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Philadelphia

Washington, DC

New York City

Milwaukee

Urban Water Sustainability Leadership Conference


Making Green Infrastructure the Centerpiece of the Urban Water World

San Francisco

December 6-7, 2010 Philadelphia, PA

Chicago

Its Time to Look at Americas Water in a Different Light.


Challenges to our nations ability to provide clean and safe water for future generations abound. The need to consider approaches that encourage watershed planning, focus on sustainability, and embrace the concept of green cities is critical to our clean water future. Clearly, the silo thinking of the past has kept clean water, drinking water, stormwater and water reuse interests segregated and while it has driven progress, it has not encouraged comprehensive thinking, planning and management of our waters on the transformational scale now necessary. An integrated national water policy that balances our commitment to social, environmental, and economic needs is essential to guide the development of our Nations environmental statutes and inform water-related decision-making. Both policy makers and the public must grow to understand that water is a nite resource that must be managed in a sustainable way to allow for continued and unrestricted access. Environmental sustainability must be advanced, water use must be efcient, and clean water must be available for human and ecosystem needs.

Clean Water America Alliance


www.CleanWaterAmericaAlliance.org

December 6, 2010

Dear Colleague, Welcome to Philadelphia and this rst national gathering of representatives from leading green cities to discuss urban water sustainability. It is symbolic that this event is taking place in Philadelphia, demonstrating the continuing relevance and evolution of William Penns vision for a Greene Countrie Towne - in which dense urban development thoroughly integrates open space and the benets it offers for cities all across the country. We are very fortunate to have policy leaders from around the country - including our own Mayor Nutter and Representatives Schwartz and Fattah - participating in discussions here and in other national venues, on urban water sustainability. Other attendees include leaders in policy, regulation, research, utility management, city administration and design. The multi-disciplinary, cross-agency attendance of this conference underscores the importance and urgency of green infrastructure leadership and investment, even with this periods scal constraints. Our work during this conference on sharing knowledge about green infrastructure development and on building pathways for future exchanges is critical to our future successes in developing sustainable urban infrastructure. It is no longer a question of Will this concept work? but of how to efciently implement green infrastructure programs into the core missions and strategies of Americas cities. Political, regulatory and legislative support from all levels of government will be critical to sustainable water management and sustainable urbanism. I look forward to productive exchanges on how water-related investments can successfully support crossagency interests, long term urban growth and sustainability, Sincerely,

Howard Neukrug, PE Chair, Clean Water America Alliance Urban Water Sustainability Council Deputy Commissioner Philadelphia Water Department

AGENDA
Urban Water Sustainability Leadership Conference Making Green Infrastructure the Centerpiece of the Urban Water World
December 6 - 7, 2010 University of Pennsylvania Perelman Quad, Houston Hall Philadelphia, PA

M O N D AY, D E C E M B E R 6
11:30 am - 12:00 pm Registration Class of 1966 Reading Room 12:00 1:30 pm Hall of Flags WELCOME, INTRODUCTIONS Dick Champion, Chair, Clean Water America Alliance Howard Neukrug, Chair, Clean Water America Alliances Urban Water Sustainability Council Andrew Fahlund, Senior Vice President for Conservation, American Rivers Feather Houstoun, President, William Penn Foundation OPENING KEYNOTERS: Shawn M. Garvin, EPA Region III Regional Administrator The Honorable Michael Nutter, Mayor of Philadelphia The Honorable Chaka Fattah, U.S. Representative 2nd Congressional District, Pennsylvania The Honorable Alyson Schwartz, U.S. Representative 13th Congressional District, Pennsylvania 1:30 2:45 pm Bodek Lounge GREEN CITY CLEAN WATERS SPOTLIGHT ON PHILADELPHIA Philadelphia leaders will offer insights into how they are dovetailing planning efforts, and investments, and how the contexts of the city provide challenges and opportunities for applying best practices. Core to the discussion will be how water-related investments can support cross-agency interests, long term urban growth and sustainability. Moderator: Dr. Susan Wachter, Co-Director, Penn Institute for Urban Research Team Panel: Joanne Dahme, Public Affairs Manager, Philadelphia Water Department Michael DiBerardinis, Commissioner of Parks and Recreation, City of Philadelphia Katherine Gajewski, Director of Sustainability, City of Philadelphia Mayors Ofce of Sustainability Christine Knapp, Director of Outreach, Citizens for Pennsylvanias Future (PennFuture) Clarena Tolson, Streets Commissioner, City of Philadelphia 2:45 3:00 pm 3:00 3:30 pm Break INTERNATIONAL EXAMPLES FROM CITIES OF THE FUTURE The International Water Association (IWA)s Cities of the Future program is an initiative to demonstrate how cities are designing innovative new approaches and solutions for sustainable cities. This new approach requires upfront collaboration between water professionals, city

M O N D AY, D E C E M B E R 6 ( C O N T I N U E D )
planners, architects, engineers and city ofcials to create integrated strategies that make cities resilient in this time of global change. The presentation will offer international examples of how cities are consciously framing a new city of the future. Steve Moddemeyer, IWA Cities of the Future Program Manager 3:30 4:45 pm WATER IS LIFE SPOTLIGHT ON WASHINGTON, D.C Washington, DC is driving a broad-based sustainability effort that is founded on smart city planning. It covers land uses, development approach and neighborhood design, environmental planning and regulation. The program sets high environmental standards combined with nancial and program incentives to drive change, with operational implementation of system improvements and sustainability governing all the systems delivering and recycling water. Directors from the responsible agencies will describe how each component is weaved into a larger effort that is stronger than any one part and is delivering one of the most successful urban greening programs in the country. Moderator: Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, Executive Director & General Counsel, Association of State & Interstate Water Pollution Control Administrators Team Panel: George Hawkins, General Manager, DC Water Harriet Tregoning, Director, District of Columbia Ofce of Planning Christophe Tulou, Acting Director, District of Columbia Department of the Environment 4:45 5:00 pm CONCLUDING REMARKS Howard Neukrug, Chair, Urban Water Sustainability Council

6:00 7:30 pm RECEPTION Regent/St. Marks, Inn at Penn

T U E S D AY, D E C E M B E R 7
8:00 8:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast Class of 1966 Reading Room 8:30 9:00 am Bodek Lounge WELCOME INTRODUCTION Howard Neukrug, Chair, Urban Water Sustainability Council MORNING KEYNOTE Nancy Stoner, Deputy Assistant Administrator for the U.S. EPA Ofce of Water 9:00 10:15 am MILWAUKEE GREEN MAP THE MILWAUKEE MODEL Milwaukee is experiencing a convergence of freshwater issues that is galvanizing the region as one of the leaders in urban water restoration. Situated on Lake Michigan, Milwaukees businesses, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and government entities have come together to protect this resource, along with marketing the regions unique abilities to provide freshwater solutions to the world. This convergence is founded on strong leadership, long-term planning, collaboration, and partnerships.

T U E S D AY, D E C E M B E R 7 ( C O N T I N U E D )
Moderator: Kevin Shafer, Executive Director, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Team Panel: Tim Bate, Director of Planning, Research & Sustainability, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Jeff Martinka, Executive Director, Sweet Water, Southeastern Wisconsin Watersheds Trust, Inc. Karen Sands, Manager of Sustainability, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District 10:15 10:30 am 10:30 11:00 am Networking Break CLEAN WATER SERVICES GOVERNORS SUSTAINABILITY AWARD SPOTLIGHT ON GREATER PORTLAND AREA CWSs world-class wastewater treatment plants, innovative regulatory framework, pioneering resource recovery efforts, and restoration of green infrastructure are paying dividends for both the environment and ratepayers. Mark Poling, Wastewater Treatment Department Director, Clean Water Services 11:00 12:15 noon BETTER STREETS AND BETTER USE OF WATER SPOTLIGHT ON SAN FRANCISCO San Franciscos sustainability mission demands we manage, recover, and reuse our valuable water, and redesign our urban environment. We are purposefully expanding our water portfolio to include the use of sump and graywater, expand water conservation and maximize water reuse. To protect the aquatic environment of the San Francisco Bay and Pacic Ocean, San Francisco has adopted a low impact development plan to reduce stormwater runoff into the combined and separate sewer systems. Moderator Michele Pla, Senior Project Manager, EPC Consultants, Inc. Team Panel Michael Carlin, Deputy General Manager, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Marla Jurosek, Manager, Wastewater Planning and Regulatory Compliance Division, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Paula Kehoe, Director of Water Resources, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Adam Varat, Citywide Policy Planning, San Francisco Planning Commission

12:15 1:30 pm Hall of Flags

Lunch and Keynote Speaker HIGH ROAD AGREEMENTS: STRATEGIES FOR MAKING GREEN JOBS GOOD JOBS The resource crisis-ahead offers potential for good quality jobs in green infrastructure that serve even the most vulnerable populations. Best practices in green infrastructure can ensure high quality jobs and equitable access to new opportunities. Vivian Chang, Director of State & Local Initiatives, Green for All (working to build an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty)

1:30 2:45 pm Bodek Lounge

A BOLD GREENPRINT FOR THE CITYS FUTURE SPOTLIGHT ON NEW YORK CITY New York City is prepared to spend $1.5 billion dollars on green infrastructure over the next 20 years to reduce combined sewer overows by 40%. This panel will discuss how New York City developed the plans and its technical underpinnings, launched pilots, and won support within the City to take the pilot projects to scale and to propose the plan to state and federal regulators, and some of the challenges that lie ahead.

T U E S D AY, D E C E M B E R 7 ( C O N T I N U E D )
Moderator Rina Cutler, Deputy Mayor, Transportation & Utilities, City of Philadelphia Team Panel James Garin, Chief, Division of Capital Program Development and Planning, NYC Department of Environmental Protection John McLaughlin, Director of Ecological Services, NYC Department of Environmental Protection Esther Siskind, Assistant Commissioner, Bureau of Environmental Planning and Analysis, NYC Department of Environmental Protection Carter Strickland, Deputy Commissioner for Sustainability, NYC Department of Environmental Protection 2:45 3:00 pm 3:00 4:15 pm Networking Break GREEN ALLEYS & MORE - SPOTLIGHT ON CHICAGO Chicago has moved from thinking green towards a more systemic and strategic implementation of green, where projects, management and leadership are merging to change our policies, ordinances and culture. Moderator Ken Kirk, President, Clean Water America Alliance Team Panel Janet Attarian, Project Director, Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program, Chicago Department of Transportation Jonathon Grabowy, Senior Civil Engineer, Stormwater Management, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago Pete Mulvaney, Assistant Commissioner Chicago Department of Water Management 4:15 5:00 pm WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED? Moderator Dick Champion, Chair, Clean Water America Alliance Team Panel Michael Carlin, Deputy General Manager, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission George Hawkins, General Manager, DC Water Pete Mulvaney, Assistant Commissioner Department of Water Management, City of Chicago Howard Neukrug, Deputy Commissioner, Environmental Services and Planning, Philadelphia Water Department Mark Poling, Wastewater Treatment Department Director, Clean Water Services Kevin Shafer, Executive Director, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Carter Strickland, Deputy Commissioner for Sustainability, NYC Department of Environmental Protection

W E D N E S D AY, D E C E M B E R 8
GREEN BUS TOUR OF PHILADELPHIA 9:00 am 9:15 9:50 am 10:00 - 10:30 am 10:40 11:10 am 11:20 11:50 am 12:00 12:50 pm 12:50 - 1:15 pm Depart Inn at Penn PECO Albert Greeneld Elementary School Comcast Friends Center Reading Terminal Return to Inn at Penn

The Clean Water America Alliances Urban Water Sustainability Council (UWSC) is the new forum for urban leaders in the elds of water, sustainability, infrastructure, planning, politics and science to meet and share ideas and strategies for creating green, sustainable cities. Council members represent a network of thoughtful leaders committed to their communities and the concepts of sustainability. They have a full appreciation for the value of integrated water management and work together to unite the new, 21st century green water policies and practices with community sustainability goals and a regions capital improvement program. Council members will create new ways to improve the urban water environment while building local economic growth and competitiveness and advancing social equity. They will meet to share their successes as well as their barriers to progress. Members Water utility leaders who have expressed a commitment to implementing green infrastructure and/or other sustainable solutions to their local and regional water issues, as well as leaders in related areas (such as urban sustainability directors, city or county environmental or planning directors, commerce leaders). Membership may expand to include civic leadership groups; NGOs; state and local governments; universities, private companies and trade associations.

SPOTLIGHT CITIES
Philadelphia
GREEN CITY CLEAN WATERS Philadelphia is enjoying a unique moment in its history. A large number of key plans and initiatives are being developed concurrently, creating a not-perfect-but-great storm of opportunity. Through investment in a series of supportive green infrastructure plans and projects, the City of Philadelphia and its partners have sought to strengthen the citys competitive position, gain the utmost value for its limited resources and meet regulatory mandates. The plans and initiatives providing a basis for sustainable development and water management include Greenworks Philadelphia, the Citys overall sustainability plan, the upcoming 2030 Comprehensive Plan, of which GreenPlan Philadelphia is the open space element, a new zoning code, -- and the landmark Green City, Clean Waters, the Philadelphia Water Departments Long Term Control Plan for Combined Sewer Overows. Green City, Clean Waters, in its most current iteration, proposes 2 billion dollars in the green infrastructure investment over the next 25 years, enhancing the overall sustainability of the city while addressing its clean water mandates. In order to make the Citys aggressive green infrastructure and sustainability plans into realities, the session panelists are collaborating with each other, and with regulators. They have thoroughly weighed the costs and benets of green infrastructure investment against those of gray infrastructure and continue to pursue both creative and sound funding strategies.

Monday, December 6 1:30 PM


Moderator: Dr. Susan Wachter, Co-Director, Penn Institute for Urban Research Team Panel: Joanne Dahme, General Manager, Public Affairs, Philadelphia Water Department Michael DiBerardinis, Commissioner of Parks and Recreation, City of Philadelphia Katherine Gajewski, Director of Sustainability, City of Philadelphia Mayors Ofce of Sustainability Christine Knapp, Director of Outreach, Citizens for Pennsylvanias Future (PennFuture) Clarena Tolson, Streets Commissioner, City of Philadelphia

In this session, city leaders will offer insights into how they are dovetailing planning efforts, and investments and how the contexts of the city provide challenges and opportunities for applying best practices. Core to the discussion will be how water-related investments can support cross-agency interests, long term urban growth and sustainability.

Washington, DC

Monday, December 6, 3:30 PM


Moderator: Alexandra Dapolito Dunn, Executive Director & General Counsel, Association of State & Interstate Water Pollution Control Administrators Team Panel: George Hawkins, General Manager, DC Water Harriet Tregoning, Director, District of Columbia Ofce of Planning Christophe Tulou, Acting Director, District of Columbia Department of the Environment

WATER IS LIFE The nations capital is a model green city, as evidenced by innovation in nearly every aspect of its local government. The District of Columbia is driving a broad-based sustainability effort that is founded on smart city planning. It covers land uses, development approach and neighborhood design, environmental planning and regulation. The program sets high environmental standards combined with nancial and program incentives to drive change. Directors from the responsible agencies will describe how each component is weaved into a larger effort that is stronger than any one part, and is delivering one of the nations most successful urban greening programs.

MILWAUKEE GREEN MAP - THE MILWAUKEE MODEL Milwaukee is experiencing a convergence of freshwater issues that is galvanizing the region as one of the leaders in urban water restoration. Situated on Lake Michigan, Milwaukees businesses, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and government entities have come together to protect this resource, along with marketing the regions unique abilities to provide freshwater solutions to the world. This convergence is founded on strong leadership, long-term planning, collaboration, and partnerships.

Milwaukee

In 2001, the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) initiated a series of programs that spearheaded the discussion of integrating green infrastructure into the regions portfolio of grey infrastructure. In 2007, MMSD completed a long-range facilities plan that used a watershed approach to planning. Through MMSDs collaboration with the regional planning commissions update of the regional water quality management plan, the combined planning effort came to be known as the Water Quality Initiative (WQI). The WQI identied both point and nonpoint pollutant loads from urban and nonurban sources and recommended actions necessary to protect and improve the regions water resources. In 2007, the Milwaukee Water Council was developed to promote the Milwaukee Region as the world water hub for freshwater research, economic development and education. In 2008, the Southeastern Wisconsin Watersheds Trust, Inc. was formed to provide a collaborative forum for water resource issues in the regions watersheds and to organize and advance water resource improvement opportunities. In 2009, the City of Milwaukee was designated as the 13th U.N. Global Compact City worldwide and the only city in the world selected for its efforts to improve water quality.

Tuesday, December 7 9:00 AM


Moderator: Kevin Shafer, Executive Director, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District

Team Panel: Tim Bate, Director of Planning, Research & Sustainability, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Jeff Martinka, Executive Director, Sweet Water, Southeastern Wisconsin Watersheds Trust, Inc. Karen Sands, Manager of Sustainability, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District

The future actions to catalyze these freshwater efforts will rely on strategic, action-oriented, integrated efforts by all parties. In this session, the regional leaders will discuss how the past progress has been made and will lay out the roadmap for the restoration and renewal of Milwaukees watersheds.

Portland Area

CLEAN WATER SERVICES - GOVERNORS SUSTAINABILITY AWARD Sustainable business and environmental practices are a way of life at Clean Water Services (CWS), earning the District the Governors Sustainability Award in 2010. Accomplishments included:

Tuesday, December 7 10:30 AM

Innovative regulatory framework that allows water quality trading of ecosystem credits. The rst practice employed under this broad system relies in part on restoration of stream corridors and tree planting instead of constructed energy intensive chilling, saving the ratepayers millions of dollars while achieving superior environmental outcomes. Mark Poling, Wastewater Helped to create the Willamette Partnership, a nonprot coalition of business, local Treatment Department Director, Clean Water Services governments, environmental, and agriculture interests to expand the pace and effectiveness of watershed restoration efforts through ecosystem trading. Nutrient recovery from wastewater at one of its world class wastewater treatment facilities that is producing a premium fertilizer and recovering nutrients from waste. Promotion of low impact development by creating a handbook for developers and businesses to encourage environmentally-friendly practices such as green roofs, water quality facilities, and green streets.

LEED certied Administrative building and the rst of its kind LEED Silver certied wastewater pump station.

These and other programs and practices have demonstrated the Districts commitment to sustainable business practices for the past 30 years.

BETTER STREETS AND BETER USE OF WATER On the edge of the continent in a semi arid region, San Francisco has come to understand that sustainability must be our core mission. In the early 20th Century San Francisco built the Hetch Hetchy water system to capture snowmelt from the Sierra Nevada and transport the pure drinking water by gravity to the Bay area. In the late 1990s San Francisco completed the CSO Long-Term Control Plan to control combined sewer overow by capturing the runoff from the paved streets before it could overow into the Bay and Pacic Ocean. These two systems are infrastructure intensive and San Francisco will spend $8 billion over 25 years on upgrades and improvements to our water supply and treatment and our wastewater infrastructure. Sustainability demands that we modify our urban environment with green streets and low impact development, we implement asset management to cost-effectively maintain our infrastructure and not over burden our rate payers and that we conserve, recover and reuse our water and other valuable resources. San Francisco is a peninsula with the San Francisco Bay to the east and north and the Pacic Ocean to the west. A small city of about 49 square miles, our city is over 95 percent paved and when it rains it takes only minutes for the rain to run downhill to either the Bay or the Ocean. The combined sewer overow control program was completed in the late 1990s at a cost of $1.5 billion. Much of sewer systems gray infrastructure is reaching the end of its useful life. The water supply comes from 167 miles away and relies on reservoirs, tunnels and pipelines.

San Francisco

Tuesday, December 7 11:00 AM


Moderator Michele Pla, Senior Project Manager, EPC Consultants, Inc. Team Panel Michael Carlin, Deputy General Manager, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Marla Jurosek, Manager, Wastewater Planning and Regulatory Compliance Division, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) has a broad based urban Paula Kehoe, Director of Water water sustainability focus that which also includes an energy conservation and renewal Resources, San Francisco power. Our urban watershed planning process has resulted in the adoption of a StormPublic Utilities Commission water Management Ordinance and additional plans and programs for low impact design Adam Varat, Citywide Policy Planning, San Francisco based stormwater management solutions. LID solutions mimic natural watershed proPlanning Commission cesses by replicating pre-urban development hydrologic site conditions. LID based solutions in both the public and private realm will direct runoff to natural vegetated systems, such as landscaped planters, swales and gardens that reduce, lter or slow stormwater runoff. Strategic placement of these vegetated systems help mitigate the impacts of impervious surfaces and in some cases increase the level of service provided by the traditional sewer pipes. Over the next

15 years we will be implementing the Better Streets Plan with the Planning Department, Department of Public Works as well as other key City Departments to maximize LID. The Better Streets Plan provides a comprehensive set of policies and guidelines for the design of San Franciscos pedestrian realm. Our wastewater program is not only looking at these sustainable options, but will also be maximize benecial reuse of biosolids, cogeneration of digester gas and heat and reuse of FOG for biofuel. Our urban water sustainability program is also focused on ensuring that in our drought prone region we are prepared for climate change and variability by maximizing our local water supply. In addition to a ground water stewardship and storage program, water conservation, reuse and recycling are essential elements of our sustainability program. The program is currently focused on the reuse of efuent for irrigation, development of graywater as approved by the State of California and the pumping of sump water for reuse rather than discharge to the sewer system.

New York City

A BOLD GREENPRINT FOR THE CITYS FUTURE Since 2002, New York City has invested more than $6 billion in water quality, and key indicators show that New York Harbor is the cleanest and healthiest its been in more than a century. But to open as much of the NYC waterfront as possible to recreation and development, the City needed a long-term plan to manage the stormwater that can overwhelm the combined sewer system when it rains, impairing water quality in the harbor and its tributaries. The biggest remaining challenge is to further reduce combined sewer overows (CSOs) that discharge a mixture of untreated sewage and stormwater runoff when it rains. Traditional approaches to reduce CSOs further would include the construction of additional, large infrastructure, but the remaining opportunities for such construction are very expensive, and do not provide the benets that New Yorkers rightly expect from multi-billion dollar investments of public funds. On September 28, 2010, New York City published the NYC Green Infrastructure Plan to reduce combined sewer overows by 40 percent over the next 20 years and to achieve this goal the City is prepared to spend $1.5 billion. The plan is an alternative approach to improving water quality that integrates green infrastructure, such as swales and green roofs, with investments to optimize the existing system and to build targeted, smaller-scale grey or traditional infrastructure. Staff members of the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), will speak about how DEP developed the plan, designed and installed green infrastructure pilots, won support within the City to take the pilot projects to scale, and is negotiating the plan with state and federal regulators.

Tuesday, December 7 9:00 AM


Moderator Rina Cutler, Deputy Mayor, Transportation & Utilities, City of Philadelphia Team Panel James Garin, Chief, Division of Capital Program Development and Planning, NYC Department of Environmental Protection John McLaughlin, Director of Ecological Services, NYC Department of Environmental Protection Esther Siskind, Assistant Commissioner, Bureau of Environmental Planning and Analysis, NYC Department of Environmental Protection Carter Strickland, Deputy Commissioner for Sustainability, NYC Department of Environmental Protection

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Chicago

GREEN ALLEYS & MORE Chicagolands history and success are integrally connected to its management of water resources. The original groundwater charged prairie streams running through northeastern Illinois have undergone a series of investments to protect the water environment. The changes that altered the regions hydrology to allow Chicagos development include: reversing the original ow of the Chicago River, construction of water and wastewater treatment plants, and channelization of the waterways to allow for an urban environment. The existing system is now a centralized system of managing water, which includes some of the worlds largest pumping stations, wastewater treatment plants, water purication plants and tunnel systems. Today, the City of Chicago and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago are wrestling with how to augment the current system to include a more distributed approach to managing stormwater and to apply principles of environmental hydrology to a system which is so fundamentally changed from its original course. True to the regions history, area engineers have taken leadership to plan a more sustainable metropolitan area through the application of green infrastructure projects and ordinance development that solve problems. Chicago and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago will present some of its history, its plans and its projects that have attracted the attention of many municipal leaders.

Tuesday, December 7 3:00 PM Moderator Ken Kirk, President, Clean Water America Alliance Team Panel Janet Attarian, Project Director, Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program, Chicago Department of Transportation Jonathon Grabowy, Senior Civil Engineer, Stormwater Management, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago Pete Mulvaney, Assistant Commissioner Chicago Department of Water Management

Recognizing the Advancements of Sustainable Water Solutions


The Clean Water America Alliance is pleased to announce the launch of its newly established United Stated Water Prize Program. The United States Water Prize Program honors individuals, institutions, and organizations that have made an outstanding achievement in the advancement of sustainable solutions to our nations water challenges. Created, sponsored and administered by the Clean Water America Alliance, the United States Water Prize Program is the rst of its kind to recognize successful efforts in protecting and improving the health of Americas watersheds. This prestigious award program recognizes outstanding achievements in addressing water quality/quantity challenges facing our nation. Any United States-based institution, organization, or individual is encouraged to apply. Applications should be made using the ofcial form on the United States Water Prize website www.uswaterprize.org and must be received by December 31, 2010. Winners will be invited to an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C. in May 2011, where they will be honored for their valuable contributions and receive a commemorative award.

www.USWaterPrize.org
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SPONSORS
For more than 60 years, the William Penn Foundation has supported a variety of programs and institutions in Philadelphia and its surrounding communities. What began as a family trust has grown into a $1.4 billion philanthropic organization, which today is the largest foundation focusing exclusively on the needs of the Greater Philadelphia region. Since 1945, the Foundation has addressed key needs in the region, making thousands of grants to organizations delivering a wide range of services. A look at the Foundations work reveals an organization promoting policy and systems change in a number of areas: community development, early care and education, equity and quality in public education, protection of open spaces and watersheds, sustainable growth, support for arts and culture, and youth development.

The Philadelphia Water Department and Water Revenue Bureau serve the Greater Philadelphia region by providing integrated water, wastewater, and stormwater services. The utilitys primary mission is to plan for, operate, and maintain both the infrastructure and the organization necessary to purvey high quality drinking water, to provide an adequate and reliable water supply for all household, commercial, and community needs, and to sustain and enhance the regions watersheds and quality of life by managing wastewater and stormwater effectively.

The Penn Institute for Urban Research (Penn IUR) is a university-wide entity dedicated to an increased understanding of cities through cross-disciplinary research, instruction, and civic engagement. As the global human population becomes increasingly urban, understanding cities is vital to informed decision-making and public policy at the local, national, and international levels. Penn IUR is dedicated to developing knowledge in three critical areas: innovative urban development strategies; building the sustainable, 21st-century city; and the role of anchor institutions in urban places. By providing a forum for collaborative scholarship and instruction across Penns twelve schools, Penn IUR stimulates research and engages with the world of urban practitioners and policymakers.

The Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership (IGEL) was established by Penn and Wharton faculty. With leadership from the business school, IGEL brings a unique business orientation and top intellectual/research capacity to bear on some of the most important long-term environmental challenges facing the future of humanity today. Wharton and Penn are entrepreneurial by nature; well-suited to shape IGEL into the preeminent academic institution dedicated to the rigorous study of business and global sustainability solutions.

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CDM is a full-service consulting, engineering, construction, and operations rm delivering exceptional service to public and private clients worldwide. Its complete suite of services spans from program management, management consulting, and architectural and geotechnical engineering, to design-build, construction management, and operations. Beyond the traditional services, CDM is also employing innovative technologies and approachesto help clients meet their challenging goals. Throughout its history, CDM has been a leader in providing lasting solutions for environmental and public health protection, while supporting economic growth and development.

Since the rms founding in 1914, Greeley and Hansen has provided services to more than 500 municipalities, states, federal agencies and industries. The rm continues to provide a full array of water and wastewater engineering services globally. Greeley and Hansen is a leader in developing innovative engineering solutions for a wide array of water, wastewater, water reuse, and solid waste challenges aimed at improving public health, safety, and welfare. With a staff of more than 300 in 16 ofces across the US, Greeley and Hansen provides services for all phases of projects ranging from master planning and feasibility studies through design, construction, and start-up. The rm also provides architectural and management consulting services.

PennWell Corporation is a highly diversied, business-to-business media company providing authoritative print and online publications, conferences and exhibitions, research, databases, online exchanges and information products to strategic global markets. Since 1910 PennWell has been known for providing comprehensive coverage of several strategic markets. In those early days, PennWell was a pioneer in the emerging oil industry with Oil & Gas Journal magazine, founded in 1902. Today PennWell publishes 45 business-to-business magazines and newsletters, conducts over 60 conferences and exhibitions on six continents, and has an extensive offering of books, maps, directories and database services.

CH2M HILL is an employee-owned company delivering consulting, program management, design, construction, and operations solutions for private and public clients, locally and globally.. CH2M HILL is an industry leader in sustainability and project and program management, widely regarded for delivering high-quality work using integrated, collaborative approaches. During 2007 and 2008, the rm won 246 awards for design innovation, health and safety practices, diversity and small business support, and other quality-related accomplishments.nts meet their challenging goals.

AKRF is a multidisciplinary consulting rm specializing in environmental, planning, and engineering services. Founded in 1981, AKRF brings together a team of more than 150 talented professionals in six ofces to handle a wide variety of projects for public agencies, private clients, and municipalities.

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SPEAKERS
Janet Attarian Project Director Chicago Department of Transportation Janet L. Attarian is a nationally recognized leader in sustainable infrastructure. As Project Director for the Streetscape and Sustainable Design Program and Sustainability Coordinator for the Chicago Department of Transportation, she works to turn Chicagos streetscapes, riverwalks, and pocket parks into great urban places. Ms. Attarian has overseen the design and management of over 70 streetscape projects and her accomplishments include the Citys Streetscape Guidelines, the Wacker Drive reconstruction project and the Millennium Park Bicycle Station, winner of the 2005 Healthy Streets Award and 2004 ALA Silver Medal Award. Ms. Attarians ability to meld the concepts of complete streets and ecological design lead to the development of the Citys Sustainable Streets Program and Green Alley Program, winner of the 2007 Chicago Innovation Award, 2007 ASLA Honor Award, 2007 Illinois ASLA Honor Award and 2007 Illinois APA Gold Award. In the last year alone Janet has spoken at over 15 events regarding sustainable infrastructure including the AIA National Convention, the Transportation Research Board and upcoming Greenbuild. Her work has been featured in Public Works Magazine, Plenty Magazine, Roads and Bridges Magazine and Building Design & Construction Magazine. Ms. Attarian is a licensed architect, previously worked for several consultant rms including DLK architecture and owned her own design rm.

Timothy Bate Director of Planning, Research & Sustainability Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Tim is the Director of Planning, Research and Sustainability for the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District, and was responsible for the engineering and technical planning aspects of the Districts 2020 Facilities Plan. Among his other duties, he is responsible for the development of the watershed restoration plans for the Menomonee and Kinnikinnic River watersheds. These are second level plans that identify specic actions and projects to improve water quality and habitat in these two watersheds. Tim received his BS degree in civil engineering from Marquette University, a MS degree in land use planning from UW-Stevens Point, and is a registered professional engineer in the State of Wisconsin.

Michael Carlin Deputy General Manager San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Michael Carlin was appointed to the SFPUCs Deputy General Manager in 2009. Previously, Mr. Carlin served as Assistant General Manager for Water since 2004. As Deputy General Manager, Mr. Carlin acts as Chief Operating Ofcer of the SFPUC overseeing the agencys efforts to integrate Asset Management, Capital Planning, Security and other functions across the Water, Wastewater and Power Enterprises and throughout the organization. Deputy General Manager Carlin plays a leading role in the many environmentally innovative green projects that cut across enterprises within the SPFUC, including a comprehensive agency approach towards ghting and adapting to the impacts of climate change. He joined the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission as the Water Resources Planning Manager in 1996. Prior to joining the City, he was the Chief of Planning for the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board.

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Dick Champion Chair Clean Water America Alliance Dick Champion began his career in water pollution control in 1969. He has been with the City of Independence, Missouri, Water Pollution Control Board for over 31 years and has been Director of the department since 1983. The department is responsible for the Sanitary Sewer Utility, the Storm Water Management Program, the Household Hazardous Waste Management Program, and related environmental compliance. He was appointed to the Jackson County Missouri Stormwater Commission by the Jackson County Executive and Legislature which was created for purposes of regional stormwater policy, planning, and coordination. Since its creation in 2001, Mr. Champion has been serving as vice-chairman of the Commission. Mr. Champion has been a member of the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA), since 1992 and was elected to the Board of Directors in 1999. He served as NACWA President for 2006-2007, and now serves as a NACWA Past President on the Nominating Committee for Ofcers. In February, 2008, NACWA created the Clean Water America Alliance and Mr. Champion was elected Chairman of the Board of Directors for a three year term. Mr. Champion earned a B.S. in Political Science with an emphasis on local government and public administration from the Central Missouri State University in 1973. Vivian Chang Director of State and Local Initiatives Green For All Vivian Chang, Director of State and Local Initiatives at Green For All , has a background in urban planning and over 15 years of experience with community organizing and policy advocacy. Prior to joining Green For All, Vivian served as the Executive Director of the Asian Pacic Environmental Network, a nationally recognized environmental justice organization focused on building leadership in Asian immigrant and refugee communities. As a well-recognized experienced organizer in the Asian community, Ms. Chang has spoken on numerous panels as well as in media outlets including KPFA (the Bay Areas Pacica network radio station), National Public Radio, the most popular Chinese ethnic media outlets including Sing Tao and Channel 26 KTSF. She holds a Masters degree in Urban Planning from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) with a concentration in regional economic and community development. Vivian is a recipient of the 2007 Gerbode Fellowship and Oaklands 2009 Woman of the Year award. Rina Cutler Deputy Mayor, Transportation and Utilities City of Philadelphia Rina Cutler, Deputy Mayor for Transportation and Utilities was appointed to the job by Mayor Michael Nutter in March, 2008. She is responsible for the coordination and oversight of all transportation functions in the City of Philadelphia as well as City utilities. In addition, Ms. Cutler will oversee the operations of a variety of City agencies including the Streets Department, the Philadelphia Water Department and the Philadelphia International Airport. She will oversee the Citys interests with a variety of transportation agencies including the Philadelphia Gas Works, SEPTA, the Parking Authority, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission and the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority. Prior to returning to Philadelphia, Ms Cutler was the Deputy Secretary for Administration for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) for 5 years. Her deputate was responsible for managing resources, monitoring spending and ensuring that management and productivity controls were in place to maximize departmental operations. In addition, Ms. Cutler served for almost 2 years as the Acting District 6 Executive in PennDOT for the 5 county Philadelphia region which has oversight for the design, construction and maintenance responsibilities for all State owned roads and bridges. In this capacity, Ms. Cutler focused her attention on project delivery, context sensitive design and smart transportation principles. Deputy Mayor Cutler has extensive experience in the management and operations of parking and transportation programs. Her prior experience also includes Transportation Commissioner for the City of Boston, the Director of Parking and Trafc for the City of San Francisco and the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Parking Authority.

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Joanne Dahme General Manager, Public Affairs Philadelphia Water Department Joanne Dahme is the General Manager for Public Affairs for the City of Philadelphia Water Department. She has 28 years of engineering program management, public relations, and government affairs experience. Joanne is currently responsible for all forms of departmental communications, including production of publications, public information campaigns and citizen advisory committees. From 1999 to 2008, Joanne was the departments Watersheds Programs Manager with the Ofce of Watersheds, directing the development and implementation of regional watershed partnerships.

Alexandra Dapolito Dunn Executive Director & General Counsel Association of State and Interstate Water Pollution Control Administrators Alexandra Dapolito Dunn is Executive Director and General Counsel of the Association of State and Interstate Water Pollution Control Administrators (ASIWPCA), headquartered in Washington, DC. Prior to ASIWPCA, Dunn served as Dean of the nationally ranked Environmental Law Program at Pace Law School (NY); as General Counsel of the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (DC); as Counsel to the American Chemistry Council (VA); and as an environmental attorney at Winston & Strawn (DC). Dunn is a published author in the areas of water quality and sustainability, and has represented parties, intervenors, or amicus curiae in over 25 environmental cases, many focused on the Clean Water Act. She is Vice Chair of the American Bar Associations Section of Environment, Energy, and Resources. Dunn is admitted to the bars in D.C., Maryland, and New York. She received her J.D., magna cum laude, from the Columbus School of Law, Catholic University of America, DC, where she was Editor-in-Chief of the Law Review. She earned her BA, cum laude, in Political Science & French from James Madison University. She serves on the Alliance Board of Directors

Michael DiBerardinis Commissioner of Parks and Recreation Michael DiBerardinis, Commissioner of Parks and Recreation and Special Advisor to the Mayor on Libraries, was appointed in April 2009. Prior to his appointment, Mr. DiBerardinis served as Secretary of Pennsylvanias Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, overseeing 117 state parks, 26 forest districts, and 7 regional community ofces. The department, under Secretary DiBerardinis, managed 2.5 million acres of public land and administered grant programs that annually dispensed over $80 million dollars. Prior to being named as Secretary for DCNR, Mr. DiBerardinis served as Executive Director of the Campaign for Working Families. Before working with the Campaign, Mr. DiBerardinis was the Vice President of Programs for the William Penn Foundation. Mr. DiBerardinis long history of public administration includes serving as the Commissioner of the Philadelphia Department of Recreation from 1992 to 2000. Mr. DiBerardinis earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from St. Josephs University of Philadelphia.

Andrew Fahlund Senior Vice President for Conservation American Rivers Mr. Fahlund was appointed Vice President for Conservation for American Rivers in 2004. Working with a staff of more than 40, his department is responsible for developing, advocating, and implementing innovative policy and science tools to protect and restore healthy rivers and the communities that depend upon them. He and his team are particularly focused on ensuring that both human and natural communities are prepared and resilient in the face of a changing climate. He currently serves as the co-chair of the Clean Water Networks Global Warming working group and is an advisor to the Johnson Family Foundations Freshwater Forum. Previously, Mr. Fahlund directed the organizations eldwork and national policy efforts to modify the operation of dams and remove those that no longer make sense. Mr. Fahlund has also focused on water supply policy with a specic emphasis on interstate compacts and water disputes. He has served on several governmental advisory groups, testied before the United States Senate and House of Representatives as well as numerous federal agencies, and participated in various policy forums and negotiations addressing water policy in the United States. Mr. Fahlund received his M.S. in Natural Resource Policy from the University of Michigan, School of Natural Resources and Envi-

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ronment with honors. He previously worked as a water conservation advocate in Colorado, a eld archaeologist in the Pacic Northwest, and an instructor in human ecology and eld archaeology at Colorado College.

The Honorable Chaka Fattah Congressman U.S. Representative 3rd District Pennsylvania Congressman Chaka Fattah is serving in his 16th year in the U.S. House of Representatives. He is a Member of the powerful House Appropriations Committee. This committee is responsible for setting spending priorities of over $1 trillion in annual discretionary funds. Representative Fattah is also Chairman of the Congressional Urban Caucus a bipartisan group of 57 Members representing Americas metropolitan centers. These Members work collaboratively with other stakeholders to address the unique challenges facing Americas urban communities. During the 111th Congress, Representative Fattah has led three major legislative victories. To date, The American Opportunity Tax Credit Act, a $14 billion program to provide a $2,500 tax credit for tuition and other expenses for college students or their parents, has assisted 12.5 million students in meeting their college expenses. He secured $3.2 billion for the Energy Efciency and Conservation Block Grants Program (EECBGP) that will assist over 1,041 local communities in the development of programs to implement various energy efciency and conservation projects. Philadelphia and its region is the recipient of $39 million in EECBG funds. Congressman Fattah created the Emergency Homeowners Relief Fund, which was included in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, signed into law by President Obama. The program, patterned after Congressman Fattahs Pennsylvania Homeowners Emergency Mortgage Assistance Program (HEMAP), will provide $1 billion in funds to help millions of responsible American homeowners avoid foreclosure. Targeted to recently unemployed borrowers, the program will keep families in their homes and mitigate the effects of recession. Fattah is also the architect of the countrys most successful early college awareness and preparation program Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP), which he shepherded through reauthorization in 2008. Over the past 10 years, more than $3 billion in federal funds have been used to serve some 12 million students in 49 states, Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. GEAR UP serves as an international model to aid underserved students in their preparation and pursuit of a college education.

James Garin Chief, Division of Capital Program Development and Planning New York City, Department of Environmental Protection James Garin, P.E. is the Chief, Division of Capital Program Development and Planning with the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Water and Sewer Operations. Mr. Garin manages the bureaus $500 Million annual budget. He initiates and/or assigns funding for all of the entire water and sewer capital projects in the City of New York. He coordinates all aspects of proposed project planning, design and construction with the Division of Sewer Maintenance. Emergency Reconstruction and System Operations primarily for projects which include trunk main extensions in conjunction with DEPs trunk main master plan, connections to tunnel # 3 shaft sites and major sewer construction/reconstruction and emergency rehabilitation projects. James plans and develops projects for separate storm and sanitary sewer systems citywide, which will reduce ows to treatment plants and minimize combine sewer overows (CSO) into the surrounding water bodies. He manages the BluebeIt Unit which develops stormwater management systems by utilizing existing naturally occurring water features and wetlands. The result of this program is a solution to a severe ooding problem by enhancing and preserving natural environments with an overall cost savings. James is the Department of Environmental Protection liaison with the New York City Department of Design and Construction and the Department of Transportation to mitigate all budget, design, and construction issues. He is also the Department of Environmental Protections Project Manager for the replacement of the Brooklyn-Staten Island Water Siphons in conjunction with the Army Corps of Engineers and Port Authority dredging operations in the Verrazano Narrows.

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Katherine Gajewski Director of Sustainability City of Philadelphia Katherine Gajewski is the Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia. She leads the Mayors Ofce of Sustainability and is responsible for overseeing the implementation of Greenworks Philadelphia and leading Mayor Nutters efforts to make Philadelphia a leading green city. Prior to her appointment as Director of Sustainability in July 2009, Katherine served as Special Assistant to the Chief of Staff in the Mayors Ofce. In this role she managed a number of the Nutter Administrations major citywide projects and community outreach efforts, and served as an advisor to Mayor Nutter and Chief of Staff Clay Armbrister on a wide range of policy issues. Prior to joining the Administration, Katherine worked on the Nutter for Mayor campaign and transition. From 2004-2006, Katherine was the Campaign Coordinator for the Breathe Free Philadelphia Alliance, the coalition that led the successful grassroots campaign to pass smoke-free legislation in Philadelphia. In 2007 she served as an Aide in the 4th Council District ofce of then-Councilman Nutter.

Jonathan Grabowy Senior Civil Engineer, Stormwater Management Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago Jonathan Grabowy is a Senior Civil Engineer in the Stormwater Management Section at the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago. Jonathan has been with the MWRD since May 1999 and in the Stormwater Management Section since January 2005. He holds a BS in Civil Engineering from Purdue University, a MS in Information Systems from DePaul University and a Masters of Engineering Management from Northwestern University. He has his PE and CFM and lives with his wife Amy in Chicago.

George Hawkins General Manager DCWater George Hawkins, General Manager of the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC Water), was named to the post in a unanimous vote September 3, 2009 by the board of directors. With an operating and capital budget of nearly $800 million dollars, DC Water provides drinking water delivery and wastewater collection and treatment for a population of more than 600,000 in the District of Columbia, as well as the millions of people who work in or visit the District. DC Water also treats wastewater for a population of 1.6 million in Montgomery and Prince Georges counties in Maryland, and Fairfax and Loudoun counties in Virginia. The Authority operates the worlds largest advanced wastewater treatment plant at Blue Plains, with a capacity of 370 million gallons per day and a peak daily capacity of more than a billion gallons. DC Waters service area covers 725 square miles.

Feather Houstoun President William Penn Foundation Feather Houstoun has led the William Penn Foundation as president since 2005. Prior to that, she served on the Foundations board of directors, as part of the team overseeing funding related to the environment and community development. Perhaps best known for her work in public sector, Houstoun has worked at every level of government, serving as Pennsylvanias Secretary of Public Welfare during Governor Tom Ridges administration, Treasurer of the State of New Jersey under Governor Tom Kean, chief nancial ofcer of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), and in a number of senior positions with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Houstoun has had a diverse range of experiences related to the Foundations work, including the development of the State Planning Commission in New Jersey, helping to launch the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark, and

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service on the boards of Philadelphias Center City District, the New Jersey State Aquarium, the New Jersey Network, and the Housing Finance Agencies of both Pennsylvania and New Jersey. She was elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration in 1991. Houstoun has published articles on growth management, gubernatorial leadership, housing, and linkages between business districts and transportation. She is a regular columnist for Management Insights, a joint publication of Governing Magazine and the Ash Institute of Democratic Governance at Harvards Kennedy School of Government. Prior to joining the Foundation, Houstoun was an executive with AmeriChoice, a United Health Group company serving Medicaid clients in 13 states, and was a senior visiting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania teaching and conducting research on public management issues.

Marla Jurosek Manager, Planning & Regulatory Compliance Division San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Ms. Jurosek is the manager for Planning, Regulations and Compliance Division at the San Francisco Public Utility Commission, Wastewater Enterprise. The Wastewater Planning and Regulatory Compliance Division provide leadership in change management for the Enterprise in anticipating and preparing for potential changes in its business environment. Ms. Jurosek oversees Regulations and Compliance, Storm Water Management, Workforce Development, Asset Management, Administration Services and Business Planning for Wastewater Enterprise. Ms. Jurosek has been with the City and County of San Francisco since 1991 and holds a Bachelors of Science in Civil Engineering from Michigan Technological University and a Wastewater Treatment Plant Operations Specialist Certication from California State University, Sacramento. During the 1990s, Ms. Jurosek played key roles in many large infrastructure development projects and her experience in the SFPUC spans 11 years rst serving as a senior manager in the Hetch Hetchy Water and Power Enterprise and most recently in the Wastewater Enterprise. One of her current primary responsibilities is the planning, development and integration of long term sustainable green infrastructure for stormwater management into the San Franciscos Public Utility Commissions wastewater business practices and our $4 billion Sewer System Improvement Program rebuilding the cities sewers, stormwater infrastructure and facilities. Recently the Urban Watershed Management Group under her direction successfully put into effect the Cities Urban Stormwater Management Ordinance requiring new developments to implement stormwater controls as a component of their project.

Paula Kehoe Director of Water Resources San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Paula Kehoe is the Director of Water Resources for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC). Ms. Kehoe has been with the City and County of San Francisco since 1990. For more than eight years, she served as Director for the Water Pollution Prevention Public Education Program receiving six state and national awards, including the Water Environment Federations Public Education Award and Association of Metropolitan Sewerage Agencies National Public Education Award. During this time, Ms. Kehoe also participated in the development of the Efuent Management Training Course for the Water Environment Federation and conducted the course in Cairo and Alexandria, Egypt. More recently, Ms. Kehoe assisted with the development of the SFPUCs $3.6 billion capital improvement program designed to rebuild and repair the third largest water delivery system in California. Currently, Ms. Kehoe oversees the development of conservation, groundwater, recycled water and desalination water supplies for the SFPUC. Ms. Kehoe directs the preparation of the SFPUCs urban water management, integrated water resource, groundwater management, conservation and recycled water plans.

Ken Kirk President Clean Water America Alliance Ken Kirk serves as president of the Clean Water America Alliance, a 501(c)(3) nonprot organization established by the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA) to explore the complex issue of water sustainability and plan for the future by improving public awareness that advances

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holistic, watershed-based approaches to water quality and quantity challenges. He has held the position of Executive Director of NACWA for more than 20 years and prior to joining NACWA, he worked with a Washington, DC-based private consulting rm, where he had responsibility for the management of several associations focused on various environmental issues faced by municipalities. He has also worked in the Environmental Protection Agencys Ofce of Legislation; and served as Public Affairs Manager at the Water Environment Federation. Mr. Kirk has degrees from New York University, the Georgetown University Law Center and the George Washington University Law Center, where his specialty was environmental law. Mr. Kirk also serves as chair of the Water Infrastructure Network, a broad-based coalition dedicated to preserving and protecting the health, environmental and economic gains that Americas drinking water and wastewater infrastructure provide.

Christine Knapp Director of Outreach Citizens for Pennsylvanias Future (PennFuture) Christine Knapp joined PennFuture in July of 2005, with a background in grassroots organizing, issue campaigning and policy work. As the Director of Outreach, Knapp manages advocacy communications to activists and to coalition partners, recruits members and volunteers to engage in campaigns and serves as a liaison for PennFutures legal and grassroots support. Based in Philadelphia, Knapp is also the coordinator for the Next Great City initiative, which is working to implement a common sense, cost effective policy agenda that enhances Philadelphias environment, strengthens neighborhoods and increases economic competitiveness. Prior to her time with PennFuture, Knapp worked for four years at Clean Water Action, working on local air pollution issues stemming from the South Philadelphia Sunoco renery and advocating for improvements to Philadelphias lagging recycling program. Knapp graduated cum laude from Villanova University in 2001 with double bachelor degrees in Political Science and Communications. While at Villanova, she served as a communications intern for the Philadelphia Streets Department. Knapp is a frequent guest on news programs such as Fox Philadelphia, CN8 and WHYYs Radio Times. She is the chair of the Urban Sustainability Forum, co-chair of the Green Economy Task Force Policy Committee and a moderator of PhillyFreecycle. She has won the Florence Neilson award for her work on the board of the Recycling Alliance of Philadelphia and the Special Recognition Award from the Philadelphia Area Project on Occupational Safety and Health (PhilaPOSH) for her work building alliances between the environmental and labor movements. Knapp also serves as the President of the Passyunk Square Civic Association in South Philadelphia.

Jeff Martinka Executive Director Sweet Water - the Southeastern Wisconsin Watersheds Trust Jeff Martinka is the Executive Director of Sweet Water, the Southeastern Wisconsin Watersheds Trust, Inc. Prior to joining Sweet Water in January 2010, he served as Executive Director of the West 7th Community Center in St. Paul, MN. Martinka also served as Vice President Community Affairs at Perspectives, Inc. (MN) and as Executive Director of Literacy Services of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. In addition to his nonprot experience, Jeff worked in management at the Milwaukee County Parks, in Milwaukee Mayor John Norquists Ofce, and at the Milwaukee Department of City Development. He earned Masters degrees in Urban Planning and Public Administration at the University of Wisconsin Madison and Bachelors degree in Geological Sciences and Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.

John McLaughlin Director of Ecological Services New York City, Department of Environmental Protection John McLaughlin is the Director, Ofce of Ecological Services, with the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). He has been with DEP for 18-years and has been active in the ecological restoration eld for over 23-years. He manages six staff people and provides experience and science based knowledge on a variety of ecological principles in the design and implementa-

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tion of environmental restoration projects. He also provides technical expertise in conjunction with the protection and restoration of sensitive natural areas that may be affected by private development and public works projects. Ecological designs that can signicantly reduce initial restoration and future maintenance costs while greatly increasing immediate environmental benets are his primary objectives. Prior to coming to NYCEP, he worked at the Fresh Kills landll and was part of team of professionals charged with restoring lost environmental function of the site. In addition to the innovative and sustainable restoration of inactive hazardous waste landlls, he has developed, implemented and collaborated on many large scale ecological designs for freshwater and tidal wetlands, coastal woodlands and grassland restorations. He also directed the development of the ecological and water quality strategies of the Jamaica Bay Watershed Protection Plan and is currently managing the installation of several aquatic pilot studies.

Steve Moddemeyer Principal CollinsWoerman Steve Moddemeyer is a thought leader with over 18 years of experience leading governments, planners, architects, land owners, and project teams towards increased sustainability. Steve specializes in creating tools and alternative strategies that lead to resilient infrastructure systems for cities and large developments. He has extensive experience with complex public/private development issues, and development of sustainable strategies for major capital improvement projects. He has been the lead in developing local government habitat preservation responses to the Endangered Species Act and negotiating team member in multimillion dollar settlements and contracts for utility-based organizations.

Peter Mulvaney Assistant Commissioner Chicago Department of Water Management Peter Mulvaney is the Assistant Commissioner of the Department of Water Management for the City of Chicago. He has spent most of his career pursuing his passion for the interaction of environmental impact and human health. Starting as eld biologist for the Museum of Southwest Biology, he gained insights into outdoor science. He then shifted to bench-top research at the National Institutes of Health, where he spent four years researching the onset of tumor cell motility. After earning a masters degree, he spent seven years as an environmental consultant on major infrastructure projects both in the U.S. and abroad. Next, Peter earned an MBA, then accepted a role with the City of Chicago to instill sustainability concepts and practices into the Department of Water Management, where he has been Assistant Commissioner for the past ve years.

Howard Neukrug Chair, Urban Water Leadership Sustainability Council Deputy Commissioner, Environmental Services Philadelphia Water Department Mr. Neukrug is the Deputy Commissioner of the Philadelphia Water Department, and is responsible for Planning and Environmental Services which oversees the departments growing environmental, energy and sustainability programs as well as its more traditional strategic and capital planning and asset management systems. His responsibilities range from the protection of Philadelphias drinking water supplies to the management and conservation of Philadelphias rain water and its sewer outfalls. Mr. Neukrug was the founder of Philadelphias Ofce of Watersheds and the creator of its Clean Water, Green Cities program which integrates land-based urban sustainability goals with the goals for clean, safe, attractive and accessible rivers and streams. He has served as an advisor to the US EPA, the State of Pennsylvania, the Delaware River Basin Commission on issues of environmental policy and regulation, water and wastewater utility planning and management, drinking water quality and treatment, urban planning and sustainability.

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His service on non-prot boards has included many national and local groups and today includes the Delaware Valley Green Building Council, the Tookany-Tacony Frankford Watersheds Partnership, the Schuylkill Action Network, and the Clean Water America Alliance where he chairs the Urban Water Sustainability Council. He is a Professional Engineer and a graduate in Civil and Urban Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, where he is currently teaching a course on How to Use Water, Science and Politics to Create a More Sustainable Philadelphia.

The Honorable Michael Nutter Mayor City of Philadelphia Since taking ofce in January 2008, Mayor Michael A. Nutter has set an aggressive agenda for Americas sixth largest city implementing a crime ghting plan that has sharply reduced the homicide rate, an education strategy to increase the high school graduation rate by 50 percent and a sustainability plan that will reduce the citys energy consumption in the years to come. He has vigorously managed city government through a deep recession, taken advantage of Federal recovery funding to create new green-collar jobs and established a customer friendly 311 system. Born in Philadelphia and educated at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, Michael Nutter has been committed to public service since his youth in West Philadelphia. He served almost 15 years on the Philadelphia City Council, earning the reputation of a reformer, before his election as Mayor of Philadelphia.

Michelle Pla Senior Project Manager EPC Consultants, Inc. Ms. Pla is a consultant, past Executive Director of the Bay Area Clean Water Agencies and a member of the Board of Directors of the Clean Water America Alliance. She consults with other clean water agencies around the country on wet weather and watershed management issues, water quality plans, permits and enforcement orders, and utility management issues. As the Executive Director of the Bay Area Clean Water Agencies, a public Joint Powers Authority with 54 San Francisco Bay Area utility members, Ms. Pla was a visible leader of the organization focused on stewardship and pollution prevention. She developed the strategic and business plans, the regulatory and communication strategy and the association positions on regulations and other water quality attainment strategies. Ms. Pla started her career as an environmental policy analyst with the Environmental Protection Agency in both Washington D.C and San Francisco. For 14 years she served as the Manager for Strategic Planning and Regulatory Compliance for the San Francisco Clean Water Program. In that role she participated in regional, California-wide and national associations and organizations on behalf of San Francisco. She served as a Committee Chair and on the Board of Directors of the National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA then the Association of Metropolitan Sewerage Agencies). Ms. Pla served as President of the Association in 1998-99 and in July 2010, was one of 40 inductees into the rst class of the NACWA Hall of Fame.

Mark Poling Wastewater Treatment Department Director Clean Water Services Mr. Poling is the director of Clean Water Services Wastewater Treatment Department and has worked as a member of its leadership team since 1996. Before joining Clean Water Services, he was manager of operations of Seattle Metros West Point Treatment Plan. He is the Vice President of the Pacic Northwest Clean Water Association and holds a Masters degree in Environmental Engineering from the University of Washington.

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Karen Sands Manager of Sustainability Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Karen Sands is the Manager of Sustainability for the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District. Besides sustainability, Karen has worked on planning, public involvement and watercourse programs for about 9 years at MMSD. With over 20 years of professional planning experience, she also has a Masters degree in Regional Planning and a Bachelors degree in Geography, both from the State University of New York at Albany. She is certied by the American Institute of Certied Planners and also has a certicate from the International Association for Public Participation. She serves as a Village of Whitesh Bay Environmental Advisory Commissioner and is on the board of the Friends of the Hank Aaron State Trail. In addition, Karen has been the proud owner of a rain barrel for nearly 10 years.

The Honorable Allyson Schwartz Congresswoman U.S. Representative 13th District Pennsylvania U.S. Representative Allyson Y. Schwartz is serving in her third term representing Pennsylvanias 13th congressional district. The 13th district includes both the close-knit neighborhoods of Northeast Philadelphia, as well as the rst ring suburbs of Montgomery County. Prior to her service in Congress, Representative Schwartz was a leading healthcare executive in Philadelphia and from 1990 to 2004 served as a member of the Pennsylvania State Senate, where she was considered one of the most accomplished legislators for her ability to forge bipartisanship partnerships. Schwartz is instrumental in legislative efforts redirecting the nations environmental and energy policies towards energy independence and the reduction of global warming. Her energy legislative accomplishments include smart reuse of Browneld sites, incentives for businesses to build energy efcient buildings and securing tens of millions of dollars to enable communities throughout the 13th district to revitalize commercial business districts and develop new greenways. Schwartz earned a B.A. from Simmons College in Sociology and a Masters of Social Work from Bryn Mawr College. She is married and has two grown sons.

Kevin Shafer Executive Director Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District Kevin Shafer became executive director at the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) in March 2002. Prior to this, he served as MMSDs director of technical services since October 1998. In his current role as the executive director, he is responsible for the overall management, administration, leadership and direction for MMSD in meeting short- and long-term goals and objectives; coordinates the establishment of strategic goals and objectives and their approval by the Commission; oversees the development of policies and operating plans; and represents MMSD to its customers, bond rating agencies, and the public. Since becoming executive director, Shafer has worked diligently on MMSDs $1 billion Overow Reduction Plan. Mr. Shafer has been instrumental in providing the regional leadership in implementing green infrastructure in MMSD facilities and on private property. This leadership has resulted in a new development approach by the communities and developers in the region. He also coordinated a $58 million long-range planning process that produced the most intensive water quality research ever for six Milwaukee area watersheds. Additionally, under his leadership, MMSD instituted a regional stormwater runoff rule and has been a leader for innovative ways to manage stormwater runoff. Prior to joining the District, Shafer spent 10 years in private industry with an international engineering rm in Chicago and Milwaukee, and six years with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Fort Worth, Texas. Shafer received a bachelors degree in science and civil engineering with a specialty in water resources from the University of Illinois in 1982, and a masters in science and civil engineering from the University of Texas in 1988. Shafer received the 2001 Individual Merit Award for Engineer in Government Service from the Wisconsin Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers. In 2007, Shafer received a National Award from Kodak American Greenways for MMSDs pioneering Greenseams project. He is the past president of the National Association of Clean Water Agencies.

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Esther Siskind Assistant Commissioner New York City Department of Environmental Protection Esther Siskind is an Assistant Commissioner for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) and the Deputy Director of the Bureau of Environmental Planning and Assessment (BEPA). She has worked at NYCDEP for 14 years and has also worked for the Delaware River Basin Commission and an environmental consulting rm. She has a broad background in the technical, economic, policy, and regulatory issues related to water, wastewater, and stormwater planning. She was a lead developer of the New York City Green Infrastructure Plan that will provide substantially greater water quality and sustainability benets at signicantly lower costs than a grey-only strategy. She oversees the installation of green infrastructure pilot projects to understand costs and benets under New York City conditions. She was also a lead developer of NYCs currently proposed stormwater performance standard. Ms. Siskind is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she earned a Masters in City Planning with a concentration in Environmental Planning and the University of Pennsylvania where she earned a BA in Economics and International Relations.

Carter Strickland Deputy Commissioner New York City Department of Enivronmental Protection Carter Strickland is Deputy Commissioner for Sustainability at the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and oversees its environmental planning, analysis, permitting, policy, and enforcement programs. Before joining DEP, Mr. Strickland was the Senior Policy Advisor for Air and Water with the Mayors Ofce of Long Term Planning and Sustainability, where he was responsible for the implementation of New York Citys sustainability plan, PlaNYC 2030, across all agencies and departments, with a focus on water, air, and natural resource issues. From 2002 to 2007, Mr. Strickland practiced and taught environmental law at the Rutgers Environmental Law Clinic, where he pursued legal reform under a wide range of federal and state constitutional, statutory, and regulatory laws, as well as local land use laws. He also counseled environmental groups on a wide variety of organizational matters, including copyright protection, First Amendment rights, and lobbying restrictions. From 1999 to 2002, Mr. Strickland was an Assistant Attorney General with the New York Attorney Generals Ofce, Environmental Protection Bureau, where his work focused on toxic waste issues, including the prosecution of state and federal hazardous waste laws and the successful defense of New York States ban on the gasoline additive MTBE. From 1996 to 1999, he was in private practice with a focus on antitrust, trade regulation, and intellectual property law. Mr. Strickland is a graduate of Dartmouth College (A.B., 1990) and Columbia University School of Law (J.D., 1995), where he was Executive Editor of the Columbia Environmental Law Journal and a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar. Following law school he clerked for the Honorable Joseph H. Young, U.S. District Judge, in Baltimore, Maryland.

Clarena Tolson Streets Commissioner City of Philadelphia Streets Commissioner Clarena I. W. Tolson is an experienced leader, having served Philadelphias residents in a number of positions over the past 28 years in City government. In her current position, she oversees a department with more than 1,800 employees and an annual operating budget of $168 million. The Streets Department is a major public works agency in the nations 6th largest city, consisting of two operational Divisions (Sanitation and Transportation) and an Administrative Division. The department manages 2,575 miles of roadway, 320 bridges, 100,000 street lights, and 700,000 tons of trash and recycling through rigorous integrated waste management policy. Services established and expanded during Ms. Tolsons tenure include: single stream recycling including the expansion of collecting household plastics and cardboard, residential mechanical street cleaning and city-wide same-day trash and recycling collection. Programs include UnLitter Us, Philadelphia Recycling Rewards Program, Tire Round-Up Program, Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Collection, and Streets & Walkways Education & Enforcement Program (SWEEP). Under Commissioner Tolsons leadership, the City battled the biggest snowstorms ever in Philadelphia during the 20092010 winter season. Most recently, Commissioner Tolson lead the department in the reconstruction of the South Street Bridge, the largest and most complex project in the history of the Streets Department. Ms. Tolson has given presentations about operations, services and management excellence to the American Public Works Association (APWA) and the United States Conference of Mayors. She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvanias Wharton School of Business.

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Harriet Tregoning Director Government of the District of Columbia, Ofce of Planning Harriet Tregoning was conrmed as director of the Ofce of Planning in February of 2007. Prior to this she was the director of the Governors Institute on Community Design and co-founder, with former Maryland Governor Glendening, and executive director of the Smart Growth Leadership Institute. The Governors Institute on Community Design is a national, nonpartisan effort created specically to assist governors and their top staff as they guide growth and development in their states. By harnessing the expertise of leading practitioners and academicians in key elds including land use policy, design, transportation, energy, development, and regional economics, the Governors Institute helps inform each states executive team as it makes choices that shape the future of communities throughout their state. A sister program of the Mayors Institute on City Design, the Governors Institute is funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts. Tregoning developed her expertise in state level action in the State of Maryland where she served Governor Glendening as both secretary of planning and then as the nations rst state-level cabinet secretary for Smart Growth. In that role, she chaired a 15-member Smart Growth Subcabinet and coordinated key Smart Growth initiatives such as revitalizing neighborhoods, historic preservation, increasing transit and transit-oriented development, promoting walkable communities, and preserving open space. Prior to her tenure in Maryland state government, Tregoning was the director of Development, Community and Environment at the United States Environmental Protection Agency. At EPA, Tregoning helped to found and coordinate the National Smart Growth Network, a national partnership program designed to inform and accelerate innovative smart growth policies and practices. The Smart Growth Network has more than 1500 individual and organizational members and partner organizations including the Sustainable Communities Network, the Urban Land Institute, the American Planning Association, the National Association of Counties, the Association of Metropolitan Planning Associations, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Trust for Public Land, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and many others. Tregonings academic training is in engineering and public policy. She was a Loeb Fellow at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design for 2003-2004.

Christophe Tulou Acting Director D.C. District, Department of the Environment In May 2010, Mayor Adrian Fenty appointed Christophe A. G. Tulou Acting Director of the District of Columbia Department of the Environment, an agency that manages air, water and land pollution; oversees the Districts energy and climate change policy implementation; and protects its sh, wildlife and natural habitats. Formerly, as principal of Christophe Tulou Associates, he advised clients on the implications and opportunities at the intersection of global change, business operations and public policy. He co-directed the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment/Ceres Resilient Coasts Initiative, a ground-breaking, two-year collaboration of private, public, scientic and nonprot sector leaders to develop and implement a Resilient Coasts Blueprint for action to make coastal communities more resilient to existing hazards and avert the worst consequences of climate change. Christophe created and served as President of the non-prot Center for SeaChange to advance substantial reform of U.S. ocean laws and policies. He also helped guide the Pew Oceans Commission, as its Executive Director, to the publication of Americas Living Oceans: Charting a Course for Sea Change, the culmination of a three-year, $6 million initiative establishing a policy framework to restore and protect living marine resources in U.S. waters. Christophe served as Cabinet Secretary for Delawares Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and served over a decade in Congress in several capacities, including as Staff Director to a subcommittee of the U.S. House Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs. Christophe was born in Geneva, Switzerland. He has a BS in Biology from the College of William and Mary, and received two masters degrees one in Zoology and the other in Marine Affairs from the University of Rhode Island. He also earned a law degree from Georgetown University while working on Capitol Hill. He is a member of the Virginia and District of Columbia Bars.

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Adam Varat Citywide Policy Planning San Francisco Planning Department Adam Varat is an urban designer in the San Francisco Planning Departments City Design Group. He oversees the Departments Public Realm Program, the Better Streets Plan, and other street design projects. Adam holds a Masters in City Planning and Certicate in Urban Design from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley.

Dr. Susan Wachter Co-Director - Penn Institute for Urban Research University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School Dr. Susan Wachter is the Richard B. Worley Professor of Financial Management and Professor of Real Estate and Finance at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Wachter is also Professor of City and Regional Planning at the School of Penn Design. At Penn, she is CoDirector and Co-Founder of the Penn Institute for Urban Research. Dr. Wachter has served as President of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association and Co-Editor of Real Estate Economics. Dr. Wachter served as Assistant Secretary for Policy Development and Research at HUD, a President appointed and Senate conrmed position, from 1998 to 2001, and was principal advisor to the Secretary responsible for national housing and urban policy. From 1996 to 1998 she was Chairperson of the Wharton Real Estate Department. Dr. Wachter is the author of over 150 publications. Dr. Wachter frequently appears on national media and is called upon to testify before U.S. Congress on sustainability issues as well as on mortgage markets and the nancial crisis.

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Notes:

Clean Water America Alliance 1816 Jefferson Place, NW . Washington, D.C. 20036 Tel: 202.223.2299 Fax: 202.833.4657 www.CleanWaterAmericaAlliance.org