JOURNAL

C M Y K
Clarks Summit, Pa. AUGUST 24 TO AUGUST 31, 2011 50¢ Serving the Greater Abington Community since 1947
P
l
e
a
s
e
e
n
c
l
o
s
e
t
h
i
s
l
a
b
e
l
w
i
t
h
a
n
y
a
d
d
r
e
s
s
c
h
a
n
g
e
s
,
a
n
d
m
a
i
l
t
o
T
h
e
A
b
i
n
g
t
o
n
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
,
2
1
1
S
.
S
t
a
t
e
S
t
,
,
C
l
a
r
k
s
S
u
m
m
i
t
,
P
A
,
1
8
4
1
1
T
h
e
A
b
i
n
g
t
o
n
J
o
u
r
n
a
l
An edition of The Times Leader
THE ABINGTON
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
PennEast
Federal Credit Union
Drive Away In A New or Used Car
with a penn east fcu Auto Loan!
*APR= Annual Percentage Rate. Rate and term received based on creditworthiness. Rates are subject to change without notice; however, rate received at loan closing remains in effect for the life of the loan.
All Auto Rates Have Just Dropped!
FFFFed ed ed ed ed ed eder er er er er er e al al al al a CCCCCre re re re edi di di di di di dittttttt Un Un Un Un U io io io io on
www.penneastfcu.org
Apply Online Today at www.penneastfcu.org
or stop into any location:
Davis Street
720 Davis Street
Clarks Summit
1070 Northern Boulevard
Scranton
441 N. 7th Avenue
A Lackawanna County man was
killed when his Ultralight air-
craft crashed. See Page A3.
RANSOM TWP.
Pilot identified
This year Cocktails on the
Court was held at State Street
Grill. See Page A9.
ABINGTONS
Annual event new venue
Earth Camp took place at the
Abington Area Community
Park. See Page C7.
SOUTH ABINGTON TWP.
Creative by nature
The USA Powerlifting 2011 Raw
National Championship took
place at Hilton. See Page C10.
SCRANTON
Hilton hosts powerlifters
ArtsEtc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C1
Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A2
Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B1
Crosswords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A11
Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A8
School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A7, C6- 8
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .C9
INSIDE
The Abington
Farmers’ Market in
South Abington
Township and
Essential Eating
Farmers’ Market in
Chinchilla are now
open for business.
See Page A5.
Homegrown
Harvest
Lackawanna Trail Jr./Sr. HighSchool
Principal JohnRushefski recalleda member
of the school’s class of 2009whodiedearly
Aug. 19ina one-vehicle crashinLackawan-
na County.
“Without question,
football was associated
withKyle Locker,” said
Rushefski, whowas also
workingat the highschool
whenLocker attended.
“He was always a friendly
student whowouldcome
backtoTrail tocheer onfootball.”
Kyle JohnLocker, 21, of Daltonwas a
passenger killedinthe crash, accordingto
Lackawanna CountyCoroner Timothy
Rowland. Driver SeanMichael Barrett, 22,
DicksonCity, was ejectedfromthe vehicle
andreceivedcritical injuries, accordingto
police. The crashoccurredat the Exit 188
on-ramptoInterstate 81northboundat
approximately12:43a.m. this morning,
Aug. 19, accordingtoPennsylvania State
Police at Dunmore. Twoother passengers,
Kaycee Pezak, 22, Jessup, andElizabeth
McManus, 20, Scott Twp., hadtobe extri-
catedfromthe vehicle bymechanical
means, accordingtopolice.
Rushefski saidthat Aug. 19, Lackawanna
Trail football coachSteve Jervis spoke with
members of the school’s football teamwho
were freshmenwhenLocker was a senior.
“Theyhada moment toreflect andremem-
ber.” He saidthe players andcheerleading
squaddefinitelywantedto“acknowledge
that his deathwas trulya tragedy.”
Principal:
Crash victim
‘first-class’
volunteer
Dalton man, 21, dies in I-81 crash;
accident injures three others
BY KRISTIE GRIER CERUTI
Abington Journal Editor
Kyle Locker
See Victim, Page 3
DUNMORE- Nearly two dozen friends
gathered outside the Pennsylvania State
Police barracks Aug. 22 when David M.
Ranakoski turned himself into police
custody at 11 a.m. Pennsylvania State
police have filed charges against the
17-year-old Scranton driver of a Ford
Focus that struck a Jeep on Dark Region
Road in Ransom Twp. in May. These
charges stem from a crash in which 22-
month-old Cole Thomas Hazelton
Driver, 17,
faces charges
in Ransom
Twp. crash
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
Abington Journal Reporter
ABINGTON JOURNAL /JASON RIEDMILLER
David M. Ranakoski, left, turns himself in at
the Pennsylvania State Police barracks in
Dunmore Aug. 22 . He faces charges that
include homicide by vehicle, a criminal com-
plaint filed .
See Driver, Page 3
We asked youngsters visiting the Abington Community Library:
“How do you envision Clarks Summit in 100 years.”
Alexander Robert Krenitsky, 8,
Clarks Summit, said Clarks Summit
people would all be robots. The
planet would have three suns,
three moons and blue grass.
Susan Dritts, 9, Clarks Summit,
said Clarks Summit would have
new things like flying cars and
airplanes that could walk or a
leaning tower of pizza.
Jacob Weinberg, 10, South Abing-
ton Twp. said people would com-
municate through watches and
candy will be very expensive.
C
entennial Day co-
chair, Julia Munley,
an attorney with
Munley & Cartwright, said
the upcoming
Centennial
weekend will
have a “com-
munity carni-
val atmosphere
and will be
the highlight
of the year-
long Clarks
Summit Cen-
tennial Cele-
bration.”
There will
be no shortage
of fun August
26 and 27 as
the weekend
gets underway
with the Rag-
time Rumble
reception Fri-
day evening
from 6 to 8
p.m. at Nichols Village
Hotel & Spa,1101 Northern
Boulevard in Clarks Sum-
mit. Attendees are invited
to wear a period costume if
they choose and spend the
evening mingling with
friends and neighbors. Cel-
ebrate the borough’s 100th
birthday with a cocktail
and enjoy the
fare from a
variety of local
restaurants in-
cluding Nichols
Village, which
is providing an
in- kind dona-
tion of their
facility, food,
venue and staff
for Ragtime
Rumble night;
Bazil/Basilico;
Formosa; Cara-
via; Cangiano’s;
Amici; Atlantic
Fish; Akita and
State Street
Grill. Beverages
will be provid-
ed by Maiolate-
si Wine Cellars
and Summit
Beverage.
Tickets for Ragtime
Rumble Centennial Party
August 26 are $20 and
Much has changed in Clarks
Summit during the past 100 years
and much has stayed the same.
Gone is the splendor of the Come-
rford Theatre. There are no longer
hearty greetings at Keen’s Pharma-
cy soda bar or the buzz of the
Northern Electric trolley.
But pedestrians can still expect a
greeting froma passerby, be it a
friend or stranger. It’s no surprise to
wake on a snowy morning to find
the walk already shoveled by a
neighbor. The business district and
school systemstill thrive. There is
an unparalleled spirit of patriotism
and community that champions
veterans monuments, libraries and
parks, civic activities and places of
worship. That character can be
seen in streets lined with American
flags, lawns decorated for the holi-
days and a procession of parades,
festivals and events.
Time marches on but the in-
spiration for progress —from100
years ago to today —still remains
as Clarks Summit and its neigh-
boring communities forge a path
into the next century.
The Abington Journal invites the
community to visit our open house
Aug. 27 from10 a.m. to1p.m.
during the celebration.
Letter from the
EDITOR
Celebrate 100 years of
history this weekend
By JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Abington Journal Correspondent
See Celebrate, Page 7
INSIDE
Special Centennial Section
Schedule of Events - PAGE 6
Centennial Map - PAGE 7
For more coverage, see
theabingtonjournal.com
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ALEX SEELEY
C M Y K
PAGE 2A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
YOUR COMMUNITY
211 S. State St., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA 18411 • 570-587-1148
NEWS@THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM
EDITOR KRISTIE GRIER CERUTI
585-1604 / kgrier@theabingtonjournal.com
STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS
ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
585-1606 / lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
585-1600 / rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
DON MCGLYNN
585-1601 / dmcglynn@theabingtonjournal.com
RETAIL ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
T’SHAIYA STEPHENSON
585-1602 / tstephenson@timesleader.com
KAREN FISCUS
558-0845 / kfiscus@timesleader.com
CLASSIFIED ADVISOR
LINDA BYRNES
970-7189 / lbyrnes@timesleader.com
COVERAGE AREA: The Abington Journal, a weekly community newspaper
that is part of Impressions Media in Wilkes-Barre, PA, covers the “Abingtons”
area of Lackawanna and Wyoming counties. This includes but is not limited to
Clarks Summit, Clarks Green, South Abington, Newton, Ransom, Glenburn,
Dalton, La Plume, Factoryville, Waverly, Tunkhannock and the Abington
Heights, Lackawanna Trail and Lakeland school districts.
Our circulation hovers between 2,000 and 3,000 readers. We try to get to as
many events as possible, but staff and space limitations make it impossible to
cover everything. If you have news about your family, town or organization,
please send it to us and we’ll do our best to publish it. Photographs (with
captions) are welcome.
CORRECTIONS, clarifications: The Abington Journal will correct errors of
fact or clarify any misunderstandings created by a story. Call 587-1148. Have a
story idea? Please call. We’d like to hear about it. Letters: The Abington Journal
prints all letters, which have local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The Abington
Journal, 211 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411. All letters must be signed
and include a phone number where we can reach the author. Editor reserves
the right to edit or reject any item submitted. Deadline is noon, Friday prior to
publication. Want a photo that has appeared? We can provide color prints of
photos taken by our staff. Prices: 8x10 - $25; 5x7 - $12. Call, mail in, or stop by
to order.
CIRCULATION
Orders for subscription received by Friday at noon will begin the following
week. See box at right for subscription prices. Local subscriptions should arrive
Wednesdays. Please inform us of damage or delay. Call 587-1148. The Abing-
ton Journal (USPS 542-460), 211 S. State St., PO Box 277, Clarks Summit, PA
18411. Published weekly by Wilkes Barre Publishing Company, 211S. State St.,
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411. $20 per year, in Lackawanna and Wyoming counties
(PA); $24 elsewhere in PA and additional offices. Periodicals postage paid at
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411, and at additional offices.
ISSN. NO. 1931-8871, VOL. 85, ISSUE NO. 34
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Abington Journal, 211 South
State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411.
©COPYRIGHT 2011: Entire contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. No
part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the express
written consent of the publisher.
ADVERTISING
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Mondays at 10 a.m.
DISPLAY ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Thursday at 5 p.m.
CALL 587-1148 (Thursday at noon if proof required.)
We have a variety of rates and programs to suit your advertising needs. The
Abington Journal satisfies most co-op ad programs. Creative services at no
charge. Combination rates with The Dallas Post, Dallas, available. We can pro-
duce your newsletter, flyer or newspaper. Call for quotes on typesetting, pro-
duction and printing.
Complete and mail in this form, or call 587-1148
Name _________________________________________
Mail Address ____________________________________
City _________________________State _____ Zip _____
Phone ________________________________________
RATES 1 Year 2 Years
Lackawanna & Wyoming counties $20 $35
Other PA, NY or NJ $24 $42
All Other States $27 $48
Return completed formwith payment to: The Abington Journal, 211S. State St.,
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
THE ABINGTON
JOURNAL
A Commemorative Blood Drive will be hosted by the Clarks Summit Fire Company, 321
Bedford Street, on Saturday Sept. 10 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. It is being held in remem-
brance of those who died on Sept. 11, 2001 and in recognition of all who serve and protect us
every day.
The need for blood is constant, and blood levels remain in a critically low condition through-
out the area. However, just one pint of donated blood can save up to three lives.
If you are looking for a meaningful way to remember those who died, whether busboys,
bankers, airline passengers, police officers or firefighters, or a tangible way to recognize and
honor our military and other front-line responders, what better way than to donate your blood
to help save another’s life?
Blood drive to honor victims of 9/11
DAILY EVENTS
August 24: Family Lung
Health Awareness Day, at the
Viewmont Mall from10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Sponsored by the Amer-
ican Lung Association in Penn-
sylvania.Features lung function
testing by the Luzerne County
Community College Respira-
tory Department, games, educa-
tional displays and handout-
s.Area agencies such as the
Pennsylvania Department of
Health will be available to an-
swer questions about lung dis-
ease. Cost: Free.
Waverly Community House
Playground Project Ground-
breaking Ceremony, on the
back lawn of the Comm, 1115 N
Abington Road, at noon. In
commemoration of the first day
of the Comm’s Playground
Project Rebuild.
August 25: Fundraising
event for “Walk the Talk ... for
the Cure” team at Patsel’s in
Clarks Summit. The team will
participate in the Avon Walk
for Breast Cancer in New York
scheduled for Oct. 15 and 16.
Cost: $50 includes heavy appe-
tizers and live entertainment.
Cash bar. Silent auctions will
include: one -night stay at
NYC’s Michelangelo Hotel,
located between Times Square
and Radio City Music Hall, a
Junior Suite, valued at $925/
night. Info: Event tickets must
be prepaid within a week of the
event with payment mailed to:
Carmina Rinkunas at 2005
Elden Drive, Clarks Summit,
PA18411.
Summer Acrylic Painting
Classes, at the Abington Senior
Community Center from1 to
2:30 p.m. Cost: $8. Sign up a
week in advance. Info:
586.8996.
August 26: Lackawanna
County George Wesley Noon-
time Concert, from noon to 1
p.m. on the Linden Street side
of the Courthouse. Info:
963.6800 ext. 1854.
Ragtime Rumble, presented
by the Clarks Summit Borough
Centennial Committee, at Ni-
chols Village from 6 to 8 p.m.
Cost: $20. Tickets available for
sale at The Abington Journal,
Angels Galleria, Sole to Soul,
Sanderson Place, Everything
Natural, Artisans Image, Lynn’s
Hallmark, Clarks Summit Bor-
ough Bldg., Kidazzle and Ni-
chols Village.
St. Stanislaus Polish National
Catholic Cathedral Block Party,
from 5 to 10 p.m. continuing
through the 27th. Corner of
Pittston Avenue and East Elm
Street, Scranton. Features a
variety of foods, drinks, games
and music. Info: 961.9231 or
www.saintstanislauspncc.org.
Spirited: A Visitation From
Jonathan and Janet, at Coun-
tryside Community Church at 7
p.m. Daily columnist and hu-
morist Jonathan Richard Cring
and master musician Janet
Clazzy will be performing for
an evening of music and mono-
logue, including readings from
Mr. Cring’s book Digging for
Gold with original musical
tunes performed by Ms. Clazzy
on the oboe and WX-5 Wind
Machine. Info: 587-3206 or
countryside-church.org
Square Dance and Polka
Party on Friday, at the Irem
Temple Country Club Pavilion
in Dallas from 7 to 11 p.m.
Hosted by the Volunteers of
America. Featuring Joe Stanky
and the Cadets. “Red” Jones
and Joe McKeown will be call-
ing the square dance and Eddie
Derwin and the Polka Naturals
will also be playing polka fa-
vorites. Cost: $10 with proceeds
to benefit the local programs of
Volunteers of America. Info/
tickets: 825.5261.
St. John’s Russian Orthodox
Cathedral Homemade Pirogie
Sale, at the church center locat-
ed on Hill Street, Mayfield,
from noon to 4 p.m. Home-
made pirogie will be sold on
first come first serve basis for
$6 per dozen.
August 27:
Spirit of Phila-
delphia Cruise, Show and Din-
ner, hosted by St. Joseph’s Se-
nior Social Club. Stop at Mt.
Airy Casino with a $35 coin
rebate. Info: Theresa 654.2967.
Music on the Lawn and Craft
Show, at Lake Winola United
Methodist Church on Maple
Drive in Mill City. Begins at 2
p.m. Cost: $9. Info/tickets:
351.7365.
The University of Scranton
baseball team Prospect Show-
cases, from12 to 5 p.m. at
Connell Park in Scranton. Cost:
$80. Info: bartolettim2@scran-
ton.edu.
The NEPA Bonsai Society’s
21st Annual Open House, from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Midway
Garden Center 1865 Highway
315, Pittston. The event will
include a large bonsai tree dis-
play by the society’s members,
various demonstrations
throughout the day, bonsai trees
and related items for sale,
Shakuhachi flute entertainment
by Jamie Orfanella, and a bon-
sai tree competition open to all
members. Info: 654.6194.
St. Joseph’s Senior Social
Club Trip on The Spirit of Phil
With a stop on the way homeat
the Mount Airy Casino. Cost:
$85, which includes a$35 slot
play at the casino.
Kayla McGrady Memorial
Benefit, at the Kingston Amer-
ican Legion 386 Wyoming
Ave., at 4:30 p.m. There will be
food, drinks, DJ, Chinese raffle,
and memorial souvenirs. All
proceeds will go to the Kayla
McGrady Scholarship for 2013,
her graduation year. Cost: $20
for adults, $6 for Children and
Friends of Kayla, and free for
kids under. Tickets/Info:
288.1794. Donations can also
be sent to: Margaret & Richard
Rovine, 121 Penn St., Kingston,
PA ,18704.
Benefit Horse Show for the
Over The Hill Farm, at the
Aberdeen Stables, 1121 Aber-
deen Road, Madisonville, start-
ing at 8 a.m. There will be
various riding classes, including
Western, English, Hunter/
Jumper and Driving. There will
also be raffles, silent auctions,
bake sales and food.
Shop for a Cause Macy’s
March of Dimes Fundraiser.
For $5, customers can purchase
a savings pass that offers 25
percent off most regular, sale
and clearance purchases at the
store or online all day. (Some
exclusions apply.) Macy’s will
donate 100 percent of the $5
cost of the savings pass to the
March of Dimes to help give
more babies a healthy start in
life.
August 28: 2011 Children’s
Miracle Network Charity Golf
Event benefiting Janet Weis
Children’s Hospital pediatric
services, at Sand Springs Coun-
try Club on Clubhouse Drive in
Drums. Hosted by McLane of
Jessup. Cost $75 per golfer or
$300 per team. Info: 330.8470
or lperry@mclaneco.com.
Five days, four nights trip to
Cape Cod Mass., runs to Sept
1. Includes transportation,
meals, tours, taxes, gratuities.
Info: 654.2967
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
Photographs from Earth
Camp that appeared in the
Aug. 17 edition were incor-
rectly cropped. They appear
correctly this week on Page
C7.
We regret the error.
EDITOR’S NOTE
Editor,
This year, there are three
candidates for school direc-
tor at-large: Mike Fleming,
Frank Santoriello and Tom
Brogan.
Mr. Brogan is the “union
candidate.” I say the union
candidate for the following
reasons: Until recently he
was a member of the AHEA
union leadership and chair-
man of the grievance com-
mittee, filing grievances and
bringing the school district to
court on behalf of the union,
costing taxpayer dollars in
the process. During the pri-
mary in May, phone calls in
support of Mr. Brogan appar-
ently came from the local
AHEA union and the state
PSEA teacher’s union. These
are the organizations that
have endorsed Mr. Brogan.
As a society, we rail at the
thought of special interests
influencing all levels of our
political systems. Do we
want the AHEA Union lead-
ership to have this type of
access to a local decision-
making entity with such a
direct impact on our commu-
nity?
You will meet the candi-
dates around town and you
should ask questions – ques-
tions especially on the candi-
dates’ views, positions and
bodies of work over time in
the district. It can be an in-
dicator of their future ac-
tions. I believe that Mr. Bro-
gan has a body of work that
does not lend itself to garner
your vote. Please ask him the
following:
1) Why did he participate
in the strikes against Abing-
ton Heights School District?
The board’s approval of the
current contract, in 2007,
was the first time since 1985
that Mr. Brogan and the
union did not strike while in
the midst of contract negotia-
tions.
2) Does he support the
union’s position of not taking
a one-year pay freeze for
2011–2012, but asking ap-
prox. $ 9.8 million in in-
creases over 5 years? The
equivalent of 47.76 mils of
tax increases. 3) Should the
union contribute to their
health insurance premiums?
4) How can he separate the
interest of the union lead-
ership from that of the dis-
trict? I believe that with the
union’s support of his candi-
dacy he cannot.
I am a director on the
board and running for re-
election. I have formed a
ticket with Mr. Mike Flem-
ing for the upcoming elec-
tion. While Mike and I do
not agree on every issue, we
are like-minded in that we
want to maintain or improve
the district’s high quality of
education at a fair value to
the taxpayers. We have no
hidden agendas. We will
work our best to be outstand-
ing stewards of your money
and the Abington Heights
School District.
Frank Santoriello
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Editor:
I would like to offer a
thank you to the NEPA
Miners for helping make
the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
Affiliate of the Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network’s
Second Annual Pancreatic
Cancer Awareness Night
July 17 a tremendous suc-
cess.
With the support of the
NEPA Miners organiza-
tion and the fans who
came out to support our
efforts, we were able to
raise much needed aware-
ness about pancreatic can-
cer, share our personal
stories as volunteers who
have been affected by this
horrible disease but most
importantly continue our
efforts in creating hope in
finding a cure for pan-
creatic cancer.
It is through events like
Pancreatic Cancer Aware-
ness Night with the NEPA
Miners that we can make
a difference in this fight.
Thank you again to all of
those involved, and we
look forward to our Third
Annual Pancreatic Cancer
Awareness Night next
year.
Pancreatic cancer is the
fourth leading cause of
cancer death in the United
States, with just six per-
cent of patients surviving
more than five years. De-
spite these terrifying sta-
tistics the National Can-
cer Institute (NCI) only
allocates two percent of
its research funding to
pancreatic cancer.
More funding needs to
be allocated to finding a
cure, and on July 17 we
took another step in the
right direction by educat-
ing the public on the need
to continue to raise
awareness throughout our
community about this
disease.
November is Pancreatic
Cancer Awareness Month
and the volunteers
throughout our area will
continue our efforts to
fight pancreatic cancer
throughout our communi-
ty. To learn more about
the Scranton/W-B Affil-
iate of the Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network
and ways you can join the
fight against pancreatic
cancer, please visit Pan-
can.org/Scranton
Taryn JonesClarks
Summit
Pinked on the Patio, a fundraiser to benefit the American
Cancer Society’s Breast Cancer Awareness Programs, is to be
held on Sept. 9 from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Abington Manor, 100
Edella Road, Clarks Summit. The event will feature “Pinked”
around the world hors’de’oeuvres and cocktails. There will also
be “Pinked” shirts and hats for sale.
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Shown, from left: Kathy Rowinski, Timmie Ott, Beth McGuigan, Lori
Zeshonski, and Linda Heath. Absent from photo is Elaine Shepard, of
Classic Properties, Clarks Summit.
Pinked on the Patio returns
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
State Police forensic team drives into the scene of a fatal plane crash
several hundred yards off Creek Road in Ransom Twp. in Lackawanna
County on Aug. 17. A section of Creek Road in Ransom Township,
Lackawanna County, was closed by state police investigating a plane
crash that killed the 67-year-old pilot.
RANSOMTWP. - A Lacka-
wanna County man was killed
when his Ultralight aircraft
crashed in a wooded area off
Creek Road on Aug. 17 ap-
proximately 300 yards from
the roadway, according to
state police.
The Lackawanna County
Coroner’s Office identified
the man as William Spear, 67.
An autopsy was completed by
Lackawanna County Coroner
Tim Rowland, who said the
cause of death was “multiple
traumatic injuries,” and the
manor of death accidental.
State police at Dunmore
said the plane went down
August 17 in the woods ap-
proximately 300 yards from
Creek Road at about 6:10
p.m.
Spear was transported to
the Community Medical Cen-
ter, Scranton, where he died
from injuries suffered in the
accident.
The National Transporta-
tion Safety Board and the
Federal Aviation Adminis-
tration were called to the
scene for investigation.
Arlene Salac, an FAA spo-
keswoman, said there was
only one person on board the
aircraft.
“The FAA will have in-
vestigators on the scene,” she
said, adding, “The NTSB is
the ultimate agency that is
going to determine the
cause.”
According to Nicholas
Worrell of the NTSB, the
on-scene part of the investiga-
tion has been completed and
a report will be released with-
in 10 to 20 business days,
followed by a final report
when the investigation is
complete, which normally
takes six months to a year.
The aircraft was a Chal-
lenger II manufactured in
1992 by the Quad City Ultra-
light Corp. The fixed-wing,
single-engine plane was clas-
sified as an experimental
aircraft and amateur built.
William and Beverly
Brown, who live near the
crash site, thought their prop-
erty might be in danger.
“It was coming down right
near our house about 100-300
feet away,” William Brown
said. “The plane was sputter-
ing really bad, the motor
revved up high and the plane
shot straight up into the air.
After it shot up, we heard it
crash into the trees about 15
seconds later. It was very
close to the house, we thought
it might crash into our garage
or house, but the pilot was
able to get it off the ground
again unfortunately he
couldn’t save it.”
The FAA registry listed the
aircraft as registered to Spear,
of Ransom Road, Ransom
Township.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JASON RIEDMILLER
A hangar for the aircraft that was involved in the crash is shown above, along with a neighboring hangar.
“It was coming down right near our house about 100-300 feet away. The plane
was sputtering really bad, the motor revved up high and the plane shot straight up into the
air. After it shot up, we heard it crash into the trees about 15 seconds later. ”
WilliamBrown, RansomTownship resident
Pilot in crash identified
BY ABINGTON JOURNAL AND
TIMES LEADER STAFFS
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 3A
Rushefski said that while
Locker was a senior at Lacka-
wanna Trail, he and two other
students requested permission
of Rushefski to dedicate their
senior project to refurbishing the
school’s weight room. Rushefski
added that four years later the
benches they painted and equip-
ment the covered is still in good
condition. “They worked really
hard. They did a first-class job.”
Locker was a student and
football player at Lackawanna
College. According to the
school’s website, Locker was a
freshman offensive lineman
during the 2010-11season. The
college posted the following to
its Facebook page Friday after-
noon: “The Lackawanna Col-
lege family would like to ex-
press condolences to the family
of student-athlete Kyle Locker
who passed away in a car acci-
dent this morning. We are all
saddened by the loss of a fellow
Falcon. Grief counselors are
available to students in the Stu-
dent Affairs office.”
Asource close to the family
who wished to remain anony-
mous said that, as a youth,
Locker was a Cub Scout with
Pack 21in Dickson City.
Trooper Thomas J. Krem-
pasky said that the crash oc-
curred as the vehicle, traveling
north on the Exit 188 on-ramp
lost control while negotiating a
right curve in the roadway. He
stated that in doing so, the vehi-
cle traveled off the roadway and
struck a light pole with its right
side. Both Locker and Barrett
did not have seat belts in use,
according to police. Pezak, who
received moderate injuries and
McManus, who received serious
injuries, were both wearing seat
belts. According to police, a
preliminary investigation re-
vealed that alcohol was a con-
tributing factor in the crash.
Anyone with information is
asked to contact Pennsylvania
State Police at Dunmore at
570.963.3156.
Locker’s funeral will be held
Aug.24 at the Frank T. Mazur
Funeral Home, Inc. 601Dundaff
St., Dickson City, with mass at
9:30 a.m. in St. Mary’s Vis-
itation Church, Dickson City.
Everyone attending is asked to
go directly to the Church. En-
tombment, St. Mary’s Mauso-
leum, Dickson City.
VICTIM
Continued from Page 1
On August 24 at noon,
the Waverly Community
House will hold a ground-
breaking ceremony on the
back lawn to commemorate
the first day of the Comm’s
Playground Project Re-
build. The public is in-
vited. The Waverly Com-
munity House is located at
1115 North Abington Road
in Waverly.
According to Executive
Director, when the play-
ground at The Comm was
inspected several safety
regulations were found; the
wood was splintering, and
new safety codes have been
put into effect after the
playground had been built
in 1990.
The restoration will be to
increase visibility of the
playground and redo the
woodwork. While it will be
an updated version with
polyvinyl chloride (PVC)
on the deck and handrails
and arsenic-free pressure-
treated wood, the layout
will remain the same.
First row, standing, from left: Camille Marquardt, Donna Khademi, Erich
Olsen, Haqique Mirza, Hayley Updyke, Peyton Reese, Hannah Gilbert
and Logan Finn (in mask). Second row: Casey Clark, Jeremy Schobel
(Counselor), Ethan Jones (Counselor) and Erich Olsen (Counselor in
Training). Foreground, far left: Kento Matsui (hidden), Duncan Breig and
Antonio Maletta.
From the
ground up
died.
Ranakoski faces charges
that include homicide by
vehicle, aggravated assault,
possession of a controlled
substance, driving under the
influence of alcohol or con-
trolled substance, driving
vehicle at safe speed and
driving while operating privi-
lege is suspended or revoked,
according to a criminal com-
plaint filed with District
Magistrate James Gibbons.
Ranakoski and his attorney
Gerald Karam declined to
comment on the case.
Deputy District Attorney
Robert Klein commented on
concerns about the delay in
charges being filed.
“We did a thorough in-
vestigation and had an acci-
dent reconstruction done,”
Klein said. “We filed the
appropriate charges and the
preliminary hearing will be
the next step in the case…
We relied on the expertise of
the state police who did the
reconstruction.”
According to Klein, there
will be other charges coming
forward. There are juvenile
petitions that will be filed
and the other adult in the car,
Patrick Molnar, will be
charged with simple posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance.
Ranakoski was given a
three- day voluntary surren-
dering period to police after
the charges were filed. Ac-
cording to Klein, it was done
as a scheduling matter to
make sure the Common-
wealth was present for the
arraignment and the bail
conditions.
“It’s just the way the case
has worked out,” Klein said.
“No two cases are alike. Our
thoughts are prayers are with
the family. It’s just unfathom-
able what it’s like to lose a
22-month -old. I can’t even
wrap my head around that.
Our sympathies go out to the
family. We hope they can
find the strength to go on
every day.
Court papers allege that
marijuana may have played a
part in the accident. Klein
did not comment directly on
this case, but talked about the
dangers of young people
driving under the influence
of drugs or alcohol.
“We won’t comment on
any details of the case while
it’s ongoing. But generally
speaking, any time that any
type of illegal substance, or
for that matter when a young
person is using alcohol and
compound it by getting be-
hind the wheel of a vehicle,
nothing good can ever come
from that,” Klein said.
Ranakoski was allegedly
smoking marijuana while
driving May 9, according to
police reports and blood
analysis reports. At that time
his vehicle rear-ended a Jeep
on Dark Region Road, occu-
pants in the Jeep were An-
drew Carullo, 25, of Scran-
ton; Ashley Jennifer Hazel-
ton, 21, of Scranton, who was
driving and her child, Cole.
According to police, Cole
Hazelton died as a result of
the collision and subsequent
fire. At that time Carullo and
Ashley Jennifer Hazelton
received severe burns and
were life-flighted from Com-
munity Medical Center in
Scranton to the Lehigh Val-
ley Medical Center.
The preliminary hearing
will held Sept. 1 at 9:15 a.m.
Bail was set a $50,000
straight bail. If Ranakoski is
capable of posting bail, there
are several conditions that
would kick in, including
abstaining from drugs and
alcohol through a color mon-
itoring system, avoiding con-
tact with the victims or co-
defendants, refraining from
driving a vehicle and agree-
ing not to commit any further
crimes.
At Lackawanna County
Central Court, Aug. 11 it was
stated that Ranakoski is not
expected to post bail and his
arraignment and he will be
remanded to the Lackawanna
County Prison.
DRIVER
Continued from Page 1
ABINGTON JOURNAL /JASON RIEDMILLER
David M. Ranakoski, center, turns himself in at the Pennsylvania State
Police barracks in Dunmore today, Aug. 22 at 11 a.m.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JASON RIEDMILLER
A crowd gathers
Aug. 22 at the
barracks of Penn-
sylvania State
Police at Dunmore
where David M.
Ranakoski turned
himself in at 11
a.m.
C M Y K
PAGE 4A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
many complications. He
needed meds to keep his
blood pressure up. He was
on complete life support.
“It was to the point where
they told us if they didn’t see
a change in 24 hours after
the third day, we would have
to consider pulling the plug.
We even had a priest give
himanointing of the sick.
Then, in the next 24 hours,
he moved his arm,” Morris
paused. “Fromthat moment
on we continued with treat-
ment.”
Treatment meant eventu-
ally transferring to the Chil-
dren’s Hospital in Philadel-
phia. According to Ralphie’s
mother, he could not sit up,
swallow…he did nothing.
He had no control over his
bodily functions. The phys-
ical therapy, occupational
therapy and speech therapy
continued seven days a
week. They actually gave
hima medication to bring
himout of the coma. One
that helps children become
more aware of what’s around
them. When he reached the
point where he was actually
looking around, they started
himon Ridalin to help with
his attention span.
“Finally, he started to talk
and swallow. It literally was
like himlearning his first
words all over again,” Morris
said. Ralphie could not move
his right side at all, and it
became apparent where the
damage was not repairing.
When he left Children’s
Hospital, he wasn’t walking
independently. He could
walk if somebody was guid-
ing himand use a wheel-
chair. Over the course of
time, Ralphie relearned
everything, and with the help
of a specially made leg brace
could walk independently.
But, using his right hand is
still a challenge. Which is
where the SaeboFlex comes
into play.
According to Ralphie’s
mother, his occupational
therapist thought the Sae-
boFlex might be the answer
despite the fact it was used
for adults and they didn’t
knowif there was one small
enough. Ralphie is on his
second SaeboFlex over the
last two plus years and he
said, “I’mtrying to eat food
with it nowlike pretzels and
grahamcrackers. With Sae-
CLARKSSUMMIT- For
Margie Morris, the Sae-
boFlex has been just another
in a long line of miracles.
The SaeboFlex allows indi-
viduals suffering fromneur-
ological impairments such as
stroke the ability to incorpo-
rate their hand functionally
in therapy and at home by
supporting the weakened
wrist, hand and fingers. The
SaeboFlex is a customfab-
ricated orthosis that is non-
electrically based and is
purely mechanical, Public
Relations Specialist for Al-
lied Services Foundation
Julie Judge explained.
What is unique in Margie’s
case is that the SaeboFlex is
being used by her soon-to-be
12-year-old son, Ralphie
Morris.
Back in December of
2007, Margie and her family
were involved in a car acci-
dent. “Ralphie and his broth-
er, Matthew, actually hit
heads. Fromthe moment of
the accident, Ralphie was
unconscious. He was alive
and his brother was critically
injured. His sister and myself
were OK. We went to CMC
where we were flown to
Geisinger in Danville. Mat-
thewneeded surgery to sur-
vive. He did well and has
fully recovered. It’s really
remarkable,” Morris said.
Ralphie, however, had a
fractured skull bleeding
throughout his entire brain –
both sides of his brain. He
was in a coma and complete-
ly unresponsive. He had
bo, I can do it. I can even
pick up a teeny tiny peg with
the Saebo on.”
Fromthe time Ralphie
started using the Saebo, his
mother said he can open his
hand up and release an ob-
ject. He can not do it without
the device. “Emotionally, for
him, it’s like I can do this and
maybe there’s hope he will
eventually without his Sae-
bo. But, for now, it’s an
amazing process. He’s an
amazing kid. He’s still play-
ing the piano with his one
hand and will continue to try
with both hands,” Morris
said. Allied Services offers
screenings for the Saebo-
Flex. “Saebo’s pioneering
treatment principles are
based on the latest advances
in neurorehabilitation re-
search documenting the
brain’s ability to “re-pro-
gram” itself through mass
practice, task oriented arm
training. The SaeboFlex
takes advantage of the most
recent research by allowing
patients to immediately
begin using their hand for
functional grasp and release
activities. Individuals up to
20 years post neurological
injury can benefit fromthe
SaeboFlex. In addition the
ability to use the hand in
therapy and at home has
been reported as extremely
motivating during the recov-
ery process,” Julie Judge
explained.
Screenings and fittings are
available through Allied
Rehab in Scranton. For more
information call
570.348.1498.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
Ralphie Morris, 12, of Dickson City, demonstrates the SaeboFlex as Stephanie Maciolek, Director of
Outpatient Therapy at Allied looks on.
Against all odds
SaeboFlex allows individuals suffering from neurological impair-
ments the ability to incorporate their hand functionally in therapy
and at home.
BY KELLY MCDONOUGH
Abington Journal Correspondent
Ralphie Morris, 12, of Dickson
City, with Stephanie Maciolek,
Director of Outpatient Occupa-
tional Therapy at Allied, dem-
onstrates how the SaeboFlex
helps him to grasp objects with
his hand.
CLARKS GREEN- This
month’s meeting of the Clarks
Green Borough Council Aug.
8 was continued to Aug. 22 to
vote on Resolution 1-2011. The
resolution concerns Act 537,
the Pennsylvania Sewage Fa-
cilities Act, which provides
various plans for maintaining
the community’s sewers and
long term needs of the waste-
water treatment facility. The
plan is part of the Abington
Regional Wastewater Author-
ity’s new facility that serves
Clarks Green, Clarks Summit,
and South Abington.
Before passing the resolu-
tion, council heard from David
Gromelski, the Clarks Green
representative to the Authority.
He addressed the concerns of
council member, Lynne Earley
about tapping fees, Marcellus
Shale fracking water, as well
as the possibility of other com-
munities eventually being
included in the Authority.
Gromelski confirmed that a
tapping fee for communities
being added to the system was
now in place. He stated that it
was a possibility that in the
future other communities
could be added but that they
would be required to pay the
tapping fee upon joining. He
also addressed the issue of the
Authority not bidding out the
building plans and explained
that he felt it was a wise deci-
sion to for the Authority to
choose a company they were
already familiar with and the
bidding process was better
invested in the actual construc-
tion of the plant.
After discussing these issues
the council voted four to two
to pass the resolution. Council
member Victor Alberigi voted
in favor but with reluctance, as
he said he would have pre-
ferred the building plans to
have been bid out. Council
woman Jill Shanrock voted
against the resolution because
she was not part of the council
when they first joined the
Authority and began discuss-
ing the plant. Council also
voted on sending a letter to the
Authority stating their prefer-
ence that the plant not treat
fracking water any time in the
future.
This Aug. 8 meeting fea-
tured a visit from Senator John
Blake .
The senator brought up the
Marcellus Shale drilling, call-
ing it “forefront and center”
and predicted debates on the
subject when he returns to
Harrisburg in September.
Council member Marnie O’
Dea Palmer said, “Our con-
cern is damage that will be
done to roads and who will
pay for it.” Blake added that
these along with frost and
thaw affects on the roads were
issues were “problems that are
distinctive to Northeastern
Pennsylvania.”
Clarks Green OKs sewer plan
BY EMILY CULLEY
Abington Journal Correspondent
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
The Clarks Green Clock Committe met on August 22 at Pennstar Bank, Clarks
Green. Shown, from Left: Gail Rees, Pennstar Bank Branch Manager; Doug Gefv-
ert, Sales Representative for The Verdin Company; Ron Liput, Clarks Green resi-
dent; Charles Sandercock, owner of Summit Frameworks; Victor Alberigi, Clarks
Green Council member. Absent from photo: Jill Shanrock, Clarks Green Council
member.
Time for a new landmark
Steamtown National Histor-
ic Site, downtown Scranton,
will be a place to create fam-
ily memories Sept. 3 and 4 of
Labor Day weekend, as the
National Park Service joins
with several partners to host
“Railfest 2011.” This year’s
event theme is “A Celebration
of Railroading.” Railfest 2011
will help commemorate four
milestone anniversaries:
25 Years - Steamtown Na-
tional Historic Site (October
30, 1986)
40 Years - Amtrak (May 1,
1971) and,
125 Years - Scranton’s Elec-
tric Trolley System (Novem-
ber 30, 1886)
20 Years – Lackawanna
Heritage Valley Authority
(1991)
with visiting equipment
displays, special shop demon-
strations and, of course, train
rides on both days of the
event.
The fun begins Sept. 3 at 10
a.m. when Park Superintend-
ent Harold (“Kip”) Hagen will
host an Opening Ceremony,
welcoming Joseph Boardman,
President and Chief Executive
Officer, Amtrak, Thomas
Carper, Chairman, Amtrak
Board of Directors and special
event Grand Marshal Joseph
McHugh, Amtrak Vice Presi-
dent of Government Affairs
and Corporate Communi-
cations.
Amtrak, America’s Rail-
road, will present its 40th
Anniversary Train to the pub-
lic on both days. This special
exhibit train features displays
of photos, uniforms, china,
and memorabilia from Am-
trak while also offering a
glimpse into the future. Dela-
ware-Lackawanna Railroad,
Norfolk Southern Railway, the
Reading Company Technical
Historical Society’s historic
FP-7 locomotives and the
Anthracite Railroads Histor-
ical Society’s DL&W F3A
locomotives are also planning
to provide equipment displays.
Planned special programs
include:
Behind-the-scenes tours of
the restored Mattes Street
Tower and the cavernous Of-
fice Storage Complex
“Big Band” railroad music
Caboose Rides
Special Shop machinery
demonstrations
Turntable Demonstrations
Historic iron pour
Special theater presentation
“Amtrak: The First 40 Years –
1971-2011
“Scranton Limited” short
train rides
Union Pacific #4012 “Big
Boy” locomotive cab tours
Planned exhibitors include:
The Lackawanna Heritage
Valley Authority
Lackawanna County Histor-
ical Society
Amtrak Trails to Rails
Carbondale Historical So-
ciety
Anthracite Heritage Mu-
seum and Iron Furnace Asso-
ciates
The Everhart Museum
“First Aid and the Rail-
roads” special exhibit
Model LEGO train displays
The evolution of Track
Maintenance equipment
The Railway & Locomotive
Historical Society
The American Red Cross
will also take part in the cele-
bration with a special blood
drive. The Red Cross Blood
Drive will be held Sept. 3,
from10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The
actual blood donation takes
about 15 minutes. Individuals
interested in donating blood
can make advance reservation
by calling 1-800-RED-
CROSS. Walk ups are also
welcome.
As a special incentive to
increase the areas blood sup-
plies, the park will waive its
$7 entrance fee for all donors.
There will be an excursion
to Moscow each day, with
‘‘photo run-bys” during each
trip. Saturday’s excursion will
be powered by historic diesel-
powered passenger locomo-
tives; Sunday’s train ride will
feature our Canadian National
#3254 steam locomotive. The
trips will depart the Steam-
town Boarding Platform at 1
p.m. each day with a planned
return to Scranton at approxi-
mately 3:30 p.m. Excursion
fares are $24 for adults 16 to
61, $22 for seniors 62 and
older, and $17 for children
ages 6 to 15. Children 5 and
younger require a “no-charge”
ticket.
Other event partners include
the Lackawanna County Trol-
ley Museum, which will offer
an expanded schedule of trol-
ley rides along a portion of
the former Laurel Line. For
more information, phone di-
rect 570. 963.6590.
Located in Scranton, Penn-
sylvania, Steamtown NHS is
open daily from 9 a.m. until 5
p.m. From I-81, follow exit
185 (Central Scranton Ex-
pressway); then, follow the
signs to the main entrance at
Lackawanna and Cliff Ave-
nues. Train excursion infor-
mation and reservations may
be made by phoning 570.
340.5204 daily, 9:30 a.m. to 4
p.m.
Railfest 2011 at
Steamtown
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 5A
CLARKS SUMMIT - It’s
time for farmers to enjoy
the fruits (and vegetables)
of their labor and sell
some of them to the com-
munity. The Abington
Farmers’ Market in South
Abington Township and
Essential Eating Farmers’
Market in Chinchilla sell
a fistful of fruit and a
variety of vegetables and
more. Each market fea-
tures five stands.
First a view of the
South Abington Twp.
offerings.
Ken Ayers, owner of
Ayers Orchard located in
Milwaukee, has 600 trees
in his farm. Therefore, he
has the ability to grow 20
types of apples, pears,
peaches and plums. They
could be found at the
farmers’ market, along
with sweet corn, potatoes
and apple cider. Ayers
runs the stand with his
wife Christina and daugh-
ter-in-law Tania Ayers. He
has been vending since
the market’s beginning.
Michelle LaCoe from
Clarks Summit arranges
and sells flowers in a glass
vase from her stand for
Bald Mountain Orchard,
which she owns with hus-
band Dean, her sons Dal-
ton and Bodie and her
daughter Samantha. Other
crops that they grow are
cauliflower, lettuce, pep-
pers, Swiss chard, onions
and tomatoes.
The Jaditz family has
been selling 30 types of
vegetables from their farm
called Timberlane Farms,
located in Clarks Summit,
since 1923.
But the farmers’ market
doesn’t stop at selling
fruits and vegetables. It
sells homemade baked
goods and homemade
condiments as well. El-
izabeth Graves from
Clarks Summit bakes and
sells from her home
through her business
called Elizabeth Graves’
Bakery. She makes many
flavors of pies . She also
bakes cookies . When
she’s not vending at the
farmers’ market, people
can buy her baked goods
by calling and ordering
baked goods.
H & H Gardens from
Tunkhannock has been
selling homemade jams,
jellies, salsas, mustards
and relish for six years. It
is owned by Lauren Hub-
bard and Tina Hodge.
Now a look at the farm-
ers’ market in Chinchilla.
This one has organic
fruits and vegetables,
hence the name Essential
Eating Farmers’ Market.
Paul Pauliny from Wya-
lusing has 35 varieties of
organic plums in his
stand, called Paul Plum
Tree-Ripened Local Fruit.
He also vends organic
peaches, apricots, toma-
toes and Granny Smith
apples.
Susan Carroll runs a
stand selling squash, gar-
lic, onions, potatoes,
beans and cucumbers.
These vegetables are
grown by her husband
Tim from their garden in
Lake Ariel called The
Garden at Safford Farm.
Bret Morrismanages Sko-
loff Valley Farm in Sus-
quehanna with his wife
Stephanie Roberts. The
farm is owned by Gary
and his wife Shary Sko-
loff. Morris and Roberts
grow diverse, certified
organic vegetables such as
onions, potatoes, peppers,
eggplants and garlic. An-
other stand at the farmers’
market sells organic
breads. This one is from
Mockingbird Bakery Arti-
sans Breads, owned by
Matt Severson, who bakes
and sells his breads at his
house in South Side,
Scranton. He sells organic
flour breads, such as sour-
dough, yeasted and
sprouted wheat flour. Se-
verson also has a stand at
the farmer’s market in
Dallas. His friend John
Alexiou from Mountain-
top carves and vends
wooden breadboards and
segmented wood tunings
in the same stand.
Bullock’s Back Achers
Farm, a bio-harmonic in
Rome, raises animals for
beef, grass-fed lamb,
chicken, eggs and Thanks-
giving turkeys both
ground and pasture-raised.
At the farmers’ market,
Sam Bullock, who owns
the farm with his mother
and his brother, sells eggs,
pure honey and maple
syrup. Bullock’s Back
Achers Farm is also in the
CSA Farm Share Pro-
gram.
The Abington Farmers’
Market is open on Sat-
urdays from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Essential Eating
Farmers’ Market is open
on Thursdays from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. It will run
every Thursday until No-
vember and every other
Thursday after November.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/BEN FREDA
Robert Jaditz, from Timberlane Farms in Clarks Summit, bags vegetables for a customer.
Breadboards and segmented
wood turnings, made by John
Alexiou, sold at Essential
Eating Farmer’s Market in
Chinchilla.
The Abington Farmers’ Market in South Abington Township.
Homegrown
HARVEST
ABINGTON JOURNAL/BEN FREDA
Stephanie Roberts, left, and her friend Julianne Muto with
tomatoes from the Skoloff Valley Farm in Susquehanna.
BY BEN FREDA
Abington Journal Correspondent
DALTON- At the Dalton
Borough Council meeting
held Aug.11, trumpeter Jesse
Morvan and tenor sax Richard
Pollock were recognized for
achievements they earned a
few months ago. During the
June meeting, Morvan and
Pollock performed with their
instruments. They received
plaques awarded by Mayor
James Gray.
Morvan earned his plaque
for Second Place Achievement
in the state. Pollock earned his
for First Place Achievement in
the state. They are Lackawan-
na Trail Jr. /Sr. High School
students.
In other business, council
member Bill Montgomery
read aloud from a letter writ-
ten by Council President Bill
Salva regarding the prospect
of acquiring a new truck body
on the dump truck. “We made
a payment on that,” said Mont-
gomery. “The body is being
supplied with the truck bed
and all the details that go with
it, and it will be some time in
October.” Montgomery added
that Salva requested disposal
plans for of the old truck.
Montgomery mentioned
that in July, the board dis-
cussed the Stormwater Man-
agement Ordinance. “What
John (Dalton Borough engi-
neer John Seamans) suggested
is that we adopt Lackawanna
County’s ordinance.”
Board member Lorraine
Daniels told Montgomery that
Dalton is in the Susquehanna
area. Montgomery replied, “At
any rate, instead of Lackawan-
na, we’re going to look at a
less complex one (ordinance)
that fits our needs.”
Student musicians
receive awards for
state achievements
BY BEN FREDA
Abington Journal Correspondent
ABINGTON JOURNAL/BEN FREDA
At the Dalton Bor-
ough Council meet-
ing Aug. 11, awards
were presented to
area student musi-
cians. From left:
All-state musician
Jesse Morvan,
Jesse’s father Paul
Morvan and all-
state musician
Richard Pollock.
RANSOM TWP. - New
plans regarding the Do-
rothy Richards Estate Mi-
nor Subdivision were sub-
mitted by Ransom Town-
ship Engineer John Sea-
mans to the Ransom
Township Planning Com-
mission at a meeting held
Aug. 15. Correspondence
between the engineers re-
garding the plans was
read aloud and discussed,
then a motion was made
and seconded and a unan-
imous vote cast to accept
the plans for review and
forward them to the re-
viewing agencies.
Also on the official
agenda as business for the
meeting was the Ransom
Recreational Shooting
Sports Land Development.
However, no new plans
had been submitted, and
nothing was discussed.
No public input was
contributed at the meet-
ing.
The next regular Ran-
som Township meeting
will be held Tuesday,
Sept. 6, as Monday is a
holiday.
Ransom
commission
approves
new plans
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
Abington Journal Reporter
Shown are the 2010-2011
Abington Senior Community
Center Site Council members.
Seated, fromleft, are: Rose Ann
Aveline, Rachel Michaels, Wil-
ma Kreher, Ann Dickinson,
Mary Leiber, Ceil Alfano and
Clara Kozlosky. Standing: War-
ren Watkins, Peg Jackson, Dr.
Eugene Roe, Pete Calabro, John
Romanowski, Richard Kranick,
Dave Evans, Hank Goldswor-
thy, Chet Lowrie, Shirley Low-
rie and Richard Berezinsky.
Upcoming events scheduled
at the center are as follows:
Sept. 1, Barbecue with enter-
tainment by the Jazzy 2; Sept.
22, Bus trip to Mt. Haven Resort
(Murder Mystery); Oct. 23,
Harvest Dinner Dance from6 to
10 p.m. ; Nov. 29, Bus Trip to
Hunterdon Hills Playhouse for
Holiday Musical-Comedy Re-
vue.
The center is open Monday
through Friday from9 a.m. to 3
p.m. with lunch served daily at
noon. Contact the center at
570.586.8996 for information
on all of our activities and pro-
grams. Activities scheduled for
the fall include: Zumba Gold,
Thursdays 9:10 to 9:55 a.m.;
Watercolor painting- Thursdays
1to 2:30 p.m.; Evening Tai Chi
– Tuesdays 4:15 to 5:10 p.m. and
Evening Yoga 5:15 to 6:10 p.m.
The Abington Senior Com-
munity Center is managed by
Telespond Senior Services, Inc.
and is funded in part by the
Lackawanna County Area
Agency on Aging.
Senior Center
plans fall events
The Catholic Choral Socie-
ty will begin its 63rd season
Sept. 6, with rehearsals Tues-
day evenings at 7 p.m. at the
IHM Center at Marywood
University. The group, com-
posed of members from both
Luzerne and Lackawanna
Counties, performs sacred,
classical, Broadway and pop-
ular music. New members
are welcome and no audi-
tions are required.
The group’s first concert is
scheduled for October while
a 10th anniversary celebra-
tion program is planned for
the annual November Gener-
ations Concert when the
Catholic Choral Society
hosts and features regional
choral groups from elemen-
tary school through college
at St. Peter’s Cathedral.
Ann Manganiello is the
music director with Jean
Shields as accompanist while
Brenda Grunza and Dr. Tho-
mas Rittenhouse are the co-
presidents. For details, visit
http://www.catholicchoralso-
ciety.org or call
570.587.2753.
Catholic
Choral
Society
rehearses
The Meals on Wheels of
NEPABoard of Directors re-
cently held its Reorganizational
Meeting at Perkins Restaurant.
Shown, seated, fromleft, are:
Dr. Alice McDonnell; Linda
Steier, MS,RD,LDN, Executive
Director; Barbara D. Noto;
Karen Arscott, D.O., Board
Chair; Lindsey Reinheimer
Loss. Standing: Bo Hoban;
Paul McGuinness; Gina
McAndrew; Gail E. Rees; Kim
Barrows, Treasurer; Anne
Kessler; Ann Williams; David
Jones.
Meals on Wheels
board assembles
The Little Sisters of the Poor
and Residents of Holy Family
Residence will welcome Dio-
cese of Scranton Bishop Joseph
C. Bambera Aug. 30, to cele-
brate Mass for the Feast Day of
St. Jeanne Jugan, the Mother
Foundress of the Little Sisters.
The Mass will begin at 10:30
a.m. in the chapel at Holy Fam-
ily Residence, 2500 Adams
Ave., Scranton. The public is
invited to attend.
St. Jeanne Jugan, who was
canonized by Pope Benedict
XVI on October 11, 2009,
founded the Little Sisters of the
Poor in Brittany, France in1839.
They welcome the elderly who
have limited funds.
For directions, visit www.lit-
tlesistersofthepoorscranton.org
or call 570.343.4065.
Feast of St.
Jeanne Jugan
C M Y K
PAGE 6A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
T
he Abington Community
Library and The Abing-
ton Journal conducted a
Centennial Contest for young-
sters ages 6 to 12.
They were asked how they vi-
sualize Clarks Summit 100 years
from now and describe it in a
picture or essay. More than 30
children entered and winners
received $25 in cash; runners up
received movie passes to the
Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock.
Special thanks to contest orga-
nizer Children’s Librarian Mary
Ann McGrath.
Winners of the essay contest:
First prize, Alison Kane, 12 and
Runner up, Michael Wentz, 12.
Winners of the picture contest:
First prize, Jeffery Nunemaker,
11 and Runner up, Phoebe Sebr-
ing, 11.
All entries are on display in
the Children’s Room at the
Abington Community Libraary,
1200 West Grove Street, Clarks
Summit
Winner Jeffrey Nunemaker, 11
ABOVE: Runner Up Phoebe Sebring,
11
LEFT: Shown, from left are contest
winners: Michael Wentz, Jeffery
Nunemaker and Phoebe Sebring.
Absent from photo: Alison Kane.
VISIONS OF THE FUTURE
Hover-mobiles zoomed past me
as I tried to cross the busy path. My
mother had told me how100 years
agao (she is 112) cars roamed the
streets, going only 30 miles per
hour. Now, hover-mobiles travel 150
miles per hour. Also there is only a
recorded 5 to 8 crashes each year
statewide. People now live longer
because scientests found out how to
unlock healthier parts of the brain.
Now since wasteful factories were
torn down and more jobs created,
the unemployed are only .001% of
America’s population. People in
Clarks Summit have finally mas-
tered going green and as our sym-
bol, all of the buildings were painted
green. A red light stopped hover-
mobiles and I crossed the street.
Traffic started again as soon as I
reached the other side. I smiled as I
touched the side of the fire station.
The walls were made of recycled
metals. My mother had showed me
a picture of Clarks Summit when
she was growing up Some places
were the same, but a whole lot had
changed.
’CLARKS SUMMIT 2111’
BY ALISON KANE, 12
Can you imagine what Clarks
Summit will be like in a century?
Would we recognize it as the same
town? I believe that in one hundred
years Clarks Summit will have
changed greatly! In one hundred
years, there would still be streets on
which solar-powered cars would
drive. However, most people will ride
in the subway system. Another
option would be complimentary
rickshaws. A monorail will span the
area where Freedom Bridge and
stood. Stores in a century will be in
buildings made of thick glass. Res-
taurants will serve foods such as
scrambled rattlesnake eggs and
octopus wings. Some of the bever-
ages will be carrot and asparagus
juice. All electricity will be replaced
by solar and wind power. The ice
sculptures for the Ice Festival will be
carved by extremely powerful laser
beams. In the winter, people will stay
warm with their clothing that is
made from fibers that adjust to the
climate. At playgrounds the equip-
ment will have an emphasis on
healthy living and exercising. In the
library, most of the books would be
on electronic devices to conserve
the use of paper; although, there
will still be a selection of printed
books for those who prefer them. So
what will Clarks Summit be like in a
century? The possibilities are end-
less. I don know, however, that
Clarks Summit will still be a great
place to live.
’CLARKS SUMMIT 2111’
BY MICHAEL WENTZ, 12
Centennial Day in Clarks
Summit will be held Aug. 27
from11a.m. to 7 p.m. Activities
will include a number of orga-
nized events in the borough’s
downtown.
The day will begin with a
Promenade along Depot Street
at 11a.m.
Entertainment on the Band-
shell and Davis Street, hosted by
John Pullo will include “Ed-
wardians Undressed” with
Bridget Conlogue and Jennifer
Ochman at 11:30 a.m.; DJ Fran-
kie Carll Productions from12 to
2 p.m.; Laughter Yoga With
Jeannine Luby at 12:45 p.m.;
The Ron Leas Big Band from2
to 3 p.m.; Ronald McDonald at
2:45 p.m.; Crystal Skies from3
to 4 p.m.; Speeches by Senator
John Blake and County Com-
missioners Corey D. O’Brien,
Bruce A. Smallacombe and
Michael J. Washo at 4 p.m.;
juggling with Rob Smith at 4:30
p.m.; Backdraft from5 to 7 p.m.
On the second floor of the
borough building, Bingo will be
held from1to 5 p.m. with Joanie
Berkoski and Patrick Williams.
Racers at South State Street
will include Kidracer from11
a.m. to 7 p.m. in which 4 to 7
year-olds can drive cars courtesy
of Oscar Koveleski and Jerry
Tunney’s Racecar. Tunney, 16, is
an aspiring NASCARdriver.
Davis Street will feature Mar-
ley’s Mission with two minia-
ture horses and handler Alishia
Allegrucci.
Food vendors on Davis Street
will include: Atami Sushi, At-
lantic Fish, Beta Bread, Café
Soriano, Chocolate Creations,
Curbside Grill, The Fudge Lady,
The Glenburn Grill, Hot Dog
Matty, JJ Bridjes, Kiki’s Ice
Cream, M&MConcessions,
Maple Lane Farms, Mr. P’s
Potato Pancakes, Plumpy’s
Pierogies, Popcorn, Etc., Sun-
rise Café and Tara Jenkins Ice.
Artists &Craftsmen on
Spring Street will include: Be-
verly Krenitsky, Homespun;
Christy P., Bows; Ellen Beech-
ko, Apricot Studio; Emily Ran-
cier, Spinning; Jack Walsh, Irish
Designs; Kathleen, Special
Touch Jewelry; Kelly Barron,
Painted Furniture; Kevin Treat,
Woodcarver; Linda, Crocheting,
Books, Jewelry; Mark Malak,
The Barnwood Gallery; Mau-
reen Duffy, Jewelry; Nannette
Scheuch Nannette Design;
Patricia Orr, Crystal Lake Jew-
elry and Tammy Milke, Flower
Arrangements.
All set for the
Centennial
2
9
9
0
3
8
2
9
9
0
3
8
AJ
AJ
Kountry Wood Cabinets, Inc.
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 7A
ABINGTON JOURNAL FILE PHOTOS
Centennial-themed costume winners are recognized at the 2011 Clarks Summit Festival of Ice.
YEAR IN PICTURES
A member of Queen Victoria’s Court in a turn of the century-themed
fashion show during the 2011 Clarks Summit Festival of Ice.
Dedication of the new Abington
Area Veterans Memorial Monu-
ment took place May 28.
Parishioners enter Our Lady of
Snows Church in Clarks Summit
for the parish’s 100th Anni-
versary Mass.
Scott Reiner, Clarks Summit
helps Troy Kester cast his line at
Family Fun Day in June.
Borough President Gerrie Carey leads the crowd in singing ’Happy Birthday’ for Clarks Summit in January.
HOWTO ENTER: Send your photo along
with name, address, phone and description of
photo contents to: “Centennial Photo Con-
test,” 211 South State St., Clarks Summit, PA
18411 or email your scanned photo to
kgrier@theabingtonjournal.com.
WHAT YOU CAN WIN: Each photo
published will be entered in a random draw-
ing to win grand prizes of $100 and one
complete custom frame job valued at $200
from Summit Frameworks.
CLARKS SUMMIT CENTENNIAL PHOTO CONTEST
PHOTO COURTESY GIFFORD HOLT
Shown are members of the Holt family, from Clarks Summit, camping at Lake Wallenpaupack in the summer
of 1935. They had the first R.V. trailer at the lake at the ‘White Beauty View’ and then later at ‘’Duffy’s Land-
ing.’ From left, sitting in the high chair, Gifford Holt, Herman Holt, Bob Holt, and Laura Holt. Across, from left,
Howard Holt Junior, Jack Fitch and Howard Holt Senior
Indy 500 auto racing posters will be featured at silent auction benefit for
the Abington Community Library. Community members also have the
opportunity to win an authentic racing tire used by local race car driver,
Jerry Tunney. The silent auction will take place Aug. 27 at the Clarks
Summit Centennial Celebration in the garage of the Borough Building.
Auction will be open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 2. Volunteers at the event will
include Library Trustees, members of the Teen Leadership Committee,
Abington Heights High School Interact and National Honor Society mem-
bers and Friends of ACL members. These colorful, 24-inch by 36- inch
posters are not available in stores. Designed and printed by the Speedway
and Sponsors, they are rarely sold. Several posters were sent to the library
by Indianapolis Motor Speedway, others donated. Framed posters are
valued at $100. Starting bid will be $35. Additional posters will be avail-
able with starting bids as low as $10. Posters include: #1- 2011 Indy 500
100 years of Firestone Racing tickets, programs; #2- 2011 Indianapolis Hall
of Fame Centennial Grid old-new race cars; #3 -2011 Indy 500 100 years
of Firestone Firehawk Tire Indy drivers; #4 -2011 Indy 500 Salute to Armed
Forces special poster; #5- 2005 U.S. GRAND PRIX F1 On Your Race Face ;
#6 -2005 U.S. Bridgestone Ferrari F1- Indy-Superbike-Kart-Motocross; #7-
2005 Ferrari World Champion Michael Schumacher in Victory Circle; #8
-2010 Bridgestone Motorcycle MotoGP All Championship Riders; #9 -1990
Great Race Across America-Disneyland to Scranton Pa. Buick/Goodyear;
#10 -1970 Road America Can Am McLaren Champions Dennis Hulme
-Oscar Koveleski and #11- 2007 and 2011 Giants Despair Hillclimb Posters
by Ken Frantz For more info, contact the Abington Community Library at
570. 587.3440.
Indy 500 posters at auction
Clarks Green Joint High School Class of 1950 was held May 28
at Amici in Clarks Summit. Shown, are some of those in attend-
ance, front row, from left: Alma Herron, Clarks Summit; Becky
Newman Simms, Clarks Summit; Nancy Singer, Clarks Summit;
Lois McDonald, Wysox; and Donna Doty Illuzi, Tunkhannock.
Back row, from left: Warren Watkins, Clarks Summit; Carl
Stoeckel, Clarks Summit; Gifford Holt, Durango, Colo.; Ron Cal-
vey, Binghamton, N.Y. and Tom Miles, Clarks Summit.
Class of 1950 reunites
must be purchased in ad-
vance. The ticket also in-
cludes a complimentary drink
from Maiolatesi Wine Cellars
and Summit Beverage. Seat-
ing is limited to 300 people.
A cash bar will be provided.
Partygoers still have time to
purchase tickets at the follow-
ing locations: The Abington
Journal; Angels Galeria; Sole
to Soul; Sanderson Place;
Everything Natural; Artisans
Image, Hallmark; the Clarks
Summit Borough Building;
Kidazzle; Nichols Village and
from borough council mem-
bers, Barb Evans, Patrick
Williams; Gerrie Carey;
Kathy Drake; Herman John-
son; Roy Davis; Mayor Harry
Kelly; Virginia Kehoe and Pat
Rogan, borough solicitor.
Entertainment will be pro-
vided by David Hunisch at
the piano, Camille Reinecke,
soloist and Nicole Linko,
violin and drums.
On Aug. 27, Centennial
Day will get underway with a
Promenade along Depot
Street at 11 a.m.
Munley said, “You can
expect fun for the whole fam-
ily on Saturday. We are en-
couraging people to come in
period dress encompassing
the Roaring Twenties, flap-
pers, 30s, 40s or 50s…”
She added, “This would
never have taken place with-
out the support and the hard
work of the Centennial com-
mittee members. My co-chair
is Barbara Evans, who is a
council woman and librarian
at The University of Scran-
ton. Our committee is com-
prised of brilliant people who
are bringing the talents of
their own businesses to the
table. We have a great histori-
an who has led us through
this whole year: Dennis Mar-
tin.”
In addition to Munley and
Evans, involved in planning
the Centennial Celebration on
Saturday are Rosangela de-
Freitas’, Linda Besten and
Annette Kalwaytis, who are
the hostesses for this Centen-
nial Celebration. Ellen
Beechko and Lorraine Durkin
are the hostesses for Ragtime
Rumble to be held Friday
evening.
“It’s all about our people.
It’s really grassroots and it’s
about each decade that has
made up the history and the
really important points in
time that the borough and the
entire Northeast Pa. have
gone through and experienced
including all of the wars from
WWI up until the Iraq and
Afghanistan wars. Everybody
is involved,” said Munley.
Radio personality John
Pullo, will be on hand to
emcee both the Ragtime
Rumble and Centennial..
At Centennial Day, attend-
ees will find a variety of food
and craft vendors as well as
fine artists selling their
wares.
Children will be kept busy
with Kidracers, courtesy of
Oscar Koveleski, a visit from
Jerry Tunney, a 16-year-old
aspiring racecar driver, as
well as horses from Marley’s
Mission. Stop by the second
floor of the Borough Building
for a few rounds of Bingo
from 1 to 5 p.m.
“With this economy we
have, I think that this is just
the thing that people are
looking to do today - these
kinds of grassroots communi-
ty activities that are family
appropriate and you can have
a lot of fun seeing your
neighbors. Have lunch and
dinner here (at Centennial
Day).”
Musical entertainment will
be provided, including local
entertainer Bill Frye, who
will be strolling through the
crowd with his guitar. For
more information regarding
Centennial Day, refer to the
schedule on Page A10. The
event will run until 7 p.m.
CELEBRATE
Continued from Page 1
SUPPORT THE CENTENNIAL
A variety of Clarks Summit
Centennial commemorative items
are available for sale and may be
purchased during the upcoming
Centennial Celebration weekend.
These items include note cards,
$5 for a pack of 10; umbrellas,
$30; aprons, $10, T-shirts, $10;
and an assortment of 10 by
14-inch professionally printed
historic photos matted for framing
priced at $36 each.
C M Y K
PAGE 8A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
Divorce is an emotionally
challenging time. Even
though you are working
through your feelings there
is one area of your life that
you should not neglect –
your financial life. Whether
you have been married for
five years or 25 years, the
financial implications of
divorce need to be ad-
dressed.
Hiring a lawyer is the
first thing you will want to
do when you begin the di-
vorce process. While a law-
yer is not a requirement in
divorce proceedings, having
legal counsel is the best
way to look out for your
financial interests. If you
don’t have the money to pay
for a lawyer (perhaps be-
cause your spouse was the
higher wage earner) you
can petition the court and
ask for your estranged
spouse to pay your legal
bills.
Some divorces will be
relatively simple in terms of
financial settlement. If the
couple was married for only
a short time, has no chil-
dren, or doesn’t own a
house then the financial
outcome will be easy to
work out. If there were chil-
dren from the marriage,
property is owned, or if one
spouse stayed out of the
workforce to care for the
home and children then the
financial settlement can
become more complicated.
Child Support
When a couple with chil-
dren divorces, one of the
first issues that needs to be
decided is who will have
custody. Custody can be
awarded to one or both of
the parents. Depending on
what parent has primary
custody, child support can
be awarded. Child support
is defined as financial pay-
ments made by the non-
custodial parent to the cus-
todial parent to provide for
the needs of the child or
children.
Child support is deter-
mined by a number of fac-
tors. Many states have gui-
delines for determining how
much child support needs
to be paid. The amount of
child support that is paid
can also be based on each
parent’s income, the per-
centage of time the child
spends with each parent,
the number of children
from the marriage, and
whether or not alimony is
paid to the former spouse.
Child support payments
are meant to provide for the
basic necessities of the
child – food, clothing, shel-
ter, and so on. Other ex-
penses such as school tui-
tion, medical insurance, or
dental work also need to be
considered. These types of
expenses can be addressed
in the child support order.
Since it is hard to anticipate
future expenses for your
children, consultation with
an experienced divorce law-
yer is important. Your at-
torney can make sure that
your financial interests
(whether as the custodial or
non-custodial parent) are
considered and protected in
the child support order.
It is important to note
that there are tax implica-
tions associated with child
support, both for the person
who pays it and for the per-
son who receives it. I
strongly recommend work-
ing with an experienced tax
professional as well to help
you navigate through this
process.
Alimony
Alimony is a financial
payment made to a former
spouse under a divorce
agreement in an attempt to
maintain the pre-divorce
lifestyle. Alimony is also
called maintenance or spou-
sal support and is based on
both the ability to pay and
the other party’s need for
financial support. Alimony
is determined by state law,
so consultation with a law-
yer is essential to make sure
your interests are protected.
The court will decide
whether or not alimony is
to be awarded. The criteria
that the court can use to
make the decision include:
Need. Does the recipient
spouse have enough money
to take care of basic needs
for him or herself, such as
food, clothing and shelter?
Ability to Pay. Can the
paying spouse afford to pay
what is needed and still
have enough money left
over to meet his or her ba-
sic needs and have a life-
style that is somewhat simi-
lar to his or her pre-divorce
lifestyle.?
Prior Lifestyle. Courts
will look at the lifestyle a
requesting spouse had be-
fore the divorce. If the cou-
ple had a high income and
lived an extravagant life-
style then that is going to
be taken into consideration
when the amount of alimo-
ny is decided.
Length of Marriage. The
longer a marriage lasts
means more sacrifice and
dependency of a spouse and
possibly the sacrifice of one
career for the care of chil-
dren and the home. The
longer a marriage the more
likely alimony will be or-
dered.
There are different types
of alimony. Since you can’t
determine the future con-
sultation with your attorney
is key when determining
the amount of alimony pay-
ments. There are different
types of alimony, including:
Temporary, also known as
rehabilitative, meant to pro-
vide financial support for a
specified amount of time to
an ex-spouse until he or she
can get back on his or her
feet.
Permanent, meaning there
is no time limit to alimony
payments.
Modifiable, which means
that payments can be in-
creased, decreased or termi-
nated based on a change in
circumstances.
Non-Modifiable, meaning
payments continue for the
specified amount of time no
matter the circumstances.
There are tax implications
to alimony, for both the
paying and recipient par-
ties. Working with an expe-
rienced tax professional is
important if you receive or
pay out alimony.
Getting a divorce can be a
very difficult time in your
life. In order to get your
financial life back on track
it is important to consult
with experienced and qual-
ified legal and tax profes-
sionals.
Money Matters
With
Jamie Kresge
Dealing with divorce
Jamie Kresge is the owner of Abington Financial Group, serving the commu-
nity since 1993. Contact him at (570) 586-1013 or www.abingtonfinancial.com.
The content provided in this article is meant to be a substitute for personal
research and conversations with a qualified financial advisor. Securities
offered through SagePoint Financial Inc., member FINRA/SIPC. Abington
Financial Group is not affiliated with SagePoint Financial, Inc. or registered as
a broker-dealer or investment advisor.
OBITUARY
Kyle Locker, 21, of
Dalton died early Friday
morning August 19, from
injuries sustained in an
automobile accident.
Born in Scranton, he
was the son of John and
Denise Locker, Dalton
and Renee Brown, Ge-
orgia. He was a member
of St. Mary’s Visitation
Church, Dickson City
and he was employed
part time at the YMCA,
Dunmore.
Kyle attended St. Ma-
ry’s Parochial School,
Dickson City and he was
a 2009 graduate of Lack-
awanna Trail High
School where he excelled
as an offensive tackle on
the football team. He
was a two time Lacka-
wanna Football Confer-
ence first team all star.
He also played in the
2009 dream Game.
Kyle was currently at-
tending Lackawanna Col-
lege, majoring in Sports
Management and was a
member of the Falcons
football team.
Kyle was an avid gol-
fer and weight lifter who
never missed a chance to
workout. He was a hard
working young man who
when told there were
things he couldn’t do he
persevered and proved
everyone wrong time and
time again. He loved his
family and friends dearly
and will be missed by
all who knew him.
Surviving are two
brothers, Matthew and
Ryan at home; maternal
grandparents Barbara
Brown, Dickson City,
and James Brown, Arch-
bald; his paternal grand-
parents John and Frances
Locker, Dalton and John
Jeffrey, Clarks Summit;
aunt, Laura Brown; un-
cles, Ted Tomko, Dick-
son City and Brian
Locker, Wyoming; his
girlfriend, Kay-cee Pezak,
Jessup; he was also sur-
vived by several other
aunts, uncles and cou-
sins.
The funeral will be
Aug. 17 from the Frank
T. Mazur Funeral Home,
Inc. 601 Dundaff St.,
Dickson City, with mass
at 9:30 a.m. in St. Ma-
ry’s Visitation Church,
Dickson City. Everyone
attending the funeral is
asked to go directly to
the Church. Entombment,
St. Mary’s Mausoleum,
Dickson City.
For directions or to
leave an online condo-
lence visit www.mazur-
funeralhome.com.
Kyle Locker
August 19, 2011
Rose Ma-
rie Holgate,
84, of Dal-
ton, died
Friday
morning,
Aug. 19, at
home. Her husband was
the late Clifford L. Hol-
gate who died in 2009.
The couple had been mar-
ried for 62 years.
Born in Scranton, she
was the daughter of Joseph
and Pola Catherine Chesh-
efski Chesek. She attended
North Scranton High
School. Early in her career
she worked as a Dental
Assistant, later devoting
her life to raising her fam-
ily. She was a member of
the Providence of God
Lithuanian National Ca-
tholic Church in Scranton.
She belonged to the
Blessed Sacrament Socie-
ty, the Ladies Oak Leaf
Guild, and was active in
many other church activ-
ities. She had a passion for
gardening, and loved can-
ning , cooking and trav-
eling. She enjoyed quilting
and crocheting, donating
numerous hand-made
items as fund raisers for
the Christian Charities.
She was known for her
beautiful African violets.
Rose Marie was very
proud of her Lithuanian
Heritage and spoke the
language fluently.
Surviving are five sons,
Mark and wife Deege of
Tunkhannock; Clifford and
wife Linda of Dalton; Da-
niel, Scranton; Patrick and
his wife Mary Ann of Ni-
cholson; Matthew and wife
Diana of Factoryville; two
daughters, Mary Holgate,
Dalton; Cheryl Matulevich
and husband Gary of Hop
Bottom; a daughter in law,
Christine Holgate, Justus;
23 grandchildren, Steven,
Amanda, Lisa Casey, Joe,
Bobby, Becky, Christopher,
Eric, Sarah, Jenny, Julie,
Josh, Meadow, Raven,
Zach, Levi, Daisy, Heath-
er, Morgan, Lucreza, Mat-
thew, Salvatore, Christina
Kerr; 5 great grandchil-
dren, Emily, Shane, Bran-
don, Katie, and Mya.
She was preceded in
death by a son Greg, a
grandson David, a grand-
daughter, Melissa and two
sisters, Florence Karnosky
and Dorothy Chesek.
The family would like to
thank Hospice of the Sa-
cred Heart and her nurse’s
aides, Christina Kerr, Kim-
berly Smurl, and Heather
Hoffman Romano, for
their loving care and com-
passion during her illness.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be held Monday at 11
am from the Providence of
God Lithuanian National
Catholic Church, Corner
of Oak St. and N. Sumner
Ave, Scranton., to be cele-
brated by the Rev. Walter
Placek, PhD., Pastor. In-
terment will be in the Par-
ish Cemetery, S. Abington
Rd., Clarks Summit.
Memorials may be made
to St. Jude’s Children’s
Research Hospital, 501 St.
Jude Place, Memphis, TN
38105. To send online con-
dolences, visit www.law-
renceeyoungfuneralhome-
.com.
Rose Marie Holgate
August 19, 2011
William Samuel Spear,
66, of Ransom Twp., died
Wednesday, Aug. 17, of
injuries due to a plane
accident. His wife is the
former Carolann Day. The
couple would have cele-
brated their 44th wedding
anniversary later this year.
Born in Scranton, he was
the son of the late Samuel
and Catherine O’Malley
Spear. He attended Holy
Rosary High School and
Johnson Technical Insti-
tute.
Prior to his retirement he
held many positions. He
was an insurance adjuster
for Allstate Insurance Co.,
he also had worked for
Pride Mobility and Keys-
tone Electronics.
He was a man of many
talents. He was known as
the neighborhood handy-
man, always willing to fix
anything and help anyone.
He loved fishing and thor-
oughly enjoyed the time
spent sitting around with
his friends. He will be
greatly missed by all who
knew him
Surviving are three
brothers, Gerald, Scranton;
Ronald, Archbald; and
Joseph, Jessup; one sister
Sandy Spear of Scranton.
A funeral service and
interment will be private at
the convenience of the
family.
Arrangements by Law-
rence E. Young Funeral
Home, 418 S. State St.,
Clarks Summit, PA. To
send online condolences,
visit www.lawren-
ceeyoungfuneralhome.com.
William Samuel Spear
August 17, 2011
Edward H.
Sopinski,
Sr., 83, of
Clarks
Green, died
Saturday,
August 20,
at the Gino J. Merli Veter-
ans’ Center in Scranton.
His wife is the former El-
sie Miller, the couple had
been married for 38 years.
Born in Scranton, he was
the son of the late Boles-
law and Constance Le-
wonczyk Sopinski. He was
a graduate of St. John’s
High School in Scranton,
and received an Account-
ing degree at the Lacka-
wanna Business School. He
proudly served in the U. S.
Army stationed in Korea.
Prior to his retirement, he
worked for Judge Lumber
for over forty years, work-
ing his way from truck
driver to the company’s
bookkeeper.
He was a lifetime mem-
ber of Abington Memorial
VFW Post #7069, a life
member of the American
Legion, Post #0665, and a
life member of the Military
Order of the Cooties, Pup
Tent 64.
Also surviving are two
sons, Paul Sopinski Sr. and
wife Mary-Lu, Taylor, Ed-
ward H. Sopinski Jr., and
wife Karen; Clarks Sum-
mit; a stepdaughter, Ro-
semary A. and husband
Robert, Bensalem; six
grandchildren, Paul Sopin-
ski Jr., Jason, Sopinski,
Nicole Miller, Matthew
Sopinski, Sarah Sopinski,
and Bradley Sopinski; two
step grandchildren, Gail S.
Shochet and Robin S. Wil-
son; nine great- grand-
children; a brother Chester
Sopinski, and two sisters,
Sister Fidelia (Florence)
Sopinski, and Mary Mile-
wski, several nieces and
nephews.
He was preceded in death
was a sister Stella Znosky,
and two brothers, Joe So-
pinski and John Gawelko.
Mass of Christian Burial
will be held Wednesday,
Aug. 24 at 10 a.m. from the
Church of St. Gregory, 330
N. Abington Rd., Clarks
Green, to be celebrated by
Rev. John M. Lapera, Pas-
tor Interment will follow in
Miller Cemetery, Scott
Twp. All those attending
are asked to go directly to
the church.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial donations may be made
to the Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond
Rd., So. Abington Twp.,
PA 18411. For directions or
to send online condolences,
visit www.lawrenceeyoung-
funeralhome.com.
Edward H. Sopinski
August 20, 2011
Kathryn
M. Igoe, 63,
of Clarks
Summit,
died Tues-
day, Aug.
16, in Moses
Taylor Hospital after a
courageous and debilitat-
ing struggle with cancer.
Born July 5, 1948, in
Scranton, daughter of the
late James M. and Kathryn
A. Battista Igoe, she and
her family had lived in
Clarks Summit since 1969,
having moved from Dun-
more. She was a graduate
of Dunmore High School
and furthered her studies
in nursing. She was em-
ployed by Dun & Brad-
street Credit & Commer-
cial Information Co., Dick-
son City, as a supervisor,
and worked there more
than 17 years. She was a
member of Our Lady of
the Snows Church. A lov-
ing and devoted mother to
her two sons, she was a
hardworking person who
cared about others. She
enjoyed others and brought
them happiness. Her gen-
tleness will be sadly mis-
sed be all who knew and
loved her.
Surviving are a son, Mi-
chael J. Churi and fiancée,
Jill Kovaleski, Clarks Sum-
mit; a brother, Peter Igoe,
Dunmore; a granddaughter,
Brittany Churi, Scranton;
nieces and nephews. She
was also preceded in death
by a son, John M. Churi,
on Jan. 2, 1995; and her
twin brother, James P.
Igoe, on Jan. 23, 2008.
The funeral was to be
Aug. 19, with Mass of
Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
in Our Lady of the Snows
Church, Clarks Summit.
Interment, St. Catherine’s
Cemetery, Moscow. View-
ing will be private for the
family. Memorials may go
to Our Lady of the Snows
Building Fund, 301 S.
State St., Clarks Summit,
PA 18411. Arrangements
are being made by the Jen-
nings-Calvey Funeral and
Cremation Services Inc.,
111 Colburn Ave., Clarks
Summit. To send an online
condolence, visit www.jen-
ningscalvey.com.
Kathryn M. Igoe
August 16, 2011
TheAbingtonJournalpublish-
esobituariesoflocalinterest,free
ofcharge.Obituariesmaybesent
toTheAbingtonJournalofficevia
traditionalmailat211SouthState
Street,ClarksSummit,PA18411,via
faxat570-586-3980orviae-mail
atnews@theabingtonjour-
nal.com.Obituariesshouldbe
submittedbyMondaytoensure
publicationinthenextpaper.
Obituariesmustbesentinbya
funeralhomeormustnamewhois
handlingthearrangements,along
withastreetaddress,city,state
andphonenumber.Formore
information,call570-587-1148.
Obituary Policy
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 9A
Ca ll Ta ra At970- 7374 To Ad vertis e
R eligious S ervice C alendar
O UR LADY O F
THE S NO W S
S t. Ben ed ict
S ATUR DAY
VIGIL M AS S ES
4 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
5 p .m . Ou rL ad yof
the S n ows
6:30 p .m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
S UNDAY
7 a.m . Ou rL ad yof
the S n ows
8 a.m . S t. Ben ed ict
9:30 a.m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
11:00 a.m . S t. Ben ed ict
11:15 Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
12:20 S t. Ben ed ict
CO NFES S IO NS
S ATUR DAYS
3:00 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
6:00 p .m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
(570) 586- 1741
Ca tholic Luthera n
TR INITY LUTHER AN CHUR CH
205 W . Grove S treet
Rev. George M athewsP astor
W ors hip S e rvic e s
S atu rd ay7:00 p .m .
Con tem p oraryS u n d ayS ervice 8:15 a.m .
Trad ition al S u n d ayS ervice 9:30 a.m .
www.Trin ityL u theran cs.com
Call ou rP reschool:
586- 5590
Chu rch Office
587- 1088
THE CHUR CH
O F THE EP IP HANY
Chu rch Hill Rd .,
Glen b u rn P A
(2 M ilesNorth
ofClarksS u m m it)
Com e join u sfor
worship on S UND AY
8:00am & 9:30 am
HOL Y EUCHARIS T
9:00 S u n d ayS chool
& Ad u ltF oru m
Nu rseryAvailab le
W ED NES D AY
9:30AM
HOL Y EUCHARIS T
5 63- 15 64
www.ep ip ha ny
glenb urn.org
God ’sheart
& han d sin
the Ab in gton s
FIR S T BAP TIS T CHUR CH
O F ABINGTO N
1216 N. Ab in gton Rd
( corn erofAb in gton & Carb on d ale)
Com e Join UsF or
S ervicesS u n d ay
M orn in g 11:00 a.m .
P astorK en n eth K n ap p
(570) 587- 4492
Ba p tis t
Chris tia n
CountryAllia nce Church
14014 Orchard D rive, ClarksS u m m it
Acros s f rom Red BarnV illage,N ewtonT wp.
(570) 587- 2885
Worship Service: Sunday 10:00AM
Time of Prayer: Sunday 11:15AM
Ep is cop a l
Free M ethod is t
W AVER LY CO M M UNITY
CHUR CH
101 Carb on d ale Road
S u n d ayS chool
10 am
M orn in g W orship 11 am
Nu rsery& Child ren ’s
Chu rch Availab le
P astorJam es
Cohen
(570) 587- 2280
waverlycom m u n itychu rch.org
S erm on S eries:
GOD,W ho Is He?
P res b yteria n
FIR S T P R ES BYTER IAN
CHUR CH
300 S chool S t.,
ClarksS u m m it
W orship with u son
S u n d aym orn in gs
9:00am & 11:15am
Child care availab le
Child ren W elcom e!
5 8 6-63 06
www. fp c c s . org
TEM P LE HES ED
1 K n ox Rd .,
S cran ton
Rab b i D an iel S wartz
http :/ / www.tem p lehesed .org
570- 344- 7201
tem p lehesed @verizon .n et
CELEBRATE S HABBAT!
F rid ays, 8 p .m .
Accep tin g Registration sfor
K- 10 S a b b a th S chool
Ad ultEd uca tion Cla s s es
BECOM E M EM BERS F OR
THE HIGH HOL ID AYS !
In terfaith F am iliesW elcom e!
Jewis h
wagnobanR.cnm
N· +77 \¡·/«/
t

APR
2

10 Year Fixed Rate
Home Equity Loan
Other rates and terms avaiIabIe
Abinglon ª Scranlon ª Wesl Scranlon
587-5705 344-6113 343-3133
EZ Loan Application
1
No fee special is available for PAproperties. NY properties require a mortgage tax fee. Ìf required, title insurance is the
responsibility of the consumer. Borrower will reimburse lender for waived bank fees and lender paid 3rd party charges,
if loan is paid off within 36 months of origination. Minimum loan amount is $10,000 in ¨new money¨ and maximum
amounts may apply.
2
Annual Percentage Rate (APR) shown is accurate as of 8/1/11 and is subject to change without
notice. A 4.99% APR, 120 month fxed rate home equity loan costs $10.60 per month per $1000 borrowed. Payments
per thousand disclosed do not include escrow for taxes and insurance that may be required. Rates assume Loan to
Value is 80% or less and payment is by auto draft from a Wayne Bank checking account. Rate quoted is for qualifed
borrowers only.
because people have to
stop to read the sign.
The signs that are legiti-
mate safety issues, the
STOP signs and yellow
hazard signs, have already
been taken care of by us-
ing a new high reflectivity
sign.
There is another solution
for street signs that have
low visibility. PennDOT
has approved a street sign
that is reflective with six
inch letters that mounts on
top of a STOP sign; James
believes this is an effective
fix for some signs.
Most municipalities have
said no to change their
signs saying it would be
too expensive; the date to
change the signs is 2018.
Pavilion construction is
at a standstill with the
electrical. Upon inspection
the pavilion plans were
given to a commercial in-
spector who insisted that
since the pavilion is for
the public engineer draw-
ings are needed. As soon
as the drawings are ap-
proved the pavilion will be
completed.
Picnic tables were as-
sembled and public works
director Thomas James
will be installing the roll-
ing path to the pavilion.
The pavilion is up to code
and usable.
Senator Toomey ad-
dressed the federal require-
ment for signage in munic-
ipalities at a Scranton city
hall meeting; township
Manager Bill White attend-
ed for Waverly Township.
The federal requirement
for a street sign is a green
background, white letter-
ing, and six inch high let-
ters; the reasoning that
they can be seen better as
opposed to the small street
signs that are used now.
The Department of
Transportation reports that
more accidents are caused
from the small street signs
Toomey discusses signage
BY BRITTNEY PIERCE
Abington Journal Correspondent
O
ne in a series of four vintage postcards,
shown above, features the second in-
stallment of a poem
Two funny feet towards you trot,
Dear Friend, oh please, forget me not.
The cards, postmarked 1906 are part of
Huld’s Puzzle Series No. 2-a by Franz
Huld, Publisher, New York. They are
shared by Clarks Summit author and col-
lector Jack Hiddlestone.
BODY OF WORK
POSTCARD COURTESY JACK HIDDLESTONE
Chair of the Board of Directors
Nancy Baskwell (right) and CEO
Jeff DeBree (left) present the
2011 Penn East FCU Scholar-
ships to Maria Genello of West
Scranton High School and Jef-
frey Horvath of Elk Lake High
School.
Each received a $2,500 schol-
arship for their winning essays,
academic excellence, citizen-
ship, community and school
involvement.
Penn East Federal Credit
Union is a community chartered
credit union offering member-
ship to anyone that lives or
works in Lackawanna, Luzerne
or Wyoming Counties.
Penn East FCU announces scholarship recipients
Cocktails on the Court
was hosted Aug. 18 with
proceeds benefit the tennis
courts at the Waverly
Community House. This
year, due to playground
renovations, the event was
hosted at State Street
Grill, Clarks Summit,
rather than at the Commu-
nity House. For more in-
formation, visit www.wa-
verlycomm.org or call
586-8191, extension 2.
Bartenders from the State Street Grill, Steve Nicolosi and Sarah
Russoniello, work in support of Cocktails on the Court to raise
money for the Waverly Community House playground project.
Each table featured informa-
tion about the Playground
Project.
Waverly friends came together to support the evening at the State Street Grill Aug. 18. Shown,
front row, from left: Marcy Curra, Tom Curra and John Gurganus. Second row: Caroleena Cole,
Colby Clark, Jay Carter, Elizabeth Carter, Maria Wilson, Joe Peters, Jim Wilson.
Annual event
at new venue
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ALEX SEELEY
Above: Caroleena Cole,
Marcy Curra, Beth Kelly and
Val Calpin, from left, attend
the event.
At right: Danielle Vinskofski,
Lisa Wahl, and Joann Cum-
mings.
Far right: Steve Nicolosi
prepares a drink.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/JESSIE FOX
C M Y K
PAGE 10A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
3
0
0
7
3
1
The Aug. 17 meeting of the
Lakeland School District Lake-
land Elementary School ad-
dressed motions to begin the
school year on a positive note.
The board noted that the
Playground for Kids Campaign
is complete, and the equipment
has been ordered for the ele-
mentary school. A local busi-
ness is donating its time to
install the equipment when it
arrives. The board approved
motions, including the approval
of the 2011-2012 Federal / State
Programs and Coordinators as
follows: Title 1 low income
coordinator and Title III Coor-
dinator Mr Alan King, Strategic
Plan Coordinator Thomas Ka-
meroski, Title II A and D Coor-
dinator Kevin Sullivan, Title IX
Coordinator Thomas Kame-
roski, Safe and Drug Free
School Coordinator James Pivi-
rotto, Wellness Coordinator
Thomas Kameroski and PIMS
Coordinator Alan King. The
board also approved the 2011-
2012 school year breakfast and
lunch prices. Breakfast will cost
$1, lunch $1.70, reduced break-
fast $0.30, reduced lunch $0.40
and milk at $0.45.
The following extra-curric-
ular coaches for the 2011-2012
season were approvedapproved:
Assistant Cross Country Coach
Derek Shayka at a salary of
$3,277, Assistant Varisty Boys
Basketball Coach Jeff Evans at
$3,459, seventh-grade Boys
Freshman Coach Amanda Vit-
zakovitch at $3,459, eighth-
grade Boys Basketball Coach
Chris Bennett at $3,459, Assist-
ant Baseball Coaches Trevor
Tellip, Derek Shayka and Joe
Bour at a rate of $3,277 each,
Three high school class advisers
at a rate of $1,214 each: Grade
10 Kylene Owen, Grade 11
Gretchen Allan and Grade 12
Leslie Graham. Scholastic Bowl
Advisor Jill Marino at $1,274,
Detention Supervisors as need-
ed Laura Sanderson, Kristia
Davis, Lorraine Movisky, Kris-
ten St. John, Kerry Naniewicz
and Gretchen Allan at $31.52
per hour.
The purchase of baseball and
softball supplies was approved
for $13,056.62 with a no vote
from member Jill Yoniski and
girls and boys track equipment
was approved at $13,670.55.
The following requests for
leave were approved: Angela
Kashuba Elementary teacher
was approved for leave to run
concurrently with unused per-
sonal and sick time beginning
Aug. 29-Nov. 21, 2011; Joseph
Vadala was approved for leave
to run concurrently with the
unused sick time and personal
time through Oct. 17, 2011 and
unpaid leave was approved for
Michael Meoni from Aug. 29
to Nov. 1, 2011.
Lakeland
personnel
approved
BY SUSAN REBENSKY
Abington Journal Correspondent
SCRANTON– With only
17 days until the academic
year begins, representatives
from local school districts
attended a state House
Democratic Policy Com-
mittee hearing at Scranton
High School on Aug. 16 to
discuss the damage they
said was caused by cuts to
public education in Gov.
Tom Corbett’s 2011 budget.
Not one of the Demo-
crats on Tuesday’s panel,
which has been traveling
around the state gathering
testimony, voted for the
Republican-backed budget,
and school officials made it
abundantly clear that they,
too, were not in favor of the
drastic reductions in state
funding.
“The American way of
life, our great democracy, is
predicated on a literate
people. Today, as never
before, there’s an effort to
destroy a child’s right to a
free public education in this
country, and that is what
brings us here today,” said
Rosemary Boland, presi-
dent of the Scranton Feder-
ation of Teachers.
“This budget put out by
Gov. Corbett is a direct
assault, an attack, on the
children and the future
taxpayers of this area and
across the Common-
wealth,” agreed Scranton
School District Superin-
tendent William King.
“The goal here is to end
public education as we
know it.”
Locally, the Scranton
School District suffered the
most with $5.5 million in
cuts, or $10,000 per class-
room and $602 per student.
Tutoring programs, the
School Age Mothers pro-
gram, Fast ForWord Read-
ing program, SAVES pro-
gram, and many others are
simply gone, King said. He
also listed the absence of
an $897,000 grant that
funded an all-day kinder-
garten program, $495,858
for an educational assist-
ance program for after-
school tutoring, $286,015
for a charter school pro-
gram, and $3,809,249 from
the basic education subsidy.
The all-day kindergarten
program, which has run for
more than 30 years, was
saved, King said, because
70 teachers retired and cuts
to other programs were
made.
He believes that the bud-
get was a direct attack on
the poor of the city, saying
that in Scranton, 61 percent
of kids are economically
disadvantaged, 17.5 percent
of students are labeled as
special needs children, and
7 percent are learning En-
glish as a second language.
While Scranton High
School was honored by
Newsweek as one of the
best high school in country,
under No Child Left Be-
hind, it was labeled as a
failing school. King said
the school had the highest
PSSA math scores of any
urban school district in the
state and the third highest
reading scores of 11th
grade urban districts.
“They say that we’re not
getting the job done. Well
guess what? We are getting
the job done.”
Struggle outside Scranton
Even the Abington
Heights School District, the
most affluent school dis-
trict in the region serving
about 35,000 students, saw
a 25 percent, or more than
$1 million, reduction in
state funding. The district
eliminated 12 teaching
positions through attrition,
cut two librarians and com-
puter teachers, six ele-
mentary positions, and
about 4.5 percent of profes-
sional staff altogether.
Abington Heights also
re-bid its insurance, elim-
inated overtime, and cut
supplies and field trips to
save money, Superintend-
ent Michael Mahon ex-
plained. He said that future
pension obligations are a
“primary concern” in the
future, paying $960,000 in
employee contributions for
teachers and staff in the
2011-2012 school year
alone – “a crushing future
obligation that will abso-
lutely undermine our abil-
ity to function.”
“I am not concerned for
the 2011-12 academic
year…. We have great
teachers, we have great
families, we have great
community, and we will do
well in 2011-2012. Howev-
er, I am frightened over the
future,” Mahon said. “It’s a
very easy year compared to
what is coming.”
With 75 percent of the
district’s funding coming
from local real estate taxes,
he noted that citizens can-
not absorb additional tax
increases and the same cuts
cannot be made again.
“We are on an unsustain-
able path now,” he stressed.
GO LACKAWANNA /RICH HOWELLS
Abington Heights Superintendent Michael Mahon, far right, was among representatives from
local school districts who attended a state House Democratic Policy Committee hearing at
Scranton High School Aug. 16 to discuss the damage they said were caused by cuts to public
education in Gov. Tom Corbetts 2011 budget.
School reps mull
funding cutbacks
BY RICH HOWELLS
Go Lackawanna Reporter
The Abington Heights
School District is considering
reinstating supplemental in-
surance for athletes.
In years past, the district
had purchased supplemental
insurance for $15,000 a year.
Abington Heights decided
earlier this month not to pur-
chase it this year, but the idea
of bringing it back was the
main topic of discussion dur-
ing the school board’s month-
ly meeting held on Wednes-
day, Aug.17.
The supplemental insurance
program covered all student
athletes and band members.
If any of those participants
were injured, their family’s
insurance was their primary
policy, and supplemental in-
surance would have covered
some secondary expenses.
The decision not to pur-
chase the supplemental insur-
ance this year was based
somewhat on the fact that
parents have the opportunity
to purchase supplemental
insurance on a voluntary basis
on their own, regardless of
whether their child participa-
tes in athletics.
The district was under the
impression this supplemental
insurance available for parents
to purchase would cover stu-
dents while they were partici-
pating in athletic events.
Based on this, the coaches
were told, and a letter was
issued to the parents, that the
district would not be purchas-
ing the insurance this year.
“Since that time, the insur-
ance company called us… and
said while it is true everyone
can purchase supplemental
insurance in the district on a
voluntary basis, it would not
cover the students while play-
ing football,” explained Su-
perintendent Michael Mahon.
“Additionally, Mrs. (Car-
olyn) Langan did a thumbnail
survey of other schools, and
we find that other schools by
and large do have this insur-
ance. And, we would be the
exception not the rule if we
did not purchase this insur-
ance.”
After presenting this new
information, Mahon asked
whether or not the board felt
the district should reinstate the
insurance.
“I have a problem with
dropping it for our athletes. I
think if we’re going to have
athletics, I think we need to
provide for the students,
which is consistent with what
other districts are doing,” said
board treasurer Louise Brzu-
chalski.
Several board members
echoed Brzuchalski’s senti-
ments, but questioned exactly
what the policy covers, and if
they could get a better offer
from a different provider.
Mahon said he would look
into and send that information
to the board before moving
forward.
In other business, Mahon
announced that Business Ad-
ministrator Carolyn Langan
intends to retire at the conclu-
sion of the calendar year.
The district plans on begin-
ning the process of finding a
replacement for her shortly.
And, a back-to-school carni-
val is being planned by the
Abington Heights High
School National Honor Socie-
ty at the high school, sched-
uled tentatively for Friday,
Sept. 9.
The school board will meet
again for its monthly work
session on Wednesday, Sept.
7.
Abington Heights
reconsidering
athlete insurance
BY DON MCGLYNN
dmcglynn@theabingtonjournal.com
Senior students were inducted into the National Honor Society at
Lakeland High School. At the National Honor Society induction ceremo-
ny, Steve Tizzonis, was guest speaker. Standing, from left, are Gina
Lemoncelli, Kelsay Gallagher, Derek Forn, Alicia Edwards, President,
Krishna Patel, Desiree Martini, Mike Magistro, Kim Walker.
Lakeland National Honor
Society students inducted
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA PAGE11A
CROSSWORDS
ANSWERS ON PAGE C11
The Griffin Pond Ani-
mal Shelter, 967 Griffin
Pond Rd., Clarks Summit,
is open for the adoption of
pets from noon to 4:30
p.m., daily. Wish list items
are always appreciated,
including kitty litter and
cat food,
Tim-
othy hay,
Carefresh or
Aspen bed-
ding for
small ani-
mals and
any type
of dona-
tion.
Adopt a
cage at
the Griffin
Pond Animal Shelter for one
month and your $20 dona-
tion will go toward care
and feeding of the animal
in that cage for the month
you choose. A card will be
placed on the cage identify-
ing the sponsor for that
month. Send the following
Adopt-a-Cage information,
including name, address,
city, state and zip, phone
number, sponsor month,
choice of dog, cat or
small animal cage and how
you would like your spon-
sor card to appear, along
with $20 for each cage to
The Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond
Rd., Clarks Summit, PA 1841 1.
My name is ...
Jessie
Name: Jessie
Sex: Spayed female
Age: 6 years
Breed: Domestic short- haired cat
About Me: I like dogs and cats. I play well
with children. I was previously kept indoors
and I’m housebroken, playful and easygoing.
Price: $50
Remember to contact the Griffin Pond Ani-
mal Shelter at 570.586.3700 if your pet is lost
or goes astray.
Centris Consulting, 800
James Ave., Scranton, recently
sponsored $600 for the
“Adopt A Cop” program to
help purchase a new bullet-
proof vest for local law en-
forcement officer Deputy
Nina DelQuaglio from the
Lackawanna County Sheriff’s
Office. The program was
created by two sisters, Jaclyn
Pocceschi Mosley and Gina
Boyle, who founded Fallen
Officers Remembered to help
bring law enforcement offi-
cers home safe to their fam-
ilies by providing bulletproof
vests to the officers who are
in need and are not provided
with them.
Sponsors and donations are
still needed to help keep the
mission going. 236,000 offi-
cers nationwide are in need.
To sponsor or donate, or if
you are an officer in need,
contact Jaclyn @
570.760.9034 or email falof-
frem@aol.com, or send a
check to Fallen Officers Re-
membered, PO Box 2299,
Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18703.
Centris sponsors ‘Adopt
A Cop’ program
Shown, from left: Jaclyn Pocceschi Mosley, F.O.R., Co-Founder; Gina
Boyle, F.O.R., Co-Founder; Barbara Strangfeld, Centris Consulting,
Director of Human Resources & Finance; Officer Nina DelQuaglio, Lack
awanna County Sheriff’s Office and James Shorten, Centris Consulting,
Technical Specialist.
Youthgroups inPennsylvania that have
carriedout projects tobenefit their town-
shipinthe last year are invitedtoenter the
YouthAwards Programof the Pennsylvania
State Associationof TownshipSupervisors.
Four winninggroups will eachreceive a
$500cashawardanda framedcertificate.
The awardprogramis opentoBoyand
Girl Scout troops, 4Hclubs, school groups,
andcivic service clubyouthorganizations.
Tobe eligible, all projects must involve
youthinthe planningandimplementation
andmust have a major impact onone or
more townships of the secondclass, which
are governedbya boardof supervisors.
Eligible projects must have beenundertak-
enbetweenOct.1, 2010andSept. 15, 2011.
Projects include, but are not limitedto:
communitybeautification, suchas parkand
roadside cleanups; safetyeducationand
awareness programs; recreationprograms;
voter registrationdrives; conservationpro-
jects; anddirect services toresidents of the
community, suchas the elderly, children,
the underprivileged, the handicappedand
disabledandhospitalizedpatients.
All contest entries must be submittedto
the group’s countyassociationof township
officials, whichwill formallynominate the
groupfor the award. Entryguidelines and
forms are available online at www.psats.org
(choose PSATSAwards Programs under
the Programs &Services tab). Youth
groups maycall Brenda Wilt at PSATSat
717.763.0930. Deadline tosubmit entry
forms is Sept. 15.
Youth groups eligible
for $500 prize
C M Y K
PAGE 12A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS
honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE
UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK.
OBEY THE LAW AND READ YOUR OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. *2.99% Fixed APR financing avail-
able for customers who qualify for super preferred credit tier for up to 36 months through Honda Financial
Services. Payment example: 36 monthly payments of $29.08 for each $1,000 financed. Offer good on all new
and unregistered CBR600RR/RA models. Not all buyers may qualify. Higher rates apply for buyers with lower
credit ratings. Offer ends 10/3/11. **$800 Bonus Bucks valid on 2011, 2010 & 2009 CBR600RR/RA models. Bonus Bucks
redeemable only for purchase at dealer on purchase date. No cash value. Non-transferable. Redemption value
not to exceed $800. Offer ends 8/31/11. Check with participating Honda Dealers for complete details.
CBR® is a trademark of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. ©2011 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (07/11) 12-1120
FI XED APR
FOR 36 MONTHS ON APPROVED CREDIT
*
$
800
2.99
%
ON ALL CBR
®
600RR
MODELS
AS
LOW
AS
BONUS BUCKS
ON SELECT MODELS
**
SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS
honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF
DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAWAND READ YOUR OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY.
*2.99% Fixed APR financing available for customers who qualify for super preferred credit tier for up to 36 months through Honda
Financial Services. Payment example: 36 monthly payments of $29.08 for each $1,000 financed. Offer good on all new and unregistered
CBR600RR/RA models. Not all buyers may qualify. Higher rates apply for buyers with lower credit ratings. Offer ends 10/3/11. **$800
Bonus Bucks valid on 2011, 2010 & 2009 CBR600RR/RA models. Bonus Bucks redeemable only for purchase at dealer on purchase date.
No cash value. Non-transferable. Redemption value not to exceed $800. Offer ends 8/31/11. Check with participating Honda Dealers for
complete details. CBR® is a trademark of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. ©2011 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (07/11) 12-1120
NORTH AMERICAN
WARHORSE
Exit 1 off Rt. 380
1000 DUNHAM DR.
DUNMORE, PA
www.nawarhorse.com
(570) 346-2453
COSTA DRUGS
Summit Square, Clarks Summit
Permanent Hours:
Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. • Sunday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.
We guarantee accuracy • Computerized
Prescription Filling • Patient Profile
We honor all major prescription
plans including CVS, Caremark,
Medco, Aetna, Geisinger and
Express Scripts
587-4717
7
0
4
6
4
8

Eliminate Your Bifocals
Premium Lens Implants Call: 1-877-DR-BUCCI
Paul Adamshick, Harveys Lake
Charles Albert, Jr., Reeders
Mary Lynn Alden, Hazleton
Marie Alexander, Forest City
Rose Andreas, Berwick
Marilyn Andres, Clarks Summit
Nancy Andrews, Forest City
Kay Andrukaitis, Wilkes-Barre
Anne Angley, Pocono Lake
Patricia Austin, Sweet Valley
Baljit K. Bailey, Hunlock Creek
Pamela Baker, Dallas
Marcia Balestek, McAdoo
Gloria Balliet, Wapwallopen
George Barna Jr., Freeland
Isabel Bartley, East Stroudsburg
Marilyn Bartoli, Mountain Top
Nancy Bednar, Mountain Top
Theresa Belcastro, Wilkes-Barre
Geraldine Berger, Hazleton
William Bevan, Jr. Harveys Lake
Valerie Bigelow, Shickshinny
Matilda Bittenbender, Myerstown
Toni Bosevich, Mountain Top
Patricia Botsko, Hanover Twp.
Michael Bott, Neumberg
Tony Botyrius, Pittston
Gail Braddock, White Haven
Marilyn Bradley
Louis Brienza, Bushkill
Helen Brigido, Pittston
Carolyn Broadt, Bloomsburg
Marie Brogna, Pittston
Theresa Buckley, Wilkes-Barre
Louise Burger, Hanover Twp.
Joann Burns, Dallas
Neil Busti, Hawley
Catherine Butkiewicz, Eyon
Margaret Butsavage, Forty Fort
Anthony Calabrese, Nazareth
Susan Cantwell, Pottsville
Thomas Capone, Shavertown
Frank Carden, Pittston
Maureen E. Carey, Wyoming
Linda Cernovsky, Bloomsburg
Cheryl Chabalko, Hazleton
JoAnn Cheesman, Freeland
Mark Cheesman, Freeland
Karen Chepolis, Nanticoke
Karen Chesla, Shenandoah
Patricia Chicalese, Hazleton
Karin Christel, Lake Ariel
Beth Chrusch, Jermyn
Casimir Ciesla, Mountain Top
Frank Ciliberto, Wilkes-Barre
Charles Colarusso, Pittston
Sharon Colarusso, Pittston
Paulette Condon, Stroudsburg
Joseph Connors, Scranton
Louise Cookus, Wilkes-Barre
Patricia Cooper, Nanticoke
James Corley, Bloomsburg
Geraldine Cornelius, Mountain Top
Joseph Costa, Hazleton
Pamela Costa, Hazleton
Carol Costantino, Pittston
Neil Craig, Hazleton
Chester Creasy, Muncy
Elias Cross, Plains
Doloires Crossley, Exeter
Dianne Curry, Edwardsville
David Cybuck, Kingston
Joseph Czekalski, Wilkes-Barre
Vada Dale, Tobyhanna
Terry Daley, Latterimer Mines
Barbara Davis, Wilkes-Barre
Patrick DeLorenzo, Hazleton
Marilyn S. Denman, Kingston
Phyllis DePolo, Mountain Top
Janet Depue, Bartonsville
Ronald Deputy, Wilkes-Barre
Anna Derrick, Danville
Cindy Dieterick, Paxinos
Jill Ditchkus, Lake Ariel
Jacqueline Domzalski, Shavertown
Marjorie Douglas, Mountain Top
Len Dugan, Monroeton
David H. Dulebohn, Sweet Valley
Donna Dzugan, Nanticoke
Shirley Emswiler, Swiftwater
Barry Erick, Dallas
Robert Ernestine, Dallas
Elizabeth Estrada, Scranton
Edith Evans, Wilkes-Barre
Norma E. Evans, Mountain Top
Beverly Fedder, Berwick
Gayle Fenton, White Haven
Margaret Filbert, Wapwallopen
Elsie Floray, Zion Grove
Eunice Frederick, Sugarloaf
Mary Frederick, Drifton
Juergen Friedrich, Conyngham
Melissa Futch, West Wyoming
Theodore Gabriel Sr., Trucksville
JoAnne Gagliardi, Hanover Twp.
James Galdieri, Clarks Green
Janet Gammaitoni, Plains
Leo Gammaitoni, Plains
Raymond Ganska, Hawley
Ronald Garbett, Nanticoke
Maude Geary, Harvey’s Lake
Barbara George, Avoca
Kathleen Geraghty, Shavertown
William Geurin, Shickshinny
Angelo Giannone, Pittston
Barbara Gilbert, Clarks Summit
Donna Ginthner, Plymouth
Edward Golanoski, Mountain Top
Elaine Golaszewski, Wilkes-Barre
Edward Golden, Wilkes-Barre
Charles Gordon, Dallas
Robert Gordon, Benton
Paul Gottleib, Plains Twp.
Laraine Grande, East Stroudsburg
Carol Grant, Effort
James Gravatt, Pocono Pines
Mary Jean Greco, Drums
Arthur Gregoire, Hazleton
Carmella Gress, S. Abington Twp.
Charlene E. Griffth, Luzerne
Carolyn Gwozdziewycz, Honesdale
Charlene Hardik, Luzerne
Harry Harmon, Berwick
Betty J. Harkleroad, Dalton
Kay Harmon, Berwick
Ralph Harris, Saylorsburg
Joseph Healy, Hazleton
Mary Hendricks, Scranton
Paul Herstek, Harvey’s Lake
Connie Hildebrand, Wapwallopen
Joyce Hocko, Mountain Top
Jennie Hodick, Hanover Twp.
Roy Hoffman, Pocono Lake
Elizabeth Hogar, Shenandoah
Joan Hopper, Dingmans Ferry
Joan Hudak, Forty Fort
Rosalie Hughes, White Haven
James Humenick, Beaver Meadows
Marianne Infantino, Wilkes-Barre
Barbara Jarrow, Blakely
Gertrude Johnson, Berwick
Irene Joseph, Wilkes-Barre
Simona Juzwiak, Plains
Carol Ann Kasper, Kingston
David Kaufman, Waverly
Sylvia Keber, Nanticoke
Stephanie Keffer, Berwick
Shirley Keenan, Moscow
James Kennedy, Hazleton
Renee Kennedy, Hazleton
Beth Kerr, Harvey’s Lake
Emily Klem, Plains
John Klimczak, Lake Ariel
Joyce Kocis, Plymouth
Lisa Koehler, Weatherly
Cecilia Kondrchek, Bloomsburg
John Kondrchek, Bloomsburg
John Koscelnick, Mountain Top
Paula Koscelnick, Mountain Top
Dennis Kravitz, Mechanicsburg
Anita Kretchic, Hawley
Edward Krubitzer, Dallas
Joan Kryzanowski, Peckville
Leo Kujawa, Edwardsville
“Debbie” Kukorlo, Bloomsburg
William Kurtinitis, Pittston
Kevin Kwiatek, Glen Lyon
Marcella Kwiatkowski, W. Hazleton
Joan Lally, Forty Fort
Molly Landmesser, Wilkes-Barre
Jerry Laudeman, Ringtown
Betty Lawrence, Clarks Summit
Toby Lovinger, Clarks Summit
Lucille Loyack, Exeter
Lorraine Lecce, Montoursville
Kenneth Legg, Exeter
Joseph Lehman, White Haven
Patricia Lewis, Danville
Roseann Libus, Nanticoke
Joseph Ligotski, Askam
Colleen Lindsay, Moosic
Eugene Lippi, Wyoming
Joseph Litchman, Kingston
William Lowe, Exeter
Al Manganello, Bloomsburg
Jane Malinowski, Mountain Top
Ayn Lynn Malkin, Lansford
Robert Marsh, Dupont
Darlene Martin, Lightstreet
Robert Marvin, East Stroudsburg
Delphine Mattei, Dupont
Ronald May, Zion Grove
Marian A. Mazza, Carbondale
Marian Mazza, Scranton
Karen McCloud, Shavertown
Georgia McDonald, Lake Ariel
Georgiana McDonald, Lake Ariel
Mary Ellen McDonough, Scranton
Patricia McElhattan, Bloomsburg
Pat McGill, Keyaryes
Mary Anne Medalis, Kelayres
Helene Megargel, Lake Ariel
Grace Merlino, Hudson
Richard Merrick, Hazleton
Walt Michaels, Shickshinny
Patricia Miles, Avoca
David Minnier, Mountain Top
Marie Montecalvo, Berwick
Paul Montgomery, Nicholson
Deborah Moran, Wilkes-Barre
Judi Morgan, Femington, NJ
Joan Moss, West Pittston
George Mullen, Avoca
Anthony Mulvey, Wilkes-Barre
Lorraine Mursch, Scranton
Mary O’Hara, Scranton
Judith O’Melia, Lake Harmony
Al Olhanoski, Hazleton
Leonard Orehek, Swiftwater
Rose M. Orehek, Vandling
Colette Orlando, Pittston
Mary Ann Pachick, Cape Coral, FL
Helen M. Parker, Dallas
Robert E. Parker, Dallas
Lucille Parrell, Macadoo
Dorothy Pembleton, Bloomsburg
Eleanor Petrucci, Scranton
Marcella Petuch, Beaver Meadows
Emidio Piccioni, Pottsville
Alex Podsadlik, Pittston
Sylvia Poltrock, Freeland
Jean Porter, East Stroudsburg
Joyce Preston, Myrtle Beach, SC
James Price, Bushkill Falls
Mary Priddy, Honesdale
Joan Rakowski, Hunlock Creek
Sharon Reichard, Bloomsburg
John Reno, Harvey’s Lake
Joann Rice, Emmaus
Stephen Rish, Dallas
Richard Rimple, Berwick
Barbara Rogers, Harveys Lake
JoAnn Rogers, Williamsport
Christine Rossnock, Bloomsburg
Marjorie Rough, Bloomsburg
Ronald Royek, Wilkes-Barre Twp.
Frank Rudolph, Forest City
Jo Anne Rushton, Mountain Top
Esther Saba, Kingston
James Saba, Kingston
Gloria Salko, Greenfeld Twp.
Joseph Samson, Pringle
Stanley Savitsky, Swoyersville
Stanley G. Savitsky, Swoyersville
Faustine Scarantino, W. Pittston
Stephen Selenski, Wyoming
Kathleen Semanek, Wilkes-Barre
Gary Seymour, Towanda
Robert Samuels, West Wyoming
Barbara Sauls, Mountain Top
Stanley Schab, Old Forge
Joanne M. Schmidt, Mountain Top
Bonnie Shaner, Turbotville
Lynn Shaw, Benton
Ann Sica, Old Forge
Patrick Sicilio, Lafin
Marian Sickler, West Pittston
Frances Sireno, Ashley
Evelyn Smith, Dallas
Paul Smith, Vandling
Thomas Soboleski, Swoyersville
Andrea Sokash, Kingston
Jude Spellman, Wilkes-Barre
Joseph Steber, Beaver Meadows
Anthony L. Stec, Wapwallopen
Lisa Steltz, Mountain Top
Stephen Stont, Miffinville
Carl Stoodley, Mountain Top
Peggy Stradnick, Berwick
Naomi Strasburger, Scranton
Mary Strizki, Uniondale
Richard Strizki, Clifford Twp.
Catherine Sunday, Hanover Twp.
Leonard Swida, Wilkes-Barre
Mary Ann Thompson, Dunmore
Roberta Titus, Shickshinny
Mark Tomassoni, Old Forge
Barbara Tomko, Nanticoke
Larry Tomko, Courtdale
Maria Torres, Wilkes-Barre
Ruth Trapane, Bloomsburg
Diane Truman, Montrose
Donna Vanvliet, Wilkes-Barre
Al Vargo, Ranson
Nancy Venturi, Mountain Top
John M. Vinton, Mountain Top
Henrietta Viola, West Pittston
Ronald Vital, Wapwallopen
Edward Walkowiak, Wilkes-Barre
Veronica Warner, Stroudsburg
Pauline Watkins, Towanda
Wayne Watkins, Plymouth
Anna Wegrzynowicz, Ashley
Helen Weiss, Forty Fort
Lorraine White, Scranton
Bonnie Whitesell, Hunlock Creek
Raymond Wilde, Wilkes-Barre
Donald W. Wilmot, Sterling
Steven Wilmoth, Edwardsville
Christine Wilson, Duryea
Vincent Wojnar, Mountain Top
Bonnie Wrazien, Stroudsburg
Charles Wrobel, Factoryville
Nancy Yalch, Nanticoke
Kathleen J. Yodock, Bloomsburg
Bonnie Yurko, Hazleton
Mary Lou Zaleski, Glen Lyon
Phyllis Zehner, Drums
Tricia Zielen, Larksville
$
1000 OFF Bladeless LASIK when you attend
a September Seminar.
Attend an educational
seminar & learn about
your surgical options
www.BucciVision.com
THE MUSIC BOX DINNER PLAYHOUSE
196 Hughes St., Swoyersville, PA 18704
presents
SEPT. 23 TO 25, 30 TO OCT. 2
MUSIC THEATRE WORKSHOP FOR AGES 11 TO 13
SESSIONS BEGIN AUG. 30
STUDENTS PRESENT GREASE: OCT. 14, 15, 16
CALL: 283-2195 or 800-698-PLAY
Members of the RotaryClub
of the Abingtons repaintedthe
planters Aug. 13onState and
Depot streets indowntown
Clarks Summit inpreparationof
the Clarks Summit Centennial
parade onAugust 27.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/BEN FREDA
ABOVE: John Hambrose (right), president elect of the Rotary, from
Clarks Summit paints planters with his wife Meg Hambrose (left).
BELOW: Warren Watkins (left),
past president of the Rotary, from
Clarks Summit and Leah Rudolph,
publicity chairman, from Clarks
Summit paint a planter together.
ABOVE: Bob Vielee, vice president
of the Rotary, finishes painting .
AT RIGHT: Ian Anderson (left),
director of the Rotary, from Dun-
more paints with his girlfriend
Jayme Doyle (right) .
Painting
planters
C M Y K
Jan. 7, 1966 - Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Temperton of Clarks Summit held a
grand reopening of The Village Ice
Cream Parlor located on East Grove
Street in Clarks Summit.
Jan. 8, 1986 - Clock tower project
culminated at Clarks Summit New
Year’s Eve celebration.
Jan. 15, 1963 - William W. Scranton was
inaugurated as governor of PA. (60th
Edition)
Jan. 26, 1967 - The average number of
vehicles passing daily through Clarks
Summit was 12,860 according to the PA
Department of Highways.
Feb. 2, 1967 - The Abington Journal
reported, “Cinema North was sold out
for the first time last Wednesday eve-
ning, when 732 seats at $2 apiece were
eagerly bought for one of the big social
events of the new year.”
Feb. 16, 1967 - “Flying saucer sighted in
Summit,” according to Clyde Beatty of
Clarks Summit.
Feb. 16, 1967 – Msgr. Charles W. Heid,
Church of Our Lady of the Snows, wrote
a column for The Abington Journal
titled, “Even the just man falls.”
Feb. 22, 1962 - First grader Cindy Hoyt
of Abington Road saved her 6-month-
old brother from a house fire when a
coal-burning kitchen oven exploded.
March 3, 1977 - Sigfried Weis, president
of Weis Markets Inc., announced the
opening of the 97th store, a 26,000 sq.
ft. modern supermarket in Clarks
Summit.
March 8, 1962 - “Neighbor nabs nomi-
nation: Bill Scranton slated to down
Dilworth.” William Warren Scranton
announced campaign for governor of
PA.
March 14, 1963 - Scranton toll charges
eliminated. Direct telephone service
between the Abingtons and Scranton is
now $50 per month, rather than a per
call charge.
March 18, 1992 - The Development
Department of Baptist Bible College has
announced that Mark G. Brinkerhoff has
been appointed director of annual fund.
March 20, 1969 - Debbie Dempsey,
violinist, and Frank Bodek, violist, will
represent Abington Heights High School
in the Region II and III State Orchestra
Festival at Conestoga Valley High
School, Lancaster, March 20 and March
22.
March 28, 2002 - Abington Communi-
ty Library Board president M. Constance
Sheils was joined by supporters, fellow
board members, Friends of Abington
Community Library staff and guests at
the groundbreaking ceremony for the
new children’s room. Construction for
the addition was scheduled to begin
March 27.
April 10, 1975 - Clarks Summit approves
midnight curfew. The first service was
set to be held at the new Abington
Heights Baptist Church on Noble Road.
April 25, 1968 - The Abington Journal
reported that PP&L increased the
capacity of distribution facilities in the
Clarks Summit-Clarks Green area north
of Scranton with the completion of a
$350,000 expansion project at Morgan
substation, South Abington Township.
May 30, 2007 – L. Cpl. Dennis Veater, a
Clarks Summit native, was remembered
throughout the Abingtons on Memorial
Day. Veater died in March 2007 while
serving in Iraq.
June 8, 1967 - Alberta Ziegler, proprie-
tor of A & Z Fountain & Luncheonette’s
located at 124 Depot St., Clarks Summit,
was open 6 days a week at 6 a.m. and
offered “Businessmen’s Luncheon
Specials.”
June 26, 1969 - The Abington Journal
reported that J. Harold Brislin, the
Abingtons’ only Pulitzer Prize winner,
and his wife Jean attended the 1969
Abington Heights Graduation ceremony.
July 3, 1980 - Number of serious
crimes reported to Clarks Summit
police increased dramatically from 74
serious crimes in 1978 to 122 in 1979.
July 7, 1966 - Theodore B. Smith, junior
secretary of revenue, announced today
that 494,385 Pennsylvania vehicle
operators whose birth dates occur in
July 1966 will receive their renewal
application next week.
July 20, 1961 - “The Last Time I Saw
Archie” was playing at the Comerford
Theater in Clarks Summit. The movie
was billed as “A Howl of a Comedy” with
stars Robert Mitchum, Jack Webb and
Martha Hyer.
July 25, 1990 - Curbside recycling
began in Clarks Summit and Clarks
Green.
July 27, 1988 - Clarks Summit Mayor
William Westington proclaimed the
week of July 25 Welcome Wagon 60th
Birthday Week.
Aug. 2, 1973 “Cinecom in bankruptcy,
Summit Theatre closes.”
Aug. 15, 1984 - Parade sponsored by
the Rotary Club of the Abingtons
welcomed home Olympic athletes Sue
Heon of Clarks Summit and Abigail Peck
of Waverly.
Aug. 17, 1967 - June Demchak, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Demchak of
Clarks Summit, participated in her
official capacity as Miss Northeastern
Pennsylvania Teenager in the half-time
show at the Dream Game at Memorial
Stadium.
NOTABLE MOMENTS IN
HISTORY
Lydia Staples Griffis residedin
Clarks Summit for several years
while she was growingup, according
toher granddaughter, BettyBrunges
of Montrose.
Brunges’ paternal grandmother
was Staples Griffis, daughter of
George T. andSarahStaples, who
residedat 502Grove St. inthe late
1800s andearly1900s until their
deaths inthe1920s.
Brunges said, “She (Lydia Staples
Griffis) residedinClarks Summit
for several years while she was
growingup, probablyfromthe
By JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
Linked by a
LETTER
PHOTO SUBMITTED BY BETTY BRUNGES
Lydia Staples Griffis, 1912
See Letter, Page 20
Regarding the Clarks Summit
Centennial celebration, Mildred
O’Hara of Clarks Summit, said,
“It’s great to think I’ve lived that
long to celebrate the 100th birth-
day. I think it’s nice because my
grandson will be involved in the
Centennial. I feel I’m lucky to be
here. There are changes all over
the place: the roads, the houses
and the traffic. When I moved up
here once in a while you’d see a
car…This road down here was
dirt and when I came up here,
there were no houses,” said
O’Hara.
In fact, in her late husband Carl
O’Hara’s boyhood days the whole
area of Edella Road, Clarks Sum-
mit, was an orchard and Carl and
his siblings rode bikes and played
in that area.
‘LUCKY
to be here’
By JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Lucky, Page 18
The current AbingtonHeights senior
highschool was dedicatedNov. 17, 1967.
Prior tothat dedication, the district went
througha varietyof changes that in-
cludedtowns comingtogether and
schools beingrazedandbuilt. Accord-
ingtothe programfromthe school’s
dedication, there were approximately
sevenbuildings that were constructed
before the current AbingtonHeights
school district was formedin1964.
“It was veryconfusing,” recalledJean
Trishman, whose oldest sonwas inthe
first class tograduate fromthe current
highschool.
Throughthe con-
structionanddivision
changes, Clarks Sum-
mit’s educationsystem
evolvedinmore ways
thanone. Fromlunch
breaks tosocial atti-
tudes, all of the chang-
es have shapedthe district intowhat it is
today.
“Uphill bothways”
JeanTrishmanmaynot have hadto
“walkuphill bothways” toandfrom
school, but she still walked.
“There were nobuses andnot many
PHOTO COURTESY
LACKAWANNA
COUNTY
HISTORICAL
SOCIETY
First Clarks
Summit High
School built
1889. Standing
in front are,
from left: Will
Litts, Silas
Griffin, James
Wagner, Asa
Nichols, Mose
Clifford, Wm.
S. Frace.
BY JOSEPH CROFT
Abington Journal Correspondent
Trishman
See Education, Page 18
Learning the ropes: Education evolution
Families share generations of Clarks Summit memories
A
ccording to a recent account written by Dick Lewis, who
presently resides in Hiawassee, Ga., and is the son of the
late L. Roy Lewis, J. Verne Lewis was described as a ro-
mantic who succumbed to the love of flying. His brother, L. Roy
Lewis, graduated with top honors from Lehigh University in 1919
with a degree in engineering.
J. Verne Lewis originally
founded the Lewis Motor
Company in Clarks Sum-
mit. During the early years
of the business when J.
Verne Lewis operated it by
himself, their mother, Eva
Lewis, urged her younger
son L. Roy Lewis to leave
his job in New York to join
J. Verne Lewis at the grow-
ing car dealership. Eventu-
ally L. Roy Lewis would
become a partner, according
to Rick Holt, grandson of L.
Roy Lewis. The name was
then changed to Lewis
Brothers Motor Company.
In the early days of the
Lewis Brothers they sold
Chevrolets, but in the
mid-1920s, they switched to
Maxwells. Then, in 1927
when Walter P. Chrysler
emerged, L. Roy Lewis
became a Chrysler Ply-
Sentimental
JOURNEY
By JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Abington Journal Correspondent
PHOTOS COURTESY DICK LEWIS
ABOVE: Lewis Brothers Mo-
tor Company, circa late
1940s. In 1947, the company
moved to this location near
the corner of State and
Grove Streets.
TOP: Lewis Brothers Motor
Company, circa 1925.
Shown, center, L. Roy Lewis
and brother J. Verne Lewis,
at right, with a 1923 new
Chevrolet Coupe. Man at left
is unidentified.
L. Roy Lewis in the aftermath
of a fire at Lewis Brothers
Motor Company January 1945. See Time, Page 17
C M Y K
2 Wednesday, August 24, 2011
The Clarks Summit Centen-
nial Committee is comprised
of individuals from all walks
of life, including profession-
als, business owners, histori-
ans and residents of the bor-
ough. These individuals have
attended centennial meetings,
given their time to plan, coor-
dinate and host events held
throughout the year or have
volunteered their time to help
make the events a success.
So many have donated their
time and resources that it is
impossible to mention every-
one, so an additional thank
you is extended to anyone
who may have been inad-
vertently not mentioned.
Members of the committee include
Dennis Martin, Gerrie Carey, Annette
Kalwaytis, Barbara Evans, Julia Munley,
Linda Besten, Charles Kumpas, Warren
Watkins, Steuart J. Bailey, Ellen Beechko,
Joanie Berkoski, Susan Burke, Charles
Charlesworth, Rosangela deFreitas, Kathy
Drake, Lorraine Durkin, Debi Hewlett,
Herman Johnson, Beverly Krenitsky,
Patty Lawler, Sandra Longo, Leah Ducato
Rudolph, Dorothy Boccella, Michael
Mahon, Joan Mead-Matsui, John McI-
nerney, Michaela Moore, Phyllis Ruz-
barsky, Janine Port, Jacquelyn Preate, Bill
Risse, Patrick Rogan, James Roland, John
Romanosky, Clyde Rosencrance, Charles
Sandercock, Liana Smith, T’Shaiya
Stephenson, Ellen Coyle, Yogesh Taylor,
Claire Tedesco, Linda Young, Estelle and
Dennis Kelly, Sarah and Jason Evans,
Marie Van Wie, Brooke Pallien, Winona
Wiemann, Jim Evans, Ken Rudolph, Jarid
Emmenuel, David Hunisch, Camille
Reinecke, Nicole Linko, John Pullo,
Laura Milunic, Jodi Evans, Joan Berkos-
ki, Patrick Williams, Oscar Koveleski,
Alishia of Marley’s Mission, Mark Lynn,
Thompson Kreidler, Bob Kester, Tom
Roberts, Charlie Wirth, Chuck Woolever,
Mark Kusma, Ed Kocis, John Kennedy,
Carolyn Crowley, Cheri Murray, Ronda
Schiavone, Colleen Gilboy, Dave and
Anne Hastie, Jack and Elaine Cooper,
Tim Rowland, Diane Vietz, Sharleen
Martin, Susan Burke, Danny Chermak,
Jerry Zubert and Matt Capwell.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Shown holding a Clarks Summit Centennial porch flag are committee mem-
bers, from left, front row, Jack Hiddlestone, Linda Young, Annette Kalwaytis,
Sharleen Martin, Dennis Martin and Patty Lawler. Second row: Leah Ducato
Rudolph, James Roland, Charles Sandercock and Phyllis Ruzbarsky .
One committed
COMMITTEE
Historians James Roland,
Charlie Kumpas, Warren Wat-
kins, Jack Hiddlestone and
Dennis Martin have shared a
wealth of knowledge regard-
ing the history of the borough
of Clarks Summit. Through-
out the course of the centen-
nial celebration, they
have provided in-
formation and sup-
port, as well as vin-
tage photos for related
stories and features
published in The
Abington Journal.
When asked “What
are your thoughts
about being part of
the centennial cele-
bration?” they had
this to say:
James Roland:
“It’s bringing back a
lot of memories. I was
raised here in Clarks
Summit and maybe
I’m a little prejudiced
but I don’t think you
could find a nicer
place in the country to
live. I’ve lived here all
my life and the people
in Clarks Summit are
nice. There’s not
much crime at all up
here. It means a lot to
me to be part of the
centennial. We have
three children and six
grandchildren and I
wanted to be part of it
and speak out about
how nice it (Clarks
Summit) is.”
Charlie Kumpas:
“I enjoy researching
all local history, and
Clarks Summit’s centennial
has given me the opportunity
to focus on its history. It has
been a pleasure investigating
its history, looking at old pic-
tures loaned to its History
Committee and speaking with
residents who have lived a lot
of its history. Being on the
Centennial Committee, I have
met a lot of new people of the
town and have enjoyed work-
ing with all of them.”
Warren Watkins:
“Having resided in Clarks
Summit for over 60 years, I
feel it’s important that I partic-
ipate and be part of the cen-
tennial celebration because of
what the community and its
citizens have done to
make me a better
person and resident.
Living in larger towns
and cities I know what
it is to be just one of
many. However,
Clarks Summit and
the small town atmo-
sphere and closeness
mean a lot to me and
my family. It’s time
for me to give back.
What better time for
me to say thank you
than at our 100th anni-
versary. I’m glad to
participate and be a
part of the celebration
of small town USA.”
Jack Hiddlestone:
“My wife and I have
lived in Clarks Sum-
mit for the last 50
years and we can’t
imagine living any-
where else. We are
very proud of the
Abingtons and our
Abington Heights
School District. We
are also proud and
honored to be a part
of the Clarks Summit
Centennial Commit-
tee. Three cheers for
all those involved and
for all past and pre-
sent residents who
made this town what it
is today.”
Dennis Martin:
“The best predictor for the
future is the past. Researching
the people who contributed so
much to the 100-year history
of Clark’s Summit gives a
strong sense of optimism for
the next 100 years. It has been
pleasure to do this work.”
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
Watkins
Roland
Kumpas
Hiddlestone
Martin
Local historians share
wealth of knowledge
W
oven throughout the history of Clarks Summit is the diverse legacy of
its places of worship, and five of those that were in existence the year
of its founding still exist today, each playing a unique role in the community
of Clarks Summit.
The oldest, even before Clarks Summit was founded, may come as a sur-
prise to some, as it is often viewed as a newer church in the community be-
cause of its many locations and name changes throughout its history.
Parker Hill Community
Church, 607 North Abington
Rd., began in 1853 when a small
group of people met in the home
of Stephen Parker, one of the
first settlers in the Abingtons,
according to Pastor Mark Fitch,
who has overseen the Adult Min-
istry Team for the past nine
years. He said the original con-
gregation, made up of 25 people,
met for its first worship service
as The Second General Baptist
Church of Abington on March
13, 1853.
Fitch said that in 1965, the
church merged with another
Baptist church in the area and
became the Abington Heights
Baptist Church, which met in a
new facility it built on Noble
Road in South Abington Town-
ship. They eventually sold this
building to Summit Baptist Bible
Church, which currently meets
there.
Fitch said the property the
church currently occupies was
purchased in 1980 from the
great-granddaughter of Parker. It
then became known as Temple
Baptist Church until 1999, when
it again changed its name to
Parker Hill Community Church.
Although the church has been
through many changes during
the years, Fitch said the purpose
of the church has not changed.
“The methods must change with
culture,” he said, “but the mess-
age must never change.”
Another church that has seen a
lot of change throughout its his-
tory is the Clarks Summit Unit-
ed Methodist Church
(CSUMC), 1310 Morgan High-
way. Ed Kerber, a member, said
that “as Clarks Summit changed,
the churches changed.”
Kerber said that what hasn’t
changed about CSUMC, howev-
er, are the children’s programs,
which drive the church. “That’s
still the heart of the church-
…what we do for the children,”
he said.
CSUMC began as a Sunday
School on Sept. 17, 1890, when a
group of women met at the Ten-
nant House Hotel. Kerber said
that it was incorporated as a
church in 1892 and its first build-
ing was constructed on Center
Street. The church quickly out-
grew that building however, and
in 1895, a second was built. The
current meeting place on Morgan
Highway was constructed in
1966.
According to Kerber, the
church’s original minister was a
circuit rider, Reverend J.B.
Sweet, who served from1890-
1893. Another core value of
CSUMC, Kerber said, is that it is
“a uniting factor in the commu-
nity,” bringing together people of
all faiths.
Our Lady of Snows Church,
301 South State St., which cele-
brated its centennial March 1,
also serves to unite and welcome
the community. Carol Salva, a
pastoral associate who has
worked with the catholic church
for 11 years, said, “Right from
the beginning, it’s always been
welcoming… It’s always been a
collaborative relationship be-
tween the pastors and the peo-
ple.”
According to Salva, what start-
ed out in 1899 with 25 charter
members grew into 100 families
by the time of the Depression.
These members foresaw the need
for a new building as the church
continued to grow. “So, they
sacrificed during the depression
and built the building and it was
on Zimmerman Street,” said
Salva. Then, in 1931, the current
building was constructed.
The rectory, located next to the
church was built in 1977, and
around the same time that reno-
Out of five churches grew many
Honoring decades of
WORSHIP
By ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER Abington Journal Reporter
Clarks Summit United Methodist Church 1895: The second
church
Clarks Summit United Methodist Church 1946: Time to
expand again
Clarks Summit United Methodist Church 1966: A church
grows in the field
Clarks Summit United Methodist Church1967: A new
church for a growing community
C.S. United
Methodist
Church
History
• On September 7 1890, a Sunday
school was formed at the Tennant
house; that Sunday school later
became a Methodist Church
• In 1892, the first church building
was built. The building still stands as
a white house on Center Street
across from UCP
• By 1895, the church and town
grew so fast, a second church
building was constructed.
• In 1911, Clarks Summit Borough
was incorporated
• In 1913, The Clarks Summit
Methodist Church doubled in size.
• By 1946, the town was growing
again, so another church building
was planned.
• In 1966, a church building was
started on Morgan Highway.
• In 1967, a large church building to
serve a vibrant and growing
community was opened.
• In the 1990s the Abington
Community Library moved across the
street.
See Worship, Page 17
C M Y K
NORTHEAST
www.northeastace.com
FromYour Helpful Hardware Place
1129 Northern Blvd. • Clarks Summit, PA 18411 • 570-586-4882
629 S Main St. • Old Forge, PA 18518 • 570-457-5495
You’re Invited!
Where Good Friends Meet and
Shop for Unique Gifts, Art, Custom
Designed Jewelry, Handbags,
Clothing and So Much More.
25 East Tioga Street, Tunkhannock • (570)836-GIFT
friendsartanduniquegifts.com
4438
A “Unique” Experience
and We’ll Always be Friends
Happy
Birthday
Clarks
Summit!
From your
family owned,
Bunnell’s Hardware,
serving the community
with personalized
service for 100 years!
Let’s make
it 100 more!
*New this month: Come
check out the daily deals on
Julie’s Bargain Table!*
Wednesday, August 24, 2011 3
I
f you happened to
live in what is
now the Borough
of Clarks Summit as
far back as the late
1800s, you would
have found a variety
of businesses offering
everything from
goods to services.
One of the earlier
businesses was Bar-
ber’s Pharmacy, run
by Howard Isby,
which later became
Keen’s Drug Store
and was located at
312 State St. Accord-
ing to Donald Keen,
whose family owned
the pharmacy for
many years, the phar-
macy got its start in
the late 1800s.
Hotels included the Tennant
Hotel, The Vogelbacker Hotel,
The Roll’s Hotel and Finnerty
Hotel, which were all part of
Clarks Summit’s landscape.
Some of the other busi-
nesses mentioned in the
“Clarks Summit: A Narra-
tive,” published in 1986 by
Helen R. and John C. Vil-
laume include Fred Clancy’s
Restaurant, Clancy & Emery
Plumbing, a jewelry store, the
W.S. Bottom Dry Goods Store
and Miller’s Sweet Shop.
J.W. Bunnell Hardware was
established in 1911 by J.W.
Bunnell. In those days, Bun-
nell’s carried harnesses, cow
stanchions, plows and milling
equipment.
As noted in the Villaume’s
book, in the early 1920s, there
were three chain grocery
stores on Depot Street – an
Acme, a second A&P and a
Grand Union.
“The Miles Foundry on
Bedford Street owned and
operated by Chester B. (Chet)
Miles, was started by William
Igo in 1928. In 1932, Miles
sold off his truck-hauling
business and purchased the
foundry.”
If you were a moviegoer, the
Aljo and Comerford Theaters
were two of Clarks Summit’s
movie theaters. The Aljo, was
owned and operated by Mr.
Alvord and Mr. Jones, hence
the name “Aljo” and was pop-
ular to people in the Abing-
tons as well as those who
came to town by way of the
Northern Electric Trolley. As
noted in Villaumes’ book, the
Comerford Theatre was built
in 1948 on the same sight on
South State Street, where
Citizens Savings Bank corpo-
rate offices are currently lo-
cated.
The oldest home in Clarks
Summit is located on Grove
Street near the current site of
the Abington Community
Library
In 1954 Lawrence E. Young
Sr., bought the funeral busi-
ness from Herman W. Cole,
which gave way to the Law-
rence E. Young Funeral
Home, Inc. located at 418 S.
State Street in Clarks Summit
In 1980, Christopher C.
Calvey joined the family prac-
tice of undertaking at the fu-
neral home on West Market
Street in Scranton and that
same year opened the Jen-
nings -Calvey Funeral Home
in Clarks Summit.
In 1962, Palazzi became the
manager of Palazzi Garden
Center, formerly located on N.
State Street on Routes 6 and 11.
A bounty of
BUSINESSES
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
The following local
businesses and
organizations supported
the Abington Journal
Clarks Summit
Commemorative
Centennial Edition:
• National Running Center
• Northeast Eye
• Jim Gibbons
• Cars R US
• Summit Cleaners
• First Financial
• Bayada Nursing
• Clarks Summit Senior Center
• Sanderson State Street Salon
• Rotary Club of The Abingtons
• Abington Travel
• State Street Grill
• Bunnell Hardware
• Jennings- Calvey Funeral
Home
• Lawrence E. Young Funeral
Home Inc.
• Summit Diner
• Abington Grooming Salon
• Everything Natural
• Northeast Ace Hardware.
• Costa Drugs
• White’s Country Floral
• The Refill Station
• Summit Frameworks
• Abington Audiology and
Balance Center
• Baptist Bible College and
Seminary
• Mile’s Auto Parts
Chances are a resident seeking a
news resource in the borough of
Clarks Summit in the past 100 years
would have found it.
Published in Clark’s Summit from
1920 through 1923, Abington Eagle
Clarion offered a glimpse at the
community at a young age by an
editor who was also of a young age:
J.E. Shurtleff. The paper ended its
run when the teenager was a senior
at the Clark’s Summit-Clark’s Green
Joint High School. The Abington
Community Library has an incom-
plete run of the newspaper from
Dec. 31, 1921 through its last issue.
The paper featured national and
international news and national
advertisements, as well as ad-
vertisements for Scranton concerns.
They were printed on an acidic
paper that is slowly deteriorating.
The library is in the process of
scanning samples of content to be
available in printed form.
In tabloid or broadsheet format,
with pages black and white or color,
The Abington Journal has been
delivering news since 1947. In the 60
years that followed, the newspaper’s
offices were located at 105 Main
Avenue in Clarks Summit, in Clarks
Green for several years during the
1980s, at 104 South State Street and
211 South State Street in Clarks
Summit, where it operates today.
The Abington Journal, originally
known as the Abington Press, was
financed by Joseph Mann and pub-
lished by William Wignall weekly
from his print shop on Depot Street,
according to “Clarks Summit, A
Narrative,” by Helen R. Villaume and
John C. Villaume. In 2006, a compa-
ny formed by Richard L. Connor
acquired the Abington Journal as
part of its purchase of The Wilkes-
Barre Times Leader. The new com-
pany, which owns all of the newspa-
pers, is Impressions Media.
For regional events, Happenings,
a magazine with its roots in Clarks
Summit has offered a comprehen-
sive guide to cultural events since
1969. Founded by Tom Reddington,
Jim Eagen and Murray Dolitsky. In
1971, Tom and Ann Reddington
became sole owners of Happenings
until the mid-1990s when Paula
Rochon Mackarey became president.
Headlines from the past
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
PHOTO COURTESY DENNIS MARTIN/
ABINGTON COMMUNITY LIBRARY
A selection extracted from The
Abington Eagle Clarion, circa 1923.
C M Y K
• Same Day Service
• Experienced, Friendly Staff
• Exceptional Quality Control
• All Work Done On Premises
• Convenient Parking
Northern Boulevard
(Rte. 6 & 11), Chinchilla, PA
Across from JJ Bridges & Monroe Muffler
570.587.1168
Monday - Friday 6AM-6PM • Saturday 8AM-3PM
Summit Cleaners
Summit Cleaners
Summit Cleaners
A
Monroe Muffler Monroe Muffler
Summit Cleaners Weis Market
Route 6 & 11
Privately Owned Since 1966
45th Anniversary
4 Wednesday, August 24, 2011
Happy Birthday
Clarks Summit!
108 S. State Street
Clarks Summit
587-4677
A FAMILY RESTAURANT
SUMMIT
DINER
115 Depot St., Clarks Summit
570-586-9557
Tues-Fri 8 am - 5 pm • Sat 8am - 12pm
Featuring:
• Lupine Collars • Furminator Shedless
• Personalized Grooming for ALL Breeds
Gourmet Pet Treats
Take a moment and “Paws” to say
Happy Birthday Clarks Summit!
Abington Grooming Salon
Abington Grooming Salon
The “Pet Spa”
of the Abingtons
Celebrating 35
Years of Business!
C M Y K
317 Davis Street • Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-1666
Competitive Internet Pricing With A Personalized Touch!
Specializing in: Corporate, Destination Weddings,
Family, Group, and Honeymoon Travel
Wednesday, August 24, 2011 5
vations and additions were
being completed around the
church, it opened the
Church of Saint Benedict
in Newton to accommodate
more families within the
growing attendance.
According to Phyllis Ruz-
barsky, who has been a
member of the church since
1983, both Our Lady of the
Snows and Saint Benedict
welcome the community
through “family-oriented
events.”The First Presby-
terian Church of Clarks
Summit, 300 School St., is
celebrating its centennial as
well. On August 3, 1911, a
small group of woman met
at the home of Mrs. William
Gibbons to organize a Chris-
tian outreach, according to
Jack Pittman, a member.
Pittman said they began
looking into the possibility
of starting a church and
approached the Presbytery
in Towanda to discuss estab-
lishing a Presbyterian
Church in Clarks Summit.
Pittman said the church’s
first congregational meeting
was held on Oct. 11, 1912, in
the Nickelette Building,
which was near what is now
the Citizen’s Plaza on State
Street. The current location
of the church was acquired
from Nelson N. Nichols and
George H. Nichols in Au-
gust 1913.
The first pastor of First
Presbyterian was Reverend
Hawley Rendell, who served
from1913 to 1916, and the
current one is Reverend
William Carter, who is a
well-known jazz pianist and
has been with the church for
at least 21 years, according
to Pittman.
During the years, the
building has been expanded
multiple times and the
church has gone through
many changes, but Pittman
said that its mission, to pro-
vide varied ways for people
to grow in their faith, has
remained the same. Pittman
described the church as a
“Christian family that is
dedicated to helping others.”
“It’s an active, not a dor-
mant church,” he said. “Peo-
ple get involved and they’re
concerned about others in
the church and the commu-
nity.
Yet another church in
Clarks Summit approaching
its centennial is the Church
of the Epiphany, 1003
Church Hill Rd., founded
Jan. 6, 1912 on the first day
of the Epiphany, a holiday
on the Christian calendar.
Roger Mattes, a member,
said its founding is credited
to Mary Oakfoard, and a
small group that met on the
Epiphany in a transformed
colonial school house..
The first minister was
Curate Houghton Percy, and
currently serving is Father
Craig Sweeny. Mattes said
Houghton was hired in 1919
at a salary of $150 a month.
Mattes said the current
church building has gone
through many renovations
and additions, the largest
change being when Perish
Hall was torn down and a
new one built in 1972. Epi-
phany also built Woodlands
Memorial Gardens, designed
by local architect Howard
Hyde in 1976.
“Literally thousands of
people have been baptized in
this church, married in this
church and laid to rest in
this church,” said Mattes.
“To me, it means every-
thing… It’s been constant in
my life… I can’t put into
words what it means to me.”
Also worthy of mention is
Clarks Green Assembly of
God Church, which, al-
though no longer located in
Clarks Summit, was found-
ed in Northern Clarks Sum-
mit in 1927, according to
Glenn Jayne Sr., a member.
The mission of the Clarks
Green Assembly of God
Church, according to Jayne,
is the spreading of the gos-
pel, both locally, and world-
wide.
Places of worship founded
in Clarks Summit in more
recent years include Trinity
Lutheran, 205 West Grove
St, 1925; Summit Baptist
Bible Church, 232 Noble
Rd., Oct. 2, 1966; Heritage
Baptist Church, 415 Venard
Rd., September 1968; Coun-
try Alliance Church, 14014
Orchard Dr., Newton Town-
ship/Clarks Summit, 1983;
Evangelical Free Bible
Church of Clarks Summit,
431 Carbondale Rd., 1989;
the Jewish Discovery Cen-
ter, 749 Northern Blvd.,
2003; and Countryside
Community Church, 14001
Church Hill Rd., which was
founded on July 1, 2008 as a
merger of Milwaukee
(1903), Newton (1875), Ran-
som (1899) and Schultzville
(1866) United Methodist
Churches.
Each of these newer
churches plays its own role
in the community, perhaps
one of the most unique be-
ing that of the Jewish Dis-
covery Center. Rabbi Benny
Rapoport said the center is
more than just a place of
worship, also acting as a
center for learning, commu-
nity, cultural planning, and
more.
“Our goal is to reach out
and welcome people from
all backgrounds,” said Rapo-
port.
And that is what Clarks
Summit is made up of: peo-
ple from all backgrounds,
their lives woven together by
common threads in the com-
munity such as these various
places of worship with their
own diverse backgrounds.
WORSHIP
Continued from Page 14
In the past century, a number of civic
organizations were brought into existence
by volunteers in the community. The fol-
lowing aims to note the establishment of
several.
AbingtonArea Joint Recreation
Established in1972, the Abington Area
Joint Recreation Board (AAJRB) is made
up of 24 municipality representatives, who
have made it their goal to provide quality
outdoor recreational opportunities for the
community.
The board manages the Abington Area
Community Park and was created when the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania deeded
surplus land to the boroughs of Clarks
Green and Clarks Summit and the town-
ships of Abington, Glenburn, South Abing-
ton and nowWaverly.
“We try to reach out to all the different
audiences and age ranges,” said South
Abington Township representative Caroline
Crowley.
AbingtonBusiness andProfessional
Association
For over 20 years, the Abington Business
and Professional Association , a group
comprised of local businesses, has been
busy coordinating free community events in
the Abingtons that serves as a catalyst to
attract business to the community and pro-
vide the residents of the Abingtons with a
better quality of life.
During the course of the year the non-
profit 501©(6) organization hosts the
Clarks Summit Festival of Ice, Men In
Black, Speed Networking, Abington Sum-
merfest &Sidewalk Sale Days, Fall Fun in
the Abington, Annual Holiday Open House
and more .
AbingtonHeights Civic League
The Abington Heights Civic League Inc.
celebrated its 80th year of service this year.
The league is a women’s organization that
supports the community through volun-
teerism. Specifically, the league works with
the Abington Community Library, the
Community Garden, the Abington Area
Joint Recreational Board, the Clarks Sum-
mit State Hospital, local parks and fire
companies and other community orga-
nizations.
Organized and federated in1931as the
Abington Junior Woman’s Club, it became
the Abington Heights Civic League in1978.
In 2008, it became the Abington Heights
Civic League Inc. and received 501c3 non-
profit status. Boy Scouts of America
Sponsored by the Abington Rotary Club,
Boy Scout Troop160, which meets at the
United Methodist Church in Clarks Sum-
mit, was established 81years ago, and dur-
ing that time, the Scouts have done their
part to help whenever they can. “It builds
character and teaches themhowto service
the community,” said Troop160 Assistant
Scoutmaster Dave Jones.
GriffinPondAnimal Shelter
Established in1938, formerly the Hu-
mane Society of Lackawanna County, the
Griffin Pond Animal Shelter has been a
valuable service not only to Lackawanna
County, but also Wyoming County, by tak-
ing in stray and surrendered animals.
“We do it all. We take animals in and if an
animal is injured, we get themhelp,” said
Griffin Pond Animal Shelter executive
director Warren Reed. Reed said that during
the years, the community has shown its
support to the shelter by donating funds,
supplies and time. For more information on
howto donate, call 570.586.3700.
Countryside Conservancy
Established in1994, the Countryside
Conservancy is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit orga-
nization dedicated to protecting lands and
waters in and near the Tunkhannock Creek
Watershed for the public benefit, nowand
for the future.The Conservancy works in
Lackawanna, Susquehanna and Wyoming
Counties in Northeastern Pennsylvania.
The group is working on a recreational
trail for non-motorized activities extending
fromClarks Summit to Factoryville and
eventually to Lake Winola.
“It’s something we’ve had our eye on for a
while, but nowwe’ll be getting into the
construction phase sometime next year,”
said executive director Bill Kern.
Girl Scouts inthe Heart of Pennsylva-
nia
Getting ready to celebrate its own100th
anniversary in 2012, the Girl Scouts in the
Heart of Pennsylvania has been providing
support to the community for a century,
putting together a number of community
service activities. “Any type of community
project you can imagine they’re going to be
there,” said Regional Director for north and
northeast Suzanne Moore.
The Girl Scouts will begin celebrating its
100th anniversary in October, for more
information visit http://www.gshpa.org/
home.html.
Ladies Auxilary of the Clarks Summit
Fire Department
The Joseph W. Hall Memorial Auxiliary
to the Clarks Summit Fire Company was
formed Sept. 18, 1951, and Peggy Yablon-
ski, Clarks Summit, was one of its founding
members.
Yablonski said, “It was a social thing and
was like a family in the beginning.”
The Clarks Summit Auxiliary was named
in memory of Joseph W. Hall, who held the
position of chief fromthe first meeting in
1912 until his death in1947 at the age of 90.
Lions Club
In the past 100 years in Clarks Summit
Borough, its residents and neighbors have
shared efforts and time through community
volunteer organizations; one such group is
the Abington Lions Club of Clarks Summit,
instated December 1949. The Lions Club
motto: “We serve.” And for the past 62
years, its members have stood by that goal.
President Mark Kusma said a fewof its
largest community activities have included
coffee stops, Adopt-a-Highway, the Santa
Project and the annual Clarks Summit Fes-
tival of Ice that is hosted by the ABPA.
Rotary Clubof the Abingtons
The Rotary Clubs of the Abingtons, part
of District 7410, has been a constant in the
community since1929. Warren Watkins
PDG, Clarks Summit, has been a member
since1968. “The Rotary Club was not
known as it is now. It was called Clarks
Summit Rotary Club, that’s howit was
started out. Then about 20 years ago we
changed the name to the Rotary Club of the
Abingtons for the simple reason we covered
the Abingtons at that time…We went all
the way to Nicholson at that time.” The
name is not the only change between1929
and the present. Up until 1988, women were
not allowed to be Rotarians, according to
Watkins, who was president from1978 to
1979.
Diane Calabro has been a Rotarian since
1988. One of the first women to join, she
was also the first woman president of the
club from1999 to 2000. The Rotary Club of
the Abingtons meets every Thursday at
12:10 p.m. at the Nichols Village Hotel &
Spa.
Lending a helping hand
PHOTOS COURTESY OF ABINGTON HEIGHTS CIVIC LEAGUE, INC.
At the 25th anniversary celebration of the Abington Junior Woman’s Club, today’s Abington
Heights Civic League, are shown: Ann Armbrust, Connie Gerber and club President Bea Ri-
chards. The event was hosted at Glen Oaks Country Club Sept. 11, 1956.
BY KELLY LEIGHTON, JOAN MEAD MATSUI,
DON MCGLYNN AND T’SHAIYA STEPHENSON
Abington Journal Staff
mouth dealer until he retired in
1960 and sold the business to
Montclair Motors of Scranton.
Throughout the 1930s, J.
Verne Lewis’ first passion was
aviation and he split his time
between the dealership and the
Scranton Municipal airport. By
the end of the 1930s, J. Verne
Lewis had weaned himself
from the automobile business
to pursue his love of aviation
full time. In fact, according to
family history, Orville Wright
signed J. Verne Lewis’ private
pilot’s certificate.
J. Verne Lewis was chief-
licensed A & P mechanic at
the Scranton Municipal Air-
port where his daughter Jean
Lewis Crump recalled often
handing her father his tools.
During the pre-war years, J.
Verne Lewis owned and con-
ducted civilian pilot training at
the local Daleville Airport.
Following these years, he
moved on to operate the Ho-
nesdale Airport.
Beginning with the onset of
the 1940s, L. Roy Lewis solely
operated the car dealership,
formerly at the site where Citi-
zens Savings Bank corporate
offices are currently located on
South State Street.
The original car dealership
remained at that midtown loca-
tion until mid-January 1945,
when a disastrous fire said to
have started by an “overheated
furnace in a garage basement,”
destroyed an entire block of
buildings, including the Lewis
Motor Company, the original
movie theater as well as anoth-
er Chevy dealership. Fortunate-
ly, there were no fatalities.
While the fire of 1945 was a
monumental setback for the
Lewis Motor Company, the
dealership found a temporary
home in a nearby vacant factory
building owned by a man
known as “Mr. Decker.” In the
latter part of 1947, the Lewis
Motor Company moved to its
new Clarks Summit location
near the corner of State and
Grove Streets in a new building
designed by the architect M.D.
Lewis, of Waverly, and built by
the Glenn Ruland Construction
Company. Currently, the original
building is occupied by several
businesses, including a sand-
wich shop and a building con-
tractor.
Holt, grandson of the late L.
Roy Lewis, described that
location of Lewis Motor Com-
pany. He said, “My recollec-
tions are vague because I was
only five years of age when the
business was sold to Montclair
Motors in 1960. However, I do
recall the unforgettable aroma
of new cars, rubber tires and
gasoline that were present in
that very clean showroom.”
He added, “My grandfather,
Roy Lewis, a quiet man, and
his brother Verne were both
extremely mechanically in-
clined. His brother, Verne Le-
wis, had a tremendous history
of being involved with avia-
tion, aircraft and their mainte-
nance.”
Holt also recalled his grand
uncle J. Verne Lewis being
extremely particular when it
came to working with his gift-
ed mechanical ability.
“Those characteristics have
definitely been passed on to
me,” said Holt. “Among his
business career, Roy Lewis
always found time to pursue
his passion for organic garden-
ing. His home was situated in
close proximity to Citizen’s
Savings and Loan at the corner
of Davis and Grove Streets.”
In the story of the business
written by Dick Lewis, L. Roy
Lewis is characterized as a
businessman with an indis-
putable reputation for fairness,
quality of service and customer
satisfaction. According to Dick
Lewis, his father L. Roy Le-
wis’ motto was unmistakably
“The customer is always right.”
The author, James R. (Dick)
Lewis was one of four veterans
who worked for Lewis Motor
Company, in keeping with a
custom to hire immediately
returning WWII veterans.
Some of the employees at
the pre-fire location of Lewis
Motor Co. included Viola
Williams, Ray Ross, Gaylord
Thomas, Sterling Stanton,
Chester Norton, William
Cracknell and Claude Barnes.
Dick Lewis also noted that at
the new facility, some of L.
Roy Lewis’ employees in-
cluded Al Miller, Gilbert Can-
terbury, Milton Walters, Roger
Clark and Bill Conklin.
TIME
Continued from Page 13
C M Y K
7
0
6
5
3
0
Breaking news as it
happens.
timesleader.com
6 Wednesday, August 24, 2011
As a historianandpart of the
Clarks Summit Centennial
Committee, resident Dennis
Martindiscoveredcountless
puzzle pieces. Ina visit tothe
Lackawanna CountyHistorical
Societyhe was able totrace the
educational journeyof Warren
W. Wireback. Martinshares his
findings withThe Abington
Journal andits readers.
PHOTOS COURTESY LACKAWANNA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Warren Wireback’s high school diploma.
Warren Wireback’s eighth grade
diploma from the Clarks Summit-
Clarks Green School District.
An entry in the high school yearbook, The Cliffs.
EDUCATIONAL JOURNEY
Carl O’Hara Sr., son of
Nellie Riker O’Hara met
Mildred in 1940. Mildred was
born and raised in Scranton
and together, the couple pur-
chased their first home on
Bailey Road in Chinchilla in
approximately 1945. Both
Mildred and Carl worked in
Scranton: Mildred worked for
Haddon Craftsman and Carl
was a postman.
Carl O’Hara Sr. passed
away in 1993 but Mildred,
who resides in the Abington
area, will soon celebrate her
91st birthday. The couple has
three children Carl, Patricia
and Virginia.
Among the things Mildred
remembers about Clarks Sum-
mit: Peggy’s Diner on the
main road, where all of the
roads were dirt, and everyone
used horse and buggies; the
school attended by all children
on Grove Street, where the
grade school is now located;
and the Marsh Hotel in Chin-
chilla, which was the local
hub for entertainment for
people living in Clarks Sum-
mit and Scranton.
“I was up here almost all
my life. Carl loved Clarks
Summit,” said Mildred O’Ha-
ra.
Her late husband was em-
ployed by Floral Haven, which
was located “in the area of
Colwell Banker on Rt. 6 in
Chinchilla” in his “younger
pre-war years.” According to
Mildred O’Hara, he (Carl)
was proud of the fieldstone
walls he built.
Patricia O’Hara Moss, the
daughter of Mildred O’Hara,
explained the history of the
Riker and Knapp families.
She said, “My grandmother,
Nellie Riker O’Hara, was
born on Fairview Road,
Clarks Summit, Pa. on No-
vember 13, 1883. She was
daughter of John Bolton Riker
and Alice Elizabeth Knapp,
both, Knapp and Riker fam-
ilies after coming over to this
country from Germany settled
in Clarks Summit.”
Hence, Knapp Rd. is named
after the Knapp family.
She added, “In approxi-
mately the late 1940s the Rik-
er family owned a grocery
store which was located right
before the bridge right past
Clarks Summit town - the
bridge is to left and road goes
to the right. It was right on the
road before the bridge. At one
time it was a general store
owned by Alice Riker for
many years and they sold
mainly groceries. I, being the
granddaughter of Nellie Riker
O’Hara, recall stories of the
Knapp family owning a huge
farm on what is now Route 6
on Clarks Summit hill and the
farm extended almost to the
Morgan Hwy.
“Carl’s uncle (his mother
Nellie Riker O’Hara’s brother)
named Earl Riker, also has a
street named after him, Earl
Street, located by the VFW in
Clarks Summit. Diehl Street
located in same area by VFW
is named after his Aunt
Diehl.”
LUCKY
Continued from Page 13
ABINGTON JOURNAL/DON MCGLYNN
Shown, in front, Mildred O’Hara.
Second row, Pat O’Hara, Ann
Gronski and Ruth Mozeleski.
people hadcars,” she explained. “We
walked, andwe were healthier for it.”
Trishman, 80, has livedinClarks Sum-
mit since1933, whenshe went byher
maidenname, Ross. Livingonthe corner
of Electric Street andCenter Street, her
first walktoDivisionStreet elementary
was not far at all. It was there that she
attendedfirst, second, thirdandfourth
grades under the teachings of Mrs. War-
ren, Mrs. Siptroth, Miss Phillips andMiss
Rosser respectively.
Infifthgrade, Trishmantransferredto
the combinationhighschool andele-
mentaryschool onGrove Street. The walk
tothis school wouldtake 20minutes, she
recalled.
Due tothe fact that the fifthandsixth
grades were housedinthe upper part of the
building, Trishmansaidthat students who
have totake the fire escapes toget inand
out of the building.
“It was dauntingat first, but soonwe
were runningupanddownthose fire es-
capes.”
She alsofondlyrememberedthe school
janitor, HuffyHuffsmith, whowouldring
the bell.
“He was like a grandfather figure,”
Trishmansaid. “All of the kids lovedhim.
We wouldbe inawe whenhe wouldring
that bell.”
As for lunch, Trishmansaidthat stu-
dents “brown-baggedit” andthere were no
cafeterias. She explainedthat seventh
graders, whohadclass inthe basement,
hada separate lunchroomandthat there
was anauditoriumfor lunchinthe high
school section. As she andher classmates
got older, however, theywouldwalkhome
for lunch.
“We were toooldtobrownbagit, or so
we thought,” Trishmansaidwitha laugh.
“We wouldhave anhour for lunch, soit
wouldtake us 20minutes towalkhome,
20minutes toeat and20minutes toget
backtoschool.”
One teacher whostoodout toTrishman
duringthis time was WilliamCrum. Ac-
cordingtoTrishman, Crumwas the high
school principal, Englishliterature teacher
andheadof the drama department.
“He was verydramatic,” she explained,
as she calledbeing“sprayedon” with
spittle duringhis readings of Shakes-
peare’s “Macbeth.”
Trishmangraduatedhighschool in
1948. While she walkedall of her years
throughschool, she saidher childrenwere
bussedfromsixthgrade forward.
Seventhgrade in“The Annex”
Twovacant buildings standnext tothe
current AbingtonHeights Administration
BuildingonGrove Street. Originally, the
buildings were constructedas silkmills
followingthe Depressionandwere later
usedas trainingareas for industrial work
duringWWII. Most unique, however, is
perhaps their linktothe educationsystem
inthe Abingtons.
AccordingtoAbingtonHeights alum-
nus RickHolt, the larger of the twobuild-
ings, knownas The AnnexBuilding,
housedthe entire seventhgrade for the
district duringthe1966-67school year.
The NewtonTownshipresident explained
that students fromthe five elementary
schools came intothe buildingbefore
movingontothe highschool. Holt saidhe
is still able torecall eachof the teachers
whowere inthe buildingduringthat year.
Music was taught byMr. Augustinand
Miss Paraschac, EnglishbyMrs. Green
andMrs. Norrick, mathbyMrs. Kobar,
social studies byMr. Michaels andscience
byMr. Rosati. Mr. Gabriel servedas prin-
cipal.
Holt alsorecalledthat students were
allottedone15-minute recess duringthe
day. For him, this made for aneasier transi-
tionbetweenelementaryandhighschool.
“I thought it was a great idea,” he ex-
plained. “It weanedus. Insteadof having
togofromhavingtworecesses tonone, we
were able tohave a15-minute break. It was
a goodtransition.”
AccordingtoHolt, most of the students
wouldsettle inat the small grassyarea
behindthe buildingdirectlyacross from
the football field. He describedthe recess
as being“punctuatedbyrumbles and
fights” amongthe boys. Holt alsorecalled
playingina concrete drainage pipe behind
the football field. He describedthe pipe as
four tofive feet indiameter andhaving, at
most, a couple of inches of water.
“It was somewhat off limits,” Holt re-
called. “There was some sneakingoff to
get toit.”
As for the buildingitself, Holt described
it as consistingof approximatelyeight or
nine rooms withlarge concrete columns
remainingas remnants fromthe previous
uses of the space. He describedthe rooms
as “modest sized,” fittinganywhere upto
30students.
Followingthe1966-67school year, the
buildingwas usedfor administrationfor
some years andseventhgrade was moved
tothe middle school.
Movingforwardwithtechnologyand
society
For AbingtonHeights School District
Superintendent Dr. Michael Mahon, ad-
vancements intechnologyandsocietyare
amongthe most strikingchanges that have
occurredineducation.
Whenthinkingof howthe education
systemhas changedduringthe years,
Mahondescribedthe “laborious” process
that students wouldhave togothroughin
the past inorder tocomplete a research
paper. Libraryshelves wouldhave tobe
raidedfor periodicals, books andscholarly
journals. Articles wouldthenhave tobe
copiedbefore students couldfinallysit
downtoreadthroughandsynthesize the
information. Today, Mahonsaidstudents
have more time tofocus onthe research
thanlookingfor it.
“It increases the qualityof the output,”
he explained. “Kids todayare a thousand
times better off. Our challenge is toedu-
cate students onhowtobest utilize the
manyresources that are available tothem.”
Alongwithfaster, easier researchmeth-
ods, Mahonsaidthat everyschool inthe
district has smart boards inthe classroom.
While these advancements have improved
education, the superintendent didnote that
challenges suchas online bullyinghave
developed. Overall, however, Mahon
notedthat technological advancements
have been“nothingbut a great help.”
Outside of technology, Mahonnoted
that societal changes have alsomade for
other educational advancements. Accept-
ance inthe classroom, he said, has enabled
students fromall backgrounds totake part
ina qualitylearningenvironment. Mahon
notedthat students wouldhave beendis-
criminatedbasedongender, race and
disabilities inthe past. Today, he saidthat
there is a “move towardinclusion.”
“There’s anobligationtoeducate all
children,” Mahonexplained. “We have
students todaythat are inspiringothers to
dobetter things inthe world. These stu-
dents wouldnot have beenallowedinthe
classrooma hundredyears ago.”
Witha combinationof advancements in
technologyandsociety, Mahonsaidhe
sees nothingbut positive changes onthe
horizon.
“It’s hardtomake anargument towant
togoback,” he said. “Change is difficult,
change is challenging, but it’s all for the
better.”
EDUCATION
Continued from Page 13
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOSEPH CROFT
According to Abington Heights alumnus Rick
Holt, the larger of the two buildings, known
as The Annex Building, housed the entire
seventh grade for the district during the
1966-67 school year. Shown is the former
Annex Building today on Grove Street.
C M Y K
7
0
4
2
8
7
Happy Birthday
Clarks Summit!
515 South State Street • Clark Summit
586-2505
www.whitescountryfloral.com
Some of our favorite memories are
“wrapped up” in this town!!!
Lawrence E. Young
Funeral Home
Principles are
not defined
simply by
putting them
on paper -
The staff at the
Lawrence E. Young
Funeral Home
continues to live up to
our reputation of
integrity, honesty,
and attention to
personal detail.
Stephen L. Young, Supervisor
418 South State St. Clarks Summit
570-586-7821 • www.lawrenceeyoungfuneralhome.com
7
0
4
9
8
6
7
Wednesday, August 24, 2011
C M Y K
7
0
4
4
9
0
Congratulations Clarks Summit!!
Celebrating 40 Years serving Clarks Summit
& Surrounding Area
Family-owned & operated
Specialized personal services
Detailed experienced installation
Fair pricing always
Routes 6 & 11
Clarks summit, PA 18411
Specializing in wall to wall
CARPETING
Residential • Commercial
wood – ceramic – vinyl
JUDITH A. LOMEO
President
Store: 586-7961
587-2232
8 Wednesday, August 24, 2011
M
ichael Dziak Jr., Lake Winola, spent
many years in some capacity in the
Abington Heights school district and
was responsible for implementing sports pro-
grams for both boys and girls during his time as
faculty manager of athletics.
Dziak cherished all of his 33 years at the
school, but ranks his time in the classroom as
his biggest joy.
“I enjoyed everything,” he
said. “First of all, I enjoyed
teaching. That was the most
enjoyable thing. I enjoyed be-
ing involved with all the activ-
ities that went on, including the
Comets Revue. I enjoyed every
aspect of teaching, adminis-
tration, athletics and social
activities: the whole realm of
it.”
Until 1950, the school was
called the Clarks Summit-
Clarks Green High School.
When Dziak began teaching
biology and American history
in 1951-52, the district was
known as Clarks Summit-
Abington. The following year
he was named faculty manager
of athletics. In Dziak’s first
year in the position, there were
only five sports programs:
football, baseball, boys basket-
ball, girls basketball and field
hockey.
Dziak noted that the tradition
of Comets’ football on Sat-
urday afternoons likely dates
back to his first year as faculty
manager of athletics. During a
game against Duryea, the dis-
trict brought in portable lights
for a night game, the first game
of the season.
“Only half of the field would
light with the generators, so the
game was played with only
half the field lit,” he said.
“Comets’ coaches blamed the
lack of light for their team’s
loss.”
Ever since, Saturday after-
noon games have been a tradi-
tion at Comets Stadium.
Dziak said that one of the
major differences from when
he first got involved in the
athletic department was the
condition of the facilities.
“They called it the Stone
Bowl where the football stadi-
um is now,” he said. “They still
refer to it as The Pit because it
was in terrible condition. When
I started out, I had to cut the
grass and put the lines on the
field. We had eighth-graders
line the field for football
games. For wrestling, we had a
storage room at the Grove
Street elementary building that
was converted into a practice
room. The field hockey team
used to play and practice up in
Waverly. Parents and coaches
were responsible for providing
transportation. We made due
with what we could. Recently
they did a lot of renovations on
the stadium and it’s now a
beautiful stadium. There was
lot of concern about not having
the field up at the high school
with lights for night games.
“My own feeling is I like the
afternoon football games,” he
said. “There’s nothing nicer
than going on a Saturday after-
noon to see a football game.”
Dziak was promoted to as-
sistant principal before eventu-
ally becoming principal in
1966. He served at the position
for 18 years until his retirement
in 1984.
“We eventually had athletic
directors and the program grew
from three sports for boys to
about 16 now and girls went
from just having just two to
almost as many as the boys.”
Dziak said one of the big
obstacles early on was having
enough students who were
interesting in participating and
a member of faculty interested
in coaching them.
“One of the challenges was
the number of students that
were involved,” Dziak said.
“We grew from a graduating
class of 70 or 80 in the 1950s
up to 350 when I retired. Over
the years there has been more
interest and more students, and
we began raising more money.”
According to Dziak, the
school needed to find faculty
members who would be in-
terested in coaching. For exam-
ple, wrestling started because
football coach Francis Pinkow-
ski was interested in forming a
team. Interest from a coach
grew into interest from boys
and clubs. Roland Schmidt and
Dick Bagley were also in-
strumental in getting the pro-
gram started.
The swimming team was
formed when the new high
school was built and had a
pool. The physical education
coach Art Wilson became the
swim coach.
“It was always a factor of
having the availability of
coaches,” Dziak said. “In the
beginning we always used
faculty members for coaches.
You didn’t go outside and bring
in people to coach. ”
According to Dziak, the rifle
club began in 1950, under the
instruction of the principal at
the time Bill Crum, who was
an outdoorsman. The club
started with just a few mem-
bers and grew over the years,
eventually becoming a sport
sometime in the period from
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Shown above, a Clarks Summit-Clarks Green Joint High School football game in 1949. Helmets had no bars or shields at that time.
At asteadypace
Dziak reflects on history of Abington Heights sports
“Only half of the field would light with the generators,
so the game was played with only half the field lit.”
Michael Dziak Jr., former faculty manager of athletics and principal
See Pace, Page 23
late 1800s until her marriage to my grand-
father, H. D. Griffis in1913. Born in1892,
she was the daughter of George Thomas
Staples and Sarah Azer Staples. Her father
was a conductor for the DL&WRailroad,
which is what brought themto Clarks
Summit fromthe Stroudsburg area.”
In a letter Griffis wrote to The Abington
Journal dated August 28, 1968, she re-
counted her years growing up in Clarks
Summit with some rather rich details of
the businesses, churches, entertainment
and many aspects of daily living. Brunges
found the letter Griffis wrote among per-
sonal papers her grandmother had saved.
Whether the typewritten letter was ever
printed in the paper remains a mystery as
Brunges has not found a newspaper copy
of it.
“It was not unusual for her to send let-
ters ‘of interest’ to the various newspa-
pers,” said Brunges. “Because of her in-
terest in history, I believe she felt the need
to preserve the history of her family and
the times in general. I have found copies of
other letters written to the papers here in
Montrose and to various family members.”
Brunges noted that Griffis came froma
large family and with many of the mem-
bers residing in Clarks Summit in the early
1900s. George and Sarah resided at the
Grove Street address until their deaths,
Sarah in1920 and George in1926.
“Her mother had11children, three of
whomdied of Black Diphtheria in a three-
week period in the winter of 1878,” said
Brunges. “Afourth child died of an illness
in Lancaster, Pa., while training as a sol-
dier during the Spanish American War.
“I remember my grandmother,” contin-
ued Brunges. “I grewup well acquainted
with my grandparents and actually much
of her extended family. She was very in-
terested in history and spent several years
compiling data to establish her member-
ship in the DAR(Daughters of the Amer-
ican Revolution). She always was recalling
things to us as children. Unfortunately, we
were not always that interested. During
WWII, she sold war bonds and volun-
teered for the Red Cross, which earned her
a certificate of recognition fromthe Amer-
ican National Red Cross.
“I ampleased that our family sawfit to
preserve many of her things including the
letter and that the paper has it,” said
Brunges. “I find it quite fitting and timely
that it can be part of Clarks Summit’s Cen-
tennial and I knowthat she would be ‘tick-
led’ that you are interested in it.”
LETTER
Continued from Page 13
EXCERPT FROM LYDIA
STAPLES GRIFFIS’ LETTER:
“I remember the time when we
knew who lived in every house.
No one had a bathroom. I do re-
member that one of our neigh-
bors had a steam heat plant, but
not even the water in the house
or a sink to wash dishes…. I
could tell you so many things that
happened in my childhood days.
The day Pedrick’s Meat Market
was robbed at noon, when they
went home for lunch, but they
found out who did it the same day
and when they went past our
home after dark with lanterns,
how excited I got.”
C M Y K
114 South State Street • Clarks Summit
585-5590 • thestatestreetgrill.com
Monday through Saturday 11:30am-10pm
Sunday 10am-9pm
Cheers Clarks Summit!
Here’s to another 100 years of a community with class
CLARKS SUMMIT
(570) 587-1112
CENTER CITY SCRANTON
(570) 348-2700
TAYLOR
(570) 348-2643
HONESDALE
(570) 253-2560
MOUNT POCONO
(570) 839-8891
SOUTH SCRANTON
(570) 348-2601
WEST SCRANTON
(570) 348-2645
TOLL FREE
1.800.692.6279
Member FDIC
STOP IN ANY FULL SERVICE
BRANCH OFFICE TO HANDLE
ALL YOUR BANKING NEEDS!
Visit Us Online!
www.citizens-savings.com
Congratulations Borough of Clarks Summit on 100 Years!
Wednesday, August 24, 2011
I
f
Y
o
u
B
r
e
a
k
I
t
.
.
.
M
y
P
a
p
a
C
a
n
F
i
x
I
t
!
!
601 Cedar Ave.
Scranton
(570) 343-1121
APPLIANCE & SERVICE INC.
Vac–Way
Factory Authorized
Parts & Service For:
• Bissell • Dirt Devil • Dyson • Eureka
• Hoover • Electrolux • Kenmore
• Kirby • Nutone
• Oreck • Sanitaire
• Black & Decker
• Briggs & Stratton
• Homelite • Weedeater
• Honda • Husqvarna
• Lawnboy • M.T.D. • TORO
• Troybilt and many more!
304 N. Main St.
Moscow
(570) 842-4668
Service & Sales on outdoor
power equipment
featuring TORO and
Husqvarna
Pickup
& Delivery
Available
Service & Sales
on vacuum cleaners
featuring Dyson,
Hoover and Eureka
586-7177
or 963-9988
701 S. State St.
Clarks Summit
CONGRATULATIONS
CLARKS SUMMIT
ON 100 YEARS!
We Are Proud To
Support The Community!
9
C M Y K
Wednesday, August 24, 2011
10
A
lthough she grad-
uated from
Clarks Summit-Clarks
Green Joint High
School in 1950, Er-
nestine Davis McCaro
still remembers her
cheerleading days as
if they were yesterday.
“My two best girlfriends
and I practiced cheers for the
whole summer before high
school in hopes of making the
squad,” she recalled.
McCaro and her friends
lived near an older member of
the squad, who helped them
learn the cheers. “We would
do drills and drills and drills,”
she said. “She gave us les-
sons.”
McCaro lived in Chinchilla
with her family, and she re-
membered how intimidated
she was by Clarks Summit-
Clarks Green Joint High
School.
“We were from this little
town and the high school
seemed so big. It was our
dream to be cheerleaders
there, we had high hopes, but
we were scared,” she said.
After a summer of practice,
the day of tryouts finally
came. McCaro climbed on the
stage with the rest of the pro-
spective cheerleaders. “Back
in those days, everyone wore
pearls all the time. I was so
nervous, I was fiddling with
mine. All of a sudden, the
strand broke. My pearls went
all over the stage. I still don’t
think anyone knew it was me,
but I was so embarrassed,” she
said.
Regardless of necklace in-
cident, McCaro and her two
best friends made the squad.
“We would practice all the
time and also teach the audi-
ence the words,” she said. “It
was physical exercise and
physical activity every day,
but there was no competition
between the cheerleaders.
New members were wel-
comed with open arms. We
were all so happy to be a part
of the squad.
“My parents never missed a
game. Everyone‘s whole fam-
ily would come to the games.
If we won, we would parade
after with the band and the
football players. I enjoyed it
so much. Everyone was one
heart.”
She noted that uniforms
today are significantly differ-
ent than when she was a
cheerleader. “The cheerlead-
ers wear so little clothing
these days. We wore big heavy
white sweaters, which we
thought were gorgeous. The
skirts were to our knees,
which was a little daring then.
It was the most wonderful
outfit.”
McCaro said she would
encourage young girls to get
involved in cheerleading. “It’s
difficult exercise. When
you’re in high school, it’s
important to be active, and
cheerleading is very demand-
ing. Cheers are hard to do and
there is a lot more activity
now, as they do so much per-
formance, when we focused a
lot more audience participa-
tion,” she said.
However, McCaro also
stressed the importance of
academics, noting that she
went on to college after high
school. Although she made
the squad in college, McCaro
quit because she disliked the
colors. “I couldn’t wear or-
ange and black after wearing
our beautiful colors all those
years,” she said.
“I do miss it terribly
though.”
Cheers to the next 100 years
Cheerleaders shown, included: Lolita Robinson, Nancy Honce, Terry
Taylor, Marcia Tinker, Nancy Hassenplug, Dorothy Hummet, Barbara
James, Ernestine Davis, Shirley O’Neal, Ann Shoemaker, Carol Dorn,
Grace LaFontaine.
BY KELLY LEIGHTON
Abington Journal Correspondent
C M Y K
509 South State Street
Clarks Summit
570-586-0592
www.SandersonStateStreet.com
Village Square Mall
Here’s to another 100
stylish years!
From your friends
at Sanderson
Clarks Summit
From your friends at the
Rotary Club
of the Abingtons
For more information on the
Rotary Club of the Abingtons,
please contact Roger Mattes
at 570-969-2222
Rotary Club of the Abingtons
Wednesday, August 24, 2011
11
I
n keeping with the
mission of the
Abington Heights
Civic League Inc.
(AHCL), “a women’s
organization that sup-
ports the heart of the
community through
volunteerism,” Clarks
Summit resident
Gretchen Eagen,
league public issues
co-chair, has spent
months gathering in-
formation and photos
of deceased Clarks
Summit veterans.
The veterans, their families
and the four branches of the
military were honored at the
Veterans Memorial Dedi-
cation through the guidance of
Mr. Herman Johnson held
May 28, and at the Memorial
Day Parade held May 30.
However, Eagen’s work con-
tinues.
She has been working on
the project “Veterans through
Time” on behalf of the league,
along with Senior Cadette
Troop 557; Brianna Eagen,
who is working on this project
for her Girl Scout Silver
Award; and VFW Command-
er Steuart Bailey, who, ac-
cording to Eagen, has helped
to identify many veterans
from our area who have
served in wars.
One of her visions is “to
enhance the banner (displayed
at the Memorial Day Parade
and the Veterans Memorial
Dedication) by adding mis-
sing photos of veterans cur-
rently displayed on the banner
and by adding additional
names and photos of deceased
veterans whose families and
friends who may have not
contacted us yet,” said Eagen.
“The banner will be used in
the future by the AHCL and
by the VFW to display on-site
and at various community
functions including future
Memorial Day Parades.”
Throughout the years, the
civic league has participated
and recognized veterans in the
annual Memorial Day Parade,
and this year as Clarks Sum-
mit celebrates its centennial, it
was Eagen’s idea to recognize
veterans throughout the past
100 years. The wars repre-
sented are WWII, Korean,
Vietnam, Desert Storm and
Operation Enduring Freedom.
She said, “When I discussed
the project with Steuart Bailey
(VFW), we decided to recog-
nize the veterans by the vari-
ous wars.”
Eagen’s goal was to com-
plete the project by the Me-
morial Day Parade, but with
the overwhelmingly positive
response she received from
the community, she decided to
continue to search for addi-
tional veterans.
She added, “It took time and
the project was more involved
than I had realized because of
trying to locate some family
history and photos. When we
put it out there to the commu-
nity in the spring, other fam-
ilies contacted me and there-
fore, now, given that window
of time, my goal then became
to find other families. This
project is a great tribute and
gift for our community both
now and years to come.”
In addition to honoring
veterans who have passed,
Edward Joseph Sheroda, a
veteran, and his wife, Irma,
who were on the civic league’s
Memorial Day float in the
parade, were also honored.
Sheroda was an Army Private
First Class from World Word
II who was drafted on Feb. 4,
1943 and discharged Feb. 11,
1946. During his service he
stepped on a landmine in
Mount Adone and his Boy
Scout training saved his life.
In addition to Sheroda, oth-
er veterans honored were as
follows: WWII – Leo Burke,
U.S. Army; Jerome Gillgallon,
Army Air Force; Charles Hor-
vath, U.S. Marine Corps; and
Andrew Martino, U.S. Army;
Howard A. Holt, U.S. Army;
William Charles Pratt, U.S.
Marine Corps; Lloyd Robert
Holt, U.S. Navy; William
Chessick, U.S. Navy; Korean
War – Herman Harold Holt,
U.S. Air Force; William
Dunn, US Marine Corps;
James Michael Eagen, Jr.,
U.S. Air Force; Robert Mor-
gan, U.S. Army; George H.
Mennig, US Marine Corps;
Vietnam War - Richard Lee
Wescott, US Navy; Robert J.
Commander Kromko, Sr. U.S.
Marine Corps; Gerald Ko-
waski, U.S. Air Force; Lance
Corporal David Albert Parker,
U.S. Marine Corps; Dessert
Storm - Thomas H. Lewis
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Air Force;
Operation “Enduring Free-
dom” – Larry Johnson, U.S.
Marine Corps; and Dennis
Veater, U.S. Marine Corps.
Bobby Cianfichi, co-owner
of Biz Gifts, Scranton, helped
Eagen to design the banner
and donated art for the ban-
ner, time and one of the com-
plete banners.
“It was his idea to use the
background of the banner,
which is the actual Vietnam
Memorial.”
For those who have any
information on the veterans
honored on the current banner
or can provide additional in-
formation regarding deceased
veterans from our area that
were not yet recognized, con-
tact Eagen at geagen@ya-
hoo.com or call 570.585.8180.
League honors veterans
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
PHOTO COURTESY GRETCHEN EAGEN
‘Veterans through Time’ banner displayed at the Memorial Day Parade
and the Veterans Memorial Dedication.
1952-84.
“Crum wanted to get boys
interested in rifle and hunting
and fishing,” Dziak said.
Dziak said it was difficult
for the school to participate in
rifle because of the lack of
teams and travel concerns.
“Only North Pocono,
Stroudsburg and East
Stroudsburg offered it, so we
had to travel a lot to participa-
te,” he said.
According to Dziak, the
rifle range was under the
present elementary school on
Grove Street
“The administration didn’t
want students bringing rifles
into the building, because it
was around the time of the
Columbine shooting,” he said.
“They were not interested in
having the range under the
school…. After they were
banned from using that range,
the club had to rent facilities
for practices.”
Dziak added, “Since there
still aren’t many schools that
offer the sport, the school
board eliminated the rifle
team, as a sport, a few years
ago because it was losing
interest due to travel concerns.
The Comets’ victory over
Shikellamy in the 1966 East-
ern Conference Football
Championship is one of
Dziak’s fondest memories
from his time guiding the
athletic programs. The game
was played at Scranton Me-
morial Stadium.
“It was a bitter, cold day in
December,” he said. “That
(game) was the highlight of
my years in the district as far
as athletics.”
Dziak said funding for
sports came from ticket sales
from boys football and bas-
ketball games as well as mon-
ey budgeted out from the
school board for athletic
equipment.
“The only thing they didn’t
budget money for was for
letters and sweaters and jack-
ets which we used to give out
over the years,” he said. “They
became an expensive proposi-
tion, so we used to do a
Comets Revue, a musical
variety show, to raise money
for athletic awards.”
According to Dziak, the
annual Thanksgiving Day
football game against Tunk-
hannock, which took place
from1940 to the 1970s was a
good source of revenue.
“We made a big profit out
of that game because every-
body came to the Thanks-
giving game. It was a good
rivalry between the two teams
at the time.”
Dziak would love to see the
game return, but feels the
playoff system makes it very
difficult to fit on the schedule.
“It’s lost interest now, but if
you talk to any of the old-
timers in Tunkhannock, they
would love to get back to it,”
he said. “The problem is that
there are so many state playoff
games now that run into the
middle of December.”
Dziak worked to create an
athletic code of conduct that
athletes were required to sign
before each season, stating
that they would not smoke,
drink alcohol or skip classes.
“I’m sure they still did it if
they could get away with it,
but we tried to enforce it as
much as possible,” he said. If
an athlete was caught break-
ing a rule they were suspend-
ed for the entire season of the
sport in which they were par-
ticipating.
Dziak said he worked hard
to ensure that the girls had as
many chances to participate in
sports as the boys did.
“I pushed for all of them,”
he said of the sports pro-
grams. “If the coach showed
interest, we would try to push
for it. The girls always wanted
equal opportunities, and right-
fully so. We tried to accom-
modate programs for the girls
as much as possible, too.”
PACE
Continued from Page 20
C M Y K
B
O
R
O
U
G
H
O
F
CLA
R
K
S
S
U
M
M
I
T
A
F
I
R
S
T
C
L
ASS
B
O
R
O
U
G
H
l00
UU
GGG
H
years
1911-2011
Centennial
August 27, 2011
Clarks Summit
1911 - 2 0 1 1
c21sherlockhomes.com
SHERLOCK HOMES
Two offices to serve you better.
Clarks Summit
570-586-1000
1-866-586-2121
Tunkhannock
570-836-3457
1-800-999-4214
Our office has been located at
109 East Grove Street
(Yes, around the corner from
Manning’s Ice Cream)
for 25 Years!
Our Tunkhannock Office
has been open for 30 Years at
74 East Tioga Street, Tunkhannock,
serving the Northern tier.
Ask us for a FREE Comparable
Market Analysis for an indication of
the value of your property!
ERA1.com
A TRUSTED NAME IN REAL ESTATE
FOR OVER A DECADE
Clarks Summit
Celebrate
Centennial!
Clarks Summit (570) 587-9999
Peckville (570) 489-8080
Moscow (570) 842-2300
Lake Ariel (570) 698-0700
Mt Top (570) 403-3000
Scranton (570) 343-9999
Stroudsburg (570) 424-0404
Lehighton (610) 377-6066
Toll Free 877-587-SELL
©2008 ERA Franchise Systems LLC. All Rights Reserved. ERA® and Always There For You® are
registered trademarks licensed to ERA Franchise Systems LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company.
Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.
One Source Realty
We are Proud Members of the
Community and Revel
in Joining in to
Te
412 S. State Street, Clarks Summit
Buying A Home?
Selling Your Home?
O’BOYLE
REAL ESTATE, LLC
O’BOYLE
REAL ESTATE, LLC
Says It All!
Residential, Commercial, Industrial
Celebrating 37Years of Excellence
1974-2011
(570)586-2911 or (570) 961-0551
www.oboylerealestate.com
Chris O’Boyle • Broker/Owner
Experienced and Dedicated to
your Real Estate Needs.
Happy Birthday
Clarks Summit!
B
O
R
O
U
G
H
OF CLARKS
S
U
M
M
I
T
A
F
I
R
S
T
CLASS BO
R
O
U
G
H
l00
M
II
TTTTTTTTTTTTT
I
RR
O
U
GGGG
HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
years
1911-2011
Wednesday, August 24, 2011 12
1911-2011: CLARKS SUMMIT CELEBRATES A CENTENNIAL OF PROGRESS
Area Businesses, Community Organizations Are Proud To Be Part Of The Celebration
Senior
Te
Abington
Community Center
1151 Winola Rd. • Clarks Summit, PA 18411
Website Address: abingtonseniorcommunitycenter.com
Email Address: abingtonseniorcenter@frontier.com
586-8996
Fax: 586-5257
Call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week
877- 394- 2024
233 Northern Boulevard
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
www.bayada.com
Fax: 570-587-8001
Toll-Free 570-587-8000
Abington Farmers
Market
Proud to Support the
Clarks Summit Area
1
FINANCIAL INVESTMENTS, INC.
ST
Phone: 570-585-6100
Fax: 570-585-6101
Toll Free: 877-586-6100
phil@1stFinInvest.com
Philip G. Goldstein
President
116 North State Street
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
Securities offered through Kalos Capital, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC
Advisory services offered through Kalos Management, Inc. an SEC Registered Investment Advisor
3780 Mansel Rd • Alpharetta, GA 3002 • Ph: (678) 356-1100
1st Financial Investments is independent and not associated with Kalos.
Chas Sandercock
Certified Picture Framer
570-587-0162
111 North Abington Road
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
Custom Picture Framing ∆ Archival Framing
Mirrors ∆ Fine Art Prints ∆ Posters
www.summitframeworks.com
100 Old Lackawanna Trail
Summit Square
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
by Gerrity’s Market
Dr. Erica Schoenberg Gallagher
Doctor of Audiology
Abington Audiology & Balance Center
604 South State St., Clarks Summit, PA
(570)587-EARS(3277)
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 1 B
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@theabingtonjournal.com
theabingtonjournal.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
7
0
6
2
8
6
7
0
6
2
8
6 Highway 315, Wilkes-Barre | 570.829.6500 | www.Infnitiofwilkesbarre.com | Hours: M-Thurs 9am-8pm Fri 9am-6pm Sat 9am-5pm
Artwork for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors.
Take advantage of the best ofers of the year
on the entire line of luxury performance vehicles.
or LEASEfor 39MONTHS
39 Month Lease. 10,000 allowable miles per year.
Tax &tags additional. See store for details andinitial
payments. Must be approvedthru IFS or Tier 0 or 1
guidelines. 2 or more vehicles available at this price.
G37Convertible
$
519
mo.+tax
Startingat $45,750 MSRP
G37Coupe
$
389
mo.+tax
Startingat $37,150 MSRP
G37
$
379
mo.+tax
Startingat $35,800 MSRP
G25
$
339
mo.+tax
Startingat $32,000 MSRP
M37
$
579
mo.+tax
Startingat $47,700 MSRP
M56
$
799
mo.+tax
Startingat $59,100 MSRP
EX35Journey
$
419
mo.+tax
Startingat $35,200 MSRP
FX35
$
499
mo.+tax
Startingat $42,600 MSRP
FX50
$
679
mo.+tax
Startingat $57,600 MSRP
QX56
$
825
mo.+tax
Startingat $58,700 MSRP
experience>>the difference
guidelines. 2 or more vehicles available at this price.
mo.+tax
Starti ting n at $57,600 MSRP
mo.+tax
Startingat $58,700 MSRP
experiieenncceeeee>>>>>> >>>>> tttthhhhhheee ddddddiiiiiffffffffffffeeeerrrreeeennnccceee
1.9%APRFinancing for 60 Months*
or 2.9%APR Financing for 72 Months*
BUY
* For well-qualified buyers.
Offer ends 8/31/11
experience>>Infiniti
BENNETTCERTIFIEDPRE-OWNED
60152A 2011 Honda CR-Z CVT EX .......................................1,759miles.......... $22,339
60015A 2010 Audi Q5 Quattro PremiumPlus................... 9,225miles..........$41,900
60109A 2010 Audi A5 Auto Quattro 2.0L Premium ........4,812miles..........$42,605
60146A 2010 Toyota Venza I4 FWD.....................................3,769miles.......... $26,850
1026 2009 Land Rover Range Rover Sport 4WDHSE 46,381miles....... $42,995
1027 2009 Acura TSXAuto.............................................25,927miles.......... $24,499
60108A 2009 Nissan Rogue AWD.......................................32,371miles.......... $20,850
1029 2009 BMW328i XDrive AWD...............................24,566miles......... $31,800
60056A 2009 Subura Legacy H4 Auto Ltd........................25,915miles.......... $21,900
60026A 2008 Land Rover LR2 AWDHSE .........................43,681miles ..........$25,198
60007D 2008 Buick Enclave AWDCXL..............................39,839miles......... $28,732
60079A 2008 Volvo XC90 AWD .........................................48,017miles.......... $26,850
60032B 2008 Lincoln MKXAWD........................................36,377miles .......... $27,190
60012A 2008 BMWX5 AWD3.0si.....................................38,996miles ..........$37,225
1025 2007 Chevy Tahoe 4WD1500 LTZ.......................49,095miles......... $29,222
1016A 2007 Saab 9-3 Auto.................................................68,278miles..........$13,254
1024 2006 Dodge Charger RT........................................24,816miles ..........$19,344
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
120 Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICES
The Abington
Journal is a
newspaper of
general circula-
tion and meets
the require-
ments by
Newspaper
Advertising Act
45 Pa.C.S.A.
Section 301.
DEADLINE:
Mondays at 4 pm
for current week
Deadline varies
during holiday
weeks
RATE:
$1.00 line/$12.
per inch
For information or
questions
regarding legal
notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
570-970-7371
or email to:
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
LEGAL NOTICE
ALL AMERICAN
SELF-STORAGE, 101
Clam House Rd,
Scranton, Pa. will
offer for sale the
property of John
Blanckard, Unit
#204. Treadmill,
floor jack, tools &
boxes. Date: 8/27/11
Time: 11:00 AM
Location: Above
570-969-9522
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
IN RE: ESTATE
OF DOROTHY E.
SCHMIDT
Late of Scranton,
Pennsylvania (died
February 21, 2011).
Notice is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary on
the above Estate
have been granted
on July 27, 2011 to
Cheryl Smith. All
persons indebted to
the said Estate are
required to make
payments and those
having claims to
present the same
without delay to the
Executrix named
above or to Robert
J. Murphy, Esquire,
208 Chestnut
Street, Dunmore, PA
18512
Robert J. Murphy,
Esquire
Attorney for the
Estate
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of Eleanor W.
Goodwin, late of
South Abington
Township, Pennsyl-
vania. Letters Tes-
tamentary in the
above estate having
been granted, cred-
itors shall make
demand and
debtors shall make
payment to Martin J.
Magerko, Executor,
or to Kimberly Kost
Scanlon, Esquire,
Oliver, Price &
Rhodes, Attorneys
for the Estate, 1212
South Abington
Road, P.O. Box 240,
Clarks Summit, PA
18411.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given of the open-
ing of THE ESTATE
OF MARTHA
RIEDMILLER, late
of 99 Bichler Lane,
Lackawanna Coun-
ty, Pennsylvania
(died February 22,
2011). Letters Tes-
tamentary having
been granted on
March 1, 2011 to:
Beverly Jean
Pappa, 99 Bichler
Lane, Taylor, PA
18517 as Executrix.
All persons indebt-
ed to decedent
shall make payment
to ANDREW
PHILLIPS, ESQUIRE,
108 N. WASHING-
TON AVENUE,
SUITE 301, SCRAN-
TON, PA 18503,
Attorney for
Executrix.”
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
NOTICE OF
GRANT OF LET-
TERS OF ADMIN-
ISTRATION.
Estate of Peter P.
Kuchmanich, late of
Jessup, Pennsylva-
nia (died October 6,
2009). Administra-
tor is Margaret
Kreckie, 333 Jeffer-
son Avenue, North
Plainfield, New Jer-
sey, 07060. Attor-
ney for the Estate is
Nancy M. Barrasse,
Esquire, 639 Jeffer-
son Avenue, Scran-
ton, Pennsylvania,
18510.
LEGAL NOTICE
Estate of GEORGE
L. SPANGENBERG,
a/k/a GEORGE
SPANGENBERG,
late of Jefferson
Township, Lack-
awanna County, PA.
Shirley A. Spangen-
berg, 42 Kitchen
Lane, Harding, PA
18643, Executrix;
Nicholas A. Barna,
831 Court Street,
Honesdale, PA
18431, Attorney.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT a Cer-
tificate of Organiza-
tion was recently
filed with and
approved by the
Department of State
of the Common-
wealth of Pennsyl-
vania, pursuant to
the provisions of the
Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania Limit-
ed Liability Compa-
ny Law of 1994, as
amended, for the
organization of WIN-
TER HILL TRUCK-
ING, LLC.
Elizabeth Schneider
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
150 Special Notices
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
FREE CONSULTATION
for all legal matters
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from home.
*Medical *Business
*Paralegal* Comput-
ers *Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. Call
888-220-3984
www .
CenturaOnline.com
CAN YOU DIG IT?
Heavy equipment
school. 3 week
training program.
Backhoes, Bulldoz-
ers Trackhoes, local
job placement
assistance. Start
digging dirt now!
866-362-6497
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
380 Travel
BRANSON, MO 8 DAY
September 18 to 24
1-800-432-8069
HAIR
ON BROADWAY
Saturday, August 27
1-800-432-8069
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
DODGE `95 Caravan
Needs head gasket
.Body good shape,
interior good condi-
tion. $700 or best
offer. Call
570-287-2517
570-472-7840
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `00 323I
Black w/ tan leather
interior. All power. 6
cylinder. Sun roof.
Recently inspected.
New tires. 140K
miles. $6,800
(570) 868-6986
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
DODGE `06 STRATUS
Only 55K. Brand
new tires, plugs,
wires, oil. Excellent
Condition. $6,995
(570) 562-1963
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $16,695
570-466-2630
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,000
570-881-2775
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
CHEVROLET `01
MONTE CARLO
1 owner. V6. Beauti-
ful, shiny, burgundy,
garage kept. New
tires, brakes &
i nspect i on. Wel l
maintained. Must
see. $3,895. Call
570-313-5538
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,300
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
412 Autos for Sale
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
‘26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
1954 MERCURY
MONTEREY
WOODY WAGON
100 point restora-
tion. $130,000
invested. 6.0
Vortec engine.
300 miles on
restoration. Cus-
tom paint by
Foose Automo-
tive. Power win-
dows, a/c, and
much more!
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$75,000
$71,000
$69,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET `00
CORVETTE
V-8. 5.7 liter.
345 Horse Power.
Automatic.
56,000 miles.
Pewter metallic.
Hatch Back.
Glass top.
Air conditioning.
Leather interior.
Power seat,
locks & windows.
Bose AM/FM
stereo.
Cassette/CD Player.
Very good to excel-
lent condition.
$17,500
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
(570) 696-0424
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$27,900
(570) 288-3256
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$27,900
(570) 288-3256
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
PAGE 2 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011
522 Education/
Training
522 Education/
Training
Director of Student
Intervention &
Support Services
Bear Creek Community Charter School, a pro-
gressive and proven K-8 public school that
offers parents a choice in public education, is
currently seeking a dynamic and experienced
professional for the career position of Director
of Student Intervention & Support Services.
This is a full-time, eleven month position.
The successful candidate will be responsible for
facilitating an educational atmosphere in which
students will move toward the fulfillment of
their potential for intellectual, emotional, physi-
cal and psychological growth and maturation in
accordance with the School’s mission, core val-
ues and annual goals. The Director will over-
see the School’s intervention and special educa-
tion programs. Candidates with Special Educa-
tion Supervisor certification and two years
experience preferred.
Bear Creek Community Charter School is the
first and only charter school in Luzerne County.
The school received Keystone Achievement
Awards from the Commonwealth of Pennsylva-
nia for five consecutive years, and was named a
2007 Charter School of the Year by the Center
for Education Reform.
Bear Creek Community Charter School is offer-
ing a competitive starting salary, comprehensive
benefit package, performance-based annual
bonus, and a rewarding work environment. Bear
Creek Community Charter School is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.
Interested candidates should submit a resume
and cover letter to:
Bear Creek Community Charter School
Attention: Human Resources
2000 Bear Creek Boulevard
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVY `05 EQUINOX
LT (premium pack-
age), 3.4L, 47,000
miles. All wheel
drive, power moon-
roof, windows, locks
& seats. Leather
interior, 6 cd chang-
er, rear folding
seats, keyless entry,
onstar, roof rack,
running boards,
garage kept.
$13,750.
570-362-1910
CHEVY`01 MALIBU LS
Shinny midnight blue
metallic. Like new
with all power
opt i ons: sunroof ,
rear spoiler and alu-
minum wheels.
Very well main-
tained. $4,295.
(570) 313-5538
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $18,500
570-760-5833
HONDA `03
ACCORD EX
6 CD changer.
Moonroof. Heated
seats. Power locks.
Black with beige
leather interior.
104,000 miles.
$9,600
(570) 474-9563
(570) 592-4394
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
LEXUS `05 GX 470
Gray with gray
leather interior. Like
new condition.
Garage kept. 60K
miles. Navigation,
premium audio, DVD
& 3rd row seat.
$26,450
(570) 417-1212
LEXUS `08 IS 250
AWD Sedan. 17,200
miles. No accidents.
Perfect condition.
Black with leather.
V6 Automatic.
Moonroof. 27 MPG.
Never seen snow.
$26,800
(570) 814-1436
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
MAZDA 2 `11
Low mileage, 197
miles. Selling due to
death in family. Lime
green. Loaded.
$14,000. Call
570-788-4354
MAZDA 3 `05
Velocity Red 4
door sedan. Auto-
matic. Only 51,500
miles. Tons of
options, perfect
condition. Asking
$10,500. Please
call or text
570-991-0812
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition, No
Accidents. Classy
Car. Price
Reduced!
$13,995
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
MINI COOPER `06
Chili red, with
white bonnet
stripes, roof and
mirror caps. Origi-
nal owner with
29,000 mi. Auto.
Cold Weather
Pkg. Dynamic Sta-
bility Control.
Front fog lamps.
Rain-sensing
wipers. Black
leather interior.
Asking $14,900
FUN TO DRIVE!
570-674-5673
MINI COOPER`08
CLUBMAN S
Sparkling silver
metallic. Roof and
mirror caps in black.
Black leather interi-
or. Automatic step-
tronic paddles. Dual
moon roof. Cold
weather package.
Dynamic stability
control. Excellent
Condition. 33,600
miles. Just Ser-
viced. 30 MPG City.
Factory warranty to
50K miles. $20,995
(570) 472-9909
(570) 237-1062
PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400
CONVERTIBLE
Blue/white top &
white interior.
Recent document-
ed frame-off
restoration. Over
$31,000 invested.
will sell $19,900.
570-335-3127
SAAB `06 93
A E R O s p o r t .
Leather interior.
Heated seats. Sun-
roof. Good condi-
tion. $9,000. Seri-
ous inquiries only.
Call 570-760-8264
412 Autos for Sale
PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER
S
Great convertible,
black top, 6 speed
manual transmis-
sion, carbon fiber
dash, leather interi-
or, front & rear
trunk, fast & agile.
$18,000 or best
offer. Call
570-262-2478
PORSCHE `85 944
Low mileage,
110,000 miles, 5
speed, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, power
windows, power
mirrors, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
leather interior, rear
defroster, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $8,000.
(570) 817-1803
SATURN `96 SL
122,000 miles.
Black. Runs good.
$1,500 or best offer
Call 570-417-5596
or 570-819-3185
leave a message.
TOYOTA `01
SOLARA SE
180k miles all high-
way. 4 cylinder,
auto. 1 owner, all
power, am/fm/cd.
Moon roof, rear
spoiler, remote
starter. All record
receipts. $3,900
(570) 693-0648
VOLKSWAGEN `04
Beetle - Convertible
GREAT ON GAS!
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Newly Reduced
$14,000
570-479-7664
Leave Message
VOLVO `01 XC70
All wheel drive,
46,000 miles, bur-
gundy with tan
leather, complete
dealer service histo-
ry, 1 owner, detailed,
garage kept, estate.
$9,100.
570-840-3981
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `80
COUPE DEVILLE
Excellent condition,
$3,000 located in
Hazleton.
570-454-1945 or
561-573-4114
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition!
Low miles!
$7500. FIRM
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
CHEVROLET `81
CORVETTE
Very good condi-
tion. 350 engine,
classic silver with
black bottom trim,
all original, regis-
tered as an antique
vehicle, removable
mirror tops. 66,000
miles, chrome
wheels & tires in
very good shape,
leather interior,
garage kept. Must
see to appreciate.
Asking $9,000 or
willing to trade for a
newer Pontoon
boat.
Call 570-545-6057
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
DESOTO CUSTOM
‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In it’s
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
she’s beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
FORD SALEEN ‘04
281 SC Coupe
1,000 miles
document. #380
Highly collectable.
$28,500
570-472-1854
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
LINCOLN `88
TOWN CAR
61,000 original
miles, garage kept,
triple black, leather
interior, carriage
roof, factory wire
wheels, loaded,
excellent condition.
$5,500. Call
Mike 570-237-7660
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
MERCEDES BENZ
`74 450 SE
SOLID CAR!
Interior perfect,
exterior very good.
Runs great! New
tires, 68K original
miles.
$5,500 FIRM.
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $31,000. Call
825-6272
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
• All original
45,000 miles
• 350 Rocket
engine
• Fender skirts
• Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
• All original
45,000 miles
• 350 Rocket
engine
• Fender skirts
• Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
STUDEBAKER ‘31
Rumble seat,
Coupe
Good condition.
Call for details
(570) 881-7545
WANTED: PONTIAC
`78 FIREBIRD
Formula 400
Berkshire Green,
Originally purchased
at Bradley-Lawless
in Scranton. Car
was last seen in
Abington-Scranton
area. Finder’s fee
paid if car is found
and purchased. Call
John with any info
(570) 760-3440
421 Boats &
Marinas
ALUM V-TRAILER 14”
15 Evinrude/55 lb.
min. anchor, oars,
seats, etc. Ready to
go, just add poles &
bait. $2,995.
570-751-8689
421 Boats &
Marinas
CREST III ‘96
25FT PONTOON BOAT
with 2007 Hoosier
trailer. 1996 Mer-
cury 90hp motor/
less than 100 hours.
Reduced to
$10,500. Call
570-215-0123
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
BMW ‘07 K1200 GT
Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean.
$9,500
(570) 646-2645
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
HARLEY DAVIDSON `07
Road King Classic
FLHRC. Burgundy /
Cream. Driver &
Passenger back
rest, grips, battery
tender, cover. Willie
G accessories. 19k
miles. $14,400 or
best offer. Call
262-993-4228
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995
570-905-9348
KAWASAKI` 05
NINJA 500
Blue Ninja 500 with
3300 mi. Current PA
State Inspection.
Never dropped or
dumped. Must sell,
moving to Florida.
$3,000.
570-237-5947
Kawasaki` 93
ZX11D NINJA
LIKE NEW
8900 Original
miles. Original
owner. V@H
Exhaust and Com-
puter. New tires.
$3,800.
570-574-3584
Q-LINK LEGACY `09
250 automatic. Gun
metal gray. MP3
player. $3,000.
Great first motorcy-
cle. 570-696-1156
SUZUKI `07 C50T
CRUISER
EXCELLENT
CONDITION
Windshield, Bags,
Floorboards,V&H
Pipes, White
walls,Garage Kept.
6K Miles $5,200
(570) 430-0357
Line up a place to live
in classified!
YAMAHA `04 V-STAR
1100 Custom. 5800
miles, light bar,
cobra exhaust,
windshield, many
extras, must sell.
$4,900. Call
570-301-3433
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
CHEROKEE ‘10
Travel trailer. 39 ft.,
4 slide outs, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath
rooms, microwave,
awning, tinted win-
dows, Brand new.
Have no pets or
smokers. Much
more!!!!!
$37,000
(cell) 682-888-2880
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras, includ-
ing hitch equipment
and sway bars.
Reduced. $12,500.
Call 570-842-6735
442 RVs & Campers
EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT
TRAILER
Brand new 2010
tandem axle, 4
wheel electric
brakes, 20’ long
total, 7 x 16 wood
deck, fold up ramps
with knees, remov-
able fenders for
oversized loads,
powder coat paint
for rust protection,
2 5/16 hitch
coupler, tongue
jack, side pockets,
brake away switch,
battery, 7 pole
RV plugs, title &
more!! Priced for
quick sale. $2,595
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels,
water purifier,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
raised panel fridge
& many acces-
sories & options.
Excellent condition,
$22,500.
570-868-6986
SUNLINE SOLARIS `91
25’ travel trailer A/C.
Bunk beds. New
fridge & hot water
heater. Excellent
condition. $3,900.
570-466-4995
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft
Rear queen master
bedroom, Walk
thru bathroom.
Center kitchen +
dinette bed. Front
extra large living
room + sofa bed.
Big View windows.
Air, awning, sleeps
6, very clean, will
deliver. Located in
Benton, Pa. $4,900.
215-694-7497
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS CXL
BARGAIN!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
22,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New tires. Like
new, inside &
out. $14,900. Call
(570) 540-0975
FORD `04 FREESTAR
Limited. Leather. 7
passenger.Remote
doors. DVD player,
premium sound.
Rear A/C. 57,800
miles. $8,995. Call
570-947-0771
FORD `90 TRUCK
17’ box. Excellent
running condition.
Very Clean. $4,300.
Call 570-287-1246
FORD `99 E250
Wheelchair Van
78,250 miles. Fully
serviced, new bat-
tery, tires & rods.
Seats 6 or 3 wheel-
chairs. Braun Millen-
nium lift with
remote. Walk up
door. Front & rear
A/C. Power locks &
windows. Excellent
condition. $7,500.
570-237-6375
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
GMC `93 PICKUP
SLE Package. 2WD.
Very Clean. 105,000
miles. $3,500.
(570) 283-3184
(570) 696-4358
GMC `99 TRUCK
SLE PACKAGE
2 wheel drive
84,000
original
miles
$5,900.
or best offer
570-
824-3096
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
NISSAN `03 XTERRA
Black with grey inte-
rior. 196k highway
miles. 4x4. Power
windows & locks.
New tires, brakes,
rotors. Great condi-
tion. $4,350. Call
570-574-7140
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,895. Scranton.
570-466-2771
MERCURY `07
MARINER
One owner.
garage kept.
Showroom condi-
tion fully loaded,
every option
34,000 mi.
REDUCED
$15,900
(570)825-5847
MITSUBISHI `95
MONTERO SR 4WD
177,102 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
seats, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
changer, leather
interior, sun roof,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new Passed inspec-
tion, new battery.
$2,500
(570) 868-1100
Call after 2:00 p.m.
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
TRACTOR
TRAILERS
FREIGHTLINER
’97 MIDROOF
475 CAT & 10
speed transmission.
$12,000
FREIGHTLINER
’99 CONDO
430 Detroit, Super
10 transmission.
Asking $15,000.
‘ 88 FRUEHAUF 45’
with sides. All
aluminum, spread
axle. $6,500.
2 storage trailers.
570-814-4790
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
462 Auto
Accessories
FLOOR MATS, 4. For
Porche Cayenne.
Excellent condition.
$200.
570-868-6174
LUGGAGE CARRI-
ER, Kar Rite, tan,
great condition. $50
570-822-5033
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
506 Administrative/
Clerical
OFFICE HELP
Happy, energetic,
detail-oriented per-
son wanted for part-
time afternoon
hours. Need some
computer skills. The
perfect person will
be able to answer
phones, schedule
appointments, work
a chiropractic billing
computer program
(training provided),
deal with insurance
and payments, and
have fun doing it!
Looking for Monday,
Wednesday and Fri-
day shifts from 2:30
until 6:30. Please
submit resume via
email to jjfinndc@
yahoo.com.
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
PAINTER
Foreperson position
available. Starting
at $15/hour. Must
know how to spray,
roll, and finish
spackle. Must have
leadership skills.
Benefits available.
AMATEURS NEED
NOT APPLY!
Call 570-654-4348
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
PRESIDENT /
CHIEF EXECUTIVE
OFFICER
United Way of
Wyoming Valley
seeks a proven
leader in complex
resource develop-
ment, non-profit
management and
leadership. 5+
years’ experience in
a senior level exec-
utive position;
including multiple
years of manage-
ment experience,
preferably in a not-
for-profit organiza-
tion, fund-raising,
and a Bachelor's
degree are
required. Postgrad-
uate studies
desired. Competi-
tive salary and ben-
efits.
To find out more,
check out our web-
site at: http://united-
waywb.org/ceo.htm
Equal Opportunity
Employer
522 Education/
Training
TEACHING POSITIONS
Available for phle-
botomy and lab
classes. Part time,
variable schedules
day & evening
classes. Must have
minimum 3 years
related work expe-
rience. Teaching
experience a plus,
but not required.
Fax resume to:
570-287-7936
Or send to
Director of Education
Fortis Institute
166 Slocum Street
Forty Fort, PA 18704
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS CDL-A
experienced OTR.
Regional lines.
HOME MOST
WEEKENDS. Up to
$3,000 BONUS. Up
to $.50 per mile.
888-463-3962 6
months OTR experi-
ence & CDL
required. www.
usatruck.jobs
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS Class A
drivers needed
regional or OTR
great pay, paid ori-
entation, 401k,
health coverage
$1500 sign on
bonus through
9/30/11. ONLINE
TRANSPORT 877-
997-8999 apply at
onlinetransport.com
DRIVERS Looking
for miles? We’ve
got em. Great runs
with great equip-
ment. Competitive
pay & benefits. Van
& flatbed divisions.
$500 sign on bonus
for flatbed CDL-A 6
month OTR
888-801-5295
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
DRIVERS NEW PAY
INCREASE FOR
TANK DRIVERS.
Lots of freight.
Great miles, 3
weeks paid vaca-
tion, incentives,
insurance & 401k.
Food grade prod-
ucts. CDL-A & 1 year
OTR experience
required. Call 877-
882-6537 Oakley-
Transport.com
DRIVERS Opportuni-
ties for reefer/
flatbed drivers now
open! Plenty of
freight & miles, top
pay, excellent
equipment, paid
training & much
more! 1-800-277-
0212 or www.
primeinc.com
DRIVERS Owner
Operators & small
fleets. Earn over
$2.00/mile. Up to
$1,000 sign on
bonus. Average fuel
network savings of
$.43 gallon. 877-
277-8756 www.
JoinMalone.com
DRIVERS top pay on
excellent runs.
Marten just raised
pay/rates. Regional
runs, steady miles,
frequent hometime,
new equipment.
CDL-A 6 months
experience
required. EEOE/AAP
866-322-4039
www.Drive4Marten.
com
DRIVERS WEEKLY
HOMETIME for most
lanes. Up to
.22cpm! Daily or
weekly pay. No
forced dispatch to
NYC or Canada.
CDL-A 3 months
recent experience.
800-414-9569
driveknight.com
WANTED CLASS A OR B
WITH TANKER
ENDORSEMENT
Rate - $18/hour plus
overtime & benefits.
Need 2 full time
(day & night) and
2 part time (Satur-
day & Sunday).
Mail resume to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 2720
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
Questions call
570-881-9536
545 Marketing/
Product
Agency
Account
Executive
One of NEPA's
largest adver-
tising agencies
is looking for a
dynamic individ-
ual to join its
team. Qualified
candidate will
have thorough
knowledge of
marketing and
advertising, will
be able to cre-
ate and present
proposals and
understand the
basics of out-
side business
to business
sales. Position
is salary plus
commission
with a competi-
tive benefits
package.
Please e-mail
resume to
VP of Market-
ing Cathy
Kmiec ckmiec@
comcast.net.
TELEMARKETERS
NEEDED
Earn $15.00-
$20.00 per hour.
NEPA’s largest
print publication
based out of Old
Forge, PA is look-
ing for experi-
enced Telemar-
keters. Base pay
is $7.25 per hour
with a $5.00
bonus for every
sale that is closed
by an outside
sales representa-
tive. There is no
selling required!
Please email
resume to
prminc14@aol.com
548 Medical/Health
BIOMEDICAL
EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN
Full time. We have
an excellent oppor-
tunity for a highly
motivated, experi-
enced BMET’s. Can-
didate should have
an AS degree or
equivalent experi-
ence, and possess
strong communica-
tion skills. We offer a
competitive com-
pensation package
& a co-operative
stable work environ-
ment. Send resume
to: c/o Times Leader
Box 2725
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
MT/MLT
FULL-TIME-2ND SHIFT
Requires MT/
MLT program
accreditation,
ASCP or equiva-
lent certification;
previous clinical
experience pre-
ferred. Benefit
package avail-
able. Apply
online or send
resume/applica-
tion to:
Bloomsburg
Hospital, Human
Resources
549 Fair St.,
Bloomsburg, PA
17815 FAX 570-
387-2434 www.
bloomhealth.net
EOE/MFHV
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
551 Other
AIRLINES ARE HIR-
ING. Train for high
paying Aviation
Maintenance car-
eer. FAA approved
program. Financial
aid if qualified, hous-
ing available. Avia-
tion Institute of
Maintenance.
888-834-9715
WINDOW CLEANER(S)
Must lift & climb
ladders & work on
roofs. Driver license
a must. 288-6794
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
GROCERY
THOMAS’ FAMILY
MARKET
FOODTOWN
Is hiring for the
following positions:
PRODUCE MANAGER
PRODUCE CLERK
Part Time
MEAT APPRENTICE
Full Time
Excellent pay &
benefits... 401K.
570-332-8361
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
LOCAL SALES
MANAGER
The Target Shop-
per Magazine,
NEPA’s largest
print publication
is looking for a
qualified individ-
ual to run its
sales depart-
ment.
Position pays a
$36,000.00
base with over-
ride on sales,
bonus for goal
achievement
and a competi-
tive benefits
package. Candi-
date MUST have
NEPA outside
sales experience
with a track
record of suc-
cess. Candidate
will be required
to manage a
house list and be
out in the field
with sales reps.
Please email
your resume to
byread@aol.com
WORK FROM
HOME!
The Target Shop-
per Magazine is
looking for outside
sales reps to work
the following
areas:
- Hazleton
- Tunkhannock
- Honesdale
This position is
goal oriented and
commission
based. It’s perfect
if you have a home
office as you will
not be required to
report to corpo-
rate offices on a
daily basis. Work
as many hours as
you would like!
Health Benefits,
fitness member-
ship and paid
vacation are some
of the benefits.
Please email
resume to
prminc14@aol.com
569 Security/
Protective Services
SECURITY
Full-Time and Part-
Time Security posi-
tions available in
Mehoopany. Nights
and weekends a
must. Must have a
valid/clean driver’s
license for at least
3 years to date and
be able to pass a
pre-employment
drug test. Benefits
are available for Full
Time and uniforms
are provided.
Please apply online
at https://jobs.nana.
com/careersnms/
Careers.aspx .
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
A
Better
Career
Starts
Here!
Your chance to build
your own business with
a JAN-PRO Cleaning
Systems franchise.
‰ Extensive Training
‰ Guaranteed
Customers
‰ Guaranteed
Financing
‰ No Selling Needed
Just $950 starts your
career, so call
570-824-5774 today!
LIQUOR LICENSE
For Sale in the
Dallas Area.
Asking $28,000.
Call 570-977-9607
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LUNCH OPPORTU-
NITY in existing
restaurant. Inde-
pendent operation
with an existing
Wilkes-Barre Busi-
ness. Must have
own resources and
capital. Serious
inquiries only. Call
570-287-7191
extension 1 LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 3 B
24
Mos.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 8/31/11.
AM/FM WITH CD
POWER
WINDOWS
POWER
LOCKS
LEATHER SEATS
FOG LAMPS
SIDE AIR CURTAINS
PERSONAL SAFETY WITH
ANTI-THEFT SYSTEM
VIN #3LBR772734
MESSAGE CENTER
COCCIA
CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD CALL NOW 823-8888 or 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
Just Minutes from Just Minutes from
Scranton or W-B Scranton or W-B
577 East Main St., 577 East Main St.,
Plains, PA Plains, PA
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Premium Pkg., 18” Aluminum Wheels,
Advanced Trac, Auto. Temp Control, AM/FM/CD, Leather
Heated/Cooled Seats, Keyless Entry with Keypad, Satellite Radio,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 8/31/11.
24
Mos.
NEW2011 LINCOLNMKX AWD
VIN #2LBBJ31864
VIN #3LCR804415
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month
lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 8/31/11.
24
Mos.
NEW2011 LINCOLNMKS AWD VIN #1LBG615430
All Wheel Drive, 3.7L V6, Remote Keyless Entry, THX Sound
Sys. w/CD, HID Headlamps, Reverse Sensing Sys., 20”
Polished Cast Alum. Wheels, Dual Zone Electronic Auto.
Temp. Control,
MPG
NEW2012 LINCOLNMKZ
Leather Seats, Message Center, Side Air Curtains, PL,
PW, Fog Lamps, AM/FM/CD, Personal Safety with
Anti-Theft Sys., SYNC,
PAGE 4 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011
PRICES STARTING AS LOW AS
$7,995
FINANCING AS LOW AS
2.9% APR
OVER 500
VEHICLES IN STOCK TO
CHOOSE FROM!!!
CLEARANCE
CLEARANCE C
CC
CC CCE ANC CLE C EAARA
CLEA CLEAARANC ARANC NN CLE CLE CC EA EAARA AR CE CE CE CE
USED CAR
NOW THROUGH AUGUST 31
ST
Cc|| ¡e|| Free 1·8óó·35ó·º383 º MeIerWer|d Drìve 1usI O|| |nIersIcIe 81, Wì|kes·8crre
SHOP 24/7 @ MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM SALES HOURS MON – FRI: 9AM-8PM SAT: 9AM-5PM SUN: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON-5PM
*ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TAG, & TITLE. FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. WARRANTY ON SELECT MAKES AND MODELS. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. UNITS MAY BE SOLD PRIOR TO PRINTING. OFFERS EXPIRE 08/31/11.
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
P15179A
K11993A
T27726A
K12074B
H26587A
K12152A
T26912A
C3410B
H26639B
T28211B
H26803A
L11203B
S0692A
B9144A
TS0329A
H26657A
TP15418
J4502B
T28268A
K12183A
K12160A
T28316A
T28272A
KP15342
KP15343
KP15345
H26601A
P15382
A10841B
D0042A
P15440
KP15455
CH5408A
T28289A
DP15374
CH5435A
KP15319
KP15297
KP15417
M7878B
KP15302
P15400
TP15517
JP15331A
A10900A
T28041A
HP15296A
H26725A
KP15488
H26805A
T27883A
P15438
T28202A
KP15458
KP15474
KP15305
T28216A
KP15441
TP15469
P15401
P15473
CH5391A
C3457A
KP15490
KP15489
D0354A
K12193A
DP15416
TP15486
K12071A
DP15384
P15412
H26695A
TP15435
H26820A
P15402
DP15413
DP15411
K11977B
H26811A
M7818A
K12123A
T28225A
D0331A
JP15496
TP15436
P15431
CP15439
K12126A
TP15236A
TP15341
H26609A
T28128A
CP15465
H26658A
CP15249A
DP15453
D0351A
P15451
A10875A
P15437
H26099B
HP15426
M7738A
T28008A
H26532A
TP15409
TP15408
A10881A
P15430
A10828A
T28275A
HP15512
HP15405
TP15452
CP15468
H26753A
B9059B
A10831A
T28194A
TP15318
J4357A
HP15383
2002
2006
2005
2005
2003
2007
2005
2004
2005
2005
2008
2005
2008
2005
2008
2009
2009
2009
2004
2007
2007
2004
2009
2010
2010
2010
2009
2009
2008
2008
2010
2010
2007
2004
2010
2008
2010
2010
2010
2006
2010
2010
2009
2008
2008
2009
2007
2006
2010
2007
2010
2010
2006
2010
2010
2010
2009
2010
2009
2008
2010
2007
2008
2010
2010
2010
2007
2010
2010
2008
2010
2010
2009
2010
2006
2008
2010
2010
2009
2009
2007
2008
2004
2009
2008
2010
2009
2010
2010
2008
2010
2008
2005
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2010
2007
2010
2007
2008
2011
2009
2008
2010
2010
2006
2008
2006
2008
2008
2008
2010
2010
2005
2007
2007
2008
2010
2008
2010
VW................
VW................
Ford..............
Chevrolet....
Mazda..........
Hyundai.......
Chrysler.......
Chevrolet....
Honda..........
Ford..............
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Scion............
Chevrolet....
Pontiac........
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Chevrolet....
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Saturn..........
Ford..............
Honda..........
Chrysler.......
Chevrolet....
Hyundai.......
Jeep.............
Toyota..........
Dodge..........
Honda..........
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Jeep.............
Hyundai.......
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
Ford..............
Toyota..........
Dodge..........
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
Jeep.............
Toyota..........
Nissan..........
Dodge..........
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
Toyota..........
Nissan..........
Nissan..........
Dodge..........
Subaru.........
Hyundai.......
Hyundai.......
Ford..............
Suzuki..........
Dodge..........
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Dodge..........
Chevrolet....
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Nissan..........
Dodge..........
Dodge..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Hyundai.......
Jeep.............
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Jeep.............
Toyota..........
Nissan..........
Chrysler.......
Hyundai.......
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Chrysler.......
Honda..........
Ford..............
Dodge..........
Dodge..........
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Ford..............
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Jeep.............
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Nissan..........
Nissan..........
Acura...........
Chevrolet....
Honda..........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Chrysler.......
Honda..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Jeep.............
Honda..........
4dr Sdn GLS Auto......................................
2dr 2.5L Auto.............................................
4dr Sdn SE.................................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sdn i Auto 4cyl....................................
4dr Sdn Auto SE *Ltd Avail*.....................
4dr LWB Touring FWD...............................
4dr 4WD LS...............................................
EX-L V6 AT.................................................
4dr 114” WB 4.0L XLT 4WD......................
4dr Auto LX................................................
4dr Sdn XL.................................................
5dr Wgn Auto............................................
4dr 4WD LT................................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sdn Auto LE.........................................
4dr Sdn Auto LE.........................................
FWD 4dr LT w/2LT.....................................
5dr LE FWD 7-Passenger...........................
4dr Sdn Auto GLS *Ltd Avail*...................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.....................................
4WD EX Auto ............................................
4dr Sdn Auto LE.........................................
4dr Sdn Auto GLS......................................
4dr Sdn Auto GLS......................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn I4 XE.............................................
4dr Sdn SE.................................................
2dr Auto EX ...............................................
4dr Sdn Touring FWD................................
4dr Sdn LT w/1LT.......................................
...................................................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
4dr V6 4WD w/3rd Row............................
4dr Sdn SXT...............................................
4dr Auto EX ...............................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4dr Limited 4WD.......................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto 1.8 S................................
4dr Sdn Auto LE.........................................
2dr Cpe Auto GS........................................
4dr Sdn I4 SEL FWD..................................
4dr Sdn Auto LE.........................................
4WD 4dr SLT .............................................
5dr LE FWD 7-Passenger...........................
...................................................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
5dr Wgn Auto FWD...................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn RWD.............................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto GLS..................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.....................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.....................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4dr Wgn SXT *Ltd Avail*..........................
4dr Auto i...................................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn SE.................................................
AWD 4dr Luxury w/3rd Row.....................
4dr HB SXT................................................
...................................................................
4dr I4 Auto LX-P ........................................
4dr Sdn R/T ...............................................
4dr Sdn LT..................................................
4dr Auto LX................................................
...................................................................
Manual ......................................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn R/T ...............................................
4dr Sdn R/T ...............................................
4dr Auto LX................................................
4dr Man LX-S ............................................
AWD 4dr Auto Limited w/XM...................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
5dr XLE FWD.............................................
2dr Auto LX................................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn Limited.........................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto GLS..................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...........................................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto LE.....................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L ........................................
4dr V6 4WD w/3rd Row............................
4dr Sdn Limited.........................................
4dr I4 Auto LX............................................
4dr Sdn SE FWD........................................
4dr Sdn R/T ...............................................
4dr Sdn R/T ...............................................
...................................................................
4WD 4dr V6 Sport .....................................
4dr Sdn SEL...............................................
4WD 4dr 4-Cyl...........................................
4dr I4 Auto EX PZEV..................................
4dr Sdn Auto .............................................
4WD 4dr Sport ..........................................
4WD 5dr Auto EX......................................
...................................................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn V6 Auto 3.5 SL.............................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn AT Navigation System.................
AWD 4dr LT ...............................................
4WD 5dr EX...............................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L ........................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn Limited.........................................
EX-L AT with NAVI.....................................
4WD 5dr EX...............................................
4dr I4 AT EX-L............................................
4dr Sdn I4 CVT 2.5 S ULEV........................
...................................................................
4WD 4dr Limited.......................................
4dr I4 Auto LX............................................
Passat.............
New Beetle ....
Five Hundred.
Cobalt.............
MAZDA6 ........
Sonata............
T&C................
TrailBlazer ......
Accord............
Explorer .........
Civic ...............
Avalon............
xB...................
TrailBlazer ......
Grand Prix .....
Corolla ...........
Corolla ...........
HHR................
Sienna............
Sonata............
Camry ............
CR-V...............
Corolla ...........
Elantra............
Elantra............
Elantra............
Aura ...............
Focus..............
Civic ...............
Sebring ..........
Cobalt.............
Elantra............
Liberty............
Highlander.....
Avenger .........
Civic ...............
Elantra............
Elantra............
Elantra............
Liberty............
Elantra............
Versa ..............
Corolla ...........
Tiburon..........
Fusion ............
Corolla ...........
Durango.........
Sienna............
Elantra............
Liberty............
Matrix.............
Sentra ............
Charger..........
Elantra............
Elantra............
Sonata............
Camry ............
Elantra............
Camry ............
Sentra ............
Versa ..............
GrandCaravan
ImprezaSedan
Elantra............
Elantra............
Focus..............
XL7.................
Caliber............
Corolla ...........
Accord............
Avenger .........
Impala............
Civic ...............
Corolla ...........
Civic Si ...........
Altima ............
Avenger .........
Avenger .........
Civic ...............
Civic ...............
Santa Fe.........
GrandChero...
Sienna............
Civic ...............
Patriot ............
Camry ............
Altima ............
Sebring ..........
Sonata............
Accord............
Camry ............
Accord............
Highlander.....
Sebring ..........
Accord............
Fusion ............
Avenger .........
Avenger .........
Altima ............
RAV4 ..............
Focus..............
Highlander.....
Accord............
Corolla ...........
Liberty............
Element..........
Camry ............
Camry ............
Maxima..........
Altima ............
TL ...................
Equinox..........
CR-V...............
Accord............
Camry ............
Sebring ..........
Pilot ................
CR-V...............
Accord............
Altima ............
Camry ............
Liberty............
Accord............
89,291
69,257
71,735
58,444
35,255
66,992
59,593
60,814
80,665
79,351
92,653
86,072
62,273
61,433
40,999
41,218
35,353
42,941
46,427
31,196
73,953
72,641
33,384
12,482
17,171
21,337
25,973
42,965
39,427
16,968
32,370
21,626
31,418
73,099
30,744
45,070
20,136
34,080
33,835
67,292
15,729
2,371
38,446
28,284
57,168
12,532
53,388
52,467
23,283
38,388
36,443
33,336
36,740
27,539
32,687
22,483
41,887
33,657
24,320
41,844
32,082
47,675
38,211
31,956
31,659
28,871
49,687
33,409
34,364
41,123
32,311
32,177
14,697
32,208
36,522
39,220
33,029
33,942
24,569
35,327
70,068
65,561
76,687
20,665
41,803
32,664
30,095
33,499
8,409
43,511
32,873
49,906
47,517
19,673
12,391
17,306
34,191
28,583
33,712
63,007
33,249
48,805
34,611
1,407
26,038
44,710
32,086
33,550
31,098
39,200
51,389
40,866
27,164
33,129
32,254
27,212
52,533
53,235
28,036
20,759
33,542
30,483
33,277
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES-
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
$5,995
$9,995
$9,995
$11,489
$11,989
$11,995
$11,995
$11,995
$12,200
$12,489
$12,989
$12,990
$12,995
$12,995
$13,995
$13,995
$13,995
$13,995
$13,995
$13,995
$14,489
$14,898
$14,900
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$14,995
$15,195
$15,200
$15,300
$15,400
$15,400
$15,489
$15,600
$15,900
$15,979
$15,979
$15,989
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,995
$15,999
$16,200
$16,200
$16,300
$16,300
$16,350
$16,350
$16,388
$16,495
$16,499
$16,499
$16,499
$16,499
$16,499
$16,499
$16,499
$16,499
$16,700
$16,979
$16,995
$16,995
$16,995
$16,995
$16,995
$16,999
$17,200
$17,200
$17,200
$17,479
$17,479
$17,489
$17,489
$17,489
$17,499
$17,499
$17,695
$17,800
$17,800
$17,979
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$17,995
$18,200
$18,200
$18,200
$18,300
$18,400
$18,400
$18,499
$18,700
$18,700
$18,979
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$18,995
$19,100
$19,495
$19,499
$19,499
$19,499
$19,979
$19,979
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
STK:
K12081A
H26686A
J4466A
KP15457
J4645A
P15482
A10787A
T28251A
T27764A
J4700A
H26825A
D0314A
T28302A
M7735A
T28229A
T28073A
H26396B
J4651A
K12076A
H26666A
D0343A
A10871A
H26413A
A10867A
P15497
H26849A
HP15480
A10914A
L11262A
KP15491
A10812A
TP15506
H26871A
KP15456
T28230A
HP15487
K12151A
J4649A
T28238A
L11053A
HP15284
T27885A
J4654A
HP15498
J4519A
D0349A
C3447A
D0333A
H26214A
H26682A
H26739A
L11275A
A10906A
A10869A
H25736B
HP15499
H26455B
AP15356
A10698A
H26727A
H26303B
T28307A
H26870A
K12028A
H26390B
D0376A
A10901A
T27735A
AP15258
L11252A
L11143A
T27767A
J4629A
A10870A
AP15259
TP15515
T28165A
B9139A
A10896A
L11271A
T27713B
A10845A
H26810A
T28286A
H25783A
H26608A
H26700A
B9087A
J4693A
T28081A
A10853A
AP15242
BP15268
L11233A
K12121A
BP15271
JP15520
JP15522
M7899A
JP15485
T28084A
L11185A
L11192A
B9107A
J4511A
J4720A
T27871A
LP15511
B9149B
A10760A
T28193A
B8931A
P15126
LP15510
B9198A
L11115A
LP15502
D0339A
T28329A
BS0325A
BP15390
BP15484
L11248A
2009
2007
2009
2011
2008
2009
2008
2007
2008
2008
2008
2010
2010
2009
2010
2010
2010
2009
2008
2010
2008
2008
2008
2010
2008
2009
2009
2009
2008
2011
2008
2010
2009
2011
2007
2009
2012
2011
2008
2008
2009
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
2008
2011
2008
2010
2008
2007
2006
2008
2010
2008
2006
2009
2009
2011
2010
2010
2011
2010
2010
2008
2008
2010
2008
2008
2008
2008
2010
2009
2009
2009
2008
2008
2010
2008
2008
2008
2010
2009
2009
2010
2008
2008
2009
2009
2009
2008
2008
2010
2010
2009
2011
2011
2008
2010
2011
2010
2009
2010
2010
2010
2010
2009
2010
2009
2010
2011
2008
2008
2009
2010
2010
2011
2010
2010
2009
2007
2008
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Subaru.........
Hyundai.......
Jeep.............
Nissan..........
Acura...........
MINI..............
Nissan..........
Nissan..........
Toyota..........
Mitsubishi...
Honda..........
Hyundai.......
Dodge..........
GMC.............
Toyota..........
Kia.................
Honda..........
Honda..........
HUMMER...
Honda..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Nissan..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Jeep.............
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Hyundai.......
Toyota..........
Honda..........
Ford..............
Jeep.............
Nissan..........
Honda..........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Jeep.............
Honda..........
HUMMER...
Dodge..........
Honda..........
Scion............
Honda..........
Hyundai.......
Honda..........
Lexus...........
Infiniti ..........
Acura...........
Jeep.............
Honda..........
Jeep.............
Acura...........
Toyota..........
Chevrolet....
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
GMC.............
Toyota..........
Saab.............
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Acura...........
Lexus...........
Acura...........
Toyota..........
Hyundai.......
Acura...........
Acura...........
Toyota..........
Volvo............
MB................
Acura...........
BMW............
Acura...........
Acura...........
Honda..........
Toyota..........
Acura...........
Honda..........
Lexus...........
Lexus...........
Toyota..........
Lexus...........
Acura...........
Acura...........
MB................
Acura...........
Lexus...........
MB................
Jeep.............
Jeep.............
Lexus...........
Jeep.............
Honda..........
Lexus...........
Lexus...........
Lexus...........
Ford..............
Toyota..........
Toyota..........
Lexus...........
Lexus...........
Acura...........
MB................
BMW............
Chevrolet....
Lexus...........
Acura...........
Lexus...........
Lexus...........
Dodge..........
Lexus...........
MB................
MB................
MB................
Lexus...........
5dr HB........................................................
4WD 4dr AT EX..........................................
4dr H4 Auto Special Edition PZEV.............
4dr Sdn 2.4L Auto GLS..............................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn Auto .............................................
2dr Cpe S...................................................
4dr Sdn I4 CVT 2.5 SL................................
4WD 4dr Auto X........................................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT............................
4WD 4dr ES...............................................
4dr Auto EX ...............................................
4dr Sdn GLS...............................................
4WD 4dr Heat ...........................................
2WD Ext Cab 143.5” SLE ..........................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT............................
4WD 4dr EX...............................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L ........................................
4WD 5dr LX...............................................
4WD 4dr SUV Adventure ..........................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...........................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L ........................................
4dr I4 Auto LX-P ........................................
AWD 4dr S ................................................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L ........................................
...................................................................
4WD 4dr Limited.......................................
4dr Sdn V6 Auto XLE.................................
...................................................................
4WD 5dr EX...............................................
...................................................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...........................................
...................................................................
4WD Reg 126.8” 4.7L V8 ..........................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn SEL...............................................
4WD 4dr ....................................................
4dr Sdn V6 CVT 3.5 SL ..............................
4dr I4 Auto EX-L PZEV...............................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L PZEV..............................
4WD 4dr 4-cyl 4-Spd AT Ltd......................
4WD 4dr Unlimited X................................
4dr I4 Auto EX ...........................................
4WD 4dr SUV............................................
4WD Quad Cab 140.5” SLT.......................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L.......................................
2dr HB Auto...............................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L.......................................
FWD 4dr I4 Auto Limited...........................
4WD 5dr EX-L............................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sdn AWD ............................................
4dr Sdn Auto .............................................
4WD 2dr Sport ..........................................
4dr V6 Auto EX-L.......................................
4dr Limited 4WD.......................................
4dr Sdn Auto Tech Pkg..............................
4dr Wgn I4 FWD........................................
4dr Sdn LTZ................................................
4WD 5dr EX...............................................
5dr HB II.....................................................
4dr Sdn 2.0L Auto SE ................................
AWD 4dr SLE-2 .........................................
5dr HB I......................................................
2dr Conv ....................................................
2dr Conv V6 Auto SLE ...............................
4dr Sdn V6 Auto XLE.................................
...................................................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sdn Auto Nav......................................
4WD 4dr Auto ...........................................
2dr 3.8L Man Track w/Nav........................
4dr Sdn Auto Tech Pkg..............................
...................................................................
4WD 4dr V6 Base......................................
2dr Conv Auto............................................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Sport 4MATIC.......................
4dr Sdn I4 Auto .........................................
4dr Sdn 328xi AWD...................................
4WD 4dr ....................................................
4WD 4dr Tech Pkg.....................................
5dr EX........................................................
4WD Double V6 AT ...................................
4dr Sdn 2WD.............................................
4WD 4dr EX-L............................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sport Sdn Auto AWD..........................
4WD Double V6 AT ...................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
AWD 4dr Tech Pkg ....................................
4dr Sdn Auto Type-S .................................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Sport 4MATIC.......................
4dr Sdn 2WD.............................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sdn 3.0L Luxury 4MATIC.....................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
4WD 4dr Laredo........................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4WD 4dr Limited.......................................
4WD 4dr EX-L............................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4dr Sdn......................................................
4dr Sdn SHO AWD....................................
4WD 4dr V6 SR5 .......................................
4WD 4dr V6 SR5 .......................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4dr Sport Sdn Auto AWD..........................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4MATIC 4dr ...............................................
2dr Cpe 328i xDrive AWD SULEV .............
...................................................................
4WD 4dr ....................................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
2dr Cpe SRT8.............................................
AWD 4dr....................................................
4MATIC 4dr 3.5L........................................
4MATIC 4dr 4.6L........................................
2dr Roadster 5.5L V8.................................
4WD 4dr ....................................................
Prius...............
Element..........
Legacy............
Sonata............
GrandChero...
Altima ............
TL ...................
CooperHardtop
Altima ............
Xterra.............
RAV4 ..............
Outlander.......
Civic ...............
Azera..............
Nitro...............
Sierra 1500 ....
RAV4 ..............
Sorento..........
Accord............
CR-V...............
H3...................
Accord............
Accord............
Accord............
Rogue.............
Accord............
Accord............
Patriot ............
Camry ............
Sonata............
CR-V...............
Camry ............
Accord............
Sonata............
Tundra............
Accord............
Focus..............
Compass........
Altima ............
Accord............
Accord............
RAV4 ..............
Wrangler........
Accord............
H3...................
Ram 1500.......
Accord............
tC....................
Accord............
Tucson ...........
CR-V...............
ES 350............
M35 ................
TL ...................
Wrangler........
Accord............
Commander ..
TSX ................
Venza..............
Malibu............
CR-V...............
Prius...............
Sonata............
Terrain............
Prius...............
3-Sep..............
Camry Solara
Camry ............
TL ...................
ES 350............
TL ...................
FJ Cruiser.......
Genesis..........
TSX ................
TSX ................
Highlander.....
C70 .................
C-Class...........
TSX ................
3-Series..........
MDX...............
MDX...............
Odyssey.........
Tacoma ..........
TL ...................
Pilot ................
ES 350............
IS 250 .............
Tacoma ..........
ES 350............
RDX................
TL ...................
C-Class...........
TL ...................
ES 350............
C-Class...........
GrandChero...
GrandChero...
ES 350............
Commander ..
Pilot ................
RX 350............
RX 350............
ES 350............
Taurus ............
4Runner .........
4Runner .........
RX 350............
IS 250 .............
MDX...............
GLK-Class ......
3-Series..........
Tahoe .............
GX 470 ...........
MDX...............
RX 350............
RX 350............
Challenger .....
RX 350............
M-Class..........
GL-Class .........
SL-Class..........
LX 570............
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
MILES
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$19,995
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,499
$20,979
$20,990
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,995
$20,999
$20,999
$21,479
$21,479
$21,479
$21,479
$21,479
$21,499
$21,499
$21,499
$21,499
$21,795
$21,900
$21,979
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$21,995
$21,999
$22,400
$22,479
$22,479
$22,499
$22,979
$22,995
$22,999
$22,999
$23,300
$23,479
$23,479
$23,499
$23,600
$23,995
$23,995
$23,999
$24,479
$24,479
$24,800
$24,979
$24,979
$25,499
$25,979
$25,995
$25,995
$25,995
$26,479
$26,479
$26,995
$26,999
$27,479
$27,499
$27,800
$27,995
$27,999
$28,400
$28,400
$28,479
$28,479
$28,695
$28,995
$28,995
$28,995
$29,479
$29,979
$29,979
$29,995
$29,995
$30,499
$30,499
$30,995
$31,479
$31,479
$31,979
$31,980
$31,995
$31,995
$31,999
$31,999
$32,499
$32,979
$32,995
$32,995
$33,999
$36,479
$36,479
$37,995
$37,995
$38,479
$38,499
$38,999
$39,995
$40,995
$43,479
$43,900
$44,995
$51,479
$64,999
41,423
35,319
22,312
24,190
31,844
17,699
56,245
43,274
36,661
37,630
32,638
13,718
16,771
33,016
19,405
20,359
20,496
28,727
24,036
36,837
53,018
18,457
29,461
14,126
38,527
22,666
45,945
16,698
35,150
22,383
36,670
26,234
34,843
22,571
39,779
33,739
1,818
2,810
30,629
27,869
45,426
26,716
29,963
17,658
49,188
36,667
27,937
1,593
34,193
31,998
38,700
54,154
44,566
32,059
9,963
19,647
47,445
44,337
39,585
1,608
23,373
13,778
407
29,669
15,618
12,533
31,227
11,513
25,908
31,432
7,577
35,005
11,325
10,549
44,211
32,616
23,179
35,112
17,121
30,550
42,930
58,896
24,482
9,210
17,697
25,784
14,968
17,377
24,232
40,118
16,628
39,820
24,550
22,067
48,342
21,528
16,141
19,739
1,449
26,882
17,958
39,772
42,278
25,634
8,939
24,248
26,102
36,671
2,117
30,175
18,396
7,452
41,335
45,005
11,945
25,872
4,580
1,660
12,588
18,488
40,023
18,194
36,420
Pre·Owned 5upersIere 14 8rcnds p Pre·Owned 5up 14 8rcnds
Call 1.866.807.9004
MeIerWer|d Drìve, 1usI O|| |nIersIcIe 81, Wì|kes·8crre
Cc|| ¡e|| Free 1·8óó·807·º004 º MeIerWer|d Drìve 1usI O|| |nIersIcIe 81, Wì|kes·8crre
SHOP 24/7 @ MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM SALES HOURS MON – FRI: 9AM-8PM SAT: 9AM-5PM SUN: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON-5PM
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 5 B
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
Sapa Extruder, Inc. is looking for a skilled and experienced
Maintenance Electrician with a strong background in
hydraulics, programmable controls and electrical facets of plant
maintenance activities. The opening is on 2nd shift.
The successful candidate must possess the ability to diagnose
and repair electrical/hydraulic problems, trouble-shoot
electrical problems and knowledge of industrial hydraulics.
A minimum of four years experience in a plant or comparable
environment is required. Hourly starting pay range is
$15.00-$18.00 and we offer an outstanding benefits package.
If qualified, send a resume with salary requirements to:
Sapa Extruder, Inc.
330 Elmwood Avenue
Mountain Top, PA 18707
Attn: Human Resources
teresa.mandzak@sapagroup.com
E.O.E.
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!
Maintenance Electrical Technician
39 Prospect St • Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
10am
to 6pm
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
Portable. 12,000
BTU, heater and
dehumidifier all in
one. $100.
570-822-1850
AIR CONDITIONER,
Portable air condi-
tioner/dehumidifier.
$175.
570-654-4582
AIR CONDITIONERS,
8,000 BTU - $75
Please Call
570-823-8442
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
BARBIE DOLLS, (11),
in boxes, $100 for
all. CLOCK Seth
Thomas humpback
clock, from Ger-
many, as is, $60.
570-735-1589
TIN, Miller beer col-
lectors,$20. MUSIC
BOX, SF music box
company $30. ITAL-
IAN PLATE, Colos-
seum, $20
570-760-4830
YEARBOOKS:
Coughlin H.S. 26,
28, 32, 34, 43-44,
46, 49, 51-55, 61,
63, 67, 86-88, 94;
GAR H.S. 34-37, 42-
47, 55-56, 61, 72-
73, 80, 84, 05, 06,
Meyers H.S.: 60,
74-77, Wyoming
Valley West H.S. 68-
69, 71, 73, 78, 84,
85, 86, 87, 88, 90,
93; Old Forge H.S.
66, 72, 74; Kingston
H.S. 38-45, 49, 64;
Plymouth H.S. 29-
33, 35, 37, 38-39,
46-48, 53-55,
Hanover H.S. 51-
52, 54; Berwick H.S.
52-53, 56-58, 60,
67, 68-69; Lehman
H.S. 73-76, 78, 80;
Westmoreland H.S.
52-54; Nanticoke
Area H.S. 76;
Luzerne H.S. 51-52,
56-57; West Pittston
H.S. Annual 26-28,
31-32, 54, 59-60,
66; Bishop Hoban
H.S. 72-75; West
Side Central
Catholic H.S. 65, 75,
80-81, 84; Pittston
H.S. 63; St. Mary’s
H.S. 29; Northwest
H.S. 73, 76, 77, 78;
Lake Lehman H.S.
74, 76, 78
Call 570-825-4721
710 Appliances
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Retired appliance
tech. Simple repairs
at a simple price.
Kenmore, Whirlpool,
all work guaranteed.
Call 570-706-6110
COOK TOP for gas
stove. GE. Ceramic.
Bone color. 5 burn-
ers. New in box.
$900. 239-3586
DISHWASHER.
Whirlpool. Under
counter, Quiet Part-
ner 1. Tall tub, black,
excellent condition.
$150. 457-7854
DRYER: Hotpoint
Gas Dryer. Only
used 3 months,
moved, switched to
electric. $200.
570-696-5651
GENE’S
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
710 Appliances
MICRO-WAVE,
Litton $20. Call
570-825-9744
MICROWAVE oven
$25. Sears chest
freezer $50.
570-824-7807
MICROWAVE: GE.
Over the Stove with
Probe, Exhaust Fan,
Surface Light.
Black. $50.
570-696-1454
REFRIGERATOR,
Side by side. GE.
Runs well. Never
needed repairs.
FREE
570-825-3269
REFRIGERATOR:
For Dorm room. 2.7
cf, white. $20. Wall
Mirror for dorm
room. $5. Call after
6 pm. 570-822-1811
WASHER & DRYER:
Maytag. Natural
gas. White. $200.
570-287-7973
712 Baby Items
BABY ITEMS: 4
King size flannel
sheet sets $20 or
will separate.
Graco stroller $5.
Graco double
stroller $10. Infant
car seat $2. Graco
playpen $5.
570-457-9724
BABY ITEMS: Graco
infant car seat.
Excellent cond.
$25.00 Evenflow
convertible car
seat. Hardly used.
Excellent cond.
$25.00 Graco high
chair. Excellent
cond. $40.00 Pack
and play. Exc. cond.
$30.00 Package
deal. Infant car seat,
convertible car
seat, highchair, and
pack and play.
$100.00
(570)654-8042
BOOSTER backless
seat with lap bar
30-60 lbs $5. Car
seat, gray with blue
trim, $30. Eddie
Bauer suede car
seat $40. Stroller
plaid $30. TV video
baby monitor, never
used $50. Baby
bath tub with show-
er $15. Wooden
changing table.
$60. 570-239-5292
CLOTHING, New-
born-12 months,
girl, new. $5 or less.
570-825-0569
JOGGING Stroller,
fair condition, FREE.
570-287-0103
STROLLER
Its Imagical 3x3
Evolution; $100;
570-696-1896
To place your
ad call...829-7130
STROLLER, Peg
Preggo, navy blue.
Good condition.
$25. TODDLER
SEAT, black $10.
570-868-6174
714 Bridal Items
CENTERPIECES, 20,
silver frosted calla
lily, 32” high, $20
each. CHAIR COV-
ERS, 130 ivory linen
look, for folding
chair, $162.50. for
all. NAPKINS, 120
ivory linen look,
large, $32.50 for all.
CHAIR SASH, 130,
chocolate satin, $65
for all. OVERLAY
TABLECLOTH, 14-
90”, chocolate
satin. $98 for all.
TABLE CLOTH, 6 -
120” ivory, round,
linen, $48 for all.
TULLE, 2 bolts,
white, 54” x 40
yards, $15 for both.
TULLE, 2 bolts,
chocolate brown,
54” x 40 yards, $15
for both. MIRRORS,
20 - 16”, for tables,
$80 for all.
570-472-3820
WEDDING GOWN,
size 4 with beading
& lots of tulle. Tulle
train and veil.
Sleeveless & off the
shoulder. $50
570-868-6174
716 Building
Materials
BATHROOM SINK
SET: Gerber white
porcelain bathroom
sink with mirror and
medicine cabinet.
Matching set. $80.
570-331-8183
FLOORING: Hard-
wood tile. 12x12,
5/16” W. Natural
pattern brown. Still
in box. 15 boxes.
$450.570-288-5788
KITCHEN CABINETS
& GRANITE
COUNTERTOPS
10 ft.x10 ft., 1 year
old, Maple kitchen.
Premium Quality
cabinets, under-
mount sink. Granite
tops. Total cost
over $12,000.
$2,750 for Cabinets
& $1,000 for Granite
570-239-9840
716 Building
Materials
RADIATORS, cast
iron. 2 have 5 sec-
tions, 36 high 14”
long. 1 has 7 sec-
tions, 36 high 18
long. 1 has 16 sec-
tions, 19 high and 41
long. $120. for all.
570-693-1046
VANITY TOP, 60”
bathroom top with 2
sinks. Kohler facets
in chrome. Cultured
marble. Good Con-
dition. $50.
KITCHEN SINK,
Kohler. Single, cast
iron, white with sil-
ver facet. 25”x22”x
7 1/2” deep. $25.
570-868-6174
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
FOREST HILLS
CEMETERY
Carbondale,
Philadelphia suburb
near the old Nabis-
co & Neshaminy
Mall. 2 graves +
concrete vault with
possibility of double
deck. Estimated
Value $7,000. Ask-
ing $5,000. Call
570-477-0899 or
570-328-3847
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
6 Plots Available
May be Separated
Rose Lawn Section
$450 each
570-654-1596
726 Clothing
BOYS CLOTHES,
size large (12-14).
Mostly name brand.
30 items $35. WIN-
TER COATS, boys
size medium (10-12).
Nike, Old Navy,
JCPenny ski coat.
$10. each or all for
$25. BOYS SCHOOL
UNIFORM, pants
and polos. Sizes
large(12-14). 20
items for $30.
SNEAKERS, Men’s.
DC skate shoe.
Brand new. Size
10.5. $20.
570-237-1583
CLOTHES chil-
dren’s: Infant boys
0-3 months 2 bags
$15. 6-9 months 1
bag $7. 3-6 months
1 bag $7, 12 months
1 bag $10. Boys
winter 2T 2 bags
$20. Boys summer
2T 2 bags $20.
Boys winter 18
month 1 bag $10.
Boys summer 18
month 1 bag $10.
boys 3T 1 bag $10,
4T 2 bags $20, 5T 1
bag $10 Sizes 6
through 8 $10 per
bag. Size 10/12 2
bags $20, size 14 1
bag $10, size 14/16 1
bag $10. Boys jeans
1 bag $10. Coats
sizes 2T, 3T, 4T, 7/8
& 10/12 $3. Sizes
14/16 & 18/20 $5.
570-457-9724
CLOTHES: Infant
girls 0-3 months
sleepers $5 per
bag. Winter 6-9
months, 12 months
$5 per bag. 18
months, 2T through
6T $10 per bag.
Summer sizes 0-6,
3-6, 6-9 & 18 month
$5 per bag. 24
month, 3T through
6T $10 per bag.
Winter coats sizes
4T, 5T, 10 14 & 16.
$3. 570-457-5192
CLOTHING: mens
shoes Nunn Bush
black, laced, 9M
barely worn
$10.Diplomats,
black pair and
brown pair, laced,
9-1/2D, barely worn
$10 each. Brown
Tom Mccan laced
shoes good condi-
tion, $5. Elk Woods
10D black and
brown hike boots
$10. BOX OF TIES
$6. NWT flannel
pajamas. The Ver-
mont Country Store
XL 2 sets $5 each 7
pair Dickies pants,
tan, brown,, navy,
green great condi-
tion sizes 40 x30 to
44 x 30 $5 each 2
pair brand new
Dockers 42 x 30
cream and tan $10
each. 3 pair Wran-
gler jeans 40 x 30
and 42 x30 great
condition $8 each. 9
pair men’s shorts,
jean, khaki, tan 40
to 44 $5. each 696-
3528
CLOTHING: men’s
winter outerwear,
suits, pants, shirts,
ties socks, sports-
wear. Sizes 44, XL
& XXL. $2 & up
570-823-2750
JEAN SHORTS,
NWT, distressed.
Sizes 3 & 5. $10
each.
570-696-3528
726 Clothing
JEANS, Antik Denim.
New with tags. Size
25. Boot Cut. $50.
570-868-6174
PROM GOWNS
sizes 10 (1) lime
green (1) watermel-
on color. Worn only
once. $75 each.
Black $75.
570-239-6011
PURSE, Gucci, Ttte
style, excellent con-
dition $335. Purse,
Louis Vuitton, zip-
pered top, shoulder
bag, excellent cond.
$325. Purse, Louis
Vuitton, Zippered,
shoulder or 2 handle
carry, very good
condition. $150.
Purse, Gucci, shoul-
der style, draw-
string style $100.
Purse, Dooney and
Bourke, tote style, 2
handle, new condi-
tion $60. 288-4451
SHOES Ladies size
6-6 1/2. Almost
new. $4.00 a pair.
570-474-5653
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER MONI-
TOR, Dell, $20.
570-760-4830
DESK/CHAIR high
back computer
desk/chair, black i
with wheels &
adjustable height.
Very good condition.
$40. 570-709-4180
EMACHINES AMD
Athlon tower. Win-
dows xp. 160gb hd.
dvdrw. wireless
mouse included.
delivery. $120.
570-905-2985
PRINTER, Canon
PIXMA MP460.
Prints, scans &
copies. Will not
feed, maybe you
can fix it. $20.
570-825-3784
“QUAD INTERFACE”
5.25”: Optical Drive
External DVD, CD,
Blu-ray writer with
LightScribe disc
labeling. New, never
used includes all
cables and soft-
ware. Paid $100.00.
Sell $70.00.
570-788-5030
732 Exercise
Equipment
AB DOER exercise
machine , very good
condition $35.
570-574-3418
AB-DOER $40. Mal-
abu Palatti $15. Both
assembled. Thigh
master $20.
570-822-8957
BOWFLEX Ultimate
2: All Bells + Whis-
tles. $495.00.
570-542-5622
EXERCISE bike.
Small. Doesn’t take
up much room.
Almost new. $25.
570-675-3328
EXERCISE:
Fitness chair.
$50 696-1896
GYM EQUIPMENT
ParaBody Serious
Steel 400 Full Body
Work out Machine,
plus floor mat. $150
570-457-4494
INVERSION TABLE,
chiropractor profes-
sional. $300.
Abdominal chair
exercise by Tony
Little $200. Profes-
sional kicking bag
40lb. $50.
570-693-2408
STEPPER, Weider
ESM5. TREADMILL,
Sears manual.
BICYCLE, Ajay dual
action. ROWING
MACHINE, Body
Tone 326. $20 each
of $65 for all.
570-288-7078
TREADMILL, Weslo,
ele/manual $50.
570-760-4830
WEIGHT BENCH,
Marcy Nexus. 170
pds in weights &
bar. Full body work-
out. $100. Will deliv-
er for small fee.
570-403-3007
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATER: kerosene
portable $30.
570-824-7807
HEATER: Propane.
Reddy 80,000
BTU’S. $40.
570-823-2650
HEATERS (4)
kerosene, all serv-
iced & working. $20
each, call Monday -
Friday after 6:30 pm
570-288-6214
OIL BOILER
runs great $100.
570-760-4830
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BED FRAME, Loft
Style, full-size. From
IKEA. Silver metal
frame with ladder.
Very good condition.
Asking $100.
570-947-6531
BEDROOM SET -
queen/king bed
rails, headboard,
dresser with mirror,
nightstand & chest -
$150. 256-4450
BEDROOM SET,
Girl’s, includes twin
canopy bed, night-
stand, and dresser
with mirror, beautiful
cream color, excel-
lent condition. Will
sacrifice for $400.
Must sell. 693-1406
BUNK BEDS, tall
dresser/desk hutch,
dark maple, $300.
Kitchen table leaf &
chairs, real wood,
walnut, $300.
PIANO upright with
bench, George
Steck, walnut . All
good condition.
$400. 474-9563
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BUNKBED twin,
over full with book-
shelf, chest, tv cabi-
net & nightstand.
Fair condition, you
must disassemble &
haul yourself. $125.
570-313-9521
CABINET Watch-
maker’s metal. $20.
570-823-2750
CARD TABLE, metal
with 4 folding chairs.
Good condition. $5.
each.
570-788-2388
CHAIR, tan, fair con-
dition, FREE. DESK,
with filing cabinet,
fair condition, $10.
FUTON, black metal
frame, good condi-
tion. $50. 287-0103
CHEST OF DRAW-
ERS. French Provin-
cial. Solid wood.
$ 9 9
570-905-4818
COUCH green
leather, very good
condition, nego-
tiable $125.
570-574-3418
DINING ROOM TABLE
with 6 chairs. Large
oval glass top,
cream base with
brass trim $600.00
Matching server
with beveled glass
top, cream with
brass trim. $450.
570-817-1803
DINING ROOM
TABLE, 6 chairs.
Two of the chairs
are broken the oth-
ers are in fair condi-
tion. call after 6pm.
$45. 570-868-8156
DROP LEAF TABLE,
oval shape with
turned legs, dark
wood, 21”L X 23” H,
10”W with leaves
dropped. $30
570-814-9845
ENTERTAINMENT
center solid oak
leaded glass door.
49 W x 47 H on
casters. $150 nego-
tiable. 570-654-1691
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER. Black with
glass doors and
storage for CD and
DVD. 60x49x19. $55
570-868-5450
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
FURNITURE: Curio
Cabinet $35. Solid
cherry wood bed-
room cabinets & 2
mirrors $185. Desk
$35. 570-831-5510
FURNITURE: Love
seat and leather
chair $225. Coffee
table and 3 black
end tables with
puter trim $125. 3
Black lamp tables
$20 each.
570-693-0477
HEADBOARD & bed
frame, boy, $40.
CANOPY BED with
headboard, four
posts & bed frame,
girl, $60. 825-7867
HEADBOARD: Oak
twin $50. Oak
nightstand $50.
570-825-0569
KITCHEN ISLAND
white, 36”L x 20”W
3 enclosed shelves.
2 large open
shelves, 1 pull out
door, towel bar
$150.570-288-4852
LAMPS (2) parlor
stand up, grey metal
& black. $25 each.
570-740-1246
LIVING ROOM SET.
Clayton Marcus
very high quality. 4
piece couch,
loveseat, chair,
ottoman. Moving
must sell!! $400.
570-298-0901
PLANET STAND,
wrought iron, cream
color, approximately
3’tall, will hold 8”
pot. $5.
570-814-9845
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
ROCKER, Hitchcock
Wooden. Good Con-
dition. $65.
570-825-9744
ROCKER/RECLIN-
ER, beige, like new,
rarely used. $250
OBO. 570-407-1135
SOFABED & Love
seat, brown tweed.
Both for $200 OBO
(570) 510-7231
TABLE, small round
kitchen table, all
wood, 4 matching
chairs, good condi-
tion, $100. SOFA,
plaid, extremely
comfortable, $100.
570-655-3197
WINDOW TREAT-
MENTS, variety of
sizes & colors,
mostly valences.
Beautiful & excellent
condition. $20/set
570-868-6174
750 Jewelry
TENNIS BRACELET
Custom made, dou-
ble row, 14 carat
BRACELET. Edged
with beautiful rope
trim. Carat weight
total 5.5. 25 1/2
grams total gold
weight. Paid $5,700.
Current Value
$7,000+. Asking
$4,500 firm. Seri-
ous inquires only.
570-239-4286
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
UTILITY TRAILER, 4’
x 6’. Tilt bed with
steel sides. Wood
floor. Good condi-
tion. $250.
(570) 479-4404
WEED WACKER.
Gas powered. Runs
good.
570-655-3179
756 Medical
Equipment
ELECTRIC WHEEL
CHAIR, Pronto M41
electric power
wheelchair by
Invacare. Hardly
used. Top speed of
5 MPH. 17 mile bat-
tery range. Original
price- $3550. Ask-
ing $900 OBO.
570-574-7266
Rollator: Medline
Guardian Deluxe.
Item is new. Never
out of box. Color is
blue. $60.
570-788-5030
758 Miscellaneous
AIR CLEANER: Elec-
tronic $30. Humidi-
fier with warm air
mist $20. Window
fan with fresh air fil-
ter $30. Portable
electric heater $20.
Footbath hydrawhirl
$15. Mini air com-
pressor $10.
570-823-2750
BACKPACK, Bill-
abong, $20. BOOK,
Twilight collection
$20. CASSETTE
DECKS (2) $40 for
both. 570-760-4830
Line up a place to live
in classified!
BEDLINER: 89
Chevy S10 truck
bedliner, standard
6’ cab $25. Four
barrel carb running
from running Chevy
motor $50. 5 used
storm windows
29x53.5” $50. all.
570-740-1246
after 5pm.
CABINET, kitchen,
21 1/2D,81 1/2 H,18”
W. Maple finish, very
good condition.
$60. 570-283-3951
CANES & WALKING
STICKS. Great for
hiking! Made from
the roots of Slippery
Maple. All different
sizes, shapes &
lengths. Over 30
available at $4 &
$5. 570-735-2081.
CLOCK. Cuckoo
clock; made in Ger-
many; 10H 8W 5D;
$35
570-696-1896
CURTAINS: Large
pocket valences. 3
seafoam green, 1
medium blue, 2
blue, 1 light blue, 1
pink, 1 multi-pink
/blue floral $2 each.
570-457-9724
DUFFEL BAG, Louis
Vuitton. Large with
shoulder strap.
$500.
570-868-6174
ESPRESSO MAKER,
Krups, single cup,
all stainless steel.
$30.
570-814-9845.
GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVER
ITEMS
Antique walnut
rocking chair per-
fect condition $50.
Apartment size sofa
bed, excellent
shape $40. Kitchen
table & 4 chairs
cream & white $30.
570-675-2647
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER
ITEMS
COWBOY BOOTS -
brand new, all
leather, black,
“Guide Gear” brand,
ankle high, Size 14,
$20. CHARCOAL
GRILL, table top,
brand new “Weber”
Smokey Joe, $20.
ARMOIRE/TV Enter-
tainment Center,
“Riverside” brand,
excellent condition,
solid oak, light
brown, $275.
570-331-3588
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER
ITEMS
Golf clubs & bag,
very good $75. Golf
club set, new
grips, very good
condition $100.
Ping Pong table &
net, excellent con-
dition $100 firm.
Head Hunter
bowling ball $20.
Alpine slider -
skier- never used,
NEW $25. AB
Roller with video
$20. Two alloy car
rims & tires 205
60R/16 $150. nego-
tiable.
570-817-5372
570-288-0971
GLASS DOOR. 4
way glass door for
bath tub. $25
570-331-8183
HALLOWEEN items:
decorations, cos-
tume accessories,
electric items. $25
570-235-5216
758 Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER
ITEMS
Heavy metal shelv-
ing, new, 8 shelves,
12’W x 8’H x 2’D,
$150. Metal shelving
4’W x 2’D x 6’H,
$60. Microwave
oven, stainless
steel, 1.6 cu ft, 1150
watts, 1 year old,
$50. Everlast
weighted punching
bag, $50. Space
heater, gas, vent
free blue flame,
14,000-30,000 BTU,
auto thermostat,
$100. Exhaust sys-
tem for Honda ATV,
400 FMP perform-
ance, $75.
570-288-9843
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER
ITEMS
TOOLS - Duo-Fast
Stapler & Staples
$30. Craftsman 12.0
Volt Drill Driver $25.
Black & Decker
Power Ratchet $7.
Central Pneumatic
Stapler & Nailer $15.
Central Pneumatic
Framing Nailer. $35.
Ryobi Saw $20.
Ryobi Vac $8. Elec-
tro File - 2 battery &
charger $25.
Craftsman Buffer
$20. Hess Van $50.
570-823-0881
HARRY POTTER
fully airbrushed full
size table, features
Harry & friends,
Voldemort & Hog-
warts castle. Use as
play/poker table.
redhouse3@knobby-
moto.com $399.
570-477-1269
HOUSEHOLD: Giant
Southwest Picture
$75. Wooden
Teepee Southwest
Shelf Stand $75.
Area Rug, olive
green with leaf
imprint, 5x7 asking
$40. 570-239-5292
KILN, Skutt. With
blank ring. $225.
OBO. Call after 6
PM. 570-823-8738.
KITCHEN items: Vic-
torian coat pitcher
$25. Silver plated
cake pedestal $10.
4 piece silver plated
coffee, creamer,
pot, tray $25. 570-
675-0920
KNITTING Machine,
Knitting Comp III,
very good condition,
$225. KNITTING
RIBBER, model
RK900, new, $175.
570-696-1896
POTS, Cooking/Can-
ning. 3 Heavy Alu-
minum Pots. 16
Quart, $10. 12
Quart, $8. 8 Quart,
$6. All for $22.
Racks & Lids includ-
ed. 570-735-2081
STOVE vintage coal
Frigidaire $299. Tv
teddy + 6 videos
$18. Solid wood
table $25. Kids suit-
case with handle/
wheels $5. mosqui-
to net for patio set
$5. Cat litter
box/food dishes $8.
570-696-3368
TIRE and rim for
1978 Chrysler
Lebaron. $45
570-824-7807
TOASTER, Drip cof-
fee maker with
extra glass carafe,
3 shelf metal rack, 6
coffee mugs - all
items hunter green.
All for $30 or will
separate.
(570) 868-5275 or
(570) 301 8515
TRUCK cap red
fiberglass for 6’
Chevy box. $130
570-760-9074
WAFFLE MAKER/
Sandwich maker,
new, $15.
570-287-0103
WHEELS Toyota
Scion 16” steel 5 lug
wheels. Total of 4.
Brand new. $180
570-287-1642
WINE supplies for
sale: 6 gallon glass
wine carboy $50.
Vinbrite wine filter:
$10. Wine siphon:
$5. Hydrometer: $5.
Wine Corker: $15.
Sterilized used wine
bottles $3. per
case, Bag of 50
new wine corks:
$10. 829-4776
760 Monuments &
Lots
MEMORIAL SHRINE
LOTS FOR SALE
6 lot available at
Memorial Shrine
Cemetery. $3,000.
Call 717-774-1520
SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY
762 Musical
Instruments
AMP: ‘97 Marshall
JCM800 Limited
Edition Tube Amp
Head. Works and
sounds great. $975
570-283-2552
rick@wyoming
valley.net
GUITAR Fullerton 6
string electric with
strap & cloth case,
Custom amplifier 10
watts $185. both.
570-235-5216
ION DRUM ROCKER
Great way to learn
drums! Ion Drum
Rocker kit for use
with Rock Band, on
the Xbox 360.
Heavy duty alu-
minum frame.
Comes with 3
durable cymbals.
Great rebound on
pads, works per-
fectly. PULSE bass
pedal also included,
along with drum
throne, Rock Band 2
and Beatles Rock
Band. $175 for all.
570-814-3383
762 Musical
Instruments
PIANO Baldwin Con-
sole. Oak with
bench, recently
tuned. Can deliver
$800. 898-1278
PIANO upright
Everett. FREE to
good home. Call
Ray 570-313-2550
766 Office
Equipment
COMPUTER, Dell
with speakers, key-
board & monitor.
$100. ALL IN ONE,
Copy, Fax, Scan &
Print, Brother. MFC
7820N. Great condi-
tion. $50.
570-868-6174
PRINTER. Brother
All-in-one. MFC
240c. Print comes
out smudged. $10
570-287-1642
768 Personal
Electronics
PLAYSTATION 3,
with original box.
$175.
570-654-4582
STEREO system
5CD, Sony $75.
Sanyo VCR player
$15. Floor lamp $10.
Hamilton Beach
mixer with bowl rest
$10. 570-262-1136
TELEVISION: 19”
Samsung tube $20.
570-239-5292
772 Pools & Spas
POOL LADDER Intex
for 4 ft pool $30.
570-574-3418
774 Restaurant
Equipment
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
Bev Air 2 door
refrigerator/ sand-
wich prep table,
Model SP48-12,
$1300. For details
Call 570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
SOMERSET TURN
OVER MACHINE -
Model # SPM45,
$500; ALSO, Bunn
Pour Over Coffee
Machine, Model #
STF15, $225
For more info, call
570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
Somerset Dough
Sheeter, Model
CAR-100. Only
1 available. $1,500
Call for more info
570-498-3616
776 Sporting Goods
BASKETBALL
HOOP; Great condi-
tion, asking $90.
Call 570-331-8183
BIKE: Girls’ 20” $10.
Girls soccer shoes
size 3 1/2 $3.
570-696-3368
BIKE: Schwinn Next
26 “ 6 speed new
condition. Bought
$125, selling $65.
570-235-5216
BOWLING
Ball 16lb. $10.
570-823-2750
CARGO carrier with
hitch attachment;
heavy duty; $100
570-696-1896
DEER TREE STAND.
Used twice. $50
570-675-3328
FOOSBALL TABLE,
Sportcraft. Excellent
shape. Extra balls.
$100. Will deliver.
570-403-3007
HUNTING clothes -
Woolrich & Win-
chester brands;
blaze orange sets
$75; blaze orange
/camoflauge set
$65; military
camoflauge set
$30; military
camoflauge slacks
$5 each; vest -
Woolrich $15
570-696-1896
HUNTING, Fishing
knives, really nice,
all brand new
between $10 & $25
each.570-332-7933
POLE/REEL (3)
Daiwa big game and
(2) regular. $80 for
all. 570-735-1589
SKATEBOARDS $10.
Pop-up cloth paint-
ball bunker/tent-
new. $20. Huffy
Micro blue mini bike
$20. Next 20” Bike
$30. 570-239-5292
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TELEVISION: GE.
28” works good,
needs remote $80.
570-740-1246
782 Tickets
AMERICAN IDOL LIVE
tickets for sale!
GREAT SEATS! Sec-
tion 118, Row H.
Seats 11 & 12. $90
each. Must buy two.
Call 570-824-5106
CAMEL BEACH
TICKETS: $25 each
Please Call
570-283-3951
PENN STATE
TICKETS
September 3,
2011
Noon Game
Indiana State
Red Zone-WH
Section. 15 yard
line. (2) at
$90 each.
570-675-5046
after 6 PM
782 Tickets
TICKETS (4) includ-
ing parking pass &
& chairbacks. Penn
State Vs. Indiana
State, Sat., 9/3.
Penn State Vs. East-
ern Michigan, Sat.,
9/24. $253.
Call 570-690-2697!
TICKETS: Bengals
vs Jets pre season
field level section
131 2 tickets & park-
ing 8/21/2011 7pm
$75. Eagles vs Jets
pre season tickets
section 131 with 2
tickets & parking
9/01/2011 7:30pm
$150.570-655-6442
TICKETS: Penn
State v Indiana
State 9-3-11. 2 tick-
ets section NF,
lower level 57. Isle
seats. $45 each.
570-338-2208
TICKETS: Yankees v
Blue Jays (2) tickets
for Saturday Sept
3rd 1:05 game 100
level. great seats
$275. 570-331-8144
784 Tools
CHAINSAW: Electric
with carrying case.
$25 570-823-2750
DOLLYS: Appliance
size $20. Box size
$10. 570-235-5216
786 Toys & Games
CHILD’S table and 2
chairs $20.
570-235-5216
DOLLS, BRATZ col-
lection, 4 boys, 13
girls, two cases,
plus accessory
items, great condi-
tion, $45.00.
570-696-2008
ROCK CLIMBING
WALL/STEPS for 4
to 5 foot platform.
$120. Section 786
10 ft Yellow Wave
Slide $20.
570-283-3951
WWE wrestling
championship toy
belts $10 each.
Small Lego set $5. 2
children’s shopping
carts $7 each.
Children’s Dirt Devil
battery operated
vacuum $7. 2 Little
Tikes girls vanities
one with chair. $25
each. Girls carpet,
dollhouse design
$10. Babydoll bath-
tub changing sta-
tion, $10. Washer &
dryer playset $25.
Popup fire engine 3
piece playset tent
$20. Max steel
action figures &
accessories $10.
570-239-5292
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
CD Player: Portable
Pack & Play by
Evenflo $50
570-696-1896
CD/TAPE/RADIO,
Sony Hi-Fi Compo-
nent System with
remote. Perfect for
dorm’s. Almost
brand new. $45.
TELEVISION, Dae-
Woo, 24 inch, color.
Works perfectly -
excellent condition.
$50 or best offer.
Call 570 696-1703
NINTENDO game-
cube games new in
wrapper Bomber-
man Jetters and A
Series of Unfortu-
nate Events $10
each 696-3528
SPEAKERS: Bose
901 series VI speak-
ers with stands and
equalizer with own-
ers guide. Paid
1,400. sell $600.
570-406-2150
STEREO SYSTEM
by Sharp. Features
5-CD tray, felt cov-
ered speakers + 1
subwoofer, remote.
Barely used, excel-
lent condition. $75.
570-332-2812
TELEVISION, Hitachi
projection, 46”
screen, rarely used
in excellent condi-
tion. $400 OBO
570-574-6261
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
ION DRUM ROCKER
Great way to learn
drums! Ion Drum
Rocker kit for use
with Rock Band, on
the Xbox 360.
Heavy duty alu-
minum frame.
Comes with 3
durable cymbals.
Great rebound on
pads, works per-
fectly. PULSE bass
pedal also included,
along with drum
throne, Rock Band 2
and Beatles Rock
Band. $175 for all.
570-814-3383
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING COINS,
gold, silver & all
coins, stamps,
paper money, entire
collections worth
$5,000 or more.
Travel to your home
CASH paid. Marc
1-800-488-4175
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
KITTEN, black &
white, 8 weeks old,
litter trained. FREE.
570-417-1506
KITTENS
FREE TO GOOD HOME
2 males. Born April
15th, half grown,
gentle.Yellow tab-
bies. Call Bob at
570-262-6560
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
GERMAN SHEP-
HERD MALE FOR
BREEDING. Excel-
lent disposition for
Breeding. AKC
females only. Call
570-885-6400
MALTESE-YORKIE
MIX PUPPIES
Look like Yorkies.
Shots are current.
5-6 pounds at matu-
rity. Females $500.
570-765-1122
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
MORKIE PUPPIES!
Hypoallergic, home
raised. Adorable.
2 males, honey
colored. 1 female,
black & tan. Ready
to go Aug 25.
Call 570-817-7878
SHIH-TZU MIX PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current. $400
570-401-1838
845 Pet Supplies
BIRD CAGE:
Small $10.
570-288-4852
PAGE 6 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 7 B
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
T he B estPrices In T he Valley!
821- 2772 •1- 800- 444- 7172
601 KIDDER STREET, W ILKES-BA RRE, PA
MON.-THURS. 8:30-8:00pm; FRI. 8:30-7:00pm; SAT. 8:30-5:00pm
V AL L EY CH EV R OL ET
www.v alleyc hev ro let.c o m K EN W AL L ACE’S
THE BEST COVERAGE IN AMERICA.
100,000-M IL E
5 Y EA R PO W ERTRA IN LIM ITED W A RRA NTY
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA RS O F C O URTESY TRA NSPO RTA TIO N
100,000-M IL E S
5 Y EA RS O F RO A DSIDE A SSISTA NC E
W hichever com es first.See dealer for lim ited w arranty details.
S E RV ICE HOURS
OPEN SATURDAY
8AM - 12 NOON
MON. - FRI. 8AM - 6:30PM
221 ConynghamAve., Wilkes-Barre
570.821.2778
w w w .va lleych evro let.co m
*Tax & tags additional. Price includes all rebates. LowAPR in lieu of rebates. CRUZE - “S” Tier - (800+) lease for 39 mos. at $169 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year $2019 due at signing to qualified buyers;
MALIBU - “S” Tier (800+) - lease for 39 mos. at $179 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year $2319 due at signing to qualified buyers; EQUINOX FWD LS “S” Tier (800+) - lease for 39 mos. at $269 per month plus tax,
12K miles per year, $1859 due at signing to qualified buyers; TRAVERSE LS FWD - “S” & “A” Tier Lease for 39 months at $299 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year, $2269 due at signing to qualified buyers. Prior
sales excluded. †GM Card Holders “Topped Off” up to $3000. See dealer for details. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Must take delivery by August 31, 2011. Not responsible for typographical errors.
N EW
2011 S IL V E RAD O HD
D URAM AX D IE S E L S
IN S TO C K !!
2011 C HE V Y IM P AL A
L S S E D AN
M S R P
$25,490
Stk. #11377,3.5L V 6 A utom atic,D ual Z one A ir
C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,Six-W ay Pow er D river Seat,
PW ,PD L ,T ilt,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 E X T C AB 4W D
Stk. #11401,4.8L V 8 4 Sp eed A utom atic,Stabilitrak,
D eep T inted G lass,A ir C ond itioning,F old ing R ear
Seat,17” SteelW heels,40/20/40 Seating
M S R P
$3 0,620
2011 C HE V Y M AL IBU
1L S S E D AN
M S R P
$22,7 3 5
Stk. #11725,2.4L D O H C M F I A utom atic,
A ir,R em ote K eyless E ntry,A M /F M /C D /
M P3,PW ,PD L ,O nStar,X M Satellite
O
R
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 4W D C RE W C AB
Stk. #11099,4.8L V 8 A uto.,A ir C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,
PW ,PD L ,K eyless E ntry,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io,
C hrom e W heels,Pow er H eated M irrors,A M /F M /C D
M S R P
$3 4,505
2011 C HE V Y TRAV E RS E
FW D & AW D
Stk. #11738 M S R P
$3 0,280
L S • LT • LT Z
M S R P
$42,7 40
2011 C HE V Y TAHO E
L S 4W D
Stk. #11921,5.3L V 8 A utom atic,C lim ate C ontrol,
Stabilitrak w / T raction C ontrol,PW ,PD L ,
B luetooth,A uto L ocking D ifferential,8 Passenger
Seating,T hird R ow Seat,O nStar,X M Satellite
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
3 3
M P G
h wy
29
M P G
h wy
O
R
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0.9
%
0.9
%
0.9
%
AP R AP R AP R
S AV EOV ER $7 000
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0.9
%
0.9
%
0.9
%
AP R AP R AP R
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 2W D RE G UL AR C AB
Stk. #11570,4.3L V 6 4 Sp eed A utom atic,A ir
C ond itioning,L ocking R ear D ifferential,
17” SteelW heels,Stabilitrak w / T raction C ontrol
M S R P
$22,560
8’ Bo x
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0.9
%
0.9
%
0.9
%
AP R AP R AP R
S TAR TIN G AT
$
1
7
,9
9
9
*
$
1
9
,4
9
9
* S TAR TIN G AT
P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
1
7
9
S TAR TIN G AT
$
2
1
,9
9
9
*
Stk. #11471,4.8L V 8,A ir C ond itioning,A M /F M
Stereo,L ocking R ear D ifferential,16” W heel,F ull
F loor C overing,C ustom C loth Seats
2011 C HE V Y E X P RE S S
2500 C ARG O V AN
M S R P
$27 ,61 5
$
2
4
,5
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
2011 C HE V Y E Q UIN O X
AW D a n d FW D
L S • LT • LT Z • 4 C yl. • 6 C yl.
ST K #11721
O
R
3 2
M P G
h wy
$
2
2
,9
9
9
* S TAR TIN G AT
P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
2
6
9
$
2
4
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
S TAR TIN G AT
$
2
6
,9
9
9
* P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
2
9
9
$
2
7
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
$
3
7
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
2011 C HE V Y C AM ARO
C O UP E
1LT • 2LT • 1SS • 2SS
C O N V E R T IB L E
Stk. #11734
$
2
2
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
3 0
M P G
h wy
L S • LT • LT Z • E C O
AL L N E W
2011
C HE V Y C RUZE
45 45 45
AVAILABLE AVAILABLE AVAILABLE
IN-STOCK & IN-STOCK & IN-STOCK &
IN-BOUND IN-BOUND IN-BOUND
O
R
M S R P
$1 7 ,1 7 5
Stk. #11540
42
M P G
h wy
(ECO)
P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
1
6
9
$
1
6
,9
9
5
* S TAR TIN G AT
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
*Tax & Tags additional. LowAPR to qualified customers. See dealer for details. Select vehicles may not be GM Certified. Photos may not represent actual vehicle. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.
06 FORD E S CA P E XL S
#11881A ,Sport,A W D....................................
$
12,497
*
09 N IS S A N ROGUE S L
#Z2384A ,A W D.............................................
$
19,989
*
07-08 CA DIL L A C S RX A W D
#Z2213,Low M iles..........................S ta rtin g A t
$
25,999
*
08 HUM M E R H3
#Z2422........................................S ta rtin g A t
$
25,987
*
08 HYUN DA I S A N TA FE
#12015A ,O nly 23K M iles.............................
$
19,999
*
03 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 RE G CA B
#11348A ,Low M iles......................................
$
13,888
* 08 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S
#11336A ,O nly 16K M iles................................
$
19,995
*
06 CHE V Y COBA L T L T
#11357A ,C oupe...............................................
$
7,999
*
08 N IS S A N S E N TRA
#12020A ,17K M iles.....................................
$
12,995
*
V IS IT US 24/7 W W W .V A L L E YCHE V ROL E T.COM
08 CHE V Y A V E O H/B
#Z2063,22K M iles............................................
$
9,999
*
08 CHE V Y E XP RE S S 12 P A S S E N GE R V A N
#Z2480,44K M iles.......................................
$
19,900
*
08 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 E XT CA B
#Z2410,4W D,O nly 33K M iles..........................
$
22,999
*
08 S A TURN V UE A W D
#Z2444,24K M iles.......................................
$
19,875
*
11 CHE V Y CRUZE E CO
#11803A ,1,346 M iles...................................
$
18,999
*
07 CHE V Y COL ORA DO W /T
#Z2320,O nly 32K M iles..................................
$
14,999
*
06 CHE V Y E QUIN OX L S
#11892A ,45K M iles......................................
$
16,389
*
05 GM C S A V A N A CA RGO V A N
#Z2415,38K M iles........................................
$
16,999
*
06 P ON TIA C TORRE N T
#Z2323,Low M iles.......................................
$
16,999
*
07 CHE V Y IM P A L A L S
#Z2402,37K M iles........................................
$
13,987
* 08 CHE V Y COL ORA DO E XT CA B
#11804A ,35K M iles,Z71,4W D........................
$
20,989
*
08 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 RE G CA B
#Z2417,4W D,O nly 39K M iles..........................
$
21,590
*
07 CHE V Y S UBURBA N
#11041A ,Low M iles.....................................
$
28,995
*
06 CHE V Y M ON TE CA RL O L T
#Z2342,36K M iles........................................
$
14,999
*
07 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 4W D RE G CA B
#11552A ,O nly 31K M iles................................
$
19,999
*
ATTENTION:
GM Ca rd
H o ld ers
U P TO $3000
To w a rd sA
New V eh icle

P L US : P RE -OW N E D
P RICE S TO GE T YOU...
A S L OW A S 1.9% A P R
DEA L • DEA L S • A N D M ORE DEA L S !
4
CAM AR O
CON V ER TIBL ES
AV AIL ABL E
0% AP R
u p to 60 m os .
O N S E L E C T M O D E L S
NOW TAK ING OR D ER S
FOR 2012 V OL T
OV ER 1 00 S ILV ER AD OS
C hevy Runs Deep
07-08 CHE V Y TRA IL BL A ZE R
#11679A
S ta rtin g A t
L OW
M IL E S
12
Tra ilbla z er’s
To Ch oose
F rom
$
14,999
* $
14,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L S •L T
$
14,950
* $
14,950
*
L OW
M IL E S
2008 GM C S IE RRA
2W D RE G CA B
SA L E
P R ICE
#11563A
07-08 S A TURN A URA XE
$
14,999
* $
14,999
*
#Z2479
S ta rtin g A t
8
A u ra ’s
To Ch oose
F rom
L OW
M IL E S
SA L E
P R ICE
2006 CHE V Y E QUIN OX
A W D L S
SA L E
P R ICE
$
15,999
* $
15,999
* On ly
22K M iles
#11916A
2010 CHE V Y HHR
P A N E L L S
#Z2438
$
13,950
* $
13,950
*
L OW A P R
A V A IL A BL E
L OW
M IL E S
32 M P G
(HW Y)
S ta rtin g A t
SA L E
P R ICE
07-10 CHE V Y COBA L TS
L S •L T •2DR •4DR
#Z2411
$
12,984
* $
12,984
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L OW
M IL E S
S ta rtin g A t
L OW A P R
A V A IL A BL E
2008 P ON TIA C G6
S E DA N
#Z2460
$
16,999
* $
16,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
ON L Y
3 6K
M IL E S
2010 CHE V Y M A L IBU
L T •L TZ
$
17,999
* $
17,999
*
L OW A P R
A V A IL A BL E
S ta rtin g A t
L ow
M iles
SA L E
P R ICE
#Z2448
2009 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 2500 HD
RE G CA B
#11681A
$
24,999
* $
24,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
On ly
9,891
M iles
03 HON DA ODYS S E Y L X
#11731A ,Low M iles...................................
$
12,999
*
01 JE E P W RA N GL E R S P ORT
#11893B,4x4,Low M iles................................
$
11,999
*
05 CHE V Y M A L IBU 4DR
#11358B,O nly 22K M iles...............................
$
11,999
*
08 FORD E S CA P E XL T
#11938A ....................................................
$
17,995
*
PAGE 8 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
Every Tuesday &
Thursday in August
9:00 am - 3:30 pm
at the Dept. of
Agriculture Building
Rt. 92 South,
Tunkhannock
YOUR CAREER. REINVENTED.
The Prudential Insurance Company of America, Newark, New Jersey and its affiliates are Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employers and are committed to diversity in its workforce.
Prudential is an employer that participates in E-Verify.
Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities.
0204417-00001-00 Ed. 7/2011
Lisa Hummel
Agency Recruiter
32 Scranton Office Park
Scranton, PA 18507
Phone 570-340-7052 Fax 570-340-7063
www.applicationstation.com
Code: PRUDWB_2R
Lisa.Hummel@Prudential.com
Picture a new kind of future – one where you can make an impact, not just a
living. Train for a career in insurance and financial product sales with The
Prudential Insurance Company of America’s Financial Professional Program.
You’ll learn hands-on from seasoned professionals, in the classroom and the
field. And you’ll get the support you need to prepare for required licensing
exams. All while receiving a generous compensation and benefits package.
After your training period, you’ll have a world of opportunities –
including the chance to lead your own practice.
Want to make an exciting career change?
If you have a strong interest in financial sales,
email your resume or call me today.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
7
0
5
9
4
9
NEWPORT TWP.
PRIME APARTMENTS STILL AVAILABLE!
ST. STANISLAUS APARTMENTS
143-145 Old Newport Rd., Newport Twp.
Affordable, Accessible 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apartments
Income Eligibility* Required.
Rents: $455-$656 plus electric
(*Maximum Incomes vary according to household size)
• High Efficiency Heat/Air Conditioning
• Newer Appliances • Laundry Rooms
• Community Room • Private Parking
• Rent Includes Water, Sewer & Refuse
For more info or to apply, please call:
570-733-2010
TDD: 800-654-5984
Apply Today!
Great, Convenient
Location!
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
Efficiencies available
@30% of income
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; • Laundry on site;
• Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
Business Analyst
The economy may be slowing, but GWC War-
ranty is growing! GWC, a nationwide leader in
vehicle service contracts, is seeking a bright,
energetic and ambitious individual to join our
marketing analytics team in our brand new
Wilkes-Barre executive office. The ideal candi-
date will possess an analytical mind, an eager-
ness to manage a variety of projects and the
ability to drive those projects to completion.
Desired attributes include strong work ethic,
creativity, hunger for learning, willingness to
take intelligent business risks, ability to cooper-
ate on a team of professionals and a sense of
humor. This job is MBA-level work but may
also be perfect for the high-performing individ-
ual aiming to gain business experience and
make a mark before embarking on pursuit of an
MBA. Candidates must possess a bachelor’s
degree and have strong working knowledge of
the Microsoft Office Suite (Excel and Power-
Point in particular). Additional knowledge of
other analytical and presentation software is a
plus.
GWC Warranty offers a competitive salary and
comprehensive benefits package including med-
ical and 401k.
Interested candidates may submit their
resumes via email to
careers@gwcwarranty.com
or by fax at 570-456-0967.
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
We are an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity in the workplace.
SALES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
Work Hard. Play Hard.
Fun, energetic individual with a love for the nightlife wanted!
The Weekender – Northeast PA’s #1 arts & entertainment free
weekly - is looking for a bright, enthusiastic sales account
executive.
Successful candidates will have strong desire to be part of a
winning team. Responsibilities include servicing existing accounts,
generating new business, and digital media sales. You will be
rewarded with a competitive base salary + commissions, and
receive a beneft package including health & dental insurance, life
insurance, 401(k) plan, and paid vacation.
Pre-employment drug screening and background check required.
Bachelor’s degree preferred. Interested candidates should send
letter of interest, resume and salary history to:
Rachel A. Pugh at rpugh@theweekender.com
General Manager
570-831-7398
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
542 Logistics/
Transportation
566 Sales/Business
Development
The Times Leader
Linda Byrnes, Classifed Sales Manager
15 N. Main Street • Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
e-mail: lbyrnes@timesleader.com
FAX: 570-831-7312
No Telephone Calls Please!
We are an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity in the workplace.
JJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJooooobbbbbsssssssssssss ooooob JJJJJJJJJJ Autos
THE TIMES LEADER
timesleaderautos.com
Do you like to talk on the phone?
Do you enjoy meeting new people?
Can you sell?
The Times Leader, the #1 daily newspaper has a full time position
open in our Classifed Advertising Department for an energetic, sales
motivated, detail oriented, multi-tasking individual to sell advertising
to private individuals and commercial advertisers.
Our ideal candidate will possess a pleasant, professional phone man-
ner along with excellent spelling, grammar and typing skills, experi-
ence with Word, Excel, email and internet searches. We need some-
one who is able to work independently and within daily deadlines.
If you meet the above requirements send your resume to:
Every Tuesday &
Thursday in August
9:00 am - 3:30 pm
at the Dept. of
Agriculture Building
Rt. 92 South,
Tunkhannock
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DALLAS
NEW CONSTRUCTION
2,400 sq feet
$329,000
patrickdeats.com
570-696-1041
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
WILKES-BARRE
129 & 131 Matson Ave
Double Block, 6
rooms + bath on
each side. $79,000
Call 570-826-1743
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
CUSTOM
FAMILY HOME
37 MAPLE ST.
Built 2007. 4 bed-
rooms, 3 bath-
rooms, double car
attached garage,
dining room, family
room, living room,
125x125 lot, deck.
Don’t hesitate,
Dallas Schools, 2
story, gas heat,
central air, whirl-
pool tub, walk-in
closet, cherry
kitchen, stone fire-
place, full base-
ment $275,000.
Call
(570) 498-0825
or email nmarr@
comcast.net.
HUNTINGTON MILLS
Beautiful Cape Cod,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, screened in
porch. Large
kitchen. On 1 acre.
$130,000.
Call 570-204-1097
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
26 Bubblo St
Cape cod. Com-
pletely renovated.
New bath & kitchen.
All stainless appli-
ances. 3 bedroom,
new high-efficiency
gas furnace with
central air. Hard-
wood laminate floor
& carpet. Washer/
dryer hookup on 1st
floor. Deck. Large
lot. Quiet neighbor-
hood. $134,900.
570-954-8825
or email
gckar1@yahoo.com
WEST WYOMING
Toy Town Section
148 Stites Street
INCREDIBLE
BUY
$71,000
On corner lot with
2 car garage.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
walk up attic & full
heated basement,
hardwood floors
with three season
room. Freshly paint-
ed & move in condi-
tion. 570-446-3254
WILKES-BARRE
FOR SALE BY OWNER.
Move in condition! 3
bedroom. 1.5 bath.
Hardwood floors.
Gas heat. Dining
room, living room,
kitchen & detached
garage. $55,000
(570) 239-6308
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
RESTAURANT FOR SALE
Profitable upscale
restaurant / bar in
York PA. Includes
building, website,
liquor license & more!
Partial owner financ-
ing available. Go to
www.YorkRestaurant
ForSale.com for
more information
912 Lots & Acreage
LAND BARGAIN
DALLAS SCHOOL
DISTRICT
2 Acres $39,500
5 Acres $59,900
Dallas’ Best
Address
Call Owner
(570) 245-6288
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood school
district. 50 acres.
Pond & mixed ter-
rain. Surveyed &
perked. Rte 437.
$187,500
570-510-7914
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
MobileOneSales.net
Call (570)250-2890
924 Out of State
Properties
COZY CABIN ON 5
ACRES $19,995.
Beautiful wood-
lands. Our best deal
ever! Call 800-229-
7843 or visit www.
landandcamps.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
WEST VIRGINIA free
lost of hunting bar-
gains. 100 acres &
up. Loaded with
wildlife. Lots of tim-
ber. Great invest-
ment timberbar-
gains.com
924 Out of State
Properties
FLORIDA WATER-
FRONT CONDO LIQ-
UIDATION! SW Flori-
da coast. Brand
new, upscale 2 bed-
room, 2 bath 1,675
sq. ft. condo. Only
$179,900. (Similar
unit sold for
$399,900.) Prime
downtown location
on the water. Call
now 877-888-7571
extension 30
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
EXETER
1054 Wyoming Ave
Available now. 2nd
floor, 2 bedroom.
Off street parking.
Central air. Building
only 5 years old.
Water included.
$650 + utilities, secu-
rity & references.
570-655-2254
FORTY FORT
2 bedrooms, 1 bath-
room, all appliances
provided, washer
/dryer on premises,
off-street parking,
rent discount avail-
able. , $575.00/per
month, water and
sewer paid, $575./
security deposit.
Call 570-991-7170
FORTY FORT
39 Tripp St.
2nd floor spacious
2 bedroom with
sunroom and rear
porch off Wyoming
Avenue near Cross
Valley. Modern
kitchen and bath-
room. Includes
stove, refrigerator,
washer/dryer, stor-
age, garage, gas
heat and off
street parking.
$550/mo. plus utili-
ties. No pets,
no smoking.
Call (570) 417-2775
FORTY FORT
AMERICA REALTY
RENTALS
ALL UNITS
MANAGED
call for
availability of
1 bedrooms
starting at
$465 + utilities.
ALL NO
PETS/SMOKING/
LEASE/EMPLOY-
MENT VERIFICA-
TION / APPLICA-
TION. Appli-
ances, laundry,
parking, modern,
very clean
standards.
570-288-1422
KINGSTON
595 MARKET ST
BRAND NEW
2 bedroom
apartment. $650 +
utilities. No pets
/ No smoking. Off
street parking, air,
new appliances &
microwave, laundry.
Security, references
& Background
check required.
570-288-4508
KINGSTON
Newly remodeled 1
bedroom, central
heat & air, off-street
parking, wall to wall,
washer/dryer hook-
up, No pets. $450
Call 570-288-9507
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
72 E. 72 E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor, located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living room,
dining room, sun
room, bathroom. 2
large and 1 small
bedroom, lots of
closets, built in linen,
built in hutch, hard-
wood floors, fire-
place, storage room,
yard. New washer/
dryer, stove & fridge.
Heat and hot water
included. 1 year lease
+ security. $950
570-406-1411
KINGSTON
Rutter Ave.
REDUCED!
1 bedroom 1st floor,
large living room,
neutral decor.
Gas heat, water
included. Off street
parking. No pets.
$410 plus security
& lease.
570-793-6294
PITTSTON
Rent to own option!
2 bedroom, bath,
kitchen, living room.
Heat & water
included. $560/
month. 1st month &
security. No pets
570-451-1038
PLAINS
1 bedroom 2nd floor,
stove & refrigerator,
washer/ dryer hook
up, wall to wall, gas
heat, 2 car off street
parking, no smok-
ing, no pets. Near
casino & I-81. 1 year
lease. $400 + utili-
ties, security, 1st &
last month, credit &
background checks.
570-639-1564
WEST PITTSTON
159 Elm St.
2 bedroom Town-
house w/full base-
ment. 1.5 baths, off
street parking.
$600/per month
+ utilities & security.
No Pets
570-283-1800 M-F
570-388-6422 all
other times
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedrooms, large
eat-in kitchen with
stove, refrigerator &
dishwasher includ-
ed. Washer & dryer
hookup, plenty of
storage space $625
+ utilities. No pets.
570-357-9076
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WEST PITTSTON
Large. 1200 sq ft 2
bedroom 2nd floor.
Heat, water,
sewage & appli-
ances. Washer/
dryer hookup. Quiet
residential neigh-
borhood. No pets,
non smoking. Walk
up attic for storage.
$710 + security.
(570) 510-3247
WILKES-BARRE
2nd floor, 1-2 bed-
rooms, heat and
hot water included.
No washer/dryer
hookup. Balcony,
eat in kitchen. Sec-
tion 8 accepted
$525 per month
570-829-4798 after
12 noon.
WILKES-BARRE
Barney Street
3rd floor, 2-3 bed-
room attic style
apartment. Eat in
kitchen, private
entrance. Includes
hot water & free
laundry. Pets ok.
$450 / month. Secu-
rity, references.
570-237-0124
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
4 bedroom half dou-
ble. $1,000 + utili-
ties. 570-242-3327
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Maffett St
Just off Old River
Road. 7 room, 3
bedroom, 2nd floor
duplex. Off street
parking, deck in
rear. Ample closet /
storage. Neutral
decor. Appliances
included. $625 +
utilities, security &
lease. No pets.
570-793-6294
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
944 Commercial
Properties
WEST PITTSTON
Lease 9,000 sq.
ft. for $600/month
net. Clean, 1/2
bath. Owner.
908-852-4410
950 Half Doubles
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
living room, dining
room, kitchen, off-
street parking with
driveway, $600
month + security.
Sewer & garbage
included. No pets.
Call 570-542-4340
LUZERNE
3 bedroom, electric
stove, modern
kitchen/bath & laun-
dry, large closets &
attic storage. Very
clean in quiet neigh-
borhood with yard.
Tenant responsible
for utilities. No Pets.
$600.
(570) 760-5573
S. WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths, small yard,
front porch, off
street parking.
$550/month
security required.
Tenant pays
all utilities.
570-332-5723
953Houses for Rent
LAKE SILKWORTH
Cozy 1 bedroom cot-
tage, year round.
Washer, dryer, fridge
& stove included.
Large yard. Tenant
pays utilities. Locat-
ed on Private Road
at Lake Silkworth.
$475 + utilities. No
pets, non smoking.
Call 570-477-3667
953Houses for Rent
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Executive condo,
end unit with 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
large 1st floor Mas-
ter Suite, Living
room, Dining room,
hardwood through-
out 1st floor, kitchen
with granite coun-
ters & all stainless
steel appliances,
loft study, gas Fire-
place, alarm sys-
tem, laundry room,
large walkout base-
ment, 2 car garage,
rear deck & side
covered patio. All
season mainte-
nance provided.
Available October
2011. No pets; Ref-
erences required,
$2000 / month +
security. Call
570-313-1229
LUZERNE
Cozy 3 bedroom, 1
1/2 bath, living
room, dining room,
eat in kitchen,
washer & dryer
hookup. Small yard.
Off street parking,
nice location. $950
+ utilities, security &
references.
570-262-8764
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
WILKES-BARRE
MONARCH RENTALS
3 bedrooms,
all appliances
provided.
Call 570-822-7039
965 Roommate
Wanted
HARVEYS LAKE
1 bedroom, fully
furnished. Includes
utilities/cable,
access to lake.
$400 month.
Call Don
570-690-1827
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
OCEAN CITY .
MARYLAND. Best
selection of afford-
able rentals. Full/
partial weeks. Call
for FREE brochure.
Open daily. Holiday
Real Estate. 1-800-
638-2102. Online
reservations:
www.holidayoc.com
SPLIT ROCK
Pocono Bed &
Breakfast. Contem-
porary, newly
remodeled 3 bed-
room home. Walk-
ing distance to Split
Rock lake and
resort. $200 nightly.
570-357-1138
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
Affordable General
Masonry & Concrete
NO JOB TOO BIG
OR TOO SMALL!
Masonry /Concrete
Work. Licensed &
insured. Free est.
John 570-573-0018
Joe 570-579-8109
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 9 B
412 Autos for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
412 Autos for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
412 Autos for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
412 Autos for Sale
We Make The Difference!
W
SOLDIN
SCRANTON
Toyota Camry is the “Most American”Car
for the third consecutive year.
††
*All offers end close of business Wednesday, August 31, 2011 or while supplies last. All offers exclude 1st payment, tax, tags, $125 processing fee and $650
acquisition fee on lease offers. Quantities as of 08/15/2011. †Finance and lease offers require tier 1 plus credit approval through Toyota Financial Services. All leases
are based on 12,000 miles per year. No security deposit required for all leases. Available unit counts include both in stock and incoming units for all model years and
trimlevels for series described. **Cash Back offers includes funds fromToyota of Scranton, Toyota Financial Services and Toyota Motor Sales combined. Vehicle must
be in stock units — Prior sales excluded. Customer must present ad at time of purchase. Camry cash back, APR and lease contracts must finance or lease through
Toyota Financial Services. Tundra cash back and APR offer must finance through Toyota Financial Services. †† According to Cars.Com’s annual “American-Made
Index,” rank in July 2010. See dealer for details. 2011 Impact Advertising 11TSS-IVC-ABJ082411
MADE IN
AMERICA
O
V
E
R
4
0
0
C
A
R
S
AVAILABLE
• PAState INSPECTIONS
• Service CARWASH
• PRIORITY Shuttle Service
• COMPLIMENTARY Loaner Car
In 2009 and 2010, Toyota Scion of Scranton was recognized with
the prestigious President’s Award for excellence in each of a
series of categories, including Customer Sales Satisfaction and
Customer Service Satisfaction.
t
s
C
One of Pennsylvania’s largest inventories
of Toyotas, insuring that you’ll findYOUR
newToyota.
Over 100 certified employees dedicated
to the Toyota brand AND
to serving you.
60,000 square-foot brand-newstate-of-
the-art facility all dedicated to
theToyota brand.
Luxury customer lounge withWi-Fi and
flat screenTVs for your comfort and
convenience during your service visit.
Featuring the ONLY Dunkin’ Donuts
in aToyota Dealership in the
United States.
One of the only brand new
environmentally friendlyToyota
Certified collision centers in the country.
R.J. BURN E
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570)342-0107 •1-888-880-6537
www.rjb urn e .c om Mon-Thurs 9-8 • Sat 9-4
2011 C A DILLA C C TS
A LL W H EEL DR IVE
S TOC K #8744 M S RP $3 9,240
L E A S E IT!
OR
BUY IT 39 m onths
$
299
per m onth
plus tax*
$1,999 DO W N
NO SEC URITY
DEPO SIT REQ UIRED**
M S RP $3 9,240
G M Re b a te $2,000
Bo n u s C a s h $1,000
RJB Dis c o u n t $1,250
SA LEP R IC E $3 4,950
0% Fina nc ing
Ava ila b le!*
L ea s e p rice b a s ed o n a 2011 CT S AW D 1S B Pa cka ge, $299 p erm o n th p lu s 9% PA s a les ta x to ta l $326.58. 39 M o n th lea s e 10,000 m iles p eryea r. 39 M o n thly
p a ym en ts to ta l $12,736, $.25/ m ile p en a lty o ver32,500 m iles . $1999 d o w n p a ym en tp lu s $299 firs tp a ym en t, p lu s ta x a n d ta gs d u e a td elivery. L ea s ee
res p o n s ib le fo rexces s ive w ea ra n d tea r. M u s tta ke d elivery b y 9/ 06/ 2011. Req u ires Ally Ba n k cred ita p p ro va l. Plea s e s ee s a les p ers o n fo rco m p lete d eta ils .
2011 C A DILLA C SR X
LU XU R Y - A LL W H EEL DR IVE
S TOC K #5243 M S RP $42,415
L E A S E IT!
OR
BUY IT 39 m onths
$
469
per m onth
plus tax*
$1,999 DO W N
NO SEC URITY
DEPO SIT REQ UIRED**
M S RP $42,415
RJB Dis c o u n t $1,520
SA LEP R IC E $40,895
L ea s e p rice b a s ed o n a 2011 S RX AW D L u xu ry Pa cka ge, $469 p erm o n th p lu s 9% PA s a les ta x to ta l $511.75. 39 M o n th lea s e 10,000 m iles p eryea r. 39 M o n thly
p a ym en ts to ta l $16,058.25, $.25/ m ile p en a lty o ver32,500 m iles . $1999 d o w n p a ym en tp lu s $369 firs tp a ym en t, p lu s ta x a n d ta gs d u e a td elivery. L ea s ee
res p o n s ib le fo rexces s ive w ea ra n d tea r. M u s tta ke d elivery b y 9/ 06/ 2011. Req u ires Ally Ba n k cred ita p p ro va l. Plea s e s ee s a les p ers o n fo rco m p lete d eta ils .
2011 C A DILLA C ESC A LA DE
A LL W H EEL DR IVE
S TOC K #8580
L ea s e p rice b a s ed o n a 2011 E s ca la d e w ith All W heel Drive $70,540 M S RP. $699 p erm o n th p lu s 9% s a les ta x to ta l $762.58 p erm o n th. 48 M o n th lea s e 12,000 m iles p eryea r.
48 M o n thly p a ym en ts to ta l $36,603.84 $.18/ m ile p en a lty o ver48,000 m iles . $3,999 d o w n p a ym en tp lu s $699 firs tp a ym en tp lu s ta x a n d ta gs , T o ta l Du e a tDelivery is $5,308.
L ea s ee res p o n s ib le fo rexces s ive w ea ra n d tea r. M u s tta ke d elivery b y 9/ 06/ 2011. Req u ires US Ba n k T ierS o r1 cred ita p p ro va l. Plea s e s ee s a les p ers o n fo rco m p lete d eta ils .
Ca d illa c Prem iu m
Ca re M a in ten a n ce
In clu d ed On All
2011 Ca d illa cs
L E A S E IT!
OR
BUY IT 48 m onths
$
699
per m onth
plus tax*
$3,999 DO W N
NO SEC URITY
DEPO SIT REQ UIRED**
0% AVAILABLE
IN LIEU OF REBATE
$63,999
North Star Foodservice of PA,
a stable and successful food
distribution organization,
is recruiting for
N th St F d i N th St F d i
Foodservice Delivery Drivers
Candidates will have a valid Class A CDL, 1 year truck driving experience
and clean driving record or 6 months of food and beverage delivery
experience. Candidates must provide a verifiable and consistent work
history, exemplary driving record, and submit to a background screen.
This position involves delivering to multi-unit franchises throughout the
Mid-Atlantic states. North Star Foodservice offers an excellent
compensation and benefits package including 401(k) with company match.
Interested candidates should apply online at
www.usfoodservice.com
under the careers/available opportunities tab, requisition 10002945.
You may also apply in person at
NORTH STAR FOODSERVICE of PA
13 Rutledge Drive, Pittston, PA
EEO/AA/M/F/D/V
$2,500 SIGN-ON BONUS!
Full Time Team, Co-Driver,
Solo, Part Time and Casual
Dedicated Account Drivers
$62K Annually, $2K Sign-On Bonus
Affordable Medical Plan options with
Eligibility First Day of Employment.
Co-Driver Positions - Home Weekly and
Every Weekend. Part Time and Casual
Positions also available. Automotive
Industry Gouldsboro PA (Scranton Metro)
TeamOne a National Logistics Organization is
currently recruiting for dedicated account Team
Drivers for their new facility that will begin oper-
ation in mid June 2011. These fully benefited
positions are well compensated. The route drivers
will be delivering auto parts to dealerships
throughout the Eastern portion of the US. Quali-
fied candidates should be 23 years of age & pos-
sess a valid CDL A drivers licenses with a mini-
mum of two years OTR verifiable experience.
Candidates must possess an acceptable BI and
MVR. Drivers must possess doubles and Haz Mat
endorsements. TeamOne offer a competitive
salary and affordable benefits inclosing choice of
medical plans, dental, vision, 401K, etc.
Interested candidates can call 866-851-9902
to set up an interview.
TeamOne is an equal opportunity Employer
M/F/H/V
RN SUPERVISOR
The Meadows Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center
11-7 Shift
Full Time
Part Time
with benefits
RNs can apply on line @
https://home.eease.com/
recruit/?id=487180
- Individualized orientation program.
- Competitive starting rates
- Vacation, Holiday and Personal Days
- Tuition Reimbursement
- Health insurance and Pension Plan
- Child Day Care on premises
Meadows Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
55 West Center Hill Road
Dallas PA 18612
Email – Meadowshr@hotmail.com e.o.e.
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER 2 GO, INC.
PA#067136- Fully
Licensed & Insured.
We install custom
seamless rain
gutters & leaf
protection systems.
CALL US TODAY ABOUT
OUR 10% OFF WHOLE
HOUSE DISCOUNT!
570-561-2328
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
PAGE 10 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
Style, Class, Excellence
*MPGS BASED ON 2011 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY. DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR AC-
TUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER CHANGES. PHO-
TOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NO RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PAYMENTS INCLUDE ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES.
SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 8/31/11.
*ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. PRICE PLUS TAX, TAG , & TITLE. PHOTOS ARE
FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL PRICES INCLUDE APPLICABLE REBATES AND/OR
INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURES PROGRAM CHANGES. PRICES AVAIL-
ABLE ON ADVERTISED VEHICLES ONLY . MILEAGE CHARGE OF $.25/MILE OVER 30K MILES. LESSEE PAYS FOR EXCESS WEAR. NOT AVAILABLE
WITH SOME OTHER OFFERS. FINANCING ON SELECT 2011 MODELS ONLY, THRU ALLY FINANCIAL, MUST QUALIFY. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 8/31/11.
*ALL LEASES PLUS TAX, DELIVERY & RESIDUAL. FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES
ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHIC ERRORS. ALL REBATES AND INCENTIVES INCLUDED. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. OFFER(S)
GOOD WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER PROGRAM CHANGES. MUST FINANCE OR LEASE THROUGH LFS, RESTRIC-
TIONS APPLY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 8/31/11.
*ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS, PLUS TAX, TAG
AND TITLE. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED.
FINANCING AVAI LABLE WITH APPROVE D CREDIT. MINIMUM FINANCED $15K WITH APPROVE D CREDIT THRU DESIGNATED LENDER. SUBJECT TO
MANUFACTURER PROGRAM CHANGES. FINANCING ON SELECT PRE-OWNED MODELS. QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS ONLY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.
ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 8/31/11.
MOTORWORLD DRIVE, JUST OFF INTERSTATE 81, WILKES-BARRE
SALES HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY: 9AM-8PM SATURDAY: 9AM-5PM
SUNDAY: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON - 5PM
WWW.MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM
North Eastern Pennsylvania’s y
#1 Luxury Vehicle Destination
www.motorworldacura.com www.motorworldgm.com www.motorworldlexus.com www.motorworldgroupmercedes.com
EXPERIENCE OUR
PERFORMANCE COLLECTION:
UP TO 23 MPG ON THE 2011 SRX AWD &
27 MPG ON THE CADILLAC CTS AWD!
2008 LEXUS ES350
STK# H26700A, 15K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, 3.9% APR FOR UP TO 60 MOS. .....................................................................SALE PRICE $28,999
2009 LEXUS RX350
STK# L11192A, 25K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION, AWD, 3.9% APR FOR UP TO 60 MOS.........................................SALE PRICE $30,999
2010 LEXUS ES350
STK# B9107A, 25K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, 3.9% APR FOR UP TO 60 MOS. .......................................................................SALE PRICE $31,999
2010 LEXUS IS250
STK# B9149B, 2K MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD, 3.9% APR FOR UP TO 60 MOS. ...........................................................SALE PRICE $33,999
2010 LEXUS RX350
STK# L11185A, 39K, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD, 3.9% APR FOR UP TO 60 MOS. .................................................................SALE PRICE $33,999
2010 LEXUS RX350
STK# L11115A, 25K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD, 3.9% APR FOR UP TO 60 MOS. ............................................................SALE PRICE $38,999
2008 LEXUS LS460
STK# L11260A, 36K MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION, 3.9% APR FOR UP TO 60 MOS.............................................SALE PRICE $47,999
2008 LEXUS LX570
STK# L11248A, 36K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION, 4X4, 3.9% APR FOR UP TO 60 MOS..........................................SALE PRICE $64,999
MSRP:
$
38,220
20
11 LEXUS IS250
MSRP:
$
38,220 ,
L
e
a
s
e
f
o
r
3
6
M
o
s
.
$
339
PLUS TAX
19 CITY
27 HWY
MPG
Lf 27 HWY 7 HWYY
*LEASE WITH 10K MILES PER YEAR, $4,616 TOTAL AT DELIVERY AND A RESIDUAL OF $23,696 (AWD)
MSRP:
$
38,995
20
11LEXUS ES350
MSRP:
$
38,995
L
e
a
s
e
f
o
r
3
6
M
o
s
.
$
389
PLUS TAX
19 CITY
27 HWY
MPG
L
27 HWY Y
*LEASE WITH 10K MILES PER YEAR, $4,616 TOTAL AT DELIVERY AND A RESIDUAL OF $23,007.
a
s
e
f
o
r
3
6
M $
389
$
19 CITY
7 HWY
MPG
27 HW
MSRP:
$
45,812
LEXUS RX350
MSRP: 45,812
L
e
a
s
e
f
o
r
3
6
M
o
s
.
$
459
PLUS TAX
18 CITY
25 HWY
MPG
L
e 25 HWY Y
*LEASE WITH 10K MILES PER YEAR, $4,616 TOTAL AT DELIVERY AND A RESIDUAL OF $27,487 (AWD)
20
11
e
f
o
r
3
6
M
o
s
$
459
$
CITYY
25 H
MPG
MSRP: $56,775
New2011 Mercedes-Benz
E350 SPORT SEDAN 4MATIC AWD
$4,764 TOTAL DUE AT DELIVERY. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED. $3,350.00 CAP COST.
10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $37,472.00. FOR DETAILS, EXCLUSIONS AND LIMITA-
TIONS ON MERCEDES-BENZ STAR SERVICE PRE-PAID MAINTENANCE, CONTACT YOUR
DEALER OR VISIT WWW.MBUSA.COM/MAINTENANCE.
Plus Tax
for 33Mos.
LEASE FOR
Plu
LEASE FOR
$
619
*
Plus Tax
for 33Mos.
LEASE FOR LEASE FOR
$
359
*
$4,293 TOTAL DUE AT DELIVERY. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED.
10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $25,830.00.
MSRP: $40,360
New2011 Mercedes-Benz
C300 SPORT SEDAN 4MATIC AWD
7 MODELS 20 MPG OR BETTER
STK# YEAR MAKE MODEL WAS NOW
A10869A..........................................2008 ACURA TL ................................$26,999 ......... $23,300
AP15258..........................................2008 ACURA TL ................................$28,999 ......... $25,995
L11143A..........................................2009 ACURA TL NAVI ........................$27,999 ......... $26,995
A10870A..........................................2009 ACURA TSX..............................$28,999 ......... $26,995
A10896A..........................................2010 ACURA TSX..............................$29,999 ......... $27,995
A10845A..........................................2008 ACURA MDX ............................$29,999 ......... $28,400
T27713B..........................................2008 ACURA MDX ............................$32,499 ......... $28,400
A10834A..........................................2009 ACURA TSX (MANUAL TRANS) .......$29,499 ......... $28,999
AP15242..........................................2008 ACURA TL TYPE-S .....................$32,479 ......... $29,995
A10853A..........................................2009 ACURA RDX TECH.....................$30,499 ......... $29,999
H25783A .........................................2009 ACURA TL ................................$34,999 ......... $29,999
L11233A..........................................2010 ACURA TL ................................$30,999 ......... $30,499
B9198A............................................2009 ACURA MDX ............................$38,999 ......... $38,499
CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED
WHY BUY ACURA CERTIFIED: 150 POINT INSPECTION.
150 POINT INSPECTION. 12 MONTH/12K MILE EXTENSION OF
THE HONDA NEW CAR WARRANTY (4YR 50K MILE) AND
THE BALANCE OF A 7 YEAR 100,000 MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY.
GETTING BEHIND THE WHEEL OF A MERCEDES-BENZ CERTAINLY HAS ITS REWARDS.
IF YOUCURRENTLY OWNA BMW, AUDI, LEXUS, JAGUAR, PORSCHE, RANGE ROVER/LAND
ROVER, INFINITI, ACURA, CADILLAC, LINCOLN, OR VOLVO YOU CAN GET $1,500 TOWARD
THE CLS-CLASS OF YOUR CHOICE OR $2,000 TOWARD THE MERCEDES-BENZ OF YOUR
CHOICE OR $4,000 TOWARD THE E-CLASS OR M-CLASS OF YOUR CHOICE.* DRIVING A
MERCEDES-BENZ HAS NEVER BEEN MORE REWARDING.
*QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS ONLY. OFFER EXCLUDES 2010 OR 2011 SPRINTER AND SLS MODELS. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS.
CELEBRATE SUMMER WITH SPECIAL LIMITED-TIME OFFERS FROM CADILLAC
20
12 ACURA TL
1.9% APR
for 37 to 60 mos.
0.9% APR
for 24 to 36 mos. .
or
or
1.9% APR
for 37 to 60 mos.
0.9% APR
for 24 to 36 mos.
or
20
11 ACURA RDX
.
1.9% APR
for 37 to 60 mos.
0.9% APR
for 24 to 36 mos.
or
20
11 ACURA MDX
s.
1.9% APR
for 37 to 60 mos.
0.9% APR
for 24 to 36 mos.
or
20
11 ACURA ZDX
.
1.9% APR
for 37 to 60 mos.
0.9% APR
for 24 to 36 mos.
or
20
11 ACURA TSX
1.9% APR
FOR UP TO 60 MONTHS ON
NEW 2011 LEXUS IS250/350
Sedans,ES350 and RX350.
ED PRE-OWNED
APR
60 mos.
SX
Certified Pre-Owned LowAPRRates
NOW TAKING ORDERS ON
THE ALL NEW 2012 ML350
COMING SOON
1.9%APR
FOR UP TO
60 MOS.
1.9%APR
FOR UP TO
60 MOS.
20 2
11
1.9%APR
FOR UP TO
60 MOS.
MBSE
Merce!es8eaz
Saaaer l·eat
2011 CADILLAC CTS AWD
2011 CADILLAC SRX AWD
2011 CADILLAC CTS AWD
2011 CADILLAC ESCALADE AWD
*LEASE WITH 10K MILES PER YEAR. $2,995 DUE AT SIGNING.
MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.
*LEASE WITH 10K MILES PER YEAR AND $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING.
MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE/FINANCING THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.
*LEASE WITH 10K MILES PER YEAR AND $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING.
MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE/FINANCING THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.
*LEASE WITH 10K MILES PER YEAR AND $3,995 DUE AT SIGNING.
MUST QUALIFY FOR LEASE/FINANCING THROUGH ALLY FINANCIAL.
0
% APR
FOR 60 MONTHS*
0
% APR
FOR 36 MONTHS*
LEASE FOR
$399
PER MONTH PLUS TAX &
TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS*
LEASE FOR
$475
PER MONTH PLUS TAX &
TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS*
LEASE FOR
$319
PER MONTH PLUS TAX &
TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS*
LEASE FOR
$779
PER MONTH PLUS TAX &
TAGS FOR 48 MONTHS*
STK# C3445
STK# C3463
STK# C3437
STK# C3339
OR OR
FINANCE WITH FINANCE WITH
LUXURY
COLLECTION
PERFORMANCE
COLLECTION
LUXURY
COLLECTION
0
% APR
FOR 60 MONTHS*
2008 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 SEDAN AWD
STK#BP15268, 24,590 MI, 3.99% APR FOR 66 MOS*......................................................... SALE PRICE $28,995
2009 MERCEDES-BENZ GLK SUV AWD, LOADED
STK#T28193A, 18,396 MI, 3.99% APR FOR 66 MOS*......................................................... SALE PRICE $34,995
2010 MERCEDES-BENZ ML SUV
STK#BS0325A, 16,250 MI ................................................................................................. SALE PRICE $43,395
2009 MERCEDES-BENZ GL450 SUV, LOADED
STK#BP15390, 40,093 MI................................................................................................. SALE PRICE $45,995
2007 MERCEDES-BENZ SL500 CONVERTIBLE
STK#BP15484, 18,194 MI 2 TO CHOOSE FROM.................................................................. SALE PRICE $48,995
0
% APR
FOR 60 MONTHS*
OR OR
FINANCE WITH FINANCE WITH
OF $27 487 (AWD) OF $27 4 27 4 $27 4 (A 87 (A 87 (A ) WD) WD)
FINAL
DAYS
AL OF OF $$23 0 $23 007 07
FINAL
DAYS
OF $23 6 23 6 $23 696 (A 96 (AWD) WD)
FINAL
DAYS
MotorWorld Acura 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
MotorWorld Cadillac 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
MotorWorld Lexus 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
MotorWorld 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
342-4115 • www.nasserrealestate.com • 587-5155
Nasser
REAL ESTATE INC.
Since 1950
LAKE WINOLA $279,000
Fabulous lake views from the large front deck, new paint, carpet and
counter tops, remodeled bathrm, vinyl replacement windows and a
stonefaced wood burning freplace. MLS #11-1512
DALTON $165,000
Beautifully updated 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home with Whirlpool appli-
ances, pellet stove, extra large living roomand stone patio. A springfed
stream and landscaping compliment the 1.3 acres. MLS #11-1307
REDUCED
REDUCED
It’s Your
Entertainment
News Source.
Read it every Friday in The Times Leader.
theGuide
NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
N
NEWS
IN LUZERN
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL L NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LEEEE DER.
timesleader.com
Selling
Your Car?
We’ll run your ad until
the vehicle is sold.
Call Classified
829-7130
ad until
s sold.
fifieedd
00
WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011 Abington Journal PAGE 11 B
The Journal Call 1-800-273-7130 For Local Pros
LOCAL PROS
CABINETRY
PLUMBING & HEATING
CONSTRUCTION
Karpentry by Keiper
Specializing in windows, doors, paneling,
decks, kitchens, bathrooms, roofing, siding,
gutters, all phases of carpentry
Licensed General Contractor. Call 563-2766
(Quality over volume, one job at a time)
DAPSIS
REGISTERED PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS
Serving Abingtons over 25 years Gas & Oil • 24 Hour Service
313 Leach Hill Road., Clarks Summit • 587-1401
GLASS SERVICES
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
We do it all!
Auto • Commercial • Residental
WYOMING AVENUE & NEW STREET
346-0777
WELL DRILLING
VAN FLEET DRILLING CO., INC.
Rotary Drilling • Goulds Pumps
Sales • Service • Installation
FREE ESTIMATES
563-1776 Dalton
•WELLS
•PUMP REPAIR
•FILTERS
•PUMPS
•WATER SOFTENERS
•SULFUR REMOVAL
COMPLETE WATER SYSTEMS
ROUTES 6-11 • DALTON, PA 18414
563-1123
“TELL YOUR WATER PROBLEMS TO CRESSWELL”
REPAIRS
Route 107, Lake Sheridn
(10 Miles from Clarks Summit)
9:00-5:00 Mon-Fri • 8:00-3:30 Sat
945-5379
Sales & Service
MTD Products, Briggs & Stratton,
Husqvarna, Tecumseh, Poulan, Kohler,
White, Mantis, Oregon, Echo, Muray
Small Engine Service
CLARK’ S SHARP-ALL
retaylor.com 570-586-7270
CLARKS SUMMIT, PA
Custom Furniture, Woodworking,
Carpentry, Design/Build,
Specializing in small unique projects
GUTTER REPAIR & CLEANING
Pat Regan Gutter Cleaning
All Winter Long
“Te Right Way” Cleaned, Flushed and Minor Repairs
CALL BEFORE YOU REPLACE THEM
Call Pat Regan • 383-1991 • No Answer, Leave Message
AIR CONDITIONING
& HEATING
A/C & Heat
Pumps
AJS Mechanical
Services, LLC
Dalton, PA
570-468-0190
Ductless
CALL
TODAY!
CLEANING
LEAH’S CUSTOMCLEANING
Residential & Commercial - Supplies Included
Over 10 years experience • Excellent references
Clarks Summit & Surrounding Areas
Call for Free Estimates (724) 875-9219
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
Visit timesleader.com & Click “Buy A Home”
to see the most up to date list of Open Houses
1805 Bundy St., Scranton
Prudential Preferred Properties
Dir: N Main Scranton to left on Theodore, up hill, left
onto Return Ave, Right onto Bundy, house on left.
MLS#11-3591
1-2:30PM $79,000
175 Taroli Street, Old Forge
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
121 Waverly Road., Waverly
Prudential Preferred Properties
Dir: Main Street Old Forge turn onto Taroli (at Beer Dis-
tributor & Sunoco Gas Station), home at end of block.
MLS#10-5680
Dir: N. Abington Rd. to a left at the Waverly Comm,
bear left onto Waverly Rd. MLS#11-3565
1-2:30PM 1-2:30PM $224,500 $825,000
1500 Mount Cobb Rd., Jefferson Twp.
Coldwell Banker Town & Country Properties
Dir: I-84 to Mt Cobb exit. Follow Rd to light at corners,
right on 348 E. Approx 1.5 miles to house on right on
corner of Lake Rd. MLS#11-3967
12-2PM $205,000
702 Fern St., Clarks Summit
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
2410 Lakeview Drive, Lake Ariel
Century 21 Select
Dir: Rt.6 Clarks Summit to Maple Street (Kost Tire), left
on Fern, home is on right. MLS#11-1405
Dir: From Main Gate, Lakeview Drive East (right at the
fag pole). House on left just before Roamingwood
Road and Glenwood Lane. MLS#11-3392
1-2:30PM 11AM-2PM $174,500 $215,000
Te Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS
®
, Inc.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 28
Open House Directory
PAGE 12 B Abington Journal WEDNESDAY AUGUST 24, 2011
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
906 Homes for Sale
REALESTATE, INC.
Clarks Summit / Scranton Office (570) 585-0600
239 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit (570) 207-6262
CLARKS SUMMIT - Fabulous all brick ranch home
on 3 acre setting. Finished lower level has 4th bed-
room, family room, workshop with wood stove.
MLS#11-3384
URSULA 585-0618
or KIM 585-0606 $295,953
GREENFIELD TWP - 3 bedroom ranch on level lot
move in condition. Hardwood foors. Home qalifes
for rural housing.
MLS#11-2892
EDNA 585-0610 $159,000
FACTORYVILLE - Beautiful 4 Bedroom, 3 bath ranch
on 2 acres. Fully fnished basement, eat-in kitchen,
& much more. MLS#11-3917
JAIME 585-0609 $189,900
CLARKS SUMMIT - Beautifully maintained home
featuring brand new heating, hardwood foors, brick
freplace, corner lot, and in-law apartment.
MLS#11-1413
MARION 585-0602 $299,000
CLARKS SUMMIT - Meticulously maintained ranch
home with fnished basement, central air, hardwood
foors, modern kitchen, peaceful sunroom & ga-
rage. MLS#11-1405
Virtual Tour! www.3dvirtualvisions.com/fern
MARION 585-0602 $174,500
ALMOST NEW! Terrifc 4 bedroom 2.5 bath well built
home in desirable neighborhood features hardwood/
tile foors, gas heat, central air, security system, great
foor plan, large level yard with custom deck, swing
set, & lower level play area. MLS#11-3945
EDNA 585-0610 $368,500
CLARKS SUMMIT - Traditional 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath
home with a 3 car garage on a cul-de-sac street
close to schools and shopping.
MLS# 11-3203
KIM 585-0606 $284,900
FACTORYVILLE - Spacious ranch on double lot with
newer furnace, central air, and new Pella windows &
doors. Large rooms, 2 freplaces, and plenty of stor-
age. MLS#10-5743
ELIZABETH 585-0608 $134,500
CLARKS GREEN - Surrounded by nearly 2 beautiful
acres, this custom brick home w/new granite coun-
tertops, tile foor, central air, plus large family room
w/stone fp & wet bar, cherry kit cabinets, formal
DR, Mst suite and relaxing screened-in porch!
MLS#11-3032
MARION 585-0602 $539,000
CLARKS SUMMIT - Move in condition bilevel like
no other with large family room addition and offce
on frst foor, hardwood foors, fnished basement.
MLS#11-2126
EDNA 585-0610 $229,000
CLARKS SUMMIT - Gently rolling country property
with large barn and gorgeous views. No gas lease!
MLS#11-3684
LORI 585-0627 $199,900
CLARKS SUMMIT - Gorgeous new construction!
Gourmet kitchen w/ granite counters, ss applianc-
es. 4 BR, 2.5 BA , central A/C, gas freplace in Fam
Rm, Mst BR suite, & deck. On over 1/2 acre lot. A
must see! MLS#11-3654
ELIZABETH 585-0608 $395,000
N
E
W
!
N
E
W
!
Clarks Summit / Scranton Office
239 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit
(570) 585-0600 (570) 207-6262
In The
Spotlight
LEWITH & FREEMAN
real estate, inc.
L
F
Offered by: Marion Gatto
Lewith & Freeman Real Estate, Inc.
Office: (570) 585-0600
Direct Line: (570) 585-0602
Real Value. Real Results.
CLARKS SUMMIT
This stately all brick home
offers 5 bedrooms, frst
foor Master suite with
dual freplace, and a resort
style atmosphere including
inground pool and hot tub.
Offered at $679,000
N
E
W
Vitual Tour! www.3dvirtualvisions.com/gorham
MetLife
Home Loans
Strength... Stability... Service
A Name You Know and Trust
Tom Burke
(570) 961-5174
www.tomburkeloans.com
tjburke@metlife.com
AVAILABLE LOANS
Conventional, FHA, VA, and PHFA.
Rural Housing loans are available
and feature no down payment and
the ability of including closing costs
with the loan.
CALL TODAY FOR DETAILS
MetLife Home Loans is Licensed by the PA Dept. of Banking and is a Division of MetLife Bank, N.A.
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE1C
ArtsEtc...
Tonight’s the night. Seven
of our area’s finest folk
musicians will be taking
the Dietrich stage for our
10thannual Gathering of
Singers and Songwriters.
Join us at 7:30 p.m. for a
fantastic evening of acous-
tic music, plus good fun
and stories from the eve-
ning’s featured artists. Mu-
sical guests include George
Wesley, Kate Jordan, KJ
Wagner, Tom Flannery,
Lorne Clark, Jay Smar and
Donna Hill.
“For over a decade, Tunk-
hannock’s Dietrich Theater
has cultivated and nurtured
one of the most vibrant,
original arts scenes in
America, said Lorne Clar-
ke, concert organizer and
emcee. “This year’s Gather-
ing of Singers & Songwrit-
ers celebrates the spirit of
this great community.”
Admission is free. Tick-
ets will be available at the
door while they last.
Speaking of music, in
September the Dietrich will
host Kenneth Womack, one
of the Pennsylvania Hu-
manities Council’s Com-
monwealth Speakers, for a
free presentation called
“The End: Authorship,
Nostalgia and the Beatles”
on Wednesday, Sept. 14 at 7
p.m.
Beatles scholar Kenneth
Womack will bring the sto-
ry of the Beatles vividly to
life. He will trace the
group’s creative arc from
their days in Liverpool to
the mean streets of Ham-
burg, through Abbey Road,
to the twilight of their ca-
reer.
In an effort to communi-
cate the power of the
band’s remarkable achieve-
ment, Womack and his au-
dience will investigate the
origins of the group’s com-
positions, as well as the
songwriting and recording
practices that brought them
to fruition. I think this pre-
sentation will appeal to
both young and mature
audiences.
Please call the theater at
570.996.1500 for reserva-
tions to this free event.
Another free event that is
just around the corner is
the Dietrich Children’s
Theatre production of “Lon
Po Po: A Red Riding Hood
Story from China.” In this
play, a mother from the
Chinese countryside travels
overnight to visit her three
small children’s sick grand-
mother, or “po po.”
She cautions her children
not to open the door to
anyone, as there might be a
MORE THAN
MOVIES
Dietrich Theater
Erica Rogler
See Dietrich , Page 5
Visual Arts
The Calligrapher’s
Guild of Northeastern
Pennsylvania exhibit at
Anthology Bookstore in
Downtown Scranton, 515
Center St., Scranton.
570.341.1443.
Oil Painting Classes by
MarylouChibirka at Dalton
Art Studio, two- hour ses-
sions, all levels welcomed.
Info: 570.563.2774
Art classes with Barry
Singer, Tuesdays, 4 to 5
p.m. ages eight to 12, 5 to 6
p.m. ages 13 and up, at the
First Presbyterian Church,
300 School St., Clarks
Summit. Cost: $40 a month
(includes all supplies) Info:
570.945.7807 or visit
www.barrysartroom.com
“Art Show and Sale”
more than 100 original
paintings by Anita Am-
brose, at Summit Frame-
works, 111 North Abington
Rd. Clarks Green, thru
Thanksgiving. Info:
570.587.0162.
Painting and Music
Lessons, Chibirka Gallery
Art and Music Studio,
Clarks Summit/Dalton ar-
ea, flexible schedules. Info:
Call 570.563.2774 or
570.903.5982.
AFA Gallery presents:
Nannette Burti, Ruth
Janiszeski and Joyce El-
len Weinstein, through
Aug. 27. Gallery Hours:
Thursday to Saturday, 12 to
5 p.m. Events are free to the
public. Info: artistsforar-
t.org 570.969.1040
The Northeast Photog-
raphy Club’s juried, sum-
mer photography exhibit
at New Visions Studio &
Gallery 201 Vine Street,
downtown Scranton, to
Aug. 30. Info: Visit http://
newvisionsstudio.com,
email newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com, or call
610-636-9684
Performing
Arts
Catholic Choral Society
62nd season, rehearsals
Tuesday evenings at 7 p.m.
at the IHMCenter at Mary-
wood University. The
group, composed of mem-
bers fromboth Luzerne and
Lackawanna Counties, per-
forms sacred, classical,
Broadway and popular mu-
sic and welcomes new
members. No auditions re-
quired. Ann Manganiello is
the music director with
Jean Shields as accompa-
nist while Brenda Grunza
and Dr. Thomas Ritten-
house are the co-presidents.
Info: www.catholicchoral-
society.org and
570.587.2753.
Indian Dance Classes,
at the Waverly Community
House, Thursdays 3:30
p.m. in the Scout Room. In-
fo: 570.586.3917.
“Live Jazz Every
Wednesday” with The
Marko Marcinko Jazz
Quartet at Amici Restau-
rant 1300, Morgan Hwy,
Clarks Summit, 8 to11p.m.
Info: 570.586.3000 or visit
www.markomarcinko.com
“Live Jazz Night,” Fri-
days at Ruth’s Chris Steak
House, The Mohegan Sun
Casino 6 to 9 p.m. with The
Jim Waltich Jazz Trio fea-
turing different guests each
week
“Sandstorm” with Ra-
chel “Kali” Dare, aerobic
workout based on Middle
Eastern/ E. European
movement and creative vi-
sualization. No experience
necessary. Learn various
dance techniques. Linn
McDonald School of
Dance, 1501Wyoming Ave.
Scranton. Thursdays 6:30
to 8 p.m. Cost: $10 per
class. First class $5. Info:
570.346.7106 or standu-
phungry@yahoo.com
Singers sought, Wally
Gordon Community
Singers, Clarks Summit
United Methodist Church,
Morgan Highway, Clarks
Summit, Tuesdays, 7:30
p.m. No auditions required.
Info: Loriann Valentine
Kerber, 570.586.2595; Judi
Jones, 570.587.5365; Dale
Thomas, 570.575.4708.
“Go Irish! The Purga-
tory Diaries of JasonMill-
er,” at the Greeley Inn, 218
Route 590, Greeley, Aug.
27. All Wednesday and Sat-
urday shows begin at 8
p.m., Sunday shows at 2
p.m. Cost: $15. Info:
570.685.9997 or visit
www.thehistoricgreeley-
inn.com.
Beavis and Butt-Head
tribute show, at New Vi-
sions Studio & Gallery
Aug.25, 7 to11p.m. to cele-
brate the return of the show
Beavis and Butt-Head to
MTV, featuring the bands
Blush, Scrap Kids, William
James, Condition Oakland,
and Overdose on Vitamins.
Cost: $ 5.
“Disney’s Alice in Won-
derland Jr.” at the Shaw-
nee Playhouse to Aug. 27,
10 a.m. Cost: $10. Info:
570.421.5093 or visit
www.TheShawneePlay-
house.com.
School House Rock
Live! Jr. at the Shawnee
Playhouse throughAug. 27.
Cost: $10. Info:
570.421.5093 or visit
www.TheShawneePlay-
house.com.
“Music on the Lawn
and Craft Fair,” Aug. 27
on the grounds of Lake Wi-
nola United Methodist
Church, Maple Dr., Maple
City. Craft fair begins at 2
p.m. a chicken barbecue
will be held from4 to 7 p.m.
Info: 570351.7365.
“Sisters of Swing: The
Story of the Andrew Sis-
ters,” through Sept. 3 at
The Shawnee Playhouse.
Cost: $28/$25/$15. Info:
www.theshawneeplayhou-
se.com or by calling
570.421.5093.
The Steamtown Origi-
nal Music Showcase, Sept.
2 to 4, seven venues, 47
acts, three clinics. Cost:
Hopper Pass $10. Info:
www.steamtownshowcase-
.com.
Dave Mason, presented
by Lackawanna college at
the Mellow Theater, Sept.
24, 7:30 p.m. Cost: $30. In-
fo: 570.955.1455
Almost, Maine, an un-
apologetically romantic fa-
ble that explores the mys-
teries of the human heart. A
play by John Cariani, di-
rected by associate profes-
sor and chair of performing
arts, Joseph C. Dawson,
Sept. 29, 30, Oct. 1, and2, at
Wilkes University. Info: 1-
800-WILKES-U, ext. 4420.
Literary Arts
Writers Group, for ages
18 and up, at the Dietrich
Theater in downtown Tunk-
hannock, Thursdays from 7
to 8:30 p.m., ongoing.
Come and read your work
or listen and be inspired.
All genres and levels of
writing welcome. Cost:
Free. Info: 570.996.1500.
Arts, Crafts
and More
Darkroom open-use at
NewVisions Studio &Gal-
lery 201 Vine St., Scranton,
Tuesdays and Wednesdays,
noon to 6 p.m.; Thursday to
Saturday noon to 9 p.m.;
Sunday noon to 3 p.m.
Cost: $19.99 for one day,
unlimited access; $79.99
for one week, unlimited ac-
cess; $199.99 for one
month, unlimited access.
Info: 610.636.9684or email
newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com
Drawing 101 for Kids
and Young Adults, ages 6
to 20, at New Visions Stu-
dio & Gallery 201 Vine St.,
Scranton, Saturdays, to
Aug. 20, 3 to 5 p.m. Cost:
$99.99, supplies included.
Info: 610.636.9684or email
newvisionsstu-
dio@gmail.com.
Basic Sculpture and 3D
Art for Kids, ages 6 to 20,
at New Visions Studio &
Gallery201Vine St., Scran-
ton, Saturdays, toAug. 20, 1
to 3 p.m. Cost: $129.99,
supplies included. Info:
610.636.9684 or email
newvisionsstu-
See Calendar , Page 5
Last week’s winner:
Maria Dalasio
of Clarks Green
Last week’s answer:
Viola Davis
T
he Glenburn Township 7th
Annual Art Show and Sale
will be on display at the
Glenburn Township Building lo-
cated at 54 Waterford Road, Dal-
ton from Oct. 2 through Dec. 8.
There are still spots open for
artists looking to exhibit their
work in the show, which may be
viewed during regular office
hours from 9a.m. to noon or by
appointment.
The opening reception will be
held Oct. 2 from 3 to 5 p.m. Ad-
mission is free and light refresh-
ments will be served.
Original artwork by many local
artists will be available for sale.
The theme for this year’s show
is “The Creative Spirit,” and
there will be work in a variety
mediums including watercolor,
oil, pastel, acrylic, pencil and
mixed media. Photography will
also be accepted into the show.
There will also be the present-
ing of the “People’s Choice”
award.
This project was supported by a
Lackawanna County Arts and
Culture Municipality Grant, a
program of the Lackawanna
County Commissioners and the
Lackawanna County Council on
the arts.
Artists interested in participa-
ting can contact Joanne Benson
at 570.954.1489 for more infor-
mation.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Shown, ‘Mother Nature’s Artistry’ by Joanne Benson, shown above, which was inspired by Ford’s Pond in Glenburn Township, will be on
display at the Glenburn Township 7th Annual Art Show.
Call to artists
Contestants can only win once in a 60-day period.
Who plays Wilbur Wilson in "Spy Kids: All the Time in the World"?
C M Y K
PAGE 2C www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
There’s still time this week to purchase chances to win
the Special Edition “Star Wars Kidracer” on display at the
Abington Community Library.
The drawing to pick the winner will take place at the
Clarks Summit Centennial Birthday Celebration at 5 p.m.
on Aug. 27 in downtown Clarks Summit. Children age
three to seven years old are invited to test drive a “Kidrac-
er” during the celebration. Chances are available at the
Circulation Desk for $2 each or $5 for three.
All proceeds benefit the library.
New DVDs
“Jesse Stone: Innocents Lost,” starring Tom Selleck-
Cindy Van Aldan was like a daughter to Jesse Stone, for-
mer Chief of Police of Paradise, and now she’s dead. Al-
though all signs point to a suicidal drug overdose, a histo-
ry of addiction and associations with mobsters, Jesse
knows Cindy better than that. He will stop at nothing to
avenge the lost innocence and subsequent death of the
young girl he once mentored. Not rated.
“Soul Surfer,”starring Anna Sophia, Robb, Helen Hunt
and Dennis Quaid – This is the true story of teen surfer
Bethany Hamilton, who lost her arm in a shark attack and
overcame all odds to become a champion again through
her sheer determination and unwavering faith. Rated PG.
“Rango,” animated, featuring the voice of Johnny Depp
as Rango, a kooky pet chameleon who gets tossed into a
wild and raucous town in desperate need of a hero. Re-
viewers called it “loads of fun and genuinely funny.”
Rated PG.
“A Shine of Rainbows,” starring Connie Nielsen and
Aidan Quinn- An orphaned boy named Tomas is adopted
by Maire O’Donnell to live on a whimsical Irish isle filled
with new friends, secret caves and a lost baby pup seal
stranded on the coast. When Maire’s reluctant husband
Alec refuses to accept Tomas as his own son, the boy
drifts down a fateful path of adventure and self-discovery,
taking an ordinary family on an extraordinary journey.
Rated PG.
Children story hours
Registration for a new series of children’s Story Hours
will begin on August 29 in the Children’s Room or by
phone. Calendars are available with dates and times for
various age groups.
Upcoming events
Wednesday, Aug. 17
Afternoon Book Club 2 p.m., The Story of Edgar Saw-
telle by David Wroblewski Adults
Nook Tutorial, 7 to 8 p.m. Learn all about NOOK Color
and NOOK Simple Touch, the Barnes & Noble award-
winning Reader’s Tablets, there will be demonstrations,
discussions and answers to FAQs. Adults
Thursday, Aug. 18
Junior Battle of the Books, 5:30 p.m., Test your book
knowledge by participating in the county-wide reading
competition held at the Steamtown Mall in Scranton.
Grades four to six.
Friday, Aug. 19
Karaoke Night 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Light refreshments will
be served. Grades four to six.
Karaoke Summer Nights 8:45 to 10:45 p.m. Light re-
freshments will be served. Grades seven to 12
Saturday, Aug. 20
Library Project Runway 6 to 8 p.m. Winners will re-
ceive a $25 Gift Card to TJ Maxx. Grades seven to 12
Monday, Aug. 22
Story Time Teens 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.- Sponsored by Teen
Leadership Committee, presented by Story Time Teens.
Theme: Garden. Ages three to six, siblings welcome.
Knitting Group 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. bring your current
project and knit with others. Adults
Wednesday Aug. 24
Luau 6:30 to 8 p.m. Enjoy some tropical fun with your
friends. Play Hawaiian games and try some food from our
50th state! Grades four to six.
Thursday, Aug. 25
Outdoor Family Film 7 p.m., the Jerry Lewis film "Cin-
derfella." The film will be shown outdoors weather per-
mitting, and in the Ryon Room in case of rain. All Ages
Friday, Aug. 26
4th Fridays Acoustic Music 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., bring
your own acoustic instrument and join in on the jammin’.
All ages
LIBRARY NEWS
BY MARY ANN MCGRATH
The Abington Community Library is located at 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks
Summit. Visit our website, www.lclshome.org/abington to register online
for events or call the library at 570.587.3440.
Don’t have a library card? Register for one at http://www.lclshome.org/
libraryinfo/library_card_reg.asp.
Camerawork Gallery’s
located in the Marquis
Gallery at 515 Center
Street, Scranton, will open
it new show “The Black
Land” on First Friday,
Sept. 2.
Featuring the work of
Ed Dougert, the show
includes photographs of
the coal country of north-
eastern PennsylvaniaAnd
will be on display Sept. 2
to Oct. 4 with an opening
reception Sept. 2, from 6
to 8:30 p.m.
Douget wrote that, “The
Pennsylvania anthracite
coal region is unique in
that a single industry,
whose peak is long past,
has left its mark on the
land, the culture, the
economy and the ecology.
Since 1999, I have been
constructing a photograph-
ic essay of the remnants
of the coal industry in
Northeastern Pa. I have
tried to illustrate the
graphic beauty of the coal
region while interpreting
its complex and emotional
history with its many
chapters of social, eco-
nomic, and environmental
issues.
My pictures try to con-
vey the emotion that un-
der lies this area’s past. I
began photographing the
Pennsylvania coal region
as a way to understand
what happened there. To
stand on the sites you
research and feel the his-
tory is a unique experi-
ence. I hope that a full
immersion into this topic
allowed me to produce
images infused with some
of the emotion found at
these places.
In addressing this pro-
ject of recording these
coal mining sites as they
exist presently, I combine
documentation and in-
terpretation.”
He added, “I am record-
ing the fast disappearing
industrial history but also
trying to offer pleasing
photographs which con-
centrate on a detail to
illustrate a larger piece of
the story. Using tradition-
al darkroom techniques
and black and white film,
the final work is prints
from 8 inches square to
11 inches square in size,
professionally mounted
and framed.”
Dougert grew up in Phi-
ladelphia earning degrees
in Liberal Arts and Me-
chanical Engineering from
Temple University.
The Black Land pho-
tographs are produced
using black and white
film and printed with tra-
ditional techniques using
darkroom and chemistry.
For more information
call Cameraworks Gallery
at 570.344.3313 or visit
http://www.camerawork-
gallery.org/.
Exhibit
illustrates
impact of
coal
industry
SUBMITTED PHOTO
‘Carbondale Powerhouse’ by Ed Dougert, will be on display at ‘The Black Land,’ beginning Sept. 2
SUBMITTED PHOTO
‘Backyard Breaker’ by Ed Dougert, will be on display at ‘The Black
Land,’ beginning Sept. 2
“Odysseys” solo photog-
raphy exhibit by local pho-
tographer Niko Kallianiotis
will be on display at New
Visions Studio & Gallery
from September 2 to 30,
with an opening reception
Sept. 2 from 6 to 10 p.m. in
conjunction with First Fri-
day Scranton, refreshments
will be served, and there
will be meet and greet with
the artist.
“Odysseys” is a collec-
tion of black and white
photographs taken both
locally in Lackawanna
County and in Greece, Kal-
lianiotis’ birthplace.
Taken from Kallianiotis’
artist statement about his
work, “My art is both rep-
resentation and interpreta-
tion of life. Because of my
hybrid background I can
look at the world from two
different perspectives, thus
heightening my sensibil-
ities whether visual or so-
cial. ”
Kallianiotis is currently
working towards his M.F.A
in Photography and re-
ceived his B.F.A in Photog-
raphy from Marywood Uni-
versity in 2002.
He has worked as a pho-
tojournalist for publica-
tions such as The Times
Leader and The New York
Times and has instructed at
Luzerne County Communi-
ty College, has nationally
won awards for his photog-
raphy and publications and
has exhibited his photog-
raphy both locally and in
Greece.
New Visions Studio &
Gallery is located at 201
Vine Street, Scranton.
For more information,
call 610.636.9684 or visit
http://newvisionsstu-
dio.com
Musicians, by Niko Kallianiotis will be on display at New Visions Studio & Gallery starting Sept. 2.
Two perspectives
‘Odysseys’ solo photography
exhibit by local photographer
Niko Kallianiotis features
photos from Lackawanna
County and Greece.
Steven Machat discusses his
world order in his new weekly
radio show “The World Ac-
cording to Steven Machat” on
WFTE Progressive Communi-
ty Radio on 90.3 and 105.7 in
Northeast Pennsylvania and
online globally at www.wfte-
.org.
The show will will be fea-
tured weekly at its regularly
scheduled time on Sundays at
5 p.m.
Recording his first show in
London, England, Machat
organically discusses his
premise of government,
health, welfare and safety and
capitalism, relating to the
public as if it is a Greek Play -
where the public becomes the
chorus.
Machat also has an im-
mense and diverse knowledge
of history that comes into play
as he discusses current events
and offers solutions as how to
turn the current global mess
around, starting in the U.S.
first.
For more information about
Steven Machat, visit his web-
site at:http://www.steven-
machat.com.
WFTE announces new
weekly programming
Dan Gauette returns to
Shawnee Playhouse to direct
“Sisters of Swing: The Story of
the Andrew Sisters,” playing
through Sept. 3 at The Shaw-
nee Playhouse, written by Beth
Gilleland and Bob Beverage.
This musical tribute follows
the lives of sisters LaVerne,
Maxene and Patty Andrews
from their childhood, their
early days on the road, through
their rise as recording stars, to
entertaining American GIs
overseas, to squabbling over
differences.
The score contains more
than 20 hit songs such as “Bei
Mir Bist Du Schön,” “Don’t Sit
Under the Apple Tree” and
“Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.”
The show offers a perspec-
tive into these women as hu-
man beings, showing how the
events of their lives shaped
who they became to the rest of
the world.
Ticket prices are $28 for
adults, $25 for seniors and $15
for children under 12.
Advance ticket purchase is
recommended and can be
made online at www.theshaw-
neeplayhouse.com or by call-
ing the box office at
570.421.5093.
Meal and show packages are
available, as well as group
packages.
Shawnee
Playhouse
celebrates
Andrew
Sisters
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 3C
plays the piano and reads
stories from his own book,
“20 Reasons to Kiss a Frog.”
His stories are mostly
about God and Jesus. They
also teach people how to
become better human beings.
“We’re all human beings,”
said Clazzy. “We have more
in common than we do dif-
ferent.”
Clazzy will also play a
wind machine called the
WX5, which can make 250
different sounds.
This year, Clazzy and
Cring are doing a Stop the
Meanness Tour, in which
they hope to inspire people
to stop yelling and start lis-
tening.
RANSOM - People coming
to the Countryside Commu-
nity United Methodist
Church Friday evening are in
for an hour of music and
humor.
They will also get the op-
portunity to listen to spiritu-
al stories, which teaches
people to respect one anoth-
er. Music will be played and
stories will be read out loud.
Best of all, the entertainment
is free.
Musician/conductor Janet
Clazzy and author/humorist
Jonathan Richard Cring, who
have been performing to-
gether for 15 years, will be
the ones entertaining at
Church in Ransom on Aug.
26 at 7 p.m.
This will be their first
appearance in the Abington
area.
The duo will perform their
program called SpiriTed.
Clazzy, who has a master’s
degree in oboe and orchestra
conducting, will accompany
Cring on the oboe while he
“It’s silly to say ‘God bless
America’ if we refuse to
bless each other,” said Cring.
In 1980, Clazzy was an
oboist in the Shreveport
Symphony in Shreveport,
La., and taught at Centenary
College. Cring was a profes-
sor at a Bible college in the
same town during the same
year. They met in 1981 at a
musical that Jonathan had
written himself.
Clazzy wrote original
scores for Cring’s projects.
From 1982-1996, they went
their separate ways and pur-
sued their careers. Janet
played in symphonies in
Houston, Santa Cruz, San
Jose, while living in Oak
Ridge, Tenn.
Cring traveled around the
country to be an advisor and
screenwriter for 13 .
In 1996, Clazzy moved to
Nashville, Tennessee, where
Cring was living with his
family. Clazzy called when
he was writing his first
book, “I’m...the legend of
the son of man.” Cring’s
publisher wanted him to
travel on a book tour. He
decided to read and play
music. That’s when they
became partners in music
and books. They now live in
Henderson, Tenn.
The two are excited to
come to perform at the
Countryside Community
UMC.
“I can’t wait to come to
Clarks Summit,” Clazzy
said. “Anyone who comes to
the show is going to laugh
because Jonathan is so fun-
ny. It’s an hour, it’s free, and
it’s fun.”
Countryside Community
UMC is glad that we will
put on a show for them.
“We’re very excited that they
are coming,” said Pastor J.P.
Duncan. “They have a won-
derful program addressing
issues of peace and non-
violence. It will be inspira-
tional.”
SpiriTed music and humor
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Musician/conductor Janet Clazzy and author/humorist Jonathan Ri-
chard Cring, shown above, will present SpiriTed at the Countryside
Community United Methodist Church Aug. 26.
BY BEN FREDA
Abington Journal Correspondent
Want to go?
What: SpiriTed by Janet Clazzy and Jonathan Richard Crings
Where: Countryside Community UMC, 14001 Church Hill
Road, Clarks Summit, PA 18411
When: August 26 at 7 p.m.
Cost: Free
Taiwan, the Republic of
China, is a land known for
both its natural and cultural
diversity, ranging from vast
mountains and forests to
bustling cities and traditional
arts. The works of four Tai-
wanese photographers show
why their home cannot truly
be represented by words
alone.
The University of Scran-
ton’s Hope Horn Gallery will
present “Taiwan Sublime:
Four Photography Masters’
Visions of the Treasure Is-
land” from Sept. 12 to Oct. 7.
Dr. Darlene Miller-Lan-
ning, Ph.D., director of The
Hope Horn Gallery, said the
exhibit will consist of four
different series that each
displays a distinct aspect of
Taiwan.
“All of the photographers
featured give a different view
of Taiwan,” Dr. Miller-Lan-
ning said. “When the series
are shown together, you get a
complete view of the life and
landscapes of Taiwan.”
Chi Po-lin’s “In Soaring –
An Elevated Vision of Nat-
ural Taiwan” gives an aerial
view of Taiwan’s landscape,
including its mountains,
coastlines, and waterways.
Liu Chen-hsiang’s “In Pas-
sion – Heavenly Feast of the
Performing Arts” displays
dramatic shots of Taiwan’s
modern and traditional forms
of dance and other perform-
ing arts.
Huang Ting-sheng’s “In
Folkways – Melding the
Mundane and the Celestial”
reveals everyday life in Tai-
wan.
Chen Chih-hsiung’s “In
Interfaces – Rhythms of Na-
ture and Humanity” shows
the contemporary, built land-
scapes and buildings of Tai-
wan.
Jeremy Hu, co-founder and
curator of the Works Gallery
in New York, N.Y., will give
a lecture on “Taiwan Sub-
lime” at Brennan Hall on
Oct. 7, from 5 to 6 p.m.,
followed by a public recep-
tion at The Hope Horn Gal-
lery, from 6 to 8 p.m., as part
of downtown Scranton’s First
Friday.
In addition, The Hope
Horn Gallery is offering ink
wash workshops based on
“Taiwan Sublime: Four Pho-
tography Masters’ Visions of
the Treasure Island.” Partici-
pants will use brush and ink
techniques to create simple
landscape drawings. School
and community groups may
call to schedule times.
In addition to the exhibit,
the University will host an
Interdependence Day and
Asian Moon Festival Per-
formance by the internation-
ally acclaimed Chai Found
Music Workshop Ensemble
on Sept. 11, at 3 p.m.
The performance, which is
free of charge and open to
the public, will take place in
the Houlihan-McLean Cen-
ter. The ensemble will also
conduct an educational work-
shop for area elementary and
high school students on Sept.
12, at 1 p.m.
The workshop is free of
charge, however reservations
are required to attend and
can be made by calling
570.941.4094.
The Hope Horn Gallery,
located on the fourth floor of
Hyland Hall, is open Sunday
through Friday from noon to
4 p.m. and Wednesdays from
6 to 8 p.m.
For additional information,
contact The Hope Horn Gal-
lery at 570.941.4214.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Liu Chen-hsiang’s ’Creative Space. Cloud Gate Dance Theatre – White’ will be among the pieces featured in ‘Taiwan Sublime: Four Photog-
raphy Masters’ Visions of the Treasure Island.’ The four photography series displaying the life and landscapes of Taiwan will be on display in
The Hope Horn Gallery from Sept. 12 to Oct. 7.
Taiwanese photographers
featured in University of
Scranton art exhibit
be so again this year. Several
of the organization’s key ser-
vices have been threatened
with funding cuts. The dance
will certainly help offset
those cuts and help local resi-
dents.
This year’s dance will bene-
fit Volunteers of America’s
Dial-A-Driver program, a
transportation service for the
elderly and disabled; the Car-
ing Alternatives Pantry for
low income mothers and ba-
bies; the Manna House for
homeless young adults; and a
program for low income fam-
ilies with young children.
For more information and
tickets, please call
570.825.5261.
After a five-year hiatus,
Volunteers of America’s
Square Dance and Polka Par-
ty has returned.
The event will be held on
Friday, Aug. 26 at the Irem
Temple Country Club in Dal-
las.
As in years past, former
Luzerne County Commis-
sioner Joseph “Red’ Jones
and Joe McKeown of Wilkes-
Barre along with the Polka
Dukes will be calling the
square dances while Eddie
Derwin and the Polka Nat-
urals will be providing the
polka music.
For Volunteers of America,
the dance was an important
fundraising event and it will
Volunteers of America
to host square dance
and polka party Aug. 26
WVIAPublic Media received
two nominations as the Mid-
Atlantic Chapter of the National
Academy of Television Arts and
Sciences has announced the
nominees for 29th Annual Mid-
Atlantic Emmy®Awards.
“ABucknell Candlelight
Christmas,” which premiered on
WVIATVon Monday, Dec. 20,
2010, has been nominated in the
outstanding Entertainment-
Program/Special category, while
WVIAProduction Manger, Ben
Payavis II received a Best Direc-
tor nomination for “ABucknell
Candlelight Christmas.”
ABucknell Candlelight
Christmas highlights the up-
lifting power of music as per-
formed by Bucknell Universi-
ty’s internationally renowned
undergraduate musical en-
sembles, the Rooke Chapel
Choir and Rooke Chapel Ring-
ers, under the direction of Wil-
liamPayn.
Adapted fromthe Service of
Nine Lessons and Carols of
King’s College, Cambridge, the
service takes place in Rooke
Chapel, a study in architectural
grace, on Bucknell’s campus.
This interdenominational
service features biblical read-
ings and traditional carols for
choir and congregation, in-
cluding “Hark! The Herald
Angels Sing,” “Joy to the
World” and “Stille Nacht (Silent
Night).”
A23-year veteran of the tele-
vision industry and graduate of
Kutztown University, Ben Paya-
vis II has served as production
manager for WVIA-TVsince
2005, where he produces and
directs a variety of television
programming including but not
limited to entertainment, sports,
live news events and public
affairs.
Throughout his career, Paya-
vis has received numerous
awards and honors for his work
including Gold and Silver AD-
DYand Telly awards. He has
also been cited for excellence in
his profession by the Pennsylva-
nia Association of Broadcasters
and PBS.
“It is an honor to be recog-
nized by the National Academy
of Television Arts and Sciences
for the work done here at
WVIA.,” said Thomas M. Cur-
rá, Executive Vice-President
and Executive Producer at
WVIAPublic Media.
“Our production teamlead by
Emmy®nominated director,
Ben Payavis II, along with
Bucknell University, produced a
programthat showcased the
musical talent of Bucknell stu-
dents regionally, but also nation-
ally as this programwas broad-
cast on PBSstations across the
country in high definition and
5.1surround-sound.”
WVIA receives 2
Mid-Atlantic Emmy®
Award nominations
C M Y K
PAGE 4C www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
“Light in
August,” is the
title of an
ongoing series
of three con-
versations
designed to
“shed light on
subjects of
both current
and enduring interest in a
friendly, informal setting.” If
you missed the first two pro-
grams presented by The Sche-
mel Forumat The University of
Scranton in partnership with
Pages &Places @Anthology,
mark your calendar for Thurs-
day, Aug. 25.
Jennifer Niles, founding
principal of “one of the most
successful charter schools in
the country,” the E.L. Haynes
Public Charter School in Wash-
ington, DC, will present “Pro-
file of a School that Works” to
be held at the Alley Kitchen &
Coffee House (Formerly Outra-
geous) located at 515 Center
St., Scranton.
According to matrix.scran-
ton.edu/academics/wml/sche-
mel/index.shtml, “The Schemel
Forumwas founded in July
2006 through generous gifts to
the Rev. George Schemel, S.J.,
Fund, created by friends of the
late Father Schemel in his lov-
ing memory to support cultural
enrichment and education in
the community.
The Schemel Forumat the
University grounds the pro-
gramin a solid academic base
to ensure its growth as an im-
portant community resource.
The spirit that created and
guides The Schemel Forum
reflects an energy and determi-
nation that bodes well for the
quality of life in the greater
Scranton area well into the
future.”
All Pages &Places @An-
thology events held three
Thursdays every month are
free. The schedule for the Au-
gust conversations is 6 to 7 p.m.
Happy Hour, 7 to 7:30 p.m.
Presentation with Closing
Drinks and Guided Discussion
at 7:30.
On Sept. 8 join Dr. Brian
Carso, Professor of History at
Misericordia University and
moderator of our panel called
“The Civil War, Slavery, and
Justice,” as he discusses the
work of the panelists, 2011
Pulitzer Prize-winner Eric Fon-
er and Lawrence Goldstone,
essentially previewing what
promises to be a very exciting
panel; Sept.15th: Rich Howells
will assemble and moderate a
discussion among NEPAblog-
gers, folks who most have their
finger on the pulse of the area’s
music, cultural, and political
scenes. Aline-up will be an-
nounced; Sept. 22: Nezka
Pfieffer, Curator at the Everhart
Museum, will present on the
work of another book festival
panelist, Nina Paley. On Tues-
day, September 20, join Bill
Black at the Abington Public
Library as he talks about the
vision behind Pages &Places
and introduces the 2011festival.
For more information regard-
ing the Thursday evening dis-
cussions, visit pagesandplace-
s.org.
Regarding the upcoming
festival on Saturday, Oct. 1, Bill
Black, co-director of Pages &
Places said, “This year’s line-up
is remarkable, truly world class,
featuring three MacArthur
"Genius grant" Fellows, this
year’s Pulitzer Prize-winner in
history, two National Book
Award nominees, a panel dedi-
cated to Scranton-born urban
theorist Jane Jacobs, who sin-
gle-handedly changed the way
the world thinks about cities,
and a panel dedicated to ‘Coal
Region Writers.’ The Book
Expo, including the publishers’
co-op, and the workshops are
coming along. The Kids Fest is
expanded and will be a great
place for kids to spend almost
the entire day.”
To learn more about the Kids
Fest, contact Julie Cohen jschu-
machercohen@hotmail.com.
Black added, “Newthis year
is a Civil War themed street fair
organized by the Lackawanna
County Library Systemin
partnership with the Everhart
and the Cultural Center. For
more on that, contact Mary
Garmat garm@albright.org at
LCLS.
Several events on the horizon
for Pages and Places Anthology
Jennifer Niles
BY JOAN MEAD MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
Join Kimberly McCul-
lough for dinner and a
movie.
McCullough will hold
the East coast debut of her
short film “Nice Guys
Finish Last” staring Da-
nielle Harris and Lexi
Ainsworth on August 28th
at Palazzo 53.
Pre registration is re-
quired. There are limited
tickets available. The cost
is $40 per person, which
includes a question & an-
swer with the actress, a
brief autograph session
and dinner. Dinner will
include a salad, pasta
course, entrée and soft
drink. There will be a cash
bar.
McCullough is an ac-
tress, dancer, and director.
She is best known for her
longtime role as Robin
Scorpio on the soap opera
General Hospital, a role
which she originated at the
age of seven, playing the
character from 1985-1996.
In 1996 she won a Day-
time Emmy for Outstand-
ing Younger Lead Actress
in a Drama Series. She has
continued to play the char-
acter off and on since.
She has had guest ap-
pearances on other prime
time television shows and
movies.
Tickets can be pur-
chased through PayPal at
this link: http://
www.jayayogastudio.com/
Jaya/Dinner_with_Kim-
berly.html
http://www.jayayogastu-
dio/
For more information
visit, www.jayayogastudio
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Kimberly McCullough will hold the
East coast debut of her short film
‘Nice Guys Finish Last’ on Aug.
28th at Palazzo 53.
General Hospital
actress debuts
film locally
seum in Philadelphia and
the International Museum
of Surgical Science in
Chicago. He also founded
the internationally recog-
nized, socially conscious
design and consulting
firm Another Limited
Rebellion.
In addition, Scalin
teaches a course on so-
cially conscious design at
Virginia Commonwealth
University. His first
book, Skulls, was honor-
ed by the New York Pub-
lic Library, named a “Top
Ten Quick Pick for Re-
luctant Teen Readers” by
the Young Adult Library
Services Association, and
was featured on The Mar-
tha Stewart Show. His
latest book, 365: A Daily
Creativity Journal, is
designed to help people
reap the benefits of mak-
ing a yearlong daily pro-
ject. His next book, Un-
stuck: 52 Ways to Get
(and Keep) Your Cre-
ativity Flowing, will be
published this November
by Voyageur Press.
The event is free and
open to the public but
seating is limited. Please
contact the Lackawanna
County Arts and Culture
Department at 570-963-
6590 x102 or artslacka-
wanna@gmail.com to
register.
The Lackawanna Coun-
ty Arts, Culture and Edu-
cation Council will pre-
sent the third annual
Wake Up with the Arts
Breakfast on Friday, Sept.
16 from 8:30 to 11 a.m. at
the Electric City Trolley
Museum, 300 Cliff St.,
Scranton, on the property
of the Steamtown Nation-
al Historic site.
The breakfast is an op-
portunity for artists, arts
organizations and others
interested in the arts to
hear from experts in the
field about various topics
concerning the arts and
culture sector. Local art-
ists will decorate the ta-
bles, and one of the coun-
ty’s performing arts
groups will be show-
cased.
This year’s speaker is
artist and author Noah
Scalin. Scalin will dis-
cuss the lessons and expe-
riences he gained working
on a year-long daily cre-
ative project and how
those lessons can be ap-
plied to art and life.
Scalin is a Richmond,
VA-based artist/designer/
activist and creator of the
Webby award-winning art
project Skull-A-Day. His
fine art has been exhib-
ited in museums and gal-
leries internationally,
including the Mütter Mu-
Lackawanna County
holds arts breakfast
The Scranton Plan, the in-
dustrial marketing arm of the
Greater Scranton Chamber of
Commerce, held its annual
Summer Festival at Glenmau-
ra National Golf Club, Moos-
ic.
The Scranton Plan, co-host-
ed by PPL Electric Utilities
and Woodloch Pines Resort,
welcomed more than 50 real
estate brokers, consultants and
site selection specialists from
neighboring states to a round
of golf at Glenmaura, fol-
lowed by dinner and a Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees
game at PNC Field.
The goal of the festival is to
introduce corporate executives
and real estate professionals
from neighboring states to the
quality of life and business
opportunities available in the
Greater Scranton area.
“The Summer Festival is
one of our most effective eco-
nomic development marketing
tools. We are able to showcase
our region’s opportunities and
our superior quality of life,”
said Chamber president, Aus-
tin J. Burke.
Since its inception, The
Scranton Plan has helped
more than 350 companies
relocate to Northeastern Penn-
sylvania and have assisted in
the creation of more than
42,000 jobs. They have also
worked with Chamber affil-
iates Lackawanna Industrial
Fund Enterprise (LIFE) and
the Scranton Lackawanna
Industrial Building Company
(SLIBCO) to develop 14 in-
dustrial, office and technology
parks, providing a real estate
investment of $637 million.
For more information, visit
www.scrantonplan.com or call
570.342.7711.
Scranton Plan hosts
summer festival
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Guests are pictured above enjoying Summer Fest held at Glenmaura
National Golf Club, followed by dinner and a Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
Yankees game at PNC Field.
The Oldest House in La-
ceyville, built in 1781, is in
need of a new roof. Part of
the fund raising effort in-
cludes a unique raffle of two
limited edition prints and
three specially handcrafted
18th Century reproduction
hunting tools created just for
this raffle.
Raffle tickets cost $2 each
and are available at the Wya-
lusing Chamber of Com-
merce office, DeRemer’s
Beauty Salon in Laceyville,
True Value Hardware in La-
ceyville, and People’s Bank
in Meshoppen. Tickets are
also available at The Oldest
House when it is open to the
public, Friday through Sun-
day between 1 to 4 p.m.
The House will be closed
for the roof renovations from
Aug. 22 through Sept. 8,
re-opening Sept. 9 with regu-
lar tour hours.
The raffle will conclude on
October 2 at the close of the
Muzzleloaders’ Rendezvous
event at the house at 4 p.m.,
and the drawing will be held
immediately. The top prize in
the raffle is a limited edition
giclée print by Andrew Knez,
Jr., titled ‘False Trail.’ It is
valued at over $300.
Prizes two through five are:
a handcrafted knife by Neil-
son; a powder horn hand-
crafted by Hove; a tomahawk
handcrafted by Simmers; and
‘The Abduction of John Tan-
ner’ a limited edition print by
Knez.
The cost of the new roof is
about $26,000; cedar shingles
must be used because of the
historical importance of the
house. Roofers who are certi-
fied by the National Shake
and Shingle Board have been
selected to install the new
roof, which will also be put
on with correct ventilation,
spacing and insulation.
To date, $16,200 has been
raised by the all-volunteer
staff of the Oldest House,
which means only $9800 is
still needed. A $10,000 grant
from Chesapeake helped
push the fundraising efforts
over the hurdle.
“We’ve been raising money
for over a year,” notes Debbie
Stevens, second vice presi-
dent of the Oldest House
Historical Society. “With the
help of Chesapeake and our
community we have passed
the half way mark and are
now at 62% of our goal.”
The staff at the Oldest
House hopes that sales of
raffle tickets will get them
that much closer to raising all
the money needed for the
roof.
“It’s rare to get a chance to
bid on artwork like this, and
handcrafted items like these,”
comments OHHS Member
Robin Robinson, who is in
charge of the raffle and who
is organizing the Muzzleload-
ers’ Rendezvous.
For more information on
the raffle, call 570.869.1426
or 570.869.1679.
PHOTO SUBMITTED
This photo, ‘False Trail’ Limited Edition Giclée by Andrew Knez Jr. is the
first prize in the raffle.
Wyoming County antique shop to hold raffle
Mount Airy Casino Resort
will host a Labor Day Week-
end filled with activities for
every age from Friday to
Monday, Sept. 2 to 5.
The weekend’s events are
all free to the public .
Mount Airy kicks off the
weekend with its “Movie
Under the Stars” series,
featuring the musical Grease
beginning at 8:30 p.m. on
Friday, outside by the lake-
side Cabana Bar.
Guests of Mount Airy are
invited to step outside to
watch a fireworks show set
to music that will begin at 9
p.m. on Saturday.
Guests will be treated to
the music of “Bad Med-
icine,” a Bon Jovi tribute
band which will be playing
from 6 to 8 p.m. on Sunday.
Wrapping up the last offi-
cial weekend of summer,
Mount Airy will host a La-
bor Day Barbecue from
noon to 7 p.m. in the out-
door Cabana Bar area on
Monday. The first 2,000
attendees will receive a free
Mount Airy T-shirt. The
barbecue will feature food
and drinks for sale as well as
a hot dog eating contest and
carnival games. Amongst
the games will be a dunk
tank for charity with all the
proceeds going to Friend-
ship House.
Live music will be per-
formed by the Melanie Rice
Orchestra.
Mount Airy plans
Labor Day events
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 5C
Happy Birthday
Clarks Summit!
Miles Auto Parts
300 Bedford Street
587-1158
Established 1932
NOW THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6
*Available on approved credit to qualified customers through Lexus Financial Services and participating Lexus dealers on a new 2011
IS 250 AWD, 2011 RX350 AWD and 2011 ES 350. Not all customers will qualify. Offer based on MSRP of $38,220 for IS 250 AWD,
$45,812 for RX350 AWD and $38,995 for ES 350, including delivery, processing and handling. 36 monthly payments total $12,205
for IS 250 AWD, $16,531 for RX350 AWD and $14,016 for ES 350. Monthly payment may vary depending on final price of vehicle &
your qualifications. You pay maintenance, insurance, excess wear & tear & $0.25 per mile over 10,000 per year. Lease-end purchase
option price $23,696 for IS 250 AWD, $27,487 for RX350 AWD and $23,007 for ES 350 plus taxes & fees. See dealer for lease
program details. Must take delivery by 9/6/11. This offer is available in the Lexus Eastern Area. †Offers available on approved credit to
qualified customers through participating Lexus dealers and Lexus Financial Services on a new 2011 IS 250, 2011 IS 350, 2011 RX350
and 2011 ES 350. Only a limited number of customers will qualify for advertised APR. No down payment required if qualified. Must take
delivery from available dealer stock by 9/6/11. See your local participating dealer for other finance program limits, qualifications and
terms. Lexus Financial Services is a service mark of Toyota Motor Credit Corporation. Vehicles shown with optional equipment. Lexus
reminds you to wear seatbelts, secure children in rear seat, obey all traffic laws and drive responsibly. ©2011 Lexus.
1. 9%APRFinancing up to 60months / Monthly Payments of $17.92per $1,000Financed

FI NANCE
$
459/mo. 36mos. *
$
3,934
due at
signing*
$
389/mo. 36mos. *
$
3,789
due at
signing*
$
339/mo. 36mos. *
$
3,914
due at
signing*
2011 RX 350AWD 2011 IS 250AWD 2011 ES 350
LEASE
Excludes official fees, taxes and dealer charges. No security deposit required.
MOTORWORLD LEXUS
150Motor World Drive, Wilkes-Barre
(570) 829-3500
L E XUS . COM
August 7, 2011 was a
banner day for our li-
brary!
Thanks to co-chairs,
Lorraine Daniels and He-
len Smetana, many of
our supporters enjoyed a
wonderful afternoon at
Maiolatesi’s for a glass a
wine and the chance to
sample some spectacular
hors d’oeuvres.
What a unique way to
learn about a new wine
or two, sample food from
local restaurants, enjoy
friends, make some new
ones and at the same
time, raise funds for our
library.
Sal Maiolatesi, our gra-
cious host, provided the
venue – a lovely deck
featuring gorgeous scen-
ery and most comfortable
tasting room featuring a
wide selection of wines.
And the hors d’oeuvres
were ever so tasty.
Many thanks to The
Dalton Country Store,
Newsies, Patsel’s, The
Terrace Cafe at Graystone
Gardens and the New
Century Buffet for your
contribution to such a
remarkable afternoon.
Those who attended are
hoping for a repeat per-
formance next summer.
Without a doubt, events
such as the one held at
Maiolatesi’s are important
to maintain an active li-
brary.
And we’ve quite had an
active summer this year.
The Summer Reading
Program served 48
youngsters, babes to age
11, and ten young adults,
ages 12 to 18, who to-
gether read a total of
700 books. The grand
finale of the program
was held on Tues., Au-
gust 2 at the Streamside
Park when Drumming
with Deerheart was the
major event.
McGrath’s Pub and Eat-
ery supplied pizza and
wings for those attend-
ing, a wonderful treat,
indeed. Thanks,
McGrath’s; you’ve always
been a loyal supporter of
our library.
The traditional “design
a bookmark contest” was
also held this summer.
Nine year old Mia Fam-
iletti won and her book-
mark will be on display
and will also be used for
our library’s bookmark
throughout the year.
The annual “Battle of
the Books,” with contes-
tants, Lili Martin, Car-
olyn Mack and Heidi
Davis, representing Dal-
ton, was held at the
Steamtown Mall on Au-
gust 18. Since this article
is being written on Au-
gust 15th, prior to my
being away, I’d love to
predict the results, but
can’t. So check at the
library to see how our
team did.
There’s a brand new
activity that started on
August 15 scrapbooking.
Shalom Lopez and Sherry
Hammaker are conducting
three workshops to help
you create your own
scrapbook. They occur
August 15, 22, and 29
from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
You’ll need to bring
your own materials and
they will help you tackle
this project so that you’ll
be able to complete a
lovely scrapbook.
If there’s enough in-
terest, they may be able
to provide more classes
in the fall.
If you have any ques-
tions about these classes,
please call Janet Geeza at
570.563.2014.
September brings a
most exciting event.
Our library is participa-
ting in Interdependence
Day (see www.interde-
pendencedaynepa.org) and
our program will be on
Tuesday, September 13.
Interdependence Day
began on September 12,
2003, a date selected to
both reflect on the trage-
dy of September 11 and
also to acknowledge our
interdependence. It’s a
call to create civility and
understanding as we work
towards creating a world
where we can all work
together.
The celebration will be
held in Scranton Sept. 12
at the Scranton Cultural
Center (see www.interde-
pendencedaynepa.org) and
will feature Patrice Brou-
deur, Associate Professor
and Canada Research
Chair on Islam, Plural-
ism, and Globalization at
the University of Mon-
treal, Canada.
We’ll participate Sept.13
at 5 p.m., when our li-
brary will show the film,
“Animating the Golden
Rule."
The film where teenag-
ers “explore ways of em-
bodying the cored values
of ’The Golden Rule.’”
Since the film features
art, music, rap, and dra-
ma skits, it should appeal
to all ages. The movie
will be followed by a
discussion and we hope
many of you will come –
with your families.
September will also
feature the beginning of
the Fall Reading Program,
Kreative Kids, and story
hour. Check the library
web site, watch for post-
ers in the library and/or
ask the libraries for the
exact dates.
Saturday Spotlight will
resume on Sept 24 at
10:30 a.m. The first book
of this year’s series is
“The House at the Corner
of Bitter and Sweet” by
Jamie Ford.
And as you library reg-
ulars know, MahJong ev-
ery Monday at 10:30
a.m., Bridge every Tues-
day at 10:30 a.m. and
Conscious Conversations
every Tuesday at 5 p.m.
still continue.
And yes, we’re still
looking for Euchre play-
ers.
We have an instructor
who’s anxious to spread
the fun.
Stop by the library and
bring a friend. You’ll be
amazed at how busy our
little library is. And as
you walk towards the
door, make sure you take
note of the lovely garden
and flower boxes, all cre-
ated and tended by the
Friends of the Dalton
Community Library.
Thanks to all the volun-
teers!
Until September, enjoy
the last days of summer
and don’t forget to wish
all the kids and teachers
a great new year at
school.
Dalton Library
Delights
with Mary Keenan
Hart
Ending summer on a high note
Mary Keenan Hart is chairperson of
the Friends of the Dalton Community
Library. Reach her or the library
staff with questions at 570.563.2014
or visit www.lclshome.org/dalton.
wolf, or “lon” lurking
about. But when there is a
knock on the door late at
night, is it their po po – or
is it really an evil lon po po
instead? To find out, join
us for free performances at
the Dietrich on Friday, Sep-
tember 9 at 10 a.m. and
1:30 p.m., and Saturday,
September 10 at 11 a.m.
Jennifer Jenkins has done a
beautiful job of adapting
this folktale for the stage.
Her plays are so inter-
active, and I think it’s great
that children can learn
about different cultures
through live theater. This
play has been sponsored by
the Pennsylvania Human-
ities Council.
For those of you who are
excited about the Dietrich’s
Fall Film Festival, the en-
tire slate of 16 movies and
their show times are now
available on our website,
www.dietrichtheater.com.
For opening night this
year, we will be celebrating
the festival Oktoberfest
style. So gather up your
friends and join us for
food, film, beer, wine, and
good fun. Nimble Hill
Brewing Company will be
offering samples of their
new beer that will be re-
leased in 2012, plus we will
have other microbrews
available.
Food will be provided by
Epicurean Delight, Seasons
Restaurant, Twigs Restau-
rant & Café and the Fire-
place Restaurant, and wine
will be supplied by Nimble
Hill Vineyard and Winery.
We will be showing the
acclaimed films “Begin-
ners” and “Midnight in
Paris” that evening. Plus
Epicurean Delight will
once again “wow” us with
an incredible dessert
spread.
Tickets to opening night
are $35 each and can be
reserved by calling
570.996.1500. You can’t
beat that price for a full
evening of food, film and
fun.
As you can see, the Die-
trich is so much more than
the movies!
DIETRICH
Continued from Page 1
Erica Rogler is a staff member of the
Dietrich theater
dio@gmail.com.
Drawing Social, AfA Gal-
lery, 514 Lackawanna Ave.,
Scranton every Sunday, 6 to 9
p.m., Cost: $5 general, $2 stu-
dent
BYOB (Bring Your Own
BOSU), Mondays and
Wednesdays, 5 p.m. at Every-
thing Natural, Clarks Summit.
Instructor: Kevin Rail. Cost:
$10 per class; $70 for 8 weeks.
Info: 570.498.7885
Hatha Yoga, Mondays, 9:30
a.m. and Thursdays, 9 a.m. at
Everything Natural in Clarks
Summit, Instructor: Nora Fox,
Cost: $12 per class. Info:
570.498.7885
Hatha Yoga, Svaroopa
Style, Tuesdays, 9:30 a.m. and
6 p.m. and Saturdays, 10 a.m. at
Everything Natural in Clarks
Summit, Instructor: Barbara
Cohen. Cost: $15 per class;
$100 for 8 weeks. Info:
570.498.7885
Tarot Readings by Intuitive
Counselor, Rev. Whitney
Mulqueen, Thursdays, 6 to
9:30 p.m. at The Montrose Inn
in Montrose on Route 29. Cost:
$25 for 15 to 20 minutes. In-
fo:570.575.8649
CALENDAR
Continued from Page 1
C M Y K
PAGE 6C www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
ABINGTONHEIGHTS
Abington Heights High School
held its award ceremony for the
class of 2011 June 15 in the high
school auditorium. Among the
awards presented were plaques to
salutatorian Crystal Page and
valedictorian Neha Pancholy by
superintendent Dr. Michael Mahon.
Also announced at the ceremony
were the students who ranked in
the top ten percent of the graduat-
ing class. These students were
presented with gold tassels to be
worn at the graduation ceremony.
Those students included Ashley
Blasi, Julia Boccagno, Alexa Bolock,
Mary Brazill, Kathleen Calcerano,
Christine Colman, Adam Dec, Molly
Egan, Morgan Fayocavitz, Mag-
delena Fruehan, Sarah Gronsky,
Kelsey Hudak, Stephanie Lalos,
John Lenahan, Katelin McAndrew,
Tessa McMinn, Alexi Michaels,
Crystal Page, Neha Pancholy, Alex-
andra Pipcho, Marco Richione, Erin
Sanderson, Jessica Serrenti, Mi-
chael Smertz, Lara Sorokanich,
Rebecca Sproul, Michael Umerich,
and Ellen Wildner
Other awards were National
Merit Scholarship Finalist: Neha S.
Pancholy; National Achievement
Scholarship Finalist: Oladayo R.
Osuntokun; National Merit Scholar-
ship Commended Students: Kath-
leen L. Calcerano, John R. Lenahan,
Oladayo R. Osuntokun, Michael C.
Smertz, Lara Sorokanich, Stephen
Sorokanich, Christopher E. Vito;
Frank T. Dolbear Citizenship Award:
Matthew T. Sopinski; Life Science
Award: Ellen F. Smith; Physical
Science Award: Rebecca T. Sproul;
Environmental Science Award:
Kathleen L. Calcerano; Mathematics
Award: Alexandra B. Pipcho; English
Award: Neha S. Pancholy ; Social
Studies Awards: Daniel P. Brazill,
Mary Caroline Brazill, Matthew V.
Brazill; Spanish Award: Crystal E.
Page; German Award: Ellen M.
Wildner; French Award: Kathleen L.
Calcerano; Latin Award: Neha S.
Pancholy; Russian Award: Jessica
A. Rzeszewski; Photography
Awards: Rachel T. Burkey, Harold C.
Weinberger; Printing Award: Tyler
S. Powell; Orchestra Award: Ashley
L. Blasi; National Orchestra Award:
Katelin M. McAndrew; Director’s
Award: Julia A. Boccagno; Vocal
Award: Erica M. Kester, Crystal E.
Page; National Choral Award: Car-
oline E. Andrews ; Band Awards:
Joshua M. Caracappa, Tia Bird,
Kirsten Overholser; Masonry Award:
Mark D.VanNort; Computer Aided
Drafting Award: Jeffrey P. Roba;
Architectural Drafting Award: Kyle
L. Pangonis; Engineering Award:
Jeffrey P. Roba; Fine Arts Award:
Mary Katherine Crowley; Ceramics
Award: Julie A. Polovitch; 3D Art
Awards: Bradley S. Parry, Alexandra
M. Sebastian; Sculpture Awards:
Molly E. Egan, Roni M. Halloran;
Jewelry Award: Rachel L. Kontz;
Business Award: Michael C. Smertzl;
Future Business Leaders of Amer-
ica Award: Marina L. Pierre; Ac-
counting Award: Mathew L. Fiegle-
man; Family & Consumer Sciences
Award: Rachel M. Volpe ; Yearbook
Awards: Rachel S. Dennen, Alyssa
M. Termini; Community Classroom
Award: Christine A. Colman; Phys-
ical Education Awards: Justin A.
Klingman, Stephanie H. Lalos; Work
Experience Award: Amanda N. Fox;
Automotive Award: Matthew A.
Lehnert; SADD Service Awards:
Ashley L. Blasi; Scholastic Bowl
Awards: Adam R. Dec, Joseph P.
Lenahan, Neha S. Pancholy, Ste-
phen Sorokanich; Forensic Team
Awards: Kathleen L. Calcerano,
Kelly A. Foley, Anni Ling, Oladayo R.
Osuntokun; Mock Trial Awards:
Mary Caroline Brazill, Warren J.
Glynn; Student Council Leadership
Awards: Brittany P. Kazmierski,
Alyssa M. Termini; District II PIAA
Scholar/Athlete Awards: James L.
Fruehan, Sarah A. Gronsky; Comet
Athletic & Sportsmanship Awards:
Joetta A. Hashem, Justin A. Kling-
man; 2011 National High School
Powerlifting Champion: Kristine M.
Polizzano; Army Reserve National
Scholar/Athlete Awards: Stephanie
H. Lalos, Michael J. Umerich; Marine
Corps Scholastic Excellence
Awards: Adam R. Dec, Neha S.
Pancholy; Marine Corps Athletic
Excellence Awards: Karlie L. Jaeger,
Justin A. Klingman; Marine Corps
“Semper Fidelis” Music Excellence
Awards: Tia R. Bird, Alexander F.
Semidei; John Phillip Sousa Band
Award: Mark Murphy; Patrick Gil-
more Band Award: Kathleen L.
Calcerano; Abington Heights School
Board Award: Tara E. MacGregor
Kaplan University
Kaplan announces Summer 2011
online graduate Lori King from La
PlumeKing was awarded a Master
of Science degree in Higher Educa-
tion from Kaplan University, a
leader in higher education in-
novation. King’s accomplishment
was celebrated during a gradua-
tion ceremony Aug. 6 at the Arie
Crown Theater in Chicago.
Lakeland School District
The Lakeland School District
Parent Teacher Student Associ-
ation honored
Deseriee Martini with a $500
presented by Kip P. Nygren, school
president; Mary Kolessar, Dean of
Middle School; and William Davis,
Middle School Coordinator.
Those presented with awards
included two seventh graders:
Gabrielle Grossman of Shavertown,
who received the Charlotte M.
Sours Academic Achievement
Award, and Richard Hughes of
Mountain Top who received the
Charles Pfifferling, Sr. Memorial
Prize for best all-around seventh
grader.
Eighth-grade winners and their
awards were: Joseph Bailey,
Wilkes-Barre, The Marjorie Harvey
Smith Award (outstanding conduct,
blue team); Charlotte Brecher,
Mountain Top, The John G. Ruggles,
III Memorial Award (excellence in
creative writing); George Casey,
Jenkins Twp., The Dartt Edwards
Prize (sportsmanship); Corinne
Conyngham, Shavertown, The
William M. Powell Prize (loyalty and
school spirit); Atalia Dressler, The
Dean’s Award (all-around student
and school loyalty); Emily Gabriel,
Forty Fort, The Jane Pfifferling
Dimond Award (excellence in girls’
athletics); Nicholas Krawczeniuk,
Scranton, The Paul Kafrissen Me-
morial Computer Award; Michael
Kulick, Bear Creek Twp., The Mar-
jorie Harvey Smith Award (out-
standing conduct, white team) and
The Harold and Mollie Cruikshank
Award (service and character);
Sarah Kwiatek, Lake Ariel, The
Margaret M. Stack Memorial Award
(Latin) and The Wilkes-Barre Day
School Trustees Prize (best scho-
lastic performance of the year);
Malcolm Lumia, Dallas, The Kenneth
and Suzanne MacArthur Award
(excellence in boys’ athletics); Mary
Lundin, Clarks Summit, The Marga-
ret M. Stack Memorial Award
(French); Emily Mackesy, Shaver-
town, The Mary Mazzitelli Memorial
Music Leadership Award; Courtney
McCarthy, Dallas, The Mary Mazzi-
telli Memorial Music Leadership
Award; Madison Nardone, Shaver-
town, The Margaret M. Stack Me-
morial Award (Spanish); Meera
Patel, Laflin, The Peter Drapiewski
Memorial Prize (integrity and in-
tellectual promise); Gianna Plaksa,
Mountain Top, The Dartt Edwards
Prize (sportsmanship); Alexis Quick,
Shavertown, The Dean’s Award
(all-around student and school
loyalty); Adam Rinehouse, Shaver-
town, graduation speaker and The
Anna M. Olcott Award (scholarship
and conduct); Katherine Rogers,
Clarks Summit, The Anna M. Olcott
Award (scholarship and conduct);
pate in the M.D./PhD. program at
Thomas Jefferson University. She
is a graduate of Wyoming Area
Secondary Center, Exeter.
Redan was awarded the Amer-
ican Chemical Society Award. He
received a bachelor of science,
magna cum laude, in biochemistry.
Redan was a member of Phi Lamb-
da Upsilon and Theta Alpha Kappa
honor societies. He also participa-
ted in the Solar Scholars, the Sus-
tainability Club, the Chemistry
Journal Club and the Faculty-
Student Research Program. Re-
dan’s future plans are to be a
research scientist in the area of
human health.
UNIVERSITYOF
SCRANTON
The following area students
were inducted into honor societies
at the University of Scranton.
Omega Beta Sigma, the
women’s business honor
society
Nicole Jensen of Clarks Summit;
Caroline Swift of Clarks Summit
Phi Epsilon Kappa, a
national honor society
dedicated to service in
exercise science
Stephen Page of Clarks Summit,
an exercise science major.
Omicron Delta Epsilon,
an international honor
society in economics
David Campbell of Clarks Green.
National Education Hon-
or Society
Diane DeWitt of Lake Winola,
junior; Theresa Ann Plishka of
Clarks Summit, graduate student.
National Jesuit Honor
Society at Scranton
Shivani K. Vekaria of Clarks
Summit, senior majoring in biology;
Maureen Grady of Clarks Summit,
junior majoring in history; Michael
Le of South Abington Towns, junior
majoring in both biology and phi-
losophy; Marie L. Libassi of Dalton,
junior majoring in counseling;
Matthew Nealon of Clarks Summit,a
junior majoring in both accounting
and finance.
Advertising Honor So-
ciety
Siobhan McKenna of Clarks
Green, senior
Communication Honor
Society
Kara Cruciani of Clarks Summit,
senior.
National Health Prepro-
fessional Honor Society
Michael Bruno of Clarks Summit,
junior; Maria Durdach of Dalton,
sophomore .
Joseph-John Simons IV, Kingston,
The Marjorie Harvey Smith Award
(outstanding conduct, blue team)
and The John D. Hughes Memorial
Mathematics Award; Lia Sminkey,
Laurel Run, The Irma Meyer Award
(excellence in art); Ashlyn Smith,
Mountain Top, The Bessie G. At-
wood English Award; Madison
Sweitzer, Kingston, The Marjorie
Harvey Smith Award (outstanding
conduct, white team) and The
Karen Smulowitz Memorial Poetry
Prize; Kyra Zarnoski, Kingston, The
Dr. Sheldon H. Kluger Memorial
Science Award.
UNIVERSITYOF
SCRANTON
Rita Alexia DiLeo, Factoryville;
Maria Alexandria Gubbiotti, Falls;
and Benjamin William Redan, Tunk-
hannock; were among the 68 stu-
dents honored by The University of
Scranton during its undergraduate
Class Night ceremony. The Jesuit
university awarded outstanding
members of the Class of 2011 for
academic achievement and service.
DiLeo received the Student Life
Award, awarded to a graduating
senior who has worked diligently
to improve the quality of life at
The University of Scranton. She
earned a bachelor of arts, cum
laude, in philosophy. DiLeo was a
member of the Special Jesuit
Liberal Arts Honors Program. She
was an officer of Phi Sigma Tau
and Alpha Lambda Delta honor
societies. DiLeo has participated in
Student Government, serving as
president her senior year. She was
an Orientation Assistant, Presi-
dential Alumni Liaison, led the
freshman in Reflective Service
Together program and volunteered
at St. Joseph’s Center. DiLeo will
begin teaching in Baltimore, MD, in
the Teach for America program
after graduation.
Gubbiotti was recipient ex aequo
of the Excellence in Biochemistry,
Cell and Molecular Biology Award.
She earned a bachelor of science,
summa cum laude, in biochemistry,
cell and molecular biology. She
was the recipient of a Goldwater
scholarship. Gubbiotti was a mem-
ber of the Honors Program. She
was vice-president of for Phi Lamb-
da Upsilon and Alpha Sigma Nu and
a member of Alpha Epsilon Delta
and Alpha Lambda Delta honor
societies. She served as secretary
for the Health Professions Orga-
nization, participated in the Bio-
chemistry/Chemistry Club and was
named to "Who’s Who Among
Students in American Colleges and
Universities." Gubbiotti will partici-
scholarship for winning an essay
contest.
Martini had to write two essays
to qualify for the scholarship.
Susquehanna County
Career &Technology Cen-
ter
At a breakfast buffet in Harris-
burg sponsored by the Pennsylva-
nia Association for Career & Tech-
nical Education (PA-ACTE), Gary
Fenton, Worksite Coordinator at
the Susquehanna County Career &
Technology Center (SCCTC), re-
ceived his certificate for ‘Out-
standing New Career & Technical
Education Teacher’.
Fenton was recognized in June
at the Pennsylvania Career & Tech-
nical Education Conference (PAC-
TEC) Conference in Lancaster.
Fenton is the Worksite Coor-
dinator at the SCCTC working in
partnership with the Carpentry and
Electrical programs on building and
construction projects. He and the
Carpentry & Cabinetmaking and
Electrical, Plumbing & Heating
classes are currently working on
construction of a new pavilion on
the school campus along with a
third student-built house.
According to Dr. Alice M. Davis,
SCCTC Administrative Director, “Mr.
Fenton has been an outstanding
addition to our staff at the SCCTC.
The students are fortunate to
receive such real-world work expe-
rience from the pre-planning phase
to the finishing details.”
Wyoming Seminary
Sixteen students in Wyoming
Seminary Lower School’s seventh-
grade Latin program recently
received awards in the National
Latin Contest for Northeastern
Pennsylvania, held earlier this year.
They include: Stefan Olsen, Pitt-
ston; Richard Hughes, Mountain
Top; Andrew Alday, Mountain Top;
Gokulan Gnanendran, Clarks Sum-
mit; and Megan Obeid, Pittston.
Second row: Alexandra Zaloga,
Moosic; Megha Sarada, Dallas;
Emily Peairs, Clarks Summit; Ga-
brielle Grossman, Shavertown; Kira
Zack, Dupont. Third row: Mary
Lundin, Clarks Summit; Jody Karg,
Pittston; Katherine Paglia, Wilkes-
Barre; Dominique Coslett, Harveys
Lake; and Leana Pande, Shaver-
town. Absent from photo: Domin-
ique DiLeo, Moscow.
Wyoming Seminary
Wyoming Seminary presented
awards to 26 outstanding Lower
School students at the annual
eighth-grade graduation ceremony
held recently on the Lower School
campus in Forty Fort. Awards were
HONORS
The Inauguration ceremony
of Rev. Kevin P. Quinn, S.J. as
The University of Scranton’s
25th president will take place
Sept. 16, in the WilliamJ. By-
ron, S.J., Recreation Complex.
The ceremony, open to the pub-
lic, is part of a weeklong series
of events intended to introduce
the newpresident to the Uni-
versity’s constituents, both in
the greater Scranton region, as
well as among higher education
institutions in the nation.
The inauguration events be-
gin with ACelebration of Ser-
vice Sept. 9. During the day,
students, faculty and staff will
join Father Quinn to do commu-
nity service.
University employees and
their families will meet Father
Quinn at the University Picnic
Sept. 11, at the University’s
Retreat Center at Chapman
Lake. The event begins at 11
a.m. with a Mass in Remem-
brance of Sept. 11, 2001.
On Sept. 13, an Inauguration
Lecture entitled “AJesuit Per-
spective on Making Human
Rights and Religion Friends,
Not Foes” will be presented by
world-renowned human rights
attorney Rev. Frank Brennan,
S.J., professor of lawat the
Australian Catholic University
and chair of
the Australian
National Hu-
man Rights
Consultation
Committee.
The free Inau-
guration Lec-
ture, open to
the public,
begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Rev.
Bernard R. McIlhenny, S.J.,
Ballroomof the Patrick and
Margaret DeNaples Center.
Bishop Joseph C. Bambera of
the Diocese of Scranton will be
principal celebrant at the Inau-
guration Eucharist on Sept. 15,
at 4 p.m. in the Byron Recre-
ation Complex. Rev. Michael
McCarthy, executive director of
the Ignatian Center for Jesuit
Education at Santa Clara Uni-
versity, will serve as homilist.
The public is invited to attend
the liturgy.
The Inauguration Ceremony
will begin at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 16.
The University of Scranton
Performance Music Choral and
Instrumental Ensembles will
performan original composi-
tion by conductor, composer,
teacher and bassist Lawrence
Wolfe at the Inauguration Con-
cert Sept. 17, at 7:30 p.m. in the
Houlihan-McLean Center.
U of S plans
inauguration for
25th president
Rev. Kevin P.
Quinn, S.J.
M & T Bank principals recently presented Penn State Worthington Scran-
ton leadership with a $12,500 commitment to fund scholarships for students
pursuing a business degree and who reside in Lackawanna, Luzerne, or
Wyoming counties. Shown in photo are seated:Maria Russoniello, director of
development and Sandy Chickeletti, administrative vice president, M&T
Bank. Standing left to right are: Dr. Mary-Beth Krogh-Jespersen, chancellor;
Carmen F. Magistro, assistant vice president, business banking; Jim Mileski,
vice president, middle market lending and Patrick J. Sheridan, campus
advisory board and For the Future campaign committee member. The inau-
gural M & T Bank Scholarship will be awarded in the fall 2011semester.
M&T Bank funds scholarships
Wyoming Seminary, with campuses in Kingston and Forty Fort,
will begin its 168th year of classes at the end of August.The
Upper School in Kingston will register boarding and day students
on Aug. 27 and 28 for grades nine through 12 and postgraduate.
New students will participate in orientation activities on Saturday
and Sunday, and freshmen will attend a special Freshman Re-
treat on Sunday. On Aug. 29, a special opening-of-school convo-
cation service will be held at the Upper School. Wyoming Semi-
nary government president Renata O’Donnell ’12 of Wilkes-Barre
will offer words of welcome and will ring the historic Cokesbury
bell 16 times, one for each decade of Wyoming Seminary’s exist-
ence, to usher in the new academic year. Rachel Bartron, a
member of the science faculty, will address the student body.The
Lower School, located in Forty Fort, will open for its first day of
classes on Aug. 30 with a convocation for students in fifth
through eighth grades. Orientation for new Lower School stu-
dents in grades 1-8 will be held on Aug. 29 from 10 a.m. to
noon, and an Open House for new and returning preschool,
pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students and their parents
will be held at the same time. Dr. Claire Smith Hornung, Dean of
Primary, announced that the opening convocation for primary
grades will be held on Aug. 31. She encourages all parents of
preschool, Pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students to attend
a Parents’ Back to School Night at 6 p.m. Aug. 26. A similar
Back to School Night for parents of children in first and second
grades will be held on Aug. 31 at 7 p.m., and for third and fourth
grades on Sept. 1 at 7 p.m. Will Davis, Interim Dean of Middle
School, encourages parents of middle-school students to attend
their orientation session on Sept. 6 at 7 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary
classes begin Aug. 29
Keystone College and MetroAction, a division of the Greater Scranton
Chamber of Commerce, recently hosted ’Marcellus Shale and Your Business,’
a seminar designed to help local businesses learn more about opportunities in
the Marcellus Shale region. Approximately 125 local business professionals
attended the event, held in Keystone’s Hibbard Campus Center. Participants in
the conference included: Fromleft: AdamDiaz, a Keystone graduate and
owner of Diaz Stone and Pallet; Janice Lobdell, Pennsylvania Independent Oil
and Gas Association; Debbie Bertha and Kristine Augustine, MetroAction; Fran
Calpin, Keystone College; Mike Narcavage, Chesapeake Energy Corporation.
Marcellus Shale seminar held
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 7C
7
0
4
5
5
0
Earth Camp, run by
Abington Area Joint
Recreational Board took
place August 2 -4, 9- 11
and 16 -18 at the Abing-
ton Area Community
Park on Winola Rd. in
Clarks Summit.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
Earth Camp participants pose with their fish print T-shirts. Row one, from left: Kiera Lucash,
Alison Kane, Tyler Blaum, Maura Jenkins, Taylor Messina, JP Habeeb, Timmy Habeeb. Row
two: Leah Byman, Jackie Cordaro, Ryan Sheffler, Trevor Sablan, Kate Coleman, Jordan Ash-
man, Jimmy McGurl, Matthan Sherman, Paxton Davis. Row three: Hollie Prescott, counselor
Maria Vietz, counselor Chris James and counselor Paul Devine.
At left: Instructor Colleen
Ayers of Burti Ceramics Studio
and Supply teaches Earth
Camp participants how to
make various types of pottery.
Shown, above left: From left:
Shanely McKeon, Ian Jewett
and Alex Kidwell work on
their pottery projects at
Earth Camp on August 3 at
the Abington Area Commu-
nity Park.
Creative
by
nature
The Dalton Fire Com-
pany Carnival was hosted
July 14-16 at the carnival
grounds on Bank Street
in Dalton. A parade was
held Friday July 15 and
featured the classic fire
engine shown here.
PHOTO SUBMITTED BY CATHERINE JANICHKO
Joe Janichko takes an antique engine out for a drive.
PHOTO SUBMITTED BY CATHERINE JANICHKO
Dalton Fire Co. Auxiliary Past Presidents Norma Sabol, Faye Kostelnik, Jean Naylor and Jean Skubla.
CLASSICS
in Dalton
Officials of The Common-
wealthMedical College
(TCMC) helda White Coat
Ceremonyfor its Class of 2015
Aug. 12at The MellowTheater
at Lackawanna College in
Scranton. Sixty-five medical
students admittedtoTCMC’s
thirdclass receivedtheir white
coats –a mantle of the medical
profession–ina hands-on
experience that symbolizes the
bondingprocess betweenphy-
sicianandpatient inthe pres-
ence of TCMCfacultyand
staff, familyandfriends.
Anaddress byLinda Tho-
mas-Hemak, MD, Director of
the PrimaryCare Internal Med-
icine Resi-
dencyPro-
gramat The
Wright Center
for Graduate
Education,
commemo-
ratedthe event
andreminded
physicians-in
trainingabout the importance
of compassionate care inthe
doctor-patient relationship. A
TCMCclinical facultymem-
ber, Dr. Thomas-Hemakserves
as SecretaryandStrategic
PlanningCommittee Chair and
is a foundingmember of the
Boardof Trustees.
TCMC holds White
Coat ceremony
Linda
Thomas-Hemak,
MD
The University of Scranton
students recently completed the
Scranton Emerging Leaders
program. The programfocuses
on communication, social
change and leadership style.
Corrine Wolff of Clarks Sum-
mit, a freshman; Emily Carpen-
ter of South Abington Town-
ship, a freshman; Kelsey Demp-
sey of South Abington Town-
ship, a junior; Courtney
Dempsey of Clarks Summit, a
junior; Jack Hambrose of South
Abington Township; a sopho-
more; Nicole Jensen of Clarks
Summit; a sophomore; Denise
Henry of Tunkhannock, a ju-
nior; completed the program.
Students
complete
program
C M Y K
PAGE 8C www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
Choose fromfamous names like Sony, Toshiba, Yamaha, Klipsch, Bose, Denon,
Infinity, Optoma, Pinnacle, NHT, or Acoustic Research.
Call for a free in home consultation, or visit our showroom.
1313 Wyoming Ave. Exeter PA 655-8811
1
9
7
8
3
5
Home Theatre Headquarters
• Guaranteed Lowest Price • Service after the sale
• Large selection of national name brands. • Complete on site installation
and explanation of operation.
Teens Get Fit for FREE!!
Programruns May 17-September 1
Two month FREE membership provides all day
access to the health club on weekends and
until 5pmon weekdays
Applies to persons ages 12-17
Personal Training is available but not included. Personal
Group Fitness classes are available at a discounted rate of
$10 for those enrolled in this program.
Last day to register is Aug. 15th
www.brownsgym.net
1000 S. State St, Clarks Summit
570-586-3481
Radiant Construction
Radiant Floor Heating • General Contracting • Free Estimates
Justin Dixon - BS in Mechanical Engineering from RIT
(570) 241-4790
5 Years Experience
Summit Square, Clarks Summit
Permanent Hours:
Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. • Sunday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.
We guarantee accuracy • Computerized
Prescription Filling • Patient Profile
We honor all major prescription plans
including CVS, Caremark, Medco, Aetna,
Geisinger and Express Scripts
587-4717
COSTA DRUGS
Happy 100th Birthday
Clarks Summit From
206 Depot Street • Clarks Summit
Classical Ballet • Stylized Tap • Free-Style
Pre-Ballet/Tap - Tots through professional
Joan L. Manze DMA, ITA, ASCAP
Director/ Choreographer- Professional Certification USA & UK
Our own proven method since 1951
Adult Classes • Professional Private Lessons
New season begins Wednesday September 7th
Limited Openings• 586-4322
Get to Know
TOM BROGAN
Abington Heights School District at Large
Where:
Clarks Summit Fire Hall,
Bedford St.
When: August 27, 2011
Time: 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Contributions Accepted
• Bouncy House for the Kids
• Face Painting • Refreshments
Paid for by Committee To Elect Tom Brogan
Members of Penn State Worthington Scranton’s Community Service
Club held “Love the Furry Friends” fundraisers for the animals at Griffin
Pond Animal Shelter. Through the sale of home-baked dog biscuits and
a donation drive for needed items, students raised $645 and collected
350 pounds of food and 100 pounds of cat litter.
Shown above, in front, from left: student organizer, Heather Konrad
and Warren Reed, Griffin Pond Animal Shelter director with Annie. In
back: Amy Smith, Stephanie Ficarro, Jeff Smith, Amanda Smith, Dr.
Matthew Mutchler, PSWS professor and club advisor; Angela Capone,
Janice Warner and David Ecker.
Penn State Worthington
Scranton students hold
animal shelter fundraisers
Abington Heights High School students Charles Jie (12th grade)
and Shomik Ghosh (11th grade) qualified for and competed in the
NCFL Grand National Speech and Debate Tournament in Washing-
ton, DC. Both students competed in the Congressional Debate
event.
Jie advanced as a national semifinalist, placing in the top 36 in
the country in Congressional Debate.
Ghosh placed at the top of his competition chamber in 2 out of 3
preliminary Congressional Debate sessions.
The team qualified 13 students to the PHSSL State Tournament
at Susquehanna University and two students to the NCFL Grand
National Tournament in Washington, DC.
Shown, from left, are Shomik Ghosh and Charles Jie.
AHHS students competed
in NCFL tournament
Lackawanna College students attended the Phi Beta Lambda
National Leadership Conference in Orlando, Fla. . PBL is a na-
tional organization for college students with an interest in lead-
ership and business. The award winners are as follows: Sean
Flood, 1st Place Award in Contemporary Sports Issues; Shawn
Solomon, 7th Place Award in Computer Concepts; Christine
Housley also competed in the National Leadership Conference in
Accounting Principles. Christine attained a 2nd Place Award in
Accounting Principles at the State Leadership Conference held in
Gettysburg in April.
Shown, from left: Shawn Solomon; Christine Housley; Sean
Flood
Lackawanna College
students receive National
Leadership awards
C M Y K
SPORTS
Clarks Summit, Pa. AUGUST 24 TO AUGUST 30, 2011 50¢
After earning a full schol-
arship to a prominent racing
school, a 16-year-old Clarks
Summit native has an oppor-
tunity to realize his dream.
Jerry Tunney never thought
he’d have an opportunity to
become a NASCAR driver
but after receiving a full
scholarship to Race 101 in
North Carolina Tunney can
take his career to the next
level.
“It was the most exciting
thing that has happened so
far in my career,” Tunney
said. “It opened up a door to
more opportunities and the
knowledge that I have
learned in the program to
take advantage of those op-
portunities and make them
work in my favor.”
At the age of nine, Tunney
started racing remote control
cars. His favorite track is the
LA Speedway in Lake Ariel.
“This is where I learned
most of what I know and
understand about car setup
and chassis adjustments,”
Tunney said.
After compiling more than
60 wins and five track cham-
pionships, Tunney moved on
to racing full size cars in
2010. He earned a Rookie of
the Year nomination at Five
Mile Point Speedway, which
is the sight of his favorite
race of his career.
“I led almost every lap and
fought side by side the last
10 laps to get the win,” Tun-
ney said. “It was a huge
milestone and really encour-
aged me to be better every
week.”
While working to better his
career, Tunney continues to
give back to the community.
“I feel this is very impor-
tant because I am encour-
aged by the community to
excel in racing,” Tunney
said. “I also enjoy the feel-
ing of knowing that you are
helping the place where you
spent a lot of time as a
child.”
Tunney donated one of his
authentic racing tires for a
silent auction Aug. 27 at the
Clarks Summit Centennial
Celebration, held in the ga-
rage of the borough building.
Proceeds benefit the Abing-
ton Community Library.
Tunney will also be at the
centennial with his car help-
ing veteran race car driver
Oscar Kovaleski with his
Kidracer program.
“Oscar is going to have a
race track set up at the cen-
tennial where any child can
get into an electric race car
and race against each other,”
Tunney said. “I will be
teaching the children about
the car, the rules of racing
and the driving line.”
Tunney is entering his
sophomore year at Scranton
Prep where he is on the
cross country and track
Summit resident shares love of racing
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTO/DON MCGLYNN
Jerry Tunney, shown above, recently received a full scholarship to Race 101 in North Carolina.
Need for speed
By Joe Baress
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Speed, Page 11
The season is in full swing for
the area’s high school tennis and
golf teams, who competed on Mon-
day, August 23.
Girls tennis
Abington Heights
Abington Heights defeated the
Buckhorns 4-1 at Wallenpaupack
High School.
Coming up with victories for the
Lady Comets were Courtney Os-
trowski over Annette Deutsch, 6-2,
6-0; Alexa Abdalla over Sarah
Lehman, 6-1, 6-3; Tyra Abdalla
over Kristen Nalesnik 6-1, 6-0 in
singles; and Alyssa Laubham and
Liz Archibald over Bree Neff and
Katie Wiest 6-4, 4-6, 6-4 in dou-
bles.
Golf
Abington Heights
Eric Monetlla won the individual
title at the Boltman Invitational
Tournament at State College with a
score of 72.
Alex Altier finished in third after
shooting a 76; Anthony Sebatianel-
li finished with a 78.
See Roundup, Page 11
High
School
Roundup
The Commonwealth Medical
College will host its third annual
golf tournament at Huntsville Golf
Club in Shavertown on Friday,
Sept. 23.
The Quandel Group, Inc. will
sponsor the event for the third con-
secutive year.
Proceeds will benef it the TCMC
student scholarship fund that will
help defer the cost of medical
school tuition.
Registration begins at 10:30 a.m.
followed by lunch and a shotgun
start at noon.
The captain and crew format is
limited to 128 golfers. The cost is
$300 per golfer or $1,200 for a
foursome and includes 18 holes of
golf with cart, greens fees, lunch,
refreshments, a golfer’s gift and
admission to the awards ceremony
and reception.
Sponsorships are available. For
more information, call
570.504.9619 or register online at
thecommonwealthmedical.com/
golf.
If you’re unable to participate and
would like to contribute, please
email Michael Walsh, Director of
Annual Giving and Special Events
at mwalsh@tcmedc.org.
From left: Michael J. Karcutskie, CMM, Vice
President, The Quandel Group; Gerald Tracy,
MD, TCMC Associate Dean for Regional
Campus Development – Scranton; Michael
Walsh, TCMC Director of Annual Giving and
Special Events.
TCMC Golf
Tournament
set for Sept. 23
Carl Danzig, head men’s
basketball coach at The Uni-
versity of Scranton, has an-
nounced that Kyle Ranck of
Lewisburg will join the Roy-
als for the upcoming 2011-
2012 season.
This past season, Ranck
was enrolled at Ithaca Col-
lege in Ithaca, NY and
played one season of base-
ball for the Bombers.
At Scranton, he will be a
sophomore academically
with four years of eligibility
remaining in basketball.
Ranck, a 6 foot 5 inch,
175-pound guard/forward,
averaged 15 points, six re-
bounds and four assists per
game in leading Lewisburg
High School to a 17-10 re-
cord in 2010.
For his efforts, he landed
first-team all-conference
honors. As a junior, he
picked up second-team all-
conference honors averaging
12 points, five rebounds and
three assists per game.
Ranck also saw action as a
sophomore, averaging seven
points, three rebounds and
three assists per game. “I’m
thrilled to welcome Kyle to
our program,” said Danzig.
“He will definitely help us at
the big guard/small forward
position with his ability to
play inside and outside. He
wraps us a solid recruiting
year for us, and I look for-
ward to working with him
and our other newcomers as
we get ready for what ap-
pears to be another exciting
year in the Landmark Con-
ference.”
Ranck joins a Royal men’s
basketball program coming
off its third Landmark Con-
ference title and third NCAA
tournament appearance in
the past four years.
During Danzig’s tenure at
head coach, Scranton is 179-
91 (.663), including five
conference titles and five
NCAA tournament appear-
ances.
Kyle is the son of Craig
and Kathy Ranck of Lewis-
burg. He plans to major in
criminal justice.
Royals
announce
addition
to roster
MOUNT COBB – Some
golfers can put up im-
pressive scores when
they execute enough
risky shots and at the
same time manage to
avoid trouble.
Abington Heights
coach Mike Williams
thought his players were
capable of posting solid
numbers without having
to take the risks.
The Comets proved
their coach correct while
pulling away for a 10-
stroke victory over de-
fending champion Scran-
ton Prep Friday in the
season-opening Jackman
Memorial Tournament at
Scranton Municipal Golf
Course.
“On the way here to-
day, I said to the kids, ‘if
we can put up four
scores under 76, we can
win this thing’ – some-
thing between even par
and 76 and that’s what
we did,” Williams said.
“We talked as a team
about playing for pars all
day long. No heroic
shots; just fairways and
greens. Take your two
putts.
“ … The kids are call
capable of shooting in
the 70s.”
Senior Dalton Cold-
water put up pars on all
but two holes and shot
even-par, 72 before win-
ning the individual title
with a bogey on the first
playoff hole.
“This was hands down,
the best golf I’ve
played,” Coldwater said
after topping the 123-
player field for his first
win.
Coldwater hit his ap-
proach to six feet and
made the birdie putt on
the par-5 13th. After his
only bogey at 17, he fin-
ished the round, which
had a shot gun start, with
seven straight pars.
“I came in wanting to
play for the team,” Cold-
water said. “We like to
win as a team. Whatever
else is extra.”
The team win came
with the help of a 74 by
Eric Montella and 75s by
Alex Altier and Anthony
Sebastianelli.
The tournament uses
the top four scores out of
the six-player lineup to
create the team score.
The Comets also showed
depth for the upcoming
season when Jamie Egan
shot 80 and Will Swisher
shot 86 although they
were not part of the team
total.
Abington Heights won
with 296 while Scranton
Prep shot 306 and North
Pocono 307. Dunmore
was fourth with a 317.
Lakeland, the top fin-
isher among Lackawanna
League Northern Divi-
sion teams, tied River-
side for fifth out of 21
teams with 321.
Lackawanna Trail tied
for 17th with 390.
The top two in each
class received trophies.
Three Abington
Heights players picked
up awards along with one
from Scranton Prep.
Because Coldwater
claimed the overall
championship, Old
Forge’s Corey Palma took
the award for top senior
after losing to him in the
playoff.
North Pocono’s Ken
Sames recovered from a
triple-bogey start to fin-
ish at 73 for a tie for
third overall and second
place among seniors. He
Comets dethrone Cavaliers at Jackman Memorial
BY TOMROBINSON
Journal Sports Correspondent
PHOTO SUBMITTED
The Abington Heights Golf Team won the Jackman Golf Tourna-
ment with a score of 296. Dalton Coldwater won the individual
tournament on the first playoff hole after a 2-way tie at 72. In the
picture are Alex Altier, Will Swisher, Dalton Coldwater, Coach Mike
Williams, Eric Montella, Anthony Sebastianelli and Jamie Egan.
See Jackman, Page 11
C M Y K
PAGE 10C www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
2
8
3
3
1
1
3400 N. Main Ave, SCRANTON
www.ToyotaScionofScranton.com
34444400 00 00 00 00 00 00 NNNNNN..... Ma Ma Ma Ma Ma MM in in in in in in AAAAAAAve ve ve ve ve ve ve,,,,,,,,, SC SC SC SC SC SC CRA RA RA RA RA RANT NT NT NT NT NT NTON ON ON ON ON ON O
ooofffffffffffSSSSSSSSSSScccrrraannntttttttooonn cccooommm
570-489-7584
We Make The Difference!
In 2009 and 2010, Toyota Scion of Scranton was recognized with
the prestigious President’s Award for excellence in each of a
series of categories, including Customer Sales Satisfaction and
Customer Service Satisfaction.
3
www ToyotaScion
3
n
W
*All offers end close of business Wednesday, August 31, 2011 or while supplies last. All offers exclude 1st payment, tax, tags, $125 processing
fee and $650 acquisition fee on lease offers. Quantities as of 08/15/2011. †Finance and lease offers require tier 1 plus credit approval through
Toyota Financial Services. All leases are based on 12,000 miles per year. No security deposit required for all leases. Available unit counts
include both in stock and incoming units for all model years and trim levels for series described. **Cash Back offers includes funds from
Toyota of Scranton, Toyota Financial Services and Toyota Motor Sales combined. Vehicle must be in stock units --- Prior sales excluded.
Customer must present ad at time of purchase. Camry cash back, APR and lease contracts must finance or lease through Toyota Financial
Services. Tundra cash back and APR offer must finance through Toyota Financial Services. See dealer for details. 2011 Impact Advertising
11TSS-EVC-ABJ082411
2011 CAMRY LE
NEW
Model #2532 Stock# 40602 MSRP: $23,060
2011 RAV4 AWD
NEW
Model #4432 Stock# 42584 MSRP: $24,584
$
199
per mo. for 36 mos. lease with $1,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
4
.9%APR
$
1,000
for 60
mos.†
Total
Cash Back
**
$
1,000
OR WITH
OR
Total
Cash Back
**
37
AVAILABLE
The Summer’s Best Selection.
The Year’s Biggest Deals.
Over 395 Toyotas Available!
With EXCEPTIONAL Inventory,
Selection, Price, Quality & SAVINGS
WHY GO
ANYWHEREELSE?
2011 CAMRY LE 2011 CAMRY LE
NEW
Model #2532 Stock# 40602 MSRP: $23,060
One of Pennsylvania’s
largest inventories of
Toyotas
Over 100 certified
employees dedicated
to serving you
60,000 square-foot
brand-newstate-of-
the-art facility
Brandnewenvironmentally
friendlyToyotaCertified
collisioncenter
Luxury customer lounge with
Wi-Fi andflat screenTVs for
your comfort
ONLY Dunkin’ Donuts in a
Toyota Dealership in the
United States
2011 CAMRY LE
NEW
Model #2532 Stock# 40602 MSRP: $23,060
0
%APR
$
1,500
for 60
mos.†
Total
Cash Back
**
$
2,500
OR WITH
OR
Total
Cash Back
**
$
149
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $1,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
209
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
73
AVAILABLE
2011 COROLLA LE
NEW
Model #1838 Incoming Unit MSRP: $18,560
1
.9%APR
$
500
for 60
mos.†
Total
Cash Back
**
$
1,250
OR WITH
OR
Total
Cash Back
**
$
149
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $1,999 down
*
LOWPAYMENT!
$
209
per mo. for 36 mos.
lease with $0 down
*
NODOWN PAYMENT!
57
AVAILABLE
2011 TUNDRA
DOUBLE CAB NEW
Model #8341 Stock# 42779 4.6L V8 MSRP: $32,176
0
%APR
$
2,000
for 60
mos.†
Total
Cash Back
**
WITH
OR
Total Cash Back
**
T t l C h B k Total Cash Back
** **
$
4,000
25
AVAILABLE
The USAPowerlifting 2011
RawNational Championship
was held Friday through Sunday,
August 19 to 21at the Hilton in
Scranton.
Abington Height High School
Powerlifting coach Claude Wel-
come, AHHSassistant coach
Amy Welcome, AHHSgradu-
ate Kristi Polizzano and AHHS
student Tyler Logan all partici-
pated in the event.
Polizzano lifted a squat of
210, bench of 132 and deadlift of
260; Logan had a squat of 155,
bench of 220 and deadlift of
260; Claude’s had a squat of
485, bench of 320 and deadlift
of 440; Amy had a squat of 250,
bench of 140 and deadlift of
355.
Polizzano finished first in the
open weight class, Amy fin-
ished fourth, Logan finished
first in the148 lbs. weight class
for 14 and15 year olds, and
Claude finished first in the
masters division.
Claude set two national re-
cords with his bench, and over-
all score of 1,245.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTO/EMILY TAYLOR
Amy Welcome, shown above, lifts for the judges at the USA Powerlifting 2011 Raw National Championships,
held at the Hilton in Scranton.
Abington Heights shines in
powerlifting championships
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Kristi Polizzano, Claude Welcome, Amy Welcome and Tyler Logan par-
ticipated in the Powerlifting Championships.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTO/EMILY TAYLOR
Tyler Logan,
pictured left,
finished first
in the 148-
pound
weight class
for 14- and
15-year-
olds.
PHOTO EMILY TAYLOR
Awards,
pictured far
left, were
presented to
the winners
at the event
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011 THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE11C
7
0
1
8
2
0
The Lackawanna Trail High School foot-
ball teamplayed its first scrimmage game on
Saturday, Aug. 20 in preparation for the up-
coming season.
No score was kept in the home game
against Holy Redeemer.
The Lions will play another scrimmage on
Friday, Aug. 26 at 6 p.m. at home against
Western Wayne.
The teamwill open their season the fol-
lowing week taking on Carbondale Area
High School at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2 in Car-
bondale.
Full-season schedules for The Lions and
the rest of the Lackawanna County High
School football teams are available in the
High School Footall Playbook 2011, available
in the Aug. 31issue of the Abington Journal
and the Aug. 28 issue of Go Lackawanna.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTO/ALICE STUFFLE
Caleb Darling, shown above, will return as quarterback for the Lackawanna Trail Lions this
season.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTO. ALICE STUFFLE
Jeremy Greenly, shown above, will share
duties at running back with Pete Murazzi
this season.
Roaring
into a new
season
Crossword answers from page A 11
beat Mike Kussoff of Ho-
nesdale on a match of
cards for the second-place
senior award.
Scranton Prep’s Joe
Chudhauri also shot 73 and
was top junior. Altier took
second place on a match of
cards over Lakeland’s Mike
Thomas.
Riverside’s Nico Munley
was low sophomore with a
74, beating Sebastianelli by
a shot.
Carbondale’s Chris Cer-
minaro shot 80 to win low
freshman by eight shots
over Owen Walsh of Ho-
nesdale.
The Comets had four
players in the top 11 while
Scranton Prep placed four
among the top 21.
David Pompey shot 76,
Jack Knowles 78 and Ryan
Brown 79 to complete the
Prep team score.
Greg Reeves shot 77 for
Lakeland. Mike Brown had
an 80 and Fred Tolerico 89.
Dalton Mecke led Lacka-
wanna Trail with an 84.
Don-Michael DeMarest
(100), Collin Chermak
(101) and Daniel Richards
(105) completed the team
score.
JACKMAN
Continued from Page 9
teams. He also enjoys fish-
ing, camping and spending
time with family and
friends.
Tunney’s next race is
Sept. 3 at Mountain
Speedway.
“I enjoy asphalt racing
and they have a very nice
track and facility,” Tunney
said. “I have learned a lot
there so far this year and
most of my competitors
are very nice and very
willing to help me out.”
Next year Tunney will
look to buy a new car and
engine while racing
throughout the northeast.
He may also head south
for a few races in Virginia
and North Carolina.
“My ultimate goal would
be to make it to a point
where I can live comfort-
ably racing,” Tunney said.
“NASCAR would be ideal
and I believe it would be
possible with lots more
hard work and dedication.”
SPEED
Continued from Page 9
The Comets won the
tournament.
Lackawanna Trail
The Lions defeated For-
est City 5-4 at Memorial
Links.
Trail’s Dom Demarest
won his individual match
over Brian Nebzydoski
forcing a split in the bet-
ter-ball to give the Lions
the win.
Lakeland
The Chiefs shutout Elk
Lake 9-0 at Tall Pines,
Mike Thomas, Mike Bren-
nan, Fred Tolerico, Jordan
Horsky, Taylor Reeves and
Greg Reeves all finished
with victories.
ROUNDUP
Continued from Page 9
The Women’s Golf Associ-
ation of the Country Club of
Scranton hosted the Helen
Niles Memorial Tournament
on July 21.
The tournament is a NE-
PAWGAevent held every three
years at Country Club of
Scranton.
Sixty teams of partners from
the13 country clubs that partic-
ipate in the NEPAWGA
(Northeast PAWomen’s Golf
Association) enjoyed a sunny
day of golf followed by a lun-
cheon and award presentation.
Championship Flight: first
place Sally McFarlane and Roz
Stahl with a lowgross score of
70; second Ruth Dettore and
Wendy Cimoch, 74; third
Kathy Oven and Barbara Poga-
na, 74.
First Flight: first Mary Ya-
blonski and Debbie Ott with a
lowgross score of 80; second
Diane Scandale and Denise
Riggi, 83; third Barbara Erhard
and Janet Wrightnour, 86.
Second Flight: first Joann
Freeman and Betsy Thomas
with a lowgross score of 87;
second Christine Yi and Deb-
bie Chang, 92; third Yvonne
Cronkey and Gail Dickstein,
93.
Third Flight: first Peg Torbik
and Trudy Mesko with a low
gross score of 91; second Che-
ryl Tierney and Sally Mar-
quardt, 93; third Carolyn Hart-
man and Eleanor Jones, 93
CCS hosts annual
golf tournament
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Championship Flight first place
winners Roz Stahl, Sally McFar-
lane, pictured above, from left.
The 2011 Children’s Mira-
cle Network Charity Golf
Tournament, benefiting Janet
Weis Children’s Hospital
pediatric services, will take
place on Aug. 28 with a 1
p.m. shotgun start at Sand
Springs Country Club,
Drums.
The cost is $75 per golfer
or $300 per team. The tour-
nament will follow the cap-
tain and crew format. Lunch
and dinner is included with
registration fee and prizes
will be awarded to winners of
the putting contest, longest
drive, closest to the pin, and
more.
For more information, call
Lorena Perry at 570.330.8470
or lperry@mclaneco.com
2011 Children’s Miracle
Network Golf tourney
planned for Aug. 28
Sponsors of the 25th
annual Swing for Sight
Golf Tournament presented
a $23,000 check for pro-
ceeds from the yearly
event to Mary Lou Was-
cavich, Executive Director
of the Lackawanna Branch,
Pa. Association for the
Blind.
The tournament was held
on June 20 at the Glen
Oak Country Club and
sponsored by Northeastern
Eye Institute and First Na-
tional Community Bank of
Dunmore.
This money will be used
for the various programs
held at the Agency which
benefit the blind and vi-
sually impaired throughout
Lackawanna County.
Pictured above, standing
left to right: Jerry Champi,
Interim CEO First National
Community Bank of Dun-
more, Mary Lou Wascav-
ich, Executive Director of
the Blind Association, and
Dr. William Jordan, Jr.,
Northeastern Eye Institute.
PHOTO SUBMITTED
Swing For Sight Golf Tournament
sponsors present check for $23,000
C M Y K
PAGE 12C www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24, 2011
cmccare.org
l
570 969 8000
Ve've gol a lol ol il. ¬nd ve leal moie ol llem
llan you migll llinl. !n lacl, ve lave lle highest
number of heart surgeries vill one ol lle !ovest
morta!ity rates
¨
in lle iegion.
Oui suigeons and caidiologisls ollei lle same lile
saving liealmenls you lnd in lig-cily los¡ilals.
¬nd lave one ol lle liglesl success iales in lle
counliy loi com¡lex ¡ioceduies. So liing youi
leail lo us. ¬nd ve'll liing information,
techno!ogy and humanity lo youi caie.
¬l CMC, ex¡ecl lle lesl. Youi lile may
de¡end on il.
Cardiac Care.
l
Expect more.
Heart.
Russell F. Stahl, M.D., F.A.C.S.
CHIEF OF CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY
¨ !ennsylvania Healll Caie Cosl Conlainmenl Council

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful