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FUN FACT Ancient Romans ate flamingo tongues and peacock brains.

Go on safari at your local river, with our nature-spotting guide. Keep emailing us at: g2kids@guardian.co.uk

sudoku
Fill the spaces with numbers from 1 to 9 so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains all the numbers from 1 to 9.

1 3 5

4 9 3 1 5 8 3 7 6 1 5 2 4 9 1 5 6

5

9 4 7

Your joke
Where does the queen chicken live? Cluckingham Palace Mollie Short, 7

3 6 9 8 2 1 5

You and Your pet
Name: Tess. Age: 6. Breed: Golden retriever. Favourite food: Sausages. Likes: Chasing deer. Dislikes: finding out that deer are a lot faster than her. Morgan, 10, and Meg, 7

7

7

3 9

what am i?
Can you identify these different ways of getting around?
For answers see tomorrow’s G2

How to... spot river wildlife
Rivers are brilliant places to experience your own local safari, with many spectacles to be seen, from trouts to voles or maybe even a kingfisher. Grab a grownup (useful Mallard duck for carrying heavy things like a picnic blanket!) and head off to the river. be pike with sharp teeth or a brown trout which can be recognised by the dark spots all along its back. If you choose the right Heron spot and you are lucky you may get a chance to see the spectacular sight of salmon leaping upstream to get back to their spawning grounds. •Birds Herons will be watching for the fish too. They are grey and stand very still – they probably look like a shadow or a cloud to the fish in the water. Staying still yourself for a little while is probably the best way to see shy animals – although you don’t have to gobble them up like herons! If you live near the sea in the south of England, you might see little egrets as well, which look like

what you need
• Binoculars • Notepad • Pens and pencils

small white herons. The easiest birds to see on your local river are likely to be graceful white swans and mallard ducks. Moorhens and coots are easy to spot and you can tell them apart by looking at the colours on their heads – coots have a white patch on their head and moorhens have a red beak. • Other animals and plants Have a look in the plants by the side of your river. There could be frogs or mice or water voles – and taking a quick dip every so often. See how many animals you can find, and how many types of flower. When you are back on dry land, take part in the survey at ourrivers.org.uk, which will help the Our Rivers campaign, led by the WWF, RSPB, Angling Trust and the Salmon and Trout Association, to hand out awards to the best rivers for spotting wildlife.

Your review
Mr Majeika Vanishes by Humphrey Carpenter This book is very good. I give it four stars. It is about when Mr Majeika (a teacher who is also a wizard) vanishes and it’s up to Pete, Jody and Thomas to find him. My favourite bit is when Wilhelmina Worlock is sent to prison. My least favourite bit is when Jody is turned bad and becomes horrid like Hamish Bigmore. This book is a bit funny and not boring. I enjoyed it and would read it again and again. I have already read it more than once! Robbie, 6
Yesterday’s answers Crossword

what to look for
• Fish Your river will be full of them, though you might not see them all from the bank. Try and find a bridge where you can look straight down into the water. Look out for the shadows swimming through the water, and for the ripple-rings they make when they feed. Hidden deep in the Moorhen water, there could

Say what you see Pins and needles

The Guardian 11

Puzzles by clarity media

G o to to g pr ua in rd t of ou ian th t m .co is o .u pa re k/ ge co g2 pi ki es ds

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