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Laboratory Exercise # 3 Basic File Management Basic principles: The two of the most common tasks performed by a computer are creating documents and managing these documents. You store your files on your computer using the Windows XPs hierarchical system of folders. In this hierarchy of folders, you can either move and copy files among folders. You may even delete it if you no longer need them. Windows XP makes sure that it is easy to organize your files and folders. Managing your files and folders is similar to working in an office and filing your folders in a filing cabinet. You can create new folders, move folders, rename folders, and delete folders. There are two ways in navigating the file system. These are: Using My Computer The icon of My Computer is found in the Start Menu. You can click the icon found in the Start Menu to launch the My Computer window. If present, you can also use the My Computer icon found in Desktop.

Figure 3.1 Launching My Computer window from the Start Menu

Figure 3.2 Launching My Computer from the Desktop

Figure 3.3 My Computer window


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Using Windows Explorer This window shows you the location of every file and folder in your computer like a map. It also helps you understand the relationship between files, folders, drives. You can launch Windows Explorer by clicking Start Accessories Windows Explorer. You can also launch Windows Explorer using the keyboard by pressing <Windows Logo >+E. The Windows Explorer has a tree structure located on the left of the window which is called the Folder pane which contains the hierarchical listing of files and folders. It also has a File pane which is located on the right side of the window and is used to display the files and folders inside the selected drive or folder. The top level of Windows Explorer is My Computer. A

Figure 3.4 Launching Windows Explorer

Figure 3.5 Windows Explorer

context menu is displayed on every object when you right-click it. Several sections are displayed on every context menu for a file or folder. Each section has a different purpose. The properties of the object dictate the sections and options of the context menu displayed. Each section of the context menu is separated by a line. The different sections of the context menu are: Actions This is the first section of the context menu that tells you what kinds of actions you can perform in a given object. Send To This section of context menu allows you to send a folder or file to another location. The options where to send the file are floppy disk, the Desktop, Mail Recipient, My Documents, and any Removable drives attached in your computer. Editing This section of the context menu contains options for cutting, pasting, and copying files.
Figure 3.6 Context Menu of Local Drive C:

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Network This section contains a single entry which is Sharing. This is used to share files in the network. Manipulation This section usually contains three entries which are Create Shortcut that allows you to create a link to a file or folder to other place in your computer, the Delete option that sends your file to the Recycle Bin, and the Rename option that allows you change the name of the file or folder. Compression and Decompression This section allows you to compress or decompress a file. Some objects have specialized context menu entries and these entries are categorized as Other Options. The Recycle Bin has an option to empty it and the Desktop has a New option that is used to create new files. Another advantage of using Windows XP is that it provides other options to represent a file or folder in a screen. It also allows you to sort files in the order you want them to. The different ways to view files and folders are: Tiles This type of view uses a large icon labeled with its name representing the file or the folder. You can move the icons to different areas of the window by dragging the object. This is recommended with few files and folders. Choose View Tiles to display the files and folders in tiles. You can also rightFigure 3.7 Viewing files and folders in tiles using the click an empty space in the Windows menu bar Explorer or My Computer and choose View Tiles from the context menu. Icons This type of view represents each object with a smaller icon with the name located under the icon. You can move the icons the same way you can move them using the Tiles view. You can view files and folders using Icons by choosing View Icons from the menu bar or by right-clicking an empty space in Windows Explorer or My Computer, then choosing View Icons from the context menu. List This is similar to small icons that are used to represent each file and folder with the name on the right. Unlike in Tiles and Icons, you cannot move the icons
Figure 3.8 Viewing files and folders in tiles using context menu
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Figure 3.9 Viewing files and folders in icons by using the menu bar

Figure 3.10 Viewing files and folders in icons using the context menu

Figure 3.11 Viewing files and folders in list using the menu bar

Figure 3.12 Viewing files and folders in list using the context menu

in the window with this view. Choose View List from the menu bar or View List from the context menu.

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Details This type of view displays the necessary information about the file or folder. The columns show the name of the file or folder, the size if its a file, type of file, and the date it was last modified. You can use this view by choosing View Details from the menu bar or View Details from the context menu.

Figure 3.15 Viewing files and folders in thumbnails using Figure 3.16 Viewing files and folders in thumbnails using the menu bar the context menu Thumbnails This type of view displays small version of the picture if its a graphic file and the name of the file underneath it. You can use this view by choosing View Thumbnails from the menu bar or View Thumbnails from the context menu. Filmstrip This type of view is applicable for Pictures folder which allows you to scroll through multiple images using the buttons in the middle of the screen. You can use this view by choosing View Filmstrip from the menu bar or View Filmstrip from the context menu.

Figure 3.13 Viewing files and folders in details using the menu bar

Figure 3.14 Viewing files and folders in details using the Page 5 of 10 context menu

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You can sort your files and folders in several ways. The folders are sorted by name first and then the files are sorted next. Windows allows you also to sort files the way you need them. You can sort files by the following:

Figure 3.17 Viewing files and folders in filmstrip using the menu bar

Figure 3.18 Viewing files and folders in filmstrip using the context menu

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Name This is the default sort used by the computer system. This type of sort alphabetizes the files and folders. Type This type of sort arrange the folders and files by type. It is sorted alphabetically within the same type. Size This type of sort arrange the files according to their sizes. Date This type of sorts arrange the files by the date they were last updated or modified.

All of these types of sort can be used by choosing View Arrange Icons By or by right-clicking an empty area of the Windows Explorer or My Computer and choosing Arrange Icons By.

Figure 3.19 Arranging icons using menu bar

Figure 3.20 Arranging icons using context menu

You need to create folders that will be used as storage for the files you created. You can create files within a folder or to another directory. You can use the File menu or the context menu to create a folder in the current drive or folder. You will be asked for a name upon creation of the new folder.

Figure 3.21 Creating new folder using the File menu

Figure 3.22 Creating new folder using the context menu

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You may need to rename files and folders. A quick and easy way of renaming files and folders is provided by Windows XP. You may rename a file by choosing the file or folder you want to rename and by choosing Rename in the File menu or Rename under the context menu.

Figure 3.23 Renaming files and folders using File menu

menu There are rules in giving names to files and folders. The naming rule for files is called File Naming Conventions. There are file naming conventions specific for a given operating system. Windows XP supports long filenames and allows spaces to be part of the filenames. Windows XP allows filenames consisting of up to 256 characters. Even though Windows XP allows up to 256 characters for filenames, it is not recommended that you have files names this long because some programs cannot interpret long filenames. Filenames cannot contain some characters like \ / : * ? < > and |.

Figure 3.24 Renaming files and folders using context

You can also move and copy files and folders in to other folders or drive. Moving and copying are two common functions you need to perform while managing files. You physically remove a file when you move it from one location and place it to another location. You make a copy of an object when you copy a file or folder and place the copy in another location. Copying a file makes the original file remains in place. You can move and copy files and folders in different ways. You can move or copy multiple files at a time by using Ctrl key and the Shift key. You can select a group of objects that are next to each other by clicking the first file or object and holding the shift key as you click the last file or object you want to select.

Figure 3.25 Selecting contiguous group of files or folders using Shift key

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You can drag files or folders if you want to move or copy them to a new location. The destination folder is highlighted when you try to drag files or folders over it. You can also drag files or folders in the tree structure. There are no rules for using dragging in moving or copying files. Windows assumes you want to move the file on the folder of the same drive when you drag the file on that folder. Windows assume you want to copy a file when you try to drag it to different drive. The files or folders are copied if a plus sign (+) appears next to the objects as you drag them.

Figure 3.26 Selecting noncontiguous group of files using the Ctrl key

Cut and Copy options in the Edit menu is another way in moving or copying files and folders. A copy of the selected files and folders are made when using the Copy option and places the selected objects on the Clipboard. The selected objects remain in their original location. The selected files and folders are deleted when the Cut option is used and places the selected objects on the Clipboard. Use the Edit menus Paste option to paste the objects from the Clipboard to the new location. The words Copy of are placed in front of the pasted objects name if you paste a copied object in the same location. You can paste, cut or copied objects into multiple location.

Figure 3.27 Options in the Edit menu

You can delete files or folders by selecting object s you want to delete and then selecting Delete from the File menu. You can also use the Delete key from the keyboard or the Delete option of the context menu.

Figure 3.28 Copying a file on the same location

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The deleted files are initially placed in the Recycle bin. he files will be in the Recycle Bin until

Figure 3.29 Delete option from the File menu

Figure 3.30 Delete from the context menu

you empty it. Recycle Bin only works with files that are saved in your computer. Files that are saved on a floppy disk or network are deleted permanently.

Figure 3.31 Recycle Bin and its context menu options

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