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Beatbox

Gracias a www.humanbeatbox.com

Recopilado por Anmi DeSean

ndice:
1-Lessons (pg. 7)
Lesson 1 : What is human beatboxing? Lesson 2: The Three Basic Sounds Lesson 3: Putting the three sounds together in a beat Lesson 4: How do I make three sounds at the same time? Lesson 5: Holding the microphone Lesson 6 : Breath Control

2-Kick Drums (pg. 24)


808 Kick [ ng ] Classic Kick Drum [ b ] Dry Kick Drum [ d ] Synth Kick Drum [ bm ] or [ bng ]

Reverse Kick Drums


Reverse Classic Kick [ wb ] Reverse Dry Kick [ vd ]

3-Snare Drums (pg. 30)


606 Snare [ cl ] 808 Rimshot Snare [ k ] 808 Snare Filter Sweep 808 Snare [ tch ] or [ 8 ] 909 Snare [ ngsh] or [ eesh ] Brushed Snare [ thb ] Classic Snare [ p ] Cough Snare [ e ] 2

Reverse Snare/Hat [ sp ] 909 Snare Filter Sweep

4-Inward Snare Drums (pg. 37)


Inward Hand Clap Snare [ ^cl ] Inward 606 Snare [ ^cl ] Inward 808 Rimshot [ ^k ] Inward 'K' Snare [ ^kh ] Inward Classic Snare (Variation 1) [ ^psh ] Inward Classic Snare [ ^ph ] Inward Combo Snare [ ^pk ] Inward Hollow Snare [ ^ish ]

5-Hi-Hats and Cymbals (pg. 44)


Closed Hi-hat [ t ] Open Hi-Hat [ ts ] Fast Hi-Hats [ t k ] Reverse Open Hi-hat [ ^shd ] or [ ^shb ] Brushed Cymbal [ th ] Splash Cymbal [ ^psh ] or [ ^pfh ]

6-Percussion (pg. 47)


Egg Shaker [ ch sh ] Sharp Shaker [ s k ] Cowbell (block click) Clave Click

7-Rolls (pg. 49)


Kick Rolls (Combo, Classic and Uvular) 808 Snare Drum Roll Inward Click Roll Inward Backspin Roll Outward Click Roll Kick Roll [ b d ] Helicopter Click Roll

8-Vocal Scratch (pg. 53)


Vocal Scratching Electro Scratching Whistle Scratching Throat Scratching Transformation Scratching in a beat Transformation Scratching (Abra Scratch)

9-Bass Sounds (pg .56)


Classic Bass Robot Bass (Cough Bass or Nasal Growl) Inward Snore Bass Throat Bass Nose Bass

10-Instruments (pg. 58)


Pizzicato Strings { thmb } Trumpet { brm } Muted Guitar

11-Oscillations (pg. 59)


Uvular Oscillation Lip Oscillation

12-Sound Effects (SFX) (pg. 61)


Beat Delay Vocal Echo Vocal Reverb Vocal Tap Reverse Reverb Finger Waggle

13-Techniques (pg. 65)


Basic Principles Creating an Auditory Illusion Backing an MC Holding the Microphone Making your act unique! MCing in a Beat Beatboxing and Bass Guitar

En este documento, se profundiza en el tema del BeatBox desde la narracin de sus orgenes hasta incluso convertirse en una completa gua de sonidos para convertirte de un novato, a al menos, un entendido del mundo del BeatBox. Pero para ms informacin sobre beatbox, ve a: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/tips Y all encontrars ms profundizacin en temas como, el origen del beatbox, o como manejarte ante un pblico Sin ms dilacin:

Lesson 1 What is human beatboxing?


Human beatboxing is urban vocal percussion. It is the ability to make a range of drum, bass and sound effects with the mouth. As well as trying to copy a real drum kit, human beatboxers try and copy the sounds of electronic musical equipment such as drum machines, samplers, synthesizers and DJ decks. In fact, the word beatbox is another name for drum machine:; beat box, i.e. a box that makes beats. For more information on what beatboxing is and where it came from, read these articles: What is human beatboxing?

Beatboxing, aka vocal percussion, is primarily concerned with the art of creating beats and rhythms using the human mouth. However, it also involves the imitation of sounds such as scratching, something which beatboxer Scratch has mastered. A good beatboxer can usually demonstrate a wide range of vocal skills. Multivocalism describes the collective process of beatboxing, sound imitation, singing and more - basically anything vocal. However, it is fair to say that the words 'beatboxing', 'vocal percussion' and 'multivocalism' pretty much all mean the same thing. 'Vocal percussion' is more commonly associated with a-cappella and rockapella groups, whereas 'beatboxing' and 'human beatbox' are terms usually associated with hip hop or other urban music genres. 'Multivocalism' is a relatively new term, coined by the UK's Killa Kela. Vocal percussion/beatboxing has been used in a-cappella groups for many years, but today it is perhaps mainly associated with hip hop music, often dubbed 'the 5th element of hip hop'. Incidentally, beatboxing has also been described as 'a lost art', something we want to help change! Human beatbox legends such as Buffy, Doug E Fresh, and Biz Markie helped propel beatboxing into the limelight throughout the 1980's, and the scene has been growing ever since. Now, at the start of the 21st century, beatboxing is set to gain further recognition as an artform in its own right, and become an international phenomenon in the process.

Part 1: The Pre-History of Beatboxing


Introduction It is usually documented that beatboxing, as we know it, has its roots in the beginning of modern hip-hop, on street corners in placed like Chicago, the Bronx, and LA, and this is quite right. However, vocal percussion - the art form from which beatboxing spawns - has been part of the music and urban scene for a lot longer than people think. As part of the new school of beatboxing and hip-hop - that is, from around 1998 to today - it is extremely important this new school knows its history, and the way in which this glorious sub culture came about. Through hard research, I will attempt to show you, the reader, the true (but brief) history of beatboxing. It first requires a trip back in time, more than 7 decades back, to the era of swing, jazz and barbershop music. It has been well recorded that jazz musicians where the first group of artists who used their voices, and indeed, their whole vocal chords to imitate instruments. When bebop arrived in the 30s, as a reaction to large swing groups and their lack of improvisation, it was becoming the norm to hear jazz and blues singers wail, moan or grunt noises unidentifiable to the human ear as words. 'Scatting' was used as jazz singers improvised harmonic and vocal scales over solos or instrumentals. This was the first mainstream look at what would become vocal percussion, and later beatboxing. Singers would sing made up words such as 'doot', 'wawp', 'bapadoo' and many others, effectively imitating the sounds of the two most common instruments in their music, saxophones and trumpets. However, the roots of imitating instruments with the human voice goes a few years earlier. The very beginning... Travelling right back, we uncover the troubadours (poet-musicians) of Southern France the 1200 and 1300s. These were travelling French minstrels who would roam the streets singing either unaccompanied or with only the accompaniment of a lute, the precursor to the modern acoustic guitar. Their music seemed to try and be different and featured courtly lyrics or religious themes. By the late 1400 and 1500s, groups would sing together, much like barbershop, harmonising to one single voice. To give their music depth, they would interchange short sharp notes, call and responsive in the melodies, making it sound like a whole band was playing with them. These French gypsies, were in fact the earliest recorded signs of vocal percussion in history.

As medieval became baroque, baroque became romantic, romantic became classical, human percussion was lost momentarily. As music swung towards Bach and Beethoven with oratorios and symphonies comprising dozens of violins and violas, the use for the human voice lost all but one purpose, to sing. However, more recent composers such as Medtner and Rachmaninov used wordless 'vocalised' sounds in their classical compositions. For example, Rachmaninov's composition for voice and piano called 'Vocalise', written in 1912, features a pure melody that unfolds over gently changing wordless vocal harmonies.

What about Indian music? North Indian music has for centuries (and perhaps millennia) used something called 'vocal bols' that sound very similar to the sounds played on percussive instruments such as the tabla. The most common bols are Dha, Dhi/Dhin, Ti/Tin, Ra, Ki, Ta, Na, Tin, and Te. Bols are combined and arranged in 4-beat patterns called thekas to provide the rhythm or tal. For example, "Ta Dhin Dhin Dha". These are still used today by a wide range of artists and bands such as Alms For Shanti on their track SuperBol (spot the pun?). Although not a direct ancestor of modern beatboxing, this parallel will no doubt find itself fused with beatboxing in the future.

From Africa to America African ritualistic music had traditionally used body sounds to maintain rhythm, such as clapping and stamping. Loud in-and-out breathing called 'over breathing' was also used as both a two-beat rhythm and to induce a trance like state in the performers. Vocal percussion patterns were also used such as, "hup, hup, hup, hup" and "Ch Ka Ch Ch". Today, West African music still uses techniques such as giving the voice an intentionally raspy or buzzy quality as well as featuring glissandos, bends, and swoops. In the 17th Century, African slaves were taken to plantations in Jamaica and the Americas where the African music was blended with European folk and brass band music to spawn new forms of music - namely jazz and blues. Barbershop In the late 1880s, black groups (usually quartets) would sing a capella, that is, using only their harmonized voices to make music. They would hold long, low notes that resemble what we hear as bass sounds in modern beatboxing. Vocal percussion was used by these quartets to help their music keep time, such as clicks of the tongue and taking a sharp breath in. Yes, more then a hundred years before Kenny Muhammad, black barbershop singers mastered the inward snare. Even though vocal percussion was only the background to this style of music, it no doubt set the stage for the oncoming craze of scatting and bass humming in the wave of jazz, blues, and swing music that was just a few years away. 9

Blues and Vocal Percussion When blues was brought about by black slaves telling the heart ache of life, there wasnt usually instruments at hand. Musicians would improvise with what little they had, their body and their voices. Claps and clicks became the drums, and low hums became the double bass; the two back bones of blues and jazz music. One would hum, one would clap, click and hit things as the drums, and one would sing. This would eventually evolve into imitating many sounds, such as the 'shhchh' of a soft snare and the 'tssa' of the hi-hat being played with brushes. Blues groups found a way to make their music with nothing but their voices. As blues became more and more mainstream, scatting and bass humming became well known. Higher range singers would wail long, joined notes, taking the place of the trumpet in solos. Immediately, this form of vocal percussion became a staple of urban culture, that is, culture of the street. Poor artists would roam the streets, or gather on street corners, imitating trumpets and saxophones outside jazz halls. Today Today, beatboxing and vocal percussion is as alive as ever. One only needs to lend an ear to the Australian charts to hear Joel Turner using beatboxing as the drums to an entire album. Joel has since claimed national glory, and multimillion dollar record deal and mainstream exposure. The formation of such groups as the Beatbox Alliance, who have major corporate backing, makes us realise beatboxing is now a card carrying member of the hip-hop community. In 2000, Rahzel made beatboxing famous in the mainstream by covering the now deceased Aaliyahs song 'If Your Girl Only Knew'. Rahzel has since been credited as the first person to conquer the art of simultaneously singing and beatboxing at the same time, a feat that has become a staple of the beatbox community.

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Part 1.2 : The Old Skool


Introduction Despite the fact that Beatboxing is an important element of Hip-hop and A Capella, some people still aren't clued up as to what beatboxing is all about! Beatboxing is The Art of Urban Vocal Percussion. i.e. - imitating drum sounds and beat patterns using your lips, tongue, mouth, throat, and voice. It's summed up with the image the guy in the hoodie with his hands cupped over his mouth spitting and making wonderful noises.

Terms and Conditions Vocal Percussion means making percussion sounds (including drum sounds) with the mouth. Traditionally vocal percussionists in a cappella groups have tried to emulate real drum sounds. Beatboxing is a form of vocal percussion in which the artist emulates the sounds of a 'beat box' or drum machine. Today, as the artform is expanding, vocal percussionists use beatboxing techniques and beatboxers use vocal percussion techniques - the difference remains in the style. Beatboxers generally produce more urban styles of music and therefore beatboxing could be called urban vocal percussion. Multivocalism is a term used for artists who use beatboxing, vocal scratching, singing, MCing and poetry in their performances. Where did the term beatbox come from? Human Beatbox literally means human drum machine and beatbox was originally used as two words 'beat box'. The term 'beat box' was used as slang for the non-programmable drum machines that were first called rhythm machines. For example, the Roland TR Rhythm Series such as the TR-33, TR55 that were produced in 1972. Later it was used to refer to a particular line of drum machines - particularly the Roland CR and the later TR series with the Roland CR-78 appearing in 1978. However, the first rhythm machine was the Wurlitzer Sideman that was made between 1959 and 1964, and this did come in a large box - so it's possible that the term "beat box" was used to refer to this machine.

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View larger image Used with kind permission The Keyboard Museum

The first time beat box was used to refer directly to a rhythm machine was in the 1970s with the ELI CompuRhythm CR-7030 Beat Box.

View larger image Used with kind permission The Keyboard Museum

And here is the staple of hip-hop music, the coveted Roland TR-808 drum machine released in 1982.

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Where did it all begin? The history of Beatboxing is blurry. It appears, like graffiti, to have begun it's life as an urban art form. The beginnings of hip-hop are well known - DJs spinning the breakbeats in records with MCs rapping over the top. When MCs starting to rap over drum machine (beat box) beats, in the ghettos such as the Bronx, drum machines and synthesisers could not be afforded (samplers were at this time well out of the reach of even well-paid musicians). Necessity is the mother of invention, and without machine-supplied beats to rap over, a new instrument was created - the mouth - and thus human beatboxing was born. The Three Kings of the 1980s In the early to mid eighties, three names stand out head and shoulders above the rest - Darren 'Buffy' Robinson, Doug E Fresh and Biz Markie. There has been a great deal of discussion about who was the first, however one thing is for sure, and that is that in 1983, a trio from Brooklyn won a talent contest at Radio City Music Hall. The trio, formerly known as The Disco Three, were comprised of Mark "Prince Markie Dee" Morales, Damon "Kool Rock-Ski" Wimbley, and Darren "Buff the Human Beat Box" Robinson. These were The Fat Boys. Buff Love, or Buffy as he came to be known, helped the group win the talent contest through his ability to use his mouth to recreate hip-hop rhythms and a variety of sound effects. The prize? A record contract. Rumour has it that the band were gutted as they wanted to win the second prize of a stereo! Buffy was known for his breathing technique between kicks and snares. The Fat Boys enjoyed a short but successful career. They finally split in the early 1990s to go their separate ways. Sadly, on Dec 10, 1995, Darren "Buffy the Human Beat Box" Robinson died of a heart attack in Rosedale, NY.

Also in 1983, Doug E Fresh (Doug E Davis) made his first appearance on a single for Spotlight called 'Pass the Budda' with Spoonie Gee and DJ Spivey although Doug E. Fresh claims that he invented human beatboxing in 1980. In 1984, Doug featured in the classic hip-hop movie Beat Street alongside the Treacherous Three and this was to launch him as one of the greatest beatboxers of all time. Doug was known for his distinctive style featuring amongst other sounds, the now famous click rolls. In 1985, Doug E Fresh and the Get Fresh Crew (MC Ricky 13

'Slick Rick' D, Barry Bee and Chill Will) released the now classic hip-hop double-A side, 'The Show/La Di Da Di'.

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Classic Doug E. Fresh Clips These two classic Doug E. Fresh clips are provided courtesy of www.dougefresh.com and influenced a whole generation of beatboxers.

Download doug_e_fresh_do_the_beatbox.mp3 Download doug_e_fresh_slick_rick.mp3

By 1985, beatboxing was being taken forward by other artistes such as Biz Markie. Although a rapper, he started working as a human beatboxer with acts such as Roxanne Shant and started developing sounds such as MCing between the beat, the inward handclap and the harmonic tap.

And then there were none... Beatboxing rode the crest of the hip-hop wave featuring on albums and videos but then it all ended. By the 1990s hip-hop was no longer center stage and beatboxers were held back by people's perceptions of them as novelty value circus acts. Beatboxing/Vocal Percussion popped up in jazz, and was the foundation for a new breed of A Capella groups using soft organic percussion to keep time in their tracks. The art form spread slowly and quietly into many genres, including rock music with the group The HouseJacks, and jazz great Bobby McFerrin showed off more and more of his skills as his audience grew.

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Vocal boundaries where also smashed by Michael Winslow the Vocal Effects Master. You probably know him as the guy from the Police Academy movies who does the amazing sound effects that you, like me, assumed were fake. He also did behind-the-camera sound effects for films such as Back to The Future.

View larger photo

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Part 2 : The three basic sounds


In human beatboxing, most grooves are made using three basic sounds. The kick drum, the snare drum and the hi-hat.

About the sounds In human beatboxing, some of the sounds are named after real instruments (e.g. classic kick drum), some are named after electronic instruments (e.g. 808 Snare Drum) and others are named after the way they sound (e.g Hollow Snare). However, the three basic categories of sound - kick, snare and hi-hat are named after the three basic parts of a drum kit. The Kick Drum is the big round drum that a drummer hits by using a foot pedal. We call it a kick drum rather than a bass drum to stop us getting confused with bass which generally means a bass sound like a bass guitar. The Snare Drum is a drum that has wires underneath called snares. The wires help create a sharp noisy rattle when the drum is hit with a stick. The Hi Hat is two cymbals that clash together when made to do so with a foot pedal. They can be apart (open) or together (closed). They may be hit with a stick in the open or closed or partially closed positions.

Click on the links to learn the three most common beatboxing sounds - this is the starting point for new beatboxers: Classic Kick Drum [ b ] http://www.humanbeatbox.com/kicks/p2_articleid/65 Classic Snare Drum [ pf / psh / ps ] http://www.humanbeatbox.com/snares/p2_articleid/69 Closed Hi-Hat [ t ] http://www.humanbeatbox.com/snares/p2_articleid/69

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Part 3 Putting the three sounds together in a beat

Once you have started to master at least the classic kick and classic snare drum sounds, you can start putting them into a groove. Click on the link to learn how to put the three basic sounds together: Basic Principles Learn how to make the classic kick drum {b}, hi-hat {t} and classic snare drum {psh}. Combine the three sounds into an 8-beat such as this: { b t psh t / b t psh t } or {b t psh t / b b psh t } Concentrate on getting the timing right. If you make a mistake, keep going, do not stop or pause. Start off slowly and build up speed once you can do the 8-beat without losing timing. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/zani_three_sounds.wmv http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/basic_principles.wmv Part 4: How do I make three sounds at the same time?
In human beatboxing it often sounds like beatboxers are making three sounds at once - well, sometimes they are, but more often than not, they are only making one sound at a time but doing it very fast! This tricks the brain into thinking that more than one sound is being made at the same time and this is called an auditory illusion. Creating an Auditory Illusion (Well talk about this topic in the last Lesson)

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Part 5: Holding the microphone


You don't have to use a microphone to beatbox - that's one of the greatest things about beatboxing! However, if you are using a microphone then there are some techniques and tips that will help get the best out of the equipment. The first link is to an article and the second link is to a video tutorial: :

Holding the Mic


There are many different ways of holding the microphone when beatboxing, and each method helps create a certain type of sound. Here are some photos of well-known beatboxers with a short description of the method they use.

1. Closed Clasp This is the preferred method used by beatboxers who make nasal bass sounds because it directs sounds from the nose into the microphone. The fingers are wrapped tightly around the microphone. Maximum bass!

Here, A-Plus presses his thumb against his nose and wraps his fingers around the head of the microphone. By using his whole hand around the mic, he funnels the sound into the microphone.

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In this variation, 3B tucks his thumb under the microphone and presses his fore-finger against his nose

To help direct the sound into the mic, Beatboy covers the exposed side of the mic with his other hand.

Monkey Moo is using a classic clasp but using his other hand for support.

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Here you can see German beatbox champion Zeero using his fingers to ensure that his nasal sounds are captured by the mic.

2. Open Clasp With the open clasp, the beatboxer is not so bothered about capturing nasal sounds. The fingers are spread more leaving gaps between fingers and often the body of the mic is inserted between the little and third, or third and middle fingers.

Anointed S is using an open clasp but with the microphone to the side of the mouth. This helps him maintain eye contact with the audience.

TyTe...

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You don't have to be right handed to beatbox! Here you can clearly see the open clasp favoured by the awesome Beatmaster G.

3. Two Mics Why use one mic when you can use two? You can use a second mic just about anywhere but the two favoured positions are on the nose or neck.

Here is Shlomo using the Techno Bass or 808 Kick in one of his trademark dance routines.

Of course, there is no 'right' or 'wrong' way to hold the mic. Try experimenting with the different methods shown above. But beware - covering up the microphone completely will render the directivity of the mic useless and this makes it prone to feedback!

Holding the Microphone


Description Microphone technique is very important and there are different ways of holding the microphone. Many beatboxers deliver poor performances because they hold the microphone incorrectly and thus they fail to maximise the power and clarity of the sounds they produce.

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Method For the method please read the short magazine article on Holding the Microphone which can be found here.

http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/holding_the_microphone.w mv Part 6: Breath Control

One thing that puzzles people is how beatboxers can beatbox for a long time without actually taking a breath. Well, the answer is to make a sound and breathe in at the same time! We call these inward sounds. What is more, as you'll discover, some of the best sounds are made like this! There are many ways of making inward sounds. Nearly every sound that can be made outwards can be made inwards - although it may take some practice to get it right! The most common sound to make inwards is a snare drum sound. This means that when you make a snare drum sound, you breathe in at the same time. The most common ways of making inward snare sounds are covered in this article:
Inward Snares

http://www.humanbeatbox.com/tips/p2_articleid/29

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Lesson 2 - KICK DRUMS


808 Kick [ ng ] Description

This kick drum sound is produced by forcefully pushing air through your windpipe and in some vocal percussion circles is called the techno swallow. Like the Classic Kick it can be unvocalised or vocalised through the nose.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/kick_drums/808_kick.wmv http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/808_kick_unvocalised.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/808_kick_vocalised.mp3 Method 1. Close off the air flow into your mouth with the back of your tongue. Note: This sound can be produced with your mouth open or closed. 2. Now vocalise a swallow! People often do this if they are pretending to swallow. 3. The trick is to keep the audible bit and not swallow at all. You should not be straining on your throat or vocal chords when doing this. 4. Keep the audible bit as short and punchy as possible. The vocalised version is the same as the unvocalised, except that you let some air and sound escape through your nose. In Context

Most beatboxers use a second mic on the throat to capture throat sounds. The 808 Kick goes particularly well with an 808 Snare sound.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/808_kick_unvocalised_pattern.mp3

And here's the pattern: 01 02 03 04 Ng t 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 Ng t Ng t 13 14 15 16 ts

Tch -

Ng Tch -

http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/808_kick_vocalised_pattern.mp3

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And here's the pattern: 01 02 03 04 Nn t 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 Nn t Ng t 13 14 15 16 ts

Ng Tch -

Ng Tch -

Classic Kick Drum [ b ]

Introduction: This is the most common way of making a kick drum sound in human beatboxing. It was the method first used by beatboxers such as Doug E. Fresh and Buffy from The Fat Boys.
Phonetic Description In phonetics, the Classic Kick Drum is described as a bilabial plosive. This means it is made by completely closing both lips and then releasing them accompanied by a burst of air. In the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) as well as in Standard Beatbox Notation (SBN) the symbol b is used.

Method:

The simplest way to make the classic kick drum is to say the letter 'b'. Here is an audio example:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/b/b.mp3

As you can hear from the audio example, the kick drum doesn't sound very powerful. To make it sound louder and punchier, you need to do what we call a lip oscillation. This is where you let air vibrate through your lips - a bit like 'blow a raspberry'. Once you can do this, you make a very short lip oscillation. Listen to this example:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/b/b%20%28variation%201%29.mp3 1. Make the b sound as if you are saying b from the word bogus. 2. This time, with your lips closed, let the pressure build up. 3. You need to control the release of you lips just enough to let them vibrate for a short amount of time.

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Variations: Once you have mastered the b kick you can make a large number of variations by shaping the mouth and voicing or vocalising the sound. Here are the most common variations: Voiced http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/classic_kick_vocalised.mp3

bng bn bo bu
With added fricative sound bh bsh bf bs bk Added fricative and voiced

bfng bush bus This video demonstrates both a voiced bm or unvoiced b classic kick drum sound with some other variations such as bsh, bf and bs.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/kick_drums/classic_kick.wmv In the contet:

This sound is good for forming one of the staple sounds as part of a kick, hi-hat and snare beat. Here is an example:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/classic_kick_pattern.mp3

And here's the pattern: 01 02 03 04 05 bo t b 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 bo t b t b 14 15 16 tss

kch -

kch -

and in Standard Beatbox Notation : [ bo _ t b / kch _ bo _ / t b t b / kch _ ts _ ]

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Dry Kick Drum [ d ] Description This is an alternative from making a kick drum with your lips and sounds very realistic when made into a mic at close range. It goes well with TyTe's 808 Kick Drum sound. Method 1. Say 'dog' (difficult eh?) 2. Now say 'd' but try not to say 'duh' - try to keep just the very beginning of the d sound. 3. To make the sound louder, flick the tip of your tongue down over the ridge above your front top teeth. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/kick_drums/dry_kick.wmv Synth Kick Drum [ bm ] or [ bng ] Description This is the classic electro style kick drum with a 70s style synth tom over the top. It's a classic kick but with falsetto humming at the same time. Method 1. First try humming falsetto - this is a high pitched register, sort of like how Mickey Mouse talks! 2. Now hum from high pitch to low pitch quickly. 3. Whilst doing this high to low hum, add a classic kick drum sound. The classic kick will be made with the lips whilst the hum will be coming out of your nose. 4. Try and keep the sound as short and as punchy as possible. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/kick_drums/synth_drum_kick.wmv

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Reverse Classic Kick [ wb ] Description This is a reverse classic kick and sounds great in fast drum and bass routines. Method 1. Start by saying 'wub'. 2. Now you have to do a lip oscillation. This is where you blow air between tightly pressed lips - a bit like blowing a raspberry. 3. Now try and say 'wub' but doing the lip oscillation at the same time. 4. At the beginning of the sound, start of quietly and then get louder towards the end of the sound. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/kick_drums/reverse_kick_drums.wmv

Reverse Dry Kick [ vd ] http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/kick_drums/reverse_kick_drums.wmv Description

This is a reverse human beatbox kick drum sound. Unlike other reverse sounds this one is not made whilst breathing in.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_kick.mp3 Method 1. Sound the word Vud. It probably sounded like vuda. 2. Now start of slowly and speed up throughout the sound. 3. End with your mouth in the starting postion of d. Do not follow through with the whole d sound. Of course can make this sound unvocalised by sounding the word Fd but again, only pronounce the very beginning of the d sound.

You can improve this sound by doing a tongue flick upwards at the end of the sound to create a click. To do this, start with the tip of your tongue on the soft gum below your lower front teeth and press hard. Then, allow your tongue to slide upwards such that it hits the hard gum above your top front teeth. This will create a quiet but audible click/slap.

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In Context

The reverse kick goes well with the reverse snare or hi-hat for break downs. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_kick_pattern.mp3 And here's the pattern: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Vd Sp Vd Vd Sp -

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Lesson 3 - SNARE DRUMS


606 Snare [ cl ]
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/606_snare.wmv Description

The 606 Snare is a staple sound of many beatboxers, particularly drum'n'bass beatboxers. It's named after the Roland TR606 drum machine that had a short sharp 'click' style snare drum sound.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/606_snare.mp3 Methods Method 1 1. Say the word clean. 2. Try and keep your tongue pressed against the gum above your front teeth and say the cl from clean. You should find that air passes each side (or one side) of your tongue. 3. Now try and make the cl sound without breathing out. Simply force out the air that is above and behind your tongue. The more force you use, the louder and sharper the sound. Method 2

Another method is to do a 'Donald Duck' impersonation. When you do this, you squeeze air out between the side of your tongue and the gum above the molars on one side of your mouth. Here's an audio MP4 example:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/606_snare_(explanation).mp3

In Context Here is an example of the 606 snare being used in a beat.


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/606_snare_pattern.mp3

And here's the pattern (repeated in the MP3): 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Bf t t t t Bf Cl ts se Bf

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 t Bf t Bf Cl ts se Cl

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Here are couple of more audio examples of using the 606 snare drum:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/606_snare%201.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/606_snare_(reverb).mp3

808 Rimshot Snare [ k ]


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/808_rimshot_snare.wmv Description

This is a rimshot sound made by squeezing air through the back of your mouth.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/rim01a.mp3 Method 1. Position your mouth as if you were going to say Ka as in Cabbage 2. Now try and make just the K sound without the breathing out. You should be squeezing a single pulse of air out. In Context

Rimshots seem to be under-used in beatbox but can sound great in complex jazz, reggae, dub and drum'n'bass beatbox.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/rim01b.mp3

And here's the pattern (repeated in the MP3): 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Bm t t Ka Bm t t t t Ka tss

808 Snare Filter Sweep


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/808_snare_filter_sweep.wmv Description Did you know you can make the dry kick and the 808 snare drum with your mouth closed? I use this in live shows and pretend to be opening and closing a door in a club - very effective.

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Method 1. To make this sound you make a series of 808 snare drums and simply slowly close your mouth but continue to make the snare sounds. Easy peasy.

808 Snare [ tch ] or [ 8 ]


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/808_snare.wmv Description

This is a great Roland TR808 snare drum sound and was invented by TyTe in 1978!! This snare is unvocalised unless you're making a bass sound at the same time.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/808_snare.mp3 Method 1. To make this sound you need to do a light forward tongue flick! 2. Position your tongue as if you are going to say the letter t. 3. Rather than simple saying t, flick the tip of your tongue down hard at the same time. In Context

Here is the 808 snare used in an electro style beat.


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/808_snare_pattern.mp3

And here's the pattern (repeated in the MP3): 01 02 03 04 Bm chewi 05 06 07 08 09 10 Bm chewi 11 12 13 14 15 16

Tch a

Tch B

Tch Ng tss

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909 Snare [ ngsh] or [ eesh ]


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/909_snare.wmv Description

This is the classic Roland TR909 snare drum sound. Note: To master this sound you will need to be able to produce the 808 Kick sound.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/909_snare_pattern.mp3 Method 1. Produce the 808 Kick sound with your mouth positioned to make a sh sound. 2. Keep the 808 Kick part of the sound short and then quickly fade out the sh part. In Context

The 909 Snare can sound good in a roll but because it is quite a long it can be hard to position your mouth for the next sound. And here's the pattern:
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Bm t t eesh Bm t t t t eesh -

Brushed Snare [ thb ]


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/brushed_snare.wmv Description This is a soft snare drum sound - as if a real snare drum was being played with a brush rather than a stick. Method 1. Say 'thub' and then make it unvocalised so it becomes 'thb'. 2. The end of the sound is made by simply closing your mouth. 3. It sounds good between classic kick drums 'B thb B thb' in place of a hi-hat.

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Classic Snare [ p ]
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/classic_snare.mp3

This is one of the most common ways of making a snare drum sound in human beatboxing. Here is an example of a classic snare drum made using one of the variations described below:
Phonetic Description In phonetics, the Classic Snare Drum is described as a bilabial plosive. This means it is made by completely closing both lips and then releasing them accompanied by a burst of air. In the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) as well as in Standard Beatbox Notation (SBN) the symbol p is used.

Method

The simplest way of making a classic snare sound is to say the letter 'p'. However, making a 'p' sound is too quiet. To make it louder you can do several things. The first is to make a lip oscillation. This is where you push the air out of your lips making them vibrate. The second is where you breath out at the same time making a [ ph ] sound.
Variations

To make the 'p' sound more interesting and more snare-like, most beatboxers add a second fricative (continuous) sound to the initial 'p' sound: pf ps psh bk This video demonstrates the classic snare with pf, ps and psh variations:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/classic_snare.wmv [ pf ] method

1. Pull your lips in a bit so that your lips are sort of hidden, as if you had no teeth. 2. Build up a little air pressure behind the hidden lips. 3. Swing your lips out (not literally swing) and just before they return to their normal position (un-hidden), release the air with a "P" sound 4. Immediately after you release the air and get the P sound out, tighten your bottom lip up against your bottom teeth to make a "fff" sound.
In Context

Here is an example of the Classic Snare used in a more complex groove:


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/classic_snare_pattern.mp3

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And here's the pattern (repeated in the MP3): 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 bm t t t t bm ps t t bm

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 t bm t bm ps t t t -

and here is the groove expressed in Standard Beatbox Notation (SBN): [ bm tt tt bm / ps t t bm / t bm t bm / ps t t t ]

Cough Snare [ e ]
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/cough_snare.wmv Description This sound is exactly as its name implies - it's a cough sound! Method 1. The trick with this sound is to keep the cough at the same pitch and as short as possible.

Reverse Snare/Hat [ sp ]
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/reverse_classic_snare.wmv Description

Here's a tip on how to make a reverse snare sound and take in a breath at the same time. One of the common problems beatboxers have is taking a breath and not losing the flow of the beat. Many use a reverse hi-hat, snare or hand clap as part of the rhythm.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_snare_01.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_snare_02.mp3 Method 1. Position your mouth as if you are going to say the letter E, S or L (or somewhere between them). 35

2. Keep your tongue in position and breathe in. The air rushing in will make a sound. 3. Okay, now do it starting off breathing in slowly and speed up to full speed. The sound will get louder. At the loudest point as you are breathing in, simply close your mouth quickly. An alternative to quickly closing your mouth is to start of with the tip of your tongue down low. At the end of the sound quickly flick your tongue upwards as if you were going to say the letter D. In Context

Here is a breakdown where the beatboxer is breathing in on the reverse snare/hat sound as well as the hand clap.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_snare_pattern.mp3

And here's the pattern: 01 02 03 Bm 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 Bm 12 13 14 15 16

Sp Bm -

Kch -

Sp Bm -

Bm Kch Bm

909 Snare Filter Sweep http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/909_snare_filter_sweep.wmv Description Here we go with a lesson in electronics!! A filter is a piece of electronics that blocks frequencies, and a low-pass filter is a filter that blocks high frequencies above a certain frequency (i.e. it lets low frequencies pass). The frequency at which the filter operates is called the cut-off frequency. So in a low-pass filter, all the frequencies above the cut-off frequency are cut off or filtered. Still with me? Okay - so when we do a 909 Snare Drum filter sweep, we are imagining that the 909 snare drum is being put through a low-pass filter and the cut-off frequency is being swept upwards. This means that as time moves on, more and more frequencies are allowed through and the sound goes from being dull to bright. Get it? No?? Oh well, let's just make the sound... Method 1. Start off by making a series of 909 snare sounds - easy. 2. Right, now start off with your mouth as if you are saying 'oooo' whilst you make the 909 snare. 3. Now whilst making the snare sounds, move your mouth so it goes from 'oooo' gadually to 'eeee'. 4. You should find that the 909 snare sounds go from being dull to bright.

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Lesson 4 - Inward snare drums


Inward Hand Clap Snare [ ^cl ] http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums_2/inward_handclap_snare .wmv http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums/inward_handclap_snare.w mv Description

Here's a tip on how to make a classic handclap/snare sound and take in a breath at the same time.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/inward_handclap_01.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/inward_handclap_02.mp3 Method 1. Position 1 Place the tip of your tongue on your gum behind your upper teeth blocking off all air flow as if you were saying the letter n. 2. Position 2 Keep the tip of your tongue in position such that you can breath through the gaps each side of your tongue. As if you were saying the letter L. 3. In Position 1, block the air flow to your nose and breathe in a little such that the pressure builds behind your tongue. Then move to position 2 breathing in as quickly and as sharply as possible. The air should rush in making a good snare sound and you've managed to take a deep breath! In Context

This sound is a very handy sound to master although it can take some time. Once you can do it, you'll be able to make continuous beats and never appear to take a breath.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/inward_handclap_pattern.mp3

And here's the pattern (repeated in the MP3): 01 02 03 04 Bo t t 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 Bo t t t t 13 14 15 16 tss

Kch -

Kch -

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Inward 606 Snare [ ^cl ] Description

This is an inward version of the 606 Snare. Just to make things more complicated, there are two variations on this sound, and either sound can be made on one side of the mouth or both simultaneously! Note: I don't take a breath when making these sounds but use the inward handclap which is an extension of this sound.
Methods Variation 1 1. You can make this variation with your teeth together or apart but it's probably easier to get with your teeth together. 2. Close off your throat (as if breathing through nose). 3. Keep your tongue straight and lying on the bottom of your mouth with the tip of your tongue pressed loosely against your closed front teeth. 4. You make the sound letting sucking air into your mouth (not lungs) either side of your tongue. 5. The air should be allowed to enter between your cheeks and your teeth so you're effectively sucking air through your teeth at the sides. 6. The air ends up beteen the top of your tongue and the roof of your mouth. Variation 2

This sound is made in almost the same way as Variation 1 although it has more power and is therefore louder.
1. Firstly start with your tongue in the same position as Variation 1 but with your teeth slightly apart. 2. Keep your throat open as if breathing through your mouth. 3. Instead of sucking air into the closed space of your mouth (as with Variation 1), you suck air into your mouth and throat.

Note: Use only the suction power of your mouth - do not use your lungs.
In Context Variation 1

Here is the inward 606 snare (variation 1) being used in a simple groove: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_606_snare_(1).mp3 It is possible to make this sound and hum at the same time: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/dum_de_dum.mp3

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Or make it with your mouth closed by starting with your cheeks full of air!! http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_606_snare_closed.mp 3 Variation 2 Here is the inward 606 snare (variation 2) being used in a simple groove: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_606_snare_(2).mp3 And with a more relaxed mouth: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_606_snare.mp3

Inward 808 Rimshot [ ^k ]

This tutorial was created for an article on inward snares:


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums_2/inward_808_rimshot.w mv

This is an older tutorial:


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums/inward_808_rimshot.wmv Description

This is an inward emulation of the classic Roland TR808 rimshot sound. A rimshot is where the stick is laid between the centre of the snare drum and the rim (edge) and tapped on the rim. The sound therefore has a 'click' plus the 'rattle' of the snare wires underneath the drum.
Method 1. This sound is made exactly like the outward 808 rimshot - that is a 'k' sound with your airway closed - except that you do it inwards. 2. You suck air into your throat but not your lungs (i.e. don't breathe in!) 3. If you do this sound with your teeth together and your lips pursed into an 'oo' position, you can create a 'sh' sound. 4. With practice you can make this sound very loud and sharp, but be careful not to put strain on your throat as excessive use can cause injury. 39

In Context

Here is the Inward 808 Rimshot with teeth together to create the 'sh' sound:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_808_rimshot_(1).mp3

And here it is with human reverb:


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_808_rimshot_(reverb).mp 3

Inward 'K' Snare [ ^kh ]


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums_2/inward_k_snare.w mv Description The Outward 'K' Snare is made by making a 'k' sound and breathing out at the same time so it's 'k' + breath sound. The Inward 'k' Snare is made exactly the same way but by making a 'k' sound and breathing in. This sound is made simply by sounding a 'k' and breathing in. A variation is to make a 'sh' sound at the same time - as if you are saying 'ksh' but breathing in.

Inward Classic Snare (Variation 1) [ ^psh ]


This is the Classic 'Electronic' Snare version as used by Hobbit: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/hobbit_inward_snare_tutorial.mp3 Description This is a variation of the inward snare. It is a modified version of the classic inward snare to give it more of a electronic style to it. Method This sound is like sucking in a p sound but with a modified intake of air. 1.To start of with close you lips firmly. 2.Build up pressure with them and start to suck in a p sound. 3.The difference between this and the classic inward snare is that when you suck in you need to position your tongue differently. 4.You need to have your tongue positioned at the top of your mouth and suck the air trough above you tongue so you get a strange noise. 5.You then need to adapt this and add it to the first 2 steps and you should get an electronic style snare. 6.Dont forget to not give up early since this snare takes a lot of practise.

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In Context http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/hobbit_inward_snare.mp3

Inward Classic Snare [ ^ph ]


This tutorial was produced for an article on inward snare drums. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums_2/inward_classic_s nare.wmv This is an older tutorial: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums/inward_classic_sna re.wmv Description

This is a very useful sound as with some of the other snare sounds, you can take a breath at the same time. As it's name suggests it is the opposite to the classic snare.
Method This is like making a 'P' sound inwards rather than outwards. 1. Start with your lips together - as if you were going to say the letter 'p'. 2. Suck in until the pressure builds up. 3. Then take in a sharp breath of air.

Here is a short MP4 audio explanation:


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_classic_snare_(exp).mp 3 In Context

And here is the Inward Classic Snare used in a simple groove:


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_classic_snare.mp3

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Inward Combo Snare [ ^pk ]


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums_2/inward_combo_ snare.wmv Description The Inward Combo Snare is a combination of the Inward Classic Snare and the Inward K Snare. It's the snare used by artists such as Kenny Muhammad and can be made whilst taking a breath at the same time. Firstly - learn how to make an Inward Classic Snare Then learn how to make an Inward K Snare Do both at the same time p + k.

Inward Hollow Snare [ ^ish ]


This is a video explanation of the Hollow Snare (including Cough Snare): http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums_2/inward_hollow_ snare.wmv http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/inward_snare_drums/inward_909_snare _(hollow_snare).wmv Description The Inward Hollow Snare is a variation of the Inward Cough Snare. Sometimes people also use 'hollow snare' to refer to the Inward 808 Rimshot or Inward K Snare but these are totally different sounds. Confused? Don't be. Stick with the TyTe and you'll be fine... The Inward Cough Snare is made exactly the same way as the outward Cough Snare but breathing in rather than out. The Inward Hollow Snare is an Inward Cough Snare with an added 'sh' or aspirated 'w' sound. Method 1. To make the Inward Hollow Snare properly you combine two sounds: (1) a sharp vocalised intake of breath - the sound people make when surprised by something (Inward Cough Snare), and (2) a 'sh' or aspirated 'w' sound made by sucking air in through your teeth or with your mouth pursed in an 'oo' shape. 2. When you make this sound you fill your lungs with air and this means you are in effect taking a breath at the same time.

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Making the aspirated W sound

You are not extending the actual vocal cough itself, but extending the air you suck in afterwards.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/inward_hollow_snare_01.mp3 Making the SH sound

Bend your tongue so the tip is pointing towards the roof of the mouth, the sides of your tongue should be touching both sides of your upper teeth and the tip of your tongue should be leaving a space between it, and the roof of your mouth (roughly so you can fit your finger between them)! Now when your tongue is pointing to the roof of your mouth, when you execute the snare, the air rushing past your tongue combined with the vocal cough, both go together to create a nice " hollow effect". Adjust the length of air you suck in to how long you want the snare to last.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/inward_hollow_snare_02.mp3 Here is short audio explanation: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_hollow_snare_(exp).mp 3 In Context

Here are a few examples of the Inward Hollow Snare in a groove:


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/inward_hollow_snare_pattern.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_hollow_snare_(1).mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/inward_hollow_snare_(3).mp3

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Lesson 5 - Hi-Hats & Cymbals


Closed Hi-hat [ t ]
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/hi-hats_and_cymbals/closed_hi-hat.wmv Description

This is the basic closed hat sound.


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/closed_hat.mp3 Method 1. Make a simple t sound but have your teeth closed or lightly closed. 2. Move the tip of your tongue forward behind your front teeth for a thin hat sound and to the traditional t position for a heavy hat sound. In Context

The closed hat is part of the staple kick, hat and snare used as the basis of most beats. It might be worth practicing doing many closed hat sounds in a row to get your speed and accuracy up.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/closed_hat_pattern.mp3

Open Hi-Hat [ ts ]
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/hi-hats_and_cymbals/open_hi-hat.wmv Description

This is the basic open hi-hat sound and is based on the closed hi-hat sound.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/open_hat.mp3 Method 1. Make a simple t sound but have your teeth lightly closed. 2. Move the tip of your tongue forward behind your front teeth for a thin hat sound and to the traditional t position for a heavy hat sound. 3. Breath out for longer to create the open hat sound. Pronounce tsss for a more realistic open hat sound. In Context

Here the open hat is used at the end of the break.


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/open_hat_pattern.mp3 44

Fast Hi-Hats [ t k ]
Description

Fast repetitive hi-hats such as those used in drum and bass routines are almost impossible using the traditional t technique. At fast tempos many beatboxers such as Kenny Muhammad alternate between two sounds. Here are a couple of short audio examples of fast hi-hats:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/fast_hats_01.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/fast_hats_02.mp3 Video Tutorial

Watch the following video tutorial (available on Learn to Beatbox Vol.1) to learn how to make the fast hi-hat sounds:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/hi-hats_and_cymbals/fast_hihats.wmv Method

1. Start with the traditional hi-hat t sound and follow it up with a K sound as if you were saying the c from cutting. 2. You can alternate between these two sounds very quickly for more complex hihat patterns.

In Context

yasSon is a beatboxer who has perfected the fast hi-hats. Check out this video to show you just how fast you can go!
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/hihats_and_cymbals/yasson_fast_hihats.wmv The fast hi-hat can also be used as a special effect. For example, in this video, yasSon uses the fast hi-hat combined with a f sound to emulate a helicopter. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/hihats_and_cymbals/yasson_helicopter.wmv Here the beatboxer is using fast hi-hats to make a simple beat more complex. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/fast_hats_pattern.mp3

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Reverse Open Hi-hat [ ^shd ] or [ ^shb ]


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/hi-hats_and_cymbals/reverse_open_hihat.wmv Description

Here's a tip on how to make a reverse closed hat sound and take in a breath at the same time.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_open_hat_01.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_open_hat_02.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_open_hat_03.mp3 Method 1. Position your mouth as if you are going to say the letter E, S or L (or somewhere between them). 2. Keep your tongue in position and breathe in. The air rushing in will make a sound. 3. Okay, now do it starting off breathing in slowly and speed up to full speed. The sound will get louder. At the loudest point as you are breathing in, simply close your mouth quickly. An alternative to quickly closing your mouth is to start of with the tip of your tongue down low. At the end of the sound quickly flick your tongue upwards as if you were going to say the letter D.

In Context Here the reverse hi-hat is used in a breakdown - useful for catching your breath!
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_open_hat_pattern.mp3

Brushed Cymbal [ th ]
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/hihats_and_cymbals/brushed_cymbal.wmv Description This is a quiet cymbal sound favoured by some vocal percussionists. Method 1. Start with your teeth slightly apart. 2. Now what you're aiming for is a sound between a 't' and a 's'. It should sound like neither!

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3. Now add a 't' sound to the beginning and you should now have a brushed cymbal sound.

Splash Cymbal [ ^psh ] or [ ^pfh ]


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/hihats_and_cymbals/splash_cymbal.wmv Description A-Plus taught me this sound, as we sat chatting over a pint after a gig in a cellar in Bristol. It's quite handy as you can make a cymbal sound and take in a breath at the same time. Method 1. First, try sucking in or breathing in air through your teeth to make an inward 'sh' sound. 2. Now make the same sound but make a kissing motion with your lips - as if you're kissing someone (perhaps this sound ought to be called smooch cymbal?)

LESSON 6 - PERCUSSION
Egg Shaker [ ch sh ] This video covers both the egg shaker and the sharp shaker: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/shakers/egg_shaker_and_sharp_shaker. wmv Description The egg shaker is a common shaker that is in the shape of an egg. It is usually plastic and filled with beads and fits snugly in the palm of the hand to give a mellow sounding rhythm section. Method The egg shaker is comprised of two sounds made one after the other. The first emulates the push of the shaker and the other, the pull of the shaker (i.e. moving the shaker forwards and backwards). 1. To make the push sound, all you need to do is make a gentle unvocalised 'ch' sound. 2. To make the pull sound is simply a 'sh' sound that starts of quietly and then gets louder, then quiet again - shSHsh. 3. Put the two together and you get ch-shSHsh.

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Sharp Shaker [ s k ]
This video covers both the egg shaker and the sharp shaker: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/shakers/egg_shaker_and_sharp_shaker. wmv Description This sound was used by artists such as Killa Kela and is useful in drum and bass routines. Method 1. To make this sound first say 'suka' (yes, like sucker). 2. Then try and unvocalise it so it becomes 'sk' (it should still sound like two sounds 's' and 'k'). 3. Finally try replasing the 's' with 'sh'

Note: This sound is like the fast hi-hats. Cowbell (block click)
Description This is the sound that kids make when they're pretending to be a clopping horse! Ok - so it's not used a huge amount in beatboxing, but it's handy because when you're learning to do click rolls because it's easy to put one of these at the end. This tutorial shows you how to make the sound: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/clicks/block_click.wmv Here, Hobbit has mastered the clop click and puts it to good effect: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/clicks/hobbit_clop_click.wmv Method

1. Start with your tongue loosely against the roof of your mouth. 2. Suck slightly and let the tongue flick/flop to the bottom of your mouth. 3. The sound is actually two sounds, one quiet one when your tongue is sucked gently from the roof of your mouth and a second louder sound when the tongue hits the bottom of your mouth.

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Clave Click
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/clicks/clave_click.wmv Description This is perhaps the simplest way of making a click sound although it's not the strongest or most realistic of the click sounds. Method 1. Position your tongue on the roof of your mouth and close your airway (so you can only breathe through your nose). 2. Try and breathe in slightly to increase the pressure above and behind your tongue. 3. Release your tongue and the release of suction makes a click sound.

LESSON 7 - ROLLS
Kick Rolls (Combo, Classic and Uvular)
This video describes three, yes three, different methods of rolling a kick drum! http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/kick_drums/kick_rolls.wmv Description A kick roll is a very fast repetition of kick drums usually achieved by a real drummer by using two kick drum pedals. Of course on a drum machine or sequencer, you just tell it to do a heap of kick sounds in a row. So how do you do it with the mouth? Well, there are three methods as shown in the video... Methods Method 1 - Combo Kick Roll

This is a lip oscillation + rolling 'r' Here is a short MP4 audio example:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/kick_roll_method_1.mp3

Method 2 - Classic Roll This is a classic kick (b) + repeated classic reverse kick (wB) Method 3 - Uvular Kick Roll This is a lip oscillation + uvular oscillation.

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808 Snare Drum Roll


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/snare_drums/808_snare_roll.wmv Description

This snare roll can be used in isolation or combined with a hi-hat to make more of a hybrid sound.
Method 1. Position your mouth as if you are pronouncing the letter t and roll your tongue as if you were going to make a drdrdrd sound. 2. Rolling the tongue can be quite tricky at first. You let out a constant air flow and let the tip of your tongue flap or vibrate.

In Context

This snare roll is quite flexible and can be used as a roll or as a sound in its own right.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/snareroll01b.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/snareroll01c.mp3

Inward Click Roll


Description This is the classic method pioneered by Doug E. Fresh. Listen to this audio example: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/inward_click_roll.mp3 This video tutorial will teach you how to make the sound: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/clicks/click_roll.wmv Method 1. To make a click, position the tip of your tongue at the top of your mouth and close off the airway. 2. Suck in to increase pressure and quickly draw your tongue back. You should hear a nice click. 3. Now, a click roll uses the same sound production method but use the side of your tongue rather than the tip. 4. Suck in air slowly into your mouth but keep the back of your throat closed - do not breathe in. Doing this, you should be able to make multiple clicks. Note: It will take practice to get the clicks to sound continuous and in time. 50

Inward Click Roll in a Beat Pattern


Here's a click roll used in a classic groove: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/inward_click_roll_pattern.mp3 This video will show you how it's done: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/clicks/click_roll_in_a_beat.wmv

It's one thing mastering the dreaded click roll, but it's another thing putting it into a beat. Don't blame me - blame Doug E. Fresh! 1. At first try following a classic kick or snare drum with a click roll. 2. Then try following the click roll with a single clave click. In this video, yasSon has mastered the click roll and uses a mixture of shortened click rolls and single click sounds in the beat pattern along with longer click rolls:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/clicks/yasson_clicks.wmv

Inward Backspin Roll


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/rolls/zani_inward_roll.wmv Description This roll is made like the inward click roll but you inhale air at the same time. FaithSFX and yasSon both vocalise inwards at the same time to create an interesting roll sound. Method 1. Line the side of you tongue with the roof of your mouth. 2. Suck in air and inhale at the same time. 3. The sound is made by the side of the tongue vibrating against the roof of your mouth.

Outward Click Roll


Description

If you find the inward click roll difficult, then you may be able to make the outward click roll. Now, TyTe is convinced that this sound can only be made by people with a certain mouth physiology as he still can't do it after months of attempting, yet some can people do it straight away! Check out this video tutorial from Bevis and Oni:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/clicks/outward_click_roll.wmv

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Method

Step 1. Put the tip of your tongue on the roof of your mouth that it just above your two front teeth (this is technically called the alveolar ridge). Step 2. You want to put the sides of your tongue on the roof of your mouth as well. Don't put your whole tongue flat against the roof of your mouth though. You need air in between the two in order to make the sound. Just make sure the edges of your tongue are all touching the roof of your mouth and there is a pocket of air in the middle. Once You've done that, apply some pressure with you tongue to make sure no air can escape. Step 3. To make the sound you want to push the air out through the tip of your tongue (You know, the part that's touching the ridge). Apply a bit more pressure with your tongue and quickly release the tip of you tongue from the roof of your mouth. Not all the way, just a little; then quickly close it. If you remove your tongue to far or remove it for too long, all the air will woosh out and it will make the sound of a silent fart. If you do it correctly and put your tongue back quickly, you will get a click sound, and you will still have air left to make more clicks.

Kick Roll [ b d ]
Video

In this video Evret shows us how to make this simple but effective Kick Roll by alternating classic (b) and dry (d) kick drums: http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/kick_drums/kick_roll_bd.wmv
Description A kick roll is a very fast repetition of kick drums usually achieved by a real drummer by using two kick drum pedals. Of course on a drum machine or sequencer, you just tell it to do a heap of kick sounds in a row. So how do you do it with the mouth? Well, here is a method as shown in the video... Method Practice doing the dry kick (d) with your lips together so that the sound is forced through your lips. This creates an oscillation. You'll find that it will start to sound like the classic kick (b). You then need to alternate between the classic kick and the dry kick (bdbdbd). The easiest way (but not the only way) to put it into a beat is to follow the drumroll (bd) with a single classic kick.

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Helicopter Click Roll


Description Yo whattup this is -----DASH----- a.k.a. DaDASHDevil from the Netherlands. This is the tutorial on how to do the Helicopter Click Roll, especially for SmVy but also for all the others on HUMANBEATBOX.COM who want to know!

http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/clicks/helicopter_click_roll.wmv
Method

Step 1.A basic click roll doesnt use any lungs and it can be done with your mouth open. When I do it, I dont use my lungs at all. The muscles of my throat pull the air in. To do the Helicopter Click Roll you have to use your lungs (i.e. breathe in). I make the clicks using the tip of my tongue whereas other people make the clicks using the side of the tongue. Note: Many people who make the clicks using the side of their tongue cant make the click roll sound using their lungs! Step 2. Making the inward click roll sound as in Step 1, you then close your lips together leaving a small gap. As you suck air in, the lips give that 'pa pa pa pa' sound. Expedion calls it The Sega Sound and this is the same technique except his lips are in a different position.

LESSON 8 - VOCAL SCRATCH


Vocal Scratching http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/scratching/vocal_scratch.wmv
Description Vocal scratching is perhaps one of the most effective and usable of the different methods of scratching available to the beatboxer. Rahzel, Kela, Scratch all use vocal scratching to great effect and although each beatboxer brings their own variations to the technique, the basics are the same. Method 1. To get really good at vocal scratching you need to master ventriloquism. This is the art of talking without moving your lips by using your throat and tongue. This will give the scratched vocal the right sort of raspy/squeezed sound. 2. The second thing you need to do is do the ventriloquised voice falsetto (that's the high-pitched Mickey Mouse type register). 3. Okay - now, the trick to vocal scratching is to say the unscratched part of your word in your normal voice and the scratched parts in the ventrofalsetto voice! 53

4. Still reading? Man, you're keen. Ok - the patterns - 'owi' and 'igada'. Try them! 5. So scratching the word 'One' becomes 'One owi One i One i One igada One'. 6. To improve the scratch sound, try adding a 'z' or 's' sound to the scratch (yes, at the same time). 7. To make a slowed down record sound simply talk in a low voice with your tongue pointing straight up!

Electro Scratching
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/scratching/electro_scratch.wmv Description

This is an unvocalised scratch sound that can be slipped between fast electro style beats.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/electro_scratch_01.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/electro_scratch_02.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/electro_scratch_03.mp3 Method 1. The simplest way to describe this is to say chowi. 2. To make it more scratch-like fade in the ch part so it sounds more like schowi or tschowi. 3. The more advanced version will be a triplet saying tschowichi tscho - wi - chi.

In Context

Here the beatboxer is using the electro scratch as part of an 808 and full beatbox pattern.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/electro_scratch_pattern_01.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/electro_scratch_pattern_02.mp3

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Whistle Scratching
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/scratching/whistle_scratch.wmv Description Some beatboxers have really mastered this technique that enables you to scratch and beatbox at the same time. Method 1. To make this sound your top lip should overhang your bottom lip. Dukebox describes it as having 'granny lip' - imagine you have no teef! 2. With your tongue placed in the gap between your lips (without touching) you should be able to breathe out channeling air under your tongue to make a whistly airy noise. 3. You can change the shape of the whistle by moving your lower lip to expose your front lower teeth and gum.

Throat Scratching
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/scratching/zani_throat_scratch.wmv Description Throat scratching is the method used by beatboxers such as Zani and yasSon. It's a useful addition to the other scratch techniques and is one of the simplest to use. It can be performed inwards or outwards! Method The sound you need to make is from the throat - a bit like the beginning or end of a yawn. You want the non-vocalised croaky sound. Once you've mastered this sound, you then need to do it high-pitched or falsetto and practice patterns such as "wa-a" and "wa-o-a-wa-a".

Transformation Scratching in a beat. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/scratching/crab_scratch_in_a_beat.wmv Description This is being able to make a beat pattern and make a crab scratching sound at the same time. Method First you need to master the Crab Scratch. You also need to be able to make a beat pattern whilst breathing inwards! You combine the two methods to do the crab scratch in a beat.

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Transformation Scratching (Abra Scratch)


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/scratching/crab_scratch_02.wmv Description Crab Scratching (which is probably incorrectly named as it sounds more like transforming), as pioneered by beatboxer Abra, is one of the most realistic sounding and effective scratches there is for a beatboxer to do. Method 1. Place the tip of your finger (You can use any finger) just against your mouth. 2. It's important to leave the gap in your mouth small (As a Pea) so you can get that whistly sound you want. If you leave the gap bigger you will get a deeper scratch which is still a good sounding scratch but not the one you want. 3. Now what you have to do is breathe inwards and you should get that scratching sound. 4. Ok now this is the most important part of crab Scratching, changing the tones. To change the tones it is like saying "Tooka" but you do it inwards and unvocalised and this should get your Crab Scratch sounding great.

LESSON 9 - BASS SOUNDS


Classic Bass
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/bass/classic_bass.wmv Description This is the easiest bass sound to make! Method 1. Make a classic unvocalised kick drum sound 2. Hum through your nose at the same time!

Robot Bass (Cough Bass or Nasal Growl)


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/bass/nasal_growl_bass.wmv http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/bass/zani_cough_bass.wmv Description This is the sound pioneered early on in beatboxing and used to great effect by the likes of Rahzel.

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Method 1. Start to cough and you should find a point where it begins to create a continuous oscillation. 2. With practice you should be able to create a continuous sound. At first this can feel very uncomfortable but it gets easier with time. You can then speak at the same time to create the classic Robot Voice. BEWARE: This sound can hurt and excessive use may be harmful.

Inward Snore Bass


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/bass/snore_bass.wmv Description This highly complex sound is erm...well...snoring. Used to great effect by beatboxers like Kela and A-Plus as part of their fast routines. Method 1. Breathe in through your nose and mouth and get that uvular banging against your tongue baby!

Throat Bass
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/bass/throat_bass.wmv Description This is a very low throat oscillation - or a kind of cartoon "I'm gonna get you" baddy voice. It's softer than the Robot Bass and easier on the throat. Method 1. To make this sound I tense my tongue - in the position that you burp in (do a burp then hold the position). 2. In this position, do a low unvocalised cough and you should be able to sustain the oscillation so it sounds a low note. BEWARE: Attempting to make these sounds could damage your throat - if it hursts don't do it!

Nose Bass
Description I quite like this sound as it's a sort of modern synth bass sound. Method 1. This sound is made from combining two sounds. The first is a low hum though the nose. 2. The second sound is to say 'wish' at the same time but unvocalised - like 'wsh'. 57

Example http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/nose_bass.mp3

LESSON 10 - INSTRUMENTS
Pizzicato Strings { thmb }
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/instruments/pizzicato_strings.wmv Description The pizzicato string sound emulates the sound of a cello string being plucked rather than bowed. Method 1. Firstly say the word "thumb" 2. Then take out the 'u' in the middle so it becomes "thmb" 3. Sing each { thmb } sound with a given pitch or note.

Trumpet { brm }
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/instruments/trumpet.wmv Description The trumpet sound is, erm, well, a trumpet. There are several different ways of making trumpet sounds - this is perhaps the easiest method. Method 1. 2. 3. 4. Hum falsetto (that's high pitched - like Mickey Mouse). Lift the back of your tongue to make the sound thinner and sharper. Add a loose, lip oscillation (classic kick drum) to the front of each note. Close your eyes, let rip and pretend you are Louis Armstrong.

Muted Guitar
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/instruments/stratocaster_guitar.wmv Description A muted guitar is a guitar that's being played with the hand gently resting on the strings such that the notes are dull and short.

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Method 1. 2. 3. 4. Say the word 'tung'. Now say it falsetto (yes, that high-pitched Mickey Mouse voice). Now try and make all the sound come out of your nose 'tng' or 'dng'. Finally, keep it short and sharp!

LESSON 11 - OSCILLATIONS
Uvular Oscillation
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/special_effects/uvular_oscillation.wmv Description You know that dangly bit at the back of your throat? Well, that's your uvular. Everyone who snores can oscillate this! Method

To make the uvular oscillation you must snore outwards!! You make a channel with the back of your tongue to direct the air over the uvular and the uvular flaps (oscillates) creating a fast 'kkkkkkkk' sound. When this is combined with other sounds you can do everything from kick rolls to timestretched vocals to phones to helicopters to daleks! Here is a short MP4 audio explanation:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/uvular_oscillation_example.mp3 In Context

Okay, so I couldn't not show you some of this stuff could I? Wouldn't be fair...
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/timestretch.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/helicopter.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/phone.mp3 http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/dalek.mp3

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Lip Oscillation.

Why does doing a lip oscillation make a classic kick or snare drum sound louder and punchier?
When you say the letter b, you are simply making one sound as shown by this waveform:

When you do an oscillation (i.e. a vibration), you make more than one sound and two sounds are louder than one - this is why it sounds louder. Look at this waveform - see the distinct bumps?:

Also, the human ear interprets oscillations as having a pitch or a tone. Because your lips are vibrating at a low frequency or speed, your ear hears this oscillation as a bass note.
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This means by varying the speed of the oscillation, you can actually give your kick drums a bass note without needing to hum! This spectrogram of a lip oscillation shows a fundamental frequency of 57Hz (that's the big first spike).

Listen to this lip oscillation that is sounding at 57Hz (that's 57 cycles per second) - way lower than a human can hum. The computer tone takes over to highlight the bass note.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/b/lip_osc_57hz_tone.mp3 Here's an example of a b kick drum with a pitched oscillation. The oscillation starts off long to help you hear the note, then it gets shorter and shorter until you have just the [ b ] kick drum. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/b/b_kick_lip_osc.mp3

LESSON 12 - SOUND EFFECTS (SFX)


Beat Delay
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/special_effects/beat_delay.wmv Description A beat delay is where you add an echo effect to beatboxed drum sounds. Method 1. 2. 3. 4. Choose the sounds you wish to delay. Keep the interval or gap between each sound the same. Keep the level or loudness of each echo the same. You might wish to make the very first sound slightly louder.

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In Context: Here is a pattern you could try that uses the classic kick and handclap: {

b b b b / ^cl ^cl ^cl b / b b b b / ^cl ^cl ^cl ^cl }

Vocal Echo
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/special_effects/vocal_echo.wmv Description Vocal echo is where you echo words to make it sound as if you are speaking through a delay unit. Once you perfect this technique it can mess with people's heads! Method In this method we will show you how to delay the word 'microphone'. 1. Firstly, break the word down into syllables (chunks). For example, microphone becomes { mi cro phone }. 2. Now, you need to say each syllable slightly louder than you would normally say it and keep them short - { MI CRO PHONE }. 3. Next, you need to generate the echoes. The echoes are ventriloquised. This means you say them without moving your lips. Also, you only need to say the very end of each syllable. o MI becomes NGI o CRO becomes RO (pronounced ROW) o PHONE becomes ONE (pronounced OWN) 4. So the pattern becomes: o { MI NGI NGI } o { CRO ROW } o { PHONE OWN OWN } {MI NGI NGI CRO ROW PHONE OWN OWN } 5. Now, each syllable, e.g. MI and its echoes needs to be exactly the same pitch and each echo gets slightly quieter by the same amount. The final pattern becomes : { NGI

MI NGI

CRO ROW PHONE OWN OWN }

Here are some other words and sentences you might wish to try:

TWO OO OO OO } BASS : { BASS ACE ACE } I LIKE TO BEATBOX : { I I I LIKE EYEG TO OO BEAT EED EED BOX OC OC OC}
TWO : {

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Vocal Reverb
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/special_effects/vocal_reverb.wmv Description This isn't really vocal reverb but reverb on individual beatbox sounds. Method 1. Choose your beatbox sound you wish to add reverb to - percussive or plosive sounds such as { b } or { k } work well. 2. Choose the sound you wish to use as your reverb - this will traditionally be a fricative or continuous sound such as { f } , { sh } or { h }. Try and see which sounds best for your sound. 3. Create your sound, then leave a small gap between it and the reverb sound. This gap is called pre-delay and with real reverb, it is the time it takes for the sound to bounce off the nearest wall. So { k } would become { k h } 4. The reverb needs to get quieter over the period of the sound. So { k } becomes {

hhh }

Vocal Tap
WARNING: Misuse of this technique can be potentially harmful. http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/special_effects/vocal_tap.wmv Description

A method pioneered by Biz Markie is called a vocal tap.


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/vocal_tap.mp3 Method 1. You hum and tap your throat just above your adams apple at the same time. The hum can be vocalised normally or done falsetto (high). 2. Open and close your mouth while you do the vocal tap to change the harmonics (tone) of the sound. In Context

Here's a vocal tap used in a groove:


First I do a falsetto hum + beat, then I do a breakdown to just the hum + tap, and finally I finish with a beat + hum + tap together with the tap being in time with the beat. 63

http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/vocal_tap_pattern.mp3

Reverse Reverb
Description

By manipulating a simple breath sound you can create an effective reverse reverb.
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_reverb.mp3 Method 1. You are simply going to take a breath but with the back of your tongue narrowing the gap such that the air makes a noise. 2. Make the breath audible and start of quietly and get louder. In Context

Use this sound just before a snare and it sounds superb.


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/reverse_reverb_pattern.mp3

Finger Waggle
Description

This sound is very simple but can sound great on recordings. I don't want to get into a great debate about whether it is true beatbox as, yes, you guessed it, it uses a finger! Here it is used in the scratch at the end of the audio clip:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/sfx_right_now.mp3 Method 1. To make this sound you simply waggle your finger quickly between your lips whilst making a sound - e.g. vocal scratching, talking, etc. 2. To make it sound effective, alter the pitch of whatever sound you're making whilst doing the waggle. Also, try altering the pitch in time with the movements of your finger. In Context

Here's an MP4 audio clip of a finger waggle used in a SFX routine where it's been used to simulate tape spooling, as well as vocal and electro scratching:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/audio/tutorials/frommp4/digital_effects_1.mp3

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LESSON 13 - TECHNIQUES
Basic Principles
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/basic_principles.wmv

1. Learn how to make the classic kick drum {b}, hi-hat {t} and classic snare drum {psh}. 2. Combine the three sounds into an 8-beat such as this: { b t psh t / b t psh t } or {b t psh t / b b psh t } 3. Concentrate on getting the timing right. If you make a mistake, keep going, do not stop or pause. 4. Start off slowly and build up speed once you can do the 8-beat without losing timing.

http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/zani_three_sounds.wmv Description

A basic beatboxing pattern is made up of three sounds, the kick drum, snare drum and hi-hat. These video tutorials show you how it's done.

Creating an Auditory Illusion


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/creating_auditory_illusion.wmv Description

An auditory illusion is where we trick the brain into thinking something is happening when it is not. What your brain hears is not always what your ear hears! The posh term for this is called psychoacoustics. Rahzel uses an auditory illusion when he sings and beatboxes at the same time. It just sounds like he is singing and beatboxing at the same time. For example, what he is really doing is "Biff Your MPfother BbonPfly Know". So how does it work? Beatboxers trick the brain into thinking that two sounds are taking place at the same time when they are not. They start with the continuous sound, the one they wish your brain to hear when it is not there - for example, a hi-hat or singing part. Auditory Illusions have been around for a very long time. For example, J. S. Bach used auditory illusions in his organ works to make you think more than one part was going on at the same time - for example, the bass part and the lead part, when in reality only one sound was being played at a time.

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Method 1. Always start with the continuous part. For example, { t t t t / t t t t / t t t t / t t t t } 2. Then bring in the snare drum. For example, { t t t t / k t t t / t t t t / k t t t } 3. Then bring in the kick drum. For example. { b t t t / k t t b / t t b t / k t t t }

What the listener should hear is both { t t t t / t t t t / t t t t / t t t t } and { b _ _ _ / k _ _ b / _ _ b _ / k _ _ _ } at the same time. Note: Many beatboxers who sing and beatbox at the same time make the mistake of starting with both parts. If you wish the illusion to work, you must start with the singing.

Backing an MC
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/backing_an_mc.wmv Description Often, as beatboxers we need to create beats for MCs. Now, of course it depends on style of rapping, for example, whether it is grime, garage, drum and bass or hip-hop. However some things are alway going to be essential to help the MC and deliver a good performance. Method 1. Choose a beat you can keep going for a long time. Do not be tempted to go for a complex beat. This is not time for you to show off you skills, this is time for you to enable another artist to show their wares. For example, try a simple beat such as { b _ _ b / k _ b _ / _ _ b _ / k _ _ k } or a rolling beat such as { b t b t / ^cl t t b / t b b t / ^cl t t b } 2. Timing is everything - you have to be rock solid. Do not slow down or speed up. 3. Keep eye contact with the MC and listen so you can add pauses at the end of phrases, know when to stop, add scratches or other effects.

Holding the Microphone


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/holding_the_microphone.wm v Description Microphone technique is very important and there are different ways of holding the microphone. Many beatboxers deliver poor performances because they hold the microphone incorrectly and thus they fail to maximise the power and clarity of the sounds they produce.

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Method For the method please read the short magazine article on Holding the Microphone which can be found here.

Making your act unique!


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/making_your_act_unique.w mv Description To make your act unique you need to find your own style! If you notice all of the top beatboxers all have their own style, techniques and sound effects to make them stand out from the rest!

MCing in a Beat
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/mcing_in_a_beat.wmv Description

There are many techniques that enable you to sing and beatbox at the same time. The simplest method is to sing or MC between the drum sounds in a beat pattern. For example, { b A ONE TWO / kch A ONE TWO / _ b b _ / kch b _ _ }. Another method is to use beatbox sounds that are similar to the letters of the words that you are singing. For example, {b EAT b OX / kch b t t }

Here, Selector is singing a tune and beatboxing at the same time. I like this example because he's got a good voice and executes the pattern well:
http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/selector_singing_beatboxing. wmv

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Beatboxing and Bass Guitar


http://www.humanbeatbox.com/videos/tutorials/techniques/beatmuppet_bass.wmv Description Many beatboxers such as Yuri Lane and yasSon are experimenting with playing instruments and beatboxing at the same time. The double bass player in the band Nizlopi beatboxes and plays simultaneously. Here, BeatMuppet demonstrates and shows you how to combine beatboxing and bass guitar at the same time.

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Gracias a www.humanbeatbox.com por los contenidos, a todos los beatboxers por editar los post. Informacin recopilada y actualizada a 11-12-2007 por Antonio Miguel Alczar para www.hhdirecto.net y www.vagos.es

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