ERA Food Scoring Guide eBook | Obesity | Vitamin

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FOOD SCORING GUIDE

M. Eat to Live– The Revolutionary Formula for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss Cholesterol Protection For Life– Lower Your Cholesterol Safely and Permanently Disease-Proof Your Child– Feeding Kids Right Fasting and Eating for Health– A Medical Doctor’s Program for Conquering Disease Eat For Health– The Original High-Nutrient-Density Program to Achieve Ideal Weight and Superior Health Two-Book Set .D.Other books by Joel Fuhrman.

LLC . Nutritional Excellence. M.D.tm FOOD SCORING GUIDE JOEL FUHRMAN.

without permission in writing from the copyright holder. including information storage and retrieval systems. LLC (877) 372-4872 www. Neither this.D. For reasons of privacy. Inc. contact: Nutritional Excellence. Do not start.Copyright 2008 by Joel Fuhrman. drugs and even surgery. Inc. and do not change your diet if you are ill or on medication. in some cases. is intended to take the place of personalized medical care or treatment. except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages in a review. nor any other book. All Rights Reserved No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means. . stop.com Printed in the United States of America ISBN: 0-974463-39-1 ISBN-13: 978-0974463-39-1 Publisher’s Note: Keep in mind that results vary from person to person. Book design: Lennon Media. or change medication without professional medical advice. For information. M. the names of patients have been changed. Some people have a medical history and/or condition that may warrant individualized recommendation and. except under the supervision of a competent physician.EatRightAmerica. Cover design: Creative Syndicate.

Dedicated to Americans who are taking steps to improve our nation’s health .

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. 132 vii . . . . . . . 6. . 83 Nutrient Density Scores. . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Your Commitment to Health . . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . 55 High-Nutrient Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . America’s Health Crisis and You . . . . . 131 About the Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . . . 41 You Are What You Eat! . . . . 3 Dramatic Results Without Drugs . 79 Dr. . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1. . . . . . .Contents Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Measuring Nutrient Density . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. . . . . . . . . . . . ix Introduction . . . . . Fuhrman’s Top 30 Super Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 A Message from the Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. . . . . . .

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The average American consumes 3600 calories per day. but we also eat all the wrong foods.Foreword M odern America is in the midst of an all-you-can-eat food fest that has us literally bursting at the seams. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that an astonishing 95% of all Americans fail to get the minimum daily requirement of nutrients. most Americans are significantly undernourished. Eating the wrong foods leads us to consume far too many calories. we eat too much and too often. Clearly. because all of these excess calories come from low-nutrient foods. The most healthful foods—fruits and vegetables—make up only 7% of our national diet. nearly twice as many as we need. However. When you factor in the sedentary lifestyle most Americans have adopted (three out ix . The standard American diet now consists of 52% processed foods and 41% meats and dairy products.

The CDC now estimates that one-half of all children will be overweight by 2010. We don’t have to be a sickly nation with illnesses and medical costs spiraling out of control. and one thing has become crystal clear—nutrition is powerful medicine.x Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide of ten American adults did not exercise even once last year). and that for the first time in our nation’s history. and even some cancers at much earlier ages. He has spent the past 20 years analyzing over 20.000 scientific studies and devising dietary . allergies. Fortunately. The World Health Organization now ranks the United States as the fattest nation on earth—including children. you have the perfect recipe for the obesity and chronic illness epidemics that are sweeping the nation. I have studied epidemiology for more than 30 years. hypertension. asthma. Dr. America’s children are developing “adult” chronic illnesses such as heart disease. we need to make fundamental changes in our eating habits. you don’t need to wait until everybody else changes. I urge you to adopt the eating principles described in this book. Fuhrman is one of the world’s authorities on the effects of optimal nutrition on health. and we need to make them fast. In spite of our spending more on healthcare than any other nation. But to restore health to America. type 2 diabetes. you can make the vitally necessary changes today. the current generation of children will not live as long as their parents.

Colin Campbell. a study on Dr.D.D. of the University of Southern California and Dr. He has tested his methods with patients for more than 15 years and has convinced me and many of my colleagues that a diet of nutrient-rich foods can prevent and cure obesity and most of America’s health problems. done in association with Barbara Sarter. Dr. But how do you know which ones are which? One of the most powerful and revealing elements of Dr. Ph. To take advantage of Dr. In fact.Foreword xi programs that take advantage of his findings. They also kept the weight off through the two-year follow-up. Fuhrman’s approach. Fuhrman’s work is his food rating system—Aggregate Nutrient Density Index (ANDI). In most cases. you need to increase your intake of high-nutrient foods and decrease your intake of low-nutrient foods. high blood pressure. ANDI is presented in this book to help you understand the differences between high-nutrient foods and those lacking in important nutrients. and obesity simply disappear as a result of patients adopting the dietary principles described in this book. diabetes. Fuhrman has put his scientific knowledge into action in the kitchen. T. of Cornell University found that the people who followed his dietary recommendations lost more weight than in any other study in medical history. I have witnessed firsthand the results of his remarkable efforts. This food rating system also shows you caloric den- .. Fuhrman’s high-nutrient diet. diseases such as heart disease. Ph..

Not only will you and your family benefit greatly through enhanced health and longevity.. blood pressure medications. Fuhrman’s advice. this book is for you. If you are tired of taking cholesterol-lowering medications. or other prescriptions that do nothing but treat symptoms without addressing the underlying cause of your ailment. this book is for you.D. and shows you how to put it to work in your everyday life. If you have tried to lose weight but failed using traditional or fad diets. In this book (and more extensively in his comprehensive two-book set. Clinical Psychiatry. Follow Dr. Now you can control your weight and health destiny like never before. Fuhrman takes the best of the world’s nutritional research. M.P.H.Sc. this book offers tremendous benefits for you and your children. A. You will be amazed at what optimal nutrition can do for you. Nutritional Epidemiology. your medical bills will go down as well.xii Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide sity. M. Eat For Health). and International Health Harvard Medical School (1974-2006) . William Menzin. low-nutrient foods. M. It will change the way you think about foods. and you will lose weight and keep it off. Dr. The information in this book may save your life. makes it understandable. which helps you avoid high-calorie.. If you are raising a family.

Nutritional science has made dramatic advances in recent years.Introduction N o one wants to have a heart attack. But lots of people die from these conditions every day... or develop cancer. it is now possible to formulate a few simple diet and lifestyle principles that can save you years of suffering and premature death. Using the information gleaned from scientific studies.unnecessarily. suffer a debilitating stroke. You have an unprecedented opportunity in human history to live healthier and longer than ever before. The overwhelming accumulation of scientific knowledge points to a dramatic conclusion—the majority of diseases plaguing Americans are preventable. How much would it be worth to you for a guarantee that you would never have a heart attack or a stroke? What would it be worth to you to see your children and grandchil1 . But living healthier and longer comes at a price.

the facts and guidelines contained herein will astound most physicians. most physicians still have no idea that food can be your most powerful artillery in the fight against the major illnesses that plague Americans.2 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide dren grow healthfully and happily? What would you be willing to pay for the assurance that you would not leave your spouse or your children all alone? Fortunately. Although the research is readily available for all to see. the expenditure is infinitely affordable—little more than the effort needed to establish new. more healthful eating habits. Still. . Everything in this book is carefully referenced to recent scientific studies.

Over the past thirty years.000 Americans died from obesity and the weight-related chronic illnesses that develop as a result of being overweight.America’s Health Crisis and You mericans are digging their graves with their knives and forks. 400. The poor diet that Americans eat also has resulted in an epidemic of heart attacks and cancer never before seen in human history. The ever increasing waistline of America is not merely a cosmetic issue. This march toward national obesity is taking a dramatic toll on our health and the economy. Last year alone. and nearly one-third (31%) of our children. At present. We literally are eating ourselves to death. Most people in America are overweight. the average weight of an 3 Chapter One A . and is causing medical and financial tragedies for more and more families. and about half of us are taking drugs for chronic illnesses. are overweight or obese. two-thirds (67%) of American adults.

. Because of America’s eating habits.. Center for Disease Control (CDC) predicts that the current generation of children will be the first in our nation’s history to live shorter lives than their parents. food everywhere Food is available and eaten in so many places—the car. Health Complications of Obesity • • • • • • • • • • Increased overall mortality Adult onset diabetes Hypertension Degenerative arthritis Coronary artery disease Obstructive sleep apnea Gallstones Fatty infiltration of liver Restrictive lung disease Cancer Overweight individuals are more likely to die from all causes. Food. the movies.4 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide American male has increased 27 pounds (from 164 pounds to 191 pounds).S. Childhood obesity has tripled over the past twenty years. the office. the TV room. the gas station.virtually everywhere—that America is fast becoming . including heart disease and cancer. the U. the ball game.

desserts. and dairy products. and only 7% of the calories we consume come from healthful fruits and vegetables. animal foods. and soft drinks now comprise 25% of all calories consumed in America.America’s Health Crisis and You 5 an all-you-can-eat buffet.S. low-calorie fruits and vegetables than any other people on the face of the earth. And we are almost always selecting the wrong foods. Composition of the American Diet 7% Fruits & Vegetables 51% Refined & Processed Foods 42% Dairy & Animal Products American diet designed for disease The U. Americans have access to a greater abundance of affordable high-nutrient. Sweets. high-calorie processed foods. Surgeon General classifies overweight and obesity as two stages of a single disease and has called our current eating habits a greater threat to our nation’s health and . But a shocking 93% of the typical American diet consists of low-nutrient.

3 million Americans will suffer a heart attack this year. Broken hearts We are losing the war against heart disease. Today. One hundred years ago. shapes. People of all weights. The tragedy of this is enormous. Modern medical techniques and drugs cannot win this war because the true cause of disease is overlooked. Heart disease is caused by inadequate nutrition. and sizes are dying needlessly from nutritional ignorance. and cancer that are plaguing the country. They are causing the record-high rates of heart disease. • 10% die of strokes. Heart disease (cardiovascular disease) kills more people than the next four leading causes of death combined. heart disease only affected 5% of the population. Impact of heart disease on America • 40% of all Americans die of heart attacks. More than 1.6 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide economy than terrorism or bird flu. it affects almost all Americans as cardiovascularrelated deaths have climbed to over 50%. The Surgeon General’s assessment of America’s eating habits (which in all likelihood means your eating habits) is critically important because bad eating habits lead to bigger problems than just larger dress sizes. diabetes. strokes. • 58% of deaths are related to cardiovascular disease. and when you .

The disability. and years of life lost are almost totally the result of dietary ignorance.America’s Health Crisis and You 7 consider that nobody really has to die from a heart. . Infant and childhood mortality has fallen dramatically. but people who reach adulthood are not living longer than at other times in human history. you simply must eat properly. The average age has gone up. This is not entirely true.or circulatory system-related death. suffering. it is even more of a tragedy. It is not impossible or even difficult to protect yourself. Deaths from Diseases of the Heart Deaths in thousands United States 1900-2003 Source: American Heart Association—CDC/NCHS Are Americans living longer? Most people accept the notion that we are living longer now than ever before in human history. Nothing else can protect you.

but when these same individuals move to America. the diseases that afflict today’s Americans are not the result of luck or genetics. However. the reality is that nutrition. Modern plumbing and refrigeration methods have greatly lowered the rates of infectious diseases. For example. but fewer than 3 people out of 100 are successful at losing weight and keeping it off permanently. Although many people accept the notion that disease is the result of genetics or luck. their children develop the same rates of heart disease as other Americans. and heart disease have negated these advances in public health. They are a recent phenomenon in human history and directly parallel unhealthful . stroke. adults do not have a longer healthy-life-expectancy than centuries ago because increases in the incidence of cancer. those living in rural China have less than a 2% heart disease risk. Diet and disease Diets of all description flood the market. it is very rare today that a woman dies during or soon after childbirth. exercise. Obviously. and environment overwhelmingly overshadow genetic considerations. The typical adult living today has almost no chance of reaching their genetic potential. The number of overweight and obese individuals is at an all-time high and still climbing.8 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Unlike in previous times.

America’s Health Crisis and You

9

Low-nutrient foods promote food cravings and overeating. High-nutrient foods promote a normal caloric drive and a normal weight.

changes in dietary patterns. The ten-fold increase in heart attacks in the last 100 years is because we are eating more low-nutrient food—lots more. You cannot escape from the biological law of cause and effect. Health results from healthful living and eating. Disease and premature death result primarily from unhealthful food choices.

Home cooking better
A major factor in the increase of diet-related health problems is the fact that Americans no longer make and eat most of their meals at home. The once common scene of a

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Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide

family gathered around the kitchen eating a healthful home-cooked meal has become so rare that many of today’s children have never experienced it. About half of all food dollars are spent eating outside the home, with the largest percent of this being spent in fast food restaurants. Traditional homemade foods are not only more healthful, they are lower in calories. Research shows that we consume double the calories when we eat out.

Macronutrients
Macronutrients are nutrients that contain calories. There are only three macronutrients—fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Macronutrients give us the calories we need for energy and growth. All natural foods contain a mixture of fat, carbohydrate, and protein, although some (primarily animal products) contain only two of the three. For example, a banana is mostly carbohydrate (93%), but it does contain some fat (3%) and protein (4%). Spinach, like all dark leafy green vegetables, contains approximately equal amounts of carbohydrate (40%) and protein (43%), along with a lesser amount of fat (7%). Sirloin steak is all fat (44%) and protein (56%) and contains no carbohydrate. I’ve listed a few more examples on the next page. With Americans gaining weight at such a fast pace, there seems to be an endless stream of diet books that focus on

America’s Health Crisis and You

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Macronutrient Percentages in 10 Sample Foods
Food Carbohydrate Fat Protein

Frozen spinach Artichokes Sesame seeds Red kidney beans Whole wheat bread Banana Hot dog Low-fat yogurt Swiss cheese Sirloin steak

43.5 74.4 15.3 69.9 71.4 92.6 2.3 64.1 5.7 0

16.9 2.4 73.1 3.5 16.9 3.0 82.4 13.1 65.9 44.0

39.6 23.2 11.6 26.6 11.7 4.4 15.3 22.9 28.4 56.0

manipulating the amounts and the percentages of the macronutrients—carbohydrate, fat, and protein—that we eat. But fiddling around with macronutrient percentages is not the way to lose weight or improve health. In fact, the only way to slow the tidal wave of increased chronic disease and obesity is for people to eat less of all three macronutrients. It is a simple equation. Macronutrients are where all of the calories come from. If you overconsume macronutrients (regardless of the percentages of each), you will get too many calories. If you consume too many calories, you will

too. various chronic diseases. and focus on providing yourself with the highest quality diet. forget about macronutrient percentages. There are 13 vitamins and 25 minerals known to be important for human health. and trace amounts . (Some researchers consider fiber and water to be micronutrients. the effects of deficiencies are devastating. Nutritional excellence is achieved by eating foods that have the highest levels of micronutrients. you quickly would get sick and die soon afterwards. and to repair damage. and we would live longer if we ate more.) Micronutrients are extremely important for your health. and premature death. and phytochemicals. Their impact on overall health is broad and vast. Americans eat too few micronutrients. The three main micronutrients are vitamins. Without micronutrients. Micronutrients are needed for your body to manufacture the materials it needs for normal function. Micronutrients Micronutrients are essential nutritional substances that do not contain calories. to rid itself of waste. minerals.12 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide experience excess weight gain. The human body requires large amounts of some of them. To lose weight and improve health. and the importance of the adequate intake of them for overall health cannot be overstated.

The foods . These processed foods do not contain the level and diversity of the vitamins and minerals we get in natural foods. Unnatural foods Knowing that the right micronutrients in the right proportions are easily available to us in whole. natural foods is wonderful. that the average 15-pound wild monkey takes in 600 milligrams per day of vitamin C. But we no longer get our foods in natural form from the wild. magnesium. by anthropologist Katharine Milton found. Berkeley. Natural foods have been shown to contain the right types of them in the right proportions for human survival and good health. the fruits and vegetables that primates eat in the wild are loaded with micronutrients. Differences on that order also were found for intakes of other micronutrients. giving these primates a diet far richer in many essential vitamins and minerals than the diets consumed by any humans in the modern world. For example. for instance. and beta-carotene. potassium. Most of the food we eat is concocted in factories. such as fiber. A study of monkey diets carried out at the University of California.America’s Health Crisis and You 13 of others. The monkey’s diet is amazingly rich in nutrients. 10 times more than the 60-milligram recommended daily allowance (RDA) for the average 150-pound human.

” The modern diet. and grapes. and they should not be considered representative of the amount of nutrients that would be found in an ideal diet.14 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide that primates in the wild eat include green leaves of many kinds and fruits such as figs. primate relatives are eating today. perhaps we could learn new things about our own dietary needs that would help reduce health problems throughout the world. Unfortunately. especially the one most Americans eat. The RDAs set by the government were determined by investigating the foods modern humans eat. The researchers in the monkey study concluded that “throughout history. similar to meat. humans have suffered from all sorts of diet-related diseases. If we paid more attention to what our wild. plums. Despite consuming almost twice as many calories (macronutrients) as we need. berries. fewer than 18% of adults and 2% of children consume the minimum daily requirement of micronutrients recommended. The study also reported that the dark green vegetables the monkeys eat contain the complete array of essential amino acids. . is too low in minerals and not even close to what we should be consuming for optimal health. most people don’t even take in the very low levels recommended in the RDAs.

Poor nutrition and disease Poor nutrition is the primary cause of common diseases. chicken. There are over 1. it should be clear why these and other diseases have become so prevalent. Consuming abundant amounts of micronutrients will help protect you against disease.. cheese. deaths due to diabetes have in- . For example. We eat plenty of meat. Since micronutrients are critical for the prevention of diseases such as heart disease. Fortunately. natural plant foods). and cookies. white bread. and they are necessary for your cells to remove waste and to maintain normal immune function. phytochemicals are present in foods that also are naturally high in vitamins and minerals (i. Phytochemicals are the most recently found class of micronutrients. beans. soda.America’s Health Crisis and You 15 Phytochemicals As serious as deficiencies in vitamins and minerals have become.e. which are very low in micronutrients and contain no phytochemicals. and if you already are sick. cancer. but Americans don’t eat much of them. Vegetables. you need lots of phytochemicals in your diet. and fruit are naturally high in micronutrients.000 important phytochemicals. there is an even more serious one—deficiencies of phytochemicals. pasta. oils. it can help you recover. For optimal health. and dementia.

About twenty years ago. The cancer rate in America rose every year for seventy-five years straight (1930-2005). headaches. kidney diseases. fatigue. body aches.16 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide creased 45% since 1987. Unfortunately. . Only by eating an assortment of natural foods that are micronutrient-rich can you get enough of these compounds to protect yourself from the common diseases that afflict Americans. arthritis. researchers found the missing link. Diabetes is fueled by excess body fat and low nutrient levels in the body’s tissues. trying to assure vitamin adequacy by adding synthetic supplements and isolated vitamins to a diet virtually devoid of the natural sources of these micronutrients did not turn out well. bowel problems. These discoveries led to the creation of the vitamin industry. They discovered that colorful plant foods in their natural state were also rich in thousands of compounds with important health properties for humans—phytochemicals. which today supplies both synthetic vitamins and natural vitamins isolated from their original sources to food manufacturers and many other outlets. and emotional disorders. allergies. The micronutrient deficiencies also leave the body prone to infections. About seventy-five years ago. scientists discovered vitamins and minerals and noted that diseases occurred when vitamin deficiencies occurred. It also was noted that low vitamin intake could lead to cancer.

With this newfound knowledge. Dietary-Induced Premature Aging Effects of the typical American diet: • Excessive weight gain • Diabetes and high blood pressure • Hardening of arteries • Increased LDL cholesterol • Autoimmune diseases • Cancer Low-nutrient foods Just as eating large amounts of micronutrient-rich natural plant foods is of great benefit to your health. eating large amounts of micronutrient-deficient animal foods and . we cannot expect the health of our nation to improve through medical interventions when the underlying cause of the problems—diets dangerously low in micronutrients that are essential to maximize human cellular function—is left unchanged. We have witnessed the power of micronutrients. As you can see.America’s Health Crisis and You 17 This new revelation in the science of health taught us that we need to eat a diet with lots of high-nutrient foods and that supplements cannot take the place of these foods. we have seen the power of nutritional excellence to prevent and even reverse disease.

or those thousands of phytochemicals that are essential for cellular normalcy. U.18 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide processed foods leaves you very susceptible to disease. such as cheese and red meat.Per Capita Cheese Consumption 1915-2000 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 1915 1935 1955 1975 1995 2000 (in pounds) . leading to heart disease. vitamin C. a man-made fat that is linked to cancer and heart disease. High saturated fat intake increases the risk of certain cancers and promotes high cholesterol. are exceptionally high in saturated fat. folate. carotenoids. That is why the standard American diet (SAD) results in the diseases Americans get. Neither animal products nor processed foods contain antioxidants. Many of the animal products consumed. To add insult to injury. many of the processed foods we eat are high in trans fat. bioflavonoids.S.

(6 oz. whole. 3.5 14 12 12 11 10 9 5 5 5 4 3 3 3 2.America’s Health Crisis and You 19 Saturated Fat Content of Various Foods Food Fat content in grams Cheddar cheese (4 oz. part skim (4 oz. part skim (1 cup) Beef.) Ice cream. semisweet (4 oz.) Pork.6 negligible negligible negligible .) Ricotta cheese (1 cup) Swiss cheese (4 oz.3% fat (1 cup) Plain yogurt Two eggs Chicken breast (6 oz.) Turkey.) Salmon (6 oz.) Milk. no skin (6 oz.) Ricotta cheese.) Butter (2 Tbsp.) Mozzarella.) Flounder or sole (6 oz.) Milk.) Chocolate candy.) Fruits Vegetables Beans/legumes 24 24 20 20 20 18 18 14. ground. no skin. 2% fat (1 cup) Tuna (6 oz. lean (6 oz. large double patty T-bone steak (6 oz. vanilla (1 cup) Chicken fillet sandwich Chicken thigh. white.) Cheeseburger.6 2 0. shoulder (6 oz.) American processed cheese (4 oz.

The standard low-nutrient diet consumed by most Americans results in fatty deposits in the walls of the blood vessels that eventually lead to blood vessel narrowing and blood clots that cause strokes and heart attacks. highnutrient plant foods lead to a potent disease-promoting synergy that is the primary cause of most life-shortening diseases in America. Americans are eating too much saturated fat and trans fat.1 You could not have designed a better environment for creating cancer and heart attacks if you scientifically planned it. and salt and an inadequate intake of unrefined. and oil. white flour. This disease process of decreased blood flow and the resulting . The micronutrient deficiencies gradually lead to more and more damage as time goes on. and our healthcare costs are spiraling out of control. The disease-building process is not the by-product of aging. which contain almost no micronutrients.20 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide A needless tragedy Clearly. Processed foods are made mostly of sugar. animal protein. our country is suffering from extremely high instances of chronic illnesses. Micronutrient deficiencies caused by excess intake of saturated fat. these fats become more dangerous when accompanied by lots of processed foods. rather it is the by-product of a diet that is poorly designed for human primates. Because of the poor food choices being made by most Americans. Even worse.

Unfortunately.America’s Health Crisis and You 21 Annual Soft Drink Consumption in the U. (12-ounce cans per person) 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1947 1957 1967 1977 1987 1997 Carbonated beverages are the number-one contributor of calories in the American diet.S. Thus. and claudication (diseased blood vessels in the . heart attacks and angina (diseased blood vessels in the heart). diminished nutrient delivery should be understood as a single disease process. impotence (diseased blood vessels leading to and in the penis). this singular cause and effect is obscured by the way diseases are named—based on which organ shows the most serious (or most obvious) symptoms. one that can be remedied by removing the original cause—poor diet. high blood pressure and strokes (diseased blood vessels leading to and in the brain). dementia (diseased blood vessels in the brain). for example.

to live longer than ever before. In fact. it is the only way to lose weight healthfully and permanently. and the damaged blood vessels can become unclogged. and to add many quality years to our lives. Scientific studies have demonstrated that the damage to diseased blood vessels can be gradually reversed. fatbinding pills. is doomed to failure. herbal picker-uppers. . Nutritional excellence is the secret to optimal health. Most diseases are effectively treated through nutritional means and. and maintaining a healthy. are completely reversed through aggressive nutritional intervention. in many cases. healthy you. to disease-proof our bodies.22 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide legs) are treated as individual diseases. such as magic drinks. disease prevention. when in fact they are merely different manifestations of the same disease. commit yourself to a new. Instead of looking for magic. Unprecedented opportunity Advances in nutritional and health sciences have given us an unprecedented opportunity to be healthier. energy boosters. Everything else. and those cancer-causing high-protein diets. slim waistline.2 The “secret” is to eat large quantities of high-nutrient foods.

Remember. one day recently I saw four patients who dropped their LDL cholesterol below 100 mg/dl.Dramatic Results Without Drugs Chapter Two I f you desire to throw away your medications and recover from chronic illnesses such as heart disease. Just as an example. then nutritional excellence is the most effective approach. Peggy suffered from chronic ane23 . this was just one day in my practice! Not only did each of these patients previously have dangerously high cholesterols. I have studied the results of nutritional intervention on thousands of my own patients. and the results have been dramatic. high blood pressure. and diabetes (all examples of common illnesses that are more effectively treated with nutritional intervention than drugs or surgery) and get slim at the same time. but each also had reported numerous additional health problems. For example. I have helped thousands of patients successfully lower their cholesterol levels without drugs.

Keith had chronic heartburn and allergies. Peggy: Total cholesterol Triglycerides LDL HDL Eugene: Total cholesterol Triglycerides LDL HDL Keith: Total cholesterol Triglycerides LDL HDL Before After 249 169 157 58 150 105 80 49 247 72 191 51 156 42 104 44 237 165 152 52 158 79 99 43.24 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide mia. Eugene was tired all the time. and they realized that prescription drugs were risky and not the answer. These four patients needed help. They all returned to my office between 6 and 8 weeks after their first visit. and this is what we found.5 . Maria had become severely ill from a statin drug prescribed to her by her prior physician.

you will likely find your digestion improves. They all became enthusiastic about life again. age more slowly. diabetes. constipation. He stopped his antacids and acid-blocking medication. Eugene was no longer fatigued. and your risk of other serious diseases—especially dementia. Maria recovered from her severe illness from the statin drug. For example.Dramatic Results Without Drugs 25 Before After Maria: Total cholesterol Triglycerides LDL HDL 283 90 183 91 168 79 98 52 Not only did they wipe out their cardiovascular highrisk status. but many of their other problems also began to clear. and headaches will disappear. too. and your heartburn. hemorrhoids. you experience a tremendously beneficial side effect—you will prevent and reverse almost all other diseases simultaneously. and cancer—will decrease. When you adopt a program of nutritional excellence to reverse or prevent heart disease. There have been cases where a patient has had to overcome some discomforting dietary hurdles after switching . strokes. Peggy’s anemia went away. Keith never had heartburn again. You’ll gain more energy. and his allergies started to improve.

and Maria are not limited only to patients who live near enough to come see me in my office. Eugene. Great results like those achieved by Peggy. My name is Joe Lavaler. Dear Dr. This letter from Joe in Connecticut is typical. Eat to Live. Fuhrman. Also. and it motivates them to take steps to enjoy healthier and more fulfilling lives. All of the patients who make the switch enjoy eating this new way. he placed me on Accupril. However. But those symptoms are temporary. and I have been able to stop all medications. and that I was going to make a major diet change and follow your recommendations instead. I have struggled with high blood pressure (160/105) and high cholesterol (275) for many years. I saw my cardiologist yester- . Hardly a day goes by when I do not receive an e-mail or letter from someone who tells me about the success he or she has achieved. Keith. I have generally enjoyed relatively good health over the years. and I am one happy 68-year-old. I have been following your program since November 2002 with spectacular results.26 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide from a dairy-meat-processed food diet to one that is vegetable-fruit based and rich in nutrients and phytochemicals. They learn to enjoy the new tastes and aromas and their newfound energy. I told him that I had recently bought your tape and book. My cardiologist visit last October resulted in his increasing my Lipitor from 10mg/day to 20mg/day.

My wife and I cook most days in a Crock-Pot. beans. etc. He said that he had heard of your program.Dramatic Results Without Drugs 27 day. It worked where all other diets failed. Dr. Sincerely yours. Joseph Lavaler . mustard greens. My cardiologist. Kunkes. I tell everyone who will listen that there is no “free lunch” and that you have to stay focused and committed. I would be willing to talk to any of your patients to help give them the support and encouragement they need to stay with the program. He copied your web address and said he was planning on reading your book. spinach. and here are the results of my blood work: Total cholesterol Triglycerides LDL HDL 148 85 69 62 While my weight had been constant since high school at 235 pounds (I am 6'6" tall). and feel better than I have in a long time. I want to thank you for my greatly improved health. I currently weigh 211 lbs. We make a lot of soups with collard greens. I brought a copy of your book with me. said I made a remarkable turnaround and should be proud of myself. Connecticut. of Fairfield.

healthy life. gout.3 The recommendations presented in this book will help . back pain. kidney stones. That means that as high-nutrient vegetables and high-nutrient fruits increase as a major portion of caloric intake. highmicronutrient diets reduce the occurrence of cataracts. and depression. When you eat foods that are naturally rich in micronutrients. Adopting a better diet could dramatically increase your health. always results in a more favorable outcome than simply covering up symptoms with medications. disease rates fall in a dose-dependent manner—the more the diet is comprised of these foods. dementia. diabetes. and life span. osteoarthritis. and a long. the better your health will be. Countless studies have shown that the combination of high-nutrient intake and lower caloric intake promotes disease-resistance and longevity. In addition to reducing the occurrence of cancer and heart disease.28 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Removing causes. and the lower caloric intake enables your body to more effectively undertake its selfhealing tasks. Increasing your consumption of high-nutrient fruits and vegetables is the key to disease resistance. The potential reduction in disease rates shows no threshold effect in the scientific studies. not symptoms Uncovering the causes of a health problem. and eliminating them when possible. productivity. disease reversal. it helps control overeating.

to achieve superior health with a comprehensive program based on the nutrient density of foods. free of the chronic diseases that plague so many Americans. Eat For Health. Fuhrman’s Health Equation Health = Nutrient intake divided by Calorie intake Do you agree that your body builds and repairs itself using the food you eat? Do you agree that high-quality. Dr. you are what you eat. It is not based on narrow or obscure scientific principles. There are distinct advantages to choosing healthful. unprecedented in human history. is easy to understand. But to live longer and more healthfully.Dramatic Results Without Drugs 29 you if you are looking to stay well and maintain your youthful vigor. The result is an opportunity. you must Eat To Live. rather it is based on the preponderance of evidence from thousands of scientific studies. highnutrient food makes a high-quality body that is more resistant to the diseases that are ravaging our nation? I hope you do because all of the leading nutritional scientists the world over have accepted these basic concepts. The science and logic behind Eat to Live and my twobook set. H = N/C . In a nutshell.

The Health Equation: H = N/C illustrates the concept that to be in excellent health. There is no health benefit to losing weight and then putting it back on again soon afterwards. then you must accept the fact that to be healthy and disease-resistant you need to eat more highnutrient foods and fewer low-nutrient foods. This equation is a powerful tool that can predict whether your eating habits are putting you at risk of a serious disease such as heart attack or stroke and shortening your life span. and you must not overeat on calories. Permanently maintaining healthy weight Temporary weight-loss techniques (what we all call “dieting”) serve no purpose. I urge you to become familiar with my simple Health Equation: H = N/C. If you agree (as leading researchers do) that the nutrient density in your body’s tissues is proportional to the nutrient density of your diet. Health benefits only occur when the weight loss is maintained forever. That means that the only dietary change that . Using it helps you make food choices that can help you to maintain youthful vigor and mental capacity as you age. If you want those advantages. your diet must be high in nutrients (micronutrients).30 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide nutrient-rich foods over unhealthful. Another way of saying that is your health is dependent on the nutrient-to-calorie ratio of your diet. nutrient-poor ones.

cancer. At a BMI of 30. and diabetes. By the time BMI reaches 35. . diabetes risk is 15%. Similar increases occur with other chronic diseases. At a BMI of 25. Researchers base their definition of obesity on body mass index (BMI).30(6):1562-66. risk is a staggering 90%. Weight and Diabetes * Incidence Body Mass Index (BMI) As you can see on the chart. Diabetes is a good example of how the incidence of serious disease goes up as your weight increases. as BMI index rises above 25.Dramatic Results Without Drugs 31 O Weight and Diabetes besity is closely associated with more than seventeen major chronic conditions. including heart disease. the ratio between weight and height. the incidence of diabetes increases rapidly. * Diabetes Care 2007. risk increases to 50%.

Eating more high-nutrient food is the only way to lose weight permanently. eating more high-nutrient foods helps control food cravings and overeating behaviors. It is controlled by a system of messengers—hormones. When your body’s micronutrient needs are not met. but you can enjoy it now. Because of poor diet and health habits. The symptoms are similar . you can be driven to eat more calories than you need for optimal health. This knowledge can guide you for the rest of your life. making it easier to reach your ideal weight. It can be your fountain of youth. Knowing these important facts and putting them into practice is your key to health and longevity. many people experience uncomfortable symptoms a few hours after eating. and neurotransmitters. It is not a fad. High-nutrient eating is the way of the future.32 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide can work is one that you stick with permanently. nerves. If the change you make to your diet is permanent. This leads them to eat too often—and too much—as a way of preventing the discomfort. you are not on a diet. you merely have changed your eating habits. and eating more nutrients leads to permanent improvements in your health. How nutrients control your appetite Hunger is a complicated thing. and it will never go out of style. Fortunately.

Symptoms of toxic hunger • • • • • • Shakes Headaches Lightheadedness Stomach fluttering Abdominal cramping Mental confusion Be forewarned. these detoxification symptoms are mistaken for hunger. However. and you will not be driven to overeat anymore.Dramatic Results Without Drugs 33 to those drug addicts feel when they are too long without their “fix. When you stop drinking coffee or discontinue other harmful habits. you may experience withdrawal or detox symptoms for a week or so.” Like drug addicts. and you will no longer desire the extra calories you used to crave to palliate unpleasant symptoms. Since eating again (akin to taking another “fix”) makes the discomfort go away. You quickly will become comfortable eating less. in a short time these long-standing symptoms will disappear.” Toxic hunger goes away when you establish the habit of eating a high-nutrient diet. people with food addictions feel poorly after digestion because their bodies are experiencing withdrawal symptoms. . I call these symptoms “toxic hunger. Eating healthfully may make the symptoms of toxic hunger feel worse temporarily.

and how much to eat. As you eat higher on the Start Eating a Higher-Nutrient Diet! T he best way to begin improving your diet is to focus more on eating micronutrients and less on eating macronutrients. See page 83 to learn about Dr. what. Eat more micronutrients: vitamins. you eventually will experience what I call true hunger. It can direct you to the appropriate amount of calories—not too many and not too few. hypoglycemic symptoms. and you will know when. You will become more in touch with your body’s natural instinctive signals. . Fuhrman’s Top 30 Super Foods with the highest nutrient density.34 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide After a period of time eating a diet much higher in micronutrients. phytochemicals. H = N/C is not only the secret formula for health. true hunger signals will help direct you to your ideal body weight. You will know when food is really needed. fat. and other sensations that drive people to overeat. One of the huge benefits of high-nutrient eating is that you lose the food cravings. minerals. Eat fewer macronutrients: protein. which is felt mostly in the throat. These natural. carbohydrates. fiber. it also is the best formula for weight loss. You will be able to step off the dieting merry-go-round.

you will find yourself effortlessly losing weight without dieting. John Pawlokoski. We also are told that they are primarily the result of genetics and. invisible damage We continually are being told that heart disease. and even dementia are the inevitable consequences of aging. high blood pressure. teenagers. We don’t see the harm as we hurt our bodies in tiny increments. day after day. Over 90% percent of elderly Americans require medications for high blood pressure or other heart conditions. There is only one best way to eat for better health and a thinner you. Let me illustrate my point with one of my patients. by eating a low-nutrient diet. therefore. Eating for nutritional excellence is the only sensible way to diet. and that is to eat a diet rich in micronutrients. But these diseases are not the consequence of aging.Dramatic Results Without Drugs 35 nutrient chart and take in high levels of phytochemicals. are beyond our control. they are the consequence of consuming a low-nutrient diet over time. we blame it on aging. But after enough time goes by. The statistics seemingly bear this out. and young adults “seem” to get away with years of poor nutrition. Then. Silent. So it is not surprising that most people assume that we have to expect these things as they are. . the damage is easily seen. When John first came to me as a patient in 1994. high cholesterol. Children.

The cardiologist agreed . John decided to follow my nutritional advice 100%.36 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide he was age 69. and he had no further angina (chest pain) symptoms. Angioplasty was recommended. He saw his cardiologist again. his total cholesterol dropped to 168. He reported that he first experienced pain in his chest and arms while exerting himself working in his backyard. John in 1994 at age 69 Weight Blood pressure Cholesterol LDL cholesterol Glucose Medications 180 160/90 240 156 98 2 blood pressure medications. He saw a cardiologist who performed a stress thallium and a cardiac catherization that demonstrated four areas of severe narrowing. After the first month. nitroglycerin Following his evaluation with me. He did not need to use nitroglycerin any longer and was able to be active and exercise without symptoms. He soon began to get uncomfortable with minimal activity. to relieve his symptoms. and he was given medications. 1 cholesterol-lowering drug. Within two months he had lost 14 pounds. including calcium channel blockers and nitroglycerin.

You can get well. High blood pressure. John’s disease parameters got lower and lower with time. no matter what your age! . John never had a heart or health problem again. His blood pressure became lower and lower with each passing month on the high-nutrient diet. He was able to discontinue all drugs. and his cholesterol dropped further and further. and the resultant diseases they cause were not from aging. and their diseases slowly melt away with time. John in 2006 at age 81 Weight Blood pressure Cholesterol LDL cholesterol Glucose Medications 150 95/70 140 70 68 none I told you about John to illustrate what I observe with all of my patients.Dramatic Results Without Drugs 37 that since John was using an effective dietary approach that was working so well. there was no need to go forward with the angioplasty. As John got older. high cholesterol. too. until he reached his ideal weight and his ideal blood pressure and cholesterol. he got healthier. They get healthier the longer they stay on the healthful diet. His own body provided the “cure” when it was supplied with the right raw materials to work with. He ate himself to wellness.

The first is that your taste adjusts. I enjoy unhealthful food too much. and you begin to relish the new foods once you get used to eat- . and I would rather die young than not enjoy my food. but also from many other diseases. They have failed with diets in the past. such as diabetes. Do you want to develop the common diseases that other Americans do and flirt with a premature death? Or do you want to enjoy good health as you age gracefully? I know that there will be people reading this who will be thinking. senility. and they don’t think they can change. If you are one of them. you can control your health destiny. They think they can’t lose weight. By now. I know eating vegetables and fruits is healthy. strokes. At this point. You can protect yourself not just from heart disease. here are a few more things you may not have considered. and dementia. cancer. The real fountain of youth Most Americans have given up hope of ever achieving their optimal weight and health. you should be beginning to understand why those diets failed and why they became too difficult to stick with. but I don’t want to eat like that. Like John. you have a choice to make.38 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Your body is a miraculous self-healing machine when your nutritional needs are met. You can get healthier and healthier every day. So they just throw in the towel.

com for information on how to purchase my comprehensive two-book set. Visit www. let’s take a look at high-nutrient eating in action. Learn the foods that are richest in micronutrients. The second is that you can quickly learn how to make high-nutrient food taste so great that you think you are eating in a 5-star gourmet restaurant. This is not primarily a recipe book (although there are some great ones starting on page 63). Eat For Health. Now you can enjoy great tasting food and add 20 or more healthful years to your life. Now that you know you can control your health destiny through high-nutrient eating. . I guarantee you that if you learn more and follow this program faithfully. but have no fear—great tasting healthful recipes abound. one volume of which is devoted entirely to recipes.EatRightAmerica.Dramatic Results Without Drugs 39 ing them. you soon will enjoy eating more—not less—than you do now. and then I will show you how to plan a menu with recipes that will disease-proof your body.

) .(This page intentionally blank to match printed version of book.

High-nutrient eating has the opposite effect.Measuring Nutrient Density Chapter Three N utrient density is a critical concept in devising and recommending dietary and nutritional advice to patients and to the public. Our modern American. Phytochemicals are necessary to enable your body’s defenses against cancer and cardiovascular disease. your body functions better and resists the effects of “aging. Micronutrient density and diversity are essential for a normal immune system and for the detoxification and cellular repair mechanisms that protect you from cancer and other diseases. low-nutrient diet leads to an overweight population suffering from the common diseases of nutritional ignorance and a national medical bill that is spiraling out of control. the leading 41 .” Nutritional excellence also helps minimize any genetic weaknesses you may have. When you ingest a broader assortment and amount of these phytochemicals.

and application of my approach.com). I encourage you to use these additional resources to further understand the science.42 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide causes of death in the modern world. As you eat more high-nutrient foods and minimize your consumption of low-nutrient foods. they will give you many valuable tips and strategies designed to make eating right pleasurable and delicious. visit: www. Fuhrman’s Aggregate Nutrient Density Index* (ANDI). and in my comprehensive two-book set. these rankings underestimate the healthful properties of colorful natural plant foods compared to processed foods and animal products. To be able to eat more of the foods that are high in nutrients and fewer of the foods that are low in nutrients. you will be able to make better choices as you shop and eat. Fortunately. Eat For Health. which is described on page 85. The rankings in this book can supplement the high-nutrient hierarchy explained in my book. Once you know the nutrient scores of foods. you will see dramatic health benefits. and also to get a deeper understanding of the benefits of eating a diet that is higher in nutrient density. Eat to Live. logic. (For more information.EatRightAmerica. Because phytochemicals are largely unnamed and unmeasured. In addition. the foods * Patent Pending . you must learn which foods are which. The nutrient density rankings of foods in this book are derived from Dr.

cholesterol. trans fat. and restaurant foods in your diet that excess sodium becomes an issue (because of the risk of high blood pressure and strokes). Try to avoid foods with more salt than calories. trans fat. there are nutrient scores for a wide range of commonly eaten foods. or added salt. they are still reasonable measurements of nutrient content. Foods that contain more sodium (in milligrams) than the number . the sodium levels need to be considered. It is only when you include prepared foods. So even though these rankings may result in lower ratings for the highest-nutrient foods. These are not recommended foods and are included simply to help people make choices as they make the transition to nutritional excellence. you need not give these unhealthful food factors much thought once you start choosing foods that have the highest nutrient density. including some high in saturated fat. all natural foods contain less than half a mg of sodium per calorie. processed foods. When eating foods from lower-nutrient categories.Measuring Nutrient Density 43 that contain the highest amounts of known nutrients also are the same foods that contain the most unknown nutrients. and added salt. Since the foods with the higher nutrient scores are low in calories and do not contain saturated fat. Smart choices In chapter 8. For example. cholesterol.

Fuhrman’s Aggregate Nutrient Density Index* (ANDI) The higher the number. the better the food. Kale Collards Watercress Bok choy Spinach (uncooked) Brussels sprouts Swiss chard Arugula Radish Cabbage (cooked) Bean sprouts Red pepper Romaine lettuce 1000 1000 1000 824 697 672 670 559 554 481 444 420 389 Broccoli Cauliflower Green pepper Tomato sauce Artichoke Carrots Asparagus Strawberries Pomegranate juice Tomato Plums Raspberries Blueberries 342 295 258 247 244 240 234 212 193 164 157 145 130 * Patent Pending . your total daily intake of sodium should be under 1000 mg. As the sodium number gets higher and higher. the food becomes more dangerous to include in your diet. Ideally. There are additional comparisons that appear later in this book. The higher the number. as well as a comprehensive list of nutrient scores for foods commonly eaten in America. the better the food. Sample scores Below is a sample list of nutrient scores for some familiar foods.44 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide of calories cannot be considered healthful. Sample Nutrient/Calorie Density Scores Dr.

Measuring Nutrient Density 45 Brazil nuts Iceberg lettuce Orange Grapefruit Cantaloupe Tofu Sweet potato Apple Peach Green peas Cherries Kidney beans Oatmeal Mango Cucumber Soybeans Prunes Sunflower seeds Shrimp Flaxseed Sesame seeds Brown rice Salmon Avocado Pork loin Pumpkin seeds Skim milk Pecans Potato Grapes Cod Banana 117 110 109 102 100 86 84 76 74 70 68 56 53 51 50 48 47 46 45 44 41 41 39 37 37 36 36 34 32 31 31 30 Walnuts Pistachio nuts Chicken breast Egg Low-fat plain yogurt Shredded wheat Whole wheat bread Corn Almonds Feta cheese Milk chocolate Whole milk Ground beef Dates Whole wheat pasta White bread Peanut butter White pasta Raisins Cashews Apple juice Swiss cheese Low-fat fruit yogurt White rice Potato chips Saltines Vanilla ice cream Sugar cookies Corn oil Olive oil Honey Cola 29 29 27 27 26 26 25 25 24 21 21 20 20 19 19 18 18 18 17 16 16 15 14 12 11 11 7 5 3 2 1 .5 .

higher-fat foods is necessary for an active. and you should eat some of your diet from lower-nutrient categories. Eating more of these highercalorie. She could become too thin. athlete. depending on the percentage of higher-fat fare such as avocados and raw nuts and seeds eaten as a percentage of total calories. The percentage of fat intake can vary from 15-40% on a healthful diet. if you only ate foods with the very highest nutrient density score. some categories of foods are lower in . the thinner you get. This. “Dieting” is not needed to maintain a healthful weight. or growing child. and so satiated from the micronutrient fulfillment. The most healthful way to lose weight is to increase the overall nutrient density of your diet. of course. You only need to eat more high-nutrient food and less low-nutrient food. If an avid (or professional) athlete ate only the very highest-nutrient foods. For example. The more high-nutrient foods you eat. thin person. your diet could be too low in calories or too low in fat. that it could keep her from meeting her caloric (macronutrient) needs. gives you a hint at the secret to permanent weight control. she would become too full from all of the food volume and fiber. As you will see.46 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Multifaceted needs Keep in mind that nutrient density scoring is not the only factor that determines good health.

skin tone. When selecting foods from those categories. Misconceptions about protein The most common question people are asked when they switch to a nutrient-rich diet is. But it isn’t. or the spelling of your mother’s maiden name. others lowprotein. some recommend very low-fat diets. and short on animal products. it might seem like a reasonable question. Adding to the confusion are diet books and magazine articles that promulgate another myth—that eating more protein is weight-loss favorable and eating carbohydrates is weight-loss unfavorable. exact ratio (percentage) of fat. pick from the higher-nutrient foods in each category. Another common misconception is the notion that you need to maintain a fixed. “Where do you get your protein?” In a diet that is chock-full of vegetables and fruits. others recommend much higher levels of fat. Some recommend high-protein. It is an old myth that a diet needs to contain lots of animal products to provide enough protein and be nutritionally sound. But regulating the macronutrient content of a diet is not the critical factor you . carbohydrate.Measuring Nutrient Density 47 nutrient density than others. blood type. and protein. eye color. There also are plenty of self-appointed experts ready to tell you that the ideal diet should be based on your heritage.

The fact is. almost all overweight individuals need to consume less of all the macronutrients—less protein. Don’t worry about not consuming enough of any of these. not just in animal products. Hundreds of studies show that as protein consumption goes up. protein deficiency is not a concern for anyone in the developed world. It is a big mistake to put emphasis on trying to get enough of something (protein) you are undoubtedly getting too much of in the first place. There is protein in all foods. especially vegetables. it is very rare to find an American who is deficient in fat. Therefore.48 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide should be concerned with. These are the source of all calories. less fat. If it is.4 Most Americans simply don’t need to increase eating any macronutrients. Micromanaging the percent of fat. Increasing . You need to consume fewer calories. unless your diet is significantly deficient in overall calories. too. so does the incidence of chronic diseases. you’ll be deficient in other nutrients as well. and less carbohydrate. It is almost impossible to consume too little protein. or carbohydrate isn’t going to change the amount of calories very much. Unless you are anorexic. If you are overweight. no matter what you eat. Is protein bad for us? No. protein. you have consumed more calories than you have utilized. or carbohydrates. protein. incidence of chronic diseases goes up when you increase the consumption of carbohydrates and fat. and here’s why.

not macronutrients. But in the here and now. what is exciting to so many people is that when your diet is high enough in micronutrients. Key to superior health and your ideal weight When you eat to maximize micronutrients in relation to calories. If any of these nutrients exceed our basic requirements.5 The problem is that people in modern societies like the United States eat diets that are deficient in micronutrients. your body functions will normalize. and it is hurting us. in both amount and diversity. Simply put. Heart disease and cancer would fade away and become exceedingly rare if people adopted a lifestyle of nutritional excellence.Measuring Nutrient Density 49 the consumption of protein (or fat or carbohydrates) is good if you need more calories because you are anorexic or are chronically malnourished. H = N/C. The focus of this book is to promote the consumption of high-micronutrient food. and high cholesterol melt away. the goal of a high-level diet is to get the most micronutrients. chronic illnesses such as high blood pressure. like a starving person in a troubled area of the world. and you maintain your youthful vigor into old age. diabetes. from the fewest calories. excess weight drops off at a rela- . Americans already get too much protein. But it is bad if you are already getting too much. the excess is harmful.

it is easy to accept it as true. Amino acids are the building blocks that make proteins. it becomes too difficult to overeat when you eat your fill of high-micronutrient food. So it should not come as a surprise that the myth that we need to consume animal products to get adequate protein is still alive and well in America. . The mistake of focusing on the “importance” of protein in the diet is one of the major reasons Americans have been led down the path to dietary suicide. we have brought forth an epidemic of heart attacks and cancers. This miscalculation has cost us dearly. too. By favoring a dairyand meat-heavy diet. we have equated protein with good nutrition and have thought that animal products—in spite of the fact that they are deficient or devoid of most micronutrients—are highly favorable foods simply because they are rich in complete proteins. instead of one rich in fruits. In fact. It’s like you had your stomach stapled. and beans. Complete protein When you hear something over and over from the time you were a young child. For too long. vegetables. The myth that plant proteins are “incomplete” and need to be “complemented” for adequate protein is still alive. You simply don’t crave to overeat anymore.50 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide tively fast rate.

and beans have lots of pro- . mostly in the form of animal products. have been found to consume 60-80 grams of protein per day. well above the minimum requirement.6 Today.7 We simply don’t need all this protein. which contains no animal products. green vegetables. This high level of animal product consumption has been linked to not just heart disease and strokes. While some vegetables have higher or lower proportion of certain amino acids than others. a sufficient amount of all essential amino acids is provided. Today’s nutritional science has deemphasized the importance of protein because we now know that it is easy to get enough. as well.Measuring Nutrient Density 51 All vegetables and grains contain all eight of the essential amino acids (as well as the twelve other non-essential ones). the average American consumes 100-120 grams of protein per day. but to higher rates of cancer. Even people who eat a total vegetarian (vegan) diet.8 Plant protein and micronutrients Eating more plant protein is the key to increasing our micronutrient intake. It is interesting to note that foods such as peas. and that too much is not good. Scientific studies on human protein requirements demonstrate that adults require 20-35 grams of protein per day. when eaten in amounts to satisfy your caloric needs.

Excesses of saturated fat are not favorable for good health.2 10 5 15 4.) Whole wheat bread (2 slices) 10 1.) Banana Broccoli (two cups) Brown rice (one cup) Chickpeas (one cup) Corn (one cup) Lentils (one cup) Peas. low-calorie foods. By eating more of these high-nutrient. Plus.52 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide tein—even more protein per calorie than meat. Protein content of selected plant foods Foods Grams Almonds (3 oz.2 18 9 7 11 5 . But what is not generally considered is that foods that are rich in plant protein are generally the foods that are richest in nutrients and phytochemicals. Animal protein does not contain antioxidants and phytochemicals. frozen (one cup) Tofu (4 oz. frozen (one cup) Spinach. animal protein is married to saturated fat. and our bodies get flooded with protective micronutrients simultaneously. we get plenty of protein. plant protein does.

high-nutrient.Measuring Nutrient Density 53 No complicated formulas or protein supplements are needed for you to get sufficient protein for growth.9 As you eat more vegetables and fewer animal products. your cholesterol lowers somewhat. But when you reduce animal protein intake and increase vegetable protein intake. your cholesterol lowers dramatically. Weight loss and cholesterol When you drop body fat. the nutrient density of your diet will go up automatically. You can achieve your ideal weight and slow the aging process with a high phytochemical intake. even if you are a serious athlete. In fact. Vegetables not only contain adequate protein. they contain an assortment of additional heart diseasefighting nutrients independent of their ability to lower cho- . and they are higher in nutrients per calorie than any other food. it was found to lower cholesterol even more than most cholesterol-lowering drugs. when a high-fiber. you will naturally get the extra protein you need. However. vegetable-heavy diet was tested in a scientific investigation. they have no saturated fat or cholesterol. Exercise drives an increased hunger. So eat more vegetables! The cholesterol-lowering effects of vegetables and beans (high-protein foods) are without question. and as you consume more calories to meet the demands of exercise.

when you use animal products. make it taste great.54 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide lesterol. seeds.10 They fight cancer. Choose health I urge you to start eating a diet that contains more highnutrient plant foods today. vegetables. disease-fighting foods on the planet. Eat fewer animal products and fewer processed foods. too. and then test it to see what kinds of results you get. Eat vegetarian dinners frequently. and beans.11 If you increase your intake 80%. the risk of getting cancer drops 80%. I recommend that you cut back on animal-product consumption from three servings a day to one serving a day. I can tell you now that the results will astound you! . Better yet. Make this dietary transition an exciting adventure where you learn new great-tasting recipes with high-nutrient plant foods. Cancer incidence worldwide has an inverse relation with fruit and vegetable intake. nuts. and replace these calories with more fruits. Design a food plan that uses large quantities of the most powerful anticancer. add them to a dish in small amounts like condiments so that the total amount you consume each week will be even less. At minimum.

First of all. not how much you eat. I hope it is clear that I am not advocating that you eat primarily high-nutrient foods for a period of time to lose weight and then go back to your old eating habits. high-nutrient foods are so nutritionally satisfying that you simply will have less desire for the high-calorie. But most importantly. low-nutrient foods that put the weight on in the first place. This is because micronutrient fulfillment (getting your fill of vitamins. Eating primarily high-nutrient foods is nothing like being on a “diet” (where you try to eat less). phytochemicals. minerals. grasp the concept that being overweight has mostly to do with what you eat. The common practice of losing weight for a tempo55 . you will be eating hearty portions of (low-calorie) food. and fiber) blunts the drive to consume calories. I am advocating that you eat primarily high-nutrient foods from now on.You Are What You Eat! Chapter Four I f you need to lose weight.

EatRightAmerica. To purchase the complete two-book set. the higher the nutrient density level. I've listed nutritionally excellent meals beside meals that are typical of the standard American diet.56 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide rary period of time and then gaining it back is of no benefit to your health. The differences are quite dramatic. Eat For Health. The complete Eat For Health program includes four phases of dietary excellence and 30 days of gourmet recipes. These three menus are merely a sample of the comprehensive nutritional makeover program described in my twobook set—Eat For Health. That means you should not diet. the more benefits you receive. Nutritional excellence brings substantial benefits. High-nutrient menus Let's compare three days of menus. Each menu is followed by an analysis of its nutrient content and its total nutrient score. visit: www.com or call: (877) ERA-4-USA. . To show that even small changes can make a big difference. What you should do is learn to eat a nutrient-rich diet. Good health is dependent on maintaining a stable lighter weight for the rest of your life. which will automatically reset your weight to a lower point permanently. I've given examples of three progressively higher levels of nutritional excellence in the following menu comparisons.

* See recipes in Chapter 5. . 63. apples & nuts Lunch • Turkey sandwich on whole grain bread w/ mixed greens & tomato • Strawberries • Water Dinner • Tasty Hummus w/ Baked Garlic Pita Chips and raw veggies* • Pasta w/ Roasted Vegetables* • Creamy Banana Fig Ice Cream* Dinner • Crackers w/ cheese spread • Spaghetti and meatballs • Vanilla ice cream See Menu I Nutrient Analysis on the next page. beginning on p. Eat For Health Diet Standard American Diet Breakfast • Orange juice • Cheerios • Whole milk Lunch • Ham & cheese sandwich on roll w/ mayo • Potato chips • Coke Eat For Health Diet Breakfast • Fresh squeezed orange juice • Oatmeal w/ blueberries.You Are What You Eat! 57 Menu I Comparison Standard American Diet vs.

thiamine (mg) B6.7 89 3.5 10.7 2.9 122 7. Eat For Health Diet SAD EFH Calories Protein Carbohydrate Fat Cholesterol (mg) Saturated fat Fiber Sodium (mg) Vitamin C (mg) B1.339 2782 1310 3532 55 .58 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Menu I Nutritional Analysis Standard American Diet vs.3 23 409 148 890 8. pyridoxine (mg) Iron (mg) Folate (ug) Magnesium (mg) Calcium Zinc (mg) Selenium (ug) Alpha tocopherol (mg) Beta-carotene (ug) Alpha-carotene (ug) Lutein & zeaxanthin (ug) Lycopene (ug) Total Nutrient Score 2011 78 249 84 337 38 15 3660 183 1.2 120 15 300 0 26 1942 71 382 29 20 4 54 1582 603 2.8 1.8 23 802 491 681 8.

Eat For Health Diet Standard American Diet Breakfast • Blueberry muffin • Coffee/cream Lunch • Nachos w/ cheese • Cookies Dinner • Iceburg lettuce salad w/Italian dressing • Fried chicken • French fries • Corn • Cake Eat For Health Diet Breakfast • Blueberry Orange Smoothie* Lunch • Vegetable Bean Burrito* • Apple Dinner • Mixed greens w/ Orange Cashew Dressing* • Chicken Dijon* • Baked Sweet Potato Fries* • California Creamed Kale* • Mango Coconut Sorbet* See Menu II Nutrient Analysis on the next page. 63. * See recipes in Chapter 5.You Are What You Eat! 59 Menu II Comparison Standard American Diet vs. . beginning on p.

5 26.8 21 717 632 735 12.8 1.60 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Menu II Nutritional Analysis Standard American Diet vs.4 88 5. pyridoxine (mg) Iron (mg) Folate (ug) Magnesium (mg) Calcium Zinc (mg) Selenium (ug) Alpha tocopherol (mg) Beta-carotene (ug) Alpha-carotene (ug) Lutein & zeaxanthin (ug) Lycopene (ug) Total Nutrient Score 2030 81 217 96 277 32 15 2889 42 .9 786 253 1257 795 19 2086 103 271 79 148 13 47 894 607 2.1 3.0 255 215 746 7.302 4420 64. Eat For Health Diet SAD EFH Calories Protein Carbohydrate Fat Cholesterol (mg) Saturated fat Fiber Sodium (mg) Vitamin C (mg) B1.4 9. thiamine (mg) B6.7 59 4.055 2373 85 .

You Are What You Eat! 61 Menu III Comparison Standard American Diet vs. Banana & Cashew Wrap* • Pomegranate juice Lunch • Romaine & spinach salad w/ Creamy Blueberry Dressing* • Fresh fruit & nut bowl Dinner • Raw veggies w/ Black Bean Dip* • Dr. Eat For Health Diet Standard American Diet Breakfast • Bagel w/ cream cheese • Orange juice Eat For Health Diet Breakfast • Lettuce. . 63. Fuhrman’s Famous Anti-Cancer Soup* • Yummy. Quick & Easy Banana Oat Bars* Lunch • Bacon ranch salad w/ crispy chicken • Ice tea Dinner • Chicken noodle soup • Grilled cheese sandwich • Potato salad • Brownie See Menu III Nutrient Analysis on the next page. * See recipes in Chapter 5. beginning on p.

62 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Menu III Nutritional Analysis Standard American Diet vs.9 3.9 1557 17 385 0 19 1985 70 335 56 .25 10 62 1123 495 1.1 23 916 642 824 10. pyridoxine (mg) Iron (mg) Folate (ug) Magnesium (mg) Calcium Zinc (mg) Selenium (ug) Alpha tocopherol (mg) Beta-carotene (ug) Alpha-carotene (ug) Lutein & zeaxanthin (ug) Lycopene (ug) Total Nutrient Score 2026 67 212 105 283 32 11 6832 167 1.4 .2 129 9.2 474 129 625 5.2 62 2.395 3167 91 . thiamine (mg) B6.55 12.165 6089 64.7 36. Eat For Health Diet SAD EFH Calories Protein Carbohydrate Fat Cholesterol (mg) Saturated fat Fiber Sodium (mg) Vitamin C (mg) B1.

High-Nutrient Recipes Chapter Five H igh-nutrient recipes taste great and are good for you! Those that follow are among the most healthful recipes in the world. Serves: 2 63 . create variations. Enjoy them. ground flaxseed Blend in blender until smooth. Breakfasts Blueberry Orange Smoothie 1 cup frozen blueberries 3 dates. pitted 2 oranges. peeled 1 banana 1 Tbsp. and start on the road to your optimal weight and health.

lay banana slices on cashew butter. A delicious and healthful treat! Serves: 2 Fruit & Nut Plate 1 cup blueberries 1 cup strawberries.64 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Lettuce. . sliced 8 walnuts. thinly sliced Spread cashew butter on lettuce leaf. sliced 1/2 green apple. Feel free to use any variety of fruit and nuts. chopped Place fruit on a plate and sprinkle with walnuts. Dr. Serves: 1 Note: This recipe is just an example to give you an idea of the quantities you should use when making a dish like this. and wrap lettuce around. Fuhrman’s Raw Cashew Butter. per leaf 12 romaine lettuce leaves 2 bananas. Banana & Cashew Wrap 2 tsp.

Cool on wire rack.High-Nutrient Recipes 65 Yummy. optional 1 Tbsp. slice into squares or bars and serve. add the applesauce and date sugar. date sugar. Quick & Easy Banana Oat Bars 2 cups quick oats (not instant) 1/4 cup chopped walnuts 1/2 cup shredded coconut 1/2 cup raisins or chopped dates 2 large ripe bananas. Bake for 30 minutes. optional Preheat oven to 350 degrees. If you’d like a sweeter. Mix ingredients together in a large bowl. moister version of these bars. Serves: 8 . Press dough in a 9x9 inch baking pan. When cool. mashed 1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce.

collards. or until beans are soft. Blend/puree the onions. Return the blended. zucchini and leeks are soft (about 20 minutes). chopped (stems and center ribs cut off and discarded) 4-5 cups fresh carrot juice 2 cups fresh organic celery juice 2 Tbsp. and leeks in a high-powered blender or food processor. mushrooms (shiitake. Fuhrman’s VegiZest or other no-salt seasoning 1 cup raw cashews 8 oz.66 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Soups Dr. Put all other ingredients into a very large pot. Remove the onions. Serves 6-8 . being careful to leave the beans and some of the kale in the pot. or oyster). zucchini. zucchini. Fuhrman’s Famous Anti-Cancer Soup 1 cup dried split peas and/or beans 4 cups water 4 medium onions 6 -10 medium zucchini 3 leek stalks 2 bunches kale. and leeks from the pot along with some of the soup liquid. Add the mushrooms and simmer another 30 minutes. Cover and simmer over low heat until onions. Dr. Add more soup liquid and the cashews to the mixture and blend/puree. or other greens. creamy mixture back to the pot. cremini. chopped Set cashews and mushrooms aside.

and pumpkin seeds. cans no-salt (or low-salt) black beans 2 cups frozen mixed vegetables 2 cups frozen corn 2 cups frozen chopped broccoli florets 2 cups fresh carrot juice 1 cup water 1 cup prepared no-salt or low-salt black bean soup 1/4 cup chopped cilantro (optional) 1/8 tsp.High-Nutrient Recipes 67 Fast Black Bean Soup 2 15-oz. or to taste 1 cup chopped fresh tomatoes 1 avocado. Serves 5 . Serve topped with avocado. chili powder. green onions. if you like) Combine first 9 ingredients in a soup pot. Bring to a boil and simmer on low heat for 30 minutes. chopped or mashed 1/2 cup chopped green onions 1/4 cup raw pumpkin seeds (lightly toasted. Stir in fresh tomatoes and heat through.

minced or pressed 3 Tbsp. grated fresh ginger root 3 Tbsp. Dr. Serve topped with chopped parsley. ground coriander 1/2 tsp. Fuhrman’s VegiZest 1 tsp. chopped 1 red bell pepper. ground cumin 1/8 tsp. and simmer for another 10 minutes. Bring to a boil. ground allspice 2 sweet potatoes. finely chopped 2 carrots. Swiss chard. and simmer for another 15 minutes. Serves 5 . and simmer for 40 minutes. finely chopped 1 onion. chopped 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley In order listed. place all ingredients—except for the sweet potatoes. and parsley—in a soup pot. cover. peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes 2 bunches Swiss chard leaves and stems. Add the potatoes.68 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Hearty Ginger Lentil Soup 8 cups fresh carrot juice 4 cups water 1 cup dried lentils 1/2 cup uncooked brown rice 2 zucchini. finely chopped 6 cloves garlic. Add the chard.

peeled and quartered 1/2 cup raw cashews (or 1/4 cup raw cashew butter) 2 Tbsp. raw cashew butter 2 Tbsp. no-salt or low-salt pasta sauce 3 Tbsp. Yield: 1-1/2 cups Creamy Blueberry Dressing 2 cups fresh (or frozen and thawed) blueberries 1/2 cup pomegranate juice 4 Tbsp. lemon juice (optional) Blend all ingredients in a high-powered blender until smooth and creamy (add orange juice if mixture gets too thick). Dr. Serves 4 . Fuhrman’s Black Fig Vinegar Mash all ingredients together with a fork until smooth. Fuhrman’s Spicy Pecan Vinegar Blend all ingredients in a high-powered blender until smooth and creamy.High-Nutrient Recipes 69 Salad Dressings Russian Fig Dressing 4 Tbsp. Fuhrman’s Blood Orange Vinegar 1/2 tsp. Dr. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. Dr. Dr. Fuhrman’s Almond Butter 2 Tbsp. Serves 2 Orange Cashew Dressing 2 oranges.

and it is a step in a healthier direction. chopped 2 carrots. basil . Vegetable Bean Burritos 1 head broccoli florets. Marinate for 1/2 hour. Put half the mixture aside and pour the rest over chicken. garlic. chopped 1 zucchini. Mix lime juice. Broil on low or grill for 7 minutes per side or until thoroughly cooked.70 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Main Dishes Chicken Dijon 2 boneless and skinless chicken breasts 4 Tbsp. fresh lime juice 2 cloves garlic. vegan Worcestershire sauce 4 tsp. but it is much better than fried chicken. minced 2 Tbsp. chopped 2 red peppers. chopped 1 medium onion. chopped 1/2 head cauliflower florets. Serves: 2 Note: This is not a high-nutrient recipe. Serve with rest of marinade spooned over top. chopped 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce. Dijon mustard Trim all fat from chicken breasts. and Dijon mustard into a marinade.

Serves: 8 . allspice (optional) 1-1/2 Tbsp. optional 1/2 cup shredded soy mozzarella cheese.High-Nutrient Recipes 71 1 tsp. oregano 1 tsp. sauté vegetables with herbs and spices in 1/8 cup water for 15 minutes or until tender. cumin 1/2 tsp. drained Topping 1/2 cup low-sodium pasta sauce. Add soy milk to the chopped cashews and blend until smooth. In a large covered pot. In the meantime. to taste 1 tsp. optional Wraps 8 whole wheat tortilla wraps or large romaine lettuce leaves Chop vegetables into small pieces by hand or in a food processor. Dr. parsley 1 tsp. Top with pasta sauce and shredded soy mozzarella cheese if desired. red pepper flakes or more. Fuhrman’s VegiZest or other no-salt seasoning 4 cloves garlic 1 cup cashews 1/2 cup unsweetened soy milk 1 15-oz. can pinto beans (no salt added). Spread mixture on tortilla or lettuce leaf and roll up to form burrito. Add cashew/soy milk mixture and beans to the veggies and mix thoroughly. place cashews in food processor and chop until very fine.

eggplant. cook pasta and drain. yellow squash. and butternut squash in prepared pan. Combine pasta. preferably whole wheat 2 medium tomatoes. and basil in large bowl. olive oil and toss to coat. penne pasta. about 25 minutes. Meanwhile. stirring occasionally. tomatoes. cut into 1/2 inch pieces 1-1/2 cup butternut squash.72 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Pasta with Roasted Vegetables. vinegar. and garlic. Combine red bell peppers. seeded. Roast until vegetables are tender and beginning to brown. divided 1 lb. Add remaining tablespoon of oil. if desired. Add cooking liquid by tablespoon to moisten. diced 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil or 1-1/2 Tbsp. minced Preheat oven to 450 degrees. reserving 1/2 cup cooking liquid. cored. balsamic vinegar or 1 Tbsp. dried 2 Tbsp. cut into 1/2 inch pieces 1 large yellow crookneck squash. fresh lemon juice 2 cloves garlic. Drizzle with 1 Tbsp. olive oil. Toss to combine. unpeeled. cut into 1/2 inch pieces 2 Tbsp. Lightly coat roasting pan with 1/2 tsp. roasted vegetables. peeled. cut into 1/2 inch pieces 1 medium eggplant. Tomatoes & Basil 2 red bell peppers. Serves: 6 . olive oil.

High-Nutrient Recipes

73

Side Dishes
California Creamed Kale
2 bunches kale (bottoms of stems removed and discarded) 1 cup raw cashews 1 cup unsweetened soy milk 4 Tbsp. onion flakes 1 Tbsp. Dr. Fuhrman’s VegiZest or other no-salt seasoning
Place kale leaves in a large steamer pot. Steam 10-20 minutes until soft. While kale is steaming, place remaining ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Place kale in colander, and press with a clean dish towel to remove some of the excess water. In a bowl, coarsely chop and mix kale with the cream sauce.
Serves 4

Note: Sauce may be used with broccoli, spinach, or other steamed veggies.

Baked Sweet Potato Fries
4 sweet potatoes 1 Tbsp. garlic powder 1 Tbsp. onion powder
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Peel sweet potatoes if not organic. Cut into strips. Lay on a non-stick cookie sheet. Sprinkle garlic powder and onion powder on potatoes. Bake approximately 1-1/2 hours, turning potatoes every 15 minutes.
Serves 4

74

Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide

Tasty Hummus with Baked Garlic Pita Chips and Raw Veggies
Tasty Hummus: 1 cup cooked or canned garbanzo beans (no-salt or low-salt), reserving liquid 1/4 cup bean liquid or water 1/4 cup raw tahini (pureed sesame seeds) 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 Tbsp. Dr. Fuhrman’s VegiZest or other no-salt seasoning 1 tsp. Bragg Liquid Aminos 1 tsp. horseradish (optional) 1 small clove garlic, chopped
Blend all ingredients in blender until creamy smooth. Use as a spread or a dip for raw and lightly steamed vegetables.
Yield: 1 cup

Baked Garlic Pita Chips: 2 whole wheat pitas Olive oil cooking spray (optional) Garlic powder
Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Split each pita in half horizontally. Spray pita halves lightly with olive oil, if desired, and sprinkle with garlic powder. Cut each half in half and then into four sections to form triangles. Place on baking sheet and bake for 8 minutes or until lightly browned & crispy. Serve with salsa or hummus.
Serves 2

High-Nutrient Recipes

75

Black Bean Dip
1 15 oz. can no-salt (or low-salt) black beans, drained 1 garlic clove 1/4 tsp. black pepper 1/8 tsp. chili pepper flakes 2 tsp. Dr. Fuhrman's VegiZest or other no-salt seasoning
Combine all ingredients in food processor with an S blade. Whirl to desired consistency, adding water one tablespoon at a time until desired consistency.
Serves: 2

Broccoli Vinaigrette
1 large bunch broccoli 1/4 cup seasoned rice vinegar 1 Tbsp. Dr. Fuhrman’s VegiZest or other no-salt seasoning 2 tsp. Dijon mustard 2 large cloves garlic, pressed or minced
Break the broccoli into bite-sized florets. Peel stems and slice them into 1/4-inch-thick strips. Steam florets and stems for 8 minutes, or until just tender. While the broccoli is steaming, whisk the rest of the ingredients in bowl. Add broccoli and toss to mix.
Serves 2

chopped 4 carrots. grated 1/2 cup currants Sauce: 1 medium cucumber 1/2 cup raisins 1/4 cup raw almond butter 2 tsp.76 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Saucy Collards and Carrots 4 bunches collard greens (stems removed and discarded). Add grated carrots and steam another 5 minutes. Steam collard greens for 15 minutes. Fuhrman’s Riesling Raisin Vinegar (optional) 1 tsp. Add currants and sauce to collards/carrots mixture and toss. nutritional yeast Set currants aside. Serves 4 . Dr. Blend all sauce ingredients in a high-powered blender until smooth.

before making recipe. Serves 4 Note: To freeze ripe bananas: Peel. wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Blend rest of ingredients in a high-powered blender. Fuhrman’s Black Fig Vinegar (optional) Blend all ingredients in a high-powered blender until creamy. Serves 4 Creamy Banana Fig Ice Cream 5 dried figs. stems removed 4 frozen bananas 5 Tbsp. cut in thirds. bag frozen mangos 3 slices dried mango. Garnish with reserved coconut. . unsweetened soy milk 2 tsp. coconut for garnish. Dr. lemon or lime juice 1 10-oz. unsweetened and unsulfured Reserve 1 Tbsp.High-Nutrient Recipes 77 Desserts Mango Coconut Sorbet 1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut 1/8 cup water 1/4 tsp. and freeze at least 24 hrs.

peeled and sliced 3/4 cup chopped walnuts 8 dates.78 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Dr. chopped 1 cup currants or raisins 3/4 cup water 1/2 tsp. Cover and bake at 375 degrees for about one hour until all ingredients are soft. . Fuhrman’s Wild Apple Crunch 6 apples. Combine all ingredients except the orange juice. stirring occasionally. stirring occasionally. Serves 8 Note: You also can simmer this for 30 minutes on top of the stove in a covered pot. cinnamon 1/4 tsp. nutmeg Juice of 1 orange Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place in a baking pan and sprinkle the juice of the orange on top.

strokes.Your Commitment to Health Chapter Six M y goal in writing this book is to help you say “no” to our culture of disease and drugs and to say “yes” to lifelong health and happiness. diabetes. There is no magic to it. but profound. joint pain. we quickly would win the war against heart disease. and cancers. fatigue. and if you start in time. men79 . Allergies. I believe all people should be informed that they have this opportunity to protect themselves. If an army of Americans made the few simple. By following the recommendations in this book. Educating yourself with the latest scientific findings and eating a diet of delicious. virtually everyone can improve their health. you actually can make yourself heart-attack proof. high-nutrient food allows you to protect yourself and your family from the health tragedies you see all around you—and not just the big tragedies like heart disease. headaches. dietary and lifestyle changes I recommend.

we can change the nutritional landscape of America. Proper selfcare is more effective and overwhelmingly less expensive than conventional care. but if you want more information and are ready to take it to the next level. Don’t let food manufacturers and fast food establishments take your health away.EatRightAmerica. Working together. Getting started This book will get you started in the right direction. Fight back against junk food and food addiction. Learn and encourage others. and save our economy that is slowly being destroyed by out-of-control healthcare costs.com or call (877) ERA4-USA to get my comprehensive two-book set. save lives. Those who truly desire to protect themselves can do so. Eat For Health. and reclaim your right to a long life of health and happiness. Good information is the most powerful artillery you have to save your life and the lives of loved ones. and digestive problems all can dramatically resolve through nutritional excellence.80 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide tal clarity. visit www. It is not an exaggeration to say that you are in a fight for your life. Be a fighter. The complete Eat For Health approach offers you . without expensive and risky prescription drugs. Join the growing army of Americans who are choosing nutritional excellence.

This four-step body makeover and disease-reversal program will help you overcome your addictions and achieve your ideal weight and health. Use these scores regularly until you are confident that your diet is as nutrient-rich as it can be. Then come the comprehensive lists of all of the foods by category. High-nutrient eating The pages that follow show you the nutrient density scores of virtually all of the categories of foods typically eaten in America. menu plans.Your Commitment to Health 81 motivational tools. It also teaches you the science behind nutritional excellence. . and great tasting recipes for superior health. First is the list of my Top 30 Super Foods—the most wholesome foods with the highest nutrient ratings in the best categories.

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6. 4. include as many of these foods in your diet as you possibly can. Fuhrman’s Top 30 Super Foods Chapter Seven N ow that you know the secret formula to health is H = N/C (health = nutrients/calories). For weight loss and improved health. 5. Dr. Collard. mustard. 3. There are comprehensive lists of nutrient density scores in the next chapter. it’s time to start putting it into practice. These are the best foods in the best categories. 2. But to make it easy for you to find the very best foods.Dr. I’ve listed my Top 30 Super Foods below. Fuhrman’s Top 30 Super Foods Nutrient Score 1. & turnip greens Kale Watercress Bok choy Spinach Brussels sprouts 83 1000 1000 1000 824 739 672 .

9. Swiss chard 670 Arugula 559 Radish 554 Cabbage 481 Bean sprouts 444 Red peppers 420 Romaine lettuce 389 Broccoli 376 Carrot juice 344 Tomatoes & tomato products 190-300 Cauliflower 295 Strawberries 212 Pomegranate juice 193 Blackberries 178 Plums 157 Raspberries 145 Blueberries 130 Papaya 118 Brazil nuts 116 Oranges 109 Tofu 86 Beans (all varieties) 55-70 Seeds: flaxseed. 25. 28. 26. 14. 11. 18. 27. 13.84 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide 7. 16. 29. 19. sesame 45 Walnuts 29 . 20. 23. 22. 30. 12. 21. sunflower. 24. 17. 15. 10. 8.

and antioxidant capacities. For optimal health. you will find extensive lists of nutrient/calorie-density scores grouped by category based on my “Aggregate Nutrient Density Index”* (ANDI). based on an equal number of calories for each food. Knowing which foods are high in nutrient density (and which are low) will make it easier to get the dramatic health benefits of eating more high-nutrient foods.Nutrient Density Scores Chapter Eight I n this chapter. ANDI Scores ANDI scores are calculated by evaluating an extensive range of food factors. including vitamins. and eat as many foods with high ANDI scores as possible. minerals. * Patent Pending 85 . After completing the calculations. I suggest you consume an appropriate number of calories to meet your needs. keep your sodium intake below 1000 mg per day. phytochemicals.

healthier you—today! . Easy-to-get benefits While nutrient scores are calculated using sophisticated scientific considerations. and menus. you don’t have to be a scientist to get the many benefits of high-nutrient food. A complete description of how ANDI scores are calculated appears in my two-book set.EatRightAmerica. visit www. recipes.com or call (877) ERA-4-USA. Simply take the information you’ve learned from this book. Eat For Health.86 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide foods are ranked on a numerical scale of 1 to 1000. To order. with the highest nutrient foods given a score of 1000. put it into practice. and start on the road to a thinner.

canned (1 cup) Soybeans.) Beverages 139 80 80 14 6 6 7 3 3 .Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 87 Sod A NDI ium score Beans/Legumes Adzuki beans. canned (1 cup) Baked beans w/ pork in tomato sauce. canned (222g) Chili w/ beans. canned (1 cup) Black beans. red (4 fluid oz. boiled (1 cup) Refried beans. boiled (1 cup) Pinto beans. boiled (1 cup) Eden Foods Organic No Salt Added Black Beans (1 cup) Black-eyed peas. boiled (1 cup) Split peas. white (4 fluid oz. boiled (1 cup) Navy beans. canned (1 cup) Westbrae Organic Kidney Beans (1 cup) Lentils.) Wine. canned (1 cup) Edamame (1 cup) Fava beans. boiled (1 cup) Chickpeas. boiled (1 cup) Lima beans.) Wine. boiled (1 cup) Great Northern beans. boiled (1 cup) Chickpeas. boiled (1 cup) Baked beans w/ pork. boiled (1 cup) Kidney beans. boiled (1 cup) White beans. boiled (1 cup) Kidney beans. canned (1 cup) Chile con carne w/ beans. boiled (1 cup) 294 18 268 1047 238 1106 227 2 220 30 198 7 269 11 286 718 269 941 287 1336 254 25 187 8 209 4 225 2 213 770 200 280 230 4 216 4 255 0 245 2 238 756 298 2 231 4 249 11 56 20 32 58 58 67 48 55 21 27 58 61 61 56 71 71 68 60 57 57 59 48 56 51 Alcohol Beer (12 fluid oz.

low-fat 1% (8 fluid oz.) Hot cocoa. whole (8 fluid oz.) Half & Half cream (2 Tbsp. bottled (8 fluid oz.) Heavy whipping cream (2 Tbsp. from dry mix (8 fluid oz.) Milk shake.) 98 158 207 343 42 39 104 105 83 122 146 270 254 123 257 152 150 137 33 12 11 127 103 100 98 252 215 49 25 19 14 11 14 8 2 28 36 23 20 11 11 9 Fruit Drinks Capri Sun Juice Drink. reduced-fat 2% (8 fluid oz.) Chocolate milk.) Kool Aid Burst.) Carrot.) Lemonade.) Sweetened condensed milk (2 Tbsp.3% (8 fluid oz. chocolate (8 fluid oz. Fruit Punch (210g) Fruit punch. unsweetened (8 fluid oz. added vitamin C (8 fluid oz. low-fat (8 fluid oz.) Apricot nectar (8 fluid oz.) Chocolate milk.) Evaporated milk (2 Tbsp.) Fruit punch.) 117 141 98 7 8 71 16 23 344 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. prepared w/ water (8 fluid oz. .) 192 113 110 146 18 10 Dairy Buttermilk. from frozen concentrate (8 fluid oz. Tropical Punch (210g) Lemonade.) 99 117 109 90 103 131 21 94 23 29 11 7 1 30 * 4 0 6 7 Juices Apple juice.) Milk shake.) Milk. whole 3.) Milk. vanilla (8 fluid oz. no added nutrients (8 fluid oz. prepared w/ milk (8 fluid oz.) Eggnog (8 fluid oz. non-fat skim (8 fluid oz.) Milk. low-fat (8 fluid oz.88 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Cocoa Hot cocoa.) Milk.

) Pomegranate juice (8 fluid oz.) Root beer (8 fluid oz.) Grapefruit. low-sodium (8 fluid oz.) Orange (8 fluid oz.) Rice milk (8 fluid oz.) Soy milk (8 fluid oz.) 211 120 125 14 86 132 19 10 33 Soda Cola (8 fluid oz.) Vegetable.) Pineapple (8 fluid oz.) 60 96 1 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals.) Tonic water (8 fluid oz.) Diet cola (8 fluid oz.) Seltzer (8 fluid oz.) Vegetable.) Tomato (8 fluid oz.) Grape (8 fluid oz.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 89 Sod A NDI ium score Cranberry juice cocktail (8 fluid oz.) Sprite (8 fluid oz. unsweetened (8 fluid oz. low-sodium (8 fluid oz. .) 144 150 101 112 140 150 41 41 46 46 5 25 2 2 2 10 656 24 140 653 55 20 * 74 86 33 193 342 342 365 365 Non-Dairy Milk Almond milk ( 8 fluid oz.) Tomato. regular (8 fluid oz.) Diet Sprite (8 fluid oz.) 119 0 0 101 0 98 83 11 38 14 32 50 27 10 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 Sports Drinks Flavored sports drink (8 fluid oz.

plain.90 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Bread/Grain Products Bagels Bagel. . whole wheat (1 pita) Pumpernickel (2 slices) Raisin (2 slices) Rye (2 slices) 130 130 133 107 82 151 170 137 120 167 120 163 130 113 165 170 160 142 166 3 265 340 198 131 272 296 304 206 310 206 350 253 197 322 340 429 203 422 39 25 18 * 18 * 15 * 22 16 * 19 * 17 * 18 * 17 * 19 * 30 21 18 * 19 19 * 16 * 20 * * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. sprouted-grain (Manna type) 1 slice (56g) Bread. ready to eat (2 rolls) French (2 slices) Hamburger roll (1 roll) Hard roll (1 roll) Hot dog roll (1 roll) Italian (2 slices) Mixed grain (2 slices) Mixed grain hamburger roll (1 roll) Pita. commercially prepared (2 bread sticks) Dinner roll. plain (1 bagel) Bagel. commercially prepared (1/4 cup) Bread sticks. whole wheat (2 rolls) Dinner roll. 100% whole wheat (2 slices) Bread. plain (1 biscuit) 212 348 11 * Bread Bread. plain (1 pita) Pita. whole-grain (1 bagel) 195 181 379 360 18 * 18 * Biscuits Biscuit. white (2 slices) Bread crumbs.

cooked) 240 193 143 13 5 5 23 32 22 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. . cooked) Barley.1 oz. whole wheat (1 muffin) French toast.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 91 Sod A NDI ium score Crackers Cheese cracker sandwich w/ cheese (4 crackers) Cheese cracker sandwich w/ peanut butter (4 crackers) Cheese crackers (30 crackers) Graham crackers (2-1/2” sq.) (30g) Nabisco Wheat Thins Crackers (16 crackers) (29g) Rice cake cracker (7 crackers) Rye crispbread (Finn Crisp or Wasa brands) (1 cracker) Saltines (5 crackers) Saltines. pearled (1 cup. enriched (1 muffin) English muffin. cooked) Cornmeal. unsalted (3 slices) Nabisco Ritz Crackers (5 crackers) (16g) Nabisco Snackwell’s Wheat Crackers (5 crackers) (15g) Nabisco Snackwell’s Zesty Cheese Crackers (1. whole grain (1 cup. low-salt (5 crackers) Soda crackers (5 crackers) Triscuit wafers (7 crackers) 127 139 151 118 100 60 130 124 112 58 58 79 62 129 136 115 37 64 65 64 140 228 199 298 169 30 140 160 69 1 124 3 124 150 315 168 21 26 161 95 161 230 10 * 10 * 13 * 8* 11 * 15 13 14 11 * 15 * 12 * 7* 10 * 7* 7* 12 20 11 * 13 * 11 * 17 English Muffins English muffin. frozen (2 slices) 134 134 251 264 420 584 13 * 28 22 * Grains Amaranth (1 cup.) (4 crackers) Health Valley Amaranth Graham Cracker (8 crackers) Health Valley Low-Fat Whole Wheat Cracker (6 crackers) Kashi TLC Original 7 Grain Cracker (15 crackers) Low-salt whole wheat crackers (7 crackers) Matzo crackers (1 cracker) Melba toast (3 slices) Melba toast.

cooked) Rice. cooked (2 cups) Pasta.92 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Couscous. . prepared (3 pancakes) 247 270 259 550 615 500 17 * 14 * 13 * Pasta Macaroni & cheese. wild brown (1 cup. spinach. canned (250g) Tortellini (1-1/2 cups) 171 880 395 3 333 15 347 8 258 1045 497 557 16 18 * 15 19 18 13 * * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. white (1 cup. cooked) Quinoa (1 cup. white w/ pasta. cooked) Rice. cooked) 176 8 250 3 210 12 216 10 205 2 246 1147 166 5 15 19 21 41 12 * 15 * 43 Matzo Matzo. whole wheat. frozen (3 pancakes) Kelloggs Eggo Buttermilk Pancakes (3 pancakes) Pancakes. cooked) Rice. commercially prepared (1 sheet) Matzo. brown (1 cup. w/ meatballs. cooked (2 cups) Pasta. cooked (2 cups) Pasta. canned (209g) Pasta. (Rice a Roni type) (1 cup. cooked) Millet (1 cup. crackers (1 cracker) 111 112 6 1 13 * 11 * Muffins/Quick Bread Banana bread (1 slice) Blueberry (1 muffin) Bran (1 muffin) Corn (1 muffin) 196 158 161 174 181 255 335 297 8* 10 * 19 * 13 * Pancakes Pancakes. cooked) Rice. in tomato sauce. (1 cup.

. frozen (2 waffles) Kelloggs Eggo Lowfat Blueberry Nutri Grain (2 waffles) Kellogg’s Eggo Lowfat Homestyle (2 waffles) 176 146 165 524 414 309 28 * 24 * 28 * Cold Cereals Cereals 134 150 122 149 111 109 598 57 44 159 14 171 203 247 206 158 27 1 1 3 20 42 * 68 * 42 * 46 * 54 * 22 42 * 61 * 26 Amaranth flakes (1 cup) Chocolate flavored rings. large biscuit (2 biscuits) Hot Cereals Cream of rice (1 cup) Cream of wheat (1 cup) 127 149 3 9 6 82 * * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. fortified (1 cup) Shredded wheat. prepared (1/2 cup) 178 543 20 * Tacos Taco shell (2 tacos) 124 98 11 * Tortillas Corn (2 tortillas) Flour (2 tortillas) 113 200 23 407 12 * 15 * Waffles (frozen) Plain waffle. sweetened (1 cup) Crisp rice cereal (1 cup) Frosted oat cereal w/ marshmallows (1 cup) Granola cereal. fortified (1 cup) Puffed wheat cereal. presweetened (1 cup) Cocoa rice cereal (1 cup) Corn flakes cereal. mix.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 93 Sod A NDI ium score Stuffing Bread stuffing. prepared (1 cup) Puffed rice cereal.

. fortified (1 package) 158 Oats. cooked w/ water (1 cup) 147 Roman meal w/ oats (1 cup) 171 109 248 2 9 66 * 74 * 53 51 Alpen Cereal Alpen Cereal (1 cup) Cereals (by brand) 398 240 22 Familia Cereal Familia Cereal (1 cup) 474 61 22 General Mills Basic 4 (1 cup) Cheerios (1 cup) Chex (1 cup) Cinnamon Toast Crunch (1 cup) Cocoa Puffs (1 cup) Fiber One (1 cup) Honey Nut Cheerios (1 cup) Kix (1 cup) Lucky Charms (1 cup) Reese’s Puffs (1 cup) Total (1 cup) Trix (1 cup) Wheaties (1 cup) 202 111 112 169 117 118 112 85 114 170 84 118 107 316 214 288 275 172 258 270 201 204 222 158 194 218 32 * 84 * 62 * 45 * 49 * 135 * 61 * 67 * 58 * 45 * 249 * 49 * 106 * Kashi Go Lean (1 cup) Good Friends (1 cup) Heart to Heart (1 cup) 148 168 147 86 130 120 28 27 129 * * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals.94 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Farina cereal (1 cup) 94 Instant oatmeal w/raisins & spice.

Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 95 Sod A NDI ium score Kelloggs All-Bran (1 cup) Apple Jacks (1 cup) Complete Oat Bran Flakes (1 cup) Corn Flakes (1 cup) Corn Pops (1 cup) Frosted Flakes (1 cup) Frosted Mini-Wheats (1 cup) Fruit Loops (1 cup) Meuslix (1 cup) Rice Krispies (1 cup) Shredded Wheat (1 cup) Smart Start (1 cup) Special K (1 cup) 115 129 140 101 118 152 174 118 293 95 103 182 118 285 157 280 203 120 198 5 151 254 255 5 275 224 236 * 46 * 257 * 75 * 39 * 43 * 47 * 71 * 70 * 62 * 64 * 136 * 118 * Post 100% Bran (1 cup) Cocoa Pebbles (1 cup) Frosted Alpha-Bits (1 cup) Grape Nuts (1 cup) Honey Bunches of Oats (1 cup) 252 154 130 417 158 367 209 212 708 257 82 * 38 * 36 * 39 * 44 * Quaker Quaker Corn Grits. . Dates & Walnuts (100g) 116 Cap’n Crunch (1 cup) 145 Oatmeal Squares (1 cup) 212 Quaker Oat Cinnamon Life (1 cup) 160 288 165 207 270 269 204 29 * 57 * 48 * 66 * 48 * 68 * Ralston Ralston Cereal (1 cup) 134 476 60 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. instant (137g) 93 Quaker Instant Oatmeal w/Apples & Cinnamon (149g) 130 Quaker Instant Oatmeal w/Raisins.

part skim (2 oz.) Feta cheese (2 oz. low-sodium (2 slices) 213 200 189 229 98 216 163 202 58 150 206 234 211 84 144 170 209 43 170 214 215 101 213 369 791 357 352 347 850 918 172 327 633 292 191 304 420 351 356 356 153 154 103 109 147 8 10 12 12 11 16 13 18 4 18 21 8 13 12 35 16 14 12 15 16 11 15 29 14 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. non-fat (2 oz. .) Gruyere cheese (2 oz.) Swiss cheese. part skim (1/2 cup) Ricotta. low-fat (1 cup) Cream cheese (4 Tbsp.) Parmesan (2 Tbsp. low-fat (2 oz.) Ricotta cheese.) Mozzarella cheese.) Blue cheese (2 oz.96 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Wheatena Wheatena (1 cup) 136 5 52 * Dairy Products & Eggs Cheese American (2 oz.) Swiss cheese.) Mozzarella cheese. fat-free (4 Tbsp.) Brie cheese (2 oz. low-fat (2 oz.) Monterey Jack cheese (2 oz.) Cheddar.) Cottage cheese (1 cup) Cottage cheese. whole milk (2 oz.) Goat cheese (2 oz.) Cheddar cheese (2 oz. whole milk (1/2 cup) Swiss cheese (2 oz.) Muenster cheese (2 oz.) Mozzarella cheese.) Cream cheese.

non-fat (1 cup) Plain yogurt.) Egg white (1 egg white) Egg yolk (1 egg yolk) 74 106 126 17 53 70 222 227 55 8 27 31 27 30 23 Yogurt Fruit yogurt. low-fat (1 cup) Plain yogurt. low-fat (1 cup) Fruit yogurt.) 127 51 24 33 24 54 61 13 45 17 45 21 17 5 16 9 16 8 Eggs Egg (1 egg) Egg substitute.) Sour cream (2 Tbsp.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 97 Sod A NDI ium score Cream Products Reddi Whip Fat-Free Whipped Topping (3 oz.) Sour cream. reduced fat (2 Tbsp. non-fat (1 cup) 250 230 154 137 149 208 98 142 142 172 189 113 162 134 14 16 26 32 18 19 30 Cakes Desserts 73 291 484 385 235 213 298 273 248 214 9* 5* 4* 4* 5* Angel food cake. . low-fat (1 cup) Vanilla yogurt. light (2 Tbsp. powder (1 oz.) Sour cream.) Sour cream. ready to eat (1 slice) Butter pound cake. non-fat (2 Tbsp. fat-free (2 Tbsp. ready to eat (1 slice) Carrot cake w/ cream cheese frosting (1 slice) Cheesecake. ready to eat (1 slice) Chocolate cake w/ frosting (1 slice) * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. non-fat (1 cup) Plain yogurt.) Sour cream. liquid (1/2 cup) Egg substitute. whole milk (1 cup) Vanilla yogurt.

) Frozen Yogurt Chocolate frozen yogurt (1 cup) Vanilla frozen yogurt (1 cup) 221 235 110 125 13 9 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. ready to eat (1 piece) Pound cake. prepared (1 slice) Pumpkin pie. prepared (1 biscuit) Sponge cake. prepared (1 slice) Boston cream pie. ready to eat (1 slice) Shortcake. prepared (1 slice) Chocolate snack cake. creme filled w/frosting (1 cake) Chocolate snack cake. prepared (1 slice) 411 360 398 231 236 262 223 452 316 327 272 355 424 316 241 230 479 349 6* 5* 9* 9* 11 * 5* 11 * 5* 18 * Frozen Bars Desserts (Frozen) 75 42 105 4 7 54 9 0 8 Frozen fruit & juice bar (1 bar) Ice pop or Popsicle (1 pop) Sundae ice cream novelty (2 oz. low-fat w/ frosting (1 cake) Cinnamon coffee cake w/ crumb topping (1 slice) Devil’s food cake w/ chocolate frosting (1 slice) Fruitcake. .98 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Chocolate cake. prepared (1 slice) Blueberry pie. biscuit type. ready to eat (1 slice) Yellow cake w/frosting (1 slice) 340 188 131 237 235 139 160 225 110 239 299 212 178 199 214 116 193 329 93 220 7* 8* 5* 8* 5* 5* 6* 9* 9* 3* Pastry & Pie Apple pie. prepared (1 slice) Butter croissant (1 croissant) Cheese croissant (1 croissant) Cinnamon Danish pastry (1 pastry) Cinnamon sweet roll w/ frosting (1 roll) Pecan pie. fat-free.

all flavors (1 cup) 12 123 217 213 3 9 67 68 3 4 11 9 Dressings/Sauces/Dips/Spreads Dressings Annie’s Natural Lowfat Mustard Vinaigrette (3 Tbsp. light (1 cup) (136g) Hot fudge sundae (1 sundae) Strawberry ice cream (1 cup) Strawberry sundae (1 sundae) Vanilla ice cream (1 cup) Vanilla ice cream. light (1 cup) Vanilla ice cream w/ cone. reduced-calorie (1 fruit ice) Italian ice. restaurant-prepared (1 cup) Pineapple coconut ice (1 cup) Sherbet.) French (3 Tbsp.) Caesar (3 Tbsp. fat-free (3 Tbsp. sugar (1 cone) Ice cream cone. soft-serve (1 ice cream cone) 377 271 284 253 268 289 218 164 84 97 182 79 92 115 98 92 6 6 9 9 8 9 10 10 Ice Cream Cones (without ice cream) Ice cream cone.) French.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 99 Sod A NDI ium score Ice Cream Chocolate ice cream (1 cup) Chocolate ice cream.) Blue cheese (3 Tbsp.) Balsamic vinegar (2 Tbsp.) Maple Grove Farms Caesar (3 Tbsp.) Blue cheese. low-calorie (3 Tbsp.) 68 4 231 45 233 15 214 63 300 0 502 540 475 90 391 384 3 17 4 8 2 4 4 4 . wafer (1 cone) 40 17 32 6 11 10 Sherbet Fruit ice.

) Horseradish.100 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size French.) Beef gravy. fat-free (3 Tbsp.) Italian.) Russian (3 Tbsp.) 113 0 128 20 84 115 76 210 203 50 92 227 393 285 729 474 597 209 200 0 343 317 391 398 8 3 6 18 2 2 3 3 4 5 5 5 Oils Canola oil (1 Tbsp.) Oil & vinegar dressing (3 Tbsp.) Hoisin sauce (1 Tbsp.) Soybean oil (1 Tbsp.) Italian.) Corn oil (1 Tbsp.) Peanut oil (1 Tbsp.) Ranch. prepared (1 Tbsp. fat-free (3 Tbsp.) Ranch (3 Tbsp. reduced-calorie (3 Tbsp. reduced-fat (3 Tbsp. canned (1/4 cup) Cheese (1/4 cup) Chicken gravy.) Mayonnaise. low-fat (3 Tbsp.) Sunflower oil (1 Tbsp. canned (1/4 cup) Cranberry (1/4 cup) Fish sauce (1 Tbsp.) Olive oil (1 Tbsp.) Sesame oil (1 Tbsp.) 23 255 31 325 121 578 47 346 105 20 6 1390 35 258 7 47 19 12 7 7 3 88 7 52 .) Ranch. low-calorie (2 Tbsp.) Mayonnaise (2 Tbsp.) Walden Farms Classic French (3 Tbsp.) Safflower oil (1 Tbsp.) 120 120 119 119 120 120 120 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 2 2 6 1 3 8 Sauces Barbecue (2 Tbsp.) Italian (3 Tbsp.

) Margarine butter blend (1 Tbsp. canned (1/4 cup) Tomato sauce. low-fat.) Hummus (1/2 cup) Jam or preserves (1 Tbsp. frozen (1/2 cup) 103 91 19 82 143 23 10 27 2 0 3 3 .) Soy sauce.) Chocolate hazelnut spread (2 Tbsp.) Margarine (1 Tbsp.) Salsa (2 Tbsp.) Marshmallow topping (1 oz.) Soy sauce (1 Tbsp.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 101 Sod A NDI ium score Ketchup (1 Tbsp.) Whipped topping.) Ketchup. canned.) Whipped cream topping. low-sodium (1/4 cup) Walnut Acres Low-Sodium Tomato & Basil Sauce (1/2 cup) 15 166 16 3 92 601 3 56 8 437 10 1029 10 600 15 690 20 321 20 20 40 20 91 92 119 47 20 30 32 15 248 247 119 Spreads/Dips Butter (1 Tbsp. canned (1/2 cup) Mustard (1 tsp.) 102 173 218 56 51 101 102 4 178 82 13 298 6 6 133 127 96 10 1 7 70 3 1 3 2 236 30 Toppings Caramel topping (2 Tbsp.) Teriyaki sauce (1 Tbsp.) Tomato sauce.) Marinara sauce.) Tahini (2 Tbsp. low-sodium (1 Tbsp.) Jelly (1 Tbsp.) Oyster sauce (1 Tbsp. pressurized (2 Tbsp. low-sodium (1 Tbsp.

102 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Breakfast Fast Foods 457 442 410 477 386 413 474 523 393 487 999 1382 888 1260 1433 889 1081 1115 1036 1135 11 * 16 * 14 * 10 * 11 * 10 * 11 * 10 * 13 * 14 * Biscuit w/ egg & bacon (1) Biscuit w/ egg & ham (1) Biscuit w/ egg & sausage (1) Biscuit w/ egg. cheese & ham (1) Croissant w/ egg. cheese & sausage (1) Burgers Cheeseburger. double patty. double patty. cheese & sausage (1) English muffin w/ cheese & sausage (1) English muffin w/ egg. . w/condiments & vegetables (1) 576 742 Hamburger. w/ condiments & vegetables (1) 359 976 Composite fast-food hamburger/cheeseburger (1) 287 495 Hamburger. large w/ condiments & pickles (1) 692 712 McDonald’s Big Mac (1) 495 737 McDonald’s Big Mac w/ cheese (1) 572 1062 McDonald’s Cheeseburger (1) 326 739 McDonald’s Hamburger (1) 270 502 McDonald’s Quarter Pounder (1) 438 640 McDonald’s Quarter Pounder w/ cheese (1) 535 1176 14 * 15 * 14 * 11 * 14 * 14 * 14 * 17 * 16 * 16 * 15 * 16 * 17 * 16 * Chicken Chicken fillet sandwich w/ cheese (1) Chicken fillet sandwich. plain (1) 457 635 Cheeseburger. cheese & bacon (1) Biscuit w/ ham (1) Croissant w/ egg. double patty w/condiments & vegetables (1) 417 1051 Cheeseburger. plain (1) 274 387 Hamburger. plain (1) 632 1238 515 957 12 * 11 * * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. double patty. triple patty. cheese & bacon (1) Croissant w/ egg. plain (1) 544 554 Hamburger.

fast food (1) Burrito w/ beans (2) Chili con carne (1 cup) Chimichanga w/ beef & cheese (1) Enchilada w/ beef & cheese (1) Nachos (113g) Nachos w/ cheese & jalapeno peppers (204g) Nachos w/ cinnamon & sugar (109g) Nachos w/cheese.) 211 256 184 161 188 136 12 10 11 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals.) Strawberry milk shake (8 fluid oz. ground beef & peppers (255g) Taco. prepared (1) Tostada w/ guacamole (1) Tostada w/ beans & cheese (1) Tostada w/ beef & cheese (1) 508 331 231 447 256 443 323 346 608 592 569 369 181 223 315 1335 991 212 985 1007 957 1319 816 1736 439 1800 802 401 543 897 16 * 17 * 8* 14 * 26 15 * 14 * 11 * 10 * 6* 11 * 16 * 18 * 14 * 17 * Milk Shakes Chocolate milk shake (8 fluid oz. . beans.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 103 Sod A NDI ium score McDonald’s Chicken McGrill Sandwich (1) McDonald’s Crispy Chicken Sandwich (1) 422 1240 537 1424 17 * 13 * Fish Fish sandwich w/ tartar sauce & cheese (1) Fish sandwich w/ tartar sauce (1) McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish Sandwich (1) 523 431 415 939 615 663 15 * 15 * 11 * Mexican Burrito w/ beans & meat (2) Burrito w/ beans. cheese & beef (2) Burrito w/ fruit (apple or cherry).) Vanilla milk shake (8 fluid oz.

fried in vegetable oil (2-1/2 oz. plain (1) Submarine w/ cold cuts. w/ meat & vegetables (2 slices) Pepperoni pizza (2 slices) 281 368 362 672 765 534 17 * 15 * 13 * Sandwiches Roast beef sandwich w/ cheese (1) Roast beef sandwich. no dressing (1-1/2 cups) 102 119 105 209 379 1572 106 489 26 38 21 50 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. . cheese & vegetables (1) Submarine w/ roast beef. no dressing (1-1/2 cups) Salad w/pasta & seafood. no dressing (1-1/2 cups) Salad w/ shrimp.104 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Pizza Cheese pizza (2 slices) Combination pizza.) Hashed brown potatoes (1/2 cup) McDonald’s French Fries (medium bag) Potato salad (1/2 cup) 195 242 151 412 164 356 140 290 195 472 8 7 7 7 9 Tossed Vegetable Salads Salad w/cheese & egg. mayonnaise & vegetables (1) Submarine w/ tuna salad (1) 473 1633 346 792 456 1651 410 845 584 1293 16 * 16 * 18 * 16 * 14 * Side Orders Coleslaw (1 cup) French fried potatoes. no dressing (1-1/2 cups) Salad w/chicken.

Nutrient Density Scores
Food item Description / portion size Calo ries

105
Sod A NDI ium score

Canned

Fish
34 168 158 100 211 145 587 127 628 242 449 428 43 338 42 42 32 36

Anchovies, canned in oil (4 anchovies) Clams, drained (4 oz.) Salmon (4 oz.) Sardines, canned in oil (4 sardines) Tuna, in oil (4 oz.) Tuna, in water (4 oz.)

Fillets
Bass, freshwater, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Bluefish, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Catfish, wild, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Cod, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Flounder, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Grouper, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Haddock, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Herring, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Mackerel, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Mahi-Mahi, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Monkfish, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Orange roughy, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Perch, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Salmon, pink, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Smelt, rainbow, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Snapper, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Sole, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Swordfish, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Tilapia, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Trout, rainbow, farmed, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Trout, rainbow, wild, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) Tuna, yellowfin, cooked, dry heat (4 oz.) 166 180 119 119 133 134 127 230 297 124 110 101 133 169 141 145 133 176 195 192 170 158 102 87 57 88 119 60 99 130 94 128 26 92 90 98 87 65 119 130 74 48 64 53 22 41 29 31 41 27 35 48 50 39 34 51 27 39 40 35 41 38 18 33 36 46

106

Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide
Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score

Food item Description / portion size

Prepared (processed)
Fish fillet, batter-coated, fried (4 oz.) Fish sticks, frozen, heated (4 sticks) 263 305 603 652 10 12

Shellfish
Clams, breaded, fried (4 oz.) Clams, cooked, moist heat (4 oz.) Clams, raw (4 oz.) Crab, Alaska king, cooked, moist heat (4 oz.) Crab, blue, cooked, moist heat (4 oz.) Crayfish, farmed, cooked, moist heat (4 oz.) Lobster, cooked, moist heat (4 oz.) Mussels, cooked, moist heat (4 oz.) Oysters, farmed, raw (4 oz.) Scallops, breaded, fried (6 scallops) Scallops, steamed (4 oz.) Shrimp, breaded, fried (4 oz.) Shrimp, cooked, moist heat (4 oz.) Squid, fried (4 oz.) Squid, raw (4 oz.) 229 413 168 127 84 64 110 1216 116 316 99 110 111 431 195 418 67 202 200 432 120 478 274 390 112 254 198 347 104 50 107 341 341 97 71 45 43 102 292 15 24 17 38 26 45

Breakfast

Frozen Foods
251 411 176 584 399 524 22 * 10 * 28 *

French toast (2 slices) French toast sticks (4 slices) Waffle (2 waffles)

Main Meal
Chicken pot pie (217g) 484 857 7

* Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals.

Nutrient Density Scores
Food item Description / portion size Calo ries

107
Sod A NDI ium score

Pasta
Cheese lasagna (240g) Healthy Choice Beef Macaroni (240g) Lasagna w/ meat & sauce (240g) 298 211 305 660 444 672 26 * 33 * 25 *

Pizza
Cheese pizza, regular crust (162g) Sausage & pepperoni pizza (146g) 434 385 724 854 14 * 12 *

Vegetables
French fried potatoes, frozen (14 fries) Hashed brown potatoes, frozen (1-1/2 cups) Onion rings, breaded (11 rings) Potato puffs, frozen (1-1/2 cups) 140 21 510 80 318 293 426 1432 11 7 6 10

Fruit
Apples
Applesauce (1 cup) Apple, dried (1/2 cup) Apple, fresh (1 apple) 194 104 72 8 37 1 31 22 76

Apricots
Apricots, dried, unsweetened (1/3 cup) Apricots, fresh (4 apricots) 104 67 4 1 21 64

Avocado
Avocado, fresh (half ) 182 3 37

Banana
Banana, fresh (1 banana) 105 1 30
* Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals.

frozen.108 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Blackberries Blackberries. fresh (1-1/2 cups) Blackberries. canned (1/4 cup) 25 105 1 20 234 3 Currants Currants (1/4 cup) 102 3 21 Dates Dates. fresh (1-1/2 cups) 82 38 100 Cherries Cherries. dried (1/4 cup) Figs. canned in heavy syrup (1-1/2 cups) Blueberries. unsweetened. fresh (3 figs) 124 111 5 2 25 62 . frozen (1-1/2 cups) 93 145 2 2 178 110 Blueberries Blueberries. frozen (1-1/2 cups) 315 137 346 11 0 4 9 68 46 Cranberries Cranberries. frozen. fresh (1-1/2 cups) Cherries. domestic (1/4 cup) Dates. fresh (1-1/2 cups) Blueberries. medjool (2 dates) 125 133 1 0 19 19 Figs Figs. canned. sweetened. fresh (1/2 cup) Cranberry sauce. unsweetened (1-1/2 cups) 338 123 279 119 12 2 3 2 8 130 9 140 Cantaloupe Cantaloupe. in heavy syrup (1-1/2 cups) Cherries. sweetened. sweetened (1-1/2 cups) Blueberries.

) 20 1 1 0 94 99 Mango Mango. fresh (1-1/2 cups) 144 0 102 Grapes Grapes.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 109 Sod A NDI ium score Fruit Cocktail Fruit cocktail. canned in juice (1-1/2 cups) Fruit cocktail. fresh (1 lemon) Lemon. fresh (1 lime) Lime. fresh (1-1/2 cups) 91 0 41 . fresh (1-1/2 cups) 92 3 31 Honeydew Honeydew. juice (1 tsp. fresh (2 kiwis) 93 5 97 Lemon Lemon. fresh (1 mango) 135 4 51 Nectarine Nectarine. canned in light syrup (1-1/2 cups) 272 164 207 22 14 22 8 14 11 Grapefruit Grapefruit.) 22 1 3 0 280 141 Lime Lime. fresh (1-1/2 cups) 96 48 45 Kiwi Kiwi. canned in heavy syrup (1-1/2 cups) Fruit cocktail. juice (1 tsp.

fresh (1 pear) 295 186 215 96 20 15 19 2 12 19 15 46 Pineapple Pineapple. halves. canned. Mandarin. Mandarin. canned. in heavy syrup (1-1/2 cups) Pears. in own juice (1-1/2 cups) Pineapple. canned in juice (1-1/2 cups) Orange. fresh (1-1/2 cups) 82 6 118 Peaches Peaches. fresh (1-1/2 cups) 297 224 112 4 4 2 18 24 64 Plums Plums. canned. fresh (1-1/2 cups) 114 0 157 .110 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Oranges Orange. canned. sweetened (1-1/2 cups) 96 38 291 203 164 353 3 0 24 19 15 23 24 73 16 21 29 49 Pears Pears. canned in own juice (1-1/2 cups) Peaches. in light syrup (1-1/2 cups) Pears. fresh (1 peach) Peaches. dried (1/4 cup) Peaches. in heavy syrup (1-1/2 cups) Pineapple. halves. canned in heavy syrup (1-1/2 cups) Peaches. fresh (1 orange) Orange. canned. canned in light syrup (1-1/2 cups) 62 138 231 0 19 23 109 67 29 Papaya Papaya. halves. frozen. in juice (1-1/2 cups) Pears. slices. canned in light syrup (1-1/2 cups) Peaches.

5 cups) 114 4 91 . fresh (2. frozen. sweetened. frozen (1-1/2 cups) 96 386 2 4 145 18 Strawberries Strawberries. fresh (2 tangerines) 89 3 72 Watermelon Watermelon. dried (1/4 cup) 102 1 47 Raisins Raisins (1/4 cup) 108 4 16 Raspberries Raspberries. sweetened (1-1/2 cups) Strawberries. frozen. unsweetened (1-1/2 cups) 69 298 78 2 4 4 212 29 174 Tangerine Tangerine. fresh (1-1/2 cups) Strawberries.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 111 Sod A NDI ium score Prunes Prunes. fresh (1-1/2 cups) Raspberries.

light meat (2 slices) Turkey.) Beef. turkey (4 oz.) Kielbasa. braised (3 oz. 1/8" fat. separable lean only.) Pastrami (3 oz.) Beef.) Beef. pot roast. broiled (4 oz.) Beef.) 175 87 92 115 83 64 417 331 739 490 277 680 13 15 24 18 23 33 Hot Dogs & Sausage Beef & pork chorizo (4 oz. turkey (1 hot dog) Italian sausage. tofu (1 hot dog) Hot dog. broiled (3 oz. tenderloin. beef & pork (4 oz. beef & pork (2 slices) Chicken roll. roasted (4 oz. braised (3 oz. ground. 1/8" fat.) Bratwurst. London broil. broiled (4 oz. beef & pork (2 slices) Turkey roll. white. bottom round.) Beef.) Corned beef brisket. deli cut (2 oz. jerky (2 oz. pork (4 oz. 1/8" fat.) Beef. short loin. rotisserie.) Italian sausage.) Beef.) 516 337 148 153 163 102 390 179 352 1400 962 513 631 330 642 1369 1052 1220 12 13 8 18 23 13 13 35 11 .) Hot dog. broiled (4 oz. 1/8" fat. 11% fat (2 slices) Salami. pork (1 hot dog) Hot dog. top round. flank. broiled (4 oz. 0" fat. cooked (4 oz.) Beef. light meat (2 slices) Ham. 0" fat. prime rib. porterhouse.) Cold Cuts Bologna. beef & pork (4 oz. beef (1 hot dog) Hot dog. 1/4" fat.112 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Beef Meat 210 37 251 43 213 64 284 82 232 1255 454 74 388 69 292 47 211 46 285 1286 124 753 21 17 27 20 13 12 12 13 26 16 28 Beef. 85% lean meat. chuck.

lean.) Smoked meat stick (2 sticks) 166 362 168 385 309 1042 218 586 19 42 5 7 Pork Bacon (2 slices) Bacon. center cut. 1/4" fat.) Pork chops. meat only. 11% fat. Canadian (2 oz. whole. meat & skin.) 195 84 101 108 27 14 20 .) Smoked sausage. fried (2 oz. breast.) 348 1055 264 1014 363 1033 9 10 6 Lamb Lamb. meat only. separable lean & fat. roasted (4 oz.) Pork loin. cured. lean. broiled (4 oz. roasted (4 oz. Meat Liver pâté (4 Tbsp. separable lean & fat. boneless. beef & pork (4 oz.) 278 Chicken. 5% fat. leg.) Pepperoni. roasted (4 oz.) Country Style Ribs.) Liverwurst spread (1/4 cup) Pork rinds.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 113 Sod A NDI ium score Knockwurst. loin chops. cured. panfried (4 oz. lean. separable lean & fat. broiled (4 oz.) Pork loin.) 68 291 89 799 372 59 337 83 202 1701 164 1364 138 1021 314 91 229 68 186 64 281 67 12 28 17 17 26 30 18 22 32 37 23 Poultry Chicken. roasted (4 oz. fried (4 oz. center cut. honey.) Ground pork (4 oz. 1/8" fat. tenderloin. beef & pork (2 oz.) 187 Chicken.) 321 57 88 92 21 16 18 Misc.) Ham. smoked (4 oz.) 337 Lamb. beef & pork (4 oz. roasted (4 oz. extra lean.) 206 Lamb. lean.) Pork chops.) Ham.) Ham. roasted (4 oz. flour coated. drumstick. drumstick. ground (4 oz. roasted (4 oz. roasted (3 oz.

) Turkey.) Chicken.) Turkey. meat only. no salt (1/4 cup) Almonds.) Duck.) Duck. raw (34. roasted (4 oz. salted (1/4 cup) Macadamia. dry roasted.25g) Cashews. dry roasted. ground (4 oz. wing. blanched (1/4 cup) Almonds.) 189 364 230 152 382 228 48 159 266 86 87 104 71 67 74 285 64 121 138 10 18 23 10 21 9 28 17 Nuts & Seeds Nut Butter Almond (2 Tbsp. dry roasted. no salt (1/4 cup) Cashews.) Tahini (sesame butter) (2 Tbsp. flour coated.) 203 188 188 178 4 5 147 34 20 13 18 32 Nuts Almonds. raw (1/4 cup) Peanuts.) Chicken.) Peanut (2 Tbsp. salted (1/4 cup) Hazelnuts (filberts) (1/4 cup) Macadamia. meat only. no salt (1/4 cup) 211 206 206 230 197 189 197 212 241 240 241 214 10 0 117 1 5 4 219 0 1 89 2 2 25 25 25 116 14 16 14 29 9 9 10 19 . salted (1/4 cup) Brazil (1/4 cup) Cashews. roasted (4 oz. bacon (0. dry roasted.) Turkey.) Cornish game hen. roasted (4 oz.44 oz. wing. roasted (4 oz. meat & skin. no salt (1/4 cup) Macadamia. dry roasted.114 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Chicken. liver (4 oz. fryer roaster. all types. roasted (4 oz. fried (4 oz.) Cashew (2 Tbsp. meat only. meat & skin. dry roasted.

soft (1 bar) Granola bar.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 115 Sod A NDI ium score Peanuts. chocolate coated. Non-Candy Snacks 115 230 117 103 132 178 95 187 114 115 127 266 70 290 130 79 5 60 81 57 116 60 71 67 72 80 111 30 280 170 16 26 9 11 9 12 22 8 9 11 11 13 22 13 20 Crisped rice bar w/ chocolate chips (1 bar) Fabes Bar (1 bar) Granola bar. almond. hard (1 bar) Granola bar. all types.) Sunflower (1/4 cup) 118 187 102 186 8 6 2 1 44 36 41 45 Bars. oil roasted. dry roasted. peanut butter. dry roasted. hard (1 bar) Granola bar. soft (1 bar) Granola bar. soft (1 bar) Granola bar. salted (1/4 cup) Pecans (1/4 cup) Pine nuts (pignolia) (1 Tbsp. fruits & nuts (1 bar) Granola bar.) Pistachio.) Pumpkin (1/4 cup) Sesame (2 Tbsp. salted (1/4 cup) Peanuts. hard (1 bar) Granola bar. Honey Oat (1 bar) . hard (1 bar) Granola bar. oats. salted (1/4 cup) Walnuts (1/4 cup) 214 216 187 58 183 182 196 297 115 0 0 3 130 1 19 17 34 10 29 29 29 Seeds Flaxseed (2 Tbsp. raisin. peanut butter. dry roasted. soft (1 bar) Halvah bar (1/4 bar) Health Valley Fat-Free Apple Bakes (1 bar) Kashi Go Lean Peanut & Chocolate Bar (1 bar) Kellogg’s All Bran Breakfast Bar. chocolate chip. chocolate chip. all types. chocolate chip. plain. no salt (1/4 cup) Pistachio. chocolate coated.

chocolate (3 balls) Kit Kat Wafer Bar (1 bar) Kudos Whole Grain Bars. Fuhrman’s Date Nut Pop ‘Ems. .13 oz. Cinnamon (3 balls) Dr.) Pop Tarts Toaster Pastry (1 pastry) 136 219 133 219 110 214 112 214 30 * 8* 20 * 8* Candy. Chocolate Chip (1 bar) (1 oz. Brown Sugar Cinnamon (1 Pop Tart) Kellogg’s Rice Krispies Treats Squares (1 bar) (1. Chocolate 3 Musketeers Bar(1 bar) Dr. Fuhrman’s Date Nut Pop ‘Ems. Non-Chocolate Butterscotch candy (5 pieces) Caramel candy (3 pieces) Chewing gum.116 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Kellogg’s Nutri Grain Cereal Bar (1 bar) (37g) Kellogg’s Pop Tarts. stick (1 stick) Dr. Plain (3 balls) Gumdrops (8 gumdrops) Jelly beans (10 jelly beans) 117 116 7 125 125 114 106 117 74 0 2 2 13 14 0 4 1 31 20 0 0 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals.) M&M’s Milk Chocolate Candies (about 60 pieces) M&M’s Peanut Chocolate Candies (about 24 pieces) Milk chocolate bar w/ almonds (1 piece) Milk chocolate candy bar (44g) (1 bar) Milk chocolate coated raisins (1/4 cup) (45 pieces) Milk chocolate covered peanuts (1/4 cup) Milky Way Bar (1 bar) Mounds Bar (1 bar) Nestle Baby Ruth Bar (Fun Size Bar) (1 bar) Nestle Butter Finger (Fun Size Bar) (1 bar) Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups (2 pieces) Snickers Bar (1 bar) Twix Caramel Cookie Bars (58g) 94 125 220 124 206 244 216 235 176 210 228 262 99 100 175 265 291 44 2 23 79 26 23 30 35 16 17 129 78 46 45 107 129 113 10 36 9 25 * 4 18 20 21 20 19 12 7 11 11 13 14 10 Candy. Fuhrman’s Date Nut Pop ‘Ems.

Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 117 Sod A NDI ium score Marshmallows (4 marshmallows) Nougat candy (2 pieces) Peanut brittle (1.) Sesame crunch candy (17 pieces) Skittles Original Bite Size Candies (30 pieces) Starburst Fruit Chews (6 pieces) Taffy (2 pieces) Toffee (1 piece) Tootsie Roll Chocolate Flavor Roll (5 pieces) 92 111 172 154 130 119 113 214 128 23 9 158 50 5 17 27 127 15 0 4 5 16 7 6 0 2 2 Cookies Animal crackers (12 crackers) 134 Arrowroot cookies (12 cookies) 134 Barbara’s Bakery Fat-Free Oatmeal Raisin Mini Cookies (6) 110 Butter cookies.25 oz. ready to eat (6 cookies) 140 Chocolate chip cookies (3 cookies) 147 Chocolate chip cookies. ready to eat (2 cookies) 162 Oatmeal cookies without raisins (2 cookies) 134 118 118 105 105 89 113 81 44 145 91 112 80 40 183 90 80 20 66 56 138 179 8* 8* 9* 7* 7* 7* 10 * 5* 9* 7 8* 12 7* 9* 9* 9* 13 * 3* 5* 7* 6* * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. lower-fat (3 cookies) 136 Chocolate coated Graham crackers (2 cookies) 136 Chocolate covered marshmallow cookies (2 cookies) 109 Chocolate sandwich cookies w/ creme filling (3 cookies) 140 Chocolate sandwich cookies w/ extra creme filling (2) 129 Fig bars (2 bars) 111 Frookie Apple Cinnamon Oat Bran Cookies (2 cookies) 90 Fudge cake cookies (1 cookies) 73 Ginger snaps (4 cookies) 116 Health Valley Fat-Free Original Healthy Chip Cookies (3) 100 Health Valley Fat-Free Raisin Oatmeal Cookies (3) 100 Health Valley Fat-Free Raspberry Center Cookies (1 cookie) 70 Nabisco Snackwell’s Caramel Delights Cookies (36g) 138 Nabisco Snackwell’s Devil’s Food Cookie Cakes (32g) 98 Oatmeal cookies w/ raisins. .

. prepared w/ 2% milk (1 cup) Vanilla pudding.118 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Peanut butter cookie. ready to eat (2 cookies) Peanut butter sandwich cookie. fat-free (1 cup) (280g) 309 285 167 320 296 283 260 835 500 203 314 341 445 596 11 12 1 10 9 10 8 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. ready to eat (2 cookies) Pecan shortbread cookie. ready to eat (2 cookies) Shortbread cookie. fat-free (1 cup) (294g) Gelatin mix. ready to eat (4 cookies) Sugar cookie. ready to eat (2 cookies) Sugar wafer cookie w/ creme filling (8 cookies) Vanilla sandwich cookie w/ creme filling (3 cookies) Vanilla wafer cookie (5 cookies) 143 134 152 161 143 143 145 142 124 103 79 146 107 41 105 92 7* 8* 5* 7* 5* 4* 6* 6* Doughnuts Chocolate coated cake doughnut (1 doughnut) Doughnut w/ creme filling (1 doughnut) Doughnut w/ jelly filling (1 doughnut) Glazed cake doughnut (1 doughnut) Glazed French cruller (1 cruller) 204 307 289 192 169 184 263 249 181 141 6 8 6 5 5 Fruit Snacks Banana chips (1-1/2 oz. prepared w/ 2% milk (1 cup) Vanilla pudding. prepared w/ 2% milk (1 cup) Chocolate pudding.9 oz pouch) Betty Crocker Fruit Roll Ups (1 Roll Up) Betty Crocker Fruit Roll Ups w/ vitamin C (2 Roll Ups) Fruit leather roll (1 roll) 221 80 90 50 104 78 3 50 55 55 89 67 8 8* 7* 12 * 14 * 17 Gelatin & Pudding Chocolate pudding mix.) Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot (1 strip) Betty Crocker Fruit Gushers (. prepared w/ water (1 cup) Rice pudding. prepared w/ 2% milk (1 cup) Tapioca pudding.

) Potato chips. salted (60g) (10 pretzels) Pretzels. salted (2 cakes) 70 126 157 77 70 59 156 298 58 30 12 8 8 12 11 * Popcorn Popcorn. unsalted (60g) (10 pretzels) Pretzels.) Potato chips. no salt (4 cups) (44g) 122 229 1 1 16 8 Pretzels Pretzels.) Tortilla chips. plain (1 oz.) Corn puffs. . sour cream & onion flavor (1 oz. hard. plain (1 oz. no salt (4 cups) (4 cups) Popcorn.) Tortilla chips. chocolate-covered (5 pretzels) Pretzels.) Potato chips. fat-free.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 119 Sod A NDI ium score Chips Corn chips. salted (1 oz. air popped. low-fat. unsalted (1 oz.) (16 chips) Tortilla chips.) (18 chips) 153 139 107 152 151 152 118 141 142 149 134 179 213 182 168 177 2 119 201 150 70 289 6 13 17 11 12 11 9 7 8 7 9 Miscellaneous Snacks Brown rice cakes (2 cakes) Corn nuts (1 oz.) Popcorn cakes (2 items) Quaker Plain Rice Cakes. light. salted (1 oz. oil popped. hard.) Potato chips.) Tortilla chips. cheese flavored (1 oz. unsalted (1 oz.) Potato chips. whole wheat (60g) (10 pretzels) 252 313 229 1029 229 173 389 1615 217 122 4* 13 * 13 * 11 * 12 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. baked w/ no fat (1 oz. baked w/ less oil (1 oz. barbecue (1 oz.) Tortilla chips. soft (1 pretzel) Pretzels. nacho (1 oz.

& Lentils Black bean. Peas. condensed. canned (2 cups) 156 Clam chowder. canned (2 cups) 78 Campbell’s Healthy Request Chicken Broth (2 cups) 34 Chicken-flavor Ramen noodle (43g) 188 Chicken gumbo. condensed (2 cups) 112 Chicken noodle. canned (2 cups) 146 Beef noodle. powder (1 cube) 14 Beef flavor Ramen noodle. canned (2 cups) 156 Chicken broth. condensed. canned (2 cups) 166 Vegetable beef. all prepared with water) Beans. dehydrated (43g) 187 Beef mushroom. condensed. condensed. condensed. New England. canned (2 cups) 190 1565 1019 861 1884 1903 1581 1152 1552 771 891 1908 2212 1889 1972 1619 1157 1830 37 15 14 18 40 34 20 22 70 10 41 18 29 10 12 67 50 Vegetables Imagine Creamy Butternut Squash (2 cups) Cream of celery. condensed. canned (2 cups) 232 2396 260 50 240 780 220 900 330 1835 36 90 94 97 32 Beef. condensed. condensed. canned (2 cups) 34 Beef broth of bouillon. condensed. canned (2 cups) 234 Campbell’s Healthy Request Cream of Chicken (2 cups) 263 Clam chowder. Manhattan.120 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Soups & Stews (all condensed soups. condensed. & Seafood Beef broth of bouillon. canned (2 cups) 149 Cream of chicken. condensed. canned (2 cups) Health Valley No Salt Added Organic Black Bean (2 cups) Health Valley Fat-Free Black Bean & Vegetable (2 cups) Health Valley Fat-Free Lentil & Carrot (2 cups) Green pea. Chicken. cube (1 cube) 10 Chicken broth. canned (2 cups) 240 740 181 1898 83 11 . canned (2 cups) 149 Chicken vegetable.

canned (2 cups) Cream of mushroom. canned (2 cups) Onion.) Tofu hot dog (1 hot dog) Tofu yogurt (1 cup) 69 163 246 9 330 92 86 23 17 . condensed. canned (2 cups) Campbell’s Healthy Request Vegetable (2 cups) Health Valley No Salt Added Organic Vegetable ( 2 cups) Healthy Choice Country Vegetable (2 cups) Health Valley Fat-Free 14 Garden Vegetable (2 cups) Imagine Low Sodium Vegetable Broth (2 cups) Imagine Organic Vegetable Broth (2 cups) Progresso Healthy Classics Vegetable (2 cups) Westbrae Natural Fat-Free Santa Fe Vegetable (2 cups) 93 164 259 146 116 171 160 180 30 145 200 160 200 160 40 60 241 320 1479 1822 1762 1781 2106 1391 70 1040 1880 1644 720 80 960 780 280 920 846 760 67 85 8 29 16 110 96 93 25 68 86 90 89 97 40 40 88 89 Soy Products Soybean Products Fermented soybean paste (miso) (2 Tbsp.) Soybean curd cheese (1/2 cup) Soy burgers (1burger) 68 1282 170 22 125 385 15 27 45 Tofu Products Tofu (4 oz. condensed. canned (2 cups) Vegetarian vegetable.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 121 Sod A NDI ium score Gazpacho. canned (2 cups) Mushroom barley. canned (2 cups) Tomato. ready to eat (2 cups) Minestrone. condensed. condensed. condensed. canned (2 cups) Health Valley No Salt Added Organic Tomato (2 cups) Imagine Organic Creamy Tomato (2 cups) Vegetable broth. canned. condensed.

ready to eat (38g) Vanilla frosting.) Honey (1 Tbsp. prepared.) Coconut water (8 fluid oz.) Molasses (1 Tbsp.122 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Syrups.) White granulated sugar (1 tsp.) Molasses. unsweetened.) Maple syrup (1/4 cup) 105 209 27 7 5 4 * Artificially inflated nutrient score due to fortification with vitamins and minerals. . baked (1 slice) 121 125 7* Sweeteners Brown sugar (1 tsp.) 105 27 5 Coconut Coconut flakes.) 11 128 64 58 47 15 1 28 1 7 11 0 2 1 1 15 33 0 Syrups Chocolate syrup (2 Tbsp. blackstrap (1 Tbsp. Sweeteners.) 88 552 46 47 36 252 5 7 38 Frosting Chocolate frosting. sweetened (1/4 cup) Coconut milk (8 fluid oz.) Corn syrup (2 Tbsp. Baking Items Cocoa Cocoa.) 12 1 518 Chocolate Syrup Chocolate syrup (2 Tbsp. dry (1 Tbsp. ready to eat (38g) 151 160 70 70 2 3 Pie Crust Pie crust.

red. savoy. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Cauliflower. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Bok choy (1-1/2 cups) Broccoli. canned (1 cup) Bean sprouts (1 cup) Beets. boiled (1/2 cup) Carrots. raw (1-1/2 cups) Cauliflower. uncooked (1-1/2 cups) Chili peppers. boiled. raw (1-1/2 cups) Cabbage. raw (1-1/2 cups) Carrots. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Cabbage. reduced-calorie (1/4 cup) 187 98 66 120 1 0 Vegetables Alfalfa sprouts (1 cup) Artichoke. cooked (1-1/2 cups) Bamboo shoots. red.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 123 Sod A NDI ium score Pancake syrup (1/4 cup) Pancake syrup. hot (1 item) Chinese or Napa cabbage. green. uncooked (1-1/2 cups) Brussels sprouts. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Cabbage. raw (1-1/2 cups) Collard greens. raw (1-1/2 cups) Cabbage. cooked (1-1/2 cups) Cabbage. raw (1-1/2 cups) Celery (2 stalks) Chicory greens. boiled (1-1/2 cups) 10 60 25 59 25 53 112 31 82 45 84 50 32 65 33 28 27 75 43 38 11 62 18 20 18 74 2 130 114 244 27 559 38 234 9 144 11 444 196 97 87 824 96 342 44 376 49 672 18 481 24 420 18 330 28 352 29 374 45 336 126 240 28 295 45 285 64 135 122 591 3 323 18 704 10 600 46 1000 . drained (1 artichoke) Arugula (5 cups) Asparagus. cooked (1-1/2 cups) Chinese or Napa cabbage. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Broccoli.

iceberg (5 cups) Lettuce. flesh only. cooked (1-1/2 cups) Peppers. raw (1/2 cup) Parsley (1 Tbsp. cooked (1-1/2 cups) Escarole (3 cups) Garlic clove (1 clove) Green beans. sweet. flesh & skin (184g) Potatoes. shitake. raw (1-1/2 cups) Pepper. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Kale.) Parsnips (1-1/2 cups) Peppers. green (or sweet). boiled (2 cups) Green peas (1-1/2 cups) Jalapeno peppers (1/8 cup) Kale. boiled (1/3 cup) Onions. canned (3 olives) Onions. baked (1-1/2 cups) Potatoes. prepared w/milk & butter (1-1/2 cups) 266 45 52 50 25 4 87 202 7 55 50 54 109 38 48 23 66 120 32 53 15 31 34 1 166 57 45 58 132 142 170 306 42 25 6 50 69 329 1 149 33 322 1 58 2 74 7 70 0 164 45 1000 43 905 40 393 36 80 28 110 22 389 4 135 5 119 9 55 34 1000 14 139 115 17 2 50 2 47 2 480 23 37 4 181 7 258 4 420 11 43 11 43 9 31 517 16 . flesh & skin (1 potato) Potatoes. white. mashed. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Okra. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Cucumber (1 cucumber) Dandelion greens. romaine (5 cups) Mushrooms (1-1/2 cups) Mushrooms. red. green (or sweet). black. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Olives. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Eggplant. uncooked (1-1/2 cups) Kohlrabi (1-1/2 cups) Leeks (2 cups) Lettuce.124 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide Calo ries Sod A NDI ium score Food item Description / portion size Corn. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Mushrooms. cooked (1-1/2 cups) Mustard greens. red (sweet) (1-1/2 cups) Potato.

no salt (2 Tbsp. acorn (winter). no salt added (1 cup) Turnip greens. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Tomatillo (2 tomatillos) Tomato. cooked (1 cup) Tomato. baked (1-1/2 cups) Squash (summer) (2 cups) Squash. paste. canned. paste. spaghetti (winter) (1-1/2 cups) Squash (winter).) Tomato.) Tomato. canned (1/2 cup) Radicchio (2 cups) Radish (6 radishes) Rhubarb (1 cup) Sauerkraut. canned (1/8 cup) Scallions (1 Tbsp. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Sweet potato (1-1/2 cups) Swiss chard. butternut (winter). uncooked (1 item) Tomato. whole.) Snow or sugar peas (1-1/2 cups) Snow or sugar peas. all varieties. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Squash. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Spinach. (2 Tbsp. uncooked (5 cups) Squash. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Spinach. sun-dried (1/2 cup) Tomato. canned (1 cup) Tomato.Nutrient Density Scores Food item Description / portion size Calo ries 125 Sod A NDI ium score Pumpkin. baked (1-1/2 cups) String beans. whole. boiled (1-1/2 cups) Turnips (1 turnip) Water chestnuts (1 cup) Watercress (3 cups) Yams (1-1/2 cups) Zucchini (2-1/2 cups) 42 18 4 25 6 2 40 101 62 34 125 122 72 63 113 65 378 52 22 43 27 27 22 70 41 46 43 34 70 11 266 45 6 372 18 359 11 554 5 106 195 98 0 173 4 127 10 113 189 697 118 739 11 60 12 159 4 141 42 52 3 137 6 75 134 83 470 670 1 72 26 190 259 197 32 197 6 164 566 113 307 163 24 163 63 1000 82 337 11 19 42 1000 20 23 28 222 .

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Tucker KL.References 1. Dauchet L. “Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of cardiovascular disease in US adults: the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Epidemiologic Followup Study. Bazzano LA. Ogden LG.” Am J Cardiol 1999. 2. Kodama K. vegetable.” Am J Clin Nutr 2002. “Vegetable and fruit 127 . Qiao N. Amouyel P. Sauvaget C. Hallfrisch J.160(12): 1223-33.” J Nutr 2005.135(3):55661. Maryland.” J Nutr 2006. and antioxidant intake and all-cause. “Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis of cohort studies. “Fruit. Platz EA. Dallongeville J.76(1):93-9. et al.136(10):2588-93. et al. “Updating a 12-year experience with arrest and reversal therapy for coronary heart disease (an overdue requiem for palliative cardiology). Hercberg S. “The combination of high fruit and vegetable and low saturated fat intakes is more protective against mortality in aging men than is either alone: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.84(3):339-41. cancer. Genkinger JM. 3. Allen N. Esselstyn CB. He J.” Am J Epidemiol 2004. and cardiovascular disease mortality in a community-dwelling population in Washington County. Hoffman SC. Nagano J. et al.

berries and vegetables is associated with excess mortality in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study. “The potential contribution of increased vegetable and fruit consumption to health gain in the European Union. Jacobs DR. Lane MA. 7. Turley M.4(4):893-901.54 Suppl 3:S15-20. Martin A. Roth GS. Kelemen LE.34(10):2355-60. Cherubini A.133(1):199-204.30(1):26-31. “Associations of dietary protein with disease and mortality in a prospective study . Jacobs DR. Rissanen TH. Cerhan JR.” Aust N Z J Public Health 2006.” Stroke 2003.” J Nutr Health Aging 2002. Ingram DK. Virtanen JK. 5.” Nutritional Abstracts and Reviews 1957. 6.6(6):392-404. Rose W. Liu RH. et al. Tobias M. “Effects of fruits and vegetables on levels of vitamins E and C in the brain and their association with cognitive performance.” J Nutr 2003.” Eur J Clin Nutr 2000.” Int J Epidemiol 2002.” Am J Clin Nutr 2003:78(3Suppl):517S-520S.” Am J Epidemiol 2005. Joffe M. Robertson A. “Vegetable and fruit intake and mortality from chronic disease in New Zealand. “The amino acid requirements of adult man.” Public Health Nutr 2001. “Health benefits of fruits and vegetables are from additive and synergistic combinations of phytochemicals. Kushi LH. Kushi LH. Andres-Lacueva C. Voutilainen S. Michels KB.31(4):84754. Wolk A. Kelemen LE. “Associations of dietary protein with disease and mortality in a prospective study of postmenopausal women. et al. “Low intake of fruits. Cerhan JR. Stefanogiannis N. intake and stroke mortality in the Hiroshima/Nagasaki Life Span Study. “Effects of reduced energy intake on the biology of aging: the primate model.128 Eat Right America • Food Scoring Guide 4.161(3):239-49. et al.27:631. Black A. “A prospective study of variety of healthy foods and mortality in women.

Martínez ME.” Journal of the American Dietetic Association 1966.” Gastroenterol Clin North Am 2002. “Effects of a veryhigh-fiber vegetable. Serdula MK.5(6):492-9. Schatzkin A.283(16):2109-15.References 129 8. of postmenopausal women.48:25.8(1):47-57. .” Am J Epidemiol 2005. Hardage M. Giovannucci E.” Ann N Y Acad Sci 2001. “A prospective study of diet quality and mortality in women. 10. exercise. “Dietary intake of fruits and vegetables and risk of cardiovascular disease.” Curr Atheroscler Rep 2003. et al.34(1):54-60. “Diet quality and subsequent cancer incidence and mortality in a prospective cohort of women. Flood A.” Int J Epidemiol 2005. Jenkins DJ. 9.494-503. Liu S. Meydani M.166:177-211. “Nutrition interventions in aging and age-associated disease.31(4):925-43.” Metabolism 2001:50(4). Kendall CW. Kant AK.161(3):239-49. Graubard BI. fruit and nut diet on serum lipids and colonic function. Bazzano LA. “Modifiable risk factors for colon cancer. Schairer C. et al. Bulwer BE. “Cardiovascular disease: optimal approaches to risk factor modification of diet and lifestyle.928:226-35. nutrition. 11. Popovich DG. Forman D. Kant AK.” Recent Results Cancer Res 2005. “Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: lifestyle.” JAMA 2000. “Nutritional studies of vegetarians. Mai V.” Curr Treat Options Cardiovasc Med 2006.

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We are prepared to help you with the tools you need to achieve your health goals. Please visit us at our website www. vitality. The total Eat For Health program provides you with a deep reservoir of knowledge and a wealth of delicious. and that you will begin the exhilarating journey towards optimal health. highnutrient recipes that will help ensure that you achieve your optimal weight and reclaim your health. Eat For Health. and freedom from the grip of chronic and devastating diseases.EatRightAmerica.O Eat Right America A Message from the Publisher ur mission is to make essential nutritional information available to people everywhere.com or call (877) ERA-4-USA. ideal weight. and we look forward to guiding you and being a vital part of your support community on your exciting journey. For complete information. 131 . longevity. we urge you to get the comprehensive two-book set. We hope your interest will be sparked through this guide.

. New Jersey. Dr. M.EatRightAmerica. and the Discovery Channel’s “Second Opinion with Dr.” TV Food Network. Oz. “Good Day NY.” CNN. Disease-Proof Your Child— Feeding Kids Right.” Dr. Fuhrman’s recommendations are designed for people who desire superior health. including: “Good Morning America. and to reverse and prevent disease.D. and a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. effective weight control. As one of the country's leading experts on nutritional and natural healing. Cholesterol Protection for Life.com (877) ERA-4-USA . www. His most recent books include Eat to Live—The Revolutionary Formula for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss.About the Author J oel Fuhrman. is a board-certified family physician specializing in lifestyle and nutritional medicine in Flemington. and Eat For Health. Fuhrman has been featured in hundreds of magazines and on major radio and television shows.

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