Outlook Round I Lesson Plans Foreign teachers: Do this.* PAs: Do anything but this.* Lesson I – Colors. Height.

Width. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

* Last year’s training was unnecessarily complicated. Teachers made their own lesson plans and no one could parse who did what. 不好. Teachers, please don’t deviate from the lessons as set. It will save us a lot of headaches later on.

7. 8. 9. 10.

11. 12. 13.

Do the students know their colors? If they don’t, drill. Prepare flash cards (real or from the PM folder) before class. Ask students what red plus yellow makes. Hit students with something soft if they don’t know or refuse to answer. Draw a blank color wheel on the board. Explain that red, yellow and blue are primary colors. Fill in the color wheel with secondary colors as students answer questions – “What is blue plus yellow?” a. Optional: Drill primary and secondary colors. Play a game where students run to touch primary or secondary. Explain that blue isn’t always just blue. There is light blue and also dark blue. Supply plenty of examples and drill. Comprehension checks. “Who is wearing a light blue jacket? “Who is wearing a dark green hat?” a. Optional: Turn off the lights and ask students to find colors with a flashlight. Be careful with this. b. Optional: Hand out paper and ask students to label their own color wheels. Ask students if they are tall or short. One student will say tall. Ask him or her to stand up next to you. They are short. Elicit simple descriptions from the students – tall, short, fat and thin. Associate an action with each word. Have students mime the actions as you call out the words. Then again. Faster. Comprehension checks. Call out combinations of words (i.e. tall and fat) for students to mime. a. Optional: Play reverse charades. One student leaves the classroom. You tell the remaining students to mime a word. When the student returns he or she must guess the action. b. Optional: Hand out paper and instruct students to fold it for a dictation exercise. Call out “Number one – fat and thin” and have students draw that in square one. Repeat steps 8, 9, and 10 for additional lexical terms – long, short, thick, thin. a. Optional: Encourage students to tag very onto their adjectives – “very, very thin” and “very, very, very fat!” Write all of the words you’ve learned today on the board. Point to a word and ask a student to produce a sentence. Homework: Students copy words learned from the board and produce sentences using those words. “The light blue pen is long and thin.”

Lesson II – Numbers. Quantity. 1. Do the students know numbers? If they don’t, drill. Prepare flash cards (real or from the PM folder) before class. 2. Ask students what one plus one makes. Hit students with something soft if they don’t know or refuse to answer. 3. Write numbers on the board. a. Very young children are generally comfortable with one through ten. Drill eleven through twenty. b. Young children are generally comfortable with one through twenty. Drill twenty-one through one hundred. c. Older students are comfortable through nine hundred and ninety nine. Explain how to count large numbers in English (nine hundred and ninety nine thousand, nine hundred and ninety nine.) 4. Teach English units – thousand, million, billion and trillion. 5. Ask students if one billion is many or few. Drill. 6. Explain that you can have very many and very few. You can also have many many, but not few few. 7. Hand out paper and instruct students to fold it for a dictation exercise. Go from “few bananas” to “many bananas” to “few monkeys and many bananas” to “many monkeys and few bananas” to “many monkeys and many bananas.” 8. Homework: Students write out five numbers in Arabic numerals and English (i.e. 22,000 / twenty-two thousand.) Note: There are a handful of numbers presentations available at G:\Renato\Presentations\Pinnacle Presentations Renato Ganoza for EF Zhengzhou, 2011

Lesson III – Prepositions. 1. Do the students know prepositions? If they don’t, drill. Prepare flash cards (real or from the PM folder) before class. 2. Place a pencil on a desk. Ask students where the pencil is. Is it on or behind the desk? Hit students with something soft if they don’t know or refuse to answer. a. Write prepositions on the board. Young children are generally only comfortable with on, in and under. b. Elicit additional prepositions from the students – over, next to, in front of, behind, near to, far from, across. 3. Demonstrate each preposition and drill pronunciation. Encourage students to form sentences using the prepositions. 4. Place an eraser on your head. “Is it on my head or under my head?” Ask students if they want erasers on their heads. a. Go from student to student in a circle. The student should say “The eraser is [behind/next to/over] my head.” b. Have students follow simple instructions. “Put a pencil on your head. Put a book under your desk.” c. Drill your prepositions again. Students really don’t use them often. d. Go from student to student in a circle. Give the student one preposition to use in making a sentence. 5. Fun! Say “Jack is in front of me.” If Jack doesn’t move, place him in front of you. “Jack is behind me.” “Jack is next to me.” “Jack is in front of the door.” “Jack is behind the door.” 6. More fun! Say “Jerry is behind me. Lily is behind Jerry. Tom is behind Lily. Tony is behind Tom. Kitty is behind Tom!” 7. Comprehension checks. Show the students one picture and ask them to describe it using prepositions. Students can first attempt this as a group and then individually. a. Optional: Hand out paper and instruct students to fold it for a dictation exercise. Call out “The pig is in the tree” and have students write and draw it out. Continue using different prepositions. a. Optional: Students prepare paper and write five sentences using different prepositions to describe a picture. 8. Finish up with one more round of “Jack is behind the chair!” – but let students lead the activity. Students can give each other instructions in a circle or you can moderate volunteers. Lesson IV – Spot Check A. Note: There’s a “Spot Check A” presentation available at G:\Renato\Star of Outlook Competition\In-Class Practice 1. Open the “Spot Check A” presentation. Students need to be able to speak for one full minute from a picture prompt. a. Note: Most students initially cannot speak for a full minute. 2. Push the students to create longer and more interesting answers. a. If students are uncomfortable speaking individually, practice speaking in teams. Award teams who perform. b. If students are struggling to name objects or items, encourage them to use their colors, sizes, and numbers. c. If students are giving accurate but boring answers, use a Taboo presentation. 3. Continue to push the students until they are completely comfortable speaking for a minute from picture prompts. a. Optional: Tell them you love them. Lesson V – Filler. 1. Remind students that one minute can be a very long time. Students are highly encouraged to use full sentences and stock “filler” phrases to lengthen their answers. a. For younger students, write “I think…” “Well, maybe…” and “My teacher says…” on the board. They copy. b. For older students elicit as many “filler” phrases as possible. Write them and encourage students to copy. 2. Demonstrate each “filler” phrase and drill pronunciation. Encourage students to form sentences using the phrases. 3. Go from student to student in a circle. The student should say “My teacher says that elephants eat shark flanks.” 4. Show students impossible pictures (like optical illusions or abstract art). Have students attempt to describe them using their “filler” phrases. 5. Homework: Five sentences written using initial “filler” phrases. Renato Ganoza for EF Zhengzhou, 2011

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