T

he expanse of shiny black panels seems
to bounce up and down in the sun as we
bump along a muddy dirt road off the
highway through stands of trees. I’m riding
with the Director of Vineland Municipal
Utilities, Joe Isabella, and we’re touring the
five pace-setting solar fields of Vineland.
Solar One, so named because it was first, is
on South Mill Road at the Landis Sewerage
Authority site. Its first phase opened two
years ago and an expansion will be completed
next month. It can generate as much as four
megawatts of electricity.
“I drive around to these and it makes me
feel like we’re quickly building a new energy
future for Vineland,” Isabella says, as we back
up to allow a construction vehicle to pass.
Even the boss has to get out of the way of the
breakneck pace of building.
Vineland’s efforts rank it in the top three
utilities nationally in the production of solar
power on a per-customer basis, according to
Isabella and other Vineland Municipal
Electric Utility (VMEU) officials. There are
other utilities with more total solar generat-
ing capacity, but they have many more cus-
tomers than Vineland’s 25,000 commercial
and residential ones.
In a gravelly but well-modulated voice and
in an unhurried manner, Isabella says, “I’m
getting calls from developers all over—a lot of
people want to know our business model
because we’re so successful.”
In the business model, the solar fields are
not owned by the power company; they are
built and entirely paid for by private develop-
ers who have contracted to sell power to
VOLUME 4 | ISSUE 28 | AUGUST 24, 2011
CONNECT I NG YOU TO VI NEL AND. WEEKLY.
INSIDE: 4-H KIDS LEARN ABOUT AGRICULTURE • A MOVIE CLASSIC • THUNDER IN GIAMPIETRO PARK • PEACH COBBLER
C
L
A
S
S
IF
IE
D
S
P
.
2
7
E C R W S S
L o c a l
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Continued on page 10
The Ellison Explorers and
Little Explorers campers hit the
high seas during the final week
of summer camp 2011. Aboard
the Sea Dragon, campers
enjoyed a day of pirate adven-
tures and are pictured here
giving a mighty pirate "ARRG!"
as they bid a fond farewell to
eight fun-filled weeks of camp
at The Ellison School.
Summer’s Last Arrg!
Joe Isabella and his workers have put Vineland in the national
spotlight with solar power. { STORY AND PHOTOS BY MICKEY BRANDT }
Vineland Municipal Utilities Director Joe Isabella at the site of Solar One on S. Mill Road.
Steward of Solar
Grapevine 1-7 082417-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:47 PM Page 1
{
2
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
{
CONTENTS
}
{
STAFF
}
MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher
DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor
LORI GOUDIE Art Director
GAIL EPIFANIO Controller
SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive
MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive
TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer
RYAN DINGER Editorial/Sales Assistant
The Grapevine
3638 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361
PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816
EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com
WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com
The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by
Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2011. All
rights reserved.
I
Letters to
the Editor
A Challenge
To state an obvious fact, we live in a
nation/society deeply divided by religion,
economics, ideology and politics. I think it
is fair to say that one’s vision for the nation
is formed by his/her experiences and views
on economics, religion, ideology and poli-
tics. I would like to challenge the minds of
all Americans to come up with a common
and unifying vision for our nation that isn’t
shaped by personal politics and ideology. I
am not so gifted as to be able to do so
myself, but maybe there is someone out
there who can. America’ needs you, our
nation is floundering.
—Jimmie L. Hollis, Millville
Bookstore in Bridgeton, Too
I read with great interest the article by
Deborah Ein in your August 10 issue
regarding Bogart’s. While I realize Bogart’s
(formerly Wind Chimes) has been around
for a long time, I’d like to point out that my
shop has also been in Cumberland County
for quite a while. I was at Dutch Neck
Village for several years and am now right
in downtown Bridgeton on Commerce
Street, just across from the Riverfront.
I, too, sell new and used books and
along with a yarn shop and coffee shop, we
make up what is called BYC (Books, Yarn,
Coffee), all under one roof.
Stop by and see the second bookstore in
Cumberland County, have some capuccino
and maybe take a crochet lesson or two.
—Linda Eisenberg, Bridgeton
Traffic Nightmare
There continues to be a traffic problem, or
should I say nightmare, at Cumberland
Crossing Shopping Center in Millville.
When exiting the shopping center, the first
intersection has stop signs for traffic that is
attempting to leave and get back to Delsea
Drive. There isn’t too much of a problemfor
vehicles that make a right-hand turn from
the stores in the south section of the shop-
ping center (Target, Kohl’s, etc.) But, there
continues to be a problemfor vehicles that
are exiting fromthe north section (Lowe’s,
Chili’s, etc.) These vehicles have to make a
left-hand turn and cross over incoming and
exiting traffic. What befuddles me is the
fact that the planners and engineers seemed
to have overlooked this traffic problem
when designing the traffic pattern for the
shopping center. The two stop signs should
be replaced with a traffic light at this inter-
section. The newtraffic light should be syn-
chronized with the traffic light on Delsea
Drive. This is the only way to solve the
problemassociated with this continuous
dangerous traffic intersection.
—David M. Levin, Vineland
S
A
V
E
B
I
G
!
EXCELLENT
QUALITY
not
EXCESSIVE
COST
All Cartridge World ink and
toner cartridges are built to
the highest standards and will
save you money. Buying big
name brands just guarantees
you’ll pay a lot more.
Over 1,700 locations worldwide.
1881-C4A(12/08) ©2008 Cartridge World. All rights reserved.
1370 S Main Rd
Magnolia Court Shopping Center
V|nc|+nd || 0c!o0 · 856-692-0372
e Global Ink and Toner Experts
www.cartridgeworldusa.com/Store305
TY I L A U Q
T N E L L E C X E
B
I
G
!
S
A
V
E
V
E G
!
A
B
I
A
V
T S O C
E IV S S E C X E
not
TY I L A U Q
y a a ll p u’ o y
t g s s ju d n a r e b m a n
. y e n o u m o e y v a s
r a d n a t t s s e h g i e h h t
s a e g d i r t r a r c e n o t
o e W g d i r t r a ll C A
. e r o t m o a l
s e e t n a r a u g
g i g b in y u B
ill d w n s a d r
o t t uil e b r a
d n d ink a l r
y a a ll p u o y
l r o s w n o i t a c o r 1,700 l e v O
856-692-0372 d || 0c!o0 · n |+ c |n V
e t n e ing C p p o h t S ur o a C li o n g a M
d in R a 1370 S M
d. e v r e s e s r t h g i ll r d. A l r o e W g d i r t r a ©2008 C
. e r o t m o a l
. e d i w d
2
r e
d
1881-C4A(12/08)
TELL ‘EMYOU
SAWIT IN
THE GRAPEVINE!
We have a distribution of 25,000
in the greater Vineland market.
(Including Millville, Bridgeton,
Upper Deerfield, Newfield,
Franklinville, Richland, Buena, etc.)
Our loyal readers should be
your customers.
For advertising info,
call 856-457-7815
We Need You!
We send you The Grapevine for free
every week and we only ask one
thing in return ... Please let our
advertisers knowthat you sawtheir
ads in The Grapevine.
1 Steward of Solar
Joe Isabella and his workers have
put Vineland in the national spot-
light with solar power.
MICKEY BRANDT
3,8, Faces in the News
11,12
6 News in Brief
13 Wedding Weekend
Landis Avenue’s first bridal event
is set for end of September.
TODD NOON
16 Crossword
17 DINING: Time for Cobbler
Peach cobbler makes the perfect
summertime dessert.
STEPHEN WILSON
20 Armadillos and More
Our guest columnist reflects on
how things get turned around.
MICKEY BRANDT
20 A True Classic
Experience Gone with the Wind
on the big screen this Thursday at
the Landis. VINCE FARINACCIO
21-23 HOME AND GARDEN
24 Community Calendar
26 Entertainment
27 CLASSIFIEDS
SERV Seeking Volunteers
The Center for Family Services program
SERV (Services Empowering Rights of
Victims) is currently seeking volunteers to
become New Jersey Domestic Violence
Response Team Advocates. SERV is the
state-designated program which delivers
advocacy, counseling, support and referral
services to victims of domestic and sexual
violence. The next 40-hour free training
takes place on October 1, 15, 22 and
November 5 and 12 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
3642 E. Landis Ave., Vineland NJ 08361.
Volunteers respond to police departments
and hospitals to assist the victims of these
crimes during their time of need. To RSVP
or for more information, contact SERV’s
Volunteer Supervisor at 856-881-4034 ext.
106 or send email to drosen@centerffs.org.
Rules Change for Cumberland
County Battery Recycling
The Cumberland County Improvement
Authority will no longer accept alkaline
batteries for recycling or disposal at house-
hold hazardous waste events. “Changes in
federal regulations combined with less haz-
ardous battery components mean the typi-
cal household AAA, AA, C, D and 9-volt
batteries now fall below the federal and
state hazardous waste standard and should
be disposed with your regular trash,” said
Dennis DeMatte, Jr., recycling coordinator
for Cumberland County.
Manufacturers have eliminated mercury
content, making the battery safe for dispos-
al. The Authority continues to encourage
residents to recycle rechargeable batteries
found in cordless power tools, digital cam-
eras, cellular phones, and toys at the many
electronic drop-off centers in the county or
during household hazardous waste events.
The next event is scheduled to be held
on Saturday, September 10, at the City of
Vineland Public Works Department on
East Walnut Road from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
These events are reserved specifically for
Cumberland County residents. Residents
are allowed to dispose of the following
items—gasoline and kerosene, pesticides
and herbicides, oil-based paints, turpentine
and thinners, and other solvents as well as
electronics.
Residents are reminded that they can
not place televisions and computers at the
curb for disposal. Besides the drop off loca-
tions in each town, residents may also
bring these items to the one-day event.
Other electronics items that will be accept-
ed include items such as keyboards, VCR
and DVD players, stereos, microwaves, and
cell phones. “No small quantity commer-
cial generators of hazardous material will
be allowed to dispose of their waste during
these clean-up days”, said DeMatte.
Tires will not be accepted at the
News in Brief
I
Continued on page 6
Grapevine 1-7 082417-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:47 PM Page 2
Happy 50th Wedding Anniversary
Frank Capabianco and Eleanor (Newton) Capabianco, of Vineland, celebrated
their 50th wedding anniversary on May 20, 2011. They were married on May 20,
1961 at Sacred Heart Church with a reception following at the North Italy Club in
Vineland.
The couple was surprised 50 years later with a reception at the North Italy
Club given to them by their daughters, Diane Rakotz, of Vineland, and Kathleen
Peaschek, of Marmora. Frank and Eleanor reside in Vineland and are enjoying
their retirement by traveling and spending time with their five grandchildren.
Dickerson Shows Love
On August 10, Megan Dickerson, a
10-year-old from Franklin Township,
donated her hair to Locks of Love.
Getting her hair cut and donated at
Kabuki Hair Salon, this was the second
time that Dickerson donated to the
Locks of Love program.
Both her parents emphasize how
proud they are of Dickerson’s efforts
and compassion.
Megan Dickerson shows off the ponytail
she had cut off and that she donated to
Locks of Love. It was the second such
donation made by Dickerson.
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
3
}
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
3
}
Faces in the News I
SEND US YOUR FACES. IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The Grapevine... birthdays, engagements, weddings,
anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them to the address listed on p. 2.
Happy First Birthday
To our son, Raymond Palmieri III:
It feels like yesterday you were born.
Oh, how the year has come and now
you’re one. You fill our hearts with joy
and laughter. We will never forget when
we changed your first diaper. The night
cries we will never forget. But most of
all, we wish you a very happy first
birthday. We look forward to
September 3rd, the day you were born.
Love Always,
Mommy and Daddy
Grapevine 1-7 082417-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:47 PM Page 3
Downtown Update
A New Jersey Main Street Community. In the
x
of the Urban Enterprise Zone
August 2011
Luciano’s FreshMarket:
ATaste of New Orleans in Downtown Vineland
Volunteer Spotlight
Get involved –
The Main Street committees meet
monthly, at the Main Street oce.
All are welcome.
Organization, 1st Thurs, 4 pm
Promotion, 2nd Thurs, 8:30 am
Design, 3rd Thurs, 8:30 am
Economic Restructuring,
4th Thurs, 8:30 am
Call for other volunteer
opportunities.
2011 Update
BBQ ‘n Chili Cook-o
Sponsored by Susquehanna Bank
and Supported by Comcast
Sat., Sept. 24
Rain Date: Sun., Sept. 25
Wedding Weekend
Fri., Sept. 30
Sat., Oct. 1
ATaste of Vineland
Wed. Oct ., 18
Soap Box Derby
Sun., Oct. 16
Rain Date: Sun., Oct. 23
Holiday Parade
Sat., Nov. 26
Rain Date: Sun., Nov. 27
All events subject to change without notice.
opened Luciano’s FreshMarket, located in Landis
MarketPlace at 631 E. Landis Ave., this past May
because I wanted to bring to my home city the deli-
cious foods I learned to prepare in New Orleans. At the
same time, I want to show that fast food can be healthy and
locally sourced.
In New Orleans, I gained experience at Emeril’s leg-
endary Delmonico Restaurant and Emeril’s NOLA in the
French Quarter. Moving to Miami Beach, I worked at the
Canyon Ranch Hotel and Spa and discovered nutritionally-
sound, environmentally-responsible cooking.
Our restaurant offers seafood, Creole/Cajun special-
ties, and Mid-Atlantic favorites, while our catering operation
includes private chef services, custom menu planning, and
cooking classes. We are committed to using local produce,
whenever possible. While enjoying your food, I also want you
to be able to sit, chat with us, and get to know us as friends.
Downtown Vineland is moving ahead with a lot of great
new business opportunities and we’re proud to be part of it.
For more information, come in, call us at 609-970-7653,
or visit our website at LucianosFreshMarket.com.
Lurie Luciano, Owner
Downtown Business Recruitment Survey
What kinds of businesses would you like to see in down-
town Vineland? Main Street Vineland is seeking public
input on this through a three-question survey.
The survey is accessible through Main Street Vineland’s
website, MainStreetVineland.org.
I Want to Support Our Downtown
$1,000.............................................Charles K. Landis Benefactor
$500..................................................................Vinelander-at-Heart
$100................................................................... Downtown Partner
$50....................................................................................... Supporter
$25...............................................................................................Friend
$20............................................................................. Senior/Student
$___________________________________
Donation Amount (Checks should be made out to VDID/Main Street)
Credit Card Information (please check one):
F F F F
____________________________________
Name
____________________________________
Credit Card Number
Exp Date _______________ Security Code ___________
____________________________________
Authorized Signature
____________________________________
Name
____________________________________
Street Address
____________________________________
City/State/Zip
____________________________________
Phone/Fax
____________________________________
E-mail
As a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit, donations to Main Street
Vineland may be tax-deductible. Please consult your tax professional.
VDID/Main Street (DBA– Main Street Vineland). Federal ID
number is 22-3116666.
This publication has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise
Zone Authority.
VDID Main Street
603 E Landis Ave
Vineland NJ 08360
856.794.8653
MainStreetVineland.org
Todd Noon,
Executive Director

“Just as your
kitchen table is the
heart of your home,
Landis Avenue is the
heart of our city.”
L
OUISE T. BERTACCHI has
spent 30 years of her life serving
the community. Currently, she is the
Fundraising Chairman of Main Street
Vineland.
“It is wonderful to see down-
town Vineland come into its own
again. With the generous help,
hard work and dedication
of the Board, committees
and community, this is
becoming a realization
long over due.”
I
John Luciano and daddy, Vince, enjoy a moment at Luciano’s
FreshMarket.
w
et e r t n S i y Ma e s r e w J e A N
oown DDo U
f t o
x
e h n t I . y t i n u m m o C
wn oown tto wnnt e
e n o e Z s i r p r e t n n E a b r e U h t
tte aat dda ppd UUp
e ek ken e WWe g din d e WWe
pt. 2 e , S . n u : S e at n D i a R
4 . 2 t p , Se . t a S
omc C y b d e t or pp u S nd a
na han e u q s u S y b d re o s n o p S
ook CCook i l il h n C Q‘‘n C B B
dda ppd 1 UUp 111 U 0 220
e tte o s a AT Ta
’ o an i c u L
d en
5 2
t s a c
k an B a
o - kk-
e tte aat dda
e lle rrl wO e f N e o
: t ke rrke a MMa hhM s es Fr re ss ’’s
n wwn o n D s iin D n a e
i
I
c
II
i c
n a lla e n iin n VVi wwn V o tto n
a p re o p d t e n r a e s I l d o o s f fo u
I
o
I
i
I
o g t n i r o b d t e t n a e I w s u a c e
I
b
I
n a . L 1 E 3 t 6 e a c a l P t e k r a M
M h s re s F ’ o n a i c d Lu e n e p o
I
u o i
e
11 0 2 t s u g u A
d n
e h t t . A s n a e l r w O e n N re i a
- i l e e d h y t t i e c m o y h o m my h
y aay t M s a s p i h , t . e v s AAv i d n
s i d n a n L d i e t a c o , l t e k r a M
ad rrad a y PPa a dda i Hol li
t. 2 c , O . n u : S e at n D i a R
6 . 1 t c , O n. u S
b rb e x D p Boox D a o S
8 , 1 t . c . O d e W
a lla e n i f VVi e o tte o s a ATTa
. 1 t c , O . t a S
0 . 3 t p , Se . i r F
e ek ken e WWe g din d e WWe
e dde
3 2
y bby
d n a
d en
d u l c n i
, a s e i t
u O
d n u o s
o y n a C
c n re F
r a d n e
n I
l l a c o l
e m a s
o t s u , c s e c i v r e f s e e ch t a v iv r s p e d
i h , w s e t i r o v aav c ffa i t n a l t A --A d i d M n a
, C d o o ffo a e s s r e ffe fff t o n a r u a t s r re u
b i s n o sp re - y l l a t n e m n ro i v nnv , e d
d n a a p d S n l a e t o ch H n a n R o
m a i o M g t n i v o . M r e t r a u ch QQu
d n t a n a r u a t s e o R c i n o m l e y D r
e p x d e e n i a , I g s n a e l r w O e n N
. d e c ur o s yy
s a t ffa a h w t oow t h o s t t n a , I w e m i t
p p
d n , a g n i n n a l u p n e mm o
n o i t a r e p g o n i r e t a r c u e o l i
- l a i c e n sp u j aaj C / e l o re C
. g n i k o o e c l b
- y l l a n o i t i r t u d n re e v o c s i d d
e h t t d a e k r o , I w ch a e i B
e h n t A i L O s N ’ l i r e m d E
- g e s l ’ l i r e m t E e a c n e i r e
d n y a hhy a t l a e e h n b a d c o o t ffo s
h t i e w g n a h t to c c e j bbj u s s t n e v l e l A
. 2 vv. 2 o , N . n u : S e at n D i a R
6 . 2 v o , N . t a S
ad rrad a y PPa a dda i Hol li
$50
................................................................... $100
.................................................................. $500
$1,000.............................................Char
t r o p ppp uup o S t tto S n a I WWa
. e c i t o t n u o h
7 2
e dde
er t Suppor
tner ar wn P o t wn o D ...............
t -Hear t -a inelander V ..............
or t enefac . Landis B les K har
n w o tto n w o r D u t O
. t e k rrk Ma sh e rre FFr
o a n a i c u n L h o JJo
e r n St i a D M I D V
e m o y a m ooy a m j nnj , e ee, e c in y, VVin ddy, V d a d d n a
Lu
s i r v o
o F
w b e n
o D
e o b t
e n e h w
n i k o o c
t e e
s ’ o n a i c u t L t a n e
r e n w O , o n a i c u L ee i rri u
re F s o n a i c t Lu e a t i s b e r w u t o i
n e i m o , c n o i t a m r o ffo n re i o r m o
d w n s a e i t i n u t r o p p s o s e n i s u b
g n i v o s m d i n a l e n i n V w o t n w o
d g n , a s h u t i t w a , ch t i o s e t l b a
g y n i y ooy j nnj e e l i h . W e l b i s s o r p e vve e
d e t t i m m o re c e a . WWe a s e s s a l g c n

. m o c . t e k r a M h s e
, 3 5 6 7 - 0 7 9 - 9 0 t 6 s a l u l a , c n
. t f i t o r a e p o b d t u ro re p ’ e w
t a re f g t o o h a l t i d w a e h g a
. s d n e i r s ffr s a w u o n o k t t e g
u o t y n a o w s l , I a d o o r ffo u o y
, e c u d ro l p a c o g l n i s o u t
F
(please tion ma or nf d I ar edit C r C
Checks should ( t moun tion A ona D
___________________ $
............................................................................. $20
............................................................................................... $25
....................................................................................... $50
F F
Name
____________________
: check one)
eet) tr ain S VDID/M o be made out t
_________________
t tuden enior/S S .......................
iend r F .........................................
er t Suppor .................................
F F
_________________
t c e rre i D ee v uti c e x E
, n o o N d d o TTo
n la e n i V ttV e e r t S n i a M
3 65 8 . 4 9 7 6. 5 8
3 8 J 0 d NNJ 0 n a l e n i V
s A i d n a 03 E L 6
e r n St i a D M I D V
V
i s b e w
h T
t u p n i
n w o t
W
w o D
r o t
g r o d. n
3
0 6 3
e v AAv
t e e
S V
. g r o . d n a l e n i V ttV ee r St n i a M , e t
g u ro h e t l b i s s e c c a s y i e v r u e s h
e u q - e re h h a t g u ro h s t i h n t t o
l e n i t V e re t n S i a ? M d n a l e n i V
l u o s w e s s e n i s u f b s o d n i t k a h W
e s R sss R ees n i s u n B w o to n w
.
s ’ d n a l e n i t V e re t n S i a h M g
. y e v r u n s o i t s e
c i l b u g p n i k e e s s d i n a l
- n w o n d e i e o s e t k i u l o d y l
y eey v r u t Su n e m ttm i u rru c e
ess ddr A eet tr S
____________________
Name
____________________
e tur na ed Sig iz uthor A
____________________
e e _______________ S t Exp Da
d Number ar edit C r C
____________________
_________________
_________________
_________________
ode ___________ y C it ecur
_________________
i
V
n w o t

ne i V
n u F
e c h t
L
l
po r SSpo eer S eee tte nnt uun llu ol VVo
h h h i W i
n w s o t o i t n e i m o d c n a l e n i n V
- n w o e d e o s l t u ffu r e d n o s w t i I “
. d n a l e
t n S i a f M n o a m r i a h g C n i s i a r d
h s t e i h , s y l t n e r r . Cu y t i n u m m o c
n i v r e e s ffe s i r l e f h s o r a e 0 y t 3 n e p s
a h I H C C A TTA R E . B T E S I U O
n
t hht ggh li liig l g lig ttl po ot
t e e r t
e h
g n
s a
. 66. 6 6 6 1 1 3 - 2 2 ss i rr e b m nu
r t n S i a – MMa A BBA D t ((D e e r t n S i a MMa //M D IID D VVD
a e l . P e l b i t c u d e dde - x a e t y b aay b d m n a l e n i VVi
, d t fi oofi r p nnp o ) n 33) n ((3 ) cc) ((c 1 0 d 5 e r e t s i g eeg s a rre A
E-mail
____________________
ax hone/F P
____________________
e/Zip t ta y/S it C
____________________
D l IID a ra e dde e . FFe ) dd) n a l e n i t VVi e e rre
. l a n o i s s e ffe oof rro x p a r t u o t y l u s n o e c s a
t e e rre t n S i a o MMa s t n o i t a n o ddo
_________________
_________________
_________________
. y itty r o h t u e A n o Z
n o i t a c i l b u s p i h TTh
g
p s aap d n u h ffu it r w o d f fo i a n p e e s b a h
n o l
o c e b
d n a
h f t o
d r a h
i a g a

w J e e NNe h y t e bby t s h u c u r s o d f fo ve o rro p ppp
e. du r e v oov g
n o i t a z i l a g a re n i m o
s s i i h , t y t i n u m m o d c
s e e t t i m m o , c d r a o e B h
n o i t a c i d e d d n k a r o d w
, p l e s h u ro e n e e g h h t t i . W n i
e s i rri p rrp e t n n E a b rrb y UUr eey U s rrs e JJe
{
4
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
Grapevine 1-7 082417-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:47 PM Page 4
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
5
}
Customer Appreciation Event
On August 11, Ronald K. Brownlee, of
RKB Wealth Management, powered by
LPL Financial, held a Client Appreciation
Event at a local restaurant. The event,
which featured over 110 guests, had a
Hollywood theme. As each guest arrived,
they were asked to stop and pose for a pic-
ture on an exquisite red carpet, donated
by Joe Marcello and Lori DiMatteo-
Fiocchi of The Landis Theatre
Foundation. Upon entering the ballroom,
guests received an engraved replica
Academy Award and a gift bag.
Brownlee stated that he wanted to
make sure his clients felt like stars and were
literally given the red carpet treatment.
As part of the evening’s festivities,
there was a special presentation on
Leukemia and Lymphoma awareness—a
cause Brownlee is very active in—given by
members of LLS (Leukemia and
Lymphoma Society).
Keynote speakers included: Monsignor
Burton, of St. Isadore and Sacred Heart
Parishes; Carolyn Heckman, Foundation
Director of South Jersey Health Systems;
Ashley Basford, LLS campaign coordina-
tor; Bob “The Hound” Kelly, former mem-
ber of the Flyers back-to-back Stanley Cup
Championship teams, and LLS activist;
and DiMatteo-Fiocchi.
The most moving speech, however,
came when Jessica Holland, speaker for
LLS and Leukemia survivor, stepped to
the microphone to tell the audience of the
time she spent fighting and beating blood
cancer. At times, Holland and those in
attendance were moved to tears.
A special moment occurred when
Holland recounted a time when Kelly
came to see her in the hospital while she
was sick. As a huge Flyers fan, Holland
stated that the visit meant so much to her.
The two then embraced on stage, capping
a wonderful overall presentation.
The evening concluded with a compli-
mentary tour of The Landis Theater.
Ashley Basford, Leukemia & Lymphoma
Society of Mt. Laurel, and Jessica Holland,
(survivor) Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
(DE Chapter).
Lori DiMatteo-Fiocchi, President Landis
Theater Foundation.
Carolyn Heckman, Executive Director
South Jersey Heath Care Foundation
From left: Ronald K. Brownlee, President
& CEO RKB Wealth Management, Ltd.,
Bob "The Hound" Kelly, Ambassador for
the Philadelphia Flyers, and Kenneth A.
Brownlee, Client Associate.
Grapevine 1-7 082417-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:47 PM Page 5
{
6
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
ropractors participating in the program.
Contact her at 2821 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 856-692-2220.
Register Now for Before and
After Care
The YMCA of Vineland, in partnership
with Vineland area schools, offers Before
and After Care during the school year. Club
Y, a before and after school program for
students in grades 6 through 8, gives
tweens and teens a positive start and end to
their school day. For $165 per month, stu-
dents receive homework assistance, one
hour of physical activity, monthly hands-on
science experiments with the 4H club,
snacks, swimming, and more. Students can
be dropped off at the YMCA as early as
6:30 a.m. and picked up from the Y as late
as 5:30 p.m.
The Before and After Care program for
elementary students allows children to be
dropped off as early as 7 a.m. and picked up
as late as 6 p.m. at their elementary school.
The prices vary by month.
For more information on the Vineland
Y’s Before and After Care program or Club
Y, call 691-0030, ext. 313. Registration is
going on now at the YMCA, which is locat-
ed at 1159 East Landis Avenue, in Vineland.
Partnership to Bring Advanced
Pediatric Care to Area
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for
Children is forming a partnership with
South Jersey Healthcare (SJH) to expand
access to high quality pediatric specialty
care throughout southern Jersey. As part of
this new relationship Nemours Pediatric
Partners at SJH provides around-the-clock
neonatal, pediatric, and emergency care for
children at SJH Regional Medical Center
requiring specialized care.
Access to Nemours physicians and
advanced, child-friendly outpatient special-
ty care will continue to be made available
at Nemours Children’s Clinics in Voorhees,
Egg Harbor Township, Philadelphia, PA
and Wilmington, DE. In addition, Nemours
Children’s Clinic offers outpatient cardiol-
ogy clinic sessions in Vineland.
Dr. Muhammad Anwar will serve as
chief of Neonatology for Nemours Pediatric
Partners at SJH. Dr. Anwar has been prac-
ticing pediatric medicine in the area for
more than a decade. Under Dr. Anwar’s
leadership, a team of five neonatologists
will provide expert critical care for chil-
dren requiring more intensive specialized
treatments.
SJH recently began construction on a
Level IIIa Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
(NICU) at the Regional Medical Center in
Vineland. This $6 million, 14,800 square
foot expansion and renovation of the nurs-
ery will bring advanced care for premature,
low birth-weight and critically ill infants to
the region. Currently, the nursery at the
RMC is classified at Level II, and can pro-
vide care for premature infants born at 32
weeks. With advancement to a Level IIIa
Hazardous Waste events, but residents may
bring tires to the Cumberland County Solid
Waste Complex during normal business
hours. There is a fee of $2 per automobile
tire, and $5 per truck tire. Anyone with
questions regarding the last Household
Hazardous Waste and Electronics Recycling
Day of the year may call 825-3700.
Community Program to Evaluate
Children’s Backpacks
A backpack may be one of the most
important school supplies a parent can pur-
chase for their child in regards to their
health and safety. Is your child’s backpack a
good fit? The Association of New Jersey
Chiropractors (ANJC) believes that back-
pack safety is a critical health concern that
needs to be addressed.
To help parents choose the right “fit” for
their child, the ANJC is offering a commu-
nity service program to guide parents
through the process. Parents can visit the
ANJC website: www.njchiropractors.com
and locate a local ANJC member partici-
pating and call their office. Let their staff
know you’d like to have your child evaluat-
ed to make sure their backpack is a good fit.
Every September, more than 20 million
students go back to school carrying back-
packs that are too heavy and pose a serious
risk to the child’s well being. According to
the American Chiropractic Association
(ACA), young children today suffer from
back pain much earlier than previous gen-
erations, and poorly fitted, overly heavy
backpacks are key factors. Along with back
pain, improper backpack use can result in
headaches, poor posture and various other
health problems.
Though a popular style now, parents
should discourage the use of messenger-
style bags, which are slung over one shoul-
der. Messenger-style bags put additional
pressure on one shoulder, which can cause
misalignment of the spine.
Dr. Tammy L. Ledden is one of the chi-
I
News in Brief
Continued from page 2
Grapevine 1-7 082417-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:47 PM Page 6
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
7
}
selected to offer LIVESTRONG at the
YMCA, an initiative designed to improve
quality of life for adult cancer survivors
and their families. This is a free, small
group program designed for adult cancer
survivors who have completed or are in
treatment and feel strong enough to
return to normal life—or to work toward
their “new normal” health goals. This is
the only free program of its type in south-
ern Jersey. It will begin on October 4 and
will be held at the Y in Vineland each
Tuesday and Friday afternoon at 1 p.m.
Individuals who have had cancer for two
to three years or less are encouraged to
participate.
The Y’s executive director, George
Steinbronn, Jr. said, “In Cumberland
County, 14 people are diagnosed with can-
cer each week. The Y’s new LIVE-
STRONG program can help those who
have finished treatment to begin increas-
ing their flexibility, endurance, energy lev-
els, and even self esteem.” In addition to
physical benefits, the program is also
focused on the emotional well-being of
survivors and their families. Program
highlights include:
—Exercise instruction and guidance
with a certified LIVESTRONG trainer
—Access to all YMCA facilities and
classes for the 12-week session
—Weekly group discussions and sup-
port sessions
—Opportunities to extend the program
beyond its 12-week schedule
LIVESTRONG at the YMCA is part of a
multi-year collaboration between YMCA
of the USA, the national resource office of
the Y, and LIVESTRONG. LIVESTRONG
is the brand of the Lance Armstrong
Foundation, which was created in 1997 by
the cancer survivor and champion cyclist
to serve people living with cancer and
empower communities to take action.
The Vineland Y has already held a
highly successful pilot session for LIVE-
STRONG. Currently LIVESTRONG at the
YMCA is offered at 61 YMCA associations
around the country. The YMCA of
Vineland program is the first in the coun-
try to offer the program in both Spanish
and English. For more information, con-
tact the YMCA at 691-0030, ext. 314. I
FREE
$50 GAS
CARD
With Your Membership Purchase for
zip codes: 08360, 08361, 08310, 08318*
CHANGING YOUR BODY…
CHANGING YOUR WORLD
110 Cornwell Drive Upper Deerfield, NJ 08302 • www.flexfamilyfitness.com • (856) 455-9691
HOURS: Mon. - Fri. 5 am-10 pm • Saturday 7 am – 7 pm • Sunday 8 am – 5 pm • Christmas Day is the ONLY day we close!
*Experience The Flex Rapid Success Guarantee
TANNING MEMBERSHIPS AS LOW AS $5/WEEK
NEW MEMBER SPECIAL! STARTING AT ONLY $7 PER WEEK!
G N A CH OU Y G IN G Y DDY BO R U … Y
Mon. - Fri. 5 am-10 pm • Saturday 7 am – 7 pm • Sunday 8 am – 5 pm • HOURS:
110 Cornwell Drive Upper
CHANG
*Experience The Flex Rapid Success Guarantee
• Saturday 7 am – 7 pm • Sunday 8 am –
.fl Deerfield, NJ 08302 • www
OU YYOUR GING
s Guarantee
Y day we Christmas Day is the ONL 5 pm •
flexfamilyfitness.com • (856) 4
WORL UR
e close!
55-9691
LD
NICU, SJH will be able to care for infants
as young as 28 weeks.
Dr. Larry Herrera will serve as chief of
Pediatric Hospitalists for Nemours Pediatric
Partners at SJH, overseeing a teamof five
pediatric hospitalists. Dr. Herrera is a board
certified pediatrician and most recently
practiced as a Nemours pediatric hospitalist
in Atlantic City. Nemours pediatric hospi-
talists will provide 24/7 consultation and
evaluation services to trauma and emer-
gency roomphysicians as well as communi-
ty pediatricians to ensure a seamless transi-
tion upon hospital discharge.
For more information regarding
Nemours Pediatric Partners at SJH, call 1-
800-770-7547 or visit nemours.org.
Cumberland County
Celebrates Opening of Courts
The Cumberland County Courts, in
conjunction with the Cumberland County
Bar Association, will celebrate its annual
Opening of the Courts Ceremony and
Memorial Service of their deceased mem-
bers on September 6, 2011.
The ceremony will take place in the
ceremonial courtroom, Room 312, in the
Cumberland County Courthouse, Broad
and Fayette Streets in Bridgeton at 8:30
a.m. The ceremony marks the traditional
start of the court year and recognizes the
accomplishments of past members of the
legal profession and Judiciary. The cele-
bration also is an opportunity to recognize
the importance and integrity of our legal
system.
The Opening of the Courts Ceremony
is a tradition that began when court
would recess in the summer and reopen in
September. Although the courts no longer
close for summer, the Cumberland County
Bar Association renewed the tradition of
the Opening Ceremony in 2006.
The Opening of the Courts is a way to
acknowledge a rich history while celebrat-
ing the dedication of our judges, staff and
members of our legal community.
Deceased members of the Bar Association
will also be remembered.
This year Cumberland County Bar
Association Historian, Theodore Ritter,
Esquire will do a presentation on the
accomplishments of Cumberland County
female attorneys who have cracked or
broken through the “glass ceiling.” He will
speak about the first female in
Cumberland County, attorney Wirt Alvort
followed by Vera Lipman, Darlyn Mann,
first Cumberland County Bar Association
female President, Linda Pirolli and other
accomplished female lawyers including
Georgia Curio, Jennifer Webb-McRae and
the other four Cumberland County Bar
Association female past presidents: Linda
Lawhun, Sue Romeo, Tina Kell and
Bonnie Laube.
Initiative for Cancer Survivors
Offered Free to Community
The YMCA of Vineland has been
Grapevine 1-7 082417-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:48 PM Page 7
YMCA Adds Two Board Members
The YMCA recently added two new members to
its Board of Directors. They are Tim Chew (top) and
Gerard Velazquez, III (bottom). Both were accepted
unanimously by the existing Board. Both new mem-
bers have served on the Y’s Community Advisory
Committee.
Chew founded BC Processing, a local electronic
payments company, seven years ago. He is a gradu-
ate of Cumberland County College. Born in Newfield,
he went to Buena High Regional High School and
now lives in Vineland, is a member of the Y and
regularly swims and plays basketball there.
Velazquez has been the president/CEO of Triad
Associates for seven years, having served previously
as the executive director of the County’s Federal
Empowerment Zone. The Buena resident attended
Vineland public schools and holds a Bachelor’s
degree from Montclair State College. Velazquez did
sports training at the Y when he was in high school
and is a member now, regularly using the large
Family Fitness Center.
The YMCA Board of Directors meets monthly at
the Y. The organization was established in Vineland
in 1927 and has always been led by community
members.
MULLICA HILL
SKINCARE
Med Spa, Weight Loss, Hormone, & Laser Center
· Laser Liposuction
· Cellulite Laser Therapy(SmoothShapes)
· Laser Hair/Vein Therapy
· Wrinkle Reduction & Photo Facials
· Botox/Juvederm/Radiesse/Restylane
· Acne Treatments/Scar Reduction
· Laser Skin Resurfacing
· Facials/Chemical Peels
· Massage & Body Treatments
Pooja MaIik, MD
Medical Director · Professional Cosmetic Physician
Fellow in Anti-Aging, Regenerative & Functional Medicine
201 Bridgeton Pike
Mullica Hill NJ 08062
856-478-2111
799 S. Delsea Drive
Vineland, NJ 08360
856-478-2111

2))
Laser LipoIysis Area
MuIIica HiII Skincare · 856-478-2111
With this coupon. Not to be combined with any other offer or speciaI. Expires 9-15-11
OPENING SEPTEMBER 2011
In VineIand - 799 S. DeIsea Drive, VineIand, NJ 08360
BACK TO
SCHOOL EVENT
at Mullica Hill Skincare
Sept 20th & 21st Raffe, Refreshments and Fabulous
Deals! Keep an eye out for more details!
{
8
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
Faces in the News
I
More Faces in the News on pages 11 and 13.
Grapevine 8-13 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:49 PM Page 8
Fazenbaker is Senior VP
at Colonial Bank FSB
Colonial Bank FSB announced that
Wheeler N. Fazenbaker, Jr. has been
named Senior Vice President to con-
tinue to build the customer service
culture and expand its community
banking franchise.
Fazenbaker has more than 30 years
of banking experience and has served
as Colonial Bank FSB’s Compliance
Officer,
Security
Officer and
Director of
Human
Resources.
He is a
graduate of
Rutgers–
The State
University of
New Jersey,
receiving a
B.S. in psy-
chology.
Fazenbaker is also a graduate of the
New Jersey Bankers Association. In
addition, he has served as an instruc-
tor for the Center for Financial Training
Fazenbaker is a current member of
the Human Resources Association of
Southern New Jersey and the Society
of Human Resource Management. He
has been very active in the communi-
ty as a member in the Bridgeton
Lions Club for 20 years. He is cur-
rently the Treasurer for the Bridgeton
Lions Club and has served in this
position for 10 years.
CENTER FOR SPINE SURGERY
at South Jersey Healthcare
Richard C. Strauss, M.D. (Left)
Board-certified in Neurological Surgery
Rahul V. Shah, M.D. (Right)
Board-certified in Orthopedic Surgery
If you’re tired of living with back pain, it’s time to give
us a call. Our specialists will use the latest treatments
and therapies to help you heal. And you’ll get the kind of
personalized care you just won’t find anywhere else. You
don’t have to go to Philly to get relief. It’s all right here at
South Jersey Healthcare.
Ready to do something about your back pain?
Call 1-800-770-7547
Or visit www.SJHealthcare.net
Hello experts.
Goodbye
.
back pain
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
9
}
SEND US
YOUR FACES.
IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The
Grapevine... birthdays, engagements,
weddings, anniversaries, births,
graduations, awards. Send them to
the address listed on p. 2.
Grapevine 8-13 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:49 PM Page 9
VMEU at a fraction of what power costs
on the open market. (One arrangement is
different and has the developer paying
VMEU to transmit its power to the grid.)
Isabella explains the purchase contracts
are for the life of the project and aimed at
guaranteeing the utility always pays below
market rates, insulating customers from
possible increases in solar power costs.
“It’s clean and below market,” he says.
“That’s unique; you usually get green at
above market price.”
The operating section of Solar One is
owned by Calpine Corporation and the
expansion by Constellation Energy, both
large national companies.
Next, we arrive across town at Solar
Two, which was formally opened July 27.
It’s on the south side of Maple Avenue
between Spring and Brewster roads. Solar
Two lies closer to the road than the oth-
ers, not as buffered by trees. As is Solar
One, it has an operational section and one
under construction. Isabella continues to
talk about how electric utility customers
benefit from solar.
“It’s a downward pressure on rates;
these projects will save our customers
$1.2 million a year when they’re all
online,” he says. “And we achieved this with
no money; it’s a pretty good deal for us.”
Isabella’s quiet enthusiasm plus the
brisk pace of solar building in the city is a
powerful combination.
Solar Two was built by NFI Solar,
which is a division of NFI, formerly known
as National Freight, based in Vineland and
Cherry Hill. When fully completed, it will
have 11,000 panels and generate up to 2.5
megawatts.
Isabella is emphasizing how quickly
VMEU has moved on these installations.
“[Many] think the public sector can’t
move fast, that decisions are slow, but
we’re moving at lightning speed proving
government can move fast to take advan-
tage of this,” he says.
VMEU, as the only municipally owned
electricity generating utility in the state, is
uniquely positioned to take this advantage.
The firm is not regulated by the New
Jersey State Board of Public Utilities.
Ironically, this means it isn’t obligated to
produce power from renewable resources
as all private utilities are. Those companies
have to buy Solar Renewable Energy
Credits (SRECs) from private solar, wind,
and geothermal producers to make up any
shortfall in their required renewable out-
put. Since VMEU doesn’t have to do that,
the solar field developers can keep the
SRECs and sell them on the open market,
helping their profits.
Also important is that VMEU doesn’t
pay federal income tax, so it loses nothing
when developers take the 30 percent tax
incentive given to solar producers, also
adding to their bottom lines.
Isabella says that VMEU is obviously
committed to solar power despite the lack
of a requirement. The utility sent out bid
proposals for the solar fields and chose the
most established companies who would
supply it with power at the cheapest rate.
“In the recent heat wave, the solar real-
ly helped us out,” he said. “It would have
been much more expensive to buy power
from the grid.”
The glistening panels of Solar Three are
in sight now, on the west side of Main
Road just north of Oak Road. It’s a
Constellation project and is under con-
struction, set to come on line soon.
We talk about a striking fact: How, as
with all good things, this may come to an
end, or at least become less important.
Isabella honestly points out factors limit-
ing the growth of solar generation.
“We’re striking while the iron is hot,
we’re building our future quickly here,
before the SRECs bubble is further
popped, which could happen,” he says.
The Christie administration lowered the
renewable energy requirements for utili-
ties recently and many observers think it
will do so again. This has lowered the
value of SRECs.
Isabella also recognizes that the current
subsidies and incentives for solar produc-
tion may not be permanent, further limit-
ing its profitability. He says subsidies were
meant to start up the process.
“Now that it’s rolling, you’d expect the
subsidies to go down,” he says.
Then, there’s the engineering problem,
simply accommodating the influx of solar
generation into the existing electrical grid.
“Systems weren’t designed for it, it will
take time and money to redesign,” he says.
“I see [solar] waning off,” he surprising-
ly notes.
Isabella mentions, though, that mass
production of solar panels would lower
their cost and might boost the profitability
of solar production. We agree that the
future is a lot harder to see than the sun
shining on the solar panels.
Vineland is producing 10 megawatts of
solar power, which includes business and
residential production. That will rise as
high as 49 megawatts if all contemplated
projects are built, according to VMEU
Senior Engineer Gus Foster. The highest
load the system has to carry is about 150
megawatts.
Isabella says VMEU service “is more
reliable and more efficient than the alter-
natives. If that ever becomes different, the
citizens should throw us out.”
Solar Four, owned by OCI Solar Power,
is a virgin tract of land on the west side of
Delsea Drive just south of Butler Avenue.
Construction there is expected to start
next month and soon the site will sprout
another field, a solar one, producing up to
2.5 megawatts. The director resumes talk-
ing about rates.
Overall, Isabella says, VMEU customers
pay an average rate that would be 24 per-
cent higher with surrounding utilities. He
says when he became director three years
ago, these rates were approximately even.
He credits much more than recent solar
power advances for low rates, and here the
conversation takes a turn.
He says that he has three goals for
VMEU—reliability, environmental stew-
ardship and lowest cost.
“You can talk to anyone in the organiza-
tion and they have the same goals,” he
says. “The talent has been here, but it’s
been shackled. There was a lot of fear in
the organization, fear of making a mistake.
Now my people are unfettered; people
who are conscientious about their job and
make a mistake are no problem to me.”
Isabella goes on to discuss how the cur-
rent administration, mayor and council,
were “on board from the start.” The politi-
cization of VMEU, long a city tradition, is a
“disadvantage” according to him. He
brings up next year’s municipal election.
“If I feel I can work with an administra-
tion that comes in, I’ll stay because I love
what I do. If not, I’ll move on,” notes the
64-year-old Isabella. He says he won’t
retire, just change direction.
“I’m bored on long weekends; I like to
work and I feel like I’m just peaking in my
career,” he says.
Isabella, who lives in Lower Bank, near
Egg Harbor City, holds an M.S. degree in
engineering management from Drexel
University and worked 25 years for
Atlantic City Electric, mostly as director of
Generation, then two years at PECO. He
became superintendent of Generation at
VMEU eight years ago and was named
director in July, 2008, after Mayor Robert
Romano took office.
He has been married for 13 years to the
former Deborah Giacomoni, a Vineland
native and they have a 12-year-old son. He
has three children from a previous mar-
riage and five grandkids. As a hobby, he’s a
private pilot.
We are at our last site, which will be
completed in September, on Sherman
Avenue between Hance Bridge and Mays
Landing roads. It’s a 4.7 megawatt plant
owned by American Capital Energy and
NJR Clean Energy Ventures. This installa-
tion will not sell power to VMEU, but to
the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland
Interconnection power grid. It will pay
VMEU for the privilege of using its lines
for the transmission of that power.
A sixth solar field, owned by OCI, on
Elmer Road, has approvals in place and
construction will likely start soon. Isabella
thinks there will be one final round of bid-
ding to construct one or more installations.
I get the Director to reluctantly contin-
ue to talk more about himself. He stresses
again that the story I’m doing should be
about Vineland’s energy future, not about
Joe Isabella. What is his personal stance,
as opposed to his professional one, on
renewable energy?
“I’m not a tree-hugger or crazy about it
but I’m interested in a clean environment,”
he says. “I have grandchildren. We are the
generation that has to assure their grand-
children will have a clean earth.”
Vineland is among the nation’s leaders
in that effort. I
This is the first installment of a two-part
series on the status of solar power local-
ly. The next part will be published in The
Grapevine in September and will include
coverage of solar installations through-
out Cumberland County as well as com-
mercial and residential uses of renewable
energy sources.
{
1
0
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
Solar
Continued from cover
Mega-What?
The production from the solar
fields profiled is expressed in
megawatts. A megawatt is a million
watts. Normally, a megawatt of
capacity will produce electricity
that equates to about the same
amount of electricity used by 400
to 900 homes in a typical year. It is
important to note, however, that
solar installations don’t generate
any megawatts at all at night or
when it is too cloudy. They also
don’t generate more electricity
than can be consumed at the
moment it is created. Hence,
despite the peak rated capability of
a plant, it can at times produce
substantially less electricity than
the rating.
Source: utilipoint.com
At the busy Solar One
construction site,
this vehicle carries
support structures for
solar panels.
Grapevine 8-13 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:49 PM Page 10
Fedup-4U Hosts National Night Out
On Saturday, August 13, Fedup-4u & The (Whyte-Boiz Muzik Group) was a guest host
at the National Night Out at the Bridgeton Commons in Bridgeton. It was free to the
public, and featured food and games. The Bridgeton Fire Department assisted in cooking
the food. Tropakana was a special guest performer. In this picture, Tropakana performs
his song "Shades" with kids on the stage participating in the dance. Tropakana gave out
50 pairs of sunglasses to the young audience members for this song. National Night Out
is a day to reflect on the safety of people in our communities and anti-violence.
VIP Treatment
Cynthia & JohnnyO, known for their
hit song "Dream Boy Dream Girl,"
recently got the VIP treatment at
Todayz Trendz in Vineland. Both
singers recently performed a Free
Style Concert as headlining acts at the
Landis Theater hosted by Star
Promotions. Todayz Trendz treated the
stars to the latest in hairstyles and
provided airbrush makeup for their
performance. Todayz Trendz is located
at: 715 B S. Delsea Drive in Vineland,
856-691-4440.
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
1
1
}
Faces in the News I
Grapevine 8-13 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:49 PM Page 11
Club Takes Part in Camp Old Navy
Boys & Girls Club of Vineland members recently were invited to spend a day
at Old Navy at the Cumberland Mall. As part of Camp Old Navy, each youth from
the Club participated in several fun activities including working the cash register,
managing the fitting
room, and trying on
some fashionable
clothing. The Old
Navy sales associ-
ates taught the
youth about Old
Navy's background,
culture and the
company's cus-
tomer service. This
also fit well with the
Club's
CareerLaunch
Program, which
teaches youth about
various careers.
Youth gain a lot by
hearing directly from and interacting with store employees and representatives of
the business community.
Old Navy provided the youth with subs, beverages, and a gift bag of candy.
Two Club members won t-shirts but all of them left with a pair of colorful flip-
flops. One Club member said, "I had a great time trying on clothes and working
the cash register. Thank you very much for the food and flip-flops. We couldn't
have had a better trip this summer! We hope to see you in the near future for a
job interview!"
The Boys & Girls Club of Vineland would like to thank all of the Old Navy
sales associates and staff members for making this experience amazing!
Members of the Vineland Boys & Girls Club pose with Old Navy store employees and
some manikins.
Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery
David C. Watts, M.D., F.A.C.S.
Cumberland Professional Campus
1051 West Sherman Avenue
Building 2, Suite A, Vineland, NJ
(856)691-0200
www.complexionsbydrwattsplasticsurgery.com
Visit us and we will help
you take steps to keep your
age out of the spotlight!
You don’t have to
look or feel older.
AGE IS JUST
A NUMBER.
Let us help you prove that
Cosmetic Consultations
are FREE!
{
1
2
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
Faces in the News
I
Susquehanna Bank Sponsors BBQ ’N Chili Cook-Off
Main Street Vineland formally announced Susquehanna Bank’s sponsorship of
the Fifth Annual BBQ ’n Chili Cook-Off at a recent ceremony at the Main Street
Vineland office. Susquehanna Bank is giving $2,500 toward the event, which will
take place on Saturday, September 24 (rain date is September 25), from 4 to 9
p.m., on the 600 block of Landis Avenue. Vendors and eateries will vie for prizes
for the best BBQ and chili at the event, which will also feature a homemade wine
contest, live music, and more.
Pictured, from left: Diane Sacco, chairperson of the Main Street Vineland Board of
Directors; Nicholas Scardino, Vice President, Susquehanna Bank Commercial
Relationship Manager; Rosana Schreiber, Susquehanna Bank Vice President/Branch
Manager; Jason Campani, Susquhenna Bank Vice President/Commercial Relationship
Manager; Jason Scythes, Susquehanna Bank Assistant Vice President/Branch Manager;
and Kathy Cavallero, Chairperson of Main Street Vineland’s Organization Committee.
Grapevine 8-13 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:49 PM Page 12
CALL
691-1950
For your free estimate
www.barrettaplumbing.com
Utility Bills Too High?
Your AC Not Cutting It?
It could be time to upgrade your system!
Vineland’s hometown
specialist for 115 years.
1117 E. Landis Ave • Suite C • Vineland, NJ 08360
Blaise Menzoni LOAN OFFICER
Gateway Funding DMS, LP
Office 856.692.9494 Fax 856.691.3687
Cell 856.297.7087
With rates at historic lows,
now is a great time to buy a new home or
consider refinancing your existing mortgage.
For unparalleled service, great rates and a variety
of financing options, call Blaise R. Menzoni.
FHA • VA • Conventional
Opening Doors to Home Ownership
Licensed by NJ department of Banking and Insurance
J
ust before I started working in
downtown Vineland almost five
years ago, the city had commis-
sioned a study from the JGSC
Group about how to bring business back
to Landis Avenue.
Many of the recommendations con-
tained in that report have since been
implemented in various forms—the
recruitment of a number of restaurants
to the downtown via the Restaurant Row
Initiative; the creation of a food destina-
tion in the form of Landis MarketPlace;
and the fostering a sense of security are
just a few items noted by the study.
Yet I found one item highlighted by
the study to be fascinating—not just
because I think it’s a good idea, but
because it made me scratch my head and
wonder why it seemed that no one had
noticed it before.
During the course of their study, the
JGSC Group noted that downtown
Vineland has an incredible number of
wedding-related businesses, from bridal
and men’s formal wear shops, to jewelers,
florists, religious shops, bakeries, shoe
stores and more. The recommendation
in the study was that we encourage
cross-promotion among and between
these kinds of businesses.
For the past few years, Main Street
Vineland’s Promotions Committee had
tried to develop a special event that
highlighted Landis Avenue’s many wed-
ding-related shops. Unfortunately, we
were never able to develop a model that
worked and so we scrapped our plans.
This year, however, is a different story,
and leading the effort on what we are
calling “Wedding Weekend” is one of our
own downtown businesspeople—Brian
Lankin of Al’s Shoes.
Several months ago, Brian (who is
also on the Main Street Vineland Board
of Directors) came to the Promotions
Committee and volunteered to spear-
head a subcommittee that would organize
an event that would help promote wed-
ding-related businesses downtown to
soon-to-be brides and grooms and their
families. Since that time, Brian has been
a man on a mission, lining up businesses
to participate and tending to the count-
less details that go into making a suc-
cessful event.
Wedding Weekend will be held in the
500-800 blocks of Landis Avenue on
Friday, September 30 and Saturday,
October 1 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. There
will be more than 20 businesses partici-
pating —places like Rienzi Bridal,
Cornerstone Christian Bookstore, Al’s
Shoes and Martini Shoes, Mori’s on
Landis, Sir Speedy Printing, DeSoto
Jewelers and so many more. While most
participating downtown businesses are
inviting brides and grooms to visit them
in their stores, others will be set up
inside Landis MarketPlace to make it
more convenient.
As part of Wedding Weekend, we’ll be
giving away gift certificates to participating
businesses, as well as a grand prize of
nearly $500 in jewelry, courtesy of
DeSoto Jewelers. To be eligible for these
giveaways, you’ll need to visit some of
the merchants and have a card stamped.
We’ll be providing more details about
Wedding Weekend in the weeks ahead.
In planning this special event, Brian
has done exactly what Main Street
Vineland encourages business owners to
do—get involved. By developing an idea
and then working to implement it, our
downtown business owners can ensure
that we are doing events that make sense
for and benefit them. I am hopeful that
Wedding Weekend is only the first of
many merchant-driven events we do on
Landis Avenue. I
For more information on Main Street Vineland,
visit the office at 603 E. Landis Ave., call
794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org,
or check them out on Facebook.
I
Downtown Vineland
{ TODD NOON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VDID / MAINSTREET VINELAND }
Spread the word to brides- and grooms-to-be:
Landis Avenue’s first bridal event is coming up at
the end of September.
Wedding
Weekend
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
1
3
}
Grapevine 8-13 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:49 PM Page 13
{
1
4
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
2040 East Oak Road · Vineland, NJ 08361 · 856-691-2780
Grand Opening Oct. 2011
· Family Owned & Operated Ior 22 Years!
· No Registration Fee
· Indoor Play Area
· High Scope Curriculum
· SaIe/Nurturing Environment
· State oI the Art Security System
· Adioining Preschool
· Highly Qualifed ProIessional Care Givers
‡ 1RZ $FFHSWLQJ $SSOLFDWLRQV IRU (QUROOPHQW
Newborn to Age 3
6:30am to 5:30pm
DIAPERS PROVIDED TO FIRST 30 FAMILIES REGISTERED*
(one month only)
DiBiase Baby Steps
Infant/Toddler Center
HAPPENINGS
VENDORS NEEDED
• On Sunday, 9/18/11, Dominick’s
Pizza will hold their 3rd annual block
party from Noon to 4 p.m. at the
Lincoln and Dante Ave. Shopping
Plaza. Proceeds from this event will go
to the Juvenile Diabetes Research
Foundation and Alex’s Lemonade
Stand. Vendors are needed for this
event. There is a $25 vendor fee.
Electric can be provided at an addi-
tional cost. For more info. or an appli-
cation, stop in the restaurant or call
Saverio at 609-381-5088.
• The Kiwanis Club of Vineland is look-
ing for vendors, crafters and yard salers
to join us in our 1st Annual Flea Market
and Yard Sale to be held on September
10th. Spot size is 8' x 8' and are avail-
able for $15 per spot. Location is
between Parrish Sign Company and
Parrish Storage on Delsea Drive in
Vineland (across from the Salvation
Army and Delsea Drive-In. Reserve your
spot now. Call 856-696-1062 or
e-mail cellis@shorememorial.org.
SACRED HEART SUB SALE
Sacred Heart Church, Vineland, is
holding a sub ticket sale, redeemable
for subs at Gardella's or Giovanni's.
Tickets are $6.00 each and proceeds
will benefit the Sacred Heart Capital
Campaign Fund. Tickets are valid
through August 31, 2011. For tickets
and information, contact the Sacred
Heart Rectory at 856-691-0420.
REDEEMER TO HOST
DIAKONIA CLASSES
This series of 5-week sessions will
be held for three hours on Tuesday
evenings, beginning on September 13th
at 6:30pm. Classes will be taught by
ordained Lutheran Pastors from various
churches in South Jersey. Open to
community members, this program is
designed to provide spiritual informa-
tion to men and women wishing to
deepen their understanding of the
Christian faith. Cost is $50 per session
plus a one-time $25 enrollment fee.
Class size is limited. Contact Site
Manager, Jan Stiegler, at 856-691-1867,
or the Redeemer church office at, 856-
691-4278, for additional information.
FEDS FEED FAMILIES
FOOD DRIVE
The USDA Service Center located in
Vineland is collecting canned food, paper
products, baby products and other
non-perishable items for the Feds Feed
Families program. Items can be dropped
off until 8/31 at the USDA Service Center
located at 1318 S. Main Rd Bldg 5A,
Vineland. Call 856-205-1225 for details.
NYC BUS TRIP
On Saturday, September 17th, a bus
trip to NYC is scheduled to see the new
musical, Priscilla Queen of the Desert.
Bus leaves at 8:15 a.m. from Veteran's
Memorial School and 8:30 a.m. from
the Buena Borough Hall (Minotola). The
show time is 2 p.m. $208. Price includes
transportation, a full-course dinner at
Tony DiNapoli's in Times Square, and an
orchestra seat for the show. This show
features dance and disco tunes from
the likes of Madonna, Cyndi Lauper and
Donna Summer. Priscilla is filled with
incredibly imaginative and over-the-top
costumes, drag makeup and dance
numbers that maintain an energetic
pulse throughout the story. Call Rusty
at 692-8573 to reserve a seat.
ICE HOCKEY SIGN-UP
High school age skaters from
Vineland, Millville, Bridgeton, Delsea
Regional, Cumberland Christian, Sacred
Heart High Schools and home-schooled
skaters from those areas are invited to
skate in the South Jersey High School
Ice Hockey League. This is a Varsity
level division with home games based
out of the Canlan Ice sports Arena in
Vineland. Contact vinelandicehock-
eyalumni@comcast.net for information
on the 2011-2012 season.
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:50 PM Page 14
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
1
5
}
VPL EVENT CALENDAR.
All events held at Vineland Public
Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland. Registration required for
all events.
August 24th: 2 – 3 p.m. Book Club
for Adults (Community Event Room)
August 25th: 5:30 p.m. Library
Board of Trustees meeting
(Community Event Room)
September 1st: 6:00 p.m. Play
Scrabble (Doris Tripp Room)
Sept. 7th: 5 p.m. Teen Volunteer
Meeting. Plan events for younger
children at the library (Teen Room)
Sept. 12th: 5:30 p.m. Learn English
in this 10-week session by
PerfilLatino.
Sept. 13th, 20th, 27th: 10:30 a.m.
Toddler Time. The story time fea-
tures books, songs, fingerplays and
other activities to get toddlers
excited about reading. (Teen Room)
Sept. 14th: 6 p.m. Book discussion
for children ages 6 to 8: Miss
Nelson is Missing by Harry Allard
(Children’s Department).
5 p.m. Teen Volunteer Meeting.
Plan teen programs (Teen Room)
Sept. 14th, 21st, 28th: 10:30 a.m.
Preschool Story Time. Children ages
3 to 5 and their parents or care-
givers are invited to Preschool Story
Time at the Vineland Public Library.
Sept. 15th: 6 p.m. Alissa Grosso
Visit. She’ll join the New Jersey
Writers Society at the Vineland
Public Library to talk to teens and
adults about publishing her first
young adult novel, Popular.
(Community Event Room)
Sept. 16th, 23rd, 30th: 10:30 a.m.
Baby time. Parents and babies 6-
23 months will enjoy simple sto-
ries, nursery rhymes and songs,
and will have one-on-one reading
time with their parents or care-
givers during the story time.
Sept. 20th: 6 p.m. Book discussion
for children ages 9 and up: Frindle
by Andrew Clements (Children’s
Department)
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:50 PM Page 15
{
1
6
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
LIFE IS MORE
EXCITING WITH
BLADE-FREE LASIK!
(The Intralase Technology Method)
Take the fear out of lasik with this new
technology! Ask Dr. Tyson
if this is right for you...
schedule a FREE LASIK
consultation today!
Sydney L. Tyson, MD, MPH
OUR OTHER LOCATIONS: Cherry Hill (856) 428-5795
8|ackwood (856) 227-6262 º hammootoo (609) 567-2355
Nays Laod|og (609) 909-0700 º To|| Free 1-800-922-1766
0% Financing - 12 or 24 Months
Eye Associates realizes you
want quality care at an
affordable price!
www.sjeyeassociates.com
856-691-8188
251 $. L|oco|o Ave., V|oe|aod, hJ 08361
The Grapevine’s
Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1. Live in a tent
5. Capital of W. Samoa
9. Seer's prop
12. Household God
(Roman)
14. Leavened rum cakes
15. Swiss river
18. Deepsea fishing line
21. "Taming of the
Shrew" city
23. Tapioca source
25. Stems used for
wickerwork
26. Very bad in degree or
extent
28. 14 lines with a fixed
rhyme scheme
29. Enfeebles
31. Pops
32. Not a convenient time
38. Estimates
39. Making easier
41. Finished a skirt edge
42. Leprosy sufferers
44. Hasidic spiritual leader
45. Wife of Abraham
46. Runner used for glid-
ing over snow
47. Not plain
52. Airport code for
Gaborone
53. A mother's
summoning words
58. London Modern Art
Museum
59. Motorcar
DOWN
1. Atomic #24
2. Pharaoh 1323-1319 BC
3. Mutual savings bank
4. Community school
assoc.
5. Winglike part
6. NPR TV equivalent
7. Farm state
8. Atomic #13
9. Extended neck for a
better view
10. Blood group
11. And gentlemen
12. Your store of remem-
bered information
(abbr.)
13. Father of Araethyrea
16. Your father's sister
17. A scrap of cloth
19. Take as a wife
20. Killers Leopold & ___
21. Breathe rapidly
22. ____ Frank's diary
24. Made dry and brittle
25. Not inland
27. Ladyfish genus
28. Look at with fixed eyes
30. Wedding vow
32. Shakespeare's
pentameter
33. Deprived of feeling
34. Double curve
35. Employees
36. Type of palm or grass
37. Forceful exertion
38. Oddball computer
expert
40. Grasp suddenly
41. Time units (abbr.)
43. Refers to a female
47. Federal excise tax
48. Ingested
49. Not yes
50. Awards org. for
country music
51. Not me
54. Overtime
55. 1/1000 of an ampere
56. Montana
57. Atomic #42
Solution to last week’s puzzle
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:50 PM Page 16
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
1
7
}
L
ots of people ask if I like to
bake at home, and truth be
told, I really don’t. Cooking is
much more my style at home.
Whenever I try to bake at home, I find
that my kitchen is inadequately stocked
with provisions and tools, and the whole
experience can be a frustrating exercise.
Baking at the bakery can be similarly
frustrating, though, as it’s nearly impos-
sible to find the time or space to bake for
fun. Since we’re a full on-production
bakery, I would simply get in the way of
my team of bakers if I attempted to bake
a little something for myself. Ah, but
Sundays are different.
I recently had the fortune of having
converging forces come together to offer
me the opportunity to do a little baking
for myself. Since it’s
late summer, our
family’s annual
crabs and spaghetti
dinner was upon us,
so I thought it
would be nice to
bake something for
it. Since a niece of
ours is allergic to
eggs, it needed to
be egg-free (which
narrows down the options quite a bit). I
did have some lovely peaches in, and I
remembered that my cobbler recipe has
no eggs… peach cobbler it would be!
Growing up in the South, peach and
blueberry cobblers were commonplace in
my house. I’m not sure why cobblers
have an association with the South. I did
a little research online, and couldn’t find
a compelling reason why that was the
case. All I know is that a good peach cob-
bler is an amazing dessert. Simple, tasty,
and good for the soul.
I
Culinary Adventures { BY STEPHEN WILSON / PHOTO: JILL MCCLENNEN }
Peach cobbler makes the perfect
summertime dessert at the annual
family crab and spaghetti dinner.
Time for Cobbler
Continued on next page
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:51 PM Page 17
{
1
8
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
Downtown Vineland
631 E Landis Ave
8562136002
LandisMarketPlace.com
FREE PARKING
Landis Avenue
Two-hour On-Street
Elmer &Wood Streets
Free Lot Parking
This ad has been paid for with funds approved for such use by the New Jersey Urban Enterprise Zone Authority.
LANDIS MARKET HOURS
Thurs/Fri 9 am – 7 pm
Saturday 8 am – 5 pm
Individual Store Hours May Vary
Amish Market
Closes 6 pm on Thursday
and 4 pm Saturday
LandisMarketPlace.com for Coupons & Specials
Featuring the Amish Market & Me
UPPER MARKET LOWER MARKET
Saturday, August 27
Live Music by
Rob Huntley
Noon—2 pm
Beiler’s Deli & Pickles
Large Selection
Deli Meats & Cheeses
UPPER MARKET L
eaturing the A FFeaturing the A
OWER MARKET
k arrket & mish M Mar the A
RKET L R MARKET
Me ket & &M
UPPER MARKET L
etPl k ar andisM L
2 pm — n o o N
tle n u H ob R
c b si u e M v i L
u g u , A yy, A a d r u t a S
OWER MARKET
om oup for C .c e ac
e i M l e D
ge r a L
s ’ r ile e B
m
y eey
y b
7 t 2 s u
RKET L R MARKET
ials c e p ons &S Sp p
s e s e e h s &C t a
on i t c e l e S e
s e l k c i i &P l e D
ing
T
or with funds appr his ad has been paid f T
rk a ot Pa e L e rre FFr
eets tr ood S W Elmer &
et e Str re n- -hour O o w TTw
enue v Landis A
ARKING FREE PPARKING
y da tur a and 4 pm S
y hursda T Closes 6 pm on
et ark mish M A
y ar V y a ours M e H or t ndividual S I
8 am– 5 pm y da tur a S
9 am– 7 pm i r hurs/F T
ANDIS MARKET HOURS L
y the New Jersey Ur or such use b ed f v o unds appr
La
. y it uthor one A ise Z pr er t ban En y Ur
om .c e lac etP ark andisM
8562136002
e v 631 E Landis A Av
ineland V wn o t wn Do
907 N. Main Rd., Vineland
Larry’s II Plaza
(856) 691-0088
CHINESE RESTAURANT
With this coupon. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Exp: 9/7/11
$
3 OFF
YOUR PURCHASE OF
$
20 or MORE!
With this coupon. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Exp: 9/7/11
BUY (3) LUNCH SPECIALS
& GET (1) FOR
FREE
We Accept
%DFN 7R
6FKRRO 6DYLQJV
The timing worked out this particular
day because I needed to be at the bakery
for a consultation with a young couple
that is planning their wedding for next
year. I got into the bakery early, and went
into the kitchen. The lights were off, but
the kitchen was illuminated by the over-
cast sky pouring in through the large win-
dows. The soft hum of the freezer and the
ice machine were the only sounds that
permeated the quiet. The kitchen sure is
a different place when we’re closed.
I flicked on the lights and turned on
the music. Abbey Road was my choice
that day, as I hadn’t listened to The
Beatles in a while. I threw on an apron,
grabbed about 10 peaches, and rinsed
them off under cool water. The skin on
them was beautiful, marbled shades of
yellow and orange swirled onto the sur-
face, with a thin fuzz coating the fruit.
They were slightly firm, too firm to eat
out of hand, but perfect for cooking with,
as they’d retain their shape better. I
grabbed a cutting board, knife, bowl, and
the other various equipment I’d need. So
much better than baking at home, every-
thing was right there and there was plenty
of space. And how nice (and rare) to be in
this big kitchen by myself!
I began to slice the peaches, first in
half and then into slices of varying thick-
nesses. The pits popped right out of their
juicy enclosures, as the peaches that
come into season this time of the year are
of the freestone variety. (Peaches are both
clingstone and freestone, meaning that
the pits either cling to the flesh, or come
free. I prefer the freestone, as they are so
much easier to work with and to eat.) The
slices went into a large bowl while I made
the “goo” that would flavor and thicken
the filling.
The “goo” consisted of honey, corn-
starch, lemon juice and zest, as well as
salt. This was then tossed with the fruit
and placed into a deep-dish glass baking
vessel that I had brought from home.
The topping was easy enough to create,
as I literally just threw it together. No
mixer was needed, nothing fancy, just
dry and wet ingredients stirred together
in the bowl.
As Paul sang “Oh Darling” in the back-
ground, I mixed up the ingredients and
scooped the wet dough onto the top of
the fruit. I then pressed it down with wet
fingers, and sprinkled raw sugar on the
top. Into the oven it went, covered at first
with aluminum, then finished uncovered.
The bride and groom showed up about
then, with perfect timing, and after hear-
ing my whistling, commented on how
they were just listening to The Beatles on
the drive down from Trenton. This day
was going swimmingly! We conducted
our meeting, and decided on their perfect
wedding cake while the cobblers baked
away in the back. After they left, I
checked out the cobbler in the oven.
Peach filling bubbled up around the sides
and through a few holes in the top, and
wow, did it ever smell good! I took it out,
quickly packed it up and went home.
From there, the ride to Pennsylvania
was torturous, since we were hungry and
the smell of warm peach cobbler saturat-
ed the air of the car. The promise of
crabs and spaghetti prevented us from
devouring the cobbler, and they did not
let us down. After gorging ourselves on
dinner, it was time for dessert. A quart of
vanilla ice cream was set on the table and
we dug in.
The peaches were luscious in their
slightly thickened sauce, firm enough not
to be mush, but soft enough to melt in our
mouths. They were sweet, but not too
much so, with the acid in the “goo” bal-
ancing the sweetness. The topping, with a
hint of ground ginger, was fluffy and
doughy, with a nice little crunch provided
by the sprinkling of sugar that went on
before baking. Ahh, heaven. Peach cob-
bler, reminding me of my childhood down
South, filling my belly and providing the
perfect end to a wonderful day. I
Continued from previous page
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:51 PM Page 18
Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy.,
Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner
Andrea Covino serves up Italian spe-
cialties in atmosphere of fine dining.
Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave,
Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food
served tapas style, catering, private
parties. Extensive wine list. Live music
Thurs. night.
Babe's Village Inn, Martinelli Avenue,
Minotola, NJ 856-697-1727. Famous
crabs, seafood, Italian cuisine. Eat in
or Take out.
Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 691-0909. Breakfast and
lunch spot offering sandwiches named
for colleges near and far.
Bain's Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 563-1400. Come in for
breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Daily spe-
cials, coffee of the day.
Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion,
782 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-
9998. Homemade chocolates and can-
dies, custom gift baskets.
Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis
Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees,
desserts, drink specials. Take-out.
Happy Hour Mon-Fri 3pm-7pm, Sun-
Thu 10pm-cl. MLB Extra Innings.
Bernardi’s Restaurant & Lounge, 140
E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, 696-1461.
Lunch and dinner specials. Open 10:30
a.m.-10 p.m. (until 11 p.m. on Friday).
Closed Sunday.
Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy.,
Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal,
chicken dishes. Meet friends at bar.
Daily lunch and dinner.
Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main
Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring
“Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza,
wings, subs, dinners.
Black Olive Restaurant. 782 S.
Brewster Rd, Vineland. 457-7624. 7
a.m. - 10 p.m daily. Entrees, desserts.
Take out available.
Bruno's Family Restaurant, Cape May
Ave. and Tuckahoe Rd., Dorothy, 609-
476-4739. Breakfast, lunch, dinner,
pizza. Open Mon-Sat. 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
Buena Tavern, 761 Harding Hwy. (Rts.
40/54), Buena, 697-9848. Seafood,
homemade Italian, Wednesday spe-
cials, half-price meals to volunteers
Thursday nights.
Chow’s Garden 1101 N. 2nd St.,
Millville, 327-3259. Sushi Bar, All-you-
can-eat buffet.
Cosmopolitan Restaurant Lounge,
Bakery, 3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
765-5977. Happy hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7
p.m. free buffet, reduced drinks.
Crust N Krumbs Bakery,
Main/Magnolia rds., 690-1200. Cakes,
pies, cookies, breads, doughnuts, cus-
tom wedding cakes.
CrepeMaker Cafe, 607 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 205-0027. Crepes any way
you like them—veggie, chicken, steak,
dessert.
Dakota Steakhouse & Sushi Bar at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 692-8600. Steaks, seafood,
sushi.
Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for
lunch, dinner specials. Soft ice cream
and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9
a.m.–8 p.m.
Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 696-1900. Breakfast, lunch,
dinner. Take-out, too. Happy Hour
Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. Open 24 hours. Kids
eat free Tues. & Sat.
Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave.,
Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-hon-
ored recipes, fresh ingredients.
Dori’s Italian, 16 N. High St., Millville,
765-9799. Open for lunch and dinner
Mon.-Sat.
Elmer Diner, 41 Chestnut St., Elmer.
358-3600. Diverse menu of large por-
tions at reasonable prices.
Esposito's Maplewood III, 200 N.
Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks,
seafood and pasta dishes at this Italian
restaurant.
Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-
9800. Greek and American cuisine,
pizza.
Fat Jack's BBQ. Cumberland Mall, next
to Starbucks, 825-0014. Open 7 days a
week, 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Eat in or take
out. Serving ribs, wings, sandwiches,
salads and sides.
Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080.
Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to
savor. Family-owned.
Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli,
527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name
says it all. Daily specials, catering.
Closed Sun.
Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd.,
Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and
dinner daily. Italian cuisine, pizza.
Golden Palace Diner Restaurant. 2623
S Delsea Dr, Vineland, 692-5424.
Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner
daily.
The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf
Course, 4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-
5558. Restaurant and lounge open to
the public for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11
a.m.–3:30 p.m.
High Street Chinese Buffet, High St.,
Millville, 825-2288. All-you-can-eat
buffet.
Jersey Jerry's. 1362 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 362-5978. Serving subs,
sandwiches, and take-out platters.
Joe's Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and
Kosher chickens, homemade sides,
catering.
Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second
St. (Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai
and Japanese cuisine. BYOB.
Larry's II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily.
Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird din-
ners.
La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante,
1406 S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332.
Pasta, veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner.
Closed Sun.
Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea
Dr., Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-
American cuisine, seafood and veal.
Open daily for lunch and dinner,
Sunday breakfast buffet.
Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave.
and Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051.
Banquet/ wedding facility and intimate
restaurant. Dungeness Crabs every
Tues. Gourmet Pizza Nite on Wed.
Millville Queen Diner, 109 E. Broad
Street, Millville. 327-0900. Open 7
Days a Week 24 Hours.
Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s
Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet
lunches and dinners, casual setting.
Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd
St., Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burri-
tos, catering.
Mori’s, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 690-
0300. Adjacent to the Landis Theater
Performing Arts Center. Includes a
“casual, upscale” restaurant with a
banquet facility and lounge on site.
Lunch and dinner.
MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland,
697-9825. Full bar menu, drink spe-
cials.
Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail
Lounge, 1554 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
692-2800. Live lobsters, seafood,
prime rib, steak, cocktails.
Old Oar House Irish Pub, 123 N. High
Street Millville, 293-1200. New menu,
kitchen open until 1 a.m. Smoker
friendly outdoor beer garden.
Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek
cuisine—lamb dishes and salads.
Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland,
694-0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner
specials; convenient drive-thru, mini-
meal specials.
Pete’s Pizza, 20 W. Park Ave.,
Vineland, 205-9998. Pizza (including
whole wheat), subs, wings. Open daily
11 a.m-10 p.m.
The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland,
697-1440. Bar and restaurant with
daily drink specials and lunch specials.
Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville,
327-8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noo-
dle soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist veg-
etarian.
Speedway Cafe at Ramada, W. Landis
Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 692-8600.
Open daily 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Dinner spe-
cials $7 and up.
Steakhouse at Centerton Country
Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove,
358-3325. Lunch and dinner. Steaks,
reserve wines, upscale casual.
Sweet Life Bakery, 601 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood
bakery. Homemade pastries, cakes,
coffee.
Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E.
Wheat Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs,
chicken, fish, steaks. Always clams, eat
in or take out. Live music Saturday &
Sunday night. Dungeness Crab All You
Can Eat.
Villa Fazzolari, 821 Harding Hwy.,
Buena Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos,
grilled meats, fish. Lunch and dinner
daily.
Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd.,
Vineland, 691-8899. Dinners, grilled
sandwiches, wings.
Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville,
327-0909. Continental cuisine and
spirits served in a casually upscale
setting.
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
1
9
}
EATING OUT
From fine dining to lunch spots to
bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy
any appetite. Call for hours.
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:51 PM Page 19
{
2
0
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
I
Vintage Vineland { BY VINCE FARINACCIO }
ATrue Classic
Moviegoers can experience Gone with the Wind on
the big screen this Thursday evening at the Landis.
F
or a motion picture that has
earned 10 Academy Awards, made
its way onto a number of best film
lists, received countless accolades
and won over several generations of
moviegoers worldwide, Gone with the
Wind surprisingly had a number of obsta-
cles to overcome in its early stages of
development. The classic screens 7:30
Thursday evening at the Landis Theater.
Gone with the Wind began life in the
form of Margaret Mitchell’s epic Pulitzer
Prize winning 1936 novel, set during the
Civil War and the Reconstruction.
Hollywood resisted translating it into cine-
matic form because of its length and details.
All the major studios passed on the rights to
the book, including David O. Selznick,
whose production company had already
enjoyed several Hollywood hits in the 1930s.
According to online sources, Selznick
was encouraged by associates to reconsid-
er his decision, and the producer commit-
ted to the project, spending an unprece-
dented $50,000 on the rights in June 1936.
His change of mind would make him one
of the biggest producers in Hollywood.
If Selznick had been able to secure his
original choices for the lead roles of
Scarlett and Rhett, it would have been
Gary Cooper telling Paulette Goddard,
“Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”
But Cooper was signed to Samuel Goldwyn
who wasn’t interested in loaning his star to
another picture. And while Goddard was
initially the favorite of the female finalists,
her chances began to fade as the screen
tests continued.
Selznick’s next choice for male lead,
Clark Gable, was signed to MGM, the com-
pany headed by Selznick’s father-in-law
Louis B. Mayer. A deal was struck whereby
Gable would be loaned out for Gone with
the Wind and MGM would front half the
movie’s budget and distribute the film.
That would mean a two-year wait, which
Selznick used to his advantage for a pub-
licity campaign.
The producer began marketing his film
immediately. He sent out a casting call for
the movie’s female lead. Famous actresses
and unknowns showed up, but the event
was held for the pure purpose of media
attention and placing the as yet unmade
film into the minds of moviegoers. By
December 1938, Selznick’s considerations
favored British actress Vivien Leigh for the
role of Scarlett.
The script was placed in the hands of
veteran writer Sidney Howard, whose origi-
nal draft would have produced a six-hour
movie, according to film sources. The
screenplay was trimmed but continued to
have problems, and Selznick brought in a
series of other writers, including Hollywood
notable Ben Hecht, to work on revisions,
which continued even during shooting.
Gone with the Wind had its share of
director troubles as well. Principal photog-
raphy commenced on January 26, 1939
with the renowned George Cukor at the
helm. Less than three weeks later, he was
replaced with Victor Fleming, who arrived
fresh from directing The Wizard of Oz.
Fleming remained in charge except for a
two-week period in May when exhaustion
forced him to step down and Sam Wood to
take over. Even cinematographer Lee
Garmes was replaced by Ernest Haller
after a month’s worth of footage was con-
sidered too dark.
The film had a successful preview
screening in Riverside, California, in
September 1939, before premiering on
December 15 that year in, appropriately
enough, Atlanta, Georgia. Afterward, it
enjoyed a successful run of road shows
playing at only select theaters before its
general release in 1941.
Audiences that watched the film’s
sequence of the burning of Atlanta and
marveled at Tara, Scarlett’s estate, weren’t
aware that they were witnessing the illu-
sion of movie magic. Tara and Atlanta were
created on Hollywood back lots where ply-
wood and paper mache gave the image of a
real structure, while interiors were shot on
soundstages.
Gone with the Wind had an illustrious
showing at the Academy Awards, garner-
ing 10 Oscars including Best Picture, Best
Director and Best Actress. It was up
against such formidable contenders as
Frank Capra’s Mr. Smith Goes to
Washington, John Ford’s Stagecoach and
Fleming’s The Wizard of Oz. Awards aside,
Gone with the Wind has earned its own
place in cinema history and in this sesqui-
centennial year of the start of the Civil
War and Vineland’s founding, it’s an
appropriate choice for a summer night at
the movies here in town. I
Y
ou might not have seen these
news accounts, but it’s been
reported now that armadillos
cause leprosy. According to
The New York Times, researchers were
able to confirm that about a third of the
leprosy cases that arise each year in the
United States almost certainly result
from contact with infected armadillos.
The cases are concentrated in Louisiana
and Texas, where some people hunt, skin
and eat the creatures.
Leprosy is an ancient scourge that has
largely disappeared, but each year about
150 to 250 people in the United States get
sick with it. If identified quickly, treatment
with antibiotics—a one- to two-year regi-
men with three different drugs—offers an
effective cure. But every year dozens of
people in this country do not recognize
their skin lesions for what they are early
enough and suffer lifelong nerve damage
as a result.
Most Americans who contract leprosy
are people who have traveled to places in
the world where the disease is widespread,
such as Brazil and India. If a possible
leprosy victim hasn’t traveled to a “hot
spot”, doctors will now know to ask,
“Any armadillos in your life?”
The lesson here is that nobody should
eat armadillos unless they are very, very
hungry. The armadillo/leprosy phenom-
enon makes me think of other topsy-
turvy connections we experience in our
sometimes unfathomable world. Here’s a
sampling:
• When we use our social networks, we
are usually alone.
• The E-Z pass lines are often longer than
the cash lines.
• AAA helps people with travel, but its
office moves around town so much it’s
hard to find it.
• The local daily newspaper upped its
Saturday price but the articles keep get-
ting shorter.
• Why do we sing “Auld Lang Syne” every
New Year’s without having a clue about
what it means?
• During the downturn when people need
all the help they can get finding work, the
library is forced to cut its hours and people
don’t have as much time to use the comput-
ers for job searching and resume writing.
• Why does it seem the ugliest people are
often walking the best-looking dogs?
• Those sections of roadways that are
sponsored or kept clean by whomever
have more litter on them than the unspon-
sored roadways.
• Our columnist is assailed for killing a
snake but the killing of people worldwide
continues unabated and gets little notice.
• A good thing about the obesity epidemic
in children is that no one is teased any-
more about being the fat kid.
• People do dumb things with their smart
phones (Angry Birds excluded).
• While many Americans are feeling the
brunt of the recession, the personal
wealth of members of Congress increases
every year.
• We care more about Caylee Anthony
than we do about the children next door.
• The saying "As good as a government
pension" isn't so true anymore. Hopefully,
"As good as a government check" won't
follow.
• Why does Vineland have two histories,
one curated by Vineland Historical and
Antiquarian Society and the other by
Friends of Historic Vineland?
• It doesn’t matter how rich you are or how
much influence you have, when you’re in a
traffic jam you’re just like everybody else.
• Ugly commercial signs and billboards are
at least helpful for little children learning
to sound out words to read.
• Some people who refuse to pay income
tax in protest of the law want a crack-
down on “illegal aliens.”
• More and more people say “Have a Nice
Day,” but days keep getting worse.
• They’re repaving Sherman Avenue but
when you detour your travel to Grant
Avenue, you’re in for a pretty bumpy ride.
• When they are stale, are they still
Philadelphia soft pretzels?
• When they first came out, they were
called “car phones,” now there’s a big con-
troversy about cell phones not being safe
to use in your car.
• Google has a new social network, called
Google+. Mark Zukerberg, the founder of
Facebook, is the most followed person on it.
• At least the endless sunny and hot days
are good for solar power. I
Our columnist reflects on how things get turned
around, upside down, and every which way.
I
Guest Column { BY MICKEY BRANDT }
Armadillos
and More
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:51 PM Page 20
Kids Get a Chance to
Learn About Agriculture
Over 100 years after its inception, many
people still think of 4-H as a program for
young people growing up in rural areas.
While it is true that 4-H had its roots in
agriculture, today’s 4-H Youth
Development Program can be found on
farms, in the suburbs and even in the inner
cities, offering learning opportunities for
the varied interests of today’s young people.
The majority of children living in New
Jersey today are growing up in the sub-
urbs, but 4-H still offers a special opportu-
nity to connect with the State’s agricultur-
al heritage through the animal science pro-
gram. Youth can learn about all aspects of
raising animals: how to care for, feed,
breed and select animals for show, market
or pleasure. Through the 4-H animal sci-
ence program, children have the opportu-
nity to learn about farm animals such as
horses, goats, dairy and beef cattle, sheep,
pigs and chickens to which they otherwise
might not have access.
The goal of the animal science program
is the same as that for all 4-H programs: to
teach children important life skills through
hands-on learning. While learning about
their animal of choice, children in the ani-
mal science clubs gain a sense of responsi-
bility, learn how to keep accurate records,
gain self-confidence, discover potential
careers, learn to present themselves in pub-
lic and at the same time have a lot of fun.
They may also participate in special coun-
ty-wide, state and national 4-H programs.
In addition to animal science clubs,
events such as the Hippology, Horse Bowl,
Horse Judging, Equine Arts Show and even
Model Horse Shows allow children who do
not own a horse to learn more about them.
Other animal events such as the 4-H Goat
Extravaganza and the 4-H Animal Science
Skill-A-Thon provide an opportunity for
youth to learn about other farm animals.
These 4-H events are becoming more pop-
ular as farmland continues to decrease in
New Jersey. But, regardless of what kind of
4-H club a child belongs to, the theme is
the same: to make learning fun. W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
2
1
}
www.EnglishSeptic.com
(856) 358-2518
EZ Pay Options Available. Follow Us On
lore lrp(overerl Corl(. L|c.# 12\l00181200 · 3epl|c lrspeclo( L|c.# NAZ3ê1wT & 1131Z0lC · Vasle( P|uroe( L|c# 3ê81025100
0lle( 0ood url|| Audusl 31sl, 2011. Coupor carrol oe used
|r corjurcl|or W|lr arv olre( olle(. Corlacl us lodav lo
scredu|e ar appo|rlrerl:
(856) 358-2518 EnglishSeptic.com
This year, let English make your summer vacation worry-free
with a complete Septic System Service or
Air Conditioning Repair & Service. Call Today!
Septic & AC Services
NO Extra Service Fees for night & weekend calls, same rates 24/7!
We Proudly Feature ECOHANCER 100%Organic Wastewater Solution
$
20OFF
© 2010 EP Henry
www.recumminesinc.com
856-691-4040
67 CHESTNUT AVENUE VINELAND, NJ 08360
3.5%
SALES TAX
Oet youz )5((
2010 HazdscapIng
Pzoject OuIde!
Home
Garden
a
n
d
Bridgeton Outdoor Market
at the Riverfront
• 59 East Commerce Street, Bridgeton
(Riverfront Parking Lot)
Phone: (856) 575-5582
Email: carolahartley@aol.com
• Open: June 17 - Aug. 26, 2011
Fridays, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
• Community Farmers Market:
Variety of fruits and vegetables
• Also Available: Hot food, crafts,
cooking demonstrations, flowers, and
entertainment on certain days
• WIC and Senior FMNP checks
accepted by some farmers
Continued on next page
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:51 PM Page 21
www.herbsshamrocklandscapingllc.com
Herb & Joe Morgan
Concrete Pavers • Irrigation Systems
Landscape Lighting • Ponds and Water Features
Leaf Defier Gutter Guards • Lawn Maintenance
Holiday Lighting
• Free Estimates on all Services •
(5 ft. x 9 ft.)
All labor and material included!
$
399plus tax
From select inventory
BBQ Grill Patio Pavers BBQ Grill Patio Pavers BBQ Grill Patio Pavers
{
2
2
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
If you would like more information on
the 4-Hanimal science programor other
4-Hclubs, please contact the Cumberland
County 4-HOffice at (856) 451-2800 ext. 3.
The 4-H Youth Development Program
is part of Rutgers Cooperative Extension,
a unit of the New Jersey Agricultural
Experiment Station. 4-H offers education-
al programs to all youth, grades K-13 (one
year out of high school), on an age appro-
priate basis, without regard to race, reli-
gion, color, national origin, gender, sexual
orientation or disability.
For additional information, visit the New
Jersey 4-Hwebsite at www.nj4h.rutgers.edu
or visit the Cumberland County website at
co.cumberland.nj.us.
Sudden Oak Death (SOD)
Sudden Oak Death (SOD), also known as
Ramorum leaf blight or Ramorum dieback,
is a fungal disease of plants only recently
discovered in Europe and the United
States. It can cause two types of diseases:
bleeding bark cankers that may kill the host
plant, and twig or foliar blights that may
not kill the host plant but may serve as a
reservoir for the pathogen.
What causes SOD?
The causal agent or pathogen for SOD is
Phytophthora ramorum. It was first identi-
fied in Germany and The Netherlands on
ornamental rhododendrons in 1993. In
June 2000 it was isolated from dying oak
trees in California.
What plant species does SOD affect?
Presently, the host range for SOD is
broad. To date, it has naturally infected and
killed or injured at least 28 host species and
has been recovered from an additional 30
plant species. Examples are various species
of west coast oak, coast redwood, and
Douglas fir, which are all susceptible to
bark cankers. Examples of hosts suscepti-
ble to twig or foliar blight are species of
Camellia, Rhododendron, Vaccinium, and
Viburnum. Visit the following site for the
most current and complete lists of regulat-
ed and associated hosts:
www.aphis.usda.gov/ppq/ispm/sod
Home
Garden
a
n
d
******NAP DEADLINE******
September 1, 2011 is the deadline to
purchase NAP for the 2012 crop year.
This deadline is for the following
crops: Christmas Trees, Fin Fish,
Flowers, Grass (SOD)
NAP cost: $250 per crop
Maximum per county: $750
Multi-county producer maximum: $1875
NAP is required for future Permanent
Disaster Programs. Call for more infor-
mation:
Angela J. Andreoli, CED
Atlantic/Cape May/Cumberland FSA
Vineland, NJ /
(856) 205-1225, ext.2
Continued from previous page
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:51 PM Page 22
Heating & Cooling
Your Home
SINCE 1982
FUEL OIL &
KEROSENE
CALL FOR PRICES
PO Box 645 West Blvd. Newfield, NJ 08344
(856) 697-4777
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
2
3
}
Come Home to
Richland Carpet and Flooring
Hardwood Floors
Laminate Flooring
Linoleum • Carpeting
Standard & Custom Rugs
9Residential
9Commercial
9Expert Installation
9Financing Available
1309 Harding HWY, Richland,NJ 08350 • www.richlandcarpet.com
(856) 697-3041
Your Hometown Flooring Experts - Since 1971
Visit Phil & Jeanne Marie today!
How does SOD spread?
SOD most likely spreads through infect-
ed plant material, rainwater, and soil.
Moist, cool, windy conditions are thought
to spread the pathogen by dispersing
spores from the leaves of foliar hosts.
What are the symptoms of SOD?
On trees susceptible to the most virulent
form of the disease, large, bleeding cankers
form on the trunk or main stem accompa-
nied by browning of leaves. Infected trees
may die within several months to several
years after initial infection. On leaves of
other hosts, dark gray to brownish lesions
with indistinct edges indicate infection.
The lesions can occur anywhere on the
leaf, in vascular tissue, or on the petiole.
Some hosts with leaf lesions defoliate and
eventually show twig dieback.
Has SOD been found in New Jersey?
No, at the time of this posting the dis-
ease has not been found in New Jersey.
Is there concern that SOD could spread
to New Jersey?
Yes. Undetected infected nursery stock
shipped froman area or nursery where SOD
has been confirmed could spread the disease.
Has stock from infected nurseries been
shipped into New Jersey?
Yes. Two large nurseries in California
located outside of 12 quarantined counties
tested positive for SOD in March 2004. In
2003 the two nurseries shipped a signifi-
cant number of plants to retail nurseries,
garden centers, and individual consumers
in New Jersey. No shipments, however,
have been made from either facility to New
Jersey since 2004.
In NewJersey, the NewJersey
Department of Agriculture (NJDA) and the
USDA- Animal and Plant Health Inspection
Service (APHIS) are tracing the movement
of plants that may be infected with SOD.
NJDAstaff and APHIS officers have jointly
visited the retail nurseries and garden cen-
ters that received the potentially infected
shipments to stop the sale of any remaining
nursery stock, and are working with Rutgers
NewJersey Agricultural Experiment Station
(NJAES) Cooperative Extension to test
plants that had not yet been sold. The NJDA
sent an advisory letter with a USDA–Forest
Service color fact sheet on SODto con-
sumers who received plants directly from
the Californian nurseries last year. The
NJDAplans to send those documents to
nurseries and garden centers throughout the
state to alert themto the symptoms of SOD.
Final Show in 4-H Dressage
Schooling Series
The Cumberland County 4-H Horse
Program will host the last of a series of
Dressage Schooling Shows on Sunday,
September 11. This show is part of a
series of four shows that were offered in
the 2011 Cumberland County 4-H
Dressage Schooling Show Series. The
show will begin at 9 a.m. and will be
held at the Cumberland County
Fairgrounds located at 3001 Carmel
Road in Millville. The year and awards
banquet for the 4-H Dressage Schooling
Series is set for Sunday, November 6.
Dressage is an advanced training
discipline of horses in which horse and
rider combinations perform precision
movements at the walk, trot and can-
ter. Entries are judged on exactness
and consistency. Dressage has often
been described as ballet on horseback.
The show will include introductory
level, training level and first level tests
as well as upper level tests. The cost
is $25 per ride. Prizes and 1st-6th
place ribbons will be awarded in each
class. Closing date for entries is the
Monday before the show.
This Dressage Schooling Show
Series is sponsored by the
Cumberland County 4-H Horse
Committee. Officers include President
Janet Biederman of Bridgeton and
Vice President Ingrid Bergen of
Vineland.
The show is open to all ages and
ride times will be assigned. To register
or for more details, contact Bergen at
inkydoots@aol.com or 692-6673.
For more information about the
Cumberland 4-H Youth Development
Program call 451-2800 ext. 3 or visit
co.cumberland.nj.us.
Grapevine 14-23 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:51 PM Page 23
jOSPH DǤ OǯNILL
CĞƌƟĮĞĚ Cŝǀŝů ĂŶĚ CƌŝŵŝŶĂů 1ƌŝĂů AƩŽƌŶĞLJ
WŽŶ ĐĂƐĞ ďĞĨŽƌĞ uŶŝƚĞĚ SƚĂƚĞƐ SƵƉƌĞŵĞ CŽƵƌƚ
nĂŵĞĚ ĂƐ Ă Super Lawyer ďLJ EĞǁ :ĞƌƐĞLJ DŽŶƚŚůLJ DĂŐĂnjŝŶĞ
MĞŵďĞƌ ŽĨ DŝůůŝŽŶ ŽůůĂƌ ĚǀŽĐĂƚĞƐ &ŽƌƵŵ
lĞĂƚƵƌĞĚ ŝŶ ĞƐƚ >ĂǁLJĞƌƐ ŝŶ ŵĞƌŝĐĂ
CHARLS IǤ COANT
lŽƌŵĞƌ !ƵĚŝĐŝĂů LĂǁ CůĞƌŬ
CŽĂƵƚŚŽƌĞĚ LĞŐĂů 8ƌŝĞĨƐ ŝŶ Ă uŶŝƚĞĚ SƚĂƚĞƐ SƵƉƌĞŵĞ CŽƵƌƚ CĂƐĞ
nĂŵĞĚ ĂƐ Ă Super Lawyer ďLJ EĞǁ :ĞƌƐĞLJ DŽŶƚŚůLJ DĂŐĂnjŝŶĞ
AƉƉĞĂƌƐ ŝŶ ĞƐƚ >ĂǁLJĞƌƐ ŝŶ ŵĞƌŝĐĂ
2·1(,// &2$17 3&
Attorneyx ut Iuw
͵Ͳ West Chestnut Avenue
vinelanuǡ NI Ͳͺ͵͸Ͳ
&Z ÊÄÝç½ãƒã®ÊÄ
$&&,'(17$/ ,1-85,(6 '($7+6
nŽ lĞĞ ŝĨ nŽ 8ĞĐŽǀĞƌLJ ŽĨ MŽŶĞLJ uĂŵĂŐĞƐ
(856i 692-2400
Inclusion in New Jersey Super Lawyers and Best Lawyers in America is based upon peer review rankings by other attorneys and is not a designation by the New Jersey Supreme Court.
{
2
4
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
HAPPENINGS
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24
Presentation on Breast Cancer
Awareness, Education, and Screening
Initiative. The Southwest Council, Inc.,
1405 N. Delsea Dr., Vineland. Noon. Free. A
luncheon with a goal of helping spread
Breast Cancer awareness and getting
women aged 40 and over in Cumberland,
Salem and Gloucester counties to com-
plete annual mammography screenings.
Bring a friend and receive a special gift.
Seating is limited. RSVP by 8/15 by calling
Amie at 794-1011 x306 or by e-mail at
amie@southwestcouncil.org.
How to Prevent, Control, Eliminate
Type II Diabetes Workshop. Cooper
Wellness Center, 6 LaSalle St., Vineland. 7
- 8 p.m. Free. Heidi Shelley from the
Foundation for Wellness Professionals will
be speaking about natural methods to pre-
vent, control or eliminate Type II Diabetes.
Limited to the first 20 callers. Registration
required. Call 691-1313.
Pizza Hut Fundraiser Night. Pizza Hut,
301 South Main Rd., Vineland. 5 - 8 p.m. $10
for adults and $5 for children (12 and under).
To benefit the Parvin State Park Appreciation
Committee, Pizza Hut will donate $2 for
each adult and $1 for each child’s buffet
sold. For more info., call 691-0399.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 25
Composers On Vacation. The Avalon
Public Library, 235 32nd St., Avalon. 7 p.m.
The August Installment of the Bay-Atlantic
Summer Lecture Series features Paul M.
Somers (pictured) and will explore what hap-
pens when a composer leaves home for a
very different place and how they reflect this
musically. Free. For more info., call 451-1169.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 26
Worship and Empowerment Service.
New Bethel African Methodist Episcopal
Church, 414 N. 7th St., Vineland. 7 p.m.
Free. Service theme is “Women Living With
Joy”. Special guest preacher Rev. Rosetta
Brown, of Greater Holy Trinity Baptist
Church in Atlantic City.
Hawaiian Luau. LLPOA Community Center,
Lake Shore and Narcissus St., Vineland. 6
p.m. $11 for adults, $5 for kids under 10.
Open to public. Put on your grass skirt, don
your Hawaiian shirt and come for food and
fun. Menu includes pork roast plus a variety
of tropical treats, salads, and desserts. Dine
in or out by the lake. Take out available.
BYOB. Music provided by Prestige Worldwide
DJ. For info or tickets, call 825-0319.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 27
Semper Marine Annual Pig Roast.
Semper Marine Detachment #205, 2041
W. Landis Ave. 5 - 11 p.m. $15 for adults,
$3 for children under 12, and free for chil-
dren under 5. Dinner includes Pulled pork,
rolls, salads, baked beans, desserts, bever-
age and beer. There will be a DJ for danc-
ing. Tickets sold by members or at the
door. Children’s tickets are only available
at the door. Hamburger or hot dog avail-
able for children on request. If you bring a
new unwrapped toy for TOYS FOR TOTS,
your name will be entered in a special
drawing for a door prize. For more info,
call 692-4300.
Sub Sale. Dorothy Fire Co., 70 Tuckahoe
Rd., Dorothy. 10 a.m. until subs sold out.
$5.50 per sub. Sponsored by The Dorothy
Fire Company Ladies Auxiliary. This is the
second sub sale within a month. Last time,
they sold out by 12:00 (900 subs). This
month they will make 1,000 subs to help
meet the demand. To place large orders or
for more information, call 609-476-2436.
Women living with joy workshop. New
Bethel African Methodist Episcopal
Church, 414 N. 7th St., Vineland. 8:30 a.m.
- 1 p.m. $25. Workshop presenters include
Evangelists Tracey Lynn Wells-Huggins and
Iris Waters. Includes a continental break-
fast, a light lunch and a workshop kit.
Registration is required. To register or for
more info., call 691-1349 or 609-805-2292.
Grapevine 24-28 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:54 PM Page 24
Back to
School Savings!
7ODAYZ TRENDZ
715 B S. Delsea Dr Vineland
856.691.4440
Get Ready For School With
A New Haircut or Style!
All Kids Receive A Free Gift With Your Haircut!
$
2
00
OFF
ANY SERVICE
EXP: 9/30/11
Enter to Win
Back to School
Book bags Full
of Goodies!
H
A
I
R
S
T
Y
L
I
S
T
&
B
A
R
B
E
R
N
E
E
D
E
D
Make a lifelong
friend from abroad.
Enrich your family with
another culture. Now you
can host a high school
exchange student (girl or
boy) from France, Germany,
Scandinavia, Spain,
Australia, Japan, Brazil,
Italy or other countries.
Single parents, as well as
couples with or without
children, may host. Contact
us for more information or
to select your student today.
Host an Exchange
Student Today!
(for 3, 5 or 10 months)
Camilla from Italy, 16 yrs.
Enjoys dancing, playing the piano
and swimming. Camilla looks
forward to cooking with her
American host family.
Daniel from Denmark, 17 yrs.
Loves skiing, playing soccer and
watching American movies. Daniel
hopes to learn to play football and
live as a real American.
Sue at 732-251-1517 or
Amy at 1-800-677-2773 7ROO )UHH
www.assehosts.com and www.asse.com/host or email us at infomasse.com.
Founded in 1976
ASSE International Student Exchange Program is a Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization.
I N T E R N A T I O N A L S T U D E N T E X C H A N G E P R O G R A M S
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
2
5
}
SIYMÒ!I
WASSIISJI!MIsq.
:u¡ W. Iandls Avc. \lncland
www.WipeOutYourBills.com
8¡6-6o6-8:uu
WIII Ò!J:
Crcdlt Card Icbt « Mcdlcal Illls
!tllltv Illls « Surcharucs
And Ivcn Somc Incomc Jaxcs
SJÒI SIIIIII`S SAII
Stop Wauc Ixccutlons
Icducc Car Iavmcnts
Stop \chlclc Icposcsslon
Ilstcn to Scvmour on thc radlo
Ivcrv Jhursdav ^luht
Irom 8-o pm on o:.i IM
Iankruptcv Attorncv lor :~ vcars
STOP
FORECLOSURE NOW!
LOAN MODIFICATION REDUCE
MORTGAGE PAYMENTS
Many People Save $500 Per Month Or More!
FREE OFFICE CONSULTATION
$
100 OFF
CHAPTER 7 & 13
BANKRUPTCY &
LOAN MODIFICATION FEES
Wc arc a dcbt rcllcl aucncv.
Wc hclp pcoplc lllc lor Iankruptcv Icllcl.
Thunder in the Park. Giampietro Park,
600 E. Park Ave., Vineland. 9 a.m. The
event is a fun-filled, family event with a
twist—a motorcycle poker run, bands, vin-
tage cars, various vendors and more—will
take place that day, all to benefit the Boys
& Girls Club of Vineland. Cat Country
107.3FM will be on hand playing music,
spinning its prize wheel for prizes and pro-
moting the event. For details call 896-0244.
AUGUST 28, 29 AND 31
Open Auditions for The Sound of Music.
Trinity United Methodist Church, 14 Fayette
St., Bridgeton. Hosted by The Off Broad
Street Players Theatre Company, auditions
for children 6 to 17 will be 8/28 from 3–6
p.m.; auditions for adults will be 8/29 and
8/31, at 7:30 p.m. The director, Walter A.
Webster, asks that all planning to audition
should prepare any song from a Broadway
musical other than The Sound of Music. The
doors will open for registration at 2:30 p.m.
on Sunday and 7 p.m. on both Monday and
Wednesday. For details call 451-5437.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 28
Nutcracker Auditions. South Jersey Ballet
School, 415 Commerce Lane, Unit 6-7, West
Berlin. SJ Ballet Theatre will hold open
auditions for its annual production of “The
Nutcracker” to be performed in Voorhees,
Camden County in December. Auditions for
boys and girls, ages 5 to 18. For additional
info. and audition times, call 856-768-1740.
Salute to Veterans Car Cruise. N.J.
Veterans Memorial Home, 524 N.W. Blvd.,
Vineland. 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free. Open to
American cars only and all motorcycles. Hot
food will be available for purchase. Music
will be provided by WVLT 92.1 FM DJ Steve
Tatz. There will also be guest appearances
by radio personalities. A Civil War re-enact-
ment group will also be set up. For details
contact John Thompson at 691-3067.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 30
Texas Roadhouse Night. Texas
Roadhouse, 2299 North 2nd St., Millville.
3:30 - 10 p.m. Hosted by The Friends of
Vineland Public Library, 10 percent of all
food purchases during this time will be
donated to the VPL. Stop in the library for
a coupon and enjoy a wonderful meal
while helping your local library. For more
information, call 794-4244.
SJ Geriatric Marketing Meeting. Baker
House, 685 S. Brewster Rd., Vineland. 2
p.m. Allows those that are involved in
Geriatric care to network with each other
and gain referrals while also gaining use-
ful information to help their patients to
the best of their ability. All those involved
in Geriatric care are welcome to join.
There is no fee, and they are encouraged
to bring business cards and brochures to
promote their company. For details con-
tact Amanda Victor at 691-9111.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31
Five Secrets To Permanent Weight
Loss. Cooper Wellness Center, 6 LaSalle
St., Vineland. 7 - 8 p.m. Class will focus
on methods to lose weight naturally and
be healthier without the use of drugs or
“dieting.” Workshop participants will gain
understanding of the cause of their weight
gain and fatigue, the role of toxicity in
weight gain, and learn about non-drug
solutions. Seating is limited to 20 callers.
Make your reservation today by calling
691-1313.
Bally’s Bus Trip. Leaves from Charlotte
Brago Senior Center, 736 Landis Ave.,
Rosenhayn. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. The bus trip is
open to anyone. Registration is required.
To register, call 455-7332 or 455-6902.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 3
Men’s Prostate Cancer Screening.
South Jersey Healthcare, Scarpa Cancer
Pavilion 1505 W. Sherman Ave., Vineland.
9 a.m. Come learn about PSA testing and
prostate cancer screenings in a casual,
relaxed environment. If you don’t have
health insurance and would like to attend,
RSVP to Christine Gregory at 641-8686.
Grapevine 24-28 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:54 PM Page 25
{
2
6
}
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
|
A
U
G
U
S
T
2
4
,
2
0
1
1
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

AUGUST 24 THROUGH 31
Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W.
Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010.
Karaoke Thursdays with Bob Morgan, 9
p.m.-close, $3 Heinekens, DJ/Dance
Party Fridays 9 p.m.-close, $3 Coronas.
All Sports Packages: MLB Extra Innings,
NBA League Pass, NHL Center Ice, and
NFL Sunday Ticket. $3 23-oz. Coors
Light & $5 23-oz. Blue Moon during ALL
Phillies games! Call for reservations info-
mation.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Nightlife at Neptune Restaurant.
1554 S. Delsea Drive, Vineland. Live DJ
and Trivia. 692-2800.
Karaoke Night. Old Oar House Irish
Pub. 123 N. High St., Millville, 293-1200.
8 p.m.
Salsa Night. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr,, Vineland. Free dance lesson
with DJ Slick Rick. $4 Sangria and
Corona and Corona light bottles. 9 p.m.
765-5977.
Bike Nite. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N.
High St., Millville. 7 p.m. 327-8011.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24
Lonnie Youngblood. Michael Debbi
Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. Buena Vista
Concert Series welcomes the “Prince of
Harlem,” a saxophonist and former band
leader for various blues singers who has
worked with Chuck Berry and Jimi
Hendrix. Family-friendly event is free.
Rain or shine. Seating available, but
bringing a lawn chair is recommended.
Dance floor if weather permits. 7 p.m.
EVERY THURSDAY
Jazz Duos. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue
Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Live
Jazz featuring area's best jazz duos.
6:30-9:30 pm. No cover. Reservations
recommended.
AUGUST 26 THROUGH 28
Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 696-3800. Wed.: Ladies Night,
1/2 price appetizers all night. Happy
Hour Mon.-Sat, 4-6 p.m. $1 off alcoholic
drinks. Fri. and Sat., live entertainment.
Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Sing along with
Zach. Fri.: Trivia at 7 p.m., dance music
at 8 p.m.. Sat: Karaoke with Patty and
Rick. Sun.: Phillies/Nascar..
Nightlife at Villa Fazzolari. Villa
Fazzolari Ristorante & Lounge, 821
Harding Hwy., Buena, 697-7107.
Thurs.: Ladies Night, Mike Yacovelli
Project, 7 p.m.
Fri.: Jazz Night.
Sat.: Italian accordian.
Live Music at Bogart’s. Bogart’s
Bookstore. 210 N. High St., Millville.
8/26: Classic Rock Jazz Trio; 8/27: An
Evening With Merritt and Andrea.
Admission is free. 7 p.m.
Live Music at The Oar House. Old
Oar House Irish Pub. 127 North High St.,
Millville. 9 p.m. 8/26: Ravioli Shanker;
8/27: Me and The Boys; Double Cheese,
in the Beer Garden. For more info., call
293-1200.
EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Top 40 Dance Party w/ DJ Tony
Morrison. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr,, Vineland. A dance party fea-
turing all of the most popular main-
stream dance music. 765-5977.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 25
Gone With The Wind. Landis Theater.
830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 7:30 p.m.
See this classic on the big screen.
Tickets can be purchased at the Box
Office or online at landistheater.com.
691-1121.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 26
Stereo Skyline. Hangar 84. 20 S. 6th St,
Vineland. 7:30 p.m. $10-15. The Long
Island quartet (pictured) brings their brand
of pop-punk/powerpop to the Hangar.
For details visit hangar84music.com.
End of Summer Beach Party with
Games. The Rail. 1252 Harding Hwy.,
Richland. Help make your last summer
memory your best with this beach party.
697-RAIL. 7 p.m.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 27
Gary Puckett. The Landis Theater. 830
E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 6 p.m. $35-45.
Gary Puckett and the Union Gap was
one of the most successful musical
groups of the 1960s. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the Box Office or online at
landistheater.com. For more information,
call 691-1121.
Breast Cancer Motorcycle Poker
Run. The Rail. 1252 Harding Hwy.,
Richland. Proceeds from this event will
go towards breast cancer research. 697-
RAIL. 7 p.m.
Gates. Fuel House Coffee Co. 6636 E.
Landis Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. Also sched-
uled to perform: The Cast Before The
Break, Wess Meets West, The La De Les,
and more TBA. For more info., call 563-
1400.
DJ Tony Macrie. Villa Fazzolari. 821
Harding Hwy., Buena. 8 p.m. Music from
the 60s, 70s, and 80s. For more info.,
call 697-7107.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 27
Thunder In The Park. Giampietro
Park, 2321 East Landis Ave., Vineland.
9 a.m.–6 p.m. Event includes entertain-
ment throughout the day, food and craft
vendors, exhibitors, non-profits, bouncies
for the kids, contests, vintage car show
and more. A Poker Run will take place
with a donation of $20 for bikers, $15
for passengers and will include a chick-
en barbecue platter, corn on the cob,
salad, roll, drink and door prize ticket.
Participation awards to first 100 bikers
to check in. Loud pipes and burnout
contest at 4 p.m. Live bands all day,
including Karen Davis (pictured), oldies
music, rock ‘n roll and bluegrass acts.
Don’t miss this event in which a portion
of proceeds support the future of our
kids. For more info., call Debra at 466-
4654 or Chris at 982-1760.
Grapevine 24-28 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:54 PM Page 26
W
W
W
.
G
R
A
P
E
V
I
N
E
N
E
W
S
P
A
P
E
R
.
C
O
M
|
t
h
e
g
r
a
p
e
v
i
n
e
{
2
7
}
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m.
To order your classified call, 856-457-7815 or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To order your classified, call 856-457-7815 or
visit www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds. See box below for additional ordering information.
Only $10 per ad, per week, up to 20 words; over 20 words,
$0.50 per word. $0.30 for bold—per word/per issue, $3 for a
Border/per issue. Add a photo for $15. Mail Ad & payment or go
online to www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds.
Not responsible for typographical errors. • Once an ad is placed, it cannot be cancelled or charged. The Grapevine does not in any way
imply approval or endorsement. Those interested in goods or services always use good judgment and take appropriate precautions.
Acct. No. ___________________________________Exp. Date________ 3 Digit # on back
of card__________
Signature:__________________________________________
Printed Name:______________________________________
Name ___________________________________
Address__________________________________
City__________________________Zip_________
Phone #: ________________________________
email____________________________________
The Grapevine
3638 E. Landis Ave.
Vineland, NJ 08361
www.grapevinenewspaper.com
Mail Ad
Form with
Payment TO:
Classfieds
Call for more information
856-457-7815
1.____________
2.____________ 3.____________ 4.____________ 5.____________
10.____________
15.____________
9.____________
14.____________ 13.____________
7.____________
12.____________
6.____________
11.____________
20.____________ 19.____________ 18.____________ 17.____________
16.____________
25.____________ 24.____________ 23.____________ 22.____________
21.____________
30.____________ 29.____________ 28.____________ 27.____________
26.____________
35.____________ 34.____________ 33.____________ 32.____________
31.____________
40.____________ 39.____________
42.____________
41.____________
44.____________ 43.____________ 45.____________
47.____________
46.____________
49.____________ 48.____________ 50.____________
38.____________ 37.____________
36.____________
8.____________
Check if needed.
Refer to prices above.
JBold
J Border
CLASSIFIEDS
Need work? Have a business and need more
customers? Why not get the word out through
The Grapevine’s Classified section?
Advertize your skills and business in the
Classifieds by calling 856-457-7815.
Having a Yard Sale or Garage Sale?
It’s time to make room in that attic, garage or
basement, and there’s no better way to get the
word out than to advertise your yard sale in
The Grapevine’s Classifieds.
Use the form below, or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Deadline is Friday for the following Wednesday’s paper.
Credit Cards
Accepted:
Micro Electric LLC.
Residential repair, addi-
tions, and services.
Bonded and insured. “no
job is too small.”
NJ LIC #14256.
Call 609-501-7777
Eugene’s Lawn Service.
Perfecting lawns one at a
time. Mowing. Leaves.
Mulch. Shrubs. Pressure
Washing. Call for free esti-
mate. 856-305-1682
Customer service rep.
needed to work for our
aid. 18 years and above
needed; must possess
good typing skills and
speak English fluently.
Will earn $3,000 monthly.
Email me at
sp7777777@blumail.org. If
interested, contact me.
BARBER/STYLIST
MALE/FEMALE. FOR
EAST VINELAND SHOP.
609-774-5359
Need to raise money? Earn
up to 40% with an Avon
fundraiser. Call 856-332-
6446 for details!
Spaces For Rent! Jess’s
Bazaar, 537 Landis Ave.
Spaces for beauty salons
and hair-braiding. Call
856-507-9500 or visit
jesssbridal.com/bazaar.
For Sale: Retired piano
teacher has collection of
music for sale. Must take
all. Will mail you inventory
sheets. 856-697-1140.
Pool For Sale: 27 foot
round Landi pool, com-
plete with all accessories,
including deck.
Five years old. $2,200.
Call 609-381-3680.
Steelman's Drywall.
Hanging, finishing and
repairs. No job too big or
small. Free estimate. Call
Joe 609-381-3814.
Turk's Pressure Clean.
Property maintenance. Vinyl
and aluminum siding, con-
crete, brick, roof cleaning,
gutter clean-out. Over 25
years in business, fully
insured. (856) 692-7470.
Electrical
Contractor
Health & Fitness
Body and Mind
Massage: profes-
sional therapeutic
massage. New
clients $45.00 for
50 minute massage.
Reg. $65.00 + tax.
856-205-2626.
Outcalls only.
For Sale: 2001 Buick
Century. Custom 6-
cyl. 82,600 miles.
Runs great, looks
great. $5,000.00.
Call 856-696-0745.
White Sweet Corn,
home grown and
picked fresh, hourly.
Sunny Meadow Farm.
Bridgeton on Landis
Ave. 1/2 mile from
Carll's Corner
Jersey Corn For Sale!
Our own fresh Jersey
yellow sweet corn.
Orders welcomed.
13 ears for $5.
856-297-3277
LIKE NEW!!! 20"
Electric Caloric
Range! Perfect for
efficiency apt., lake
house, or RV. ONLY
$185.00 OBO! Call
214-277-2450 or
972-304-1861.
Redefined Spaces
Painting, drywall,
kitchens, bathrooms,
decks, siding, win-
dows, and doors.
Fully licensed &
insured. Great serv-
ice, affordable prices.
Free estimates avail.
Call John Donoflio at
609-670-0604 today!
For Sale • For Sale • For Sale
Business Oppty.
Help Wanted
A CUT ABOVE LAWN
CARE. LAWN MAIN-
TANCE, LEAF CLEAN
UPS, PAVERS,
PATIOS, WALK WAYS,
POOLS & MORE.
FREE ESTIMATE.
ALEX 609-381-8586
Landscaping
Pete Construction.
Specializing in decks,
roofs, and home
remodeling. State
licensed and insured.
Call for a free esti-
mate. 856-507-1456.
Sales Person
Wanted! Yellow page
experience preferred.
Salary plus commis-
sion. Call 856-881-
1225 or email resume
to theweeklyjournal
@comcast.net
Home
Improvement
Miscellaneous
Do you have a car or boat that is
taking up space in your driveway?
Are you hoping to sell your
vehicle for some extra cash?
Publicize the sale of your vehicle
by advertising in The Grapevine’s
Classifieds section. Make your
junk someone else’s treasures.
Selling your Car?
KAYAK/TOURYAK—
Prijon
1 owner, garaged,
1 1/2 yr old, very
good/exc. cond.
Includes balanced
wing rudder, nylon
spray skirt w/
adjustable tunnel.
Color yellow. $1,200.
Werner Camano pad-
dle, amber, exc. cond.,
$175. 609-742-6647
No Math Left
Behind! Tutoring in
math for all ages.
Tuesday and
Thursday currently
open. Call 691-5534
to get your child
ahead of the curve.
Services
Need Computer Help?
PC Troubleshooting,
Wireless Networking,
Email Setup, PC Tune
Up, Internet
Connection Help,
Virus Removal, New
PC Setup etc. Fast,
friendly service.
Reasonable rates.
Call 856-558-9812
Help Wanted
Space for Rent
Home
Improvement
The Grapevine’s
Business Directory Ads
Grow your business with an ad this
size at a price you can afford!
Call 856-457-7815
Grapevine 24-28 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:54 PM Page 27
Lobby Hours All Locations:
Monday - Wednesday: 8:30 AM– 5:00 PM
Thursday & Friday: 8:30 AM – 6:00 PM
Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Drive-Thru Hours All Locations:
Monday- Thursday: 8:00 AM– 6:00 PM
Friday: 8:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234
Our Focus Is You.
Member FDIC
Capital Bank is rated 5 Stars by Bauer Financial.
See your bank’s rating at BauerFinancial.com
Savings rate guaranteed, as a minimum, through 12/31/2011; interest rate may vary thereafter.
Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY).
Checking interest rate may vary. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings.
Or Anytime at CapitalBankNJ.com
Se Habla Español
1.00
%
APY* SAVINGS
No Minimum Balance
Rate Guaranteed to December 31
FEE-FREE CHECKING
With Interest
FREE ATM Transactions • FREE Checks
Grapevine 24-28 082411-de:Layout 1 8/22/11 6:54 PM Page 28