You are on page 1of 48

Supplement to Inside Supply Management

1 20

20

12

Su

IN ly pp

ma ly pp u ns i er re ca ur yo

em

nd a
g na e

n me

stay

competitive

Surf @ San Diego


Online Masters degree in Supply Chain Management

Two years that will change your life


Virtually Anywhere The online program allows you to study and learn wherever you are and enjoy the added benefit of coming to San Diego three times a year to interact with your co-learners and faculty. High Impact Apply your learning immediately to drive efficiency and build profitability for your company. Be at the leading edge of world class knowledge and practice.

Surf to www.sandiego.edu/msscm for more information about the ISM Approved Master of Science in Supply Chain Management

Table of Contents

Supply

your career in supply management

IN Demand

8 2

Pu b lI Sh I n g S tA ff
Paul novak, CPSM, C.P.M., A.P.P., MCIPS Chief Executive Officer speaking@ism.ws Deborah Webber, CPSM, C.P.M., CAE Senior Vice President dwebber@ism.ws

ADvErtISIng
Cindy urbaytis, MA Vice President curbaytis@ism.ws Kathy braase Senior Sales Associate kbraase@ism.ws trish true Senior Sales Associate ttrue@ism.ws

12
2 Embrace the Ahead Opportunities
Regardless of where you begin your supply management career, use all of your native intelligence and knowledge gained in school to continually learn and develop on the job.
BY PHILLIP L. CARTER, DBA

EDItOrIAl

4
12 ISMs 2011 Salary Survey
Supply management professionals are seeing a major increase in their average salaries compared with 2009.
BY JOHN YUVA

terri tracey, CAE Vice President/Editor-in-Chief ttracey@ism.ws John Yuva Editor jyuva@ism.ws lisa Arnseth Senior Writer larnseth@ism.ws Mary Siegfried Senior Writer msiegfried@ism.ws lisa Wolters-broder Copy Editor lwoltersbroder@ism.ws

PrODuCtIOn & DESIgn


frances hernandez Production Coordinator/Print Buyer fhernandez@ism.ws James Cain Graphic Designer jcain@ism.ws
Published by Institute for Supply Management, Inc., P.O. Box 22160, Tempe, AZ 85285-2160. Telephone: 480/752-6276. Copyright 2011 by Institute for Supply Management. All rights reser ved. www.ism.ws. Canadian Institute for Supply Management, The Exchange Tower, 130 King St. W., Suite 1800, Toronto, ON M5X IE3. The authors of the articles published in Inside Supply Management and this supplement are solely responsible for their accuracy and content. Opinions expressed in the articles and materials published herein do not reflect the opinions of ISM unless it is expressly stated that such opinions have been formally adopted by ISM. The publication of an advertisement by Publisher is not an endorsement of the advertiser nor the products or services advertised. Publisher assumes no responsibility for claims or statements made in an advertisement.

4 8

A Quick Study in Supply


ISM surveys working professionals about supply management as a career choice.
BY LISA WOLTERS-BRODER

19 Directory of Supply Management Schools 41 Profiles of Supply Management Schools

Decision Point
Start your career path off on the right foot by carefully choosing your first job.
BY AMANDA DECOOK

Institute for Supply Management


2055 E. Centennial Circle Tempe, AZ 85284 Phone: 800/888-6276 (U.S. or Canada) or +1 480/752-6276 (all others) Fax: 480/752-7890 Online: www.ism.ws
Member of the International Federation of Purchasing and Supply Management (IFPSM).

www.ism.ws

Supplement to Inside Supply Management

Opportunities Ahead
By Phillip L. Carter, DBA

EMbrACE ThE

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Regardless of where you begin your supply management career, use all of your native intelligence and knowledge gained in school to continually learn and develop on the job.

elcome to the global marketplace! Whether youre considering studying supply management as your career, or are currently working in the field and continuing your education, you have chosen well. Few careers like supply management involve going around the globe and back again all while sitting in your office. Of its many advantages, the profession exposes you to new cultural experiences while providing a critical view of the supply chains inner workings. A career in supply management puts you into the middle of many important business changes occurring around the globe today. One cannot read a newspaper that doesnt include a story about world events with supply chain implications. Whether its the earthquake and tsunami in Japan, political unrest in the Middle East, devaluation of the U.S. dollar or the challenges of providing affordable healthcare for an aging U.S. population, all of these headlines impact supply chains. The opportunities in supply management are plentiful and rewarding. Despite the current high unemployment rate in the United States, there is a looming shortage of supply management professionals as baby boomers retire and businesses expand globally. Companies need well-educated, highly motivated talent in their organizations. And they are working hard to attract you by designing new hiring procedures, implementing new orientation and rotation programs, and creating opportunities that will challenge you from day one. experience in several parts of the company. Following this rotation (of up to two years), you will have several choices of where to start a longer-term assignment.

Captain of Your Ship


And when it comes to career progression, you will be responsible for managing your own career goals. Longterm employment with a single company, while not unusual or unique, is becoming less common. Mergers, acquisitions, global competition, technology changes and fickle consumers all conspire to create and require large-scale changes in businesses and business models. You must always be ready for the next assignment, the next job, the next employer or even the next country where you may work. Think and plan ahead, as your current work situation may not last forever. Keep in mind that opportunities for promotion may not always come from within the organization where youre now working. Whether you work in a small or large enterprise, always be prepared to take on new assignments and embrace new challenges. Todays supply management professional requires a mind-set that extends beyond the traditional boundaries of supply management. Its a more holistic view of how you contribute to the success of the company, not just to the supply management function. For you to succeed, your company must succeed. As you embark on your journey in supply management, always consider the many opportunities that come your way in an organization. With multiple perspectives of business operations, its just another level of value you bring to the organization and your career. There is a vast sea of opportunities go claim your place in the supply management profession. ISM
Phillip L. Carter, DBA, is executive director for CAPS Research, and the Harold E. Fearon Chair of Purchasing Management at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona. For more information, send an e-mail to author@ism.ws.

teamwork, Collaboration, Critical Skills


Today, multinational companies are hiring for jobs within countries where goods and services are both sourced and sold. No matter where youre based, youll be working and collaborating with colleagues and partners from around the world. Collaboration is a critical skill to develop as you work with colleagues on projects for their benefit, yours and the companys. As you consider or complete your supply management studies, the knowledge gleaned from an academic program prepares you well for a position in supply management. You will be able to hit the deck running, whether it is participating on an established team solving supply chain issues or contributing immediately to the requirements of the day. Many companies have developed an effective onboarding process to get you oriented into your new environment smoothly and quickly. Larger companies may offer you a formal rotation program that provides a wide and in-depth

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

ISM surveys working professionals about supply management as a career choice.

A Quick Study in
W
hen youre a business-minded student, trying to choose from the many career options that will soon be available to you with your degree can be daunting. Even if youve already selected supply management as your likely future path, you probably still have questions. With that in mind, for this years edition of Supply IN Demand, ISM asked, and got answers for you. We surveyed our membership to find out what working supply management professionals think of the profession. We hope youll learn a thing or two. And dont worry: Unlike your textbooks, theres no quiz at the end. Our survey respondent field was made up of those who classified themselves as: purchasing/supply management/sourcing directors (29.6 percent); managers (59.3 percent); experienced supply management professionals (7.4 percent); and those who classified themselves as other (3.7 percent). If youre still undecided about supply management as a career choice, consider the 96.2 percent of respondents who recommend it as a profession to young people entering the job market. The remaining questions and answers in ISMs survey of supply management professionals are just as telling.

Supply
By Lisa Wolters-Broder

Questions, Answered

Q: A:

Are you satisfied with your career?

85.2% yes 14.8% no Comments included: The role is integrated with many other related fields, such as sales, finance and commodities, and incorporates a high level of communication within all levels internal and external to organizations. And, Very happy with the range of businesses I have been able to transfer my skills to, all within supply management great big picture view. Another noted, I would have benefited from working with a mentor early on in my career path.

Q: A:

Is the profession what you thought it would be when you first got into it?

38.5% yes 61.5% no The higher percentage responding no is not necessarily a negative reflection of the profession; instead, it reflects the alwayschanging and -evolving nature of the field. As respondents noted: It is far more diverse in required skills than originally anticipated, and somewhat philosophically The complexities of almost any function

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

are underappreciated until experienced firsthand. Others noted, It is much more complex as we go forward into the future, and, This profession is full of surprises, challenges and opportunities to learn and grow.

recommended getting experience in sales or finance/accounting, or doing a thorough job rotation for breadth, and simultaneously adding depth in a few selected areas of supply for maximum marketing power in your career. Would you advise young professionals to seek out a mentor in supply management while still in college?

to enter them successfully are poised to do very well.

Q: A:

Would you advise gaining realworld experience prior to pursuing a graduate degree? 81.5% yes 18.5% no One particularly enthusiastic respondent wrote, YES YES YES!!! The MBA is so much more valuable to me having been able to bring my business experience to the classroom. Others commented: Graduate degrees rely heavily on experience, and, Its how I did it, but it was very hard as a working adult. I would advise a young professional its based on his/her circumstances considering finances, family situation, etc.

Q: A:

Do you see supply managements value continuing to grow in organizations? 88.9% yes 11.1% no While one respondent said things remain about the same, others noted: Absolutely. As cost control and offshoring become more prevalent, we see our value to other business units growth and we are asked to help make informed decisions. And, Absolutely.

Q:

A:

85.2% yes 14.8% no This was summed up most succinctly with, Having a good mentor can never hurt! And, Most definitely also pursue internships in their senior year, and, Mentoring is a valuable element to the learning process, and, in more detail, Very critical to do so find someone who has wisdom but also knows how to

Sold on Supply Management Yet?

You have the opportunity to interact with very high-powered decision-makers. Who wouldnt want that in a career?

We are always being asked to do more new product programs to hit market windows, access sources in new markets like Africa and Latin America, etc.

teach a young person. The way I went about my work at age 25 almost makes me cringe today at 50. Could have used a mentors guidance back then.

Q: A:

Would you recommend getting experience in other business units before/after joining a supply management organization? 81.5% yes 18.5% no One respondent said, Maybe, but not really necessary. Supply management gives you a great view across the full company, and movement within procurement teams can broaden your view without the experience of being in other business units. That said, there is nothing wrong with bringing business knowledge into supply. Others

Q: A:

Is it important to have skills in a second language and/or to have some international business experience? 73.1% yes 26.9% no Respondent comments included: Understanding Mandarin, Spanish, Arabic are all going to help in job placement and in traveling internationally. Even those who said no admitted, Having it in advance could be an advantage. Another noted having a secondlanguage requirement for all senior buyers. And, New markets are opening as we speak, and those who know how

Sidney Johnson, CPSM, vice president, global supply management for Delphi Corporation, and ISMs Board Chair, says supply management has many selling points for students, the first being its wide reach. You learn a lot about other industries and cultures as you interact with local and global communities, he notes. You manage corporate social responsibilities and work with diverse suppliers both large and small companies, including a multitude of ethnic groups. And, you have the opportunity to interact with high-powered decisionmakers. Who wouldnt want that in a career? Johnsons best advice for students pursuing their first position in supply management? Strive for opportunities and jobs that demonstrate your abilities to interact with, influence and persuade others within an organization such as leading a college association, actively participating on a debate team or winning a Richter scholarship. That gets you through the door. Then, you need to seal the deal. ISM
Lisa Wolters-Broder is ISMs senior copy editor. For more information, send an e-mail to author@ism.ws.

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Advance your career in

SUpply MAnAGEMEnt
Earn your graduate degree in two years or less.

with a masters degree or certificate from AGU.

AGUs Master of Supply Management (MSM) or Master of Business Administration Supply Chain Management Concentration degree programs are designed to give supply management, purchasing and procurement professionals in industry and federal, state, and local government advanced knowledge in end-to-end demand, production, delivery and servicing of products and services along todays evolving supply chain. Coursework focuses on developing each students understanding and skills to more effectively move goods and services through better logistics management, effective pricing and costing, streamlined operations, and agility in their use of management information systems. AGU offers an affordable, anywhere/anytime option for advancing your career through graduate study. Apply today online at www.agu.edu and see the AGU difference in your career. An AGU graduate education in Supply Management is practical, flexible and a great value: n Very affordable tuition n All text books included, no added costs n Transfer up to 6 credits from another approved institution (2 courses) n Rolling admissions start your masters degree program anytime youre ready
In addition to Supply Management, AGU offers several more choices for improving your earning power with accredited distance learning masters degrees for working professionals, including: n n n n n Master of Contract Management (MCM) Master of Acquisition Management (MAM) Master of Project Management (MPM) Master of Business Administration (MBA) Masters Certificate Programs

AGU Office of the Registrar 733 North Dodsworth Avenue Covina, CA 91724 www.agu.edu

www.ism.ws

Find the right course of study to advance your individual career goals faster. Visit www.agu.edu to learn more about all our graduate programs or call an AGU admissions counselor at 1-877-351-9060. Supply IN Demand

ion cis e

t In O
By nda Ama DeCo

h off r pat aree ully our c caref y t by Start ht foo ob. e rig first j on th your osing cho

ok

hen deciding which offer to accept as my first job out of college, I recalled the advice given to me by my mentor Your first job may not be the defining moment in your career, but it is instrumental in your career path and success. Those words weighed heavily on my decision to begin my supply management career at my current employer. My decision was made after three undergraduate internships each at a different company in a different industry with different responsibilities. The hands-on experience I gained during the internships also factored into my post-collegiate employment choice. As my mentor also suggested, I used my internship experiences to gauge and identify what was important to me in my first career choice. I knew that selecting the right company to begin my career was important, so I followed a detailed process to help me decide which job offer was the best opportunity for me, both professionally and personally. I started by listing five key criteria. They included: 1) Job/industry. What will my responsibilities be? Will I have ownership over projects and deadlines? What industry will the role be in? Am I excited about that industry? 2) Training/long-term potential. What is the employers training and education investment portfolio, both initially and long-term? Will the employer train me in the skills necessary to be successful? What are the long-term career development opportunities? 3) Company culture. Will I fit in? Will I like working with my new colleagues on a daily basis? Do I share similar values with the company? 4) Location. Is it an urban or remote location? How close is it to my family? 5) Salary. Is the employment package competitive?

The list was based on my personal situation. Because everyone has his or her own unique situation, the criteria can and probably will change. The criteria for what is important in your first job choice may also be based on what stage you are at in the recruiting process. Other points that can be used By Lisa in evaluating a prospective employer include work/ Arnseth life balance, green initiatives, corporate citizenship, financial health, global presence and so forth. The factors are endless, but limit the criteria to five for optimal impact.

Weighing the Options


The next step is to weigh each point based on its importance to you. This also will be different for each individual and may change over time. Following is the weight I gave to each criterion as well as my rationale behind each: ob/industry, 40 percent. After interning in sevJ eral different industries, I had a good idea of what I liked and what I found exciting. The experiences taught me that it is important to be passionate about what you are doing. This was my first career step out of college, and I wanted to be sure that my job was rewarding because it would be the foundation for the rest of my career. raining/long-term potential, 20 percent. I knew T this position would be the starting point for my career. I wanted to be certain that my employer valued and provided employee training. Additionally, I evaluated the long-term development opportunities at the company and the likelihood that it would enable me to achieve my career aspirations. ulture, 15 percent. It was important to me to C have the feeling of belonging. I knew my coworkers would have an impact on whether I enjoyed my job, and I like to be happy at work.

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

ocation, 15 percent. Location, location, location L need I say more? alary, 10 percent. Salary was by no means the S deciding factor, but it was still a factor. I created a weighted matrix based on my criteria and proceeded to score each prospective employer, as the chart below shows. Once the matrix was completed, the choice was clear. A.T. Kearney was the best option for me, scoring 47 out of 50 possible points; the runner-up came in with 33.5 points.

Justifying the Decision


The perfect score I gave A.T. Kearney in the job/ industry category was based on my desire for a consulting rather than an industry position. Also, I believed my work assignments would be meaningful and challenging with a great deal of responsibility. The training/long-term potential category received a perfect score because of the training I would receive not only in my first month with the company, but also throughout my career there. One of my near-term goals is to attain my MBA; candidates with experience at A.T. Kearney are well-received by MBA programs additional proof of the long-term value. Company culture received a high score, as well. Everyone I met during the interview process was extremely smart, and the collaborative work environment was apparent. Location received a score of four out of five. Ideally, I preferred to live near my family in Michigan; however, my assigned office in Chicago was only a train ride away. Finally, the company made a very competitive compensation offer. As a result, the company once again received a perfect score. Using this quantitative method to make a qualitative decision helped me keep everything in perspective, and ensured I considered all the criteria that truly mattered to me.

Another quality that weighed on my decision although not listed on the matrix was my prospective employers support of undergraduate mentoring and career enrichment programs, such as the R. Gene Richter Scholarship Program, the largest nationally recognized scholarship program in the field of supply chain management. As I am a 2009 Richter Scholar, A.T. Kearneys continued involvement in the scholarships, which are awarded through Institute for Supply Managements Scholarship Fund and the R. Gene and Nancy D. Richter Foundation, made a lasting impression. It was an added bonus. After more than a year on the job, I can still justify the scores I gave the company. I love living in Chicago. My team members are extremely smart and passionate about the work, and the company culture is very collaborative. The first weeks of training were packed with tools and applications I was unfamiliar with, but am beginning to master now. Additionally, I am involved in challenging, yet interesting and meaningful projects. When facing the pivotal decision of where to start your post-undergraduate career, I recommend: etworking with mentors to gain their insights and N advice eflecting on what is truly important to you and R what you want from your career sing a quantitative matrix similar to the chart U below to help guide your decision. Your first career step is an important one. Take the time to consider your options and carefully weigh what is important to you both now and into the future. ISM
Amanda DeCook is a sourcing analyst within the procurement and analytic solutions group for A.T. Kearney in Chicago. For more information, send an e-mail to author@ism.ws.

Weighted Matrix to Score Prospective Employers


COMPANY
Company X Criteria and Distribution Job/Industry (40%) Training/Long-Term Potential (20%) Culture (15%) Location (15%) Salary (10%) total Score
Score 3 4 2 2 3 14 Weighted Score 12 8 3 3 3 29 Score 4 3 4 2 4 17 (Scale of 1-5)

Company Y
Weighted Score 16 6 4.5 3 4 33.5 Score 4 4 2 1 4 15

Company Z
Weighted Score 16 8 3 1.5 4 32.5

A.T. Kearney
Score 5 5 4 4 5 23 Weighted Score 20 10 6 6 5 47

10

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

explore. experience. expand.

Get fast, focused learning about Supply Chain Management and Complete your Certificate in just 8 coursesall Online!
Offered in cooperation with Los Angeles Chapter of the Institute for Supply Management (ISM-LA) & California Association of Public Purchasing Officers (CAPPO)

Learn all aspects of Supply Chain Management, including:


Supply Chain Analysis & Compliance Legal Aspects, Govt. Contracts & Federal Acquisition Regulations Negotiation Technology & Cost Management Inventory Management, Logistics, Operations & Methods Global Sourcing

Plus:

Courses offered online and on-ground in Los Angeles Custom-designed programs available at your workplace Select courses may be used to acquire points toward Certified Purchasing Manager (C.P.M.) certification*

Get complete details: uclaextension.edu/scm


Classes start every quarter:
Enroll beginning 7/25 for Fall (starts Sep 19) Enroll beginning 11/7 for Winter (starts Jan 9) Enroll beginning 2/6 for Spring (starts Apr 2) Enroll beginning 4/16 for Summer (starts Jun 25)

More info (310) 206-1548; ceisman@uclaextension.edu.


*Contact ISM-LA directly for details: communications@ismla.org.
12261-11

Supply management professionals are seeing a major increase in their average salaries compared with 2009.

12

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

ts that time of year again, when ISM releases its annual salary survey results. For supply management professionals, its an opportunity to compare and contrast their earnings against others in the profession: How do I stack up against others in my position or region of the country? How advantageous is it to my career to have a credential? These are relevant questions and ones that are answered in this article. Even more important, however, is the use of this information as a benchmark and tool during your next performance review or salary renegotiation. The results of ISMs sixth annual salary survey reveal the increasing value organizations are placing on supply management. The average salary for supply management professionals is now

ISMs 2011
Financial stability of the organization (65 percent) was reported as the leading determinant in job choice for respondents. Both benefits package and job satisfaction tied for second place at 61 percent. This was followed by work/life balance (48 percent), promotion (45 percent) and wages (44 percent). Other factors that were rated highly included work location, organizational culture/work environment and bonuses.
Position and Experience Whats in a salary? There were many factors that impacted salary amounts. It was nearly impossible to make an

average salary increase of 3.5 percent from what they received in 2009, compared with an average increase of 2.8 percent in 2009 over 2008. Of all respondents, 66 percent reported that their salaries increased (compared with 78 percent in 2009), 6.6 percent indicated that their salaries decreased (compared with 20 percent in 2009) and 19 percent reported that their salaries did not change in 2010 (compared with 2 percent in 2009). A recovering economy, coupled with the importance of supply management during such a crisis, is bringing greater visibility and value to the profession. Despite a healthy increase in salary for 2010, salarys importance in job choice was lower (sixth place in importance to job choice) compared with other factors.

apples-to-apples comparison of all respondents. Such factors as regional location, education level attained, credentials obtained, level of responsibility, gender and position were the defining characteristics of an individuals salary. Thus, a number of discrepancies can exist for differences in salary between individuals, jobs and organizations. Due to these varying factors, salaries were based on position rather than specific job titles. Respondents self-selected the position that best represented their title and responsibility. By position, respondents classifying themselves as an entrylevel supply management professional earned an average salary of $49,502; those selecting experienced supply management professional as their position earned $75,383; those classified as manager earned

By John Yuva

US$103,664, an increase of 5.6 percent over 2009 ($98,200). This shows a significant increase compared with the stagnant movement in salary of 0.08 percent seen between 2008 and 2009. The median salary was $87,000, with the highest salary reported at $683,000 and the lowest at $16,000. The salary numbers reported are for the 2010 calendar year and include wages and any bonuses received; all amounts given are in U.S. dollars. The percentage of respondents earning $100,000 or more also increased compared with 2009, from 34 percent to 38 percent in 2010. Respondents self-reported an

$98,264; those classified as director earned $134,220; those selecting vice president as their position earned $238,396; and those classifying themselves as a chief earned $231,142. The average salary for those classified as a chief decreased by 3.8 percent compared with 2009 ($240,408). In general, more years of experience translated to a higher salary. That correlation existed in most comparisons among the experience levels. Supply management professionals working in the profession for 11 or more years can expect to earn 43 percent more than those who have entered the field with two years or less of experience

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

13

ISMs 2011 Salary Survey BY POSITION


Women 05 Total 05 Men 05

BY Years/experience
Average Salary by Years of Work Experience

Key to Charts

(this compares with 32 percent reported in 2009). The average salary for supply management professionals with 11 years of experience or more was $108,860, while the average salary for those with two years or less of experience was $76,032. Overall, supply management professionals with three to five years of experience earned an average salary of $91,346; those with six to 10 years of experience earned $88,448; those with 11 to 20 years of experience earned $96,136; and supply management professionals with 20 or more years of experience earned an average of $121,584. Variations in salary also occurred among different industries. Of the 19 industries under which respondents classified themselves, accommodation and food services ranked the highest in salary at $176,686, followed by mining ($135,787), and finance and insurance ($120,006). Last years leader, the construction industry ($91,504) dropped to 12th place in 2010. The industry reporting the lowest salary was arts, entertainment and recreation ($63,418). The second and third lowest industry salaries were real estate, rental and leasing ($75,037) and educational services ($75,785), BY Education respectively. Among the 19 industries, six reported average salaries higher than the overall survey average of $103,664.
Make Education Matter One of the major factors affecting salary and professional achievement continues to be education. Todays young supply management professionals realize the need to earn a bachelors degree at a minimum to contend with an evolving marketplace. To the point, supply management professionals with a bachelors degree earn 60 percent more than those with only a high-school education. While an associates degree can earn you nearly 23 percent more in salary than a high-school education, a bachelors degree can lead to a 31 percent salary increase over an associates degree. What impact does having a masters degree have on salary? Supply management

BY POSITION

1-2 years

3-5 years

6-10 years

11-20 years

21 years or more

Average Salary by Position


Chief, Purchasing/ Supply Management/ Sourcing $231,142 $258,619 $207,100 $238,396 $252,623 $206,857 $134,220 $138,179 $122,196 $98,264 $102,614 $89,621 $75,383 $76,687 $74,399 $49,502 $39,669 $52,452 $95,276 Other $136,400 $72,430

BY INDUSTRY

Vice President, Purchasing/Supply Management/Sourcing

Director, Purchasing/ Supply Management/ Sourcing

Manager, Purchasing/ Supply Management/ Sourcing

Experienced Supply Management Professional

Entry-Level Supply Management Professional

NOTE: Caution should be taken when examining the various breakdowns as response rates vary and may make the information less reliable.

14

Supply IN Demand

BY Education

www.ism.ws

$104,729

$80,620

$48,506

$88,448

$104,156

$95,429

$84,329

$76,032

$121,584

$90,674

$77,882

$97,672

$91,346

$96,136

$130,141

BY Education
Average Salary by Highest Level of Education Completed
professionals with a masters earned 18 percent more in salary than their counterparts with only a bachelors degree. Thus, the decision to invest in graduate school either immediately following an undergraduate education or later in ones career is paying off for supply management professionals. How do the various degree fields stack up? Degrees in the technical/engineering fields continued to offer the highest average salary among respondents, at $126,999. Supply management professionals entering businessrelated fields (other than supply management) reported average salaries of $110,041. Those respondents who earned degrees in supply management/supply chain management earned an average salary of $101,615, while liberal arts majors followed with an average salary of $96,003.
CPSM and Other Credentials Paying Dividends Have you earned your Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM) designation? Attainment of a supply management certification is giving a boost to the average salary of respondents. The average salary for supply management professionals with one or more credentials was $107,181, compared with $100,071 for people without a credential. The salary for those with a credential increased 8.6 percent over 2009s $98,701. ISMs CPSM credential is making its impact on average salary in organizations. Respondents who hold a CPSM designation are earning 23 percent more on average salary compared with those without a credential. This was a significant increase compared with 2009, when respondents with a CPSM reported earning 9.8 percent more than their counterparts without credentials. Specifically, supply management professionals with a CPSM are earning an average salary of $123,008, compared with $100,071 for those who lack a designation. With this being only the second year for reporting on ISMs CPSM, the value of this designation in organizations will likely only continue to grow. The Certified Purchasing Manager (C.P.M.) designation continues to add value to ISM members and supply management professionals, as well. The average salary for respondents holding a C.P.M. was $101,840, an increase of 2.5 percent over 2009 ($99,314).

$130,000

$104,690

$123,062

$132,534

$107,857

$58,906

$99,698

High-school graduate

Some college

Associates degree

Bachelors degree

Masters degree

Doctorate degree

Average Salary by Industry


Accommodation and food services (hotels, food and drinking places) Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting Arts, entertainment and recreation (performing arts, museums, amusement industries) Construction Educational services Finance and insurance Government/public administration Healthcare and social assistance Information (publishing, motion picture and sound, broadcasting, telecommunications, Internet publishing and service-provider industries) Management and administrative services Manufacturing Mining (oil and gas extraction and other mining) Professional, scientific and technical services Real estate and rental and leasing Retail trade Transportation and warehousing Utilities Wholesale trade Other services $176,686 $88,665 $63,418 $91,504 $75,785 $120,006 $76,734 $100,746 $106,209 $83,261 $109,165 $135,787 $99,227 $75,037 $98,813 $92,109 $109,167 $82,244 $93,471

BY INDUSTRY

$113,600

$99,982

$66,246

$79,283

$84,377

$117,700

$89,291

$80,152

$65,341

$75,159

$75,193

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

15

ISMs 2011 Salary Survey

Average Salary by Geographic Region

*
HI

AK

Pacific (AK, CA, HI, OR, WA) $104,437 Mountain (AZ, CO, ID, MT, NM, NV, UT, WY) $86,382 West North Central (IA, KS, MN, MO, ND, NE, SD) $91,321 West South Central (AR, LA, OK, TX) $104,470 East North Central (IL, IN, MI, OH, WI) $101,506 East South Central (AL, KY, MS, TN) $98,357

South Atlantic (DC, DE, FL, GA, MD, NC, SC, VA, WV) $103,353 Middle Atlantic (NJ, NY, PA) $125,982 New England (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) $118,253

F
16

How the Survey Was Conducted


bonuses and other income received before taxes and deductions. For the second time, we asked if respondents were employed for the full year. Eighteen, or 2.4 percent, of the respondents indicated they were not employed for the full year (compared with 4 percent in 2009). The results posted exclude those not employed for the full calendar year of 2010. More detailed data from this survey are available on the ISM website. A brief summary of the results is available to the general public, while a detailed report is available at no charge to ISM members. Nonmembers may purchase the detailed report for US$199. The reports can be accessed in the ISM Career Center at www.ism.ws.

or the sixth year in a row, ISM has collected information from various supply management professionals. The survey was conducted during January and February of 2011. Random samples of customers were pulled from an ISM database that included both members and nonmembers. An e-mail message requesting participation was then sent to these customers. In all, a total of 743 responses were received, representing a response rate of 7.1 percent. ISM staff tabulated the responses and set the confidence interval for the overall mean salary as plus or minus 4.7 percent. Respondents were asked to report salary information for the 2010 calendar year. Salary included wages,

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Bonuses, Stock Options and Benefits When examining annual income, bonuses and stock options can represent a major portion of that amount. For the purpose of the survey, respondents were asked to include bonuses as part of their overall salary reported. Among the respondents who received a bonus in 2010, the average bonus received was $21,139, which represented approximately 21 percent of the total gross salary received. This amount was a 14 percent increase compared with the average bonus amount for 2009 ($18,504), and was based on a combination of company results (59 percent), department results (15 percent), individual results (21 percent) and other results (5 percent). The highest bonus amount reported for 2010 was $259,000, and the median bonus was $9,000. While stock options were not included as a part of salary, they were earned by 14 percent of the respondents. The average estimated dollar value of the stock options received was $29,975. The median was $10,000. With regard to fringe benefits, respondents reported being offered health insurance (92 percent), dental insurance (90 percent), life insurance (86 percent), pension or retirement plan (85 percent), vision insurance (73 percent), long-term disability (71 percent), short-term disability (70 percent) and tuition reimbursement (67 percent). Additional benefits received included paid training/professional certification (58 percent), personal communication devices (cell phone, laptop, PDA and the like) (51 percent), paid maternity/family leave (45 percent), association membership (41 percent), long-term care insurance (28 percent), health club membership (23 percent), personal legal services (10 percent) and vehicle/vehicle allowance (8 percent). Gender and Salary Despite ISMs official position statement on the issue of gender and equal compensation, gender continues to play a factor in the salary of supply management professionals. The average salary among the

male respondents in this years survey was $112,952, compared with $90,200 for female respondents. Men earned an average of 25 percent more than their female counterparts. There are, however, areas where a contraction in the gender gap is occurring. For example, in education, women with an associates degree earned 12 percent more in average salary ($84,377) compared with men ($75,159) at the same educational level. And with a bachelors degree, the average salary gap narrowed to less than 8 percent between men ($107,857) and women ($99,982). In terms of experience, there was a significant difference (66 percent) in annual salary between women ($80,620) and men ($48,506) with one to two years of experience. And for supply management professionals with three to five years of experience, women continued to lead in annual salary ($84,377) over men ($75,159). How did annual salary compare between men and women who have earned credentials? The average salary gap between men and women with one or more credentials was 29 percent. However, the gap narrowed to 23 percent between men ($111,382) and women ($90,605) who have earned a C.P.M. The most striking comparison, however, was between men and women who have earned ISMs CPSM certification. The difference in annual salary narrowed to a mere 0.6 percent between men ($123,452) and women ($122,713) with a CPSM credential. This is a positive trend that will hopefully continue as more supply management professionals earn their CPSM certification.
On Average, Improvement What does the past say about the future? If average salary comparisons between 2005 (the inaugural year of ISMs salary survey) and this years survey results are any indication, supply management professionals should expect a healthy increase in average salary in the coming years. The average salary increased 32 percent compared with 2005 from $78,470 to $103,664, even as global economies struggled amid a coming recession for nearly half this period.

Significant increases in average salary are also now prevalent for various job titles. On average, chiefs earn 43 percent more today ($231,142) than in 2005 ($161,082); vice presidents earn 51 percent more today ($238,396) than in 2005 ($158,256); directors earn 11 percent more today ($134,220) than in 2005 ($120,401); and managers are earning 23 percent more today ($98,264) than in 2005 ($80,159). These figures help reaffirm the growing value of supply management in todays organizations. Education is also being rewarded with higher average salaries. While a bachelors degree in 2005 led to an average salary of $79,368, its now $104,690 a 32 percent increase. And a masters degree today yields an average salary of $123,062 compared with $99,373 in 2005, a 24 percent increase. As technology and the marketplace evolve, both four-year and graduate degrees are becoming essential. Gender is a factor that continues to impact average salaries between men and women. While the average salary for men has increased from $86,662 in 2005 to $112,952 in 2010 (a 30 percent jump), women experienced a larger percentage growth (37 percent) in average salary, from $66,032 in 2005 to $90,200 in 2010. As the economy recovers, supply management professionals must continue their ability to remove supply chain costs and improve efficiencies to remain on the radar of executive management and be compensated appropriately for their efforts. As the results of this years salary survey indicate, the compensation for men and women in supply management is beginning to parallel their contribution to the organization. Lets ensure this continues in the years to come. This article contains just a sample of whats included in ISMs comprehensive salary survey. A more detailed report is available on the ISM website at www.ism.ws/CareerCenter. ISM
John Yuva is editor of Inside Supply Management. For more information, send an e-mail to author@ism.ws.

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

17

supply chain. This awareness has finally reached within organizations,

The vitality of a companys success is dependent on a strong

and its function is far greater today in measuring and forecasting success.

JAMES MARTIN

18

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

School listing compiled by INSTITUTE fOR SUPPLY MANAgEMENT

Directory of Supply Management Schools


The listing on the following pages is comprised of institutions offering supply management-related degree programs, certificate programs, CPSM Exam preparation courses and distance-learning opportunities. ourses may be in supply C management, materials management, logistics, purchasing, operations management or related areas. egrees may be a business D degree with emphasis in one of these areas. istance-learning opportunities D can include courses offered through the Internet, video, satellite or other means. This list is not all-inclusive but may serve as a starting point for identifying training and development opportunities. As a testament to the growth of the profession and its prominence in business, this list (first published by ISM in 1990) continues to grow.

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

19

te s

ate

SM

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Alabama
Alabama A&M University School of business Normal, Alabama | +1 256/372-5000 | www.aamu.edu Auburn University College of business Auburn, Alabama | +1 334/844-4000 | www.auburn.edu University of Alabama Department of Information Systems, Statistics and Management Science Tuscaloosa, Alabama | +1 205/348-6085 | www.ua.edu
n n n

Alaska
University of Alaska Anchorage College of business and Public Policy Anchorage, Alaska | +1 907/786-4100 | www.scob.alaska.edu
n n n n n

Arizona
Arizona State University see profile on page 41 W. P. Carey School of business Tempe, Arizona | +1 480/965-6044 | http://wpcarey.asu.edu Pima Community College Tucson, Arizona | +1 520/206-4500 www.pima.edu Thunderbird School of global Management Glendale, Arizona | 800/848-9084 www.thunderbird.edu University of Phoenix business Management Phoenix, Arizona | 800/660-6846 | www.phoenix.edu
n n n n n

Arkansas
Arkansas State University College of business Jonesboro, Arkansas | +1 870/972-3035 | www.astate.edu/business University of Arkansas Sam M. Walton College of business Fayetteville, Arkansas | +1 501/575-5949 | www.uark.edu
n

California
American graduate University see profile on page 41 Covina, California | 877/351-9060 www.agu.edu California Maritime Academy Vallejo, California | +1 707/654-1000 www.csum.edu
n n n

20

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ste

fic

nc

eL

Re

rs

SCHOOL DIRECTORY

am

gr

Pro

vie

ea

rni

ng

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

California State University Chico College of business Chico, California | +1 530/898-6271 | www.cob.csuchico.edu California State University Dominguez Hills see profile on page 41 College of Extended and International Education Carson, California | +1 310/243-2425 | www.csudh.edu/supplychainmanagement California State University East Bay College of business and Economics hayward, California | +1 510/885-3291 | www20.csueastbay.edu/academic California State University fullerton University Extended Education Fullerton, California | +1 657/278-2011 | www.csufextension.org/classes/certificate California State University Long Beach Center for International Trade and Transportation Long beach, California | +1 562/985-2872 | www.uces.csulb.edu/citt California State University Los Angeles Department of Management Los Angeles, California | +1 323/343-2890 | www.calstatela.edu California State University Sacramento College of business Administration Sacramento, California | +1 916/278-6578 | www.cba.csus.edu California State University San Bernardino College of Extended Learning San bernardino, California | +1 909/880-5979 | http://cel.csusb.edu Coastline Community College Fountain Valley, California | +1 714/546-7600 www.coastline.edu golden gate University Edward S. Ageno School of business San Francisco, California | +1 415/442-6500 | www.ggu.edu Naval Postgraduate School Graduate School of business and Public Policy Monterey, California | +1 831/656-2023 | www.nps.edu Riverside Community College Norco Campus Norco, California | +1 951/372-7068 | www.academic.rcc.edu/logisticsmanagement University of California Berkeley Industrial Engineering and Operations research berkeley, California | +1 510/642-5484 | www.ieor.berkeley.edu

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

ng

21

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

SM

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

University of California Irvine UCI Extension Irvine, California | +1 949/824-4661 | http://unex.uci.edu University of California Los Angeles see profile on page 43 UCLA Extension Los Angeles, California | +1 310/825-9971 | www.uclaextension.edu/techmanagement University of California Riverside UC riverside Extension riverside, California | +1 951/827-4105 | www.extension.ucr.edu University of California San Diego UCSD Extension San Diego, California | +1 858/882-8038 | www.extension.ucsd.edu University of San Diego ISM Approved Supply Chain Management Institute San Diego, California | +1 619/260-4894 www.sandiego.edu/msscm
see profile on page 43
n n

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Master of Science in Supply Chain Management

University of San francisco University of San Francisco Online San Francisco, California | 800/609-4196 | www.usanfranonline.com/ism University of Southern California Marshall School of business Los Angeles, California | +1 213/740-5033 | www.marshall.usc.edu
n n

Colorado
Colorado Technical University Colorado Springs, Colorado | +1 719/598-0200 http://cs.coloradotech.edu University of Denver Daniels College of business Denver, Colorado | +1 303/871-3411 | http://daniels.du.edu
n n n

Connecticut
Quinnipiac University School of business hamden, Connecticut | +1 203/582-8200 | www.quinnipiac.edu
n n

District of Columbia
george Washington University School of business Washington, D.C. | +1 202/994-5536 | www.gwu.edu Howard University see profile on page 42 School of business Washington, D.C. | +1 202/806-1674 www.bschool.howard.edu/programs/scm/index.html
n n n

22

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ate

ste

fic

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

University of the District of Columbia School of business and Public Administration Washington, D.C. | +1 202/274-5000 | www.udc.edu

florida
florida A&M University School of business and Industry Tallahassee, Florida | +1 850/599-8335 | www.famu.edu florida Atlantic University Executive Continuing Education boca raton, Florida | 800/584-4723 | www.fauexecutiveprograms.com florida Institute of Technolgy Extended Studies Melbourne, Florida | +1 321/674-8880 | www.fit.edu florida International University ryder Center for Supply Chain Management Miami, Florida | +1 305/348-3898 | http://rydercenter.fiu.edu florida State University Department of Marketing Tallahassee, Florida | +1 850/644-3090 | www.cob.fsu.edu University of florida MbA Programs Gainesville, Florida | +1 352/392-7992 | www.floridamba.ufl.edu University of North florida Coggin College of business Jacksonville, Florida | +1 904/620-2590 | www.unf.edu/coggin/trans_logist
n n n n

georgia
Clark Atlanta University School of business Administration Atlanta, Georgia | +1 404/880-8000 | www.cau.edu Clayton State University School of business Morrow, Georgia | +1 678/466-4549 | http://business.clayton.edu Dalton State College School of business Administration Dalton, Georgia | +1 706/272-4507 | www.daltonstate.edu The georgia Institute of Technology EMIL-SCS The Supply Chain in Logistics Institute and Supply Chain Strategy Program Atlanta, Georgia | +1 404/385-2538 | www.emil.gatech.edu georgia Southern University Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics Statesboro, Georgia | +1 912/681-0318 | http://coba.georgiasouthern.edu
n n n

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

ng

23

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

SM

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Southern Polytechnic State University School of Engineering Technology and Management Marietta, Georgia | +1 678/915-7778 | www.spsu.edu

Idaho
Boise State University College of business and Economics boise, Idaho | +1 208/426-1181 | http://itscm.boisestate.edu
n

Illinois
DePaul University College of Commerce/Management Development Center Chicago, Illinois | +1 312/362-8300 | www.depaul.edu Elmhurst College Center for business and Economics Elmhurst, Illinois | +1 630/617-3400 | http://elmhurst.edu Illinois Central College business and Information Systems East Peoria, Illinois | +1 309/694-5558 | www.icc.edu Loyola University Chicago School of business Administration Chicago, Illinois | +1 312/915-6113 | www.luc.edu Northern Illinois University College of business DeKalb, Illinois | +1 815/753-5000 | www.niu.edu Northwestern University The Transportation Center Evanston, Illinois | +1 847/491-3741 | http://transportation.northwestern.edu Western Illinois University College of business and Technology Macomb, Illinois | +1 309/298-2442 | www.wiu.edu William Rainey Harper College Palatine, Illinois | +1 847/925-6358 www.harpercollege.edu
n n n n n n

Indiana
Indiana State University College of business Terre haute, Indiana | +1 812/237-2086 | www.indstate.edu Indiana University Bloomington Kelley School of business bloomington, Indiana | +1 812/855-8100 | www.iub.edu Indiana University South Bend Continuing Education South bend, Indiana | +1 574/520-4415 | www.iusb.edu
n

24

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ate

ste

fic

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Purdue University Krannert School of Management West Lafayette, Indiana | +1 765/494-9700 | www.mgmt.purdue.edu University of Indianapolis School of business Indianapolis, Indiana | 800/232-8634 | www.uindy.edu Vincennes University see profile on page 44 Department of business and Management Vincennes, Indiana | +1 812/888-4271 | www.vinu.edu/logistics
n

Iowa
Iowa State University College of business Ames, Iowa | +1 515/294-3659 | www.business.iastate.edu University of Northern Iowa Department of Management Cedar Falls, Iowa | +1 319/273-7620 | www.cba.uni.edu
n n n

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

ng

25

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

SM

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Kansas
Kansas State University Department of Management Manhattan, Kansas | +1 785/532-6296 | www.cba.k-state.edu Southwestern College Professional Studies Wichita, Kansas | +1 316/684-5335 | www.southwesterncollege.org University of Kansas FEDS (Finance, Economics and Decision Sciences) School of business Lawrence, Kansas | +1 785/864-2191 | www.business.ku.edu
n

louisiana
Louisiana State University E.J. Ourso College of business baton rouge, Louisiana | +1 225/578-0278 | www.bus.lsu.edu Southeastern Louisiana University Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management hammond, Louisiana | 800/222-7358 | www.selu.edu
n n n

Maryland
Cecil College North East, Maryland | +1 410/287-1000 www.cecil.edu University of Maryland College Park robert h. Smith School of business College Park, Maryland | +1 301/405-2286 | www.rhsmith.umd.edu University of Maryland University College Department of Management and Technology Adelphi, Maryland | 800/283-6832 | www.umuc.edu Towson University College of Graduate Studies and research Towson, Maryland | +1 410/704-6868 | http://grad.towson.edu
n n

Massachusetts
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Transportation and Logistics Cambridge, Massachusetts | +1 617/258-7267 | www.mit.edu Merrimack College School For Advanced Studies North Andover, Massachusetts | +1 978/837-5154 | www.merrimack.edu Suffolk University Sawyer business School boston, Massachusetts | +1 617/573-8395 | www.suffolk.edu
n n n n

26

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ate

ste

fic

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Michigan
Central Michigan University College of business Administration Mount Pleasant, Michigan | +1 989/774-3124 | www.cba.cmich.edu Eastern Michigan University College of business Ypsilanti, Michigan | +1 734/487-4140 | www.scm.emich.edu ferris State University College of business big rapids, Michigan | +1 231/591-2427 | www.ferris.edu grand Valley State University Seidman College of business Allendale, Michigan | +1 616/331-7100 | www.gvsu.edu Michigan State University see profile on page 42 Eli broad College of business East Lansing, Michigan | +1 517/353-8711 | http://broad.msu.edu University of Michigan see profile on page 43 ross School of business Ann Arbor, Michigan | +1 734/647-1396 | www.bus.umich.edu/mscm
n

T R A N S P O R T A T I O N

&

L O G I S T I C S

P R O G R A M

Ranked 13th in top logistics and supply chain management programs in the country State-of-the-art supply chain technology lab SAP University Alliance membership provides faculty and students access to
Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) suite Internationally recognized faculty engaged in leading edge research Curriculum certied by the American Society of Transportation & Logistics Located in Jacksonville, Florida Americas Logistics Center
C O G G I N C O L L E G E

For more information: www.unf.edu/coggin/trans_logist Email: logistics@unf.edu


www.ism.ws Supply IN Demand

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

27

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

SM

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Wayne State University School of business Administration Detroit, Michigan | +1 313/577-4525 | www.business.wayne.edu/gscm Western Michigan University haworth College of business Kalamazoo, Michigan | +1 616/387-5075 | http://ism.hcob.wmich.edu

Minnesota
Capella University School of business and Technology Minneapolis, Minnesota | 888/CAPELLA (227-3552) | www.capella.edu University of Minnesota Carlson School of Management Minneapolis, Minnesota | +1 612/625-0027 | www.csom.umn.edu University of St. Thomas Opus College of business Minneapolis, Minnesota | +1 651/962-5544 | www.stthomas.edu/business
n n n n

Missouri
Missouri State University College of business Administration Springfield, Missouri | +1 417/836-5646 | www.coba.missouristate.edu Park University Extended Learning Program Parkville, Missouri | +1 816/584-6816 | www.park.edu Saint Louis University John Cook School of business St. Louis, Missouri | +1 314/977-3617 | www.slu.edu University of Missouri St. Louis College of business Administration St. Louis, Missouri | +1 314/516-6267 | www.umsl.edu Washington University in St. Louis see profile on page 44 Olin School of business St. Louis, Missouri | +1 314/935-6000 | www.olin.wustl.edu/msscm Webster University School of business and Technology St. Louis, Missouri | +1 314/968-7021 | www.websteruniv.edu
n n n n

nebraska
Metropolitan Community College business Department Omaha, Nebraska | 800/228-9553 | www.mccneb.edu
n

28

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ate

ste

fic

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

nevada
University of Nevada Las Vegas College of business Las Vegas, Nevada | +1 702/895-1762 | www.unlv.edu
n n

new hampshire
Southern New Hampshire University School of business Manchester, New hampshire | +1 603/644-3102 | www.snhu.edu
n n

new Jersey
Bloomfield College business Administration bloomfield, New Jersey | +1 973/748-9000 | www.bloomfield.edu Rutgers University see profile on page 42 rutgers business School Newark and New brunswick, New Jersey | +1 973/353-1169 www.business.rutgers.edu/scmms Seton Hall University Stillman School of business South Orange, New Jersey | +1 973/761-9535 | www.shu.edu Stevens Institute of Technology howe School of Technology Management hoboken, New Jersey | +1 201/216-5263 | http://howe.stevens.edu Thomas Edison State College Trenton, New Jersey | +1 609/984-1150 www.tesc.edu
n n n

new York
Clarkson University School of business Potsdam, New York | +1 315/268-6400 | www.clarkson.edu/business Columbia University Columbia business School New York, New York | +1 212/854-5553 | www4.gsb.columbia.edu Cornell University The Johnson School Ithaca, New York | 800/847-2082 | www.johnson.cornell.edu Niagara University Department of Transportation and Logistics Niagara University, New York | +1 716/286-8050 | www.niagara.edu State University of New York Plattsburgh Plattsburgh, New York | +1 518/564-4197 www.plattsburgh.edu/academics/gscm
n n n n n

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

ng

29

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

SM

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Syracuse University Whitman School of Management Syracuse, New York | +1 315/443-3751 | http://whitman.syr.edu University of Rochester Simon Graduate School of business rochester, New York | +1 585/275-3533 | www.simon.rochester.edu

north Carolina
Central Piedmont Community College Continuing Education Charlotte, North Carolina | +1 704/330-4223 | http://cce.cpcc.edu Duke University Fuqua School of business Durham, North Carolina | +1 919/660-7700 | www.fuqua.duke.edu East Carolina University College of business Greenville, North Carolina | +1 252/328-6131 | www.ecu.edu/business gaston College Dallas, North Carolina | +1 704/922-6200 www.gaston.edu Lenoir Community College Kinston, North Carolina | +1 252/527-6223 www.lenoircc.edu North Carolina A&T State University School of business and Economics Greensboro, North Carolina | +1 336/334-7229 | www.ncat.edu/~sbe North Carolina State University College of Management raleigh, North Carolina | +1 919/515-5560 | www.mgt.ncsu.edu University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Kenan-Flagler business School Chapel hill, North Carolina | +1 919/962-3236 | www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu University of North Carolina at greensboro Department of Information Systems and Operations Management Greensboro, North Carolina | +1 336/334-5666 | www.uncg.edu/bae/isom University of North Carolina at Wilmington Cameron School of business Wilmington, North Carolina | +1 910/962-3777 | www.csb.uncw.edu
n n n n n

Ohio
Air force Institute of Technology Graduate School of Engineering & Management Wright Patterson AFb, Ohio | +1 937/255-3025 | www.afit.edu
n n

30

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ate

ste

fic

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Bowling green State University Department of Management bowling Green, Ohio | +1 419/372-2946 | www.cba.bgsu.edu Case Western Reserve University Weatherhead School of Management Cleveland, Ohio | +1 216/368-2030 | http://weatherhead.case.edu Cleveland State University see profile on page 41 Monte Ahuja College of business Cleveland, Ohio | +1 216/687-4740 | www.csuohio.edu/business/osm Columbus State Community College Marketing and Graphic Communications Department Columbus, Ohio | +1 614/287-5175 | www.cscc.edu Cuyahoga Community College business Technologies Cleveland, Ohio | 800/954-8742 | www.tri-c.edu John Carroll University boler School of business University heights, Ohio | +1 216/397-4386 | http://bsob.jcu.edu
n

Learn from and collaborate with a faculty of highly accomplished researchers, practitioners, and teachers. Gain access to Fortune 100 employers. Earn a degree from an AACSB-accredited program.

Enhance the experience with endless student organization and internship opportunities. Enjoy one of the nations most beautiful campus settings.

www.business.iastate.edu 515.294.3656
www.ism.ws Supply IN Demand

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

31

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

SM

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Miami University Farmer School of business Oxford, Ohio | +1 513/529-4219 | www.fsb.muohio.edu/scm The Ohio State University Department of Marketing and Logistics Columbus, Ohio | +1 614/292-9695 | www.osu.edu Sinclair Community College business Technologies Dayton, Ohio | 800/315-3000 | www.sinclair.edu University of Akron College of business Administration Akron, Ohio | +1 330/972-7042 | www.uakron.edu University of Cincinnati Department of Quantitative Analysis and Operations Management Cincinnati, Ohio | +1 513/556-7140 | www.business.uc.edu University of Dayton School of business Administration Dayton, Ohio | +1 937/229-1000 | www.udayton.edu/business University of Toledo College of business Administration Toledo, Ohio | +1 419/530-2087 | www.utoledo.edu Wright State University raj Soin College of business Dayton, Ohio | +1 937/775-2437 | www.wright.edu/business
n

Oklahoma
Langston University School of business Langston, Oklahoma | +1 405/466-3207 | www.langston.edu Northeastern State University College of business and Technology Tahlequah, Oklahoma | +1 918/444-2900, extension 2900 | www.cbt.nsuok.edu University of Oklahoma Michael F. Price College of business Norman, Oklahoma | 800/234-6868 | http://price.ou.edu
n

Oregon
Portland State University School of business Administration Portland, Oregon | +1 503/725-4769 | www.sba.pdx.edu
n n

Pennsylvania
Duquesne University A.J. Palumbo School of business Administration Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania | +1 412/396-6276 | www.bus.duq.edu
n n

32

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ate

ste

fic

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Lehigh University College of business and Economics bethlehem, Pennsylvania | +1 610/758-3400 | www.lehigh.edu Luzerne County Community College Nanticoke, Pennsylvania | 800/377-5222 | www.luzerne.edu Pennslyvania State University Smeal College of business University Park, Pennsylvania | +1 814/863-8323 | www.smeal.psu.edu/supplychain Saint Josephs University University College Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | 877/648-3758 | www.sju.edu/uc Shippensburg University see profile on page 42 John L. Grove College of business Shippensburg, Pennsylvania | +1 717/477-1434 | www.ship.edu/business University of Pennsylvania Wharton School Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | +1 215/898-7507 | www.wharton.upenn.edu
n

South Carolina
Clemson University Department of Management Clemson, South Carolina | +1 864/656-2011 | www.clemson.edu College of Charleston Department of Management and Marketing Charleston, South Carolina | +1 843/953-5507 | www.cofc.edu greenville Technical College Greenville, South Carolina | +1 864/250-8111 www.gvltec.edu Midlands Technical College Continuing Education Columbia, South Carolina | +1 803/732-0432 | www.mtctraining.com Trident Technical College business Department Charleston, South Carolina | +1 843/572-6022 | www.tridenttech.edu University of South Carolina see profile on page 43 Darla Moore School of business Columbia, South Carolina | +1 803/777-3482 | www.moore.sc.edu
n n n n n

tennessee
Chattanooga State Technical Community College business and Information Technologies Chattanooga, Tennessee | +1 423/697-4441 | www.chattanoogastate.edu
n

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

ng

33

am

gr

Pro

vie Re Di

te s

SM

Ma

Middle Tennessee State University Department of Management and Marketing Murfreesboro, Tennessee | +1 615/898-2736 | www.tnstate.edu/business Tennessee State University College of business Nashville, Tennessee | +1 615/963-7123 | www.tnstate.edu/busadmin University of Memphis Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management Memphis, Tennessee | +1 901/678-3721 | www.memphis.edu University of Tennessee College of business Administration Knoxville, Tennessee | +1 865/974-5061 | www.bus.utk.edu Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management Nashville, Tennessee | +1 615/322-2534 | www.owen.vanderbilt.edu

Ph

Ce

As

texas
Baylor University hankamer School of business Waco, Texas | +1 254/710-2261 | www.baylor.edu Palo Alto College Management Program San Antonio, Texas | +1 210/921-5151 | www.alamo.edu/pac/htm Sam Houston State University Department of Management and Marketing huntsville, Texas | +1 936/294-1254 | www.shsu.edu St. Edwards University Graduate School of Management Austin, Texas | +1 512/448-8400 | www.stedwards.edu Stephen f. Austin State University Department of Management, Marketing and International business Nacogdoches, Texas | +1 936/468-4103 | www.sfasu.edu Texas A&M International University A.r. Sanchez, Jr. School of business Laredo, Texas | +1 956/326-2495 | www.tamiu.edu/coba Texas A&M University Mays business School College Station, Texas | +1 979/845-1616 | www.business.tamu.edu Texas Christian University M.J. Neeley School of business Fort Worth, Texas | +1 817/257-7717 | www.neeley.tcu.edu
n n n

CP

Ba

34

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ate

ste

fic

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

University of Dallas Graduate School of Management Irving, Texas | +1 972/721-5000 | www.udallas.edu University of Houston College of Technology houston, Texas | +1 713/743-2255 | www.tech.uh.edu University of Houston Downtown College of business houston, Texas | +1 713/221-8000 | www.uhd.edu University of North Texas Department of Management Denton, Texas | +1 940/565-3140 | www.coba.unt.edu/mgmt University of Texas Austin McCombs School of business Austin, Texas | +1 512/471-3322 | www.mccombs.utexas.edu University of Texas Dallas ISM Approved School of Management richardson, Texas | +1 972/883-2705 http://som.utdallas.edu

Consider a degree in Supply Chain Management.


Outstanding opportunity in the heart of the Midwest.
Our SCM graduates are actively recruited by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) John Deere Monsanto State Farm and many more Fortune 500 companies.

Le arn more at wiu.edu/cbt or call (309) 298-1619.


www.ism.ws Supply IN Demand

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

35

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

SM

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

University of Texas El Paso College of business Administration El Paso, Texas | +1 915/747-5174 | http://business.utep.edu

utah
Brigham Young University Marriott School Provo, Utah | +1 801/422-4285 | http://marriottschool.byu.edu Weber State University John b. Goddard School of business and Economics Ogden, Utah | +1 801/626-7307 | http://goddard.weber.edu
n n

virginia
American Public University System Department of Transportation and Logistics Management Manassas, Virginia | 877/755-2787 | www.apu.apus.edu Hampton University School of business hampton, Virginia | +1 757/727-5472 | www.hamptonu.edu Northern Virginia Community College business Technologies Division Alexandria, Virginia | +1 703/845-6313 | www.nvcc.edu/Alexandria Old Dominion University College of business and Public Administration Norfolk, Virginia | +1 757/683-3964 | www.odu.edu Tidewater Community College business, Public Services and Technologies Division Portsmouth, Virginia | +1 757/822-2300 | www.tcc.edu University of Virginia School of Continuing and Professional Studies Charlottesville, Virginia |+1 703/536-1139 | www.scps.virginia.edu Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of business Information Technology blacksburg, Virginia | +1 540/231-6596 | www.bit.vt.edu
n n n n n

Washington
Central Washington University College of business Ellensburg, Washington | +1 509/963-1955 | www.cwu.edu Shoreline Community College business Administration Division Seattle, Washington | +1 206/546-4665 | www.shoreline.edu University of Washington Foster School of business Seattle, Washington | +1 206/685-3400 | www.foster.washington.edu
n n

36

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ate

ste

fic

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

Broad College of Business

Supply Chain Management Programs


from one of the worlds top supply chain schools
Want to stay on the leading edge of supply chain knowledge? Choose programs from the supply chain management school thats been on the leading edge for five decades. Master of Science in Supply Chain Management A unique graduate program providing specific deeper knowledge of supply chain practices and technologies in a structure that allows it to be completed while students are working full time. Rated #2 by U.S. News & World Report, 2010
http://broad.msu.edu/supplychain/msscm 517-432-6458

Executive Development Programs Our SCM programs offer real-world business knowledge, allowing participants to put their education into action in the workplace.

Purchasing and Supply Chain Management Executive Seminar - June 3-8, 2012 West Michigan Supply Chain Management Certificate Series - January 12-December 6, 2012
800-356-5705 http://broad.msu.edu/edp/open

Broad Executive Summit - October 25-26, 2011 Supply Chain Logistics Management Executive Seminar May 6-11, 2012

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Wisconsin
Lakeshore Technical College Cleveland, Wisconsin | 888/468-6582 www.gotoltc.com Northeast Wisconsin Technical College business and Information Technology Green bay, Wisconsin | +1 920/498-5435 | www.nwtc.edu University of Wisconsin Eau Claire Department of Management and Marketing Eau Claire, Wisconsin | +1 715/836-3677 | www.uwec.edu/cob University of Wisconsin Madison Grainger Center for Supply Chain Management Madison, Wisconsin | +1 608/262-1941 | www.bus.wisc.edu/grainger University of Wisconsin Stout College of Management Menomonie, Wisconsin | +1 715/232-2696 | www.uwstout.edu University of Wisconsin Superior Transportation and Logistics Management Superior, Wisconsin | +1 715/394-8374 www.uwsuper.edu/acaddept/dbe/trans/index.cfm University of Wisconsin Whitewater College of business and Economics Whitewater, Wisconsin | +1 262/472-3964 | www.uww.edu/cobe
n n

universities Outside the united States


Australia
Curtin University Curtin business School Perth | 61-8-9266-1134 | www.cbs.curtin.edu.au Southern Cross University business School Lismore | 61-2-6626-9168 | http://www.scu.edu.au/business University of South Australia School of Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Mawson Lakes | 61-8-8302-3095 | www.unisa.edu.au
n n

Canada
Conestoga School of business Kitchener | +1 519/748-5220 | www.conestogac.on.ca george Brown College School of business Toronto | +1 416/415-5000 | www.georgebrown.ca
n n n

38

Supply IN Demand

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

www.ism.ws

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

cia

elo

rs

ate

SM

ste

fic

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Ryerson University Yates School of Graduate Studies Toronto | +1 416/979-5000 | www.ryerson.ca

China
fudan University School of Management Shanghai | 86-21-65642673 | www.fudan.edu.cn Jiao Tong University Antai College of Economics and Management Shanghai | 86-21-52586794 | www.acem.sjtu.edu.cn/index_en.jsp
n n n

france
Audencia Nantes School of Management Nantes | 33-2-40-37-34-34 | www.audencia.com/specialised-masters MgCM Professional Training Programs Nanterre | 33-1-49-67-06-06 | www.mgcm.com
n n

germany
European Business School (EBS) Supply Management Institute (SMI) Wiesbaden | 49-611-36018-883 | www.ebs.edu University of Stuttgart Department of business Administration baden-Wurttemberg | 49-711-685-83161 | www.bwi.uni-stuttgart.de WHU-Otto Beisheim School of Management Masters of Science Program Vallendar | 49-261-6509-545 | www.whu.edu
n n n n n n

South Korea
Seoul School of Integrated Science & Technologies Graduate Institute of Management Seoul | 82-70-7012-2227 | www.assist.ac.kr/english
n

turkey
Dogus University Institute of Science & Technology Istanbul | 90-216-3271104 | www.dogus.edu.tr
n

united Kingdom
Cranfield University School of Management bedfordshire, England | 44-0-1234-758102 | www.som.cranfield.ac.uk Heriot-Watt University School of Management & Languages Edinburgh, Scotland | 44-131-4513883 | www.sml.hw.ac.uk/logistics
n n

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

ng

39

am

gr

Pro

vie Re

te s

SM

Ma

Ph

Ce

As

CP

Ba

Kingston University School of business Kingston Upon Thames, England | 44-2084-179000 | www.kingston.ac.uk The Robert gordon University Aberdeen business School Aberdeen, Scotland | 44-1224-263858 | www.rgu.ac.uk University of Birmingham birmingham business School birmingham, England | 44-121-414-6266 | www.mba.bham.ac.uk University of glamorgan Glamorgan business School Pontypridd, Wales | 44-1443-654450 | http://bus.glam.ac.uk University of Huddersfield School of Applied Sciences huddersfield, England | 44-1484-473346 | www2.hud.ac.uk/sas University of Hull hull University business School hull, England | 44-0-1482-347500 | www2.hull.ac.uk University of Liverpool School of Management Liverpool, England | 44-151-7952476 | www.liverpool.ac.uk University of Salford Salford business School Salford, England | 44-161-2955923 | www.business.salford.ac.uk University of Strathclyde Strathclyde business School Glasgow, Scotland | 44-1415-5483145 | www.strath.ac.uk
n

40

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

Di

sta

so

ch

.D

rti

Supply Management Education

cia

elo

rs

ate

ste

fic

nc

eL

rs

ea

rni

ng

American graduate University


Contact: Marie Sirney 877/351-9060, extension 1003

Arizona State University W. P. Carey School of Business


Contact: John fowler +1 480/965-6044

f +1 626/915-1709 a 733 N. Dodsworth Ave.


Covina, CA 91724 U.S.

f +1 480/965-8629 a P.O. Box 874706


Tempe, AZ 85287 U.S.

e mariesirney@agu.edu w www.agu.edu
Established in 1976, American Graduate University (AGU) has been a standard-bearer of academic excellence in distance learning, serving thousands of dedicated professionals from civilian agencies, from all branches of the military and from commercial organizations of all sizes. AGU functions as a university without walls. We specifically design high-level courses to cater to the busy life of a professional adult, offering masters degrees, masters certificates and customized on-site training in the areas of: Supply Management Federal Acquisition Management Contract Management Project/Program Management Business Administration American Graduate University is accredited by the accrediting commission of the Distance Education and Training Council (DETC). AGUs open admissions policy means you can begin your coursework at any time of the year from anywhere. For more information, visit www.agu.edu or call 877/351-9060.

e wpcarey.scm@asu.edu w www.wpcarey.asu.edu/scm
The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University takes an integrated approach to supply chain management. At W. P. Carey, supply chain is a way of thinking about business, understanding that everything we do is connected and impacts everything else that must be done. While addressing the three prime areas of the supply chain procurement, operations and logistics our programs focus on integrating all aspects of the product and service life cycle, from the design stage to final customer delivery and product disposal. Globalization and information-management tools are important considerations in this approach. Our department offers undergraduate, MBA and doctoral degrees; graduate certificates and custom MBA degree programs; and online professional certificates and executive education programs. Gartner Research recently ranked the W. P. Carey supply chain management program No. 3 in the nation.

California State University Dominguez Hills


Contact: Babette Wald

Cleveland State University Operations and Supply Chain Management


Contact: Dr. Oya I. Tukel, Chair and Professor +1 216/687-4741

Extension Program Coordinator


+1 310/243-3730

a 1000 E. Victoria St., EE 1335


Carson, CA 90747 U.S.

f +1 216/687-9343 a 1860 E. 18th St., BU 539


Cleveland, OH 44115 U.S.

e bwald@lists.csudh.edu w www.csudh.edu/supplychainmanagement
California State University, Dominguez Hills offers two online certificate programs taught by leading professionals in the field to help advance your career in supply chain management, production and inventory control, and purchasing. Production and Inventory Control features instruction in scheduling and planning, operations execution and control, resource planning and strategic management of resources, helping prepare students for the APICS CPIM certification examinations. Purchasing features instruction in cost-price analysis and negotiation, public sector procurement and advanced purchasing concepts, helping prepare students for the ISM CPSM certification examinations. The certificates each consist of five three-unit courses of bachelors degree credit. Students may pursue the entire certificate or take individual courses. For further information, visit www.csudh.edu/lapicsonline and www.csudh.edu/purchasingonline, or call 877/GO-HILLS.

e o.icmeli@csuohio.edu w www.csuohio.edu/business/osm
The OSM Department in the Monte Ahuja College of Business at Cleveland State University is committed to excellence in research and teaching. Our nationally and internationally recognized faculty members are active in scholarly pursuits and participate in training/consulting activities in areas such as project management and innovation management. The OSM Department offers a BBA with a major in operations and supply chain management, and a specialization in global operations management. We offer an MBA with a concentration in operations and supply chain management and a DBA in operations management. We prepare students for APICS certification, and our strong relationships with regional corporations provide opportunities for internships and employment. The Monte Ahuja College of Business Administration has more than 75 full-time faculty members, with programs accredited by AACSB.

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

41

Howard University
Contact: Ronald Straight or Eric S. Williams +1 202/806-1531 or +1 202/806-1674

Michigan State University


Contact: Nancy M. Taylor +1 517/432-6458

a School of Business, 2600 6th St. NW


Washington, D.C. 20059 U.S.

f +1 517/432-1112 a Broad College Supply Chain Management Department


N370 Business College Complex East Lansing, MI 48824 U.S.

e rstraight@howard.edu or

eric.s.williams@howard.edu

e taylor@bus.msu.edu w http://broad.msu.edu
The Broad College of Business leads the nation in supply chain management education. Programs range from undergraduate and graduate degrees to executive education and corporate learning programs. We offer a variety of formats at convenient locations: on-campus classes or short-duration seminars at our learning center or your facility, as well as online and blended programs. From a Master of Science in supply chain management (SCM) to an SCM certificate series, our approach is to integrate supply chain management topics from manufacturing operations to procurement and logistics. We are a leading research university with a diverse portfolio of cutting-edge research and first-rate faculty. We create a closeknit learning environment while teaching our students to apply their new-found knowledge to the real world through practical, hands-on activities and projects.

w www.bschool.howard.edu/programs/scm/index.html
Howard Universitys charter was enacted by the U.S. Congress and subsequently approved by President Andrew Johnson on March 2, 1867. Located in northwest Washington, D.C., Howard University is one of only 48 U.S. private, doctoral/researchextensive universities. It comprises 12 schools and colleges with 10,500 students enjoying academic pursuits in more than 120 areas of study leading to undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees. The university continues to attract the nations top students and produces more on-campus AfricanAmerican Ph.D.s than any other university in the world. The supply chain management (SCM) program has provided an MBA degree with a concentration in SCM since it began in 2001. In April 2007 the Howard University administration approved an undergraduate SCM program.

Rutgers Business School Newark and New Brunswick


Contact: Dr. Lei Lei +1 973/353-5185

Shippensburg University John L. grove College of Business


Contact: finance and Supply Chain Management Department +1 717/477-1434

f +1 973/353-1325 a 1 Washington Park


Newark, NJ 07102-3122 U.S.

f +1 717/477-4067 a Grove Hall 228


1871 Old Main Dr. Shippensburg, PA 17257 U.S.

e llei@business.rutgers.edu w www.business.rutgers.edu/scmms
ew Supply Chain Management and Marketing Science N Department ranked 11th overall by AMR Research. 3 full-time professors focused on end-to-end supply chain 3 management, research, teaching and collaboration with industry. ur faculty is globally recognized for its expertise in O procurement, supply chain optimization and marketing science that interfaces with the supply chain and the business. orld-class research on sustainability, responsiveness and W flexibility, and risk management. xecutive Education Program based on current industry trends E and timely topics to help your business and career. Rutgers Supply Chain Management & Marketing Science: Improving efficiencies and effectiveness in supply chain management.

e jwkohl@ship.edu w www.ship.edu/business
Shippensburg University is located in southcentral Pennsylvania, a key hub for warehousing and distribution. As a result, students in the John L. Grove College of Business who are supply chain management (SCM) and logistics management majors find plentiful internship and employment opportunities at area companies that specialize in getting goods to market. Courses cover global logistics, strategic procurement, quality management and continuous improvement, supply chain systems, warehouse management and data mining, as well as core business subjects. Students can participate in the colleges SCM team, which took first place in the 2011 CSCMP Pittsburgh College Challenge. The John L. Grove College of Business is accredited by AACSB International and is recognized by US News & World Report as one of the nations top undergraduate business programs.

42

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

UCLA Extension
Contact: Carol Eisman +1 310/206-1548

University of Michigan Ross School of Business - Master of Supply Chain Management Program
Contact: Eric Olson +1 734/647-1396

f +1 310/206-2815 a 10995 Le Conte Ave., Suite 540


Los Angeles, CA 90024-1333 U.S.

f +1 734/763-7804 a 701 Tappan St.


Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1234 U.S.

e ceisman@uclaextension.edu w www.uclaextension.edu/techmanagement
UCLA Extensions Certificate in Supply Chain Management offers precise tools and practical knowledge to help you manage all aspects of supply chain management, including purchasing, logistics, inventory management, compliance and outsourcing. With a unique two-track path for government and private sectors, supply chain managers can tailor the program to fit their professional needs. This eight-course program is offered in cooperation with the Los Angeles affiliate of the Institute for Supply Management (ISMLos Angeles, Inc.) and the California Association of Public Purchasing Officers (CAPPO). Some of the courses may be used for ISM Continuing Education Hours (CEHs). The certificate may be completed entirely online. In addition, customized programs can be offered on-site at your company.

e rossmscm@umich.edu w www.bus.umich.edu/mscm
The University of Michigans Ross School of Business offers an intensive one-year masters degree in supply chain management (MSCM). The Ross MSCM emphasizes action-based learning throughout our comprehensive SCM curriculum, taught by our world-renowned operations management faculty. MSCM students receive the necessary skills to be successful supply chain leaders via our business boot camp, which covers topics in finance, accounting, statistics, marketing and strategy. Students further develop themselves as global leaders via specialized leadership training modules and enjoy unprecedented access to senior industry leaders in SCM. The cornerstone of the MSCM program is a paid team-based internship with the Tauber Institute for Global Operations. Assignments range from strategic analysis and supply chain audits to supply chain design issues and distribution challenges with top companies around the globe.

University of San Diego


Contact: Lauren Lukens +1 619/260-7901

University of South Carolina, Darla Moore School of Business


Contact: Dr. John Jensen +1 803/777-6824

f +1 619/260-7611 a 5998 Alcala Park


Durango, Suite A San Diego, CA 92110 U.S.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Master of Science in Supply Chain Management

a 1705 College St.


Columbia, SC 29208 U.S.

e jensen@moore.sc.edu w www.moore.sc.edu
Companies covet managers and analysts with strong technical skills who can think broadly about business issues. They find them in the Global Supply Chain and Operations Management Program at the Moore School of Business. Rigorous, interdisciplinary undergraduate and MBA curricula blend topnotch faculty, innovative courses and hands-on learning within major corporations in a uniquely powerful experience. The program, coupled with the Global Supply Chain and Process Management Center, offers: A cutting-edge experiential education Six Sigma Green Belt certification to qualifying students nnovative and value-added operations and supply chain I solutions to member organizations knowledge-creation and networking forum for academia and A practice.

e msscm@sandiego.edu w www.sandiego.edu/msscm
The ISM Approved Master of Science in Supply Chain Management is designed as a highly personalized, relevant learning experience for working professionals. Delivered via e-learning with only a few on-campus sessions per year, this ISM Approved program affords you the opportunity to obtain two professional qualifications, one from ISM and one from CIPS. Develop leadership competencies that will enable you to initiate change and drive improvements across increasingly complex supply chain networks. Gain the experience necessary to deliver real, bottom-line benefits to your organization. Distinctions: ISM Approved CIPS Accredited Top Ranked Business School E-Learning Relevant Curriculum With Applied Learning Experienced Faculty Flexible Delivery Expanded Professional Network Join us now for two years that will change your life!

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

43

Vincennes University
Contact: John Zalesak +1 812/888-4271

Washington University in St. Louis Olin Business School


Contact: Nikki Lemley, Associate

f +1 812/888-5582 a BB119, 1002 N. First St.


Vincennes, IN 47591 U.S.

Director, Specialized Masters Programs Admissions


+1 314/935-8469

f +1 314/935-4464 a Campus Box 1133


1 Brookings Dr. St. Louis, MO 63130-4899 U.S.

e jzalesak@vinu.edu w www.vinu.edu/logistics_ism
To be competitive and successful, business and industry need specialists knowledgeable in the full circle of supply chain logistics and management. Vincennes University teaches internal and external management with instruction in procurement, production planning and scheduling, materials management and transportation. A one-year certificate, a two-year AS degree and a four-year BS degree (a 2+2 program with the University of Indianapolis) are available. Indianas first college, Vincennes University, is the states premier transfer institution and a leader in innovative career programming. In addition to educational programming in supply chain logistics, Vincennes University offers training classes through the Business & Industry division at various locations across the state.

e msscminfo@wustl.edu w www.olin.wustl.edu/msscm
Exceptional management of a companys supply chain is absolutely essential, especially in todays challenging economic environment. Olin Business Schools Master of Science in Supply Chain Management (MS/SCM) equips graduates to stand out in this challenging and critically important career field. This 36-credit-hour program brings together faculty renowned for their work in risk management and supply chain research, a cutting-edge curriculum and industry collaboration. The full-time program may be done in two or three semesters, and a part-time version is available to working professionals. As one of seven schools at Washington University in St. Louis an internationally recognized institution of higher education and research Olin Business School has exceptional resources and offers a highly personalized educational experience.

INDEX Of ADVERTISERS
American graduate University ............... 7, 41 Arizona State University............................. 41 California State University Dominguez Hills ......................................... 41 Cleveland State University ......................... 41 georgia Institute of Technology................. 25 Howard University...................................... 42 Iowa State University ................................. 31 Michigan State University .................... 37, 42 Rutgers Business School ............................ 42 Shippensburg University ............................ 42 UCLA Extension ................................... 11, 43 University of Michigan ............................... 43 University of North florida ........................ 27 University of San Diego ...................... IfC, 43 University of South Carolina....................... 43 Vincennes University .................................. 44 Washington University in St. Louis ............. 44 Western Illinois University........................... 35

44

Supply IN Demand

www.ism.ws

?
Free Membership Gets You on the Fast Track!
As a full-time student or academician, you are eligible for dues-free membership in the Institute for Supply Management (ISM). Once your dues-free membership is approved, you will have exclusive access to all of the benefits provided to regular members, including: nlimited access to the Members Only section of U the ISM website ree subscription to Inside Supply Management F magazine ISMs award-winning publication etworking opportunities with more than N 40,000 supply management professionals at ISM or affiliate events ttend ISM conferences at the discounted rate A of US$250 ull access to thousands of articles and research F on supply management topics areer development and significant discounts on C educational products and seminars ontinuing education opportunities C through the ISM Knowledge Center at www.ism-knowledgecenter.ws iscounts on professional certification to D advance your career, Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM) Access to ISMs Online Career Center he ability to enter ISMs annual Student T Essay Contest, where winners receive one free registration at ISMs Annual International Supply Management Conference & Educational Exhibit (May 6-9, 2012, Baltimore, Maryland). If youre serious about your career in supply management, there is simply no substitute for ISM membership.

Interested?
To join, e-mail your contact information name, full address, phone number and school schedule or business credentials to isminfo@ism.ws. Please reference source code SC057-8/09. Additional information about valuable membership resources is available, including a dues-free membership application, in the Membership section of the ISM website under Students and Educators.

Criteria
Educators Employed full-time with an academic appointment as a teacher, research specialist, department head, director or dean of a college, university or other academic institution with an educational responsibility including purchasing, materials management or other related fields. Students Enrolled full-time in an accredited community college or four-year college or university. Full-time is defined as 12 or more credit hours for undergraduate students, and six or more hours for graduate students. You must indicate your estimated date of graduation on your application and submit a copy of your school-issued class schedule for the current semester as documentation of your full-time status.

Join Us Online
Connect with us online at Facebook.com, LinkedIn.com or Plaxo.com, or follow us on Twitter.com. 800/752-6276 www.ism.ws

www.ism.ws

Supply IN Demand

45

management as the identification, acquisition, access, positioning and management of resources and related capabilities the organization needs or potentially needs in the attainment of its strategic objectives.

Institute for Supply Management

(ISM) defines supply

INSTITUTE FOR SUPPLY MANAGEMENT 2011

Supply

IN Demand

Supplement to Inside Supply Management

P.O. Box 22160 Tempe, AZ 85285-2160 800/888-6276 +1 480/752-6276 www.ism.ws

JC SC 057 8/11 37.2M