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Table of Contents Introduction Mission Statement Course Selection Process Schedule Change Policy Grading Scale Enrollment/Pupil Services Guidance/Mentoring Program Academic Pacing Graduation Requirements Information and Technical Department Live Orientation National Honor Society English Language Learners (ELL) Department Art Department Career Studies/Grad Project Department Driver’s Education Department English Department Family and Consumer Sciences Department Health and Physical Education Department Mathematics Department Music Department Science Department Social Studies Department Technology and Engineering Department World Language Department
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Introduction

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chievement House Cyber Charter School is a public, tuition-free school serving grades 7 through 12, chartered by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Our goal is to provide you and your child with the best educational experience possible in order to prepare for the future. AHCCS provides each student with a computer, printer, and internet connection reimbursement so that they can pursue their educational goals on their own schedule in the comfort of their home. Students can also take advantage of the additional support offered by our highly qualified teaching staff at our innovative learning centers in both eastern and western Pennsylvania. Outside of the virtual classes and learning centers, students are encouraged to participate in AHCCS’s list of various clubs and extracurricular activities. The dynamic Achievement House program relies on close collaboration between teachers and parents to provide the best possible environment for student success. Students receive a diploma upon graduation and have the opportunity to participate in our senior prom and graduation ceremony. For more detailed information about our program, please contact the school at (484) 615-6200 or (724) 371-1390 or visit our website at www. achievementcharter.com. Mission Statement

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chievement House Cyber Charter School students will experience an improved individual outcome, measured by academic achievement, in a personalized and rich learning environment that prepares them for success in a technology-driven world. Course Selection Process ourse selection sheets are provided by our guidance counseling department for students to fill out and submit to their guidance counselor by June 21 for the upcoming school year. Students will be contacted by the guidance counselor regarding course placement.
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Schedule Change Policy

Grading Scale 97 > 93-96 90-92 87-89 83-86 80-82 77-79 73-76 70-72 67-69 63-66 60-62 59 < A+ A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF 4.3 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.7 0.0

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ou can change your mind about courses any time up to two weeks into the start of the school year. That is the deadline for any adds, drops, or changes. After that point, regardless of whether or not a course you are taking is required for graduation, you cannot drop it (unless approved by our principal). If you enroll with AHCCS in the midst of a school year, you will have two weeks to determine if you will decide to remain in the course or to drop or change it. Adds/drops/changes for ANY course must be submitted to the Guidance Counselor and approved by our school principal. Enrollment/Pupil Services

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hen you initially call AHCCS, you should speak with a Pupil Services representative. Our Pupil Services Department will work closely with you and your family during the enrollment process and throughout the year to provide school-wide correspondence and prepare records as needed. The Pupil Services Department will also work with each School District across Pennsylvania to make sure that accurate child accounting is maintained. Interested families should request an enrollment packet online, or by contacting the main office at (484) 615-6200. Once the packet has been completed and returned to us, the family will have an enrollment meeting on the phone with the student’s mentor. During this time, we will contact the student’s school to obtain records so that the Guidance Counselor can determine the student’s placement.
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Guidance and Mentoring Program

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uidance Counselors aid students through the course selection process, provide assistance with educational goal setting; post-high school planning; career and college information; home, school, and/or social concerns; or any other concerns a student or parent may encounter. The Guidance Department works closely with Pupil Services Staff, Mentors, Teachers, and Administrators to ensure that we develop a program of studies to prepare your child for life after high school. Every student at AHCCS has a designated mentor. The mentor’s role is to orient students and parents to the cyber world. They will provide support to you and your family throughout your time at our school. Mentors are here to promote student success and to ensure every student is given the opportunity to reach their full potential. Among various other duties and responsibilities, Mentorsp romote positive communication between students and teachers, work with students on motivation and planning, and monitor progress and problem solve. Upon enrolling, every student will be guided through an orientation program that will help acclimate them to the cyber school environment. Students will then be contacted by their mentor. Mentors are available to each of their students via phone, instant messaging, text, or e-mail during school hours. Academic Pacing Within the Achievement House program, every child is encouraged to work at their own pace on assignments, however, students must adhere to all due dates for full credit to be issued. Every lesson is presented to each child at his or her own ability level. Students are required to show mastery of the course content per Pennsylvania standards before advancing to the next course level. This approach results in a solid foundation of core knowledge essential for success in the next subject level. Students have the opportunity for Independent Study which is a formalized approved program. Although the program is individualized, students are required to progress and achieve one or more grade levels per school year as specified by law and the individual program policy.
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Graduation Requirements

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tudents earn one full credit for completing a full year course, half a credit for completing half year courses and a quarter credit for completing quarter year courses with credit values. Course completion is determined by final average grade. For a full year course, students must complete at least 3 out of 4 Marking Periods with a final average passing grade. Students enrolling mid-year with grades transferred from other schools will have the opportunity to complete courses by averaging transfer grades with grades earned at AHCCS. Students enrolling in AHCCS from any grade level below and including 11th grade, must complete the following graduation requirements: • • • • • • 4 Core English credits; 3 Core Math credits; 3 Core Social Studies credits; 3 Core Science credits; 2 Health/PE credits; 5 Elective credits to include: 1 Foreign Language credit (2 Foreign Language credits for college bound students); and • Graduation Project. Students must take a Technology course while at AHCCS and students must also take a Career Studies class during each school year. To be eligible to enroll as a 12th grader and graduate, you must be able to earn the following graduation requirements through a combination of transfer credits and credits earned at AHCCS during the year you enroll: • • • • • • • 4 Core English credits; 3 Core Math credits; 3 Core Social Studies credits; 3 Core Science credits; 2 Health/PE credits; 5 Elective credits; and Graduation Project.

Students must maintain a passing GPA in order to be eligible for graduation from AHCCS.
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Information and Technical Department

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he Achievement House Information and Techinical Department strives to provide a technological experience that not only leads the way for Cyber Schools, but in fact rivals the hardware and software used by Fortune 100 companies. Students are provided with stateof-the-art, brand name laptops, printers, keyboards, headsets, and carrying cases. Software includes Windows 7, Microsoft Office 2010 including Outlook, an Exchange email account for both students and parents, parental control software, the leading student classroom software (Moodle) and blackboard software (Elluminate) just to name a few. A Live Orientation class is scheduled with all new students and parents/ guardians designed to familiarize everyone with their equipment and how to navigate the software platform. We offer three forms of Help Desk support to suit all preferences: a toll-free number to get live help 24/7, a live chat offering or email support. Additional training classes are offered during the school year to introduce new features on an as needed basis. All students leave Achievement House Cyber Charter School not only academically prepared for the working world or college experience that lies ahead of them, but technologically prepared as well! Live Orientation

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ll new students attend an orientation session at our Eastern or Western offices to help with the successful transition to cyber school. You’ll receive your laptop, printer and accessories and we’ll teach you how to login to your classes. We’ll walk you through a sample class and you’ll even get a chance to try to complete and submit sample assignments. Finally, you’ll take some placement tests to help us assign you to the proper level Math and English classes. You’ll leave with all the tools you need to get started at AHCCS!
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National Honor Society

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he National Honor Society (NHS) and National Junior Honor Society (NJHS) are the nation’s premier organizations established to recognize outstanding high school and middle level students. More than just an honor roll, NHS and NJHS serve to honor those students who have demonstrated excellence in the areas of Scholarship, Leadership, Service and Character (and Citizenship for NJHS). The NHS’s guiding principal is to honor overachieving students who possess a strong sense of individual growth, not only through academics but civic responsibility as well. For more information, please contact Mrs. Carter via e-mail (ncarter@achievementcharter.com) or phone (484-615-6229). English Language Learner (ELL) Department

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he primary goal of AHCCS’s English Language Learner (ELL) program is to help develop Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (CALP) for students in order to prepare them for responsible and successful independence in a mainstream classroom setting and then the job market and larger community. A rigorous, standards-based curriculum is conducted in English (with content area clarifications made in Spanish if necessary) through direct instruction, one-on-one tutoring, and interactive webbased programs. The program is designed to be flexible, based on the oral proficiency, reading, and writing needs of each individual learner in order to help them master school-wide academic content as rapidly as possible.

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n the following sections, you will find each content area (i.e., Art, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, English Language Arts, etc.) and the courses offered through that department. Each subsection begins with an introduction to the content area and then a description of the courses offered through the middle school and then high school.
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Academic Departments of Achievement House Cyber Charter School

The Art Department is centered on fostering a creative environment in which students can express themselves and flourish. Technology and creativity come together to offer students experience in digital photography, graphic design, mixed media and fine arts. With courses dedicated to exploring both history and method, students absorb a variety of techniques and experiences. Middle School Art 7 (12ART7): (Marking Period 1) — In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of the elements of art and composition. Students will create art using pencils, pens, brushes and ink. Art 8 (12ART8) : (Marking Period 4) — In this course students will explore the principles of design. The element of color is explored along with ideas of depth and perspective. Students will learn printmaking, painting, and watercolor. High School Art 1 (12ART1F/12ART1S): .5 credits, Grades 9-12 (offered during the first and second semesters) — In this course students will focus on learning how to draw using elements of design. Students will learn about a variety of approaches to drawing such as Cubism, and Post Impressionism through choice, gesture/contour, compositional choice, value for expressive purposes and figure/portrait expressive development. Projects will include still life, warm/cool color schemes, and architectural drawings. Students will also learn how to critique artwork. Art 2 (12ART2): .5 credits, Grades 10-12 (offered during the second semester only) — In this course, students will continue learning how to create art projects using elements of design. Projects will include value studies of 3D forms, still life paintings, and paintings showing light and shadow, among others. Students will learn about a variety of approaches to painting such as technical approaches to materials, styles and techniques. Prerequisite – Art 1 Digital Photography (12DIGPF/12DIGPS): .5 credits, Grades 10-12 (offered during the first and second semesters) — In this course, students will focus on presenting an introduction to the concepts, design principles, materials, and techniques of photography. Students will learn how to take pictures through the basics of camera operation and photographic composition. The emphasis of the course will be creating and manipulating photographic images using free software. There will be one photo assignment per week involving one to two hours which the student will complete outside of school. 8

Art Department

The completion of a Graduation Project is mandated by the state and is necessary for students to graduate. Students will work on their career portfolio, an independent learning experience in which students choose a topic of interest to them. Students will begin in 9th grade, culminating in their final graduation project which will be presented during their graduating year. Career Studies 9 (12CS9.1/12CS9.3): .25 credits — Students will work on building their career portfolio. Career Studies 10 (12CS10.2/12CS10.4): .25 credits — Students will work on building their career portfolio. Career Studies 11 (12CS11.1/12CS11.3): .25 credits — Students will work on building their career portfolio.

Career Studies/Grad Project Department

Career Studies 12 (12CS12.2/12CS12.4): .25 credits — During this course, students will complete a graduation project by applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating information and communicating significant knowledge and understanding that they have accumulated throughout their time at AHCCS. During the year of completion, the project will be reviewed by a panel of faculty members on dates assigned by the school. Faculty panels will ensure that all specific project requirements have been completed.

New drivers must complete a driver education course in order to apply for a Pennsylvania driver’s license. Teen drivers especially benefit by learning PA traffic laws, road signs and safe driving practices through this course. Before you get behind the wheel, ensure you are prepared as possible to handle inclement weather, hazardous drivers and any other unforeseen condition that could hamper your safety. Driver’s Education (12DRVRF/12DRVRS): .5 credits (offered during the first and second semesters) — In this course, students will be provided with all the information needed to earn their driver’s license. Interactive lesson are used to examine up-to-date safe-driving techniques. Students who take this course will enjoy an effective, high-quality driver’s education course that will teach them everything they need to know in order to become safe, confident drivers. They are provided 24/7 online access, perfect for those students who may not have the time or access to attend traditional driver’s education classes. Prerequisite – Students must be 16 years of age or older 9

Driver’s Education Department

The English Department offers a variety of writing and literature courses that provide opportunities for all students to apply creatively. We strive to provide a strong background for students to gain momentum in writing and literature, assuring that our students possess skills necessary to succeed personally, academically, and professionally today and in the future. The content of each course is aligned with Pennsylvania Academic Standards for reading, writing, listening, and speaking, and is designed to foster the unique creativity of each student and create critical thinkers. Department Requirements: Middle School — Students in grades 7 and 8 must complete a core English course that includes a state aligned curriculum and the Achieve 3000 Reading Program. A supplemental English course may be required based on individual literacy needs. High School — Students are required to complete 4.0 credits in English during their 9-12 grade years. Students may take four year-long English courses, or supplement with English electives (as indicated). Middle School: Core Classes English/Language Arts 7 (12ENG7)— This full year course is designed to help students explore and analyze literature including fictional and nonfictional novels, poetry, graphic novels, plays, informational texts, and short stories. The course will focus on reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, and listening skills according to state standards. Students will use the 6 Traits Writing Program to improve their skills and engage in a creative writing unit that will also address mechanics, conventions, and the eight parts of speech. In addition, students will explore current events and discuss how they affect our point of view. English/Language Arts 8 (12ENG8) —This full year course is designed to help students explore many types of literature including fictional and nonfictional novels, poetry, graphic novels, plays, comics, informational texts, and short stories. The course will focus on reading, writing, speaking, comprehension, and listening skills according to 8th grade state standards. Study of literature includes mastery of basic reading skills to evaluate literature and apply background knowledge to assess which qualities improve literature and writing. In addition, students will explore current events and discuss how they affect our point of view. Literacy Journeys (12LJFMS)— Literacy Journeys is a course that provides reading and writing instruction through various individualized programs tailored to the specific literacy needs of each student. This course teaches critical reading skills and is aimed to support readers who struggle with decoding, encoding, fluency, or comprehension. 10

English Department

High School: Core Classes English 9 (12ENG9.1/12ENG9.2): 1 credit — This course begins the journey through high school English and is meant to provoke critical thinking through careful exploration and reflection of fiction and non-fiction literature. Students will study the time periods from the early 5th century through the Renaissance. Students will collaboratively explore the concept of change as it relates to language and society. English 10 (12ENG10.1/12ENG12.2): 1 credit — This course is centered around the concept of individualism. Students will interact with a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts to help them develop a deeper understanding of literature from the 18th century through the Victorian Era. Course work will include mastery of the elements of literature, opportunities for creative writing, and a guided research paper that incorporates the use of higher-ordered thinking skills as students reflect on literature and the world around them. English 11 (12ENG11.1/12ENG11.2): 1 credit — In this course, students will explore literature from the 1800’s through the 1900’s and reflect on the concept of transformation. Through the close reading of selected texts, students will explore the evolution of societal values and thinking. The class will also focus on writing, reading, and thinking skills to prepare students for college and workplace reading and writing. Students will read and make connections with texts, research, integrate their readings into writing, and expand their vocabulary and writing styles. English 12 (12ENG12.1/12ENG12.2): 1 credit — In this course, students will explore the theme of commitment through the exploration of Modernism and literature of the 20th century. Students will gain a fuller understanding of the past as they read, complete writing assignments, and study what literature can reveal about individual and social issues. The class will also focus on writing, reading, and thinking skills to prepare students for college and workplace reading and writing. Students will read and make connections with texts, research, integrate their readings into writing, and expand their vocabulary and writing styles. English as a Second Language (ESL): 1 credit — This course is designed to help students develop Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency in order to prepare them for responsible and successful independence in a mainstream classroom setting and then the larger community. A standards-based curriculum is conducted in English (with content area clarifications made in Spanish if necessary) through direct instruction, one-on-one tutoring, and interactive web-based programs. The program is designed to be flexible, based on the oral proficiency, reading, and writing needs of each individual learner in order to help them master school-wide academic content as rapidly as possible. 11

English Department

High School: Electives Journalism (12JOURNF/12JOURNS): .5 credits, Grades 9-10 — Students will learn about journalistic writing principles and styles through examples, practice, and writing for publication. Skills emphasized will include interviewing, capturing reader interest, and maintaining journalistic integrity. Materials will include current newspaper articles. Students will be able to specialize in areas of interest in their writing such as sports, news, or features. Literacy Journeys (12LIF9/12LIS9/12LJF1011/12LIS1011 12LIF12/12LIS12): .5 credits — Literacy Journeys is a course that provides reading and writing instruction through various individualized programs tailored to the specific literacy needs of each student. This course teaches critical reading skills and is aimed to support readers who struggle with decoding, encoding, fluency, or comprehension. Monsters in Literature (12MONLITF/12MONLITS): .5 credits, Grades 11-12— Monsters in Literature is a course that explores the use of monsters in novels. Students will independently and collaboratively draw conclusions, as well as gain a better understanding of characterization and plot while using higher-ordered thinking skills to reflect on literature and the use of monsters as characters. Out of the Ashes - Holocaust Literature (12OOTAS): .5 credits, Grades 11-12 — This half year course is for students with a desire to learn about the Holocaust and the literature associated with it. Students in this class will gain valuable knowledge about Hitler’s rise to power during WWII and the effects of his dictatorship. Students will read texts written by individuals who experienced first-hand the horrors of the Holocaust and discuss the impacts of the Holocaust on society and culture. An optional end of the year field trip to the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. will act as a capstone to our learning.

English Department

The Family and Consumer Sciences Department focuses on family life, work, and career by providing opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, and behaviors needed to become independent. Students learn to make decisions and solve problems based on values, goals, and standards, along with working collaboratively and communicating effectively with others. These are skills that students need as family members now and in the future. Students are taught to take responsibility for the consequences of their actions and develop the knowledge and skills needed in making choices to meet their personal, family and work responsibilities. 12

Family and Consumer Sciences Department

Middle School Family Consumer Science 7 (12FCS7) — This is a 9 week course which is designed to give students the opportunity to develop various skills needed to be responsible, productive family and community members. Students will explore 2 Sections: Food Science and Nutrition and Child Development. Since this class explores what is fundamental to everyday living, the subject matter is engaging and useful to all students. Family Consumer Science 8 (12FCS8)— This is a 9 week course which is designed to give students the opportunity to develop various skills needed to be responsible, productive family and community members. Students will explore 2 Sections: Financial and Resource Management and Balancing Family, Work and Community Responsibility. Since this class explores what is fundamental to everyday living, the subject matter is engaging and useful to all students.

Family and Consumer Sciences Department

The Health and Physical Education Department includes classes in both Middle School and High School. Students will graduate from AHCCS with a basic understanding of Health and wellness practices and, in Physical Education, “Fitness for Life.” Department Requirements: Middle School — 7th and 8th grade students must complete a PE/Health course each year. High School — Students are required to complete 2.0 credits in PE and Health combined, during their 9-12 grade years. 13

Health and Physical Education Department

High School Family and Consumer Sciences (12FCSF/12FCSS): .5 credits (offered during the first and second semesters) — This course is designed to provide students with basic information and skills needed to function effectively within the family and within a changing, complex society. Emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America; individual and family relationships; housing and interior design; the physical, emotional, social and intellectual development of children; nutrition and food selection; healthy lifestyle choices; meal planning, preparation and service; home management; money management; the application of current technology in the home and workplace.

Middle School Health/Physical Education 7 (12PEHE7) — The Middle School Health and PE program will meet for the entire school year. Students will complete Health and PE assignments on alternating weeks. The 7th grade course will cover topics such as nutrition, dealing with stress and conflict, the dangers of addiction (tobacco) and disease, as well as safety, among other topics. The Physical Education assessments may include student logs and reporting of results from various activities. Health/Physical Education 8 (12PEHE8)— The Middle School Health and PE program will meet for the entire school year. Students will complete Health and PE assignments on alternating weeks. The 8th grade course will cover topics such as drugs and alcohol, self-esteem and body image, mental and emotional health among other topics. The Physical Education assessments may include student logs and reporting of results from various activities. High School Health (12HEFALL/12HESPR): .5 credits — During the adolescent years up through early adult-hood students face a variety of difficult decisions and challenges. Students in health class are provided with instruction and practice in the ten health skills; communication, refusal skills, conflict resolution, accessing information, analyzing influences, practicing healthful behaviors, stress management, decision making, advocacy and goal setting. Physical Education 1 (12PE1F/12PE1S): .5 credit — In this this course students will learn to make informed decisions that will assist them both now and in the future. Course work has been developed using scientific evidence that has shown that regular physical activity is essential to our health and wellness. Students will learn basic fitness terminology such as resting heart rate, maximum heart rate, exercise heart rate, overload, progression and specificity. Students will also learn how physical activity benefits both our body and mind. The students conclude the course by participating in a variety of physical activities and discuss their experiences with their classmates. Physical Education 2 (12PE2F/12PE2S): .5 credit — In this course, students make informed decisions that will assist them both now and in the future. All course work is based upon research from the American Heart Association which has indicated that the primary cause of death in the U.S., heart disease, can be treated with daily participation in physical activity. Students will review basic fitness terminology and benefits that were introduced during physical during PE 1. The students will also be introduced to the steps of the personalized fitness program design process. 14

Health and Physical Education Department

Physical Education 3 (12PE3F/12PE3S): .5 credits — Students in Physical Education 3 continue the work begun in the two previous courses. They will assess their current fitness, set Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Time Based (SMART) goals for improving their fitness, explore activities and identify activities they would enjoy and create a personalized fitness program that is aligned with all of the above. The students will then participate in their personal fitness program for five weeks submitting weekly fitness logs. After five weeks the students re-assess their fitness to monitor improvement.

Health and Physical Education Department

The Mathematics Program is designed to build each student’s knowledge of the skills and concepts required by the Pennsylvania Department of Education’s Mathematics Standards. The courses are designed to focus on supporting students to make sense of problems and persevere in solving them, reason abstractly and quantitatively, construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others, model with mathematics, use appropriate tools strategically, attend to precision, look for and make use of structure, and look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. Department Requirements: Middle School — 7th and 8th grade students must complete a core Mathematics course each year. High School — Students are required to complete 3.0 credits in Mathematics during their 9th-12th grade years. Middle School: Core Classes Mathematics 7 (12MATH7)— This course covers topics which build upon basic mathematics skills. Abstract thinking is introduced through concrete and numeric examples. Content includes decimals, patterns, variables, number theory, fractions, as ratios, percentages, equations, inequalities, geometry, graphing and probability , data analysis and graphs, geometry, measurement, and integers. Pre-Algebra 7/8 (12PREAL78) — This course is designed to cultivate mathematical understanding and competency through the study of number theory. This study includes estimation and calculation, geometry, fractions, decimals, percentages, and ratios. Students are also introduced to fractional multiplication, division, percentages and rates. Problem solving is used to develop higher order thinking while showing understanding of computations. 15

Mathematics Department

Integrated Algebra 8 (12INTAL8) — This course introduces students to all operations with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers. Students also learn measurement with both standard and metric systems. Students will learn perimeter, area, surface area, volume, angles, and angle relationships in the area of geometry. Additionally, this course will cover probability, ratios and percentages, statistics and graphing. Finally, this course also provides an introduction to algebraic expressions and equations. Pre-Algebra 8 (12PREAL8) — This course will help students develop the skills necessary to manipulate numbers, solve equations and understand the general principles at work. Students will learn to compute interest through percentages, graph linear functions, compare rational numbers with scientific notation, and convert fractional numbers between fractions, decimals, and percentages. High School: Core Classes Algebra 1 (12AL18/12AL19/12AL110): 1 credit — In this course, students will be introduced to linear equations and inequalities in one variable, ratio and proportion, operations with radicals and radical functions and exponents and exponential functions. The course will conclude with the study of linear and quadratic functions, linear models and graphs of linear equations and inequalities. Operations on polynomials such as adding, subtracting, multiplying, factoring polynomial expressions, and many other topics will also be introduced. Geometry (12GEO910/12GEO1112): 1 credit —The Geometry course will emphasize making connections within the concept of plane geometry. Students will be introduced to inductive and deductive reasoning, logic and proof including two column proofs, thinking more logically and precisely, learning the basic principles of plane and coordinate geometry, develop problem solving skills, and fully integrate algebra and geometry. Additionally, this class will prepare students for more advanced work in mathematics in other high school and college courses. Prerequisite: Algebra I Algebra 2 (12AL21011/12AL212): 1 credit — This course reviews the ideas and concepts taught in Algebra 1 along with a serious investigation of advanced algebraic concepts, including: quadratic equations, systems of equations, systems of equations, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, matrices and determinants, probability and statistics and trigonometric functions. 16

Mathematics Department

Pre-Calculus (12PCAL1112): 1 credit — This class reinforces and builds upon the material learned in Algebra 2. Additionally, it teaches basic trigonometry. This course includes equations and their graphs, families of graphs, polynomials, rational functions and expressions, radicals, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections and some work with sequences and series. The trigonometric topics include definitions and graphs of the trigonometric functions, identities and equations, and practical applications of the trigonometric functions through right angle trigonometry and the use of law of sines and cosines. Prerequisite: Students must have received a grade of B or better in Algebra 2 Integrated Algebra 09 (12INTAL9): 1 credit — Students take this mathematics course concurrently with their Algebra 1 class. This support provides students extra class time each day to get additional practice and instruction with the material being covered in Algebra 1. This class is an elective course that is designed to provide support so that all students can be college and/or career ready. Integrated Math 10 (12INTMAT10): 1 credit — This class is an elective course that is designed to provide support so that all students can be college and/or career ready Students take this mathematics course concurrently with their Geometry1 class. This support provides students extra class time each day to get additional practice and instruction with the material being covered in Geometry. Integrated Math 11 (12INTMAT11): 1 credit — This class is an elective course that students take concurrently with Algebra 2. This support provides students extra class time each day to get additional practice and instruction with the material being covered in Algebra 2. Financial Literacy (12FINLIT): 1 credit, Grade 12 — This course is designed to help prepare students for the financial challenges they will face in life after high school. The course will cover the concept of “financial health,” comparing the discipline required to maintain financial health with the discipline required to keep physically healthy, budgeting, and banking. Additional topics covered include credit and debt, with focus primarily on revolving consumer debt, credit cards, credit card marketing, credit reports/scores, identity theft, and recognizing the trouble signs of unmanageable debt. The course will end with the “real world” calculator, in which students have the opportunity to interact with a hypothetical post-graduation budget based on actual starting salary data for over 40 professional fields. 17

Mathematics Department

The Music Department includes required middle school general music class, high school elective classes, and private and group instrumental lessons. Students have many options for participating in music, including a class on the History of Rock and Roll and group Beginner Guitar Lessons. While making class and lesson appointments and completing assignments is very important, interactive participation in music classes helps students to engage in music absorption. Middle School Music 7 (12MSC7): (Marking Period 1) — This course builds upon basic concepts and is designed to provide students with a better understanding of music from other countries and cultures. The students will continue to focus on critical listening skills while exploring areas in music history, style, creation, performance, and response. The students will gain a broader perspective of world music and discover how non-Western musical styles relate to current popular trends in the United States. Music 8 (12MSC8): (Marking Period 3) — This course is the culmination of skills and objectives achieved in the previous grade. The main objective of this course is for the students to analyze, connect, and comprehend music on multiple levels and continue to develop critical listening skills. The bulk of the class material will focus on popular musical trends in the United States between 1860 and 1970. Special emphasis will be placed on how technology has influenced the creation and performance of music within that time period. High School Introduction to Music Theory (12INTMUSF/12INTMUSS): .5 credits, Grades 10-12 (offered during the first and second semesters) — This course develops the student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the processes of music. Topics covered in this course include music notation, structure and form and hearing and notating pitches, intervals, scales, keys, chords, meter, and rhythm. History of Rock and Roll (12HROCKF/12HROCKS): .5 credits (offered during the first and second semesters) — This course will explore the Rock and Roll origins and development, from the Delta blues and the early pioneers through the British invasion to today’s integration with other popular styles. Upon completion of this course, students will gain a comprehension of rock styles and artists, and investigate how it changed the social and cultural norms of America. Online Guitar Lessons (XX): .5 credits (offered during the first and second semesters) — This course will provide students with the fundamentals so they can develop the capacity to strum chords, read simple melodies and improvise guitar solos using the blues and pentatonic scales. 18

Music Department

The Science Department focuses on helping students to develop their literacy in science. This is accomplished through lesson and units of study that address the process of Inquiry Learning. Inquiry requires that students examine information and resources, plan and conduct experiments and investigations, compare their findings to others, and to communicate their results and conclusions.The Science Department offers courses for students in grades 7-12.Students in grades 7 and 8 will explore a comprehensive study of the processes and principles related to Earth and Space Science, Physical Science, and Life Science. The courses offered for students in grades 9 through 12 include Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Physical Science, and Environmental Science. Department Requirements: Middle School — 7th and 8th grade students must complete a core Science course each year. High School — Students are required to complete 3 credits in Science during their 9th-12th grade years. Middle School: Core Classes Science Explorers 7 (12SCIEXP7)— This course will focus on Earth, Space, Environment and Ecology. This course will also focus on the PA Academic Standards for Science and Technology and Environmental Studies. Special emphasis will be placed on sound and light, astronomy, weather and climate, biology, ecology, and earth’s interior, surface and waters. Interactive labs, inquiry-based activities, hands-on investigations, online virtual labs, and engaging assignments. In addition, benchmarks and assessments will establish the critical foundation to build upon the natural scientific curiosity of students. Science Explorers 8 (12SCIEXP8) — This course will offer students the opportunity to explore the principles and concepts related to the biological and physical sciences. These concepts correlate to both the Physical and Biological science understandings on the PSSA test and the PA Academic Standards for Science and Technology. Special emphasis will be placed on essential questions and underlying concept attainment for the following: Electricity and magnetism, motion, forces and energy, chemical building blocks and interactions, as well as environmental science and ecology. Students will participate in Inquiry-based and interactive activities, handson investigations and online virtual labs, among other various assessments which will assist students’ knowledge and performance of key scientific investigations, skills and concepts. 19

Science Department

High School: Core Classes Physical Science (12PSCI0910): 1 credit — This course is the combination of Physics and Chemistry concepts. The first half of the course will be dedicated to investigating the chemistry in our everyday lives and the second half of the course will study the relationship between matter and energy. Earth Science (12EARSCI9/12EARSCI911): 1 credit — This course examines the principles and processes that shape Earth and the universe. Topics include the forces and processes shaping Earth, forces inside Earth, historical geography and oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. All topics focus on the scientific principles that govern the geological processes that can be observed in the natural world. Biology (12BIO1011/12BIO11): 1 credit — This course examines the concepts and processes of life science. Topics include cell chemistry and structure, genetics, ecology, evolution, and human anatomy and physiology. All topics will focus on the principles that govern biological processes that can be observed in the natural world. Chemistry (12CHEM1112): 1 credit — In Chemistry we learn about matter, its chemical structure and properties as well as the changes matter undergoes. We will cover atomic structure, stoichiometry, solutions, gas laws, periodic law, bonding, molecular orbital theory, equilibrium, acids, bases, and become proficient in the calculations necessary to understand chemical equations and reactions. Prerequisites: Students must have received a grade of B or better in Algebra 1 Anatomy and Physiology (12ANPH12): 1 credit — Anatomy and Physiology encompasses a review of the human body, its functions and pathologies. In this course, we will review basic human structural and functional organization at both the microscopic and macroscopic level. Units will include discussions of the basic body systems including the musculo-skeletal, circulatory, nervous, reproductive, lymphatic, pulmonary, and digestive systems. Also included are discussions of human genetics, heredity, evolution, and psychology, as well as a review of recent advances in medical technology. Environmental Science (12ENVSCI): 1 credit, Grades 10-12 — The Environmental Science course explores the complex interactions between living organ-isms and their non-living environments. The course discusses current environmental concerns and evaluates strategies for conservation and preservation. It examines the vital role that humans play in the global ecosystem. All topics focus on the scientific principles that govern eco-logical processes that can be observed in the natural world. Prerequisite: Students must have completed one high school science course before enrolling in Environmental Science. 20

Science Department

The Social Studies department consists of many different classes spanning all eras. It is our goal for students to make connections between the American experience and the global one; we are not isolated, rather we are part of an ever-changing world. Students that learn from the past will be more informed citizens of the present and better able to create context for the future using 21st century skills. Department Requirements: Middle School — 7th and 8th grade students must complete a core Social Studies course each year. High School — Students are required to complete 3.0 credits in Social Studies during their 9th-12th grade years. Middle School: Core Classes Ancient World Cultures 7 (12AWC7) — This course is designed to help students become amateur historians as they explore the ancient world, from the very beginnings of human society through the early 1500’s and the age of European Exploration. A variety of fascinating topics are covered, from the builders of the Pyramids to the fierce warriors of Mesoamerica! American History 8 (12AMHIS8) — This course will guide students through the first half of American history with a special focus on Pennsylvania history. Beginning with the very first people to reach North America and ending around 1914, students will gallop through a diverse array of historical topics including the American Revolution, founding of the United States of America, and the Civil War, among many others! High School: Core Classes American History 9 (12AMHIS9): 1 credit — This course covers a time span from the early 1900’s to the present day. A wide range of historical topics will be covered through this survey-style course. By the end of the course, students will have developed a broad understanding of contemporary American and Pennsylvania history by studying subjects such as WWII, the Civil Rights Movement, and the New Millennium. Students will complete activities including selected readings, videos, writing assignments, and discussion boards. World History 10 (12WHIST10): 1 credit — This course covers a time span that begins in the early 1500’s to the present day. A wide range of historical topics will be covered through this survey-style course. By the end of the course, students will have developed anunderstanding of contemporary world history by studying subjects such as WWII, the Cold War, and the Modern Era. Students will complete activities including selected readings, videos, writing assignments, and discussion boards. 21

Social Studies Department

Civics 11 (12CIV11): 1 credit —This course is designed to help students become active, productive citizens of the United States of America. Throughout the course, students will be answering questions such as, “What is government?” “How does the American government function?” and “What am I doing to become an ideal citizen?” Topics covered include a study of citizenship and the American government. By the end of the course, students will more fully understand how the government works and what role they as individuals play in these dynamic systems! Global Studies 12 (12GLOBAL): 1 credit — Students in this course examine various countries’ recent history (past 50/60 years), economic issues (poverty, growing economies), environmental issues, culture, and international politics (nuclear weapons, regime changes, and human rights). Students will take a mental expedition across the globe beginning in East Asia (China, India, and Korea) and jumping to Europe (Germany and Russia) and the Middle East/North Africa (Egypt, Israel, and Iraq) before a final crash landing in hopefully South America (Brazil and Colombia). High School: Electives Intro to Psychology (12PSYCHF/12PSYCHS): .5 credits, Grades 10-12 — This class offers an examination and application of major principles of psychology through guided study. The course will provide an introduction to research methods and scientific developments in the field of psychology. Topics covered in this course will include human development, learning and conditioning, the brain and spinal cord, and dreams and sleep. Students will examine famous psychologists, such as Pavlov and Skinner, and how their contributions to the field of psychology are still important today. This course is designed to help prepare college bound students and/or for those who have an interest in learning more about human psychology. Criminal Justice (12CRIMJ): .5 credits, Grades 11-12 — This course provides an overview of the American criminal justice system. Students will explore the basic principles of Law Enforcement, the Court System and the Corrections System. Students will also analyze the inter-relationship that is shared by each branch of the criminal justice system in the administration of justice. Students will explore the Amendments that govern the criminal justice system, including the types of crimes, the various defenses of the accused, and ultimately, the judgment, and punishment of criminals. Child Development (12CHDEVF): .5 credits, Grades 9-10 — This half year elective will provide interested students with guided study intended to investigate how children develop physically, emotionally, and cognitively throughout their early years. Students will gain valuable knowledge regarding the health and general development of children and will leave the course with a better understanding of techniques and schools of thought that can be utilized to help children grow and learn safely. 22

Social Studies Department

Parenting (12PARS): .5 credits, Grades 11-12 — This half year elective will provide guided study intended to help students to understand the role of a parent, to build self -esteem within the family, and to explore human development in the early years. Topics covered in the course include parenting roles and responsibilities; the impact of attitudes, opinions, culture and society on parenting; nurturing, discipline, and guidance for children. This elective will be of particular interest to students who are currently parents or about to become parents, although it is not a requirement.

Social Studies Department

The technology courses in general are keeping pace with the ever changing world of technological advancements. Computer literacy is one goal of the technology courses and is aimed at helping prepare students for their cyber education and the real world. Several specialized technology programs promote skills and preparation in Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM), as well as, computer programming.

Technology and Engineering Department

Middle School Middle School Technology (12TECHMSF/12TECHMSS) — This course is designed to promote computer literacy by providing the necessary tools for the AHCCS cyber school student to thrive and succeed. Students will gain comfort and familiarity in using the programs available on their AHCCS laptop. They will master using spellcheck and the “snipping tool.” Students will be introduced to the essentials of Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint. Students will learn to access assignments and learn to submit various assignment types in the AHCCS Learning Management System, Moodle. This course then focuses on more: Internet Safety, Netiquette, and Internet Searches. The instructor will augment this curriculum with additional course content and resources as needed. New this year in the Technology and Engineering Department is a program known as Project Lead the Way ( PLTW) which prepares middle school students to be the most innovative and productive leaders in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Through an engaging, hands-on curriculum, PLTW encourages the development of problem-solving skills, creative and innovative reasoning and a love of learning. STEM education is at the heart of today’s high-tech, high-skill global economy. Our next generation of leaders must develop the critical-reasoning and problem-solving skills that will help make them the most productive in the world. 23

Gateway To Technology (GTT) Middle School Course Descriptions (Limited Enrollment) — The middle school program is an activities-oriented program designed to challenge and engage middle school students. Taught in conjunction with a rigorous academic curriculum, the program is divided into six independent, nine-week units.

Technology and Engineering Department

Design and Modeling (12PTLWF) — Focuses on the use of solid modeling software (a sophisticated mathematical technique for representing solid objects) as part of the design process. Utilizing this design approach, students understand how design influences their lives. Students also learn sketching techniques and use descriptive geometry as a component of design, measurement and computer modeling. Students brainstorm, research, develop ideas, create models, test and evaluate design ideas and communicate solutions. Automation and Robotics (12PTLWS) — Focuses on the history, development, and influences of automation and robotics in our lives. Students learn about mechanical systems, energy transfer, machine automation and computer control systems. Students acquire knowledge and skills in problem solving, teamwork collaboration and innovation. Energy and the Environment (EE) Course — Students investigate the importance of energy in our lives and the impact energy use has on the environment. They design and model alternative energy sources and then participate in an energy expo to demonstrate energy concepts and innovative ideas. Students evaluate ways to reduce energy consumption through energy efficiency and waste management techniques. High School Introduction to Drafting and Computer Aided Design (12CADF/12CADS): .5 credits (offered during the second semester), Grades 9-12 — This course is associated with Engineering Design Concepts. The course includes a brief introduction into some of the basic features of SolidWorks design software. Other topics covered are the importance of the engineering notebook and the usefulness of (Engineering) sketching techniques. Topics such as, “what is meant by design intent?” and the “pros and cons of joining vs. fastening” are also explored. A good portion of the class covers basic drafting concepts and procedures, as well. Prerequisite: Algebra Technology (12TECHF/12TECHS): .5 credits (offered during the first and second semesters) — This course is designed to promote computer literacy by providing the necessary tools for students to thrive and succeed. Students will gain 24

familiarity in using the programs available on their AHCCS laptop. They will master using spellcheck and the “snipping tool.” Students will be introduced to the essentials of Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint. Students will learn to access assignments and learn to submit various assignment types in the AHCCS Learning Management System, Moodle. This course then focuses on more traditional technology education covering topics such as: The History of the Computer, Internet Safety, Netiquette, e-Commerce, Internet Searches, and more. The instructor will augment this curriculum with additional course content and resources as needed.

Technology and Engineering Department

We believe that studying a world language (second language) and its cultural influences enhances one’s personal education in many ways. Students who study a second language and culture have a powerful foundation for successful communication. To study another language and culture is to gain an especially rich preparation for the future. Second language/cultural learning is an essential requisite for life as a citizen in the ever-growing local, national and world communities. Department Requirements: High School — Students enrolling with AHCCS in grades 9-12, are required to complete 1 World Language credit. Our primary focus is the study of French and Spanish. Other languages may be studied independently as per student requests or needs. High School French 1 (12FREN1): 1 credit, Grades 9-12 — In this course, students will learn the alphabet, pronunciation, greetings, vocabulary, and basic grammar. Students will also learn about French culture. The curriculum centers on assignments from Rosetta Stone, the internationally acclaimed software for learning World Languages by immersion, work from other websites, and participation in virtual classes. French 2 (12FREN2): 1 credit, Grades 9-12 — In French 2, you build on the basis of French 1 with great expansion of vocabulary, beginning to read French texts, and more detail on the verb system of French and other grammar. We will deepen our knowledge of French culture and also French Speaking African cultures. Our curriculum will center on the Rosetta Stone, the internationally acclaimed software for learning World Languages by immersion. The grade will be based on assignments from Rosetta Stone, work from other websites, and participation in virtual classes. Prerequisite: Students must receive a grade of C or better in French 1 25

World Language Department

Advanced French 3: 1 credit, Grades 9-12 — In French 3, you build on the basis of French 2 with great expansion of vocabulary, reading French texts, and more detail on the verb system of French and other grammar. We will deepen our knowledge of French culture and the Franco-phone (French-Speaking) countries. Our curriculum will center on the Rosetta Stone, the internationally acclaimed software for learning World Languages by immersion. The grade will be based on assignments from Rosetta Stone, work from other websites, Reports about French literature and culture, and participation in virtual classes. Prerequisite: Students must receive a grade of C or better in French 2 Spanish 1 (12SPAN1): 1 credit, Grades 9-12 — In this course, students will explore the cultures of Spain, Puerto Rico, Texas and Costa Rica. The first quarter is spent in Spain. Students learn the basics of greeting, introducing, numbers and spelling in this quarter. In the second quarter, we are located in Puerto Rico where students learn to describe and to talk about likes and dislikes. In the third quarter we go to Texas. Students talk about what they want to do, like to do and their everyday activities. They also learn to tell how often they do these activities. We spend the fourth quarter in Costa Rica. We talk about what we have and need, classes and plans and invite someone do something. Spanish 2 (12SPAN2): 1 credit, Grades 9-12 — Students explore the cultures of Chile, Mexico, Argentina and Florida. Students learn to describe people and family relationships, talk about where they and others live and to talk about their responsibilities. Students also learn to comment on food, take and make polite requests, and to offer help and give instructions, talk about their daily routine, how they feel, and how to give advice. Finally, students will learn the essentials for shopping: giving opinions, asking for and offering help in a store. Students also learn to say where they went and what they did and to talk on the phone. Students use a book that provides audio visual features right from their computer. Students hear dialogues, watch cultural and grammar videos, complete multiple choice activities that have a self-check feature and other activities that the teacher can assess. Each quarter, students complete one reading and one writing assignment. Each of these assignments is introduced with a reading or writing strategy that will be practiced in the assignment. Students will also record themselves speaking Spanish for the teacher to hear. Students meet for three hours each week. Prerequisite: Students must receive a grade of C or better in Spanish 1 Spanish Advanced — This course includes an intense review of grammar, vocabulary, and idioms as well as intensive use of drills and exercises to develop competence and fluency in speaking and writing idiomatic Spanish through conversation, debates and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Students must receive a grade of C or better in Spanish 2 26

World Language Department

EAST 222 Valley Creek Boulevard, Suite 301 Exton, PA 19341 Office: 484-615-6200 Fax: 610-644-7019

WEST 163 9th Street New Florence, PA 15944 Office: 724-371-1390 Fax: 724-235-2081

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