° C Minimum Maximum (7) kg/km 43 73 85 128 214 319 394 726 974 1281 1621 1998 1781 (8) W /km 2.12 18.9 528.09 6/4.97 118.88 78.53 42/4.60 120.09 7/1.3 28 10 14 10 16 10 17 95 .06868 0.0 1.7 Approx. Galvanized Steel-Reinforced (Clauses 10.00 42/3.96 7/3.7 (6) mm 4.1871 0.9 261.780 1.10.50 5.70 91.045 0.05231 (9) kN 3.3 28 10 14 10 16 1.85 0.618 1.79 130. 1 6 6 30 42 54 Steel 2 1 7 7 7 7 Lay Ratios for Aluminium Wire Ratio of Lay Ratios for Layer immediately Aluminium wire Outermost Innermost Layer of Conductors with Steel core 16 beneath Outermost Diameter To steel layer 3 Aluminium Wire Layers wire Layer) layer Wire Diameter Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1.9289 0.15 18.33 7.ALL ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR GALVANIZED STEEL – REINFORCED IS 398 Part 2/1996 Nominal Aluminium Stranding and wire diameter Aluminium Steel (1) mm2 10 18 20 30 50 80 100 150 200 400 420 520 560 (2) mm 6/1.60 18.35 1/4.035 Max 0.2.8) Number of Wires Alu.5 425.57 7/2.72 30/2.68 Approx.13 (3) mm 1/1.11 1/2.50 to 1.35 Lay Ratios of Aluminium conductors.0 10 14 3.18 54/3.18 7/3.50 54/3.0 158.3 28 10 14 10 16 10 17 1.25 26.1 404.05595 0.5 597.28 36.50 1/1.59 1/3.8 1.88 61.41 67.07311 0.62 31.35 6/4.1390 0. Diameter (5) mm2 12.13 21.50 to 0.12 24.394 0.0 1.0 591.34 89.88 28.59 7/3.97 6.10 20.74 7.2792 0.3.10 Max to 0.1 212.59 6/3.61 52.05 12.50 6/1.5 194.27 14.59 30/3.32 159.61 11.3 28 10 14 1.77 10.

87 04.81 60 S (m) 03. mm sq.23 GROUND WIRES FOR TRANSMISSION LINES – COMMONLY USE SIZES AAAC WIRES Sr. mm mm kg/mm kN kgf kg sq.091 30.70 59.78 09. No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Description Nominal area Sectional area AAAC Steel Total Over all diameter Approximate mass Rated Strength Modulus of elasticity 8 coefficients of linear expansion ° C Electrical resistance 9 Tension / Sag Span (m) 260 275 320 350 380 400 96 Unit sq.85 06.56 1790 0.69 09.37 08. 1) Number of Wires in Conductor Aluminium Steel (1) (2) 6 0 6 7 30 7 42 7 54 7 Mass Aluminium Stranding Constant Steel (4) (5) 1.24 05.032 0.091 6.4125 T (Kg f) 477 389 77 394 477 407 477 414 477 420 477 424 S (m) 03.41 2387 0.63 10. mm per ohms 19/2.70 10.55 05. A-2.37 09. 1.90 55.16 07.42 08.93 04.14 10.57´ 10 23.032 0.30 2576 0.75 .46 80 (Kg f) 358 293 358 297 358 306 358 311 358 316 358 319 90 59.0´ 10 23.3663 T (Kg f) 515 425 515 430 515 444 515 451 515 458 515 462 S (m) 04. mm 19/200 sq.57´ 10 79.07 08. 3.86 07.45 06.07 08.01 08.Stranding Constants (Table I and Clauses 13.169 2 1.16 07.81 79.67 42.00 08.43 218 23.32 05.86 0.30 248 3.23 05.0´ 10 0.00 164 17.31 90.0´ 10 23.27 09.37 09.07 04.552 T Temp (C) 32 53 32 53 32 53 32 53 32 53 32 53 7/3.6´ 10 90.169 2 7.81 11.7 04.25 09.31 12.16 10.73 04.6.024 32 7.33 05.018 94 (3) 6.24 0.86 06.034 08 7. 2 and A-2.032 0.032 0.86 07.29 0. mm sq.000 0. A-2.

mm sq.38 6.59 3.54 3.65 73.05 7.66 7/4.375 2.07 7.80 6.500 2.68 2002 1760 2002 1770 2002 1817 2002 1817 2002 1833 2002 1842 2.15 7/3.18 706 980.96 5.41 5.62 12.65 10.16 10010 1.98 3.0318 T S T S T S (Kg f) (m) (Kg f) (m) (Kg f) (m) 1142 1007 1142 1013 1142 1041 1142 1041 1142 1050 1142 1056 3.933´ 10-6 90.96 6.33 3.50 8.77 8134 1.40 5.74 6.95 7.30 6.76 7.17 3.11 1627 1430 1627 1439 1627 1477 1627 1477 1627 1490 1627 1497 2.99 4.37 6.55 9.36 7.GROUND WIRES FOR TRANSMISSION LINES – COMMONLY USE SIZES Galvanized Steel Wires Sr.933´ 10-6 11.5´ 106 11. mm sq.98 575 79.78 3.933´ 10-6 73. No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Description Nominal area Sectional area AAAC Steel Total Over all diameter Approximate mass Rated Strength Modulus of elasticity Unit sq.67 97 .78 4.5´ 106 11.39 3.5´ 10-6 3.97 7.52 5. mm mm kg/mm kN kg kg sq. mm Coefficients of linear expansion ° C Electrical resistance at 20 ° C Tension / Sag Span (m) 260 275 320 350 380 400 Temp (C) 32 53 32 53 32 53 32 53 32 53 32 53 7/3.30 5.02 5.06 55 sq.62 90.40 3.55 54.99 3. mm per ohms /kms 75 90 54.77 4.51 5.95 6.45 428 56 5710 1.

6 28 37.43 350 200 37/2.0 32 46.71 620 520 61/3.0 40 53. / mm mm mm 100 19/2. mm.0 46 NOTE: The dimensions after compression are same as that MID SPAN JOINT. No.95 640 560 61/3.7 D E mm mm 29.1 22.DEAD END COMPRESSION CLAMPS Sr. A1 A2 B D E This Portion is factory compress B Uniterms : Compression Dead Ends for AAAC 98 B C . It is not a general practice for utility to use DEAD END CLAMP COMPRESSION upto 80 sq.55 31.33 457 400 37/3.2 29. Area Diameter Sq.88 20.0 46 53.12 665 A2 B mm 250 314 363 399 494 517 575 596 mm 30 33 38 38 48 48 54 54 C mm 15.95 280 150 37/2.68 33.50 19.0 32 37. All dimensions are in mm.45 31.79 13.1 24.44 550 420 61/3.16 405 300 37/3.5 35.0 34.4 25 32. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 CONDUCTOR A1 Normal Construction Outer Alu.19 28.92 27.0 40 46.49 17.19 22. mm Nos.

16 22.95 33.10 24.50 19.40 32.00 37.68 Outer DIAMETER mm 13. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 NORMAL ALU.00 53.19 37/3.71 31.95 17.88 37/3.33 27.12 A B mm 139 175 210 241 275 287 320 332 mm 30 33 38 38 48 48 54 54 C mm 15.45 31. NO. mm 100 150 200 300 400 420 520 560 CONDUCTOR CONSTRUCTION Nos.0 37.49 37/2.5 19.95 17.50 35.0 34.20 29.79 37/2.92 61/3.33 27.55 61/3.43 20.7 D mm 29.00 53.19 61/3.43 20.5 35.00 53. AREA Sq./mm 19/2.19 61/3.79 37/2.00 46.88 37/3.55 61/3.1 24.44 28.00 E mm 25 28 32 32 40 40 46 46 C D A E B 99 .19 37/2.60 37.00 46.10 22. mm 100 150 200 300 400 420 520 560 CONDUCTOR CONSTRUCTION Nos.4 32. SL.71 31.45 31.49 37/2.6 37.12 A B C D E mm 350 440 510 610 690 711 800 830 mm 30 33 38 38 48 48 54 54 mm 15.00 mm 25 28 32 32 40 40 46 46 C A D E B Before compression After compression REPAIR SLEEVE SL.MID SPAN COMPRESSION JOINT FOR AAA CONDUCTORS.92 61/3.00 34.1 22.00 46.44 28./mm 19/2.00 53.2 29.70 Mm 29.95 33. No.16 22. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 NORMAL ALU. AREA Sq.68 Outer DIAMETER mm 13.00 46.

1 Drum Nomenclature 100 .CONDUCTOR PACKING: DRUM DIMENSIONS TO IS 1778/1980 Drum Component (mm) 1 Flange diameter Barrel diameter Traverse Flange thickness Bore Diameter Nail Circle Nail length Nail Size (Min.25 3. of Bolts Diameter of bolts (Min.) Thickness of Barrel end supports Thickness of Barrel end lagging No. of binders over external lagging Constructional Details for Drum Components 3 4 5 6 965 1065 1195 1220 1345 585 600 600 600 600 510 710 710 710 710 2x 25 2x 32 2x 32 2x 32 2x 32 80 80 80 80 80 3 5 5 5 5 65 75 75 75 75 3.25 3.) Size of square washer Size of spindle plate Diameter of spindle plate hole No.25 3. of stretchers Stretchers size No.25 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 38 4 4 4 4 4 100x 38 100x 38 100x 38 100x 38 100x 38 4 4 4 4 4 12 12 12 12 12 50x 6 50x 6 50x 6 50x 6 50x 6 150x 150x 6 150x 150x 6 150x 150x 6 150x 150x 6 150x 150x 6 90 90 90 90 90 4 4 4 4 4 12 12 12 12 12 38 38 38 38 38 2 2 2 2 2 2 X Washer for Barrel Bolts Traverse Spindle Plate Bolt Washers Barrel Bolts or Studs Barrel End Support (Disc or Segmant) Stretchers Spindle Plate Bolts End of Bolts or Studs Riveted over Conductor Hole X Barrel Battens Flange Section XX Fig.25 3. of Spindle plate bolt Spindle plate bolt diameter Thickness of external logging No.

CONDUCTOR PACKING: DRUM DIMENSIONS TO IS 1778/1980 Drum Component 1 Flange diameter Barrel diameter Traverse Flange thickness Bore Diameter Nail Circle Nail length Nail Size(Min. 2 Drum having 3 ply flange construction with barrel middle supports.25 50 38 6 100x 33 6 12 50x 6 230x 230x 6 90 4 8 1475 600 710 2x 32 80 5 75 3.65 50 50 6 100x 50 6 19 50x 6 230x 230x 6 90 4 12 38 3 12 50 3 12 50 3 12 50 3 Spindle plate bolt diameter Thickness of external lagging No.65 50 50 6 100x 50 6 19 50x 63 230x 230x 6 90 4 10 1725 710 812 2x 33 100 6 89 3.) Size of square washer Size of spindle plate Diameter of spindle plate hole No.25 38 50 38 50 4 4 75x 50 75x 75 4 4 19 22 75x 6 100x 6 230x 230x 6 380x 380x 6 4 4 16 38 2 16 50 3 Protective External Logging Range Barrel Battens Square Plate Barrel End Support (Disc or Segment) Slot for Inner end of Conductor Barrel Bolts Barrel Middle Support X Recess for Binder Section XX Fig. of bolts Diameter of bolt (Min.25 3. 101 . of spindle plate bolt Constructional Details for Drum Components 7 1370 600 710 2x 32 80 5 75 3. of binders over external lagging X 11 12 1100 1900 750 1500 600 600 2x 32 2x 33 54x 54 105x 105 5 5 75 75 3. of stretchers Stretchers sizes No.) Thickness of barrel end supports Thickness of barrel end lagging No.25 50 50 6 100x 50 6 19 50x 6 230x 230x 6 90 4 9 1615 685 812 2x 33 100 6 89 3.

102 .

VARIOUS INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

103

104

ALL ALUMINIUM STANDARD CONDUCTORS – BARE (TO BS: 215 PART 1)

Code Word

Aluminium
Area mm2

Standard
Nominal
Copper
Area/mm2

Standing Number
& Diameter Of
Wires mm
Diameter
2.06

Diameter
of
Conductor
mm

Rated
Ultimate
Strength
Kg.

D-C
Resistance
at 20 °C

Weight
Kg/Km.

Midge

23.29

14.19

No.
7

6.17

430

W
/Km.
1.22700

Aphis

26.45

16.13

3

3.35

7.21

445

1.08100

72.5

Gnat

26.84

16.13

7

2.21

6.63

490

1.06400

73.4

Weevil

31.55

19.35

3

3.66

7.87

520

0.90780

86.3

Mosquito

36.90

22.58

7

2.59

7.77

645

0.77420

100.9

Ladybird

42.90

25.81

7

2.79

8.38

740

0.66550

117.3

Ant

52.77

32.26

7

3.1

9.3

890

0.54110

144.3

Fly

63.68

38.71

7

3.4

10.21

1050

0.44860

174.0

Bluebottle

73.55

45.16

7

3.66

10.97

1195

0.38840

201.0

Earwig

78.77

48.39

7

3.78

11.37

1275

0.36280

215.3

Grasshopper

84.13

51.61

7

3.91

11.73

1355

0.33950

229.9

Clegg

95.35

58.06

7

4.17

12.50

1520

0.29950

260.7

Wasp

106.2

64.52

7

4.39

13.18

1675

0.26910

290.0

Beetle

106.10

64.52

19

2.67

13.33

1810

0.27050

292.0

Bee

132.10

80.64

7

4.90

14.71

2060

0.21620

362.0

Cricket

157.90

96.77

7

5.36

16.08

2450

0.18090

432.0

Hornet

157.70

96.77

19

3.25

16.26

2575

0.18210

433.0

Caterpillar

185.90

112.90

19

3.53

17.65

2985

0.15440

510.0

Chafer

213.80

129.00

19

3.78

18.92

3390

0.13430

588.0

Spider

237.30

145.20

19

3.99

19.94

3735

0.12100

652.0

Cockroach

265.30

161.30

19

4.22

21.08

4135

0.10820

729.0

Butterfly

322.40

193.50

19

4.65

23.24

4940

0.08910

885.0

Moth

373.60

225.80

19

5.00

25.02

5700

0.07686

1027.0

Drone

372.60

225.80

37

3.58

25.07

5730

0.07748

1030.0

Locust

428.60

258.10

19

5.36

26.80

6515

0.06698

1177.0

Centipede

416.30

258.10

37

3.78

26.49

6325

0.06941

1150.0

Maybug

486.00

290.30

37

4.09

28.63

7290

0.05943

1342.0

Scorpion

529.00

322.60

37

4.27

29.87

7870

0.05459

1463.0

Cicada

627.80

387.10

37

4.65

32.54

9210

0.04601

1735.0

Tarantula

795.60

483.90

37

5.23

36.63

11570

0.03630

2198.0

63.5

105

05522 1734 1451.267 0.36 45 3.47 1 4.27 7 2.87 3.20 152.41 53.189 0.42 212.072 0.336 0.965 16.67 33.28 15059 0.85 0.442 8.0 Bluejay 111300 563. Dia No.10250 1066.7 892.35 18 4.961 2.21 9.15 9.000 336.673 Dia.474 2.40 7 2.82 13630 0.000 13.3 104.16 818.365 Gauge AWG mm2 Approx.8 146.48 7.18 8.9 369.0 326.16 8.142 Wt .15 26.87 7 3.0 Tern 795000 402.41 53.4 Osprey 556500 282.59 7.8 849.1 184.20 126.30 18869 0.00 380. of complete Cable mm 5.71 253.03212 3086 2510.20 135. Rated D-C Weight kg/km Ultimate Resistance Tensile at 20 °C Steel Strength (W /km) Total Alum.0 341.8 Flamingo 666600 337.534 0.00 202.2 Rook 636000 322.33 4.55 19867 0.00 297.0 305.2 232. Steel (kg) Core Diameter mm Complete Conductor Chickadee 397500 201.58 7 2.08 9798 0.70 7 2.05981 1600 1339.47 29.93 602.776 3.9 666.08550 1277 936.85 34.74 381.04785 2007 1681.93 329.42 516.503 3.77 7 3.8 Teal 605000 306.84 304.193 3.18 38.35 24 3.6 Flicker 477000 241.0 348.46 10773 0.03988 2411 2019.00 14039 0.47 22.211 0.09420 1267.61 19 2.800 4/00 250.76 17010 0.0 Chukar 1780000 901.76 24.2 849.0 369.4 Pelican 477000 241.932 4.49 67.11950 914.168 0. 57.07 8.00 6.0 217.0 1033500 523.10 405.5 554.35 45 3.14 7 2.76 10410 0.381 3.98 8.55 212.80 26 3.04486 2143 1795.60 107. ultimate Tensile Strength Kg 4 3 2 1 1/0 2/0 3/0 4/0 266.03 45 3.400 397.58 126.22 40.3 292.68 273.00 170.50 201.71 45 4.2 546. and Dia.5 Squab 605000 306.15 26.93 975.10 24312 0.03 152. W /Km.958 3.04 45 4.77 21.52 177.37 45 4.70 19 2.0 Bunting 1192500 604.357 10.54 9.39 21.500 21.68 18 3.26 646.01 24 3.58 376.14 1 4.01 24.01 18 4.00 318.68 24 4.509 11.66 31.0 412.21 8.43 85. Dia.53 7 3.80 30 3.23 7 2.7 72.03 7 2.25 10.0 ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR STEEL REINFORCED – BARE (AMERICAN SIZE) Aluminium Area Code Word Circular Mils mm2 Standing No.75 9004 0.03988 2543 2131.351 1.38 7 2.328 9.0 283. and diameter Equivalent Copper size AWG Nominal area mm2 No.0 Lapwing 1590000 805.68 559.16 732.0 434.07177 1333 1116.2 417.58 356.606 7.417 4.85 7 2.45 192.43 85.11890 770.874 15.8 389.09432 1397.47 6509 0.4 467.08966 1218.62 42.25 9.31 24 4.70 45 4.09420 1159.69 24. in Kg/km.16 775.26 430.77 1 3.65 7 3.70 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 19 19 19 1.04222 2275 1906.16 7802 0.10 152.51 689.06 481.58 346.0 Ortlan 106 87.25 27.87 7 2.00 84 3.01 107.40 8.14 7 2.53 16057 0.0 Rail 954000 483.01 95.97 354.8 122. 6 5 4 3 2 1 1/0 2/0 3/0 188.674 0.82 8.40 10954 0.0 392.68 177.82 25.16 25.9 325.883 6.1 .81 7.07 18053 0.40 415 515 635 775 940 1185 1435 1810 2280 2670 2995 3470 Aluminium area of complete cable Standard Resistance at 20 °C 1.0 Dipper 1351500 685.0 Nuthatch 1510500 765.0 576.29 506.77 4717 0.92 35.251 14.05127 1875 1570.37 45 4.424 0. Dia.48 567.80 24 4.202 2.76 33.39 12202 0.22 7.800 300. mm.62 42.14270 641.3 553.57 30.1 669.8 776.84 430.796 13.8 91.14 20.10180 898.119 3.58 23.ALL ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS – BARE (AMERICAN SIZES) Code Name Rose Lily Iris Pansy Poppy Aster Phlox Oxlip Daisy Peony Tulip Canna Aluminium stranding No.39 192.0 Bittern 1272000 644. Area of Of Wires mm.0 Bobolink 1431000 725.5 Peacock 605000 306.3 16.45 192.02 36.0 216.77 18.48 456.69 11.8 115.28 10274 0.68 4.8 309.70 45 4.67 33.03 45 4.0 Parakeet 556500 282.8 7813 285.14 5579 0.68 255.03589 2677 2243.10 37. Copper Complete Steel Equivalent Aluminium Conductor mm2 2 mm No.70 13041 0.49 67.00 7 2.80 861.26 364.4 851.905 18.7 244.

0 Hawthom 1.20 380.000 322.0720 72.0478 1670.113.500 1.8 Iris 2 33.0 Columbine Carnation Gladiolus Coreopsis 1.724 26.01 53.673 18.70 430.0 Magnolia 954.800 135.500 1./Km 21.590.119 9.0 Petunia 750.10 765.0399 0.95 10615 0.0715 1111.36 3470 0.1680 467.033.41 26.98 2670 0.000 684.8500 91.15 13.31 5665 0.023 20.00 36.0 Cosmos 477.5 Zinnia 500.0758 1048.1890 417.0449 1781.00 19 4.193 15.417 13.0551 1445.3360 232.70 456.70 19 3.60 515 1.70 152.192.780 3.6 Dahlia 556. Rated ultimate strength Kg.6740 115.00 95.02 11090 0.80 725.8 Poppy 1/0 53.617 25.0 Bluebell 1.0597 1333.00 37 4.0513 1560.71 6375 0.1020 774.1420 553.34 775 0. Dia.00 177.2670 292.0 Marigold 1.2110 369.000 241.4240 184.431.0423 0.60 19 3.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS –BARE (CANADIAN STANDARD SIZES) Aluminium Area Code word Rose AWG of circular Mills 4 mm2 Copper equivalent mm2 Stranding.70 37 3.70 329.000 402.330 23.351.4 Tulip 396.30 202.100 34.500 282.000 483.03 36.88 2280 0.0378 0.0 Anemone 874.20 67.00 354.80 253.55 1185 0.26 1810 0.400 170.79 1435 0.120 20.40 506.500 604.62 7 3.20 85.5340 146.0 2226.961 5.000 1. of conductor mm.30 159.2 Orchid 636.40 805.9 Violet 715.3 7 1.500 523.3510 57.67 16.70 61 61 61 61 3.43 7 4.000 253.49 33.432 30.00 239.3 Canaa 397.40 37 4.891 3.50 405.551 31.0 Narcissus 1.7 Lily 3 26.56 8155 0.70 61 3.533 24.474 7.0 2116.01 7 4.87 9910 0.2 Phlox 3/0 85.00 481.1190 663.079 28.00 37 3.62 21.0895 888.92 2995 0.12 4080 0.1130 695.42 635 0.0359 1893.668 33.75 8835 0.43 42. D-C resistance 20 °C W /Km.0652 1222.04 6940 0.40 19 4. Weight Kg.998 4.36 940 0.00 61 3.40 37 3.10 278.500 443.272.0795 1000.000 644.50 228.77 7 2.91 11795 12225 12905 13585 0.244 29.932 11.000 564.41 7 3.904 27.381 16.33 7475 0.0 107 .50 107.60 4275 0.000 152.8 Pansy 1 42.70 37 3.500 201. Number and diameter of wires (mm) No.510.202 6.346 21.01 35.75 4760 0.32 6545 0.000 380.00 37 3.3 Oxlip 4/0 107.776 8.49 7 3.500 362.9 Daisy 266.0 2005.67 7 2.15 7 2.40 126.40 19 4.0 Arbutus 795.503 10.20 19 3.1 Aster 2/0 67.40 304.89 415 1.40 61 3.958 14.2 Peony 300. Dia.

359 19/2.5 171.4 523.04227 2574 1895 679 817 456.15 6/2.70 54/4.6 322.8 380.09 3210 0.2.707 67.51 9.515 31.6 298.41 53. & Area of Copper diameter of wires mm Ultimate Resistance Complete equivalent Complete Steel Tensile at 20 °C conductor Total Aluminium Steel mm2 conductor Core Strength ohms per 2 Aluminium Steel mm kg.63 6/1.4 78.4 159.89 660 1.67 6/3.38 12360 0.67 10190 0.11 9.20 18/3.77 6/2.84 10.7 419.64 45.69 18.15 26.4 307.40 30/3.5 684.15 9.5 312.89 1/1.02 43.220 25.1 765.61 36.4 9.31 57.6 87.70 26/3.33 19550 0.76 24.38 33.89 27.78 2425 0.1694 687.62 7000 0.27 11340 0.550 38.4 470.090 25.339 35.460 24.900 19/2.4 187.820 7/2.37 3.06531 1674 1226 448 515.2 405.6 202.07171 1624 1113 512 455.454 28.140 19/2.67 33.04 8820 0.5 1.09439 1158 848 310 395.3 16.01 18/3.084 7/3.76 15690 0.1 116.36 14175 0.28 22.14 7/2.7 85.09 15.1 456.5351 215.01 6/5.36 2.55 8.1902 697 420.2118 506.43 11.55 6/1.40 30/4.33 3.7 216.43 6/4.2 152 152 170.5 354. Stranding No.70 30/3.5 99.28 6.37 4330 0.3 322.5 362.2 135.14 2.28 7/3.6 329.89 10.6 248.423 33.46 8.5 170.4245 272.8 402.233 7/3.5 253.5 69.50 1/1.9 232.62 6/3.81 8.67 1.99 1.3 337.00 54/3.774 19/2.67 1/2.88 12.54 17.1 228.6 92.6 228.8 506.2137 545.3 644.1 16.084 26.280 26.720 7/2.05133 2120 1560 560 680.6 72.1434 811.7 179.7 253.41 17440 0.7 108 D-C Rated Diameter mm Weight kg per km.00 16.7 193 210.14 10.47 17.210 7/3.44 19.38 7.1 14330 0.1 55 62.480 28.1025 1137 779 358 346.13 15535 0.76 9060 0.08966 1299 890 409 364 202.00 54/4.31 6.55 16850 0.88 21.4 481.1 67.84 11090 0.49 6/4.233 29.53 28.1025 1293 779 514 327.2 276.4 201.60 30/2.7 14245 0.47 1/3.7 241.08569 1276 935 341 445.12 17.07177 1833 1144 719 468.7 234.07966 1462 1001 164 409.350 27.34 3.80 54/3. .189 32.75 4.68 9.78 1/3.9 604.9 667.07 7735 0.97 34.88 7.2671 432.3 198.44 8.8 177.760 24.70 30/2.690 24.44 7/2.76 9.22 19.5 139 157.018 19/2.64 42.67 1265 0.67 8.00 30/3.920 7/2.3 282 282 306.03992 2275 2006 719 862.515 7/3.84 14650 0.266 33.73 7/2.37 1/3.89 7/2.40 30/3.40 54/3.4 192.00 1/3.07 10210 0.05527 1979 1449 530 635.714 42.249 19/2.25 1/4. Egret Grosbeak Goose Gull Redwing Staring Crow Mallard Drake Condor Crane Canary Cardinal Curlew.3 556.99 11.20 30/2.5 430.2 135.28 8.616 39.49 67.40 26/4.00 26/3.79 16.77 11950 0.2 125.75 24175 0.20 26/2.01 26/2.50 4.77 3820 0.376 30.12 1/2.3 107.2 85.86 13.47 4060 0.12 830 1.68 21.01 2.22 10.07978 1648 1002 646 421.41 6/3.28 6 5100 0.6 278.1686 542 468. Finch Grackel Pheasant Martin Plover Parrot Falcon 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 36526 36557 36617 266800 266800 266800 300000 300000 336400 336400 336400 336400 397500 397500 477000 477000 500000 556500 556500 605000 636000 636000 636000 666600 715500 715500 715500 795000 795000 795000 874500 900000 954000 1033500 111300 1192500 1272000 1351500 1431000 1510500 1590000 8.4 805.24 13.9 152.77 1/4.4 73.7 95.1 304.96 9.80 54/3.75 6375 0.1 184.00 9 3 1585 0.20 7/3.442 7/3.6 85.40 54/3.5 170.8 362.8507 135.36 5730 0.890 23.70 26/3.07183 1522 1114 408 500.37 10.55 13.21 12.57 7/2.68 15.37 6/1.7 20320 0.22 21.77 22.5 201.6 471.47 3.00 30/3.1435 923.1 152.3 107.25 18.05988 1826 1337 489 291.8 443.700 19/2.7 202.26 6/1.1 483.5 402.33 340 3.354 85.34 6.1 255.04 1.760 7/2.92 20.27 10730 0.11 3.6 366.1 136.9 146.83 8.25 12950 0.65 10.69 7/2.7 142.75 13.95 18238 0.78 11.920 26.38 1025 1.77 14.4 373. .05 21590 0.37 1940 0.60 26/2.8 402.ALUMINUM CONDUCTOR STEEL REINFORCED (CANADIAN STANDARD SIZES) Aluminium Area Code word AWG or Circular Mils mm2 Wren Warbler Turkey Thrush Swan Swallow Sparrow Robin Raven Quail Pigeon Penguin Partridge Owl Waxwing Piper Ostrich Oriole Linnet Merlin Lark Ibis Hen Hawk Heron Eagle Dove Duck.4 126.33 1/1.08973 1466 891 575 374.70 51/3.32 7340 0.7 110.00 54/2.09 5.08979 1218 892 326 381.70 54/4.81 5.5 228.77 21.08 25445 0.89 5.920 19/2.21 8.03782 2877 2118 759 907.690 7/2.8 370.2 286. km 9.55 10.376 7/3.7 556.154 53.54 7/2.5 425 2.6754 171.07985 1370 1003 367 494.9 107.41 22860 0.2 135.5 95.92 7/2.2126 429.25 12.68 530 2.09 1/3.410 36.9 177.3 6.5 362.78 7.9 11.6 10590 0.482 37.1 152.25 12.279 29.7 253.3367 342.4 241.8 371.23 53.7 563.39 17.03592 3028 2229 799 .3 322.8 176.63 49.68 5.40 54/3.47 11140 0.970 7/3.48 26.96 12.00 54/3.460 7/3.1196 1108 668 440 281.40 54/4.2 126.1195 974.70 54/2.5 212.06344 1723 1262 461 546.00 26/4.42 31.647 19/2.8 725.12 6.68 1/1.5 293.135 19/2.83 12750 0.8 8.30 54/2.37 10.1 253.1141 1162 701 461 347.0449 2422 1783 639 771.38 8.074 107.38 10.5 583.36 7/1.25 3030 0.279 7/3.820 25.1696 781.17 12.40 26/3.3 310.61 39.62 42.36 11.20 22.19 612.70 54/3.43 85.31 4.0479 2271 1672 590 726.38 1/2.01 107.

44 3.9 64.58 46.85 1/4.65 7/1.122 0.561 2.55 293.11 6/4.76 795.11 7/1.7 4.62 4.67 27.08 12.74 55.193 0.517 0.8 3.8 1.96 8.99 381.78 175.54 6/4.66 22.78 12.59 5.73 136.3 52 160 73 225 71 225 102 257 104 322 81 299 101 320 147 368 145 450 114 419 142 449 204 511 195 614 278 695 246 776 352 882 307 968 439 1099 380 1197 541 1354 300 1112 490 1546 689 1719 390 1447 487 1805 637 2395 802 3005 kg.35 54/3.14 150.81 30/2.3 108 152 154 155 218 218 219 221 305 305 307 307 419 417 530 530 661 660 817 813 812 1056 1030 1057 1318 1758 2203 kg.85 89.62 26/2.0995 0.0733 0.84 6/4.00 30. weight of conductor Area of Standard Area Resistance Ultimate weight of conductor Km/ drum complete Complete Steel length of of Alu.85 26/3.53 30/1.54 7/1.43 6.90 1/2.39 235.97 7/1.11 1/4.32 54/4.70 238.53 26/3.44 10.84 5/2.26 0.85 4.95 222.85 343.41 54/3.95 30/3.2 8.61 29.32 2.53 7/3.17 26/2.595 2093 1596 2093 1596 2347 2093 2175 2346 2346 2165 2160 kg Approximately Net Diameter of Approximately Approx.37 mm2 18.90 381.88 185.2 2 2.71 19.69 55.89 293.7 69.21 469.95 25.122 0.74 111.85 6/4.84 1/1.82 38.12 30/2.0765 0.053 1.33 7/1.51 6.11 380.17 79.47 12.33 12.17 7/2.59 7.356 0.59 79.23 191.18 26/3.25 111.97 443.42 7/2.0613 0.44 26/1.02 19/2.109 Calibri Randine Fringuelio Carvo Gufo Merlo Quaglia Fragrance Colombo Cincia Canario Sparviero Pemice Civetta struzzo Gru Zigolo Ghiandaia Rigogolo Fanello Allodola Usignuola Picchio Falcone Airone Gazza Storno Beccaccia Aquila Code word 10 16 25 35 35 35 50 50 50 50 70 70 70 70 95 95 120 120 150 150 185 185 185 240 240 240 300 400 500 mm2 Nom Copper area mm Steel 6/1.263 0.59 79.84 7/1.53 7/2.00 54/3.25 110.89 10.06 7/2.0764 0.19 17.9 6.15 34.48 475.88 10.6 23 102. at 20 °C strength of kg conductor conductor core drum contd.86 5.35 7/3.74 79.13 27.70 10.72 7/2.63 7/2.37 26/1.58 14.093 1.38 19.03 352.26 24.33 12.59 7.152 0.52 6.03 64.75 92.362 0.60 mm Alu.85 7/1.52 4.64 55.362 0.0495 0.84 4.54 8.57 430.28 30/1.95 21.32 6/2.87 19/2.26 0.11 4.4 5.0989 0.95 634.08 24.053 156 2053 1561 2312 2053 2124 2312 2312 2133 2124 kg 555 555 555 555 2093 1595 555 524 2093 1596 555 524 2093 1596 2093 1595 2. Alu.79 125.72 68.18 7/3.7 128.61 292.36 28. Standing & wire diameter 15.137 0.0992 0.04 98. kg.6 13 1. 0. Steel Total Ungreased Greased ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR STEEL REINFORCED – ACSR (EUROPEAN STANDARD SIZES) .88 14.4 9.368 0. 20.25 65.58 14.808 1.75 15.44 1/3.14 8.55 7.32 10.53 54/2.24 17.80 7/2.00 7/3.84 2.63 26/4.90 6/3.9 3.7 12 12 16 15 20 19 25 23 30 17 30 41 22 27 37 48 2´ 4556 2´ 3301 1701 1715 2´ 3208 2´ 2123 1217 1226 2´ 2265 3053 3343 2245 2646 1768 2120 1420 1715 1152 2078 1328 1236 1597 1279 891 708 2´ 4247 2´ 2671 2´ 1707 2428 m 548 548 548 548 2053 1561 548 513 2053 1561 548 513 2053 1561 2053 1561 2.32 1/2.83 92.37 mm2 5.3 5.152 0.8 1408 1956 2114 2608 2771 2503 2971 3694 3873 3504 4091 4890 5348 6563 6677 8255 8474 10206 10170 12501 9267 13109 15907 11916 14724 19241 24090 kg 43.77 191.42 238.35 39.05 11.193 0.71 151.32 7/3.35 30/4.98 1.05 895.59 715.38 30/285 7/2.727 0.0367 W /km 610.11 4.71 22.7 6.05 9 10.524 0.522 0.90 110.5 920.12 330.33 19/2.93 537.25 129.66 30/3.3 8.03 277.263 0.36 7.26 294.98 9.

6 Otter 51.2 387.79 73.16 6 3.0 Deer 258.7 260.089 106.5 7 4.7 289.06076 1805 1.94 12.00 1500 0.1 107.1 586.27 7 4.6 57.5 30 3.1 364.2 122.9 6 2.79 36.15 14740 0.99 7 3.2203 605.0 156.90 22.3418 338.18 423.5 162.8 30 3.08935 1491.2 Hors 45.27 429.457 464.52 6 4.91 131.54 7 1.5 20185 0.08 955 1.2 132.45 6 1.35 528.50 3315 0.8 Mink 38.6 733.18 7 3.8 326.10 16.90 28.654 6 5.44 6.07606 1443 1055 388.0 136.6 54 3.26 10160 0.72 7 1.66 1 3.35 7 3.80 14.16 3660 0.2 Fox 22.33 770 1.05 1860 0.80 19.0548 2002 1464 538 Theoretical values valid upto 60 Hz for a wind velocity of 0.51 13.2 Boar 161. 110 .1 Weasel 19.6 47.97 11885 0.13 6875 0.7 86.6 73.0 Antelope 225.52 7 4. Total Aluminium Steel Mole 6.2697 451.09 1 4.5 174.50 31.6 148.0 Camel 290.1 529.57 105.4 Gopher 16.3633 318.9 145.5 215.676 170.06079 2192 1319 873.09 78.27 2745 0.81 4120 0.0 Bison 225.5 100.72 1 4.1 195.00 18.5 423.66 63.1093 1219.9 Leopard 80.79 7 2.3929 540.50 15.35 4.7 124.0 Wolf 96.3 587.39 6 4.18 237.72 105.382 302.6 m/sec.50 11320 0.8 2.65 30 2.5 28.8 Beaver 45.59 1 2.66 2915 0.4 30.97 2615 0.93 15900 0.054 254.97 7 2.18 7 3.70 14.2177 493.06748 1976 1189 787.0 Hare 64.53 7945 0.0 Skunk 38.35 49.97 374.8 115.58 6 2.15 3310 0.7 509.59 7 2.7 365.99 374.9 Lion 145.00 380.52 6 4.11 1 2.36 26.50 410 2.97 87.7 261.84 91.5 41.97 13765 0.0 Rabbit 22.29 111.59 63.2 337.28 7 1.95 61.99 74.6 Sheep 225.35 7 3.95 5270 0.18 4645 0.2 118.06773 1619 1184 435.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR STEEL REINFORCED .07736 1418 1037 381.32 485 Moose 322.71 7 3.52 5790 0.81 6 3.7 288.35 1 3.2722 424.75 131. mm No.20 21.55 116.8 55.8 54 2.2 12.10 27.5 296.1368 974.20 13.1219 1093 657.99 1 3.0 71.36 1 2.62 13245 0.59 158.9 102.60 14.2722 395.68 7.79 42.79 7 2.29 100.00 211.2 288.36 7 2.71 324.1 241.8 82.3 Goat 193.705 42.7 593.6 160.95 24.2) Code Word Stranding & wire Nom.7 Lynx 112.59 31.71 12 2.8 97. mm Area Of Ultimate Resistance Weight Kg/Km Aluminium Complete Overall Tensile at 20 °C W 2 Area mm Conductor Diameter Strength /Km mm2 Kgs. and solar action for an initial temperature of 35 °C and an ultimate cable temperature of 80 °C In the case of unusual placement without air movement.36 1310 0.1831 727.57 10.53 7 3.8 Coyote 80.1 54 3.1 Panther 43.0 399.78 10.5 597 31.9 13.58 12.33 106.22 1 4.73 11680 0.7 205.00 1 3.7 Tiger 80.59 7 2.8 Squirrel 12.9 34.7 151.65 26 2.77 30 2.00 42.3 203.9 Farret 25.20 29.1 Cat 58.7 Dog 64.74 12.2 126.5 229.3 54 3.50 95.00 7 3.90 7.1575 846.77 16280 0.2 30 3.10 26.1 Hyena 64.36 131.8 435.70 115.57 4150 0.0 Zebra 258.2 430.79 1 2.2 27.39 7 1.1 Racoon 48.366 84.7 485.0 360.9047 127.35 52.7 129 30 3.ACSR (BRITISH STANDARD SIZES) BS 215 (PART .8 54 3 7 3.61 6 4.42 11.22 83.79 183.71 6 3.50 1 1.5 482.9 30 2.0 Elk 290.11 20.7 462.16 6 4.5 292.77 1135 0.50 476.63 36.98 2205 0. these values will be reduced on an average of 90% approximately.50 1 4.1 30 4.2198 521.30 30.0773 1725 1038 687.00 9095 0.50 26.3 897.13 6 2.50 10.92 8.1 68.60 25.4 109.3005 384.6 538.37 264.41 9.778 148.89 18190 0.8 172.74 97.35 6 2.6 6 3.16 12 2.5404 213.97 6110 0.9 226.6 337.3 30 3.3 30 4.35 476. diameter Copper Steel Area Aluminium mm2 No.60 23.

89 5.9 32.2 26.38 1/2.5 69.55 10.7 7000 0.25 12.1 340 3.1025 Peacock 306.2 7.41 6/3.3 6/2.8 39.5 10190 0.2 17.6 126.76 24.7 202.00 116.9 32.1 421.3 41.4 281.4 429.3 24/4.8 10274 0.12 17.5 31.42 85.2 85.714 Turkey 13.89 27.3 59.76 7/2.46 8.5 31.73 7/2.68 21.6 366.38 7.19 Oriole 170.4 24/3.50 4.7 3/2.8507 Robin 42.074 Sparrow 32.67 45.9 32.7966 Gull 111 .6 5579 0.9 32.28 7/3.62 6/3.63 6/1.69 18.2 126.1696 Linnet 170.1 2425 0.86 13.9 376.21 848 310 1158 73.14 20.21 7/3.28 22.7 7735 0.8 30/3.9 67.6 6509 0.14 7/2.8 73 27 4330 0.4 126.5 139 432.47 22.02 43.89 62.26 6/1.68 1/1.77 2.9 32.78 420.2 26/2.7 26/3.14 7/2.3 273 152 24/3.6 212.9 32.54 17.08569 Redwing 362.1 1585 0.7 18/3.87 554.9 68.5 583.7 30/3.77 12.08966 Egrit 322.54 7/2.76 24.9 32.4 13.1196 Hawk 241.39 17.80 667.4 32.00 9.8 192.8 39.9 125.4 47 248.6 30/2.55 779 358 1137 68.7 39.4245 Pigeon 85.7 26/3.7 56.11 146.89 23.5 86.5 974.01 18/3.71 13.9 107.8 39.1018 Parakeet 282 36.4 215.8 346.1141 XX 282 15.1694 Marlin 170.2 212.14 1/4.8 210.90 891 575 1466 60.4 18/4.14 72.1435 Lbis 201.61 19/2.08966 Goose 322.67 4.16 25.8 86.5 152.22 25.64 67.5 31.4 307.1 152 26/3.2 26.78 19.49 669.7 177.8 10730 0.82 7/2.5 67.31 293.7 24/4.33 1/1.92 19/2.6 4060 0.7 32.58 7/2.15 6/2.22 21.81 5.67 6/3.4 192.5 171.9 356.7 364 202.8 43.9 9798 0.6 4717 0.97 34.0942 Teal 306.88 556.5 212.3367 Penguin 107.2 13630 0.2 26.38 36.1 73.5 7340 0.1 3820 0.50 28.40 668 440 1108 60.6 39.6 202.33 3.69 24.01 14.77 1/3.5 31.77 1/4.31 470.12 6.1 1025 1.77 67.21 850 309 1159 73.1025 Eagle 282 45.08973 Grosbeak 322.1434 Pelican 241.2 342.2 276.54 850 308 1268 6.3 107.43 31.61 107.1 228 30/3.31 67.5 9.3 310.8 122 898.63 135.09 15.6 67.423 10.7 95.77 18.08979 Flaningo 337.154 Thrush 16.1 1265 0.7 193 612.1427 Lark 201.9 32.354 Swallow 26.89 10.69 7/2.2 30/2.84 892 326 1218 73.37 10.9439 Rook 322.4 13.67 1/2.1 830 1.88 21.1 318.55 6/1.09 1/3.6 3210 0.37 1.16 15.1 152 30/3.3 395.28 419.5 5100 0.64 42.5 31.9 86.89 1/1.12 1/2.5 95.8 24/4.01 26/2.7 687.33 776.5 8820 0.67 8.78 1/3.36 7/1.6 26/2.2 18/3.9 32.82 25.8 26/3.00 1/3.2137 Owl 135.43 1002 646 1648 60.37 6/1.07 49.92 20.6 228 26/4.1902 Ostrich 152 24.7 11090 0.4 374.7 85.5351 Quill 67.5 59.9 32.58 23.2 26.5 272.83 471.3 107.01 6/5.8 381.61 67.22 781 286 1067 73.5 187.2 15690 0.55 1.32 6.1 530 2.6 39.6 49.21 78.47 1/4.44 19.5 39.7 506.6 39.5 31.03 7/2.15 890 409 1299 6.3 41.4 13.97 7/3.72 7/2.43 6/4.3 39.43 11.25 1/4.87 7/2.50 1/1.44 7/2.28 373.0942 Squab 306.1 55 171 67.6 69.4 87.8 234.67 42.6 770.5 6375 0.9 32.3 73.28 26.1 152 18/4.2 17.7 10590 0.3 2.53 67.6 66.4 142.70 19/2.4 914.4 68.7 216.1 660 1.9439 Duck 306.07966 Starling 362.6 811.68 663.7 176.2 22 157.44 9.5 11340 0.1 641.25 851 546 1397 60.7 13.48 26.37 1/3.7 31.23 7/2.6 87.5 31.4 13.6754 Raven 53.8 11140 0.9 177.77 6/2.1189 Flicker 241.04 36.707 Swan 21.5 5730 0.4 68.7 9060 0.2126 Piper 152 35.47 1/3.8 9004 0.5 192.01 24.6 85.5 192.79 16.3 781.09 25.4 255.3 60.87 7/3.75 232.99 22.3 39.2671 Partridge 135.69 24.78 11.5 177.3 54/2.36 57.3 52.57 7/2.4 298.39 21.0855 337 43.4 11.2 26.8 346.56 24.7 68.7 68.2 26.1 67.01 92.5 12750 0.8 697 60.1 1940 0.68 1001 461 1462 68.3 39.4 30/3.7 297.1 136.09 370.25 18.44 556.2 14330 0.8 54/2.8 86.00 16.7 244.8 7802 0.62 5.35 27.15 3.1 312.3 39.68 5.82 25.1 425 2.4 13.1686 Chickadee 201.3 104.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR STEEL REINFORCED – ACSR (CANADIAN STANDARD SIZES) Cross sectional area Code word Aluminium Steel 8.76 67.4 159.47 371.5 82.23 53.1 16.7 54/2.7 364 202.7 381.6 542 86.5 10954 0.9 67.4 26/3.4 179.82 893 326 1219 73.38 935 341 1276 73.34 184.47 17.9 545.88 Ultimate DC strength resistant of at 20 °C Aluminium Steel conductor W /km Kgs 33.3 60.8 10773 0.5 27.3 39.8 10210 0.2 26.92 7/2.8 198.4 73.2118 Waxwing mm Wren Warbler 2 mm Total 2 Stranding and wire Weight per km Copper Overall diameter area diameter Aluminium Steel Aluminium Steel Total mm2 mm2 No/mm No/mm Kg/k Kg/k Kg/k %wt 135.20 7/3.38 936 341 1277 73.7 110.41 7.1 3030 0.22 99.49 8.89 7/2.1195 Hen 241.6 445.1 26.5 31.5 31.1 255.1195 Heron 253.37 468.7 923.20 22.9 327.96 701 461 1162 60.69 7/2.7 14.49 6/4.22 53.1 67.

1 181.5 116./mm2 1 daN : 1.144699 0.3 9.55 6 7.71 47.6 22.850 7.27 46.45 10 11.4 18 18 18 18 18 18 The steel strands have an ultimate strength of 117.850 7.83 34.50 28.039418 0.850 7.168826 7 26 30 54 7 6.850 7.197 0.91 9. Steel Min (1) 6 6 30 42 54 Max (2) 1 7 7 7 7 Ratio of Aluminium wire Dia to steel wire diameter layer) Min (3) 1 3 1 1.85 697 1055 1540 1620 3050 3840 4145 5200 6260 7710 9690 11975 1.6988000 36.027623 5.3692000 29.50 2.8 1 Lay ratios for Aluminium Wire Lay ratios for steel core ( 6 Wires ) Outermost layer Max (4) 13 13 13 13 Max (6) 10 10 10 10 10 Min (5) 28 28 28 28 Steel wires in cores Layer immediately beneath over most layer Min (7) 14 14 14 14 14 Max (8) 10 10 10 (9) 16 16 16 Inter most layer or cach two wires 3 Aluminum wire layers (10) 10 10 (11) 17 17 .7 17.910890 25.80 3.1 18.14 4.157 0.038680 0.034155 52.977 1.7 54.3343000 0.02kg./force These cables are manufactured in accordance with the Standard NF.4 37.79 297.24 119.616 0. Coefficient conductor Modu.6478000 30.15 3.55 1 1 3 1 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 2.00 2.80 3.077370 19. Of diameter Area sq.850 18.6hbars.337632 7 ACSR Aluminium conductors surrounding the steel core 19 37 6 6.00 2.30 6 6 9 6 12 12 30 30 30 30 30 30 2.850 7.8181000 0.75 17.00 2.7407000 0.243 0.500 8.25 2.500 7.04719 … LAY RATIOS OF ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS GALVANIZED STEEL-REINFORCED Number of Wires 112 Alu.650 7.28 147.098 76 120 155 190 276 348 432 547 675 848 1.2kg.077370 0.122 0.15 2.25 2.6 59.83 37.7 75.55 69. 1 hectobar : 1.00 2. Gross Weight Nominal Elect.50 2.020 0.961810 3.15 2.00 3.306 0.99 22.5 8. mm mm kg.2785000 7.25 2.34 43. Steel No.150 10.15 3.7 15.7 18.25 2.50 2.00 2. WEIGHT AND RESISTANCE OF ACSR AND AAC All Aluminium Conductors Numbers of strands Area Weight Resistance 3 2.10 54.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR STEEL REINFORCED-ACSR (FRENCH STANDARD SIZED) Ext.5 19.81 233.090260 26. C 34-120.144433 0.00 27.0534794 0.923620 6.6 228 288 36.530 0.923620 18. kg/km kg/km hbar ´ 10-6 W /km.05 24.00 2.5 4 6 7 7 8 13 17 21 26 33 43 1.71 94.2021000 7.150 7.6 18.99 27.4 15.3065000 37.43 7.018976 … 7.77 21. Composition 3 22 34. mm No. CONSTANTS FOR DETERMINING AREA.5 2 3 2 3 3 7 8 10 13 17 22 7.605 0.500 10.00 3.074 1. mm Ultimate resistance of Weight Covered Uncovered elasticity of Aluminium Steel Strength at 20 °C expansion conductor Total Alu.2 147. kg/km.25 14 15.6995000 55.765 0.00 3.376 2.50 2.26 184.80 29.

37 4.32 6. weight Standard weight of length standard Alu.67 33.68 1.3 51.6 72.81 5.5 110.8 22.9 36. none of which will be shorter than half of the standard minimum length.708 1.67 3 3. Steel length Km drum 67.2 51.55 24.64 99. ACSR Types 100 150 and 200 have an ultimate strength equal to 100% 150% and 200% respectively of the equal sizes of ACSR 6/1.7 27.16 3.91 4.585 1.4245 0.1 48.92 6.1 32.5 425 2.1 32.77 21.67 16.8 48.41 53.13 17.15 10.39 78.3 179.62 1.295 2.62 5.68 32.2 60.77 21.37 10.7 42.295 2.9 10.62 42.12 1.1 5.82 500 640 780 0.1 146.79 6.55 44.12 2.9 67.8 48.19 20.9 92.615 4.22 125.01 107.11 3.28 5.625 980 1.62 42.8 48.9 57.714 2.15 26.354 1.7 43.2 51.71 7. Weight tolerance is ± 2% of the nominal for the complete conductor and ± 4% for the aluminium.26 6.77 10.423 2.425 3.9 67.3 16.43 5. Comp.82 8.154 53. Normal cable spans are supplied with a length tolerance of ± 10%.41 11.25 4.9 171.63 8.84 56. 2.6754 0.48 22.625 280 67.25 4.2 Aluminium Area 39.07 1.9 32. 3. 4.5 232.1 146.9 10.35 280 67.3 16.7 D-C Complete Ultimate Diameter in mm Weight in kg/km Equiv.2671 3.615 300 370 370 370 370 370 370 150 300 300 300 300 300 280 280 280 560 560 560 560 560 560 185 185 185 % of total Approx.8 48.1 32.8 39.67 33.37 4.39 40.8 57.4 184.9 28.2 116.35 12.38 2.8 51.48 62.9 72.16 14.37 9. 10% of a purchase order may be supplied in manufactured lengths.7 36.2 60.49 67.67 33.305 2.79 9.3387 0.09 1.2 60.295 2.78 4.55 13.714 42.423 33.3 21. The galvanized steel and round aluminium strands used to manufacture these conductors meet the requirements of CS Specifications C49 -1965.8 39.4 87.19 4.67 3 3.2 67.67 5.78 1.175 3.1 11.2 48.113 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 200 200 200 200 200 200 200 xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx 2 5 4 3 2 1 1/0 8 7 6 5 4 3 5 4 3 2 1 1/0 2/0 3/0 4/0 8 7 6 8 7 6 AWG 33.2 51.37 10.16 3.354 1.1 32.26 9.37 3.95 6.7 13.15 26.1 660 630 1.49 67.8 39.708 1.25 10. in of breaking resistance copper at 20 °C Conductor Complete Steel strength mm2 mm2 Alu.9 67.9 72.9 13.74 21.074 0.38 2.645 1.615 2.505 1.41 53.154 231 89.4 285.4 112.3 139 34.8507 1.68 13.62 16.305 4.26 3.1 92 45.37 3.55 12.5351 0.8 272 343 432.23 1.8 1.6 55 69.9 32.07 1.6 28.4 34.4 87.86 4.5 115.41 53.33 340 3.6754 0.47 5.2 32.67 33.07 1.17 6.154 1.6 56.2 51.9 67.2 60.4 34.15 26.31 2.71 31.94 2.9 92.9 51.4 22.645 4.18 5.67 2.89 2.9 36.3 139 21.2 60.68 530 2.255 280 1.8 39.9 72.5 17.48 8.62 42.55 7.4 139 43.1 8.714 2.2 145.074 0.1 32. Steel Total mm2 kg Conductor Core W /km 8.1 32.1 215.1 6.8507 0.2 39.6 135.074 1.37 10.63 4.33 1.8 60.3 107. 100 100 100 Type xx xx xx Code Word COMPRESSED ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR STEEL REINFORCED (CANADIAN STANDARD SIZED) .5 110.1 32.84 16.77 21.12 2.7 27.2 51.85 865 1.2 8.9 45.55 13.37 8.3 16.8 48.84 19.26 35.63 8.9 67.7 793.39 28.9 142.615 2.55 13.22 49.91 7.39 25.89 2.1 39.37 3.8 39.4 183.77 21.5 45.03 3.9 32.9 57.5 44.265 1.58 71.7 55 69.615 4.3 71.355 2.26 6.4 57.9 67.55 13.615 2.5351 3.423 2.77 2.30 16.6 55 69.38 2.41 5.67 3 3.1 32.49 6.88 2.2 51.8 48.025 1.25 1.77 21.8507 0.2 51.78 4.354 1.305 4.78 4.15 26.9 4.36 110.8 226.5 22.34 8.175 3.3 87.77 1.9 67.5 85.31 2.3 15.2 116.8 48.43 85.77 2. 5.55 13.8 67.645 1.49 8.9 28.15 26.16 3.8 57.5 91.2 60.

6 940 0.3 265 2.08 0.3 Salamander 4/0 107.50 7´ 2.9 Komodo 266.01 18 13.7 256.149 36.5 107.43 7 12.15 37´ 2.267 292.95 Approximately weight kg/km 60.80 7´ 3.49 7 10.465 12.01 53.8 135.115 0.3 7 5.7 18 16.41 26.06 3.3 117 148 181 228 288 366 475 570 604 114 Composition maximum mm 7´ 2.25 12.4 126.351 57.2 67.2 94 118 149.534 146.4 43.119 663.189 417.67 7 7.5 2.4 170.5 93.336 232.5 Tadpole 300 152 95.3 8.6 2.55 61´ 3.41 7 9.80 19´ 3.62 7 8.85 91.6 22.146 0.5 31.357 0.37 7 4.725 19.4 415 1.47 0.185 0.8 2.50 19´ 2.825 Electrical resistance at 20 °C W /km 1.5 0.8 Tuatara 1/0 53.55 Exterior diameter mm 6 7.15 61´ 3.5 14 15.605 18.85 28.183 0.283 0.958 0.9 635 0.15 19´ 2.55 7 4.52 21.7 1.4 9.438 0.415 1.9 1.3 321.42 0.213 370.35 31.704 45.96 7.6 18 14.15 7 6.25 19´ 2.6 407 500 627.8 Moloch 2 33.485 9.5 19.1 1008.8 Dragon 4 21.75 17.769 0.2 Crocodile 3/0 85.055 .2 1.665 Ultimate strength kg 725 1.2 85.50 37´ 2.84 4.0706 0.603 0.168 467.6 1311.9 3.995 0.1 Alligator 2/0 67.15 37´ 3.8 335 1.77 10.142 553 477 241.05 24.5 4.3 Hatteria 397.9 1.02 15.00 7´ 2.574 1.0905 0.7 152 18 18.COMPRESSED ALL ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR (CANADIAN STANDARD SIZES) Toad 6 13.0583 0.6 75.1 515 1.86 5.8 Monitor 1 42.5 794.67 16.5 8.15 13.7 Lizard 3 26.1 54.0036 Normal area mm2 22 34.43 42.424 184.072 72.475 3.3 Ozard 5 16.45 11.2 18 15.80 37´ 3.5 Chuckwalla ALL ALLOY ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR (FRENCH STANDARD SIZES) Characteristics Modulus of elasticity 6120 kg/mm2 Coefficient of expansion 23 ´ 10-4 Coefficient of variation in Electrical Resistance per ? C 0.45 61´ 3.77 7 6.49 33.79 2.81 0.67 0.2 207.125 1.4 Basillisk 336.224 0.674 115.435 0.6 775 0.5 201.

45 11.74 99.7 5.78 4.7 3.15 37´ 3.295 Kg 477 760 1.85 21.21 1.05 24.55 37´ 2.75 23.15 19´ 3.326 2.34 12.167 0.4 207.37 3.75 14.07 280 371.5 8.6 821.3 785. Kg/km 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 19 19 19 19 19 37 37 mm 1.4 43.5 330.02 kg of force.67 39.3 117 148 188 228 288 366 475 604 Composition N° x mm 7´ 2.337 0.3 155.1 0.ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTOR 6201 T.142 0.2 795 1009.1 54.9 41.13 28.5 93.7 5.57 375.5.36 469.194 0.5 14 15.25 18.5 636 795 6/1 6/1 6/1 6/1 6/1 6/1 6/1 26/7 26/7 26/7 26/7 26/7 26/7 26/7 Equivalent ACSR Cable Diameter MCM.81 Akron Alton Ames Azusa Anahim Anherst Alliance Butte Canton Cario Dairen Elgin Flint Greeley Composition Exterior Cable Cable Ultimate Resistance at Intensity weight Strength No.25 3.47 123.246 0. 81 (ASTM STANDARD SIZES) Section Code Word MCM mm2 30.7 5.12 2.80 37´ 3.75 19.0608 0.853 0.25 19´ 2.664 0.9 407.8 394.95 134.131 0.8 The above cables are manufactured in accordance with accordance with ASTM Standards B 398-67 and B399-69a.02 mm 5.7 240.1 473.9 66.1 264.2 65.211 0.0479 Module of elasticity bars 6 6 6 6 5.1 394.8 552.925 2.594 6.4 397. (2) 1hbar = 1.185 0.96 105.498 2.22 169.69 77.35 4.6 104.85 28.77 3.101 0.9 256.9 312.7 1313.7 246.4 9.75 17.0891 0.04 6.296 0.28 199.942 0.87 33.695 4.01 10.5 5.0801 Amps ACSR Cable of equal Diameter MCM. (3) These cables are manufactured according to the Standard C34-120 115 .7 5.31 16.50 19´ 2.15 25.1 13 20.5 652.126 0.7 5.97 4.07 5.4 131.425 0.357 1. mm AWG 25.2 94.469 0.68 2.93 9.49 24.95 4.592 0.5 Coefficient of line expansion x 10° 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 NOTE: (1) daN = 1.1 478 576 706 873 1294 1563 1917 2371 2923 3733 4617 5694 7206 8895 1.5 199 235.13 19.308 0.80 19´ 3.57 3.381 0.4 517.153 0.14 42 68 108 172 217 273 345 436 551 650 781 1911 1.36 8.68 83.8 336.11 11.60 meters / second and a co-efficient of emissivity of 0.1 118 149. ALL ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR –AAC (FRENCH STANDARD SIZES) Section Nominal mm3 27.2 15.25 7´ 2.157 0.0967 0.6 165. Standing AWG 100 130 180 240 280 325 380 440 510 570 630 710 770 890 6 4 2 1/0 2/0 3/0 4/0 266.55 61´ 3.03 0. Carrying capacity is calculated for an increase of 50° C over an ambient temperature of 25° C a wind velocity of 0.50 7´ 2.24 52.833 0.233 0.15 19´ 2.4 740.7 5.1 158.0787 0.mm.25 12.161 2.145 20° C 50° C W /kg 2.385 1.02kg/sp.247 10.15 61´ 3.373 0. Resistance value is based on a minimum conductivity of 52.66 3.95 76.47 78.25 4.527 0.0712 0.75 7.16 125.6 22.4 628.927 3.112 0.8 397.267 0.5 465.626 5.034 1.5 477 556.5% IACS.8 927.80 7´ 3.6 75.7 5.118 0.536 0.35 31.4 195.597 7.51 Exterior diameter mm Cable weight Kg/Km Ultimate strength Electrical resistance at 20° C/Km 6.503 13..8 34.4 1668.82 283.4 559.58 48.4 627.25 52.7 209.9 334.

of wires Resistance at 20 0C Current carrying Capacity A .218 224.104 111.09 91 3.27 117 147.05 0.82 0.1 1.5 19´ 2.83 61 3.4 400.76 0.50 12. In the case of unusual placement without air movement.54 61 2.6 0.89 25 No.6 36.7 7´ 2.10 6.02 0.042 1255 Nominal Actual mm2 mm2 16 15.1 32.36 65.25 34.23 91´ 2.184 490 240 242.5 181 18.1 Cable weight Approximately ultimate strength Kgs.99 19 2.138 585 300 299.9 2.090 105 24.5 61´ 2.370 135 35 34.09 0.20 91 2.379 139.48 7 3.2 222.0 322 32.5 256 26.3 670 67.054 1075 800 802.74 Cable diameter mm 6. Calculated breaking load mm mm kg/km kN W /km 7 1.36 7 2.96 91´ 3.067 930 625 626.5 12.35 36.27 19 2.1 7´ 2.6 m/sec.14 61 2.5 827 83.77 1.25 15.89 61´ 3.3 7.50 17.1 19´ 2.f.5 0.70 5.80 9.5 28 29.11 37 2.2 802.8 406 41.690 210 70 65.3 66 6.5 20.36 49.62 37 2.9 0.6 1.63 0.358 320 120 116.507 255 95 93.7 17.43 61 2.25 61´ 2.25 37´ 2.25 20.5 7´ 3.50 22.6 242.10 10.0 135 13.35 91´ 3.00 9.967 170 50 49.5 94 9.35 19 1.25 7 2.5 9 9 10.8 37´ 2.8 626.1 499.0 133 13.38 0.732 174.5 299.89 26.50 7.82 93.81 19 2.8 19´ 2.285 365 150 147.44 2.084 810 500 499.73 0.6 0.80 14. and solar action for an initial temperature of 35° C and an ultimate cable temperature of 80° C.96 32.68 0.47 0.5 14 15.23 29.671 210 50 48.ALL ALUMINIUM CONDUCTOR – AAC (DIN STANDARD SIZES) Section Nominal Theoretical area mm3 25 35 50 50 70 95 120 150 185 240 300 400 500 625 800 1000 Composition N° ´ mm 24.0 19´ 1.5 500 50. 67 94 135 133 181 256 322 406 501 670 827 1105 1381 1733 2219 2766 425 585 810 860 1150 1595 1910 2570 3105 4015 4850 6190 7670 9610 12055 14845 Constant load capacity Amp.8 41.0 1.1 181.1 43 4. Weight approx.112 670 400 400. these values will be reduced on an average of 30% approximately. 145 180 225 225 270 340 390 455 520 625 710 855 990 1140 1340 1540 Theoretical values valid up to 60Hz for a wind velocity of 0.5 61´ 2. ALL ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTOR (AAAC) DIN 48201/6 Cross Section 116 Construction Wire diameter Complete Conductor diameter Cond.227 425 185 181.1 999.48 48.

90 4.97 28.68 3.25 1395 29.82 3.61 835.12 33.7 113.23 3.59 909.2 151.38 38.76 3.9 25.80 372.23 294.30 3.1 362.1 205.11 3.02 1887 35.62 2.5 8.62 1336 29.0 805.55 3.0 354.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS (AAC) ASTM B 231 CSA-Standard C 49.1 228.60 698.78 3.7 14.7 18.3 -1977 Code Word Cross section (Actual) PEACHBELL ROSE IRIS ANSY POPPY ASTER PHLOX OXLIP SNEEZEWORT VALERIAN DAISY LAUREL PEONY TULIP DAFFODIL CANNA GOLDENTFT COSMOS SYRINGA ZINNIA HYACINTH DAHLIA MISTLETOE MEADOWSWEET ORCHID HEUCHERA VERBENA FLAG VIOLET NSTURTIUM PETUNIA CATTAIL ARBUTUS LILAC COCKSCOMB SNAODRAGON MAGNOLIA GOLDENROD HAWKWEED CAMELLIA BLUEBELL LARKSKPUR MARIGOLD HAWTHORN NARCISSUS COLUMBINE CARNATION GLADIOLUS COREOPSIS JESSAMINE COWSLIP AGEBRUSH LUPINE BITTERROT TRILLIUM BLUEBONNET mm2 13.01 62.75 3.34 1050 25.72 2.9 524.3 684.91 4.99 46.05 54.96 3.69 58.1 9.34 117.7 11.37 3.84 51.91 4.1 17.79 234.5 362.76 57.31 888.80 2.4 135.2 7.0 524.09 4.00 37.5 20.01 1999 36.06 20.73 104. mm kg/km 4.95 35.22 Complete Conductor Conductor diameter weight approx.23 77.35 84.0 20.8 16.45 3.9 455.01 38.05 373.20 63.5 5.2 330.54 42.6 725.7 506.2 19.50 3.33 3.8 24.42 78.36 2785 43.1 186.0 402.55 1.81 80.72 1256 27.5 507.9 126.43 22.3 14.98 72.7 457.33 43.9 563.6 202.47 2.75 998.90 470.00 24.10 665.46 67.79 1447 30.99 4.1 13.67 69.08 3.7 126.6 21.8 15.8 260.75 1447 29.43 976.3 24.96 3.70 2442 41.3 252.21 4.65 697.13 76.26 1400 29.86 4993 Calculated breaking load kN 2.48 977.16 664.89 4.3 330.6 131.1 402.4 281.62 3887 50.4 885.00 4.38 3.0 354.01 3.45 16.1 241.03 1779 34.35 3.8 119.08 31.0 222.65 36.25 3.7 107.9 20.02 58.21 21.02 26.4 483.71 998.8 Resistance at 200C W /Km 95 130 175 200 235 270 315 365 405 405 420 425 455 495 506 550 545 615 615 635 635 680 680 715 745 755 790 790 800 800 825 825 855 855 925 925 960 960 990 990 1015 1015 1040 1085 1130 1175 1220 1265 1305 1385 1500 1600 1700 1795 1885 2035 117 .89 3168 46.56 1333 28.6 10.12 3.9 282.47 3.25 4.1 303.3 21.38 1050 26.10 4.95 418.5 177.55 349.0 15.78 3. of wires 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 19 7 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 37 19 37 19 37 37 37 37 37 61 37 61 37 61 37 61 37 61 37 61 37 61 37 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 61 91 91 91 91 127 127 Wire diameter mm 1.25 489.43 56.42 3.95 7.90 3.90 2221 38.0 253.99 13.01 8.95 1665 33.58 74.88 58.49 53.50 185.18 4.04 1109 26.40 557.67 3.0 24.38 98.40 348.49 2.12 2.8 381.72 3.91 49.87 40.95 4.31 86.53 2.8 645.8 167.73 10.96 2.19 3.00 2114 36.31 3527 48.41 92.36 147.18 3.43 3.5 152.5 14.4 484.41 4.5 766.8 1010 1138 1267 1396 1517 1776 No.0 22.9 170.75 778.2 322.3 23.55 628.52 67.3 135.70 4223 54.23 92.9 23.31 3.4 20.6 603.91 106.88 4.02 2.57 21.81 1261 28.10 1111 27.4 24.87 1554 31.91 60.2 241.27 43.77 775.93 4.92 20.94 5.

80 860 59.35 264.1 MOOSE 597.96 12.37 4.3 7X4.79 42.62 7.29 540 59.0 32.60 27.1 ZEBRA 484.50 54X3. kg/km kN current carrying capacity Alu.18 428.30 WOLF 194.6 33.50 920 72.00 1444.50 10.30 985 59.59 158.5 7X2.33 84.3 7X3.7 40.72 17.0 32.05 587.24 250 37.22 13.9 1X3.6 27.86 519.40 GOAT 400.50 14.70 CARACAL 194.20 DINGO 167.48 6.59 5.54 131.89 1977.98 6X4.70 30X2.45 1217.00 25.53 528.10 LION 293.3 7X2.0 32.81 6X3.70 30X3.0 32.46 430 69.88 12X2.3 31.80 26X2.6 CAMEL 537.25 WEASEL 36.3.6 47.0 1X2.1 7X1.88 7.09 78.59 31.85 180 68.4 7X3.0 132.0 32.35 61.09 55.28 131.37 6X2.5 62.7 40.8 1X3.0 198.6 27.11 20.9 7X1.41 RABBIT 61.6 27.61 10.7 11.18 55.50 15.66 339.4 7X3.30 61.36 30.0 115.2 42.60 6X4.50 14.94 165 68.00 171.0 1X3.0 121.98 GOPHER 30.0 163.4 7X3.6 62.64 10.20 15.1 1X2.4 41.82 OTTER 97.79 8.6 19.27 100.30 BEAR 326.50 30X3.12 BEAVER 87.35 8.90 640 59.07 6X3.32 280 37.6 7X1.90 12.4 95.0 32.0 1X3.27 320.50 111.15 395.92 280 68.22 595 59.98 6X4.1 25.30 1030 72.30 780 59.80 29.99 75.35 52.50 477.40 PANTHER 261.52 6X3.97 1493.3 7X4.92 SKUNK 100.10 985 72.5 7X2.7 SHEEP 462.80 6X5.90 18.05 213.57 452.00 49.08 106.30 435 59.50 28.0 178.50 940 59.86 210.0 1X4.4 7X2. Steel A % % Construcion Section Construction steel Steel Aluminium Section Aluminium mm2 mm2 mm mm MOLE 12.11 6X2.0 41.90 19.70 TIGER 161.3 66.50 54X3.77 1999.0 46.48 9.60 30X3.00 42.59 36.23 125 67.18 55.27 6X2.3 ANTELOPE 422.8 1X3.20 685 59.29 345 68.50 31.36 4.0 155.79 73.9 32.00 HYENA 126.50 385.6 27.0 32.50 6X4.75 506.60 LYNX 226.60 SQUIRREL 24.70 30.40 30X3.10 23.66 10.40 COYOTE 151.20 27.57 325 68.00 LEOPARD 148.70 30X3.52 605.00 7.73 1415.94 400 73.9 32.99 87.97 303.26 80 67.40 30X4.35 476 ELK 588.95 536.79 42.50 1.36 DOG 118.00 975.30 13.61 184.22 CAT 111.75 16.90 22.13 726.10 12.50 15.77 6X1.3 7X2.02 RACCOON 91.70 18X3.00 305 68.79 6.50 7X4.5 40.7 40.53 844.4 7X2.0 1X3.0 32.52 11.0 10.7 40.ALUMNIUM CONDUCTORS STEEL REIN FORCED ( ACSR) BS 215 Part 2 Cord word Total Cross section Complete conductor diameter mm2 mm conductor Calculated weight breaking approx.15 1801.27 429.77 127.10 540 86.87 6X4.12 250 68.61 FOX 42.36 26.6 35.2 13.5 1X4.0 83.3 7X3.36 131.80 30X2.9 4.86 11.1 13.30 19.59 36.03 145 68.7 40.0 35.43 HORSE 116.50 18.50 16.8 71.0 136.79 183.6 30.7 40.80 30X2.16 424.20 18X3.4 7X1.3 7X3.0 147.7 40.9 DEER 529.0 1X3.70 490 86.88 MINK 73.53 68.50 42.7 40.26 1097.39 106.57 345 64.69 10.55 590 86.72 105.35 8.10 JAGUAR 222.80 18X3.2 13.1 1X1.97 374.50 2196.9 27.3 36.59 63.22 83.50 21.00 HARE 122.99 12.8 60.79 36.1 13.40 30X4. load.0 32.11 3.0 22.00 381.71 75.60 26.68 FERRET 49.50 6X3.00 49.70 54X3.0 119.0 103.97 48.20 13.37 148.1 26.0 1X4.60 850 72.24 290 67.81 493.6 27.4 15.20 845 72.0 32.99 375.57 18.0 1X2.0 29.4 7X3.35 158.71 324.6 56.00 212.10 BISON 431.62 1622.20 19.5 32.69 490 59.5 54X2.66 63.93 1726.12 225 68.74 345 72.50 95.3 7X3.60 14.50 6X2.84 12X2.0 1X4.72 105.95 463.0 1X2.18 238.6 27.00 31.90 16.93 20.60 54.5 118 .98 255.8 8.7 40.81 195 68.30 671.3 7X3.

70 19 3.4 27.34 7.67 8.92 No.02 83.85 5.40 37 2.47 7 2.90 19 3.71 7 2.09 660.37 10.50 912.8 3.8 4.34 216.7 14.2 52.65 7 3.3 FLINT - 350 GREELEY YEW 400 119 .02 28.83 197.57 266.03 AMHERST - 90 108.56 211.80 782.90 7 4.06 28.60 19 3.53 24.6 479.87 7 3.76 1.18 15.40 FIR 40 47.84 7 2.55 7 3.19 7 2.44 7 3.25 12.90 416.75 - 79 84.36 21.96 ACACIA 20 23.00 62.62 97.70 19 4.83 ALMOND 25 30.30 7 4.11 2301.8 36.73 7 4.20 99.90 165.55 UPAS 300 362.10 - 80 96.18 7 2.5 22.3 MULBERRY BUTTE 125 158.54 7.26 16.81 26.10 37 3.35 745.1 58.0 9.30 9.78 71.80 OAK 100 118.9 32.90 - 200 270.95 327.0 134.3 13.1 7.05 21.78 11.77 8.55 51.20 DARIEN 225 283.90 19 3.00 37 4.8 11.71 998.31 344.73 231.0 137.7 90.71 23.48 17.44 13.76 18.00 19 3.13 1033.65 13.31 116.05 7 3.1 20.98 19.88 7 15.90 651.6 96.8 69.87 20.8 30.30 551.30 37 3.80 37 3.54 830.9 37. of wires Wire diameter 11.40 19 3.01 108.7 25.40 WILLOW 75 89.8 236.97 SYCAMORE ELGIN 250 331.85 131.2 83.67 1163.6 23.80 374.61 10.0 71.2 81.90 469.11 172.40 498.6 7.36 68.47 4.ALL ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTORS (AAAC) ASTM B 399 BS 3242 : 1970 CODE WORD - CROSS SECTION (Nominal) Actual mm2 mm2 10 AKRON Complete conductor diameter Conductor weight approx.08 6.53 CEDAR 30 35.79 7 2.10 7 2. mm mm kg/km KN 1.90 CANTON 150 199.91 11.04 42.66 18.30 437.20 39.00 ALLIANCE 100 125.67 ASH 150 180.10 7 4.32 298.70 AZUZA PINE 60 ANAHEIM 78.59 25.42 MES - 35 42.80 581.24 65.10 HAZEL 50 59.3 103.41 32.22 22.42 1321.83 150.25 ELM CAIRO 175 POPLAR 239.0 107.12 6.04 12.0 12.0 120.12 247.0 46.00 19 4.40 421.54 ALTON 24.60 37 4.1 29.19 12.52 7 Calculated breaking load BOX 15 18.40 7 4.50 37 3.75 273.9 15.7 61.9 5.52 7 4.2 19.30 37 3.68 5.14 1295.3 48.82 7 1.95 8.

9 6 13.324 700 MCM 354.6 12 3.3 24 0.4 17 1.0 4 21.65 1750 MCM 870.080 400 MCM 203.30 30 0.0 4/0 107.2 22 0.5 5 16.654 900 MCM 457.26 28 0.4 19 0.4 14 2.065 350 MCM 177.62 250 MCM 126.17 29 0.8 10 5.36 26 0.0 16 1.4 2 33.2 7 10.8 13 2.63 27 0.821 1000 MCM 506.05 300 MCM 151.5 25 0.411 750 MCM 381.2 11 4.205 600 MCM 303.5 18 0.30 1500 MCM 745.128 500 MCM 252.107 450 MCM 227.0 3/0 85.2 15 1.9 9 6.517 800 MCM 405.259 650 MCM 328.3 8 8.0 2/0 67.7 21 0.AWG/MCM versus metric conductor sizes 120 AWG mm2 AWG mm2 AWG mm2 2000 MCM 994.7 3 26.039 1250 MCM 621.162 550 MCM 279.7 20 0.08 .7 23 0.0 1/0 53.0 1 42.

6 560/50 611.85 26X3.86 67.2 20.4 210/50 261.306 7X1.0 981 93.81 1.4 27.4 20.01 0.49 34.56 0.075 7X3.40 85.74 263.10 0.4 11.4 40.027 7X2.25 23.50 230.35 67.29 72.49 34.49 34.0 432 44.9 794 77.45 448.19 0.40 63.6 383 35.4 62 5.85 26X2.86 561./St.36 36X1.051 7X3.74 494.33 26X2.27 67.00 678.83 36X2.243 7X1.9 18.31 0.4 32.8 490/56 553.3 11.3 67.25 3.9 537 58.0 680/85 764.2 27.68 304.00 212.57 49.6 32.46 0.835 1x2.4 18.90 0.5 23.30 256.10 0.27 0.4 29.91 72.85 0.7 1770 134.7 32.297 7X3.68 39.33 0.4 16.80 2.1 14.33 29.044 7X2.49 45X4.5 150/25 173.2 14.09 45X3.80 15.064 7X2.9 50.02 571.6 450 27.09 24X3.7 284 26.0 2564 209.9 1636 120.3 9.8 550/70 620.75 41.138 7X2.51 37.0 877 73.1 8.68 39.69 0.7 79.28 72.2 373 45.074 7X2.1 604 54.226 7X2.42 0.6 450/40 488.095 7X3.30 653.7 11.94 0.8 16.67 15.16 0.60 71.85 30X2.5 21.79 78X2.45 243.10 24.67 32.4 67.20 56.02 1.36 341.4 40.0 1174 92.8 97 9.8 32.193 7X3.60 0.68 39.5 899 106.4 27.67 14X2.8 70/12 81.3 590 57.9 105/75 181.86 304.20 52.2 28.30 149.8 22.70 171.55 54X3.0 17.90 19.77 49.4 2163 155.25 75.28 72X4.0 714 80.00 30X2.95 0.6 44/32 75.00 381.28 45X4.136 7X3.57 67.5 494 44.98 6X2.00 49.7 1336 104.70 108.00 94.18 0.0 17.35 67.4 18.4 25/4 27.49 83.48 30X3.3 27.37 0.2 17.87 45.86 0.05 0.7 240/40 282.4 116.109 7X2.17 37.20 8.85 24X3.1 1155 99.49 48X3.33 29.6 570/40 610.8 16.4 2085 167.60 549.70 72.4 27.8 21.17 0.6 32.00 11.40 490.299 7X2.5 36.52 0.68 510.871 1X1.95 54X4.30 1045.5 95/55 152.9 50.6 230/30 260.61 83.086 7X2.0 17.4 257/60 316.6 32.1 62.2 62.3 850 74.1 140 12.1 1177 109.6 32.20 48.9 987 86.2 20.4 81 11.8 6.271 19X2.00 339.6 32.595 1X3.25 12X3.54 79.87 0.58 72.198 1x2.70 0.56 72.245 7X2.00 183.558 7X2.6 120/20 141.4 27.05 0.8 5.48 54X3.4 20.26 67.4 20.59 59.82 49.48 48X3.413 7X1.8 32.98 0.085 19X2.90 1.6 32.1 170/40 211.694 7x2.9 125/30 157.49 34.6 19.20 96.86 67.4 35/6 40.6 495/35 528.20 0.20 386.119 7X2.3 150/53 202.7 32.06 59.9 32.68 39. Breaking Load mm2 mm Kg/km kN Elec Resistance at 200C Steel Construction mm W /km Steel Cross Section mm2 Alu.60 122.28 0.30 54X3. Calc.25 26X2.98 32.54 6X1.7 27.10 52.5 40.44 121.167 7X2.28 48X3. mm2 Total Cross Section Conductor Diameter Conductor weight approx.78 67.44 0.5 654 70.1 62.6 28.10 105.00 43.00 49.33 127.1 47.89 67.50 34.15 94.30 0.8 30.28 0.6 1860 152.92 59.05 76.4 15.7 300/50 353.0 3249 217.10 0.1 24.5 50.30 59.0 744 66.48 26X3.4 120/42 160.28 0.1 17.36 83.05 118.09 48X3.050 7X2.2 1889 137.8 1647 136.4 1002 83.55 14X3.33 29.2 32.042 19X2. ConstruSection Portion ction Steel Portion mm2 % mm % 16/2.70 5.40 0.25 67.00 49.85 94/22 22.10 0.124 7X2.2 210/35 243.04 6X3.0 510/45 555.4 26X1.33 29.3 27.71 79.6 32.30 12X3.066 7X3.4 27.6 385/35 420.9 380/50 431.307 7X2.00 0.20 434.65 72.0 904 98.156 7X2.4 20.33 29.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS STEEL REINFORCED (ACSR) -DIN 48204 Nominal cross Section Al.052 7X3.33 51.2 1943 146.85 96.87 45.87 45.31 0.6 50/8 56.15 37.70 148.99 0.241 7X3.7 24.58 36X2.0 1448 120.49 54X2.9 43.20 59.77 59.1 265/35 297.20 56.094 7X2.31 69.5 827 86.85 48X3.5 21.10 67.194 7X2.70 40.70 34.1 25.7 1553 120.1 26.1 120/70 193.0 650/45 698.3 1045/45 1090.08 30X2.9 40. Alu Cross Alu.6 185/30 213.058 7X2.113 7X3.6 435/55 490.2 95/34 131.7 13.49 26X3.73 6x2.04 79.85 12X2.20 209.58 88.5 1236 107.1 95/15 109.056 7X2.09 26X3.5 17.6 340/30 369.059 7X3.4 305/40 344.62 72.6 196 17.60 71.29 79.00 49.91 0.25 54X3.7 378 44.7 1799 187.87 30X3.6 32.6 50/30 340/110 121 .8 34.8 30.40 31.9 40.

96 1162.8 32.90 6X4.45 430.98 690 1X4.34 555 1X3.72 282.8 12.46 282.50 86.00 24.9 1030.25 11.4 1110.00 68.60 22.12 58.44 10.66 960.8 62.6 42.7 77.1 31.21 1158.50 18X3.30 72.18 26.10 18.40 81.80 740 7X2.20 18X3.1 SPARATE 42.22 6X3.70 26X2.78 67.4 15.75 343.9 SPARROW 39.13 570 7X2.77 11.00 42.9 32.60 67.54 58.09 8.9 SWAN 24.7 90.1 31.1 OSTRICH 176.52 5.8 977.31 698.00 23.9 OWL 153.10 72.28 59.19 1159.33 575 7X2. Steel mm2 mm kg/km kN A mm mm2 mm mm2 % % TURKEY 15.38 1006.87 282.20 22.07 6X3.93 410 7X1.69 39.27 430 1x3.50 26X3.3 CHICKADEE 212.80 30X3.55 1142.6 27.1 GOOSE 364.5 16.36 85.90 23.9 BRANT 227.22 1068.0 108.53 99.0 105.7 56.00 16.47 33.7 27.46 65.5 27.67 750 1X4.78 17.88 813.70 17.38 4.0 32.10 59.58 36.90 18X4.12 21.0 69.71 6.2 PARTRIDGE 156.22 500 1X3.90 24.96 21.50 15.00 26X2.10 710 7X2.35 901.5 60.80 26X2.11 216.09 510.55 5.1 31.60 6X5.77 107.10 21.5 DUCK 346.89 170.69 39.60 24X3.41 310 1X4.70 565 7X2.99 7X2.30 67.0 101.7 76.03 306.89 45.28 253.9 40.7 32.68 39.00 86.92 46.88 54X2.78 635 7X2.20 56.00 36X3.80 26X3.39 130 1X2.29 700 7X2.8 SWALLOW 31.9 32.84 1218.14 107.35 230 1X3.50 18X3.ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS STEEL REINFORCED (ACSR) CSA -C49.60 72.4 DOVE 328.9 MERLIN 179.68 745 1X3.90 18X4.70 19.1 PARAKEET 318.19 8.2 OSPREY 298.30 59.44 924.40 72.09 7.7 5.18 6X4.8 23.79 17.70 17.6 27.68 13.6 10.89 2.81 200 1X3.28 545.9 32.84 331.10 19.90 23.47 1X1.7 27.20 86.55 11.7 40.0 95.83 784.60 67.12 24.9 32.01 135.00 86.90 30X2.7 40.76 322.40 24X3.67 67.30 59.25 27.0 52.1 67.47 9.25 85.50 23.5 HAWK 281.35 543.3 EAGLE 347.00 92.1 13.1 13.67 68.1 13.9 HERON 312.1 WAXWING 142.10 24X3.77 68.7 773.34 271.41 68 32 RAVEN 62.3 7.90 26X3.34 625 1X4.87 305.0 TRUSH 19.60 6X2.58 241.4 IBIS 234.0 14.6 8.90 710 7X3.7 40.4 9.14 13.70 18X4.12 68 32 PENGUIN 125.60 72.00 7.44 32.32 7X2.15 18X4.76 41.30 86.78 11.04 53.20 90.38 323.38 26.0 99.62 762.35 7X1.68 175 1X2.60 24.2 19.3 PELICAN 255.9 32.67 5.6 50.9 FLICKER 273.90 86. Alu.68 2.2 38.60 72.61 5.80 67.0 LINNET 198.20 67.69 170.05 1X2.77 200.47 170.9 32.3 122 .00 22.20 241.67 33.92 6X3.12 3.3 SWANATE 26.30 12.28 95 1X1.31 433.59 67.3 SQUAB 355.6 PEACOCK 345.78 54X3.2 HEN 297.37 53.09 135.27 201.6 6.22 1298. Calculated breaking load Current carrying capacity Construction Section Steel Steel Construction on Aluminium section Alu.0 88.80 6X1.4 37.78 323.13 175 1X3.79 760 3X2.10 25.50 59.40 22.0 108.69 306.25 440 7X2.2 41.48 9 171.90 67.8 29.80 24X4.90 24.73 152.38 9.80 20.30 72.89 16.1 Code word Total cross section complete Conductor conductor weight diameter approx.28 612.68 7X3.80 26X3.14 242.00 21.24 158.30 68.59 265 1X3.4 105.60 68 32 SWIFT 332.57 134.14 201.10 14.1 41.73 640 7X2.30 30X3.20 645 7X3.61 6X2.47 6.0 60.15 7X2.22 6X1.40 24.01 49.9 72.92 200.49 914.47 15.37 8.10 745 7X3.1 65.9 - 343.4 64.52 68 32 QUAIL 78.55 7X2.36 135.5 44.6 30.80 30X2.44 241.8 40.9 86.1 ORIOLE 210.85 640.39 31.14 30X3.1 7.09 350 1X4.90 59.45 515 7X2.47 282.51 1236.9 ROBIN 49.7 KINGBIRD 340.77 17.25 14.52 130 1X2.0 122.44 6X2.1 13.69 39.90 16.1 13.8 27.1 LARK 247.5 27.30 18.30 8.73 510 7X2.6 10.80 20.33 68 32 PIGEON 99.

2 LAPWING 863.40 1270 19X2.70 995 7X3.61 1603.40 1335 7X3.4 14.30 1110 7X2.0 177.4 COOT 413.0 JOREE 123 .11 403.30 30.4 GULL 381.10 28.10 1225 19X2.90 67.00 72X4.00 85.0 125.70 903.00 87.6 27.90 835 7X3.40 945 7X2.94 47.54 7X3.76 3740.40 31.6 27. Alu.4 ORTOLAN 560.76 4095.08 402.70 3089.6 14.10 1360 19X2.66 7X2.70 40.70 1435 19X2.0 139.23 443.40 1540 7X2.10 38.15 1302.50 72.0 133.60 33.30 72.0 87.03 1336.20 30.50 30X3.20 28.10 45X4.44 402.00 45.6 27.0 32.44 89.60 1080 19X2.22 73.39 1195.00 84X4.20 24X4.0 243.51 522.98 1871.0 186.27 76.9 BLUEBIRD 1182.80 54X3.70 33.1 KIWI 1147.62 402.5 27.00 80.0 227.4 BLUELJAY 604.0 101.60 54X3.42 1832.70 322.0 GRACKLE 679.10 2435.00 24.93 47.7 27.10 60.8 27.30 1030 7X2.0 FALCON 908.30 17.4 DIPPER 731.20 36X3.4. Calculated breaking load Current carrying capacity Construction Construction Section Steel Steel on Alu.0 268.8 CROW 409.38 484.3 19.50 51X4. Steel mm2 mm kg/km kN A mm mm2 mm mm2 % % ROCK 365.50 27.65 764.70 45X4.10 38.50 72.60 30X3.50 26X3.82 43.93 970 1X4.60 27.60 32.14 605.77 602.47 33.0 160.10 72.30 83.30 25.66 38.40 885 7X3.50 36X4.40 1025 7X3.57 36.6 CRANE 500.59 455.70 54X4.50 83.96 1840.78 59.40 31.80 45X4.8 32.20 900 19X2.24 2400.60 29.74 1510.40 72.50 27.70 24X4.5 DRAKE 468.80 72.17 2134.0 74.30 72.60 25.82 337.0 105.9 12.80 83.3 CHUKAR 976.0 274.0 161.0 123.4 BITTERN 689.0 116.1 CURLEW 590.0 194.79 3761.0 230.50 1755 19X2.90 1471.76 41.30 750 19X2.51 67.0 PLOVER 818.10 72.16 54.78 807.28 1370.8 27.61 307.30 72.60 60.50 52.00 28.0 109.02 685.90 54X3.10 72.5 27.00 42.7 27.0 32.10 26X4.00 44.30 795 7X3.10 3430.90 24X4.20 54X3.48 86.0 78.0 RUDDY 487.26 3047.43 875 7X2.8 17.70 54X3.4 134.2 39.20 83.40 82.10 26.00 72.80 67.76 41.3 CANARY 515.53 725.55 97.82 43.0 140.19 2265.30 68.0 117.9 17.90 72.20 72.0 170.20 31.45 65.4 7.85 45.2 39.97 2280.23 337.85 2133.21 1276.6 STARLING 421.1 TEAL 376.40 684.60 45X4.02 50.80 45X3.90 26.70 39.80 45X4.88 7X2.0 111.72 54X2.0 251.50 790 7X2.10 34.6 27.00 72X4.11 1626.0 221.9 17.0 171.0 FINCH 636.77 11.92 362.08 52.6 FLAMINGO 381.3 39.36 806.6 27.72 1523.81 1735.14 726.80 8.6 27.20 83.1 PHEASANT 726.0 206.40 35.0 124.70 14X1.4 39.2 TERN 431.0 142.78 456.20 80.41 86.27 1031.00 44.27 644.00 54X4.18 55.90 1125 19X2.4 GROSBEAK 374.Code word Total cross section complete Conductor conductor weight diameter approx.22 2671.08 52.0 153.92 262.0 116.60 92.00 76X4.0 218.84 1223.65 565.50 26.70 1060 7X2.59 1976.14 323.30 25.6 27.80 35.85 523.40 36.0 149.5 CONDOR 454.70 54X3.68 1465.00 37.11 1674.7 THRASHER 1235.07 64.20 25.0 17.75 860 1X3.0 97.71 3222.22 73.0 17.76 1366.9 17.70 1155 7X2.0 REDWING 444.0 17.50 1315 19X2.0 MARTIN 772.16 69.0 139.0 132.40 29.38 403.17 2587.20 72.50 1250 7X3.12 2005.1 CARDINAL 547.38 1276.4 RAIL 517.80 60.09 52.10 52.85 44.50 27.40 26X4.8 27.35 82.34 81.30 1615 19X2.1 11.10 36.6 47.25 27.00 26.14 13.60 68.40 30X3.50 775 19X2.36 54X3.10 980 7X2.28 59.60 28.21 361.24 1397.90 82.24 2743.80 82.90 92.70 37.10 72.00 88.0 17.0 151.70 1205 7X2.60 890 7X3.80 54X4.50 82.0 174.80 72.23 57.90 45X4.3 BUNTING 647.90 955 7X3.07 1093.00 24.2 MALLARD 495.90 645.80 1670 19X2.70 483.19 71. Section Alu.07 338.00 60.00 47.43 1651.62 1274.0 17.30 45X3.9 32.3 GANNET 393.0 208.00 76X4.60 45X3.25 766.10 54X3.74 1523.14 484.0 187.90 885 7X3.97 321.25 2892.60 1295 7X3.0 123.38 62.0 EGRET 396.20 2529.20 45X4.16 70.8 CUCKOO 454.10 25.80 30X4.7 CATBIRD 498.0 NUTHATCH 817.41 1100.00 565.98 1441.48 91.52 1725.62 102.10 1600 7X2.00 85.48 91.7 27.30 29.77 401.10 765 7X2.80 83.2 BOBOLINK 775.87 54X2.7 27.70 840 19X2.10 1175 19X2.90 775 7X3.50 84X3.4 7.43 1171.0 17.2 PARROT 863.7 - 1076.3 19.0 140.

39 0.43 61 2.50 17.5 2017 369.25 7 2.62 37 2.5 1221 236.11 37 2.737 195 150 147.5 626 121.36 7 2.499 80 50 49.38 0.50 12.54 61 2.48 7 3.72 2.46 0.3 162 31.0 785 152.65 1.ALUMINUM CLAD STEEL STRANDED CONDUCTORS DIN 48201/8 Cross Section 124 Construction no.476 255 240 242.10 6.99 37 2.736 115 70 65.27 19 2.587 225 185 181.925 170 120 116.56 3.81 19 2.20 0.40 1.50 22.5 441 85.00 9.546 65 35 34. Calculated breaking load Calculated conductor resistance at 200C Current carrying capacity Nominal Actual mm2 mm2 mm mm kg/km kN W /km A 25 24.25 15.357 310 300 299.25 20. of wires Wire diameter Complete Conductor diameter Conductor weight appr.2 1635 299.313 135 95 93.05 0.50 7.80 14.0 330 64.7 990 191.10 10.5 229 44.289 355 .26 0.

ALL ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTORS STEEL REINFORCED (AACSR) NFC 34-125 Code word Total Complete Conductor Calculated Electrical cross conductor weight breaking resistance section diameter approx.6 62.7 10.72 717.83 30X2.05 1074 160.4 81.95 32X3.90 0.10 3174 460.25 71.60 848 126.237 19X3.75 802 136.30 155 23.6 62.27 18X2.83 24X2.065 19X2.80 59.83 24.75 547 81.4 57.69 18X2.55 24.10 62.75 0.54 18X2.80 184.0 19.36 24.36 30X2.80 43.50 88.55 30X3.85 0.50 34.20 2211 389.60 1244 212.40 1593 238.25 27.227 7X2.50 0.80 PHLOX 116.0 38.00 0.20 2241 326.580 19X2.80 116.71 37.225 37X2.00 0.15 140.6 PASTEL 412.0 22.9 40.27 50 50 45.0 26.642 19X1.8 40.9 57.95 29.42 9X2.33 62.70 37.27 42x2.78 18.2 PHLOX PASTEL Construction Steel Section Construction Section AIMGsi Steel Steel AAA AAA mm mm2 mm mm2 % % 1.9 507.1 15.5 PASTEL 288.1 PHLOX 181.5 11.162 19x2.0 22.3 14.25 47.40 85.2 PASTEL 299.6 17.50 1570 268.15 0.9 227.170 3X2.2 PHLOX 288.95 0.5 147.72 59.30 0.00 9.61 PETUNIA 865.180 7X2.50 990 168.99 12X2.26 59.70 4475 663.142 7X3.1 15.5 PASTEL 228.1 12.00 56.60 0.25 27.28 24.50 93.15 148.1 43.12 15X2.70 0.15 233.880 7X2.6 17.6 147.5 75.8 40.0 19.24 42X2.1 37.00 37.66 58.300 19X2.7 41.05 1320 208.0 22.07 18X3.17 42.80 125 .279 7X2.7 8.80 147.85 0.60 PHLOX 59.10 51.57 24.9 40.5 PASTEL 181.60 325. load at200C mm2 mm kg/km kN PHLOX 37.25 119.72 56.50 206.00 21.1 PHLOX 228.5 75.47 956.3 POLYGO NUM 1185.4 75.10 30X2.20 0.68 42.99 18X2.60 0.00 276 PHLOX 75.00 0.80 110.378 19X2.0 44.1 37.0 25.1 PHLOX 376.80 66X3.466 19X2.80 227.25 75.80 0.4 481 80.035 37X2.15 148.79 20X4.06 66X3.65 104.5 75.0 32.50 147.9 W /km PETUNIA 612.695 7X2.00 636 108.00 59.35 0.50 675 101.85 0.28 59.5 75.82 54X2.103 19X2.00 28.15 54.7 70.83 12X2.25 348 PHLOX 94.047 19X3.50 93.

224 7X3.30 59.1 47.55 6X1.55 0.4 230/30 260.074 7X2.45 243.86 304.4 240/40 282.7 32.70 21.62 72.5 120/20 141.8 32.1 120/70 193.ALL ALUMINIUM ALLOY CONDUCTORS STEEL REINFORCED (AACSR) DIN 48206 Nominal Cross section Total cross section Complete Conductor Calculated Electrical conductor weight breaking resistance at diameter approx.4 27.690 1X3.10 604 73.225 7X2.00 22.355 7X1.60 67.67 15.90 0.80 1647 194.80 68.40 31.00 6X2.33 29.10 105.90 30X3.158 7X3.70 79.1 210/50 261.48 54X3.8 32.36 341.127 7X2.6 27.55 54X3.3 32.3 170/40 211.25 75.5 40.182 7X2.60 0.40 15.80 2.00 11.30 67.50 230.10 14.45 448.00 0.90 32.00 49.00 44.10 24.20 37.20 374 51.30 11.80 15.70 1553 178.50 493 60.70 5.181 1X1.10 24X3.2 210/35 243.60 21.49 34.68 39.90 0.8 32.70 378 51.40 16.7 50/8 56.9 32.9 40.00 2564 300.00 32.30 54X3.00 381.33 29.70 24.076 7X3.48 48X3.30 67.3 67.85 69.6 560/50 611.49 34.20 59.90 983 120.40 26X2.80 24X3.35 0.2 62.00 339.6 340/110 450.07 0.06 0.09 48X3.80 36X2.276 7X1.138 7X2.20 27.70 6X2.6 550/70 620.90 18.3 257/60 316.068 7X3.15 0.00 67.10 26X3.10 52.00 8.40 85.28 72.60 71.00 713 96.60 382 46.60 59.33 29.7 27.10 140 17.00 903 122.48 0.00 1448 170.48 0.70 0.30 848 103.29 72.35 0.85 48X3.85 5.84 0.9 32.40 2085 245.00 94.69 0.00 432 54.7 490/65 553.20 28.2 305/40 344.60 71.90 67.00 49.83 51.00 183.15 0.8 105/75 181.10 0.49 54X2.2 150/53 202.347 7X3.60 28.70 13.20 96.50 26X3.10 24.5 17.20 56.9 380/50 431.763 7X2.30 12X3.30 18.8 32.29 79.44 11.50 654 85.70 14X2.90 67.00 212.048 19X2.33 29.099 7X2.50 21.00 978 123.20 0.145 7X2.50 0.9 W /km 35/6 40.20 243.50 37.70 108.70 1799 233.396 1X2.4 20.4 20.085 7X2.30 67.40 36X85 96.10 25.6 680/85 764.5 95/55 152.20 26X2.7 50.04 79.4 27.9 50.20 1943 223.70 11.356 7X2.20 0.25 4.50 17.10 30X2.40 490.9 40.65 72.6 27.479 7X1.5 67.10 1155 136.3 126 .50 0.15 94.6 450/40 488.318 19X2.60 19.86 561.2 62.70 34.33 29.655 7X2.1 62.25 23.50 34.94 0.60 1860 219.55 0.8 70/12 81.20 67.70 32.90 792 99.70 1336 153.75 96 Construction steel Section Construction Section steel AAA AAA AAAC Steel mm mm2 mm mm2 % % 2.6 40.10 1177 149.4 185/30 213.00 30X2.110 7X3.60 0.20 434.40 67.5 50.274 7X3.70 25/4 27.20 48.70 40.80 0.3 20.2 94/22 116.1 265/35 297.20 20.4 300/50 353.276 7X2.80 16.3 120/42 160.9 125/30 157.160 7X2.00 1174 134.40 998 120.20 8.7 44/32 75.4 27.087 7X3.6 340/30 369.80 30.30 26X2.00 6X3.40 63.60 196 24.70 283 34.00 873 105.6 40.6 435/55 490.30 256.50 30X3.00 0.80 22.40 62 7.00 49.30 590 74.50 26X3.05 118.969 1X2.90 19.098 19X2.131 7X3.70 72.50 14X3.85 0.262 7X2.4 27.80 30X2.30 12X3.80 0.68 39.00 27.80 78X2.00 49.059 7X3.20 14.70 72.2 50/30 81.6 385/35 420.80 0.10 26.108 7X2.50 894 122.060 7X3.80 59.2 12.44 121.20 0.80 67.20 56.30 9.10 17.1 95/15 109.50 36.55 0.60 49.95 54X4.33 127.80 49.71 79.00 1.80 6.80 26X3.195 7X2.00 678.80 49.7 32.70 171.30 149.20 0.75 41.49 48X3.1 31.60 36X2.10 59.20 32.8 32.00 37.85 0.80 0.25 54X3.90 72.68 39.74 263.5 150/25 173.4 20.80 26X2.90 59.56 0.60 122.49 34. load 20 0C mm2 mm kg/km kN 16/2.60 549.80 12X2.58 72.70 148.347 7X2.12 0.2 95/34 131.4 27.00 744 91.50 23.7 32.50 1232 151.90 537 70.20 52.00 67.40 18.68 304.70 16.50 827 108.20 386.

05357 0.ALUMINIUM WIRES AND ALUMNIUM STRANDED CONDUCTORS DIN 48203 Part .02757 0.5 Table 1.74 62. Fixed values Number of wires linear force due to mass per unit cross sectional (QLK) N/m mm2 7 19 37 61 91 0.01126 Material Wires Stranded Conductors Copper Wrought copper alloys (Bz) Steel Aluminium E-AIMgsi Copper covered steel Aluminium-clad steel Aluminium reinforced steel E-AIMgsi reinforced steel *) January 1975 draft DIN 48 200 Part 1 DIN 48 200 Part 2 DIN 48 200 Part 3 DIN 48 200 Part 5 DIN 48 200 Part 6 DIN 48 200 Part 7 DIN 48 200 Part 8 - DIN 408 201 Part 1 DIN 408 201 Part 2 DIN 408 201 Part 3 DIN 408 201 Part 5 DIN 408 201 Part 6 DIN 408 201 Part 7 DIN 408 201 Part 8 DIN 48 204 DIN 48 206 Technical delivery conditions New Previous DIN 48 203 Part 1 DIN 48 202 Part 2 DIN 48 203 Part 2 DIN 48 202 Part 2 DIN 48 203 Part 3 DIN 48 202 Part 1 DIN 48 203 Part 5 DIN 48 202 Part 1 DIN 48 203 Part 6 DIN 48 202 Part 3 DIN 48 203 Part 7 DIN 48 202 Part 5 DIN 48 203 Part 8 DIN 48 202 Part 1*) DIN 48 203 Part 11 DIN 48 202 Part 1 DIN 48 203 Part 12 DIN 48 202 Part 4 IEC 207 208 209 210 127 .35 93.01676 0.26 Stranding constants for Electrical resistance 1447 0.34 37.0275 Coefficient of linear expansion 1/K Practical modulus of elasticity 23-10-6 60 57 57 55 55 Table 2. Stranding constants Number of wires 7 19 37 61 91 Mass 7.091 19.

5 3. In this case. the values given in the table for the next largest diameter shall apply.90 159 151 1.00 12.8 1.03 3. For wire with intermediate diameters.75 2.50 15.25 33.99 4.77 193 183 15.94 173 164 4.00 3.98 181 172 7.11 10. The values shall be converted accordingly for plus or minus deviations from the wire dimeter.00 8. 2.07 169 160 4.3 4.3 2.8 4.0 11.25 8.50 4.75 ± 0.9 4.56 29.41 188 179 11.7 kg/dm3) in kg (Kg/km) » 1. 128 . The resistance per unit length is calculated for the nominal wire cross section.00 19.04 162 154 2.41 22.25 14.94 26.WIRES FOR STRANDED CONDUCTORS ALUMINIUM WIRES DIN 48 200 PART .75 5.19 160 152 1.91 177 168 5.76 13.1 3.4 3.0 3.78 42. 3.57 160 152 2.50 1.5 Nominal diameter1 (mm) Permissible deviation Wire cross section (mm2) Tensile strength (N/mm2) Resistance per unit length3 Before Standing (min) After Stranding (min) ( W/km) min Mass (2.25 ± 0.9 2.14 184 176 9.75 6. the permissible deviations for the next largest diameter given in the table shall apply.7 2.5 2.00 7.30 166 157 3.50 9. taking the specified minimum conductivity as the basis.04 1.76 16.62 164 156 2.99 38. Intermediate values are permitted.

50 to 4 260 3½ over 4 275 4 1. The values shall apply for the final (galvanized) condition.05 mm 0.75 to 3.8 kg/dm3 shall be used as the basis for calculating the mass. 129 .025 mm 0.04 1270 1310 to 1570 to 1520 1810 2.05 1140 1250 390 690 650 1250 1490 3. The extensometer reading at this initial stress is the starting point for the measurement of the 1% extension and shall have the value given in the following table.25 mm: 100 N/mm2 :for nominal diameters over 2.25 mm 0.25 upto 3mm: 200 N/mm2 For nominal diameters over 3mm: 300 N/mm2 .20 mm 0.075 mm 0.56 to 1.24 210 2½ 2. in mm Mass per unit area g/m2 Number of inersions2 1.76 to 2.76 to 2.300 mm 0.125 mm 0. 2.95 ±0.3 Nominal diameter.35 to 1. Zinc coating Table . in N/mm2 100 200 300 0.05 240 3 3.25 to 2.375 mm A density of 7.1 Steel VI Tensile Tensile Strength Tensile Tensile Strength Tensile Strength stress at stress at 1% 1% Before After After extension1 After Before Before Permissible N/mm2 stranding stranding extension1 stranding 2 N/mm stranding stranding stranding N/mm2 » N/mm2 deviation N/mm2 N/mm2 (min) N/mm2 (min) N/mm2 N/mm2 (min) (min) (min) (min) 1.75 200 2 1.5 to 4.100 mm 0. Table .75 ±0.49 250 3½ 3. Finish drawn and galvanized.06 1100 1180 Nominal Diameter (mm) Steel I Tensile Strength Steel II Steel III 1) The intial stress prior to the application of the extensometer shall be For nominal diameters up to 2.74 230 3 2.74 ±0.75 to 3.35 to 1. Testing shall be carried out as specified in DIN 48202 Part 3.49 ±0.55 190 2 1.2 Gauge length in mm 50 200 250 At an initial stress.Wires for Stranded Conductors Steel Wires DIN 48 200 Part 3 Table .035 1310 390 690 650 1180 1250 1540 1.06 to 3.

2 34.7 11.81 9.31 134.1571 0.7 56.9 19.7 11.01 66.5 297.31 35.7 30.7 11.3 7.8 181.94 98.2 420.9 3 Cross section ratio Alu.5 11.2992 0.0 21.7 11.0 21.2028 0.5 25/4 35/6 44/32 50/8 50/30 70/12 95/15 95/55 105/75 120/20 120/70 125/30 150/25 170/40 185/30 210/35 210/50 230/30 240/40 265/35 300/50 305/40 340/30 380/50 385/35 435/55 450/40 490/65 495/35 510/45 550/70 560/50 570/40 650/45 680/85 1045/45 130 2 Required cross section mm2 17.0 81.3 14.28 74.3058 0.09 86.0584 0.7 698.4130 0.94 105.2 610.87 7 Resistance per unit length W /km 1.20 106.7 6 6 1.4 32.18 44.2 9.4 24.6 29.0590 0.2 141.1094 0.99 217.0 16.3 6 6 4.STEEL REINFORCED ALUMINIUM STRANDED CONDUCTORS DIN 48 204 Conductor DIN 48 204-95/15-AL/St Table 1. mechanical and electrical values 1 Nominal cross section mm2 16/2.7 1.4 36.98 155.5 24.7 344.1 4 Conductor diameter mm 5.0 5 1 Mass Kg/km » 62 97 140 373 196 378 284 383 714 899 494 904 590 604 794 744 848 979 874 985 998 1233 1155 1174 1448 1336 1647 1553 1860 1636 1770 2085 1943 1889 2163 2564 3249 6 Theoretical breaking force2 kN 5.5 7.4 6 1.3 21.6 243.1 18.2259 0. » 6 6 6 1.69 44.8 28.09 99.8 27.1 75.1380 0.46 17.0 27.7 32.56 120./St.1363 0.7 28.8 764.7 6 7.0 26.5 14.9 213.7 45.1682 0.0851 0.2736 0.4 6 1.8 173.1 211.1 11.6573 0.16 57.94 92.8 528.3 109.02 12.0426 0.42 146.1 369.8 40.8 22.3 81.0526 0.3 7.2364 0.3 7.8 353.7 23.7 152.37 77.0 20.2 261.3 6 4.52 209.2 553.30 92.7 4.3 7.1939 0.6 488.3 7.6 11.0949 0.25 73.3 17.0277 8 Current carrying capacity3 A 105 140 170 210 290 350 410 425 470 520 535 590 610 630 645 680 740 740 790 840 850 900 920 960 985 995 1020 1040 1050 1120 1150 1580 .0666 0.0566 0.4 157.28 26.0442 0.4 555.8 620.9 30.8793 1.85 120.6 16.1 25.27 120.4 193.1188 0.28 137.1 490.4 6.2 32.5 18.86 54.33 167.1249 0.5 15.9 611.5 1090.0757 0.8 282.46 82.5644 0.0514 0.7 14.17 80.0949 0.19 152.8353 0.31 136.7 13.0644 0.5 260. Dimensions .91 104.0 43.7 11.2374 0.0506 0.0 17.5946 0.7 6 7.0748 0.8 8.1 431.

09 510/45 48 3.27 1 1.70 19.35 1 2.33 1 51.70 - 5.00 2 212.91 7 2.74 2 263.33 6.99 29.02 3 571.61 45.68 8.00 9.51 7 3.20 1 48.04 39.67 5.30 450/40 48 3.01 15.80 - 2.70 1 34.26 7 3.58 19 2.44 2 121.20 9.80 71.33 6.30 3 653.00 49.00 9.25 75.49 7.00 85.20 31.49 7 2.60 56.60 10.39 7 1.STEEL REINFORCED ALUMINIUM STRANDED CONDUCTORS DIN 48 204 Table 2 Construction of conductor 1 2 Nominal cross section 3 4 Aluminium parts WIRE 5 6 7 8 9 Steel parts OUT SIDE LAYER WIRES Core mm2 Number Diameter (mm) Number of wire layers Cross section (mm2) Number Diameter (mm) Diameters (mm) Cross section (mm2) 16/2.00 49.33 6.20 3 386.49 340/30 48 3.28 131 .31 24.47 34.10 40.85 120/70 12 3.92 7 2.85 150/25 26 2.33 2 127.40 3 490.80 1 15.00 1 43.70 2 171.20 1 96.25 11.30 4 1045.04 39.20 3 434.68 3 510.85 2 69.10 7 2.04 7 2.80 71.85 70/12 26 1.49 265/35 24 3.33 6.40 10.70 7 3.77 7 2.17 7 2.36 7 2.20 2 209.28 7 3.00 2 183.70 7 3.25 125/30 30 2.74 34.47 34.33 6.99 29.20 - 8.15 2 94.5 6 1.04 39.87 8.62 7 2.00 49.66 7 2.25 170/40 30 2.86 2 304.55 120/20 26 2.99 29.86 1 2.49 7.90 5.60 56.86 7 2.85 210/35 26 3.49 490/65 54 3.20 9.71 7 2.33 95/55 12 3.25 1 23.09 210/50 30 3.40 12.09 435/55 54 3.04 50/30 12 2.30 105/75 14 3.28 550/70 54 3.85 380/50 54 3.55 495/35 45 3.70 8.04 39.00 49.45 2 243.99 29.60 3 549.00 3 339.68 8.49 7.08 185/30 26 3.86 3 561.40 95/15 26 2.00 3 678.54 25/4 6 2.74 3 494.20 63.87 8.28 680/85 54 4.78 7 2.10 1 105.65 7 3.87 8.60 10.32 11.44 4.67 50/8 6 3.95 1045/45 72 4.48 570/40 45 4.68 8.54 7 2.67 19 2.09 300/50 26 3.49 650/45 45 4.68 3 304.50 2 230.25 1 3.16 7 2.00 9.10 6.45 3 448.48 305/40 54 2.25 - 3.40 7.98 35/6 6 2.47 34.73 44/32 14 2.57 7 1.58 7 2.89 7 1.61 45.05 7 2.48 230/30 24 3.49 7.15 7 3.99 29.68 8.60 1 122.98 7 2.85 240/40 26 3.06 7 3.00 9.29 7 2.29 7 3.48 385/35 48 3.00 3 381.70 2 148.25 560/50 48 3.61 45.

5 37.7 4.3 68./St.3 6 (single-layer) 6 (multi-layer) 7.5 23.4 1.3 14.) »Aluminium to total mass % 1.8 79.8 67.Table 3 Lay Ratio for Steel wires 1 2 3 4 5 Lay Ratio Number of wires in conductor 7 19 1st layer 2nd layer min max min max 13 13 28 28 12 24 Table 4 Lay ratio for Aluminium wires 1 Number of wires in conductor 6 12 14 24 26 30 45 48 54 72 2 3 1st Layer min max 4 5 Lay Ratio 2nd Layer min max 6 3rd Layer min max 8 9 4th Layer min max 10 14 - - - - - - 10 16 10 14 - - - - 10 17 10 16 10 14 - - 10 17 10 16 10 15 10 14 Table 5 Aluminium parts Proportion of Aluminium Ratio of cross-sectional area of Proportion by mass of Aluminium to Steel (Alu.7 83.4 88.7 11.3 59.1 132 7 32.0 72.9 .

STEEL WIRES AND STEEL STRANDED CONDUCTORS DIN 48 203 Part 3 Table 1.34 Wires Stranded Conductors Technical delivery conditions New Previous IEC Copper DIN 48 200 Part 1 DIN 408 201 Part 1 DIN 48 203 Part 1 DIN 48 202 Part 2 - Wrought copper alloys (Bz) DIN 48 200 Part 2 DIN 408 201 Part 2 DIN 48 203 Part 2 DIN 48 202 Part 2 - Steel DIN 48 200 Part 3 DIN 408 201 Part 3 DIN 48 203 Part 3 DIN 48 202 Part 1 - Aluminium DIN 48 200 Part 5 DIN 408 201 Part 5 DIN 48 203 Part 5 DIN 48 202 Part 1 207 E-AIMgsi DIN 48 200 Part 6 DIN 408 201 Part 6 DIN 48 203 Part 6 DIN 48 202 Part 3 208 Copper covered steel DIN 48 200 Part 7 DIN 408 201 Part 7 DIN 48 203 Part 7 DIN 48 202 Part 5 - Aluminium-clad steel DIN 48 200 Part 8 DIN 408 201 Part 8 DIN 48 203 Part 8 DIN 48 202 Part 1*) - Aluminium reinforced steel - DIN 48 204 DIN 48 203 Part 11 DIN 48 202 Part 1 209 E-AIMgsi reinforced steel *) January 1975 draft - DIN 48 206 DIN 48 203 Part 12 DIN 48 202 Part 4 210 133 . Stranding Constants Number of wires 7 19 Stranding constants for mass Material 7.mm2 Coefficient of linear expansion 1/K 0. Fixed values for steels I to VI Number of wires Linear force due to mass per unit cross section (QLK) N/m. 10-6 7 19 Practical modulus of elasticity kN/mm2 180 175 Table 2.0792 11.091 19.

3./St. on which the calculation of the conductor sag is to be based.07306 24.10-6 110 107 82 81 77 74 70 68 62 61 60 The mass per unit and cross-sectional area is the load per m conductor length and per mm2 conductor cross section.10-6 0.23 19.0375 0.5 23.32 7. Stranding constants Number of wires Aluminium Steel 6 12 14 14 24 26 30 45 48 54 54 72 1 7 7 19 7 7 7 7 7 7 19 7 Stranding constants for calculating Electrical Aluminium Steel resistance 6.0491 0.01894 55.2.68 7.9.01421 Material Wires Copper Wrought Copper Alloys (Bz) Steel Aluminium E-AIMgsi Copper covered steel Aluminium-clad steel Steel reinforced Aluminium Steel reinforced E-AIMgsi *) January 1975 draft DIN 48 200 Part 1 DIN 48 200 Part 2 DIN 48 200 Part 3 DIN 48 200 Part 5 DIN 48 200 Part 6 DIN 48 200 Part 7 DIN 48 200 Part 8 134 Stranded Conductors DIN 408 201 Part 1 DIN 408 201 Part 2 DIN 408 201 Part 3 DIN 408 201 Part 5 DIN 408 201 Part 6 DIN 408 201 Part 7 DIN 408 201 Part 8 DIN 48 204 DIN 48 206 Technical delivery conditions New Previous DIN 48 203 Part 1 DIN 48 202 Part 2 DIN 48 203 Part 2 DIN 48 202 Part 2 DIN 48 203 Part 3 DIN 48 202 Part 1 DIN 48 203 Part 5 DIN 48 202 Part 1 DIN 48 203 Part 6 DIN 48 202 Part 3 DIN 48 203 Part 7 DIN 48 202 Part 5 DIN 48 203 Part 8 DIN 48 202 Part 1*) DIN 48 203 Part 11 DIN 48 202 Part 1 DIN 48 203 Part 12 DIN 48 202 Part 4 IEC 207 208 209 210 .23 7.035 Coefficient of linear thermal expansion Modulus of elasticity 1/K kN/mm2 15.WIRES AND STRANDED CONDUCTORS Steel-reinforced Aluminium Stranded Conductors Technical delivery conditions Table 1.10-6 20.6.032 0.15 0.1692 12.26 7.10-6 19.10 17. Properties of stranded conductor Approximate ratio of Aluminium/Steel cross-sectional areas » Number of wires Alu.7 11.5.10-6 19.10-6 19.07306 14.04253 26.032 0.032 0.4.032 0.10-6 0.0309 0.5 7.9.10-6 21.98 7.032 0.10-6 -6 15.03408 45.01894 73.8.15 0.32 19.03928 30.06 7.0466 0.032 0.0298 20.4 1.3 14.7 4.67 7. Alu.02129 55.3.032 0.0336 19.02271 49.091 1 0.08514 14.10-6 18. DIN 48 203 PART 11 Table 2.56 7.032 0.1 Mass per unit length and crosssectional area.3 6 7. 14/7 14/19 12/7 30/7 6/1 26/7 24/7 54/7 54/19 48/7 45/7 72/7 1./St. N/m-mm2 0.032 0.032 0.7.

1565 0.3655 397-26/7 436.7 0.4 19 0.1672 0.6 0.1327 0.1716 0.316 0. Cable dia.5 19 0. AWG or KCmil and Stranding Weight per 1000 ft Breaking load lbs lbs Resistance at20 0C W /miles Akron 35.5437 Alliance 246.2697 Cairo 465.8631 Anaheim 155.7 2.69 7 0.09681 1/0-6/1 115.4 7 0.ASTM STANDARD B 399 Aluminium alloy 6201 T-81 condcutors (Same diameter as ACSR conductors) Code name Conductor Number of wires KCmil Wire dia.1441 0.3402 Canton 394.373 Azusa 123.9 0.8 19 0.563 0.991 0.5818 636-26/7 695.502 0.2 3.149 0.1148 135 .5124 556-26/7 612.8 37 0.198 0.0834 0.1436 Greeley 927.447 0.2 0.1052 0.47 7 0.4394 477-26/7 525.1415 0.9 0.7 7 0.3098 336-26/7 370.642 0.398 0.4 19 0.1939 4/0-6/1 231.9 7 0.06084 2-6/1 72.858 0.03824 4-6/1 45.6846 Amherst 195.3 0.4309 Butte 312.1878 0.3 7 0.5 19 0.4 0.185 Ames 77.2456 266-26/7 293.1537 3/0-6/1 183.4 0.2 37 0.4 0.2286 Darien 559. (in) (in) ACSR Conductor of same dia.1853 0.479 Alton 48.USA .927 0.02402 6-6/1 28.721 0.0661 0.1221 2/0-6/1 145.1583 1.8 0.1631 Elint 740.108 0.1283 0.1902 Elgin 652.7 0.7 1.250 0.58 7 0.7282 795-26/7 870.783 0.

13 7.71 5.2 280 19 3.15 143 450 37 3.3 112 7 4.02 15.9 40 7 2.51 33.2 80 7 3.26 30.91 6.39 161 500 37 4.95 25 7 2.1 83.94 129 400 37 3.81 24.9 125 19 2.87 65.27 46.71 115 355 37 3.7 12.89 38.ASTM STANDARD B 399 M (metric) Aluminium Alloy 6201 T-81 Conductors Conductor section Number of wires mm2 136 Wire dia.7 31.1 224 19 3.8 100 7 4.7 140 19 3.1 63 7 3.6 160 19 3.9 250 19 4.6 180 19 3.35 16 7 1.09 .09 73.29 90.39 19.9 20 7 1.66 58. Breaking load mm kN 630 37 4.66 181 560 37 4.1 50 7 3.5 102 315 37 3.39 9.USA .5 200 19 3.47 52.5 7 2.06 42.

3. be annealed over a distance of a least 200mm on each side of the joint. Max.4 In Aluminium Alloy stranded Conductors having multiple layers of wires. satisfy all the relevant requirements of this standard. NOTE.05% coppers.2 TOLERANCES ON THE STANDARD DIAMETERS OF WIRES A tolerance of ? 1% is permitted on the standard diameters of all wires.3 STANDARD SIZES OF ALUMINIUM ALLOY STRANDED CONDUCTORS The sizes of standard Aluminium Alloy stranded conductors are given in Table 3. the Aluminium Alloy wires for the standard constructions covered by this specifications shall have the diameters specified in Table 2.4.4 JOINTS IN WIRES 3. the lay ratio of any layer shall be not greater than the lay ratio of the layer immediately beneath it. --------16 14 3. the successive layers shall have opposite directions of lay. in addition to joints made in the base rod before final drawing. the outermost layer being right handed. The masses (excluding the mass of grease for corrosion protection and resistances may be taken as being in accordance with Table 3.6 COMPLETED CONDUCTOR The completed conductor shall be free from dirt. subsequent to welding. Joints made by resistance bull-welding shall. 3. TABLE 1: LAY RATIOS FOR ALUMINIUM ALLOY STRANDED CONDUCTORS Number of wires in conductor 7 19 37 6—wire layer Min. 3. and excessive amounts of awing oil and other foreign deposits. 3.2 The lay ratio of the different layers shall be within the limits given in Table. 3.5 STRANDING 3. They are not required to fulfill the mechanical or electrical requirements for unjointed wire. DIMENSIONS AND CONSTRUCTION 3. except those made in the base rod or wire before final drawing. or additionally to wires in specific layers. By agreement between the purchaser and the manufacturer suitable grease may be applied to the center wire. 3. 3. 1 NOTE: It is important to note that lay ratio is now defined as the ratio of the axial length of a complete turn of the helix formed by an individual wire in a stranded conductor to the external diameter of the helix. joints in individual wires made by cold-pressure bull-welding are permitted in any layer and those made by resistance bull-welding are permitted in any layer except the outermost layer. A suitable material is one containing amounts of Magnesium and Silicon appropriates to the mechanical and electrical properties specified and containing not more than 0.5.5.1 The wire used in the construction of a stranded conductor shall.3 In all constructions.4. before stranding.1 Conductors containing more than seven wires: There shall be no joints in any wire of a stranded conductor containing seven wires. Max.5.1 STANDARD SIZES OF WIRES After drawing and heat treatment. 3. evenly throughout the length of the conductor. The cross section of any wire shall not depart from circularity by more than an amount corresponding to a tolerance of 1% on the standard diameter. No two such joints shall be less than 15m apart in the complete stranded conductors. grit. Max. ----10 14 10 16 18—wire layer Min. 137 .5. The wires in each layer shall be evenly and closely stranded.Magnesium Silicon Alloy wires having the mechanical and electrical properties specified in this British Standard. 10 14 10 16 10 17 Lay Ratio 12—wire layer Min. MATERIAL The conductor shall be constructed of heat treated Aluminium --.BS : 3242 2. 3.2 Conductors containing more than seven wires: in stranded conductors containing more than seven wires.

10 16.1 Tensile test.28 mw/cm.53 3.30 3. from not less than 10% of the individual lengths of Aluminium Alloy wire included in any one final heat treatment batch. sufficient to provide one test specimen for each test. the determination shall be valid only if the fracture occurs between the gauge marks and not closer than 25mm to either mark.787 11.45 23.1.68 26. all tests shall be made at the manufacturer's works.557 6. shall be taken from each of the selected lengths of wire. When tested before of after stranding.54 2. samples of wire shall be taken from lengths of stranded conductor selected from approximately 10% of the lengths included in any one consignment. 4. 138 Standard diameter mm 2.4. when the purchaser states at the time of ordering that he desire tests to be made in the presence of his representative. When tested before of after stranding.1.1. TESTS 4.4 ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TEST The resistivity of one specimen cut from each of the samples taken as specified in 4. 4. the tensile strength of the specimen shall be not less than 29.1. TABLE 2: ALUMINIUM ALLOY WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF STANDARD ALUMINIUM ALLOY STRANDED CONDUCTORS Standard diameter mm 2.68 18.2 PLACE OF TESTING Unless otherwise agreed between the purchaser and the manufacturer at the time of ordering.2.3 MECHANICAL TESTS 4. One sample.5%.1 or 4.914 Minimum breaking load for standard diameter wire N 1270 1490 2020 2520 2810 2890 3280 5010 Note: The values given in Columns 2 to 5 are given for information only. 4.1.417 3.53 3. shall be taken from each of an agreed number of wires of the conductor in each of the selected lengths.2 having an original gauge length of 250mm.835 8.414 4. 4. The test shall be made in accordance with BS 18*.511 9. The load shall be applied gradually and the rate of separation of the jaws of the testing machine shall be not less than 25 mm/min and not greater than 100mm/min. sufficient to provide one specimen for each of the appropriate tests.2 Elongation test.1. If the specified value is not reached.3.95 3. the elongation shall be not less than 3. furnish him with a certificate giving the results of the tests made on the samples taken in accordance with 4. on a specimen cut from each of the samples taken as specified on 4.61 13.3.34 2.2 shall be determined in accordance with the routine method give in Bs3239+.1 SELECTION OF TEST SAMPLES 4.48 3.34 2.1 or 4.301 5.09 25.65 .2 Alternatively.76 4.65 Cross – sectional area of standard diameter Wire mm2 4. whatever the position of the fracture.755 3.067 6.321 2. The resistivity at 200 C shall not exceed 3.1. The load shall be applied gradually and uniformly on a specimen cut from each of the samples taken as specified in 4.927 1.1 or 4.1.5 CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE When the purchaser does not call for tests on wires taken from the stranded conductor the manufacturer shall.98 Mass per Standard resistance at 20° C per km km kg 11.800 3.3 and 4.54 2.4 shall be taken by the manufacturer before stranding. The elongation shall be measures on the gauge length after the fractured ends have been fitted together.1.42 29.1 Samples for the tests specified in 4.30 3. One sample.48 3.553 9. if the specified values in reached.98 45.1.95 3. 4.85 x 7.76 4. The test shall be made in accordance with BS 18*. The determination shall be valid. if requested. 4.5 hbart.

02 7.90 13. 3. The resistance of any length of a stranded conductor is the resistance of the same length of any one wire multiplied by a constant as set out in Table 4. APPENDIX A NOTES ON THE CALCULATION OF TABLE 3 A-1 Increase in length due to stranding.276 9 33.54 7/2.156 8 59.30 0.0 362.094 8. as set out in Table 4. therefore obtained by multiplying the mass of an equal length of straight wire by an appropriate constant.3.C. may be taken to be 95% of the sum of the strengths of the individual Aluminium Alloy wires calculated from the value of the minimum tensile strength given in 4. A-2 Resistance and mass of conductor.40 18.549 8 16. The breaking load of an aluminium alloy stranded conductor in terms of the strengths of the individual component wires.091 19.76 37/3. Attention is draw to the fact that the sectional areas of standard conductors covered by the specification refer to Aluminium Alloy areas.1.928 1 9.95 17.10 0. except the central wire.34 7/2.144 7 0.027 57 139 .9 180.34 Electrical resistance 0.71 82 97 131 164 325 497 580 997 6 7 Calculated D.183 0 50.85 9. each wire in any particular layer of a stranded conductor.30 7/4. is longer than the stranded conductor by an amount depending on the lay ratio of that layer. has been assumed for each layer. 2. The mass of each wire in any particular layer of stranded conductor except the central wire. Calculated resistance at 20 °C breaking load W / km kN W 1. A-3 Calculated breaking load of conductor.34 37. The sectional area of an Aluminium Alloy Stranded Conductor is the sum of the cross sectional area of the individual wires. For the basic of calculation of this table.TABLE 3: STANDARD ALUMINIUM ALLOY STRANDED CONDUCTORS 1 Nominal Aluminium area 2 Stranding and wire diameter mm2 25 30 40 50 100 150 175 300 mm 7/2.80 24. In calculating the stranding constants in Table 4. The total mass of any length of an Aluminium Alloy Stranded Conductor is. kg 7. the arithmetic mean of the relevant minimum and maximum values in Table 1. TABLE 4: STRANDING CONSTANTS Numbers of wire in conductor 7 19 37 Stranding constants Mass 7.95 7/3.09155 101.384 59.7 211. consequently they are larger than the nominal aluminium areas by which they are identified.65 19/3.5 1 Nominal Aluminium area mm2 25 30 40 50 100 150 175 300 Note: 1.10 35.48 19/3. will be greater than that of an equal length of straight wire by an amount depending on the lay ratio of that layer (see A-1 above).683 0 13.1 4 Approximately overall diameter 5 Approximately mass per km mm. When straightened out. the mean lay ratio i.053 57 0.44 0. see Appendix A.94 0.62 8.80 0.e.40 0.87 118.53 3 Sectional area mm2 30.47 47.64 0.

53 Code name ALMOND CEDAR FIR HAZEL OAK ASH ELM UPAS APPENDIX D LAY RATIOS AND STRANDING CONSTANTS FOR NON STANDARD CONSTRUCTION Number of wires in conductor 61 91 140 6-wire layer min max 10 17 10 17 Lay ratio 12-wire layer 18-wire layer min max min max 10 16 10 15 10 16 10 15 24-wire layer min max 10 14 10 14 30-wire layer min max 10 13 Stranding constants Mass Electrical resistance 62.54 7/2. APPENDIX C CODE NAMES FOR STANDARD ALUMINIUM ALLOY STRANDED CONDUCTORS Note: These code names are not an essential part of the standard.0 x 10-6 Note: These values are given for information purposes only. They may be regarded as being accurate to within ± 300 hbar*.0 x 10-6 23.95 7/3. 7/2.26 0. Nominal Aluminum area mm2 25 30 40 50 100 150 175 300 Stranding mm.30 7/4.0 x 10-6 23. Number of wires in conductor 7 19 37 Practical (final) modulus of elasticity (hbar2) 5900 5600 5600 Coefficient of linear expansion/° C 23.76 37/3. They are given for convenience in ordering conductors.01676 0.34 7/2.APPENDIX B NOTE ON MODULUS OF ELASTICITY AND COEFFICIENT OF LINEAR EXPANSION The practical module of elasticity given below are based on an analysis the final module determined from a large number short-term stress/strain tests and may be taken as applying to conductors stressed between 15% and 50% of the breaking load of the conductor.48 19/3.35 93.01126 .65 19/3.

2. The resistivity of Aluminium wire depends upon its purity and its physical condition. at 200C.1 SCOPE Part 2 of this British Standard applies to aluminium conductors.2. At a temperature of 20? C the density of galvanized steel wire is to be taken as 7.3. measured between two potential points rigidly fixed to the wire.00403/? C.3.3.8264 mw. MATERIAL drawn Aluminium is to be taken as The aluminium wires used in the construction of the conductor shall be material GIE in the H9 condition as specified in BS 2627. Lay ratio. Diameter. They are not required to fulfill the mechanical requirements for unjointed wires. By agreement between the purchaser and the manufacturer a suitable grease may be applied to the center wire.1 Aluminium wires. 3.5? 10-4/? C be taken as the value for the coefficient of linear expansion of galvanized steel wires used for the aluminium conductors.3 JOINTS IN WIRES 3. The ratio of the axial length of a complete turn of the helix formed by an individual wire in a stranded conductor to the external diameter of the helix.1 STANDARD SIZE OF WIRES The Aluminium and Steel wires for the standard constructions covered by this specification shall have the diameters specified in Table 2 and 3 respectively.2 STANDARD SIZES OF ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS.1 The sizes of standard Aluminium Conductors.3 STANDARD FOR HARD-DRAWN ALUMINIUM WIRES 1. 1. 141 . Direction of lay. The galvanized steel wires shall be of the standard tensile strength grads given in BS 4565 unless due of the higher tensile strength grades is specified by the purchaser. steel-reinforced for overhead power transmission. For the purpose of this British Standard. 1. in addition to those made in the base rod or wire before final drawing. The center wire or wires are of galvanized steel and the outer layer of layers of aluminium. GENERAL 1.3. A conductor consisting of seven or more Aluminium and galvanized steel wires built up in concentric layers.2 Coefficient of linear expansion. Steel reinforced are given in table 4. 3. on each side of the joint. For other definition reference should de made to US 205. 1. be annealed over a distance of at least 200mm.4 STANDARD FOR GALVANIZED STEEL WIRE 1. 2. the wires conform to the direction of the central part of the letter S when the conductor is held vertically. 1. In order to obtain uniformity in calculations. 3. joints in individual Aluminium wires are permitted.2 Density.2 DEFINITIONS For the purpose of this part of this British Standard the following definitions apply. the maximum value permitted is 2. Aluminium conductors. and this value shall also be used as the standard resistivity for the purpose of calculation.4.3 Coefficient of linear expansion. containing any number of Aluminium wires. The coefficient of linear expansion of hard 23? 10-6/? C. is taken as 0. In aluminium conductors. but no two such joints shall be less than 15 m apart in the complete stranded conductor. The mean of two measurements at right angles taken at the same cross section. steel reinforced.80 g/cm3. a value of 11. steel reinforced.1 Resistivity.4 Constant mass temperature coefficient. 3. evenly throughout the length of the conductor.2 The masses (excluding the mass of grease for corrosion protection) and resistance's may be taken as being in accordance with Table 4. DIMENSIONS AND CONSTRUCTIONS 3. 1.1 Density. steel-reinforced. 3. The diameters of the steel wires shall be measured over the zinc coating. At a temperature of 200 C the constant mass temperature coefficient of resistance of hard drawn Aluminium wire. At a temperature of 20? C the density of hard drawn aluminium wire is to be taken as 2. or additionally to wires in specific layers. With right-hand lay. 1. The direction of lay is defined as right-hand or left-hand. STEEL REINFORCED. Joints made by resistance bull welding shall.703 gms/cm3. 1. Such joints shall be made by resistance or cold pressure bull welding.BS 215 (P II) / 1970 1.3.4. subsequent to welding.

The wires in each layer shall be evenly and closely stranded. girl.REINFORCED Alu.2 The lay ratio of the different layers shall be within the limits given in Table 1.000 13 28 10 14 -- -- -- -- -- -- 7 1. 3. the successive layers shall have opposite directions of lay.000 13 28 -- -- 10 14 -- -- -- -- 18 1 1.2 Galvanized steel wires. There shall be no joints. the outermost layer being right handed. One sample. 4. TABLE 1: LAY RATIOS FOR ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS.3 In all constructions. 3.4.3 shall be taken by the manufacture before standing. 4. sufficient to provide one test specimen for each of the appropriate test. 142 . except those made in the base rood or wire before final drawing.000 13 28 -- -- 10 17 10 16 10 14 3. shall be taken from each of an agreed number of wires of the conductor in each of the selected lengths.1 The wires used in the construction of an Aluminium Conductor.4. the lay ratio of nay Aluminium layer shall be not greater than the lay ratio of the Aluminium layer immediately beneath it. 3. Steel reinforced. unless the core consists of seven or more galvanized steel wires. Steel 6 1 Ratio of Aluminium to Steel wire diameter 1. Steel reinforced shall. In the latter case joints in individual wires are permitted. but no two such joints shall be less than 15 m apart in the complete steel core. in steel wires forming the core of an Aluminium Conductor. when the purchaser states at the time of ordering that he desires tests to be made in the presence his representative.1 SELECTION OF TEST SAMPLES 4. STEEL . TESTS 4. sufficient to provide one specimen for each of the appropriate tests.000 13 28 -- -- 10 16 10 14 -- -- 54 7 1. Notes: It is important to note that lay ratio is now defined as the ratio of the exist length of a complete turn of the helix formed by an individual wire in stranded conductor to the external diameter of the helix. before stranding. satisfy all the relevant requirements of this standard.3.3.2 Alternatively. One sample. and excessive amounts of drawing oil and other foreign deposits. shall be taken from each of the selected conductor.4.1.000 -- -- 10 16 10 14 -- -- -- -- 30 7 1. Joints in galvanized steel wires shall be made by resistance bull welding and shall be protected against corrosion.4.000 6 7 12 Numbers of wires Lay ratios for steel core 6-layer wire Lay ratios for Aluminium layers 12-layer wire 18-layer wire 24-layer wire min max min max min max min max min max -- -- 10 14 -- -- -- -- -- -- 3.1 Samples for the tests specified in 4.4.4 STRANDING 3.5 COMPLETED CONDUCTOR The completed conductor shall be from dirt. from not less than 10% of the individual lengths of Aluminium and galvanized Steel wire which will be included in any one consignment of stranded conductor. 3. samples of wire shall be taken from lengths of stranded conductor selected from approximately 10% of the lengths included in any one consignment.5 Steel wire shall be formed during stranding so that they remain inert when the conductor is cut.4 In conductors having multiple layers of Aluminium wires. in addition to those made in the base rod or wire before final drawing.1. 3.

1.2 shall be subjected to the following tests in accordance with BS 4565t.2 shall be subjects to the same tests but in the case of the tensile test the tensile strength of the specimen shall not be less than 95% of the appropriate minimum value specified in BS 2627*.1 shall be subjected to the following tests in accordance with BS 4565t and shall meet the requirements of that standard.4 Because of the difficulty in straightening samples taken from stranded cores.1. In the case of the stress at 1% elongation. Tensile test Torsion test or elongation test as appropriate. Wrapping test. Galvanizing test.1 Aluminum wires. 4. it is recommended that determination of stress at 1% elongation on samples taken under 4.1. all tests shall be made at the manufacturer's works.2 PLACE OF TESTING Unless otherwise agreed between the purchase and the manufacturer at the time of ordering. Determination of stress at 1% elongation. furnish him with a certificate given the results of the tests made on the samples taken in accordance with 143 . if requested.1.4.2 Steel wires. NOTE: 4. Determination of Stress at 1%elongation.2 be carried out on the center wire only.3. 4.3 TESTS 4. Galvanizing test. Resistively test Test samples of Aluminum wires taken under 4. torsion. The test samples of Aluminum wires taken under 4.1 shall be subject to the following tests in accordance with BS 2627* and shall meet the requirements of that standard: Tensile test Wrapping test. The test samples of galvanized steel wires taken under 4.5. wrapping and galvanizing tests the appropriate requirements of BS 4565* shall be met.3.1. The test sample of galvanized steel wires taken under 4. In the case of the tensile test the tensile strength of the specimen shall not be less than 95% of the appropriate minimum value specified to BS 4565*. Wrapping test. CERTIFICATION OF COMPLIANCE When the purchaser does not call for tests on wire taken from the stranded conductor the manufacturer shall. In the case of the elongation test the elongation of the specimen shall be not less than the appropriate minimum value specified in BS 4565* reduced in numerical value by 0. Tensile test Torsion test or elongation test as appropriate.

79 3.24 16.62 7.00 974 0-136 3 92.6 484.59 2.740 3.72 4.5 18.814 10.72 TABLE 3: STEEL WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF STANDARD ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS. CONDUCTORS.79 18/3. TABLE 4.47 23. STANDARD ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS.86 54/3.18 3.06 3.57 4.114 7.999 1190 3.86 91.80 175 184.70 7/2/72 7/2.70 10.82 14.00 172 0-676 6 15.3 194.35 50 73.59 1/3.814 10.34 30.18 mm 1/ 2.374 5.3 19.970 2.069 7.36 6/2.61 12. breaking Standard load for Resistance at standard 20° C W /km diameter wire n N 6.35 30/2.50 11.77 128 0-907 7 11.63 842 0-157 6 79.35 12.59 3/3.5 21.52 1.05 214 0-543 6 18.280 1.114 7.2 15-56 558 0-273 3 32.86 4.70 15.30 671 0-136 7 46.79 3.30 Min.615 2780 Standard Diameter mm 2.621 0-067 40 131.6 222.260 3.88 7.2 19.18 3.02 27.70 17.10 175 212.06 106 1-093 9.61 3.5 28.00 18/3.86 4.36 2.1 261.374 5.25 200 210.86 1.9 400 .35 3.18 9.51 36.11 21.18 3.461 770 5.63 47.61 30/3.069 3.48 9.30 3.20 40 52.10 34.35 7/2.86 Note: The Values in Columns 2 to 4 are given for information only.35 11.C.990 2.36 2.98 538 0-583 8 61.79 3.24 11.12 41.75 79.13 726 0-183 8 69.559 1310 3.59 2.28 Minimum load at 1% elongation for Standard diameter standard diameter wire N mm 2.269 6.13 61.007 1450 2.79 1/3.623 1030 3.269 6.30 7 73.59 2.2 13.61 25 31.36 2.58 61.86 7/3.870 3.70 100 1581 194.95 68.41 49.09 47.TABLE 2: ALUMINIUM WIRES USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF STANDARD ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS.00 3.069 7.61 7/3.00 1/3.24 11.69 55. STEEL REINFORCED Standard diameter Cross-sectional area of stranded diameter wire Mass per km mm mm2 kg 1.61 3.278 30/2.79 .55 200 428.700 3.18 Calculated Sectional Total Approximate Approximate Calculated Normal D.36 6.05 587 0-156 3 41.53 19. STEEL REINFORCED Standard Diameter Cross sectional Area of stranded diameter wire Mass Per kms mm mm2 kg 2.57 2.00 3.37 116.00 1/3.00 3.20 150 158.9 18.67 31.7 157.415 1870 1. STEEL REINFORCED Normal Aluminium area mm2 25 30 40 50 70 100 150 150 175 175 200 200 400 144 Stranding and wire diameter Aluminum Steel mm 6/2.59 1/3.61 8.45 30 42.00 8.70 150 183-4 225.36 1/ 2.010 2.00 6/3.75 506 0-181 5 35.59 18/3.942 8.59 6. area of sectional overall mass breaking Aluminium resistance at Aluminium area diameter per km load area 20° CW /km mm2 mm2 mm kg mm2 W kN 26.936 4.365 906 4.761 1560 2.5 16.37 116.942 8.35 7/2.

Notes on Table 4:
1. For the basis of calculation of this table, see Appendix A.
2. The sectional area is the of the sectional area of the relevant individual wires.
3. Attention is drawn to the fact that the aluminum sectional areas of standard conductors covered by this specification are larger than
the nominal aluminum areas by which they are identified, they should not be compared directly with conductors manufacture
exactly to nominal areas.

APPENDIX A
NOTES ON THE CALCULATION OF TABLE 4
A. 1

Increase in length due to standing. When straightened out, each wire in any particular layer of a stranded conductor, except
the central wire, is longer than the standard conductor, by an amount depending on the lay ratio of that layer.

A.2

Resistance and mass of conductor. In aluminum conductors, steel-reinforced the conductivity of the steel core is neglected
and the resistance of the conductor is calculated with reference to the resistance of the aluminum wires only. The resistance of
any length of stranded conductor is the resistance of the same length of any one aluminum wire multiplied by a constant, as
set out in Table 5.
The mass of each wire in a length of stranded conductor, except the central wire, will be greater than that of an equal length of
straight wire by an amount depending on the lay ratio of the layer (see A.1 above). The total mass of any length of conductor is,
therefore, obtained by multiplying the mass of an equal length of strength wire by their appropriate constant set out in Table 5.
The masses of the steel core and aluminum wires are calculated separately and added together
In calculating the stranding constants in Table 5, the mean by ratio, i.e. the arithmetic mean of the relevant minimum and
maximum values in Table 1, has been for each layer.

A.3

Calculated breaking load of conductor. The breaking load of a conductor, in terms of the strengths of the individual
component wires, may be taken to be the sum of the strengths of the aluminum wires calculated from the specified minimum
tensile strengths plus the sum of the strengths of the steel wires calculated from the specified minimum stress at 1%
elongation.

TABLE 5. STRANDING CONSTANTS
Number of wires in conductor
Aluminium

Steel
6
6
12
18
30
54

1
7
7
1
7
7

Stranding constants
Mass
Electrical resistance
Aluminium
Steel
6.091
1.000
1.169 2
6.079
7.032
0.169 2
12.26
7.032
0.085 14
18.34
1.000
0.056 60
30.67
7.032
0.034 08
55.21
7.032
0.018 04

APPENDIX B
NOTE ON MODULUS OF ELASTICITY AND COEFFICIENT OF LINEAR EXPANSION
The practical moduli of elasticity given below are based on an analysis of the final moduli determined from a large number of short
term stress / strain tests and may be taken as applying to conductors stressed between 15% and 50% of the breaking load of the
conductor. They may be regarded as being accurate to within +300 hbar*.
The coefficient of linear expansion given below have been calculated from the practical moduli for the aluminum and steel
components of the conductors and coefficient of linear expansion of 23.0×10-2 and 11.5×10-4/.C. Aluminium and Steel respectively.

145

Number of wires in conductor
Aluminium
Steel
6
6
12
18
30
54

Practical (final) modular of
elasticity
1
7
7
1
7
7

7.900
7.500
10.500
6.600
8.000
6.900

Coefficient of linear
expansion/°
C
19.1×10-6
19.8×10-4
15.3×10-6
21.2×10-4
17.8×10-4
19.3×10-4

Note: These values are given for information purposes only

APPENDIX C
CODENAMES FOR STANDARD ALUMINIUM CONDUCTORS, STEEL-REINFORCED
NOTE: These code names are not an essential part of the standard. They are given for convenience in ordering conductors.
Nominal Aluminium
Area
mm2
25
30
40
50
70
100
150
150
175
175
200
20
400

146

Stranding
Aluminium
mm
6/2.35
6/2.59
6/3.00
6/3.35
12/2.79
6/4.72
30/2.59
18/3.35
30/2.79
18/3.61
30/3.00
18/3.89
54/3.10

Code name

Steel
mm
1/ 2.36
1/ 2.59
1/3.09
1/3.35
7/2.79
7/1.57
7/2.59
1/3.35
7/2.79
1/3.61
7/3.00
1/3.86
7/3.18

Copier
Weasel
Rabbit
Horse
Dog
Wolf
Dingo
Lynx
Caracal
Panther
Jaguar
Zebra

147

148 .

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