PAUL GILBERT present s

SHRED ALERT!!!
DVD
THE
ULTIMATE
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GUIDE!
Photograph by PHOTOGRAPHER
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2 GUITAR WORLD
PAUL GILBERT present s
SHRED ALERT!!!
DVD
1. ALTERNATE UNIVERSE
Using alternate picking and note skipping to play interesting arpeggio patterns
2. READY TO RUMBLE
Quick, effective pick-hand warm-up exercises
3. READY TO RUMBLE, PART 2
More pick-hand warm-up exercises
4. ASSUME THE POSITION
Using position shifts to your advantage when soloing
5. ACCENTUATE THE POSITIVE
Alternate picking with accent patterns
6. FAST AND CLEAN
Alternate-picked 16th notes—the business card of shred guitar
7. STICK YER NECK OUT
Using neck diagrams to your advantage
8. SHAPE SHIFTING
How to organize patterns on the fretboard
9. SNAKE-CHARMING LICKS
The fifth mode of harmonic minor
10. UNITED MUTATIONS
Mastering muting techniques
11. BREAKIN’ OUT
The blessings and benefits of live performance
Instead of just playing a C major triad
(C E G) over C5, let’s add the s4 to the
mix, as shown in FIGURE 6 with the notes
C, E, Fs and G. If we apply the note-
skipping concept, we get C-Fs as our
frst pair (FIGURE 7a). FIGURE 7b illustrates
the ensuing sequence played across
»
three octaves. It’s also fun to play each
pair as a two-note chord (FIGURE 7c).
Try applying this approach to
whatever scale or mode you can think
of. As shown in FIGURE 8a, it works well
with E Dorian, the E blues scale and an
A diminished-seven arpeggio.❒
ALTERNATE UNIVERSE
USING ALTERNATE PICKING AND NOTE SKIPPING
TO PLAY INTERESTING ARPEGGIO PATTERNS
CHAPTER 1
3 GUITAR WORLD
HI, AND WELCOME to the frst
chapter of Shred Alert, where
I’ll teach you many of the
techniques I use. Let’s begin
with a very simple picking
exercise (FIGURE 1) and look
at some of the neat and musically
interesting variations you can spin
from it. We have two notes, E and B,
picked repeatedly with alternating
downstrokes and upstrokes, a technique
known as alternate picking. This is a
good exercise for what I call “outside
picking,” as the pick movement is
consistently on the “outside” of the pair
of strings, which is considerably easier
than “inside picking.”
What I am going to do now is
expand on this idea by applying a
mathematical pattern to an Em triad
arpeggio (E G B). In FIGURE 2a, the
notes are played sequentially in an
ascending fashion in two octaves
across the neck; in FIGURE 2b, the same
notes are played in a different position
as a sweep-picked arpeggio (sweep
picking involves dragging the pick
across the strings in a single downward
or upward motion).
This is how most rock guitarists
play arpeggios—straight up and down.
What I like to do in order to create
a more interesting melodic contour
is apply a note-skipping pattern that
goes “up two, back one, up two, back
one,” etc,” as demonstrated in FIGURES
3a-d: in FIGURE 3a, instead of playing E
to G, I play E to B, just like our initial
picking exercise. In FIGURE 3b, I move
on to the next pair, G-E, using the same
“outside picking” motion. Now that we
have a new pattern, let’s get it under
our fngers by alternating between
each note pair (FIGURE 3c). FIGURE 3d
shows the next pair, B and G, and all
three pairs are played in sequence in
FIGURE 4a. The pattern sounds cool
when continued across three octaves,
as demonstrated in FIGURES 4b and
FIGURE 4c.
This note-skipping concept can
be applied to other arpeggios, as
well as scales. A very common chord
progression in rock and metal is Em D5
C5 (FIGURE 5a). It’s standard practice
with this progression to substitute the
raised, or sharp, four (s4) for the fve
of the C5 chord, sounding C and Fs
instead of C and G. This alludes to the
C Lydian mode, shown in ascending
four-note groups in FIGURE 5b.


P.M.





P.M.


FIGURE 1
* = downstroke
*

2

4

2

4



= upstroke
FIGURE 2a Em triad

12

10

14

14

12

16

( )
17
151919
FIGURE 2b
sweep arpeggio


12
10
9
9
8
912



FIGURE 3a


12
14
12
14

12

3 3 3
3 3









FIGURE 3b
10
14


15
14
15
14


FIGURE 3c


15
14
15


12
14
15
14


FIGURE 3d
14
17



14
17
14
17
FIGURE 4a

sim.
12

14

15

14

14


17







FIGURE 4b
12
14
15
14
14
1714
16
17
17
16
20
FIGURE 4c 

17
19

12
14
15
14
14
1714
16
17
17
16
2017
19


17
19
16
20
17
17
14
16
14
17
15
14

12
14




FIGURE 5a
Em
7
9
9
8
7
9
9
8
D5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
5
7
7
5
7
7
0
C5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
3
5
5



3
4
3
5
0
3
4
3
5
3
4 








FIGURE 5b C Lydian mode

8
7 9 10

10
9 11 12
13
12 14 15
1
!
12 12 10
13
FIGURE 6


(root)
C
8

(maj3)
E
7

F#
(#4)
9
G
(5)
10





FIGURE 7a
sim.

8
9
8
9
!
8
FIGURE 7b


8
9
12
10 9
10
10
9
10
11
14
12 11
13
12
12
13
14
17
15
!
19
20

20






FIGURE 7c
8
9
12
10 9
10 X
10
9
10
11
14
12 11
13 X
12
12
13
14
17
15
0
19
20
FIGURE 8a E Dorian


19
18
17
19 18
17
19
20
1/2
17
21


E blues scale
12
13
15
1413
12
14
1412
12
14
1512
12
15
15
12
12
15
15
( )
1/2
17
18

18

A diminished-seven arpeggio
14
15
17
16
15
14
16
1714
14
17
17
19
20


FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 2b FIGURE 3a
FIGURE 3b FIGURE 3c FIGURE 3d FIGURE 4a
FIGURE 4b FIGURE 4c
FIGURE 5a
FIGURE 5b FIGURE 6
FIGURE 7a FIGURE 7b
FIGURE 7c FIGURE 8a
the two. You’ll fnd that when playing
very quietly it takes a lot of control to
keep the picking even.
Let’s move to some different chords:
FIGURE 12c begins with a G major voicing,
again altered by changing the note on
the high E string: FIGURE 12d features an
ascending D diminished-seven voicing,
and FIGURE 12e begins with some natural
harmonics (N.H.), sounded by lightly
READY TO RUMBLE
QUICK, EFFECTIVE PICK-HAND WARM-UP EXERCISES
CHAPTER 2
»
laying a fret-hand fnger across the top
three strings directly above the fretwire.
If you play all of these fgures in
sequence without stopping, you will
have repeated this picking motion for
about three minutes. By this point,
your pick-hand will be warmed up.
In the next chapter, I’ll offer some
permutations on this useful and
effective exercise.❒


P.M.


P.M.


P.M.




FIGURE 1
*
* = upstroke = downstroke
Em

0

0

0


 
FIGURE 2

Am

5

5

5

 
FIGURE 3

sim.
Am
5
5
5
7
5
5
8
5
5
7
5
5
3 3 3 3 3 3





FIGURE 4a
P.M. throughout
sim.
Am

8
10
9
    

8
10
14

12
13
14
 
FIGURE 4b

sim.
P.M. throughout
Am
15
13
14
14
13
14
12
13
14
14
13
14
3 3 3 3 3 3 3
15
13
14
14
13
14
12
13
14

14
13
9
8
10
9
10
10
9
12
10
9
10
10
9
8
10
9
7
10
9
8
10
9

7
10
5
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
5
5
5
7
5
5
8
5
5

mp
7
5
5

5
5
5
 
 
cresc.

mf

mp

cresc.

mf

3 3 3 3 3



FIGURE 4c
P.M. throughout
sim.
G
7
8
7
8
8
7
10
8
7
8
8
8
7
8
7
5
8
7

7
8
7
   
3 3 3 3 3 3 3







FIGURE 4d
P.M. throughout
sim.
Ddim7
4
6
7 
4
6
10
7
9
10 
7
9
13
10
12
13 
10
12
16

13
15
16
 
13
15
14
Am

12
13
14
 
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3



FIGURE 4e
sim.
N.H.
Em

12
12
12
   
5
5
5

5
5
5
   
0
0
0
 
3 3 3 3



 

Am

5
5
5
 

(slow down)

0
7
5
5
5








3
IN THIS CHAPTER, I’d like to
show you my favorite right-hand
(pick-hand) warm-up exercise. I
use this exercise at every show,
every clinic and any time I need
to warm-up my right hand
before performing.
The entire exercise is played on the
top three strings in a rhythm of repeating
eighth-note triplets. This means that
each beat in a bar of 4/4 is divided
like this: ONE-trip-let, TWO-trip-let,
THREE-trip-let, FOUR-trip-let. To play
each eighth-note triplet, I use a picking
motion of up-up-down. As illustrated in
FIGURE 9, I pick the open high E string
with an upstroke, followed by the open B
picked with an upstroke, followed by the
open G string picked with a downstroke.
I also use palm-muting (P.M.) to attain
a more staccato (detached) sound. Palm
muting is performed by resting the edge
of the pick-hand palm across all of the
strings, at the bridge saddles.
Note that the upstrokes are performed
as individual strokes, as opposed to
picking a single upstroke dragged across
the top two strings, which would be
what’s known as a reverse sweep or
reverse rake. It requires more muscle
movement and coordination to perform
two upstrokes, but that’s why this is a
good warm-up exercise—repeating three
distinct picking motions in this way will
build up the muscles in the pick hand.
Because I get bored hearing the same
three open strings over and over, I like to
use different chords to make the exercise
sound more interesting. As shown in
FIGURE 10, I can barre across the top three
strings at the ffth fret to sound an Am
triad. This will soon get monotonous as
well, so I can easily make it sound more
interesting by changing the note on
the high E string to imply a melody, as
demonstrated in FIGURE 11.
In order for this exercise to be an ef-
fective warm-up, I need to keep picking
the strings in this way for at least two
minutes, which of course inspires me
to move around the fretboard a little bit
and fnd some other interesting shapes
and fgures to play. Let’s start with dif-
ferent inversions (chord voicings) of Am,
as shown in FIGURE 12a: I begin in eighth
position, with the minor third, C, on top,
and then shift up to a 12th-position in-
version of Am with the ffth, E, on top.
Likewise, I’ll alter the note on the
high E string for a little variety, as in
FIGURE 12b. Another good thing to do is
to practice picking dynamics, by picking
softer or louder, or switching between
ON
DISC
ON
DISC
4 GUITAR WORLD
FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11
FIGURE 12a FIGURE 12b
FIGURE 12c
FIGURE 12d
FIGURE 12e
Now let’s apply our picking tech-
nique to these chord shapes, as dem-
onstrated in the second part of FIGURE
14. Following an eighth-note pickup
on the fourth string, picked with a
downstroke, each eighth-note triplet
is picked up-up-down on the second,
third and fourth strings, respectively.
Notice that I like to use palm muting
throughout (rest the edge of the pick-
hand palm across the bridge saddles)
to attain a more percussive attack and a
clearer separation of notes.
Now that you have a handle on the
concept, let’s experiment by moving
these chord shapes around the board in
different patterns: as shown in FIGURE
15, I begin by descending in the same
»
manner as FIGURE 14 for the frst two
bars, but at the end of bar 2 I anticipate
each new chord shape by shifting to it
on the preceding eighth note, sounded
on the fourth string with a down-
stroke. This approach is then adhered
to for the remainder of the exercise.
Anticipating each new chord shape like
this serves to make the exercise sound
even more interesting.
Once you’ve become comfortable
with the picking technique and musi-
cal concept, try to invent your own
ways of connecting these kinds of tri-
adic chord shapes. For the truly adven-
turous and ambitious, try applying the
pattern to all the other groups of three
adjacent strings. ❒


Freely

FIGURE 1
12
1/2
E7¨9
1210
13  1210 9
9
10 9
10 10 9
10 910
9
10 9  7 9 7 6 7 6
8
6
8 7
8
1/2
7 7 7 5 7 5 4 1
 
0
0
0
2
2
1
0
0






3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3




P.M.


FIGURE 2
E E7¨9 Am E7 F
14
13
13
12
10
12
10
9
10
9
7
9
E Dm E


7
5
6
6
4
5
3
2
3
2
1
1
0
5 A

*
* = downstroke
14



E
13

13

14


E7¨9
= upstroke
12

10

12

Am
10

9

10

E7
sim.
F
9

7

9

E
6
5
7
5
4
6
Dm
3
2
3

E
1
1
1
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3




FIGURE 3
14

P.M. throughout
13

13

14

12

10

12

10

9

10
 sim.
9

7

9

6
5
7
5
4
6
3
2
3

1
1
6
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

5
4
3

3
2
7
6
5
6

5
4
9

9
9
7

6
5
10

10
9
9

9
7
14

13
13
12

12
10
10

10
9
9

9
7
7
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

6
5
6

5
4
3

3
2
2

1
1
3

3
2
7

6
5
10

10
9
14
13
13
14
15


1
15


3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
IN THE LAST CHAPTER, I pre-
sented an intensive pick-hand
exercise that I do before every
show or clinic. I know that
in any situation it will get me
warmed up and ready to play
in no time. To refresh your memory,
the exercise is built from sequences of
eighth-note triplets that fall on three
adjacent strings, one note played per
string, moving from the highest string
to the lowest. Instead of playing each
triplet as a reverse sweep, which in-
volves dragging the pick across the
three strings in a single upward mo-
tion, I prefer to use individual pick
strokes, picking the frst two notes
with upstrokes and the last note with
a downstroke. It is the use of these
individual strokes that really builds up
one’s picking strength and stamina.
With just about everything I use as
a warm-up exercise, one of my hopes
is that I will eventually use the given
technique in a piece of music. I’m not
interested in warm-ups that are simply
muscle-building routines. To me, it’s
more useful and enjoyable if the exer-
cise exudes some musical merit as well.
One of the ways to apply a musical
approach to this picking exercise is to
instill a scalar concept, molding the
exercise to the musical structure of a
given scale. A scale that works well with
this exercise is Phrygian dominant,
which is the ffth mode of the harmonic
minor scale. Sometimes referred to as
the “snake charmer” scale, Phrygian
dominant is intervallically spelled 1 f2 3
4 5 f6 f7. In the key of E, the notes are E
F Gs A B C D; FIGURE 13 is a descending
run based on this exotic-sounding scale.
The frst thing I did with the scale
was to harmonize it in three-note
chords, as shown in the frst bar of
FIGURE 14. Starting with an E
+
(E aug-
mented) triad, I move the chord shapes
down the neck by shifting each note on
each string to the next lower scale tone
on that string, i.e., the E note on the
fourth string moves down to D, the Gs
on the third string moves to F and the
C on the second string moves to B. The
process continues down the fretboard
to frst position.
5 GUITAR WORLD
READY TO RUMBLE, PART 2
MORE PICK-HAND WARM-UP EXERCISES
CHAPTER 3
FIGURE 13
FIGURE 14
FIGURE 15
sane) position-shifting exercise is to
play the entire A minor pentatonic scale
in ffth position using just one fnger. As
shown in FIGURE 19, I frst play the entire
scale using only my index fnger, which
forces me to move it up and down the
fretboard very quickly and, hopefully,
accurately. I then repeat the exercise
with the middle fnger, ring fnger and
pinkie. This type of drill will get you
accustomed to making instantaneous
position shifts with every one of your
fretting fngers.
The last position-shifting lick in this
chapter is shown in FIGURE 20. This
one looks a little crazy because I shift
»
back and forth between two positions
very quickly. In the frst bar, I begin in
10th position and use string skipping,
from the high E to the G, to play the
frst two notes. I then play the last four
notes in 12th position. The lick in bar 2
is almost identical, except the frst and
fourth notes in the lick are played one
fret lower. When you get this one up to
speed, it sounds a little like a synthe-
sizer lick.
Hopefully these exercises will help
you to get a handle on position shift-
ing, and I do hope you have fun play-
ing minor pentatonic scales with your
pinkie only. ❒



FIGURE 1 A minor pentatonic scale
8 5
8 5
7 5
7 5
7 5
8 5

FIGURE 2

0 3 5
3 5 7
5 7
5 7
0
17 19
17 19
17
1
20
17 20 20 20 17
20 17 20
1














FIGURE 3
5 7
5 7
0
17

5 7
5 7
0
17 19
17 19

0 3 5
3 5 7
5 7
5 7
0
17 19
17 19
0 3 5
3 5 7
5 7
5 7
0
17 19
17 19
17
1
20
17 20 20 20 17
20 17 20
1




index:
middle:
ring:
pinkie:
1
2
3
4
FIGURE 4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
5 8
5 7
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
etc.
etc.
etc.
etc.
5 7
5 7
5 8
5 8 10 8 5
8 5
7 5
7 5
7 5
8 5







1
FIGURE 5
3 1 4 1 3

10
12
12 15
12 14
 
1 3 1 3 1 3

9
12
12 14
12 14
 
3 3
I’D LIKE TO ADDRESS the dodgy
subject of “position shifting.”
A great way to jump into this
topic is to use as our basis one
of the most commonly used
scales in rock, the minor pen-
tatonic. FIGURE 16 illustrates A minor
pentatonic played in ffth position.
Most guitar players have played this
scale in this position a million times. In
this chapter, I’ll show you how to play
it “outside of the box,” using position
shifts that give you greater movement
and versatility over the fretboard.
When this scale is played in ffth
position, the highest note is C (frst
string, eighth fret) and the lowest note
is A (sixth string, ffth fret), and you are
stuck within the limitations of those
boundaries. Position shifts open those
boundaries, allowing us to play this
scale from the absolute lowest note pos-
sible, the open low E, to one of the high-
est notes possible on a guitar, the D on
the frst string’s 22nd fret.
FIGURE 17 illustrates a very comfort-
able way to traverse this scale, as well
the entire fretboard, across three and
a half octaves of A minor pentatonic.
Following the frst note, the open low
E, I fret a G on the third fret of the sixth
string and then hammer-on up to A at
the ffth fret. I then move over to the A
string and start with a hammer from the
third fret to the ffth, then slide up from
the ffth to the seventh fret. This is fol-
lowed by ffth-to-seventh-fret hammers
on the D and G strings.
The next note is the key to this ex-
ercise: using the open high E string to
sound the next note in the scale, I am
afforded the opportunity to shift all the
way up to 17th position and continue
playing the rest of the scale.
Making that position shift sound
seamless can be a little tricky, so it’s a
good idea to break the phrase up into
smaller pieces, as shown in FIGURE 18.
Begin by looping the frst six notes of
the scale with the position shift. Once
that begins to feel comfortable, add a
few more notes and continue to do so
until the entire phrase feels comfortable
and seamless. Familiarizing yourself
with an expanded note register like this
will afford you a range that is normally
exclusive to keyboard players.
Another good (but admittedly in-
6 GUITAR WORLD
ASSUME THE POSITION
USING POSITION SHIFTS TO YOUR ADVANTAGE WHEN SOLOING
CHAPTER 4
FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17
FIGURE 18
FIGURE 19
FIGURE 20
*by Paul Gilbert
»
IN THIS CHAPTER we’re go-
ing to look at the concept of
syncopation, and we’ll begin
with a rhythm fgure that lays
out an accent pattern. Keep
that rhythmic syncopation in your
mind, because I use those same ac-
cents in the crazy picking exercise
that is the focus of this column.
Check out the rhythm guitar fgure
riff in FIGURE 21: this pattern is made
up of root-ffth power chords played
in a syncopated fashion against an
open low-E pedal tone. This is essen-
tially a two-bar rhythm pattern with
very pronounced, specifc accents: in
bar 1 they fall on the downbeat of beat
one, the upbeat of beat two and the
downbeat of beat four; the accents in
bar 2 fall squarely on beats one, two
and three. If one were to recreate that
rhythm orally, it would sound like
this: ONE (and two) AND (three and)
FOUR (and) ONE (and) TWO (and)
THREE (and four and).
FIGURE 22 illustrates the picking
exercise, which is based on a long
sequence of 16th-note triplets. Notice
how the line is contoured with ac-
cents falling in the same places as in
FIGURE 21. It’s in the key of E minor
and stays diatonic (within the scale
structure of ) to the E natural minor
scale, which is also known as the E
Aeolian mode (E Fs G A B C D).
The great majority of the lick is al-
ternate picked, but I throw in a couple
of double hammer-ons, which serve to
smooth out the sound. Also, it’s very
important to begin this lick with an
upstroke. Throughout the exercise,
the initial pick on each new string is
executed in this manner.
I begin FIGURE 22 in ninth position
and play the initial pattern twice. I
then move up to 12th position and
follow the same pattern contour
while staying within the scale struc-
ture of E natural minor, which neces-
sitates a slight change in fngering. I
then do the same thing in 16th posi-
tion. In FIGURE 22a, I move the lick up
the fretboard one scale degree at a
time, beginning in ninth position on
Fs, then starting on G, A, B and C.
A great thing to do is focus on one
part of the lick, such as the fragment
shown in FIGURE 23. Play this slowly un-
til it feels comfortable, then gradually
increase your speed. ❒
7 GUITAR WORLD
ACCENTUATE THE POSITIVE
ALTERNATE PICKING WITH ACCENT PATTERNS
CHAPTER 5


P.M. P.M. P.M.
1.


P.M.
2.



FIGURE 1 q = 152
B5 D5
2
4
4

0 0
5
7
7

E5
P.M.
A5
0 0
7
9
9

0
P.M.
G5
P.M.
E5
12
14
14

0
10
12
12

0
7
9
9


G5
0 0
P.M.
F#5
P.M.
E5
10
12
12

0
9
11
11

0
7
9
9


0 0
P.M.
3.
P.M. P.M.
D5
P.M.
G5
P.M.
E5
5
7
7

0
10
12
12

0
7
9
9


B5
0 0
D5
2
4
4

0 0
5
7
7

E5
0 0
7
9
9

7
9
9



P.M. P.M. P.M.

FIGURE 2
Em
= downstroke
9


12

10

8

10

12

 = downstroke
9

10 12
9


12

10

9

10

12

9

10 12
9


12

10

9

10

12

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3


9


12

10

9

10

12

(repeat
prev. beat)

9


X

sim.
12

15 14 12 14 15
12 14 15
12

15 14 12 14 15
12 14 16
12

16 14 12 14 15
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
 
12


0 151719
15

19 171517 19
1517 19
16

19 17161719
161719

16

1917 161719

16



3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3


P.M. P.M. P.M.

FIGURE 2a
Em
9


12

10

9

10

12

9

10 12
9


12

10

9

10

12

9

10 12

9


12

10

9

10

12


9

X


3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
sim.
10

14 12 10 12 14
10 12 14
10

14 12 10 12 14
10 12 14

11

14 12 10 12 14

11

X


3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
12

15 14 12 14 15
12 14 15
12

15 14 12 14 15
12 14 16

12

16 14 12 14 16

12

X


3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
14

17 15 14 15 17
14 15 17
14

17 15 14 15 17
14 16 17

14

17 16 14 16 17

14

X


3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3


P.M.
15

19 17 15 17 19
15 17 19
16

19 17 16 17 19
16 17 19

16

19 17 16 17 19

16



FIGURE 3


16

19

17

16

17

19


3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
FIGURE 21
FIGURE 22
FIGURE 22a
FIGURE 23
directly against the 19th fret.
As these exercises include a few
two-notes-per-string descending lines,
a cool twist is to use pull-offs wherever
possible in order to attain a smoother
legato sound, as demonstrated in FIGURE
26. And despite what some people say,
»









FIGURE 1a
*
* alternate picking:
Em
7


5


8


5


= downstroke;
FIGURE 1b


= upstroke
Em
7


5


8


5


sim.
8

7

10

7

!
8
7
10 7
8


FIGURE 1c

Em
10 8
12 8
!
10
8
12 8
10







FIGURE 1d
Em
12 10
13 10
!
12
10
13 10
12


FIGURE 1e

Em
14 12
15 12
!
13
12
15 12
14







3
FIGURE 1f
Em
2 4 1 3
15 14
17 13
2 4 1 3
!
15
14
17 13
15


FIGURE 1g

Em
17 15
19 15
!
17
15
19 15
17







FIGURE 2
Em
19 17
20 17
(play 5 times)
19
17
20 17
17 15
19 15 17
15
19 15
15 14
17 13 15
14
17 13
14 12
15 12 13
12
15 12
12 10
13 10 12
10
13 10
10 8
12 8 10
8
12 8
8 7
10 7 8
7
10 7
7 5
8 5
!
7
5
8 5 7
1/2
!
*T.H.
*Tap harmonic
7

(19)



FIGURE 3 legato (w/pull-offs)
Em
19 17
20 17 19
17
20 17
17 15
19 15 17
15
19 15
15 14
17 13 15
14
17 13
14 12
15 12 13
12
15 12




12 10
13 10 12
10
13 10
10 8
12 8 10
8
12 8
8 7
10 7 8
7
10 7
7 5
8 5
(play 3 times)
!
7
5
8 5 7
1/2
)

using pull-offs and hammer-ons is not
cheating! Legato phrasing is a very valid
technique, and, personally speaking,
I do not adhere to a “pick everything”
approach when I play. I actually use
a combination of picking and legato,
which I think sounds great. ❒
I WANT TO talk about an in-
gredient that is essential to
every guitar soloist’s arsenal:
alternate-picked 16th notes.
Sixteenth notes are like the
“business card” of shred guitar,
as the essence of the style is the ability
to cleanly execute fast, alternate-picked
16ths throughout the fretboard. I’d like
to show you a great 16th-note sequence
that can be played all over the neck, is
great for both your right- and left-hand
technique and also sounds very melodic
and musical.
For the sake of familiarity, let’s use
the key of E natural minor (E Fs G A B
C D). FIGURE 24a illustrates the initial
shape, which we’ll adapt to various posi-
tions, moving up the neck through the
scale. Using alternate (down-up) pick-
ing, starting with a downstroke, I play
on the top two strings exclusively, begin-
ning with two notes on the high E string,
followed by two notes on the B string,
then one note per string, ending with
two notes on the B. In this and all other
examples, the index fnger remains at
the same fret throughout the melodic
shape. Begin by playing this lick slowly,
and gradually build up speed.
For FIGURE 24a we started on B, the
ffth of the scale. Let’s move the idea
one note higher within E natural minor,
beginning on C, the sixth (FIGURE 24b).
Notice that the fngering is slightly
different—this is to accommodate the
structure of the scale: whereas the frst
two notes of FIGURE 24a were a whole
step apart, and fretted with the ring
and index fngers, the frst two notes
in FIGURE 24b are a half step apart, and
are fretted with the middle and index
fngers.
For FIGURES 24c-g, we continue to
move the pattern up one scale degree
at a time. FIGURE 25 then begins on the
ffth, B, one octave higher than where
we started.
Each of these “shapes” offers a new
challenge in terms of fret-hand fnger-
ing. FIGURE 24f is particularly interesting
because you have to use all four fngers
(fret-hand fngerings are indicated below
the tab). Another cool thing about that
lick is its pull to a C Lydian (C D E Fs G A
B) tonality (C Lydian and E natural mi-
nor are comprised of the same notes).
Now let’s run these melodic shapes in
sequence. In FIGURE 25, I play the initial
lick fve times and then descend through
the shapes. I end with a little fair, bend-
ing the Fs up a half step to G and ap-
plying a tapped harmonic, executed by
“bouncing” the pick-hand index fnger
8 GUITAR WORLD
FAST AND CLEAN
ALTERNATE-PICKED 16TH NOTES—THE BUSINESS CARD OF SHRED GUITAR
CHAPTER 6
FIGURE 24a FIGURE 24b FIGURE 24c
FIGURE 24d FIGURE 24e
FIGURE 24f FIGURE 24g
FIGURE 25
FIGURE 26
the seventh fret, as demonstrated at the
beginning of FIGURE 29c.
String bending is a technique that
imparts a lot of emotion and char-
acter to your playing, and as such I
don’t want to be limited to just one
position—I want to be able to bend ev-
erywhere! In searching for more places
to bend, I realized that, in the key of
A, I could use the notes of the C minor
triad shape in FIGURE 28, as long as I
»





fret-hand: 2
FIGURE 1a
Am
1 4 1 3
8fr 9fr
7fr
5fr 3fr
.
.
.
.
.
!
7

5

9

5

8


3
FIGURE 1b
Am
1 4 1

8 5
9 5

3
8








FIGURE 1c
Am
8 5
9 5


7
5 9
5
(play 3 times)
8 5
9 5
7







FIGURE 1d
Am
8 5
9 5
(play 3 times)
7
5 9
5 8

1

8

5 8 5
9
5
9 5 9 5
7
5 9
3 3
5 8 5 8 5
9
5
9 5 9 5
7
5
7

7
3 3







FIGURE 2
Cm
!
11 8
12 8
10

FIGURE 3a


A7
1
7 7 5
7
FIGURE 3b


1
8
5 5
8
1

3



FIGURE 3c
freely
A(7)
1/2
8 7 7
1/2 1/2
5
7
5
7
1 1/2
5
5 8 8
1
5 8 5
8
5
8
5
8 5 8 5
8
5
8 7
5
1
8 7 5
7
5 7 7 7 5
7
5

5
1


7 7 5
7
5 5
7

3 3 3





3
FIGURE 3d
grad. bends
A(7)
1/2
1 4
1/4
1
1
2
1/2
11 8
12 8
1/2
1
10

7

FIGURE 4


A(7)
1/2
1/2 1
1/4
11
8 12
8
1/2 1/2
7
7 7
1/2 1/2 1/2
5
6
1/2
5
3
1
3 3 3
1
A5
2 0
3
0
2
2
0
2
2
bend each note up a certain amount to
a “right” note in the key of A, as dem-
onstrated in FIGURE 29d. Now that I had
these new places to bend, I combined
them with the more conventional “key
of A” bends, as shown in FIGURE 30.
Try incorporating these bends into
your playing. For the adventurous, take
a really bad note in the key of A—like
Bf—and bend the daylights out of it until
it sounds good. ❒
ONE THING I’VE FOUND very
helpful in my guitar studies over
the years is using what I call
neck diagrams to map out riffs,
patterns and melodic “shapes.” I
fnd that diagramming makes it
easier to visualize and, in turn, remem-
ber, new shapes on the fretboard.
A good example of a common fret-
board shape is an open D chord: just
about every guitar player is familiar
with the triangular shape of a D “cow-
boy” chord. But when the shape is a
little more complex, it helps to map it
out and study it visually.
Let’s start with a string-skipping ar-
peggio in the key of A minor, illustrated
in FIGURE 27a: this begins at the seventh
fret on the D string, followed by the
ffth and ninth frets on the G string, a
skip over the B string and then the ffth
and eighth frets on the high E string.
Notice the visual shape created by
these points on the fretboard (see dia-
gram)—it looks a little like a rhombus.
Pay close attention to the fret-hand
fngering indicated for this shape.
Aside from picking every note, you
can use hammer-ons and pull-offs, as
there are two consecutive notes pres-
ent on the G and high E strings. FIGURE
27b illustrates how to play the lick using
pull-offs, and FIGURE 27c takes things a
step further by incorporating pull-offs
on the way down and hammer-ons on
the way up. Using hammers and pulls
like this makes the lick considerably
easier to play than it would be if you
were to pick every note because of the
numerous skips over the B string.
Another advantage of using ham-
mers and pulls is that you can get some
good speed going and create interest-
ing phrasings. As shown in FIGURE 27d,
I use quick hammers and pulls on the
high E and G strings to keep the lick
moving along. Practice all of these pat-
terns slowly, striving for a very smooth
and even sound.
Now that you have this pattern
clearly visualized, I’d like to show you
a cool bonus beneft that I discovered.
If we transpose the pattern up a minor
third (three frets), we get a C minor
arpeggio, as illustrated in FIGURE 28.
But here’s the twist: one day, I de-
cided I was going to explore the entire
fretboard and fnd every single place
I could possibly bend a note within
the context of a blues in A. In this key,
most guitarists will bend the G string
at the seventh fret, as shown in FIGURE
29a, or the B string at the eighth fret, as
in FIGURE 29b, or perhaps the B string at
9 GUITAR WORLD
STICK YER NECK OUT
USING NECK DIAGRAMS TO YOUR ADVANTAGE
CHAPTER 7
FIGURE 27a FIGURE 27b
FIGURE 27c
FIGURE 27d
FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29a FIGURE 29b
FIGURE 29c
FIGURE 29d FIGURE 30
which is a little more work for the brain
because it involves different “shapes.”
Let’s use this approach to create licks.
FIGURE 35 incorporates the root/ffth
“power chord” concept, with the notes
played separately and in sequence. Given
a chord progression like A5-G5-F5, as
shown in FIGURE 36, you can play that lick
in F over the F5 chord. Add a few notes
to that shape, and we can get an F Lydian
sound, as shown in FIGURES 37a-c.
»
Let’s apply the concept to an E minor
lick (FIGURE 38a). We can move this up
one and two octaves, as shown in FIGURE
38b, fretting it exactly the same way. For
fun, try improvising around those shapes.
FIGURES 39a-c incorporate this con-
cept with a Csm7f5 arpeggio; for an
additional twist, FIGURE 39c positions a
Csm7f5 arpeggio-type lick over an A7
chord, which yields a cool, fusion-y A9
(A Cs E G B) sound. ❒

FIGURE 1
5
7
10
FIGURE 2
a)

0
A5
5
7
b)
0
A5
7
9
c)
0
A5
10
12
FIGURE 3
a)

5
4 7
b)
7
6 9







c)
10
9
!
12


12 9
10
9 6
7
7 4
5
9 6
7
12


3 3 3 3





FIGURE 4
5
4 7
7
6
5
5
5
6
7
7 4
5
4 7
7
6
5
5

9

3
9
FIGURE 5

5
7
7
9
10

12


3 3 3 3 3 3







FIGURE 6
A5
5
7
7
G5
3
5
5
0
E5
1
5
5
13
15
15
!
17
18
20 20

FIGURE 7a

13
12 14 15
FIGURE 7b


15
14 1617
18
17 1920
3 3






FIGURE 7c

13
12 14 15

15
14 16 17
18
17 19 20 17
1
17

15

!
13
 FIGURE 8a

7 10
7 9 10








FIGURE 8b
9 12
9 1112

1215
121415

FIGURE 9a

C#m7¨5
8fr
T 2 3 1
7 9
7 10
FIGURE 9b

7 9
7 10
7 9
7 10



FIGURE 9c
A7
5 7 9
7 10
 7 9 11
9 12
 10 12 14
12 15
1/2
14 14 14 12
1/2
!
15
12
13
14


5 5 5 3

FIGURE 1
5
7
10
FIGURE 2
a)

0
A5
5
7
b)
0
A5
7
9
c)
0
A5
10
12
FIGURE 3
a)

5
4 7
b)
7
6 9







c)
10
9
!
12


12 9
10
9 6
7
7 4
5
9 6
7
12


3 3 3 3





FIGURE 4
5
4 7
7
6
5
5
5
6
7
7 4
5
4 7
7
6
5
5

9

3
9
FIGURE 5

5
7
7
9
10

12


3 3 3 3 3 3







FIGURE 6
A5
5
7
7
G5
3
5
5
0
E5
1
5
5
13
15
15
!
17
18
20 20

FIGURE 7a

13
12 14 15
FIGURE 7b


15
14 1617
18
17 1920
3 3






FIGURE 7c

13
12 14 15

15
14 16 17
18
17 19 20 17
1
17

15

!
13
 FIGURE 8a

7 10
7 9 10








FIGURE 8b
9 12
9 1112

1215
121415

FIGURE 9a

C#m7¨5
8fr
T 2 3 1
7 9
7 10
FIGURE 9b

7 9
7 10
7 9
7 10



FIGURE 9c
A7
5 7 9
7 10
 7 9 11
9 12
 10 12 14
12 15
1/2
14 14 14 12
1/2
!
15
12
13
14


5 5 5 3
I’VE FOUND IT VERY helpful as
a guitarist to familiarize myself
with the layout of the keyboard
on a piano. This in turn has
made it easier for me to visual-
ize patterns on the guitar fret-
board. A quick look at the black keys on
a piano reveal the logic with which they
are laid out: starting on the far left and
moving right, there are two blacks keys
followed by three black keys, and the
pattern repeats across the entire key-
board. The great thing for piano play-
ers is that any scale, chord or musical
phrase in one position and octave can be
easily moved to another because it will
look exactly the same; you only have to
memorize its “shape.”
The guitar, however, is not like this;
depending on the string or fretboard
position, the “shapes” of scales and
riffs can change quite a bit, even when
playing exactly the same notes. But I’ve
developed an approach to the guitar’s
fretboard wherein you can use the same
shapes, and very easily move them
through different octaves.
As shown in FIGURE 31, there is an A
note located on the sixth string’s ffth
fret, another A one octave higher lo-
cated on the seventh fret of the fourth
string (two strings over and two frets
higher), and another A located at the
10th fret on the second string (two
strings over and three frets higher).
It’s very valuable to memorize the
positions of these three A notes, because
the patterns of many licks based around
one of these A notes can easily be moved
to either of the other two A notes. This
is especially true if the lick falls on the
sixth and ffth, fourth and third, or sec-
ond and frst strings, because these pairs
of adjacent strings are tuned in fourths,
and the shape of any lick on these pairs
of strings will be identical.
A simple example is an A5 power
chord: FIGURE 32a combines an A root
note on the sixth string with an E note,
which is the ffth, on the ffth string; you
can move this shape up an octave to the
fourth and third strings, two frets high-
er (FIGURE 32b), or the second and frst
strings, three frets higher (FIGURE 32c).
FIGURE 33a illustrates an A major triad
(A Cs E) played on the bottom two
strings; we can move this same trian-
gular shape over to the other A notes
(FIGURES 33b and 33c) and yield the same
musical result in higher octaves.
In comparison, fngering the notes of
this arpeggio across all of the strings in
one position would give us something
like what is illustrated in FIGURE 34,
10 GUITAR WORLD
FIGURE 31
FIGURE 39a
SHAPE SHIFTING
HOW TO ORGANIZE PATTERNS ON THE FRETBOARD
CHAPTER 8
FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33
FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35
FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37a FIGURE 37b
FIGURE 37c FIGURE 38a
FIGURE 38b FIGURE 39b
FIGURE 39c
»
¸
,


FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant mode
B7(¨9)
7 8 11
7 9 10
7 9 7
10 9 7
11 8 9
FIGURE 2a

B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8

......
,
,
freely

FIGURE 2b
B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8 11 12
8
12 11 8 11 12
8 11 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11
5
,
,
8 11 12
8
1
11 12 12 12 11 8
12 11
!
8
12 11 8 11


,
.......
FIGURE 3a

B7(¨9)
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3 3 3
,
,
,
,

FIGURE 3b
B7(¨9)
8
8
11
11
12
12
14
14
12
12
11
11
8
8
......
FIGURE 4

B7(¨9)
14 16 17
14 15 17
-..
11 12 14
11 12 14
-...
8 11 12
!
8 11 12 12
-
....
3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 5
B7(¨9)
8 11
12
8 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11 8 11 12 14
11 12 14
1/2
14 14 12 11 1112 12 11
14
11
3
,
,
,
,
14 12
11
14 12 11
17 17 14 14 15 15
17 17
14 14
16 16 17 17
....
14 14 16
-
,
,
14 16 17
14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14
17
14
17 16
14
17 16

14 11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3
3 3
3 3
3
12141211
14
111214
14
11
1412
11
1412

11 8 1112
811 1112 11 12 8
12
811 8
12
8
1211
8
1211
!
1
8
10

10
.....
5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 6
7 4 0 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 5 0 7 7 4 0 8 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0
3 3
,
,

12 12 8 0 10

1
......
.
FIGURE 7

*

*
grad. increase speed
8
12 10 8
11
8
12 10 8
11
= upstroke

-= downstroke

5 5
¸
,


FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant mode
B7(¨9)
7 8 11
7 9 10
7 9 7
10 9 7
11 8 9
FIGURE 2a

B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8

......
,
,
freely

FIGURE 2b
B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8 11 12
8
12 11 8 11 12
8 11 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11
5
,
,
8 11 12
8
1
11 12 12 12 11 8
12 11
!
8
12 11 8 11


,
.......
FIGURE 3a

B7(¨9)
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3 3 3
,
,
,
,

FIGURE 3b
B7(¨9)
8
8
11
11
12
12
14
14
12
12
11
11
8
8
......
FIGURE 4

B7(¨9)
14 16 17
14 15 17
-..
11 12 14
11 12 14
-...
8 11 12
!
8 11 12 12
-
....
3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 5
B7(¨9)
8 11
12
8 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11 8 11 12 14
11 12 14
1/2
14 14 12 11 1112 12 11
14
11
3
,
,
,
,
14 12
11
14 12 11
17 17 14 14 15 15
17 17
14 14
16 16 17 17
....
14 14 16
-
,
,
14 16 17
14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14
17
14
17 16
14
17 16

14 11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3
3 3
3 3
3
12141211
14
111214
14
11
1412
11
1412

11 8 1112
811 1112 11 12 8
12
811 8
12
8
1211
8
1211
!
1
8
10

10
.....
5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 6
7 4 0 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 5 0 7 7 4 0 8 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0
3 3
,
,

12 12 8 0 10

1
......
.
FIGURE 7

*

*
grad. increase speed
8
12 10 8
11
8
12 10 8
11
= upstroke

-= downstroke

5 5
¸
,


FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant mode
B7(¨9)
7 8 11
7 9 10
7 9 7
10 9 7
11 8 9
FIGURE 2a

B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8

......
,
,
freely

FIGURE 2b
B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8 11 12
8
12 11 8 11 12
8 11 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11
5
,
,
8 11 12
8
1
11 12 12 12 11 8
12 11
!
8
12 11 8 11


,
.......
FIGURE 3a

B7(¨9)
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3 3 3
,
,
,
,

FIGURE 3b
B7(¨9)
8
8
11
11
12
12
14
14
12
12
11
11
8
8
......
FIGURE 4

B7(¨9)
14 16 17
14 15 17
-..
11 12 14
11 12 14
-...
8 11 12
!
8 11 12 12
-
....
3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 5
B7(¨9)
8 11
12
8 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11 8 11 12 14
11 12 14
1/2
14 14 12 11 1112 12 11
14
11
3
,
,
,
,
14 12
11
14 12 11
17 17 14 14 15 15
17 17
14 14
16 16 17 17
....
14 14 16
-
,
,
14 16 17
14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14
17
14
17 16
14
17 16

14 11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3
3 3
3 3
3
12141211
14
111214
14
11
1412
11
1412

11 8 1112
811 1112 11 12 8
12
811 8
12
8
1211
8
1211
!
1
8
10

10
.....
5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 6
7 4 0 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 5 0 7 7 4 0 8 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0
3 3
,
,

12 12 8 0 10

1
......
.
FIGURE 7

*

*
grad. increase speed
8
12 10 8
11
8
12 10 8
11
= upstroke

-= downstroke

5 5
¸
,


FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant mode
B7(¨9)
7 8 11
7 9 10
7 9 7
10 9 7
11 8 9
FIGURE 2a

B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8

......
,
,
freely

FIGURE 2b
B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8 11 12
8
12 11 8 11 12
8 11 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11
5
,
,
8 11 12
8
1
11 12 12 12 11 8
12 11
!
8
12 11 8 11


,
.......
FIGURE 3a

B7(¨9)
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3 3 3
,
,
,
,

FIGURE 3b
B7(¨9)
8
8
11
11
12
12
14
14
12
12
11
11
8
8
......
FIGURE 4

B7(¨9)
14 16 17
14 15 17
-..
11 12 14
11 12 14
-...
8 11 12
!
8 11 12 12
-
....
3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 5
B7(¨9)
8 11
12
8 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11 8 11 12 14
11 12 14
1/2
14 14 12 11 1112 12 11
14
11
3
,
,
,
,
14 12
11
14 12 11
17 17 14 14 15 15
17 17
14 14
16 16 17 17
....
14 14 16
-
,
,
14 16 17
14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14
17
14
17 16
14
17 16

14 11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3
3 3
3 3
3
12141211
14
111214
14
11
1412
11
1412

11 8 1112
811 1112 11 12 8
12
811 8
12
8
1211
8
1211
!
1
8
10

10
.....
5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 6
7 4 0 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 5 0 7 7 4 0 8 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0
3 3
,
,

12 12 8 0 10

1
......
.
FIGURE 7

*

*
grad. increase speed
8
12 10 8
11
8
12 10 8
11
= upstroke

-= downstroke

5 5
¸
,


FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant mode
B7(¨9)
7 8 11
7 9 10
7 9 7
10 9 7
11 8 9
FIGURE 2a

B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8

......
,
,
freely

FIGURE 2b
B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8 11 12
8
12 11 8 11 12
8 11 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11
5
,
,
8 11 12
8
1
11 12 12 12 11 8
12 11
!
8
12 11 8 11


,
.......
FIGURE 3a

B7(¨9)
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3 3 3
,
,
,
,

FIGURE 3b
B7(¨9)
8
8
11
11
12
12
14
14
12
12
11
11
8
8
......
FIGURE 4

B7(¨9)
14 16 17
14 15 17
-..
11 12 14
11 12 14
-...
8 11 12
!
8 11 12 12
-
....
3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 5
B7(¨9)
8 11
12
8 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11 8 11 12 14
11 12 14
1/2
14 14 12 11 1112 12 11
14
11
3
,
,
,
,
14 12
11
14 12 11
17 17 14 14 15 15
17 17
14 14
16 16 17 17
....
14 14 16
-
,
,
14 16 17
14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14
17
14
17 16
14
17 16

14 11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3
3 3
3 3
3
12141211
14
111214
14
11
1412
11
1412

11 8 1112
811 1112 11 12 8
12
811 8
12
8
1211
8
1211
!
1
8
10

10
.....
5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 6
7 4 0 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 5 0 7 7 4 0 8 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0
3 3
,
,

12 12 8 0 10

1
......
.
FIGURE 7

*

*
grad. increase speed
8
12 10 8
11
8
12 10 8
11
= upstroke

-= downstroke

5 5
¸
,


FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant mode
B7(¨9)
7 8 11
7 9 10
7 9 7
10 9 7
11 8 9
FIGURE 2a

B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8

......
,
,
freely

FIGURE 2b
B7(¨9)
8 11 12
8 11 12 11 8
12 11 8 11 12
8
12 11 8 11 12
8 11 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11
5
,
,
8 11 12
8
1
11 12 12 12 11 8
12 11
!
8
12 11 8 11


,
.......
FIGURE 3a

B7(¨9)
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3 3 3
,
,
,
,

FIGURE 3b
B7(¨9)
8
8
11
11
12
12
14
14
12
12
11
11
8
8
......
FIGURE 4

B7(¨9)
14 16 17
14 15 17
-..
11 12 14
11 12 14
-...
8 11 12
!
8 11 12 12
-
....
3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 5
B7(¨9)
8 11
12
8 12 111211 8
12
8 11 8
12
8
12 11
8
12 11 8 11 12 14
11 12 14
1/2
14 14 12 11 1112 12 11
14
11
3
,
,
,
,
14 12
11
14 12 11
17 17 14 14 15 15
17 17
14 14
16 16 17 17
....
14 14 16
-
,
,
14 16 17
14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14
17
14
17 16
14
17 16

14 11 12 14
11 12 14
3 3
3 3
3 3
3
12141211
14
111214
14
11
1412
11
1412

11 8 1112
811 1112 11 12 8
12
811 8
12
8
1211
8
1211
!
1
8
10

10
.....
5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
,
,

FIGURE 6
7 4 0 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 5 0 7 7 4 0 8 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0
3 3
,
,

12 12 8 0 10

1
......
.
FIGURE 7

*

*
grad. increase speed
8
12 10 8
11
8
12 10 8
11
= upstroke

-= downstroke

5 5
IN THIS CHAPTER, I’d like to
talk about what I refer to as
“snake-charming licks”—my
slang term for licks built from
the Phrygian-dominant mode,
the ffth mode of the harmonic
minor scale. The notes of the E har-
monic minor scale are: E Fs G A B C
Ds. To form the ffth mode of this scale,
start from the ffth scale degree, B, and
proceed up one octave while using the
same notes; the resulting scale, shown
in FIGURE 40, is B Phrygian-dominant
and is spelled: B C Ds E Fs G A. Notice
that this scale fngering requires a bit
of a stretch on the low E string: while
rooted in seventh position, the pinkie
has to reach up to the 11th fret, which
is one fret higher than the standard,
and more comfortable, four-fret span of
many scales.
Let’s begin with a series of string-
skipping licks. When possible I like
to devise easy fngerings, and the lick
shown in FIGURE 41a, utilizes the same
fngering on both the G and high E
strings: I begin with the index fnger at
the eighth fret on the G string, followed
by the ring fnger at the 11th fret (a bit of
a stretch) and the pinkie at the 12th; the
exact same frets and fngers are used
on the high E string. Instead of simply
playing this riff up and down, move it
around a little and use hammer-ons and
pull-offs, as shown in FIGURE 41b.
Now let’s move the concept up to the
next fretboard position: As shown in
FIGURE 42a, I use the 11th, 12th and 14th
frets on both the G and high E strings.
You can even link these two positions
using two-note chords, as shown in
FIGURE 42b, which is a nice way to har-
monize B Phrygian-dominant.
Let’s move up the concept one more
time, to 14th position. Here we have to
change the fngering slightly: 14-16-17
frets on the G string and 14-15-17 frets
on the high E. FIGURE 43 then links these
three positions together. Now that you
have the shapes, try creating improvised
patterns and different ways to connect
the positions, as shown in FIGURE 44.
Here’s another great lick: FIGURE 45
incorporates a series of double pull-offs
from various positions. Because we’re
in the key of B, we can take advantage of
our open B string. FIGURE 46 is based on
a fve-note sequence that sounds great
when cycled repeatedly: start with an
upstroke, followed by a downstroke and
two pull-offs, and end with a down-
stroke. Five is a weird number for a rock
lick, but if you play it fast enough, you’ll
feel the pulse of the downbeats. ❒
11 GUITAR WORLD
SNAKE-CHARMING LICKS
THE FIFTH MODE OF HARMONIC MINOR
CHAPTER 9
FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41a
FIGURE 41b
FIGURE 42a
FIGURE 42b FIGURE 43
FIGURE 44
FIGURE 45
FIGURE 46
12 GUITAR WORLD
»
ONE OF THE MOST important
things about playing rock and
roll guitar is to make big rock and
roll motions. If you see a guitarist
who’s playing with the tiniest of
physical motions, it’s not very
exciting to watch. But a guitarist that’s
bouncing and moving around, swinging
his arms and playing rhythm or lead with
real energy—that, to me, is much more
exciting and much more rock.
It’s not always easy to play the elec-
tric guitar with such physical abandon,
because it’s diffcult to maintain perfect
control over a cranked-up guitar and
amp. When playing just one string, you
have to control the other fve so that they
will not make any unwanted noises.
The solution is to use various parts
of your fret-hand fngers and thumb to
mute different strings. In FIGURE 47, I’m
picking across all six strings while using
the fret hand to block every string except
the fourth, on which I’m fretting and
shaking notes with my ring fnger. The
top three strings are muted by the under-
side of the index fnger, the ffth string is
muted by the tip of the ring fnger, and
wrapping the thumb over the top of the
neck mutes the sixth string.
Another useful way to mute is to
use what I call “pick muting”: after
picking a note with a downstroke, I
immediately stop the string from ringing
by lightly touching it with the pick on
the upstroke. Likewise, after picking an
upstroke, I immediately touch it lightly
on the downstroke. As demonstrated in
FIGURE 48, this produces a staccato sound,
which means “very short in duration.” In
FIGURE 49, I begin by allowing the notes
to ring as long as possible (known as
tenuto articulation), and then I switch to
a staccato attack. In both examples, I use
alternate picking throughout, alternately
damping the string with either an
upstroke or a downstroke; this is more
clearly illustrated in FIGURE 50.
Using this technique, you can create
some really great aggressive-sounding
licks, like the ones shown in FIGURES 51a
and 51b: both of these freely improvised
phrases combine the staccato attack with
the legato (“smooth”) sound of hammer-
ons and pull-offs.
You can, of course, gain further con-
trol over the strings by additionally palm
muting them, laying the edge of the pick-
hand palm across all of the strings at the
bridge saddles.
The sooner you master these muting
techniques, the sooner you’ll be able to
rock out and still play with a good mea-
sure of control over your instrument. ❒
,
,
,
,

3
FIGURE 1
X
X
X
7
X
X
3
X
X
X
9
X
X
....
3
X
X
X
10
X
X
....
3
X
X
X
X
12
X
.... ....
3
X
X
X
X
14
X
3
X
X
X
X
15
X
....
3
X
X
X
X
X
17
....
3
X
X
X
X
X
19
.... .....
FIGURE 2 pick muting

*
* = staccato; play note as short as possible.

5

8

8

5

5

8

7

5

5

7

7

5

5

7

,
,
,
,
,

FIGURE 3
*
* = tenuto: allow note to ring as long as possible.

5

8

8

5

5

8

7

5

5

8

8

5

5

8

7

5

5

7

7

5

5

7

7

5

5

7

8

5

5

,
FIGURE 4

-

*
*
= upstroke
= downstroke
5

-
5

5

-
5

5

-
5

5

-
5

,
,

FIGURE 5a
(Am)
1/2
7
5

8

7 8 7 5
8

5

8

7

5

8
sim.
5

8

7

5

1/2
8 7 5
7 5
7 5 7 5
7
5
7 6
5
1/2
7 6 5
7
3
3
6
5
7 6 5
8 5 3 5
....
3

5 3
...

5
5

3

5

3

7
5 6 7
1/2
5
7
7 5
7 5 7
....
8

10

11

8

3
,
,
sim.
10 11 10 8 
8 10 11 10 10 10 11 10 11 10 8
10
10
10
8
10 8
9
8 10 13
........
5
,
,

FIGURE 5b
(Am)
12

15

12

13

14

12

14

121412
14

12

13

14

sim.
13

14

15

12

14 15 14151412
13
12
12 14
14
1214
12
13
14 12
14 13
3
5
¸
,
,
,
12
14 13 12
15 12 10 12
10 12 13 12 13 12
1/2
10
12
12
12
10
12 10
12
10 11 12

.......
12 12
3
,
,
11
10
12 11
10
12
13 10
1/2 hold bend
14

14

14

14

1/2
13 14 14
1/2 grad. bend
14 14 10 10 10 10
1/2
10 10 10 10
rit.
rit.
10101010
1
10101010101010
...
10 10 8
10
10
,
8
3
1
10 8
10 9 8 5
8 7
1/2
5
8 7 5
1/2
7 5
7 6
A7sus4
5
8 5 3 5
7
5
7
5
5

,
3 3
,
,
,
,

3
FIGURE 1
X
X
X
7
X
X
3
X
X
X
9
X
X
....
3
X
X
X
10
X
X
....
3
X
X
X
X
12
X
.... ....
3
X
X
X
X
14
X
3
X
X
X
X
15
X
....
3
X
X
X
X
X
17
....
3
X
X
X
X
X
19
.... .....
FIGURE 2 pick muting

*
* = staccato; play note as short as possible.

5

8

8

5

5

8

7

5

5

7

7

5

5

7

,
,
,
,
,

FIGURE 3
*
* = tenuto: allow note to ring as long as possible.

5

8

8

5

5

8

7

5

5

8

8

5

5

8

7

5

5

7

7

5

5

7

7

5

5

7

8

5

5

,
FIGURE 4

-

*
*
= upstroke
= downstroke
5

-
5

5

-
5

5

-
5

5

-
5

,
,

FIGURE 5a
(Am)
1/2
7
5

8

7 8 7 5
8

5

8

7

5

8
sim.
5

8

7

5

1/2
8 7 5
7 5
7 5 7 5
7
5
7 6
5
1/2
7 6 5
7
3
3
6
5
7 6 5
8 5 3 5
....
3

5 3
...

5
5

3

5

3

7
5 6 7
1/2
5
7
7 5
7 5 7
....
8

10

11

8

3
,
,
sim.
10 11 10 8 
8 10 11 10 10 10 11 10 11 10 8
10
10
10
8
10 8
9
8 10 13
........
5
,
,

FIGURE 5b
(Am)
12

15

12

13

14

12

14

121412
14

12

13

14

sim.
13

14

15

12

14 15 14151412
13
12
12 14
14
1214
12
13
14 12
14 13
3
5
¸
,
,
,
12
14 13 12
15 12 10 12
10 12 13 12 13 12
1/2
10
12
12
12
10
12 10
12
10 11 12

.......
12 12
3
,
,
11
10
12 11
10
12
13 10
1/2 hold bend
14

14

14

14

1/2
13 14 14
1/2 grad. bend
14 14 10 10 10 10
1/2
10 10 10 10
rit.
rit.
10101010
1
10101010101010
...
10 10 8
10
10
,
8
3
1
10 8
10 9 8 5
8 7
1/2
5
8 7 5
1/2
7 5
7 6
A7sus4
5
8 5 3 5
7
5
7
5
5

,
3 3
,
,
,
,

3
FIGURE 1
X
X
X
7
X
X
3
X
X
X
9
X
X
....
3
X
X
X
10
X
X
....
3
X
X
X
X
12
X
.... ....
3
X
X
X
X
14
X
3
X
X
X
X
15
X
....
3
X
X
X
X
X
17
....
3
X
X
X
X
X
19
.... .....
FIGURE 2 pick muting

*
* = staccato; play note as short as possible.

5

8

8

5

5

8

7

5

5

7

7

5

5

7

,
,
,
,
,

FIGURE 3
*
* = tenuto: allow note to ring as long as possible.

5

8

8

5

5

8

7

5

5

8

8

5

5

8

7

5

5

7

7

5

5

7

7

5

5

7

8

5

5

,
FIGURE 4

-

*
*
= upstroke
= downstroke
5

-
5

5

-
5

5

-
5

5

-
5

,
,

FIGURE 5a
(Am)
1/2
7
5

8

7 8 7 5
8

5

8

7

5

8
sim.
5

8

7

5

1/2
8 7 5
7 5
7 5 7 5
7
5
7 6
5
1/2
7 6 5
7
3
3
6
5
7 6 5
8 5 3 5
....
3

5 3
...

5
5

3

5

3

7
5 6 7
1/2
5
7
7 5
7 5 7
....
8

10

11

8

3
,
,
sim.
10 11 10 8 
8 10 11 10 10 10 11 10 11 10 8
10
10
10
8
10 8
9
8 10 13
........
5
,
,

FIGURE 5b
(Am)
12

15

12

13

14

12

14

121412
14

12

13

14

sim.
13

14

15

12

14 15 14151412
13
12
12 14
14
1214
12
13
14 12
14 13
3
5
¸
,
,
,
12
14 13 12
15 12 10 12
10 12 13 12 13 12
1/2
10
12
12
12
10
12 10
12
10 11 12

.......
12 12
3
,
,
11
10
12 11
10
12
13 10
1/2 hold bend
14

14

14

14

1/2
13 14 14
1/2 grad. bend
14 14 10 10 10 10
1/2
10 10 10 10
rit.
rit.
10101010
1
10101010101010
...
10 10 8
10
10
,
8
3
1
10 8
10 9 8 5
8 7
1/2
5
8 7 5
1/2
7 5
7 6
A7sus4
5
8 5 3 5
7
5
7
5
5

,
3 3
UNITED MUTATIONS
MASTERING MUTING TECHNIQUES
CHAPTER 10
FIGURE 47 FIGURE 48
FIGURE 49 FIGURE 50
FIGURE 51a
FIGURE 51b
13 GUITAR WORLD
»
BEING A FULL-TIME guitar
player is an amazing experience.
I’ve had this “job” for the past
20 or so years, and it’s brought
me a great deal of happiness.
I’ve often thought about the
most important aspects of my job. One
is that, when I perform, it’s not neces-
sarily essential that I play all the notes
perfectly or in a technically pristine
manner. More important is that I have
a great time. If I am really having fun
onstage, that energy translates to the
audience and they have a great time too.
Of course, if I hit lots of wrong notes, I
defnitely won’t be having a good time.
But if I hit one bad note and in my mind
I’m thinking, “I don’t care—the rest of it
is great,” then everything is cool. It’s all
about enjoying having the opportunity
to perform music.
This brings me to the matter of the
difference between being a “bedroom”
guitarist and one who is experienced
and comfortable playing live in front of
people. I’m of the frm belief that when
performing onstage you should play
the guitar with more than just your
fngers—you should play with your
entire body.
I performed at a tribute to the
Who last year, and had to follow Pete
Townshend’s lead when it came to rec-
reating his parts. Pete absolutely does
not play with just his hands; he uses
his whole body, including his back,
torso, legs and arms. It’s a stunning
experience to play Who songs with the
mindset of being a vessel for the music,
as Pete does. The Who’s music is very
high-energy, and it feels great to stand
up and play it with all your might.
One of the frst times that I really
“got it” and understood what this
meant was when I was listening to Jimi
Hendrix. I shouldn’t say “listening,”
because my parents gave me a couple
of Hendrix albums when I was young,
and I did like them, but the thing that
really got me excited was when I saw
a Hendrix movie, and suddenly I could
watch how he played, and how he
moved when he played. For example,
he took a very simple string-bending
lick, along the lines of FIGURE 52, and
just shook the earth with the thing by
adding such physical force and rhyth-
mic drive to it. There was so much
power in his playing, and I thought,
“Oh, that’s it—that’s why people keep
talking about Hendrix.”
To play rock music back in those
days, you had to get together with
other musicians and crank up the amps
loud, as opposed to simulating this via
using Pro Tools in your bedroom. This
is why so many musicians of Hendrix’s
era tended to be good at delivering
powerful musical statements to the au-
dience. I encourage you to get together
with other musicians and fnd a place
where you can crank it up.
There are an infnite number of
things to be learned from live perfor-
mance. An obvious one is getting over
making a mistake—if you’re used to
merely hitting “undo” on your key-
board, you won’t know how to deal
with it when you are onstage.
All the pioneers of rock—Jimi
Hendrix, Pete Townshend, Eric
Clapton, Jimmy Page and Eddie Van
Halen, to name a few—learned these
valuable lessons early on. When you
think of young Eddie jamming in his
basement with his brother Alex, you
can envision how the two of them
learned to play together like they were
one person, or like musical twins. If
you can build musical relationships by
fnding musicians you enjoy playing
with, and do so over a long period of
time, you will increase the likelihood of
making magic come out of your guitar.
So play with other musicians as often
as you can. If you know that the drum-
mer is showing up at seven o’clock, it
will motivate you to get your act to-
gether. I’ve written many a song using
that specifc motivation.
Here’s another tip: Even if you are
playing some terrifying shred-type
licks, you should end the solo with as
much expression as you can muster.
For example, if you play something like
FIGURE 53, which features some blaz-
ingly fast shredding, end things with
an expressive bend and some extreme
body movement, in order to send it off
with a big exclamation point. Try to
harness as much energy as possible and
channel it into your playing.
This wraps up our the Shred Alert.
I hope you’ve learning the techniques
I’ve taught you, and that they help your
playing to improve and become more
expressive. ❒
,
,

FIGURE 1
.

1
7
,
Th
N.C.(A)
7 5
7 5
5
X
7

5
X
7

1
5
X
7

7
×
7 5
7 5
1
Th
7 7 5
1
5
X
7 5
7 7 5
5
X
7 5
1
7 7 5
G5
5
X
7
X
X
X
3
5
5
3
5
5

3
5
5
3
5
5
3
5
5
3
5
5
,
,

FIGURE 2
E5
13 12 13 12
15
1215 15 13 12
14
12 13 15
12 14 12 14 12
15
12 15 14 15 14 12 15 14 15 14 12
15
6 7 3
7
5 5
12
15 13 15 13 12
14
 
11 12 13 15
12
15 13 15 13 12 12 11
14
11 14 12 14 12 11 14 12 14 12 11
14
11
14
7
9 9
12141211
14
111211
14
111412141211121119
12
9
12111211 9
12
9
12
grad.
bend
1
101210 9
12
9
10
-
0

,
.
9 5 5 9 6
BREAKIN’ OUT
THE BLESSINGS AND BENEFITS OF LIVE PERFORMANCE
CHAPTER 11
FIGURE 52
FIGURE 53

ALTERNATE UNIVERSE 2. FAST AND CLEAN 7. UNITED MUTATIONS The blessings and benefits of live performance 2 GU I TA R WOR L D Photograph by PHOTOGRAPHER 11. PART 2 More pick-hand warm-up exercises Using position shifts to your advantage when soloing 4. STICK YER NECK OUT 8. ACCENTUATE THE POSITIVE Alternate-picked 16th notes—the business card of shred guitar Using neck diagrams to your advantage How to organize patterns on the fretboard 6. SHAPE SHIFTING 9. ASSUME THE POSITION Alternate picking with accent patterns 5.DVD SHRED ALERT!!! Using alternate picking and note skipping to play interesting arpeggio patterns Quick. READY TO RUMBLE. READY TO RUMBLE 3. effective pick-hand warm-up exercises PAUL GILBERT presents 1. BREAKIN’ OUT . SNAKE-CHARMING LICKS The fifth mode of harmonic minor Mastering muting techniques PHOTOGRAPHER TKTKTK 10.

Try applying this approach to whatever scale or mode you can think of.                14 14 14 14     14 17 14 17 14 17  14  14 17   10 15 15 15 15  121415  12 14 15 14  FIGURE 4b FIGURE 4b  FIGURE  FIGURE 4c 4c  19 19 19 17 2017 17 2017 17 20 17   16 16 16 16 16 16   14 1714 17 14 1714 17 17 14 17 14  14 14  121415 14  121415 14 15 12 P. What I like to do in order to create a more interesting melodic contour is apply a note-skipping pattern that goes “up two. instead of playing E to G. ❒ FIGURE 1 1 FIGURE *     4 4  12 16    99   2 2  14   1210 14  12 14 12 14 12  12 10 3 3 *  = downstroke  = upstroke 3 3 3 FIGURE 3d FIGURE FIGURE FIGURE FIGURE 3b 3b FIGURE 3c 3c FIGURE 3d  FIGURE 4a 4a sim.” etc. I play E to B. Let’s begin with a very simple picking exercise (FIGURE 1) and look at some of the neat and musically interesting variations you can spin from it. picked repeatedly with alternating downstrokes and upstrokes. Fs and G. using the same “outside picking” motion. sounding C and Fs instead of C and G. E and B. four (s4) for the five of the C5 chord. Now that we have a new pattern. just like our initial picking exercise. as well as scales. the notes are played sequentially in an ascending fashion in two octaves across the neck. shown in ascending four-note groups in FIGURE 5b.CHAPTER 1 ALTERNATE UNIVERSE » USING ALTERNATE PICKING AND NOTE SKIPPING TO PLAY INTERESTING ARPEGGIO PATTERNS Instead of just playing a C major triad (C E G) over C5. or sharp. This is a good exercise for what I call “outside picking. GU I TA R WOR L D HI. 8 9 8   9 8 !  10 9 11 12 13 FIGURE FIGURE 6 6 C 12 14 15 12 12 10 FIGURE FIGURE 7b 7b  12 13 14   (root) (maj3)   E 8 7    8 9 12 10 9 10 9 10 10 11 14 12 11 13 12 17 15 19 20  ! 20  21 1/2 9 10 FIGURE 7c FIGURE 7c   9 8 9 10 X 10 9 10 12 12 13 X 11 12 11 12 10 14 14 15 20 13 17 19 0 15  FIGURE FIGURE 8a8a E Dorian E blues scale 13 14 13 12 14 14 12 12 14 15 12 12 15 15 12  17 18   12 15  ( 18) 1/2  19 18 17 19 18 17 19 20 17   A diminished-seven arpeggio 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 17 17 19   20 12 15 14 3 . as shown in FIGURE 6 with the notes C. in FIGURE 2b. This is how most rock guitarists play arpeggios—straight up and down.   FIGURE 2 2a Em triad FIGURE  17 ( 151919 )  FIGURE 2b FIGURE 2b sweep arpeggio  8 9 12  FIGURE FIGURE 3a 3a P.” as demonstrated in FIGURES 3a-d: in FIGURE 3a. I move on to the next pair. back one. This note-skipping concept can be applied to other arpeggios. and all three pairs are played in sequence in FIGURE 4a. a technique known as alternate picking. back one. E. A very common chord progression in rock and metal is Em D5 C5 (FIGURE 5a). which is considerably easier than “inside picking. up two.M.” as the pick movement is consistently on the “outside” of the pair of strings. The pattern sounds cool when continued across three octaves. AND WELCOME to the first three octaves.M. where I’ll teach you many of the techniques I use. as demonstrated in FIGURES 4b and FIGURE 4c. it works well with E Dorian. the E blues scale and an A diminished-seven arpeggio. G-E. FIGURE 3d shows the next pair. As shown in FIGURE 8a. B and G. we get C-Fs as our first pair (FIGURE 7a). In FIGURE 3b. let’s get it under our fingers by alternating between each note pair (FIGURE 3c).” What I am going to do now is expand on this idea by applying a mathematical pattern to an Em triad arpeggio (E G B). the same notes are played in a different position as a sweep-picked arpeggio (sweep picking involves dragging the pick across the strings in a single downward or upward motion). If we apply the noteskipping concept. let’s add the s4 to the mix. FIGURE 7b illustrates the ensuing sequence played across chapter of Shred Alert. This alludes to the C Lydian mode. We have two notes. In FIGURE 2a. It’s standard practice with this progression to substitute the raised. It’s also fun to play each pair as a two-note chord (FIGURE 7c). FIGURE FIGURE 5a 5a FIGURE FIGURE 5b 5b C Lydian mode       Em 8 9 9 7 D5 8 9 9 7 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 7 7 5 7 7 5 X X X X X X X X X X X X C5 0 1  5  5  3  13 ! 4 3 5 3 4 3 5 3 0 3   4  F# G (#4) (5)   FIGURE FIGURE 7a 7a 8 7 9 10   sim.

Another good thing to do is to practice picking dynamics. as shown in FIGURE 12a: I begin in eighth position. N.    0 0 0 P. which would be what’s known as a reverse sweep or reverse rake. as demonstrated in FIGURE 11. It requires more muscle movement and coordination to perform two upstrokes. Note that the upstrokes are performed as individual strokes. 7 5 5 8 5 5 7 5 5 Am 5   3 3 3 3 FIGURE 4b FIGURE 12b 8    15 sim. I’d like to show you my favorite right-hand (pick-hand) warm-up exercise. Likewise. I like to use different chords to make the exercise sound more interesting. as opposed to picking a single upstroke dragged across the top two strings. as in FIGURE 12b.) to attain a more staccato (detached) sound.M.M.M. every clinic and any time I need to warm-up my right hand before performing. I use this exercise at every show.H. or switching between GU I TA R WOR L D ON DISC laying a fret-hand finger across the top three strings directly above the fretwire.M. so I can easily make it sound more interesting by changing the note on the high E string to imply a melody. I’ll offer some permutations on this useful and effective exercise. THREE-trip-let. followed by the open G string picked with a downstroke. As shown in FIGURE 10.  mf  P. at the bridge saddles. I need to keep picking the strings in this way for at least two minutes. Let’s move to some different chords: FIGURE 12c begins with a G major voicing.M. I pick the open high E string with an upstroke. Because I get bored hearing the same three open strings over and over. I use a picking motion of up-up-down. I’ll alter the note on the high E string for a little variety. In order for this exercise to be an effective warm-up. FIGURE 4a FIGURE 12a * P. By this point.M. You’ll find that when playing very quietly it takes a lot of control to keep the picking even. which of course inspires me to move around the fretboard a little bit and find some other interesting shapes and figures to play. I also use palm-muting (P. Let’s start with different inversions (chord voicings) of Am.H. and FIGURE 12e begins with some natural harmonics (N. 5 P.M. C. As illustrated in FIGURE 9. The entire exercise is played on the top three strings in a rhythm of repeating eighth-note triplets. you will have repeated this picking motion for about three minutes. throughout Am 3 13 14 14 9 8 3 10 9 10 3 10 9  8   15 sim. FOUR-trip-let. on top. EFFECTIVE PICK-HAND WARM-UP EXERCISES the two. 10 9       13 12 14 13 14 14 13 10  12 14 13 14    10 10 9 10 9 P. E. 6 4 7 6 10 7 9 7 10 9 13 10 12 10 13 12 16 13 15 16     13 15 14   12 13 14    FIGURE 12e FIGURE 4e 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3   12 sim. To play each eighth-note triplet. but that’s why this is a good warm-up exercise—repeating three distinct picking motions in this way will build up the muscles in the pick hand. throughout Am 8     3 = upstroke = downstroke       5 5 5 3 Am       5 sim. Palm muting is performed by resting the edge of the pick-hand palm across all of the strings. In the next chapter. I can barre across the top three strings at the fifth fret to sound an Am triad. If you play all of these figures in sequence without stopping. This means that each beat in a bar of 4/4 is divided like this: ONE-trip-let.  mf  mp  cresc. again altered by changing the note on the high E string: FIGURE 12d features an ascending D diminished-seven voicing. throughout   sim. with the minor third.). your pick-hand will be warmed up. TWO-trip-let.M. by picking softer or louder. followed by the open B picked with an upstroke. 13 14 14 13 12 14 13 14 14 13 14 12 3 9 10 7 3 10 9 8 3 10 9 7 3 10 5 5 3 5 5 7 3 5 5 8 3 5 5 7 3 5 5  3 5 5 5   3 3 3 3 3 3 3  FIGURE 12c FIGURE 4c G 3 3 3 3 mp 3 cresc. sounded by lightly FIGURE FIGURE 9 1 FIGURE FIGURE 102 IN THIS CHAPTER. on top. and then shift up to a 12th-position inversion of Am with the fifth.CHAPTER 2 » READY TO RUMBLE QUICK. ❒ FIGURE FIGURE 11 3 Em    * P. 8 8 7 8 10 7 8 8 7 8 7 8 8 5 7 8 7 7 8 7      Am 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Ddim7 4 P. This will soon get monotonous as well. throughout 7 FIGURE 12d FIGURE 4d      sim. 12 Em 12           5 5 5 5 5 5 5      0 0 0 3 Am 5 5     3 3  3 4  (slow down) 3     0 5 5 5 7 .

which involves dragging the pick across the three strings in a single upward motion. but at the end of bar 2 I anticipate each new chord shape by shifting to it on the preceding eighth note. Notice that I like to use palm muting throughout (rest the edge of the pickhand palm across the bridge saddles) to attain a more percussive attack and a clearer separation of notes. For the truly adventurous and ambitious. one of my hopes is that I will eventually use the given technique in a piece of music.M. I begin by descending in the same FIGURE FIGURE 13 1 manner as FIGURE 14 for the first two bars. ❒ 1/2 E7¨9 12 10 13 12 10 9 10 9 Freely 1/2    12  10 9 10 9 10 9 10 9 10 9 7 9 7 6 7 6    1 0 3 8 6 8 7 8 7 7 7 5 7 5 4 3 FIGURE FIGURE 14 2 3 3 3 E E7¨9 Am E7 F E Dm E  3 3    13 13 14 12 10 12 10 9 9 7 10 9 6 5 3 1 5 4 2 1 7 6 3 2  0 10 12  5 A * P. throughout 13             13 12 10 14 9 9 10 7 9 3 3 6 5 5 6 4 3 3 6 5 = downstroke  = upstroke sim. picked with a downstroke. respectively. 6 3 3 3 3 14 5 5 7 4 3 6 2 1 3 1   6 3 10 9 3 7 3 3 10 9  3 3 2  7  9 9 9  7  10  9 9  14 13 13  12 12 10  10 15 3 6 3 5 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 6 3 3 10 3 13 3 5 6 4  3 2  2 1  3 2  7 5  10 9  14 13  3 14  1  9 9 7 7   15 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 . the Gs on the third string moves to F and the C on the second string moves to B. the E note on the fourth string moves down to D. try to invent your own ways of connecting these kinds of triadic chord shapes. I pre- Now let’s apply our picking technique to these chord shapes. each eighth-note triplet is picked up-up-down on the second. I know that in any situation it will get me warmed up and ready to play in no time. Sometimes referred to as the “snake charmer” scale. With just about everything I use as a warm-up exercise. as demonstrated in the second part of FIGURE 14. Instead of playing each triplet as a reverse sweep. Now that you have a handle on the concept. E Dm E  6 14 5 5 7 4 3 6 2 1 3 1 1 FIGURE FIGURE 15 3 *    5 4  P. it’s more useful and enjoyable if the exercise exudes some musical merit as well. I prefer to use individual pick strokes. sounded on the fourth string with a downstroke. It is the use of these individual strokes that really builds up one’s picking strength and stamina. third and fourth strings. Following an eighth-note pickup on the fourth string. A scale that works well with this exercise is Phrygian dominant. One of the ways to apply a musical approach to this picking exercise is to instill a scalar concept. In the key of E.M. as shown in the first bar of FIGURE 14. i.. Phrygian dominant is intervallically spelled 1 f2 3 4 5 f6 f7.CHAPTER 3 READY TO RUMBLE. This approach is then adhered to for the remainder of the exercise.   E 13          13 12 14 10 10 12 9 9 10 7 9 3 3 3 3  3 0 0 0 1 2 2 0    E7¨9 Am E7 F sim. the notes are E F Gs A B C D. To me. try applying the pattern to all the other groups of three adjacent strings. one note played per string. which is the fifth mode of the harmonic minor scale. moving from the highest string to the lowest. The first thing I did with the scale was to harmonize it in three-note chords. FIGURE 13 is a descending run based on this exotic-sounding scale. Once you’ve become comfortable with the picking technique and musical concept. the exercise is built from sequences of eighth-note triplets that fall on three adjacent strings. let’s experiment by moving these chord shapes around the board in different patterns: as shown in FIGURE 15.e. picking the first two notes with upstrokes and the last note with a downstroke. I’m not interested in warm-ups that are simply muscle-building routines. The process continues down the fretboard to first position. PART 2 MORE PICK-HAND WARM-UP EXERCISES » sented an intensive pick-hand exercise that I do before every show or clinic. Starting with an E+ (E augmented) triad. To refresh your memory. I move the chord shapes down the neck by shifting each note on each string to the next lower scale tone on that string. Anticipating each new chord shape like this serves to make the exercise sound even more interesting. GU I TA R WOR L D IN THE LAST CHAPTER. molding the exercise to the musical structure of a given scale.

FIGURE 17 illustrates a very comfortable way to traverse this scale. I fret a G on the third fret of the sixth string and then hammer-on up to A at the fifth fret. When you get this one up to speed. which forces me to move it up and down the fretboard very quickly and. I begin in 10th position and use string skipping. it sounds a little like a synthesizer lick. ring finger and pinkie. Making that position shift sound seamless can be a little tricky. hopefully. I first play the entire scale using only my index finger. to play the first two notes.” A great way to jump into this topic is to use as our basis one of the most commonly used scales in rock. the highest note is C (first string. This one looks a little crazy because I shift FIGURE FIGURE 16 1 A minor pentatonic scale back and forth between two positions very quickly. so it’s a good idea to break the phrase up into smaller pieces. Most guitar players have played this scale in this position a million times. In the first bar. I’ll show you how to play it “outside of the box. FIGURE 16 illustrates A minor pentatonic played in fifth position. Position shifts open those boundaries. etc. the D on the first string’s 22nd fret. Familiarizing yourself with an expanded note register like this will afford you a range that is normally exclusive to keyboard players. the open low E.CHAPTER 4 ASSUME THE POSITION USING POSITION SHIFTS TO YOUR ADVANTAGE WHEN SOLOING » subject of “position shifting. Begin by looping the first six notes of the scale with the position shift. etc. eighth fret) and the lowest note is A (sixth string. allowing us to play this scale from the absolute lowest note possible. add a few more notes and continue to do so until the entire phrase feels comfortable and seamless. Once that begins to feel comfortable. to one of the highest notes possible on a guitar. I then play the last four notes in 12th position. except the first and fourth notes in the lick are played one fret lower. etc. as well the entire fretboard. I then repeat the exercise with the middle finger. The next note is the key to this exercise: using the open high E string to sound the next note in the scale. and I do hope you have fun playing minor pentatonic scales with your pinkie only. the minor pentatonic. As shown in FIGURE 19. and you are stuck within the limitations of those boundaries. This is followed by fifth-to-seventh-fret hammers on the D and G strings. This type of drill will get you accustomed to making instantaneous position shifts with every one of your fretting fingers. Hopefully these exercises will help you to get a handle on position shifting. from the high E to the G. accurately. Another good (but admittedly inGU I TA R WOR L D I’D LIKE TO ADDRESS the dodgy sane) position-shifting exercise is to play the entire A minor pentatonic scale in fifth position using just one finger. ❒  5 8 5 8 5 7 5  5 7 5 8 5 1 FIGURE 17 2 FIGURE 7  20   0 3 5 3 5 7 5 7 1 17 20 17 20 0 7 17 19 17 19 17 20 17 20 20  FIGURE 18 FIGURE 3   5 0 7 5 7    17   0 5 7 5 7 17 19 17    19    17 19 17  0 3 5 7 1 5 7 5 7 17 19 17 19 0 3 5 1 20 17 20 0 3 5 7 5 7 5 7 17 19 20 17 20 20 20 17  0 3 5 FIGURE FIGURE 19 4    5 1 2 3 4 8 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 7 1 2 3 4 5 7 5 7 5 8 5 8 10 8 5 8 5 7 5 7 5 7 5 8 5 index: middle: ring: pinkie: 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 etc. The last position-shifting lick in this chapter is shown in FIGURE 20. then slide up from the fifth to the seventh fret. The lick in bar 2 is almost identical. I am afforded the opportunity to shift all the way up to 17th position and continue playing the rest of the scale.” using position shifts that give you greater movement and versatility over the fretboard. the open low E. Following the first note. FIGURE FIGURE 205      10 12 12 15 12 14    9 12 12 14 12 14      1 3 1 3 4 1 3 1 3 1 3 3 1 3 6 . fifth fret). across three and a half octaves of A minor pentatonic. I then move over to the A string and start with a hammer from the third fret to the fifth. In this chapter. When this scale is played in fifth position. as shown in FIGURE 18.

       P.M. 0 0 0   12 12 10  G5 P. which is also known as the E Aeolian mode (E Fs G A B C D). two and three.         9 12 10 3 9 3 10 12 9 10 12      P. If one were to recreate that rhythm orally. 0 12 12 10  G5 P.   15 14 12 14 15 12 14 15 3 12 15 14 12 14 15 3 3 12 14 16 3 12  16 14 12 14 15 3  3 12 3  16 3 0 15 17 19 3 19 17 15 17 19 3 15 17 19 3 19 17 16 17 19 3 16 17 19 16  3 3 19 17 16 17 19  16    X 3 3 3    sim. Also.M. A great thing to do is focus on one part of the lick.    7 7 5  4 4 2 B5 P. A. 9 12 3 10 8 10 3 12 9 10 3 12 9 12 3 10 9 3 10 12 9 10 12 9 12 10 9 10 12     9 12 10 9 10 12 3   FIGURE 2a FIGURE 22a 12   3    9 X 3 3 3 (repeat prev. I begin FIGURE 22 in ninth position and play the initial pattern twice. This is essentially a two-bar rhythm pattern with very pronounced. it would sound like this: ONE (and two) AND (three and) FOUR (and) ONE (and) TWO (and) THREE (and four and).M.M. 0 12 12 10  G5 P. I move the lick up the fretboard one scale degree at a time. I then move up to 12th position and follow the same pattern contour while staying within the scale structure of E natural minor.M. Keep that rhythmic syncopation in your mind.M.  0 7 7 5 D5 P.M. P. The great majority of the lick is alternate picked.M.M. the initial pick on each new string is executed in this manner. beat)  15    sim. It’s in the key of E minor and stays diatonic (within the scale structure of ) to the E natural minor scale. the accents in bar 2 fall squarely on beats one. and we’ll begin with a rhythm figure that lays out an accent pattern.M. Check out the rhythm guitar figure riff in FIGURE 21: this pattern is made up of root-fifth power chords played in a syncopated fashion against an open low-E pedal tone.  0 7 7 5 D5 P. which necessitates a slight change in fingering.     7 GU I TA R WOR L D 3 3 .M.M. then gradually increase your speed. P. 9 12 10 9 10 12  9   11   12    10 3 10 14 12 10 12 14 3 3 10 12 14 3 14 12 10 12 14 3 3 10 12 14 11   3 3 3       14 12 10 12 14 X  12 3 3 12  14 15 14 12 14 15 3 3 12 14 15 3 15 14 12 14 15 3 3 12 14 16 12 16 14 12 14 16  14 3 17 15 14 15 17 3 3 14 15 17 3 17 15 14 15 17 3 3 14 16 17 14  3 3 17 16 14 16 17   14   X   X 3  15 19 17 15 17 19 3 15 17 19 3 3  16 19 17 16 17 19 3 16 17 19 3 3 16  19 17 16 17 19 3 3   16    3 FIGURE FIGURE 23 3 3   16   19 17 16 17 19  P. FIGURE 22 illustrates the picking exercise. specific accents: in bar 1 they fall on the downbeat of beat one. such as the fragment shown in FIGURE 23.M. Throughout the exercise.M. 0 11 11 9  F#5 P. ❒  3.       Em 9 3 12 10 9 10 12 3 9 10 12 3 P. 0 0 0   D5 P. the upbeat of beat two and the downbeat of beat four. it’s very important to begin this lick with an upstroke.   E5 9 9 7 2. Notice how the line is contoured with accents falling in the same places as in FIGURE 21.M. E5   9 9 7 P. because I use those same accents in the crazy picking exercise that is the focus of this column.*by Paul Gilbert CHAPTER 5 » ACCENTUATE THE POSITIVE ALTERNATE PICKING WITH ACCENT PATTERNS FIGURE FIGURE 21 1 q = 152 IN THIS CHAPTER we’re go- ing to look at the concept of syncopation. 1. I then do the same thing in 16th position.  0 9 9 7 E5 P.M. beginning in ninth position on Fs. P. B and C.  0 9 9 7 E5  9 9 7 0 0 0 0 FIGURE FIGURE 22 2     = downstroke  = downstroke                Em P.M.M. In FIGURE 22a. Play this slowly until it feels comfortable. but I throw in a couple of double hammer-ons.M.  0 4 4 2 B5 P. which is based on a long sequence of 16th-note triplets. which serve to smooth out the sound. E5   9 9 7 P. then starting on G. 0 0 0 14 14 12  A5 P.M.M.

In FIGURE 25. 8 7 7 10 7 8 10 7     8 ! FIGURE 24c FIGURE 1c Em 12 8 10 8 12 8    10 8   10 ! FIGURE 24f1f FIGURE     12 10 13 10 12   12 ! FIGURE 1e FIGURE 24e Em 15 12 13 12 15 12 Em 17 13 15 14 17 13   15 14   15 ! 3 FIGURE 24g FIGURE 1g Em    14 12   14 ! 3 2 4 1 3 2 4 1    17 15 19 15 17 15 19 15   17 ! FIGURE FIGURE 25 2 Em 20 17 19 17    14 19 17 (play 5 times) 20 17   17 15 19 15 17 15 19 15 15 14 17 13 15 14 17 13 12 15 12 13 12 15 12 12 10 13 10 12 10 13 10 10 8 12 8 10 8 12 8 1/2 *T. ❒ 8 . I end with a little flair. For FIGURE 24a we started on B. And despite what some people say. For FIGURES 24c-g. the fifth of the scale. alternate-picked 16ths throughout the fretboard.  = upstroke 10 13 10    sim.CHAPTER 6 » ALTERNATE-PICKED 16TH NOTES—THE BUSINESS CARD OF SHRED GUITAR I WANT TO talk about an in- FAST AND CLEAN FIGURE 24a1a FIGURE Em * gredient that is essential to every guitar soloist’s arsenal: alternate-picked 16th notes. followed by two notes on the B string.and left-hand technique and also sounds very melodic and musical. I’d like to show you a great 16th-note sequence that can be played all over the neck. and are fretted with the middle and index fingers. the first two notes in FIGURE 24b are a half step apart. I do not adhere to a “pick everything” approach when I play. 8 7 10 7 8 7 10 7 7 5 8 5 7 5 8 5 7 ! 7(19) !  FIGURE 26 3 legato (w/pull-offs) FIGURE Em *Tap harmonic    19 17 20 17 19 17 20 17 17 15 19 15 17 15 19 15 15 14 17 13 15 14 17 13 14 12 15 12 13 12 15 12 12 10 13 10 12 10 13 10 10 8 12 8 10 8 12 8 8 7 10 7 8 7 10 7   7 5 8 5 7 (play 3 times) 5 8 5   1/2 ! 7 )  directly against the 19th fret. Using alternate (down-up) picking. then one note per string. a cool twist is to use pull-offs wherever possible in order to attain a smoother legato sound. Notice that the fingering is slightly different—this is to accommodate the structure of the scale: whereas the first two notes of FIGURE 24a were a whole step apart. I play on the top two strings exclusively. For the sake of familiarity. as demonstrated in FIGURE 26. B.H. and fretted with the ring and index fingers. As these exercises include a few two-notes-per-string descending lines. and. using pull-offs and hammer-ons is not cheating! Legato phrasing is a very valid technique. FIGURE 25 then begins on the fifth. the sixth (FIGURE 24b). bending the Fs up a half step to G and applying a tapped harmonic. starting with a downstroke. moving up the neck through the scale. ending with two notes on the B. which we’ll adapt to various positions. I actually use a combination of picking and legato. we continue to move the pattern up one scale degree at a time. Now let’s run these melodic shapes in sequence. Let’s move the idea one note higher within E natural minor. Sixteenth notes are like the “business card” of shred guitar. one octave higher than where we started. and gradually build up speed. personally speaking. executed by “bouncing” the pick-hand index finger GU I TA R WOR L D                7 5 8 5 7 5 FIGURE 24b1b FIGURE Em 8 5   * alternate picking: FIGURE 1d FIGURE 24d Em = downstroke. the index finger remains at the same fret throughout the melodic shape. which I think sounds great. I play the initial lick five times and then descend through the shapes. FIGURE 24f is particularly interesting because you have to use all four fingers (fret-hand fingerings are indicated below the tab). Each of these “shapes” offers a new challenge in terms of fret-hand fingering. is great for both your right. FIGURE 24a illustrates the initial shape. beginning on C. Another cool thing about that lick is its pull to a C Lydian (C D E Fs G A B) tonality (C Lydian and E natural minor are comprised of the same notes). beginning with two notes on the high E string. let’s use the key of E natural minor (E Fs G A B C D). Begin by playing this lick slowly. In this and all other examples. as the essence of the style is the ability to cleanly execute fast.

I’d like to show you a cool bonus benefit that I discovered. as there are two consecutive notes present on the G and high E strings. If we transpose the pattern up a minor third (three frets). you can use hammer-ons and pull-offs. As shown in FIGURE 27d. 7fr 5 9 8fr 9fr FIGURE 1b FIGURE 27b  8 5 9   Am 8 5 9 5   8  FIGURE FIGURE 27c1c     5 Am 5 9 5 8     7 (play 3 times) 5 3 1 4 (play 3 times) 5 5    7 1 3  FIGURE 27d FIGURE 1d 8 Am 5 9 5 7 5 9     8 8 1 5 8 5 9 5 9 5 9 5 7 5 9  9 5 9 5 3 7 5 7 3 8 5 8 5 9 5  1 7 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 2 Cm 8 12 8 FIGURE 29c FIGURE 3c    11   10 ! 3 FIGURE 29a FIGURE 3a A7 7 3 1  1   7 5  7 FIGURE 29b FIGURE 3b  1   1 8 5 5 8  3 freely A(7)    1/2 1/2 1/2 1 1/2 8 7 7 5 7 5 7 5 5 8 8 5 8 5 8 5 8 5 8 5 8 5 8 5 8 7 5 8 7 5 7 5 7 7 7 5 7 5 5 7 7 5   1 7 5 5   7 FIGURE 29d FIGURE 3d 3 A(7) 1/2 1/4 1 FIGURE 30 4 FIGURE 3 3 grad. For the adventurous. or the B string at the eighth fret. Try incorporating these bends into your playing. Let’s start with a string-skipping arpeggio in the key of A minor. in turn. In this key. new shapes on the fretboard. it helps to map it out and study it visually. FIGURE 27b illustrates how to play the lick using pull-offs. patterns and melodic “shapes. But when the shape is a little more complex. as demonstrated in FIGURE 29d. But here’s the twist: one day.. Another advantage of using hammers and pulls is that you can get some good speed going and create interesting phrasings. bends    1/2 1/2 11 8 12 8 10 3 1 4 1  2   7 1 A(7) 1/2 1/2 1 1/4 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1 1 A5    11 8 12 8 7 7 7 5 6 5 3 3 3 3 2 0 3 2 2 0 2 2 0 the seventh fret. take a really bad note in the key of A—like Bf—and bend the daylights out of it until it sounds good. String bending is a technique that imparts a lot of emotion and character to your playing.CHAPTER 7 » STICK YER NECK OUT USING NECK DIAGRAMS TO YOUR ADVANTAGE FIGURE 1a FIGURE 27a ONE THING I’VE FOUND very helpful in my guitar studies over the years is using what I call neck diagrams to map out riffs. I realized that. I combined them with the more conventional “key of A” bends. as in FIGURE 29b. most guitarists will bend the G string at the seventh fret.” I find that diagramming makes it easier to visualize and. I could use the notes of the C minor triad shape in FIGURE 28. Pay close attention to the fret-hand fingering indicated for this shape. or perhaps the B string at GU I TA R WOR L D fret-hand: 2      Am      5 ! 8 5 9 1 4 1 3 3fr 5fr 7 . . I use quick hammers and pulls on the high E and G strings to keep the lick moving along. and as such I don’t want to be limited to just one position—I want to be able to bend everywhere! In searching for more places to bend. Now that you have this pattern clearly visualized. Aside from picking every note. ❒ 9 . as shown in FIGURE 30.. striving for a very smooth and even sound. and FIGURE 27c takes things a step further by incorporating pull-offs on the way down and hammer-ons on the way up. . in the key of A. as illustrated in FIGURE 28. Notice the visual shape created by these points on the fretboard (see diagram)—it looks a little like a rhombus. as demonstrated at the beginning of FIGURE 29c. as long as I bend each note up a certain amount to a “right” note in the key of A. A good example of a common fretboard shape is an open D chord: just about every guitar player is familiar with the triangular shape of a D “cowboy” chord. Now that I had these new places to bend. Practice all of these patterns slowly. I decided I was going to explore the entire fretboard and find every single place I could possibly bend a note within the context of a blues in A. as shown in FIGURE 29a. Using hammers and pulls like this makes the lick considerably easier to play than it would be if you were to pick every note because of the numerous skips over the B string. remember. followed by the fifth and ninth frets on the G string. we get a C minor arpeggio. a skip over the B string and then the fifth and eighth frets on the high E string. illustrated in FIGURE 27a: this begins at the seventh fret on the D string.

fretting it exactly the same way. another A one octave higher lo15 1514 16 17 12 1415 15 10 7 7 9 910 cated on the seventh fret of the fourth 10  1312 14 13 7 710 string (two strings over and two frets higher). there is an A 17 1920 17 20 17 17 15 13 17 19 17 15 13 note located on the sixth string’s fifth 18 18 14 16 17 fret. A quick look at the black keys on a piano reveal the logic with which they c) c) 12 12 12 99 12 12 9 9 12 are laid out: starting on the far left and 10 10 10 10 99 66 99 66 moving right. on the fifth string. 14 7 7  9 11  9 11 9 12 7 10 10 which is the fifth. you can play that lick additional twist. or secFIGURE ond and first strings. you only have to 44 77 77 44 44 77 77 55 55 55 memorize its “shape. and very easily move them 33 33 through different octaves. one and two octaves. for an In comparison. The great thing for piano playFIGURE FIGURE ers is that any scale. This 10 10 10 7 7 10 7 7 10 7 7 10 is especially true if the lick falls on the 77 99 77 99 77 99 sixth and fifth. the “shapes” of scales and A5 G5 E5 A5 G5 E5 riffs can change quite a bit. as shown in FIGURE strings. and we can get an F Lydian chord. which is a little more work for the brain Let’s apply the concept to an E minor FIGURE 33a illustrates an A major triad because it involves different “shapes. This in turn has 99 66 99 77 77 77 made it easier for me to visual77 44 77 5 5 5 ize patterns on the guitar fret5 5 5 board. Add a few notes Csm7f5 arpeggio-type lick over an A7 one position would give us something to that shape. with the notes fun.” The guitar. there are two blacks keys 77 77 followed by three black keys. we can move this same trianFIGURE 35 incorporates the root/fifth 38b. FIGURE 39c positions a this arpeggio across all of the strings in in F over the F5 chord. and the 77 44 55 pattern repeats across the entire key33 33 33 33 board. 8fr 8fr It’s very valuable to memorize the FIGURE FIGURE positions of these three A notes. or the second and first strings.CHAPTER 8 » HOW TO ORGANIZE PATTERNS ON THE FRETBOARD           ! !   SHAPE SHIFTING 0 0 0 0 FIGURE FIGURE FIGURE I’VE FOUND IT VERY helpful as FIGURE FIGURE FIGURE FIGURE 31 11 FIGURE 32 22 FIGURE 33 33 A5 A5 A5 a guitarist to familiarize myself A5 A5 A5 a) b) c) a) b) a) b) c) a) b) with the layout of the keyboard 12 12 10 10 10 10 on a piano. is not like this. But I’ve 17 14 16 17 17 14 16 17 15 15 developed an approach to the guitar’s 77 55 55 15 15 15 12 14 15 77 55 55 15 12 14 15 fretboard wherein you can use the same 13 13 55 33 11 13 13 shapes. because FIGURE 8b FIGURE 9b FIGURE 38b8b FIGURE 39b 9b TT 2 2 3 1 31 the patterns of many licks based around 12 14 15 12 14 15 12 15 12 15 one of these A notes can easily be moved 9 9 11 12 11 12 9 9 12 12 to either of the other two A notes. as cept with a Csm7f5 arpeggio. three frets higher (FIGURE 32c). We can move this up (A Cs E) played on the bottom two Let’s use this approach to create licks. 33 33 33 33 33 33 33 depending on the string or fretboard FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37b 7b FIGURE 37a 7a FIGURE FIGURE FIGURE FIGURE 66 FIGURE 7a FIGURE 7b position. (A Cs E G B) sound. however. 11 FIGURE FIGURE 7c FIGURE FIGURE 8a FIGURE 37c7c FIGURE 38a 8a As shown in FIGURE 31. For gular shape over to the other A notes “power chord” concept. fourth and third. sound. two frets higher (FIGURE 32b). fingering the notes of shown in FIGURE 36. and the shape of any lick on these pairs of strings will be identical. chord or musical FIGURE 34 44 FIGURE 35 FIGURE FIGURE 55 phrase in one position and octave can be 12 55 55 99 99 12 10 55 55 55 10 easily moved to another because it will 66 66 66 99 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 look exactly the same. 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 A simple example is an A5 power 1215 14 14 14 12 15 14 14 14 12 12 12 12 chord: FIGURE 32a combines an A root 1012 14 15 13 101214 15 13 9 12 14 note on the sixth string with an E note. ❒ 0 0                                  0 0   ! !           ! !                              ! ! 10 GU I TA R WOR L D . (FIGURES 33b and 33c) and yield the same played separately and in sequence.” lick (FIGURE 38a). you 7 55 77 99 can move this shape up an octave to the 55 55 55 33 fourth and third strings. Given FIGURES 39a-c incorporate this conmusical result in higher octaves. because these pairs FIGURE 39c9c FIGURE 9c A7 A7 of adjacent strings are tuned in fourths. fusion-y A9 like what is illustrated in FIGURE 34. try improvising around those shapes. which yields a cool. and another A located at the FIGURE FIGURE 39a 9a FIGURE 9a 10th fret on the second string (two C#m7¨5 C#m7¨5 strings over and three frets higher). a chord progression like A5-G5-F5. as shown in FIGURES 37a-c. even when 20 20 17 19 20 20 20 17 19 20 18 18 18 18 playing exactly the same notes.

upstroke speed  *8 * FIGURE 7 8  12 12 38 0 10 3  grad. the fifth mode of the harmonic minor scale. I’d like to talk about what I refer to as “snake-charming licks”—my slang term for licks built from the Phrygian-dominant mode. the resulting scale. Because we’re in the key of B. To form the fifth mode of this scale. to 14th position. Five is a weird number for a rock lick. we can take advantage of our open B string. You can even link these two positions using two-note chords. FIGURE 43 then links these three positions together. followed by the ring finger at the 11th fret (a bit of a stretch) and the pinkie at the 12th. FIGURE 46 is based on a five-note sequence that sounds great when cycled repeatedly: start with an upstroke. When possible I like to devise easy fingerings. but if you play it fast enough. increase speed     12 12 8 0 10  8 5 5     12 10 8 11 8 12 10 8 11     5 5 12 12 8 0 10 5 5 11 11         5 5  5 5 8 11 12 12 8 11 12 12 8 11 12 12 8 11 12 12 8 11 12 12 12 11 8 12 11 8 12 11 8 12 11 1 12 11 8 12 11 12 11 1 12 11 8 12 11 8 11 12 12 12 11 8 12 11 1 1 1 1                    8 12 11 8 11 12 8 11 12 11 8 12 11 8 11 12 8 12 11 8 11 12 12 11 8 11 12 8 8 8 12 11  8 11 12 11 8  8 8 11 12 11 8  8 11 12 11 8 12 11    8 11 12 11 8 12 11  12 11  8 8 7     7 11 8 9 8 11 12 11 8 12 11 8 7 11 8 9    11 8 9  8 11 12 8 11 12 11 8 12 11  8 7   11 8 9  7   8 11 12 8 11 8 812 11 8 8  8 11 8 9 8 11 12 12 11 8 11 87  8 12 11 8 8 9 12 8 11 12 11 12 11 8 12 8 11 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 11 8 11 12 11 12 11 8 8 11 8 8 8  11 11 8 12 11 8 11 12 8 11 12 11 12 11 8 12 8 11 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 11  12 11 8 11 12 12 12 12 11 12 11 8 11 12 8 11 12 11 12 11 8 12 8 11 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 11 8 11 12 8 11 12 11 12 11 8 12 8 11 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 11 5 8 11 12 5 5 12 12 11 12 11 FIGURE 3a 12 FIGURE 42a 5 FIGURE B7(¨9) FIGURE 3a 3a B7(¨9) FIGURE11512 14 3a B7(¨9) 11 12 14 5 B7(¨9) FIGURE11 12 14 11 12 14 11 12 14 11 12 14 3a 11 12 14 11 12 14 B7(¨9) 11 12 14 11 12 14 FIGURE11 12 14 11 12 14 11 12 14 11 12 14 3a 11 12 14 11 12 14 11 12 14 11 12 14 B7(¨9) FIGURE 41a FIGURE 2a FIGURE B7(¨9) FIGURE 2a 2a FIGURE B7(¨9) 2a B7(¨9) FIGURE 8 11 12 2a B7(¨9) 8 11 12 8 11 12 FIGURE B7(¨9) 2a 8 11 12 B7(¨9) 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 1112 11 1112 11 1112 11 1112 11 1112 11 1112 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 5 11 . as shown in FIGURE 41b. and proceed up one octave while using the same notes. Let’s move up the concept one more time. you’ll feel the pulse of the downbeats. ❒ GU I TA R WOR L D FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant mode FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant mode B7(¨9) B7(¨9) FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant mode B7(¨9) FIGURE 1 B Phrygian dominant 7 mode B7(¨9) 7 9 B7(¨9)11 7 9 10 7 9 FIGURE 8 B Phrygian dominant 7 10 9 1 mode 7 9 7 10 9 7 7 9 10 10 9 7 8 11 B7(¨9)11 7 9 10 7 9 7 7 8 FIGURE 2b 7 9 10 10 9 7 9 7 7 8 11 FIGURE 2b FIGURE 41b B7(¨9) 7 9 10 FIGURE 2b 10 9 freely 7 7 7 freely B7(¨9) FIGURE 8 11 78 11 12 11 8 9 2b freely B7(¨9) 8 9 10 11 8 10 9 11 12 11 8 12 11 8 11 12 7 2b11 FIGURE 8 11 12 8 11 12 freely B7(¨9) 8 11 12 8 11 12 11 8 12 11 8 11 12 12 11 8 11 12 freely 8 11 12 FIGURE B7(¨9) 2b 8 11 12 8 11 12 11 8 12 11 8 11 12 freely B7(¨9) FIGURE 40 1 B Phrygian dominant mode FIGURE     8 11 12 12 11 8 !   11    8 11 12 12 11 8 ! 11 8 12 11 8 11 8 11 12     8 12 11 8 !   8 11 12 11   3      3 3 3 8 11 12 12 11 8 11 8FIGURE 4 !   11 12 14 11 12 14 11 12 14 11 12 14 FIGURE 3b 3 3   3 3 3 3  3 11 12 14 3 11 12 14 FIGURE B7(¨9) 3b 8 11 12 12 11 FIGURE 4 ! 12 11 8 4 11  FIGURE 3b FIGURE  FIGURE 43 B7(¨9)   3  3 3 3   B7(¨9) FIGURE 42b8 11 12 14 12 11 8  FIGURE 4B7(¨9) 14 15 17  11 12 14  3   FIGURE 3b 8 11 12 ! 12 B7(¨9) B7(¨9) 3 14 3 11 12 3 8 11 12 14 12 11 8 12  8 11 12 14 12 11 8 FIGURE 14 16 17 14 15 11 12 14 11 12  8 11 12 8 11 12 !  4B7(¨9) 14 15 17   17 11 12 14 8 12 B7(¨9) FIGURE 3b  8 11 12 14 12 11 8  14 16 17 3 14 3  17 11 12 14 12 B7(¨9) 8 11 12  3b  4B7(¨9)  FIGURE 14 16 17 14 15 11 12 14 11 12  83 11 12 83 11 12 ! FIGURE 8 11 12 14 12 11 8    8 11 12 14 12 11 8   14 16 17 14 15 17 11 12 14 11 12 14 8 11 12 8 11 12 ! 12   B7(¨9) B7(¨9)    14 16 17 3 11 12 14 3  8 11 12 3  3 11 12 14 3 8 11 12   8  3 14 15 17 12 FIGURE 5 11 12 14 12 11 8 !   5   3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 FIGURE B7(¨9)12 14 12 11 8 FIGURE 8 11 5   8 11 8 12 11 12 11 8 8 11 8  14 16 8 3 11 12 14 11 12 14 14 8 11 12 12 3 11 11  B7(¨9)  3 17 3 3 3 3 14 3 11 12 FIGURE B7(¨9) 5  44 B7(¨9) 8 12 11 12 11 8 8 11 8 8 3 8 8 11 12 14 14 14 12 11 12 12 11 11 FIGURE 8 11 12 8 12 11 12 11 8 12 8 11 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 311 8 11 3 14 11 3 14 14 14312 11 123 11 14 11 12 FIGURE 8 11 5  12 3 12 12 12 11 12 11 8 11 12 14 14 FIGURE B7(¨9) 5 12   8 11 12 8 12 11 12 11 8 12 8 11 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 311 8 11312 14 11 3 14 14 14312 11 123 11 14 11   8 11 12 8 12 11 12 11 8 12 8 11 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 11 8 11 12 14 11 12 14 14 14 12 11 12 11 14 11  B7(¨9)  12 12 12 8 8 3   8 1111 8 12 11 12 11 171217 11 8 12 8 15 11 8 12 11 8 1114 14 11 12 14 14 14 12 11 12 11 14 11 3   14 12 15 12 11 14 12 12   14 12 11 14 12 11 171217 314 12 15 11 17 17 8 1114 14 16 16 17 17 14 14 1614   11 14 14 314 14 15 15  14 12 11 14 12 11 17 17 314 14 15 15 17 17 14 14  16 16 17 17 14 14    16 16 17 17 14 14 16  15 17 17 14 14 12 14 12 11 17 17 14 14 16   14 12 11 14 12 11 17 17 314 14 15 15 17 17 14 14  16 16 17 17 14 14 16  16 16 17 17 14 14     14 12 11 14 12 11 17 17 14 14 15 15 17 17 14 14  16   14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14 14 14 11 12 14 17 16  12 14 11 12 14 14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14 17 14  14141216 17 14 12 11 15 17 15 14 14 15 14 17 14 17 16 1417 161614171117 14 14 16 14 14 15 17 14 11 12  14 16 17 14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14 17 14 17 16 14 17 16 1411 12 14 11 12 14   14 16 17  14 16 17 14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14 17 14 17 16 14 17 16 1411 12 14 11 12 14 17 17 16 17 16 14 11 12 14  14 16 17   3 3 3 3 14 15 17 15 17 15 14 14 15 14 17 14 17 16 14 17 16 14 11 12 14 11 12 14 3 3 3  3 3 3 3  3 3 3 3 3 3 3  14 16 17 3 3 3  17 17 16 17 16 14 11 12 14  12 14 12 11 11 12314 11 3 11 8 11 12 8 811 8 8 8 3 3 3 310  3 10 ! 12 14 12 11 11 12 14 11 8 12 14 12 11 14 11 12 14 14 11 14 12 11 14 12 11 8 3 12 8 11 12 3 11 8 11 12 8 12 811 812 8 12 11 8 12 11 8 10 3 10 811 8 8 8 3 3 3 3  11  ! 14 11 12 14 14 11 14 12 11 14 12 11 8 11 12 8 11 12 12 811 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 11 8 10  10 12 14 12 11 14 8 12 11 12 11 12 11 8 3 3 14 14 12 14 12 11 83 12 3 12  3 3 10  8 11 12 8 11 12 3 8 12 811 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 11 8 10 ! 12 14 12 11 14 11 12 14 14 11 14 12 11 14 12 11 10 ! 10   8 11 12 3 3 12 14 12 11 14 11 12 14 14 11 14 12 11 14 12 11 3 8 5 3 3 8 12 811 8 12 8 12 11 8 12 11 8 3 3 11 12 3 3  10 10 ! 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 FIGURE 6 5 14 3 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 14 14 12 14 12 11 3 11 12 3 8 12 3 12 12 11 12 11 8 FIGURE 6 5 FIGURE 7 4 0 8 3 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 3 5 0 3 7 7 4 30 8 8 3 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0 6 3 3 3  7 4 0 8 5 0 10 10 7 03 8 8 5 0 7 7 4 0 8 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0 FIGURE 7 5 0 8 3 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 3 5 0 3 7 7 4 30 8 8 3 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0 5 3 3 3 3  6 4 5 FIGURE 7 5 0 8 3 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 3 5 0 3 7 7 4 30 8 8 3 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0 5   6 4 3 3 3 3    3 FIGURE 7 4 0 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 8 8 5 0 7 7 4 0 8 8 5 0 10 10 7 0 12 12 8 0 45 FIGURE 6 3   7 34 0 8 35 0 10 10 7 0 FIGURE 7 0 7 7 4 0 8 8 5 0 10 *10= upstroke12 =12 8 0 8 8 5 3  7 0  downstroke FIGURE 7   3  3 * = upstroke = downstroke * FIGURE 7 3 * = increase = downstroke grad.upstroke = downstroke FIGURE * 12 12 8 0 10  46* 8      12 10 8 11 8 12 10 8 11 grad. and more comfortable. which is one fret higher than the standard. Now let’s move the concept up to the next fretboard position: As shown in FIGURE 42a. 12th and 14th frets on both the G and high E strings. which is a nice way to harmonize B Phrygian-dominant.CHAPTER 9 » SNAKE-CHARMING LICKS THE FIFTH MODE OF HARMONIC MINOR IN THIS CHAPTER. shown in FIGURE 40. Here’s another great lick: FIGURE 45 incorporates a series of double pull-offs from various positions. followed by a downstroke and two pull-offs. increase speed  12 12 8 0 10    = increase speed     FIGURE 7 12 10 8 11 8 12 10 8 11 grad. and the lick shown in FIGURE 41a. four-fret span of many scales. move it around a little and use hammer-ons and pull-offs. I use the 11th. Here we have to change the fingering slightly: 14-16-17 frets on the G string and 14-15-17 frets on the high E. increase speed 12 10 8   * 8 12 10 8  8 FIGURE 7 12 10 8 11 8 12 10 8 11 * = upstroke = downstroke 12 12 38 0 10 3       * 8 12 10 8 11 8 12 10 8 11 grad. is B Phrygian-dominant and is spelled: B C Ds E Fs G A.upstroke = downstroke * = increase speed grad. B. as shown in FIGURE 42b. Instead of simply playing this riff up and down. start from the fifth scale degree. the exact same frets and fingers are used on the high E string. try creating improvised patterns and different ways to connect the positions. Let’s begin with a series of stringskipping licks. Notice that this scale fingering requires a bit of a stretch on the low E string: while rooted in seventh position. utilizes the same fingering on both the G and high E strings: I begin with the index finger at the eighth fret on the G string. the pinkie has to reach up to the 11th fret. and end with a downstroke. as shown in FIGURE 44. The notes of the E harmonic minor scale are: E Fs G A B C Ds. Now that you have the shapes.

It’s not always easy to play the electric guitar with such physical abandon. to me. after picking an upstroke. FIGURE FIGURE 3 3 3 3 FIGURE 4933 3 3 3 FIGURE 50 4 *  = staccato. The sooner you master these muting techniques. 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 A7sus4 A7sus4 5 A7sus4 5          3 rit. I immediately touch it lightly on the downstroke. rit. which means “very short in duration. 7 6 5 8 5 3 5 3 rit. because it’s difficult to maintain perfect control over a cranked-up guitar and amp. As demonstrated in FIGURE 48. swinging his arms and playing rhythm or lead with real energy—that. you have to control the other five so that they will not make any unwanted noises. 5 5  8758 5 8 7 5 8 5 8 7 5 8 7 5 7 5 7 5757 5 7 6 5 7 6 5 5 8 7 7 7 5 7 5    7 5 8 78758 8 7 5 8 5 8 7 5 8 7 5 7 5 7 5757 5 7 6 5 7 6 5 7 7   7 6 5 7 5 7 7 6 7 3  3 3     3      8 10 11 8        3  8 10 11 8   3          8 10 11 8 5 7 5   5 5 6 7 5 7 7 5 7 5 7 FIGURE 47 1 FIGURE FIGURE 1 FIGUREX1 X X X           X X X X X X      X X X X X X X X    X X X X X    X X X  X X 10 12 14 15 17 19 7 9 X X X X X X  X X 10 12 14 15 17 19 7 9  X X X X X X X X  X X X X X X  X X 10 12 14 15 17 19 7 9 X X X X X X X X X X X X 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3  X X X X X X X X X X 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 FIGURE 48 2 pick muting FIGURE FIGURE 2 pick muting * * 5 8 5 FIGURE 2 pick muting 8 5 8 8 5 5 * 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 3 3 5 3 3 5 6 7 6 5 3 sim. When playing just one string. I’m picking across all six strings while using the fret hand to block every string except the fourth. Using this technique.   (Am) sim. and then I switch to a staccato attack. gain further control over the strings by additionally palm muting them. is much more exciting and much more rock. The top three strings are muted by the underside of the index finger. laying the edge of the pickhand palm across all of the strings at the bridge saddles. But a guitarist that’s bouncing and moving around. I immediately stop the string from ringing by lightly touching it with the pick on the upstroke. rit. Another useful way to mute is to use what I call “pick muting”: after picking a note with a downstroke. 10 14 14 14 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 14 14 14 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 grad.  *  = downstroke 8 5 * *  = upstroke  = downstroke FIGURE 51a5a = tenuto: allow note to ring as long as possible.” In FIGURE 49. the fifth string is muted by the tip of the ring finger. play note as short as possible. like the ones shown in FIGURES 51a and 51b: both of these freely improvised phrases combine the staccato attack with the legato (“smooth”) sound of hammerons and pull-offs. The solution is to use various parts of your fret-hand fingers and thumb to mute different strings. 14 15 14 15 14 12 12 14 12 14 15 14 15 14 12 13 12 14 12 13 sim.  7 5 8 7 8 7 5 8 5 8 7 5 8 5 8 7 5 8 7 5       sim. alternately damping the string with either an upstroke or a downstroke. this is more clearly illustrated in FIGURE 50. bend grad.CHAPTER 10 » UNITED MUTATIONS MASTERING MUTING TECHNIQUES ONE OF THE MOST important things about playing rock and roll guitar is to make big rock and roll motions. 10 11 10 8 10 11 10 8 10 10 11 10 8 10 11 10 8 10 sim. you can create some really great aggressive-sounding licks. of course. 10 11 10 8 10 11 10 8 10 5 5 8 8 5 5 6 6 7 7 6 6 5 5 5 5    3 5 3 5 7 3 5 3 5 3 10 11 10 11 10 8 10 3 10 11 10 11 10 8 10 10 10 10 10 10 11 10 11 10 8 10 10 10 5 5 3 5 3 5 3 3 5 5 3 3 5 5    7 7 5 6 7 5 6 7 5 7 7 7 5 7 7 5 5 7 7 8 8 8 10 10 10 FIGURE FIGURE 51b5b       8 8 8 9 9 9 8 8 8 10 13 10 13 10 13    FIGURE 5b (Am) (Am) FIGURE 5b (Am)               5 12       12 14 12 14 12  12 13 14 13 14 15 12           12 15 12 13 14 12 14 12 14 12 14 12 13 14 13 14 15 12   12 15 12 13 14 12 14 12 14 12 14 12 13 14 13 14 15   12 15 12 13 14  14  3 3 3 3 3 1/2 hold bend 1/2 hold3bend 1/2 sim. In FIGURE 47. play note as short as possible.  *  = tenuto: allow note to ring as long as possible. 12 10 12 13 12 13 12 10 12 12 14 13 12 14 13 12 15 12 10 12 10 12 13 12 13 12 10 12 12 12 12 15 12 10 12 12 12 14 13 12 10 12 13 12 13 12 10 12 15 12 10 12 12 12    10  10   10 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 5 5 5        10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10  1 1 1 10 13 10 11 12 11 10 12 13 10 14 11 10 12 11 12 10 13 10 10 11 12 11 12 10     14 14 hold bend 14 14 14 14 14 14     14 14 14 1 1 12 10 10 11 12 12 12 10 12 10 11 12 12 12 12 10 10 11 12 12 12 1/2 1/2      12 12 12 1/2 1/2      13 14 13 14 13 14 14 14 141/2 10 10 bend 10 10 10 10 1/2 10 1/2 grad. FIGURE  *  = downstroke *  = upstroke FIGURE (Am) 5a  = upstroke (Am) FIGURE 5a   5         sim. You can. 12 . this produces a staccato sound. Likewise. on which I’m fretting and shaking notes with my ring finger. * = staccato. play note as short as possible. 8 5 3 5 sim. I use alternate picking throughout. ❒ GU I TA R WOR L D                      8  5 8 7 5 5 7  5        5 8  5  7 5 5 7 7 5 5 7   8 5 8 5 7 5 7     7 5 7 5  7 5 7  *  = staccato. 12 14 12 14 13 14 12 13 14 15 14 15 14 12 12 12 14 14 12 14 12 14 12 14 13 13 13 14 13 12 14 12 14 14 12 14 13 sim. the sooner you’ll be able to rock out and still play with a good measure of control over your instrument. and wrapping the thumb over the top of the neck mutes the sixth string. If you see a guitarist who’s playing with the tiniest of physical motions. bend 8 8 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 8 10 rit. I begin by allowing the notes to ring as long as possible (known as tenuto articulation). it’s not very exciting to watch. FIGURE 3   FIGURE 4       *       3                            *   *       8 8 5 8 5 * FIGURE  5     5 8 5     FIGURE 4       5   5 8 5          5 8 8 5 5 8 7 5 5 7  5           *  5  5  5  5     *       58855875 58855875 57755775 57 5   5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5  8 5875 55555555 8 5 8 5 7 5 7 5   5 5 5 5 7 7 5 7 5 7 5 7 8 5 5    7 5 7 5 8 5 7 5 7 5  = tenuto: allow note to ring as long as possible. 3 3 3 3 3 3 10 8 110 8 5 1/2 1/2 10 8 10 8 10 9 8 5 5 7 10 9 8 5 8 7 5 8 7 5 5 7 5 5 10 8 10 8 8 7 8 7 5 7 7 6 5 7 10 9 8 5 5 5 7 5 8 7 8 7 5 7 7 6 5 8 5 3 5 7 5 8 5 3 5 7 3 rit. In both examples.

It’s a stunning experience to play Who songs with the mindset of being a vessel for the music. that energy translates to the audience and they have a great time too. This wraps up our the Shred Alert. If I am really having fun onstage. and it feels great to stand up and play it with all your might. and suddenly I could watch how he played. you will increase the likelihood of making magic come out of your guitar. to name a few—learned these valuable lessons early on. if you play something like FIGURE 53.” then everything is cool. legs and arms. including his back. There are an infinite number of things to be learned from live performance.C. that’s it—that’s why people keep talking about Hendrix. and how he moved when he played. end things with an expressive bend and some extreme body movement. but the thing that really got me excited was when I saw a Hendrix movie. The Who’s music is very high-energy. I shouldn’t say “listening. Pete Townshend. ❒ 13 . and I did like them. It’s all about enjoying having the opportunity to perform music. as Pete does. you had to get together with GU I TA R WOR L D FIGURE FIGURE 52 1 N. I hope you’ve learning the techniques I’ve taught you. For example. All the pioneers of rock—Jimi Hendrix. and had to follow Pete Townshend’s lead when it came to recreating his parts. This is why so many musicians of Hendrix’s era tended to be good at delivering powerful musical statements to the audience. Try to harness as much energy as possible and channel it into your playing. An obvious one is getting over making a mistake—if you’re used to merely hitting “undo” on your keyboard. you should end the solo with as much expression as you can muster. torso. More important is that I have a great time.(A) 7 5   7    7 X 5 1  7 7 5 7 X 5 Th 7 X 5 1 7 7 5 7 5    1 G5 7 5 7 7 5 7 X 5 Th 5 7 5 7 X 5 5 7 7 X 5 X X X 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 5 5 3 FIGURE FIGURE 53 2    12 E5 15 1215 13 15 13 12 14 12 13 15 12 14 12 14 12 15 12 15 14 15 14 12 15 14 15 14 12 15 12 13 12 6 7 3 7 5 5 15 13 15 13 12 14 12 13 15 12 15 13 15 13 12 11 12 11   14 11 14 12 14 12 11 14 12 14 12 11 14 11 14 7 9 9 12 14 12 11 14 9 11 12 11 14 11 14 12 14 12 11 12 11 19 12 9   1 grad. which features some blazingly fast shredding. There was so much power in his playing.CHAPTER 11 » THE BLESSINGS AND BENEFITS OF LIVE PERFORMANCE BEING A FULL-TIME guitar BREAKIN’ OUT    1 1 player is an amazing experience. and do so over a long period of time. This brings me to the matter of the difference between being a “bedroom” guitarist and one who is experienced and comfortable playing live in front of people. For example. Eric Clapton. I’m of the firm belief that when performing onstage you should play the guitar with more than just your fingers—you should play with your entire body. “I don’t care—the rest of it is great. he took a very simple string-bending lick. I performed at a tribute to the Who last year. he uses his whole body. I definitely won’t be having a good time. Pete absolutely does not play with just his hands. you can envision how the two of them learned to play together like they were one person. If you know that the drummer is showing up at seven o’clock. if I hit lots of wrong notes. If you can build musical relationships by finding musicians you enjoy playing with. or like musical twins. I encourage you to get together with other musicians and find a place where you can crank it up. in order to send it off with a big exclamation point. Jimmy Page and Eddie Van Halen. you won’t know how to deal with it when you are onstage. along the lines of FIGURE 52. and just shook the earth with the thing by adding such physical force and rhythmic drive to it. But if I hit one bad note and in my mind I’m thinking.” To play rock music back in those days. Here’s another tip: Even if you are playing some terrifying shred-type licks. So play with other musicians as often as you can. One of the first times that I really “got it” and understood what this meant was when I was listening to Jimi Hendrix. Of course. “Oh. bend 12 11 12 11 9 9 12 9 12 10 12 10 9 6 12 9 10 0   5 5 other musicians and crank up the amps loud. I’ve written many a song using that specific motivation. it will motivate you to get your act together. When you think of young Eddie jamming in his basement with his brother Alex. when I perform. I’ve often thought about the most important aspects of my job. One is that. I’ve had this “job” for the past 20 or so years.” because my parents gave me a couple of Hendrix albums when I was young. and that they help your playing to improve and become more expressive. it’s not necessarily essential that I play all the notes perfectly or in a technically pristine manner. and it’s brought me a great deal of happiness. and I thought. as opposed to simulating this via using Pro Tools in your bedroom.

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