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MAXCI Algorithm

The retransmission processes unconditionally have higher priorities than the initial transmission queues. The retransmission processes are sorted in first-in first-out (FIFO) mode. The initial transmission queues are sorted in the CQI order. A higher CQI means a higher data priority.

The MAXCI algorithm aims to maximize the system capacity but cannot ensure user fairness and differentiated services. RR Algorithm
The retransmission processes unconditionally have higher priorities than the initial transmission queues. The retransmission processes are sorted in FIFO mode. The initial transmission queues are sorted in the order of the waiting time in the MAC-hs queue. A longer waiting time means a higher data priority. The RR algorithm aims to ensure user fairness but cannot provide differentiated services. Not considering the CQI reported by the UE leads to lower system capacity.

PF Algorithm
The retransmission processes unconditionally have higher priorities than the initial transmission queues. The retransmission processes are sorted in FIFO mode. The initial transmission queues are sorted in the order of R/r. Here, R represents the throughput corresponding to the CQI reported by the UE, and r represents the throughput achieved by the UE. A greater R/r value means a higher data priority. The PF algorithm aims to make a tradeoff between system capacity and user fairness. It provides the user with an average throughput that is proportional to the actual channel quality. The system capacity provided by PF is between the system capacity provided by RR and that provided by MAXCI.

EPF Algorithm
The EPF algorithm can meet the requirement of the telecom operator for controlling user fairness and differentiated services and provide very high system capacity. Firstly, the EPF algorithm distinguishes between delay-sensitive data and throughputsensitive data. The delay-sensitive data unconditionally has a higher priority than the throughput-sensitive data. The delay-sensitive data includes the following data:
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signaling and AMR service data whose waiting time approaches the value of the discard

timer The throughput-sensitive data includes the following data:


BE

service data service data data and AMR service data whose waiting time is far from the value of the discard

Streaming IMS

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timer Secondly, the EPF algorithm distinguishes between retransmission processes and initial transmission queues. The retransmission processes unconditionally have higher priorities than the initial transmission queues.

If two queues or processes have the same absolute priority, the algorithm considers the waiting time, CQI reported by the UE, throughput achieved by the UE, guaranteed bit rate (GBR), scheduling priority indicator (SPI) weight, happy bit rate (HBR), and power consumed in the queue for a certain period, which are described as follows:
For For

the delay-sensitive data, a longer waiting time means a higher data priority.

the throughput-sensitive data, a greater R/r value means a higher data priority. Here, R represents the throughput corresponding to the CQI reported by the UE, and r represents the throughput achieved by the UE. users not achieving the GBR have higher priorities than those already achieving the GBR. higher SPI weight means a higher data priority. larger difference between the actual rate and the HBR means a higher data priority.

The A A

When

the resource limitation switch (RscLmSw) is on, the algorithm gives the lowest priority to a queue whose power consumption exceeds the threshold. RscLmSw is used to prevent the users in a poor-coverage area from consuming too many cell resources and thus avoid a sharp decrease in system capacity. The ratio of the maximum available power of a queue to the total power of the cell depends on the GBR, as shown in Table 5-1. Table 1.1 Default maximum ratios based on the GBR

GBR (kbit/s) 8 16 32 64 128 256 384

Maximum Ratio 10% 10% 15% 15% 20% 25% 30%

The SPI weight is used to control differentiated services for different users. It can be specified on the basis of SPI on the RNC side. The HBR is used to control user fairness. It defines the highest throughput expected by the user when the resources are limited. By giving more chances to the users without the HBR than those with the HBR, the algorithm improves the overall user satisfaction. The HBR is specified by the parameter HappyBR on the RNC side. The setting can be based on user levels, including gold, silver, and copper. For details on the parameters related to QoS management, such as the GBR, SPI, SPI weight, and HBR, see section 6.2 "Diff-Serv Management." The EPF algorithm is optional.

1.1.2 Comparison of Four Algorithms


Table 5-2 lists the factors considered in the four scheduling algorithms.

Table 1.1 Factors considered in the four scheduling algorithms Factor Service type Initial transmission or retransmission Maximum power Waiting time CQI Actual throughput SPI GPR HBR MAXCI No Yes No No Yes No No No No RR No Yes No Yes No No No No No PF No Yes No No Yes Yes No No No EPF Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Table 5-3 lists the effects of the four scheduling algorithms. Table 1.2 Effects of the four scheduling algorithms Item System capacity User fairness Differentiated services Real-time services MAXCI Highest Not guaranteed Not guaranteed Not guaranteed RR High Best Not guaranteed Not guaranteed PF Higher Guaranteed Not guaranteed Not guaranteed EPF Higher Guaranteed Guaranteed Guaranteed