CREATIVE SELF-HELP DIVERSITY PROACTIVE INFLUENTIAL SUPPORTIVE EXPERIENCED ACCESSIBLE RESPONSIVE PROGRESSIVE CHALLENGING

cpf

CITY PAROCHIAL FOUNDATION

Grants Review 2004
Trust for London

COLLABORATIVE CREATIVE SELF-HELP DIVERSITY PROACTIVE INFLUENTIAL SUPPORTIVE EXPERIENCED ACCESSIBLE RESPONSIVE PROGRESSIVE CHALLENGING

Managing assets

Introducing City Parochial Foundation and Trust for London
City Parochial Foundation and Trust for London exist to benefit the poor of London and provide support to community organisations that have charitable purposes. In achieving those aims, both organisations are involved in a wide range of activities…

The Foundation owns a large property and equities portfolio. The Trust also has an equities portfolio. These provide the resources to meet the charitable aims of both bodies. One of the assets of the Foundation is the Resource Centre for London’s voluntary sector on Holloway Road, N7 which provides meeting facilities, offices and services

Good practice
Good governance and grant support both before and after are vital activities if maximum use is to be made of charitable resources. The Foundation and Trust publish guides to good practice

Properties
The Foundation owns a number of sites and buildings which are let at low or peppercorn rents to organisations for charitable or voluntary activities

Reactive grants
The Foundation and Trust provide direct grants for specific purposes, often responding to local or exceptional needs as they arise

Special programmes
The Foundation supports organisations working with disabled people through a scheme known as Count Us In. Previous special programmes have included work with youth organisations

Equality
The Foundation and Trust support work to counter discrimination and to tackle violence and isolation. Another initiative is to offset disadvantage in established communities, often predominantly white, in areas of long term poverty

Partnerships
A number of the Foundation’s major schemes which tackle schools exclusion, refugee education and work with young men are funded jointly with other trusts and organisations

Inside
Foreword page 2 Reviewing the programmes page 4-11 Looking ahead page 12-17 CPF Grants made 2004 page 18-31 CPF Finances page 32 TfL Grants made 2004 page 33-41 TfL Finances page 42 Trustees and Staff page 43-44

Innovation
Schemes responding to new needs have been established including an education awards initiative, and access to appropriate employment for displaced professionals

Consultation
Because of their extensive experience the Foundation and Trust are frequently asked to comment on policy proposals and consultation documents produced by other bodies including local and central government

Networks
The exchange of information, good practice and ideas between funding organisations has many benefits. The Foundation and Trust are active in many formal and informal networks including the London Funders Group and the Association of Charitable Foundations

Grants Review 2004

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ondon is one of the most exciting cities in the world. It is a living, breathing, pulsating city with millions of people resident within its boundary and millions more commuting in each day. It boasts a tremendous mix of cultures, races and religions and it attracts newcomers from across the world. It is a working city with a huge tourist market. It is also a rich city, generating 20 per cent of Britain’s wealth. It has some of the most affluent areas in the UK but alongside that it also has some of the poorest. It is in this context, with poverty living ‘cheek by jowl’ with affluence, that the Foundation works to address the needs of the poor, the disadvantaged, and the marginalised of London. The main feature of 2004, falling in the middle of the current quinquennium 2002-2006, was to assess the progress that had been made against the targets and

Communities Histories Project, which is about newcomers to London, the Leisure & Lifestyle Centre seeks to address the poverty and multiple deprivation found in one of London’s older, predominantly white, housing estates. The Centre opened in April 2004 with a fine display of gymnastics by the Ladywell Gymnastics Club, which has its permanent home at the Centre. The Gymnastics Club is fitted with Olympic standard facilities and it is an aspiration of both the Foundation and, I am sure, the Gymnastics Club that some of its young members will participate in the Olympics in 2012.

Sharing experience
The Foundation is of the firm opinion that we should learn from mistakes and shortcomings, and share our experiences with others. The Schools Exclusion Project was only partly successful. The funding partners published an evaluation carried out by Julia Unwin, and a summary report was published in the Association of Charitable Foundations quarterly newsletter Trust and Foundation News to ensure lessons learnt were heard by other grant-givers. The wider world saw important developments in 2004. The merger of the Community Fund and the New Opportunities Fund into the Big Lottery Fund will have major implications for London’s voluntary sector. It was heartening that the Government listened to the views of the voluntary sector and chose to keep lottery funding independent of Government direction. The Bill formally uniting the two Funds is still awaited. The publication of the white paper on charity reform and its subsequent Bill was a significant event for the charitable sector. Although this Bill fell in the run up to the General Election, I am glad to see that the Government has re-introduced it in the Queen’s Speech. This is the first major rewrite of charity law since the 17th century and the wide consultation in the lead up to the Bill has resulted in proposals that should be of considerable benefit to charities and their beneficiaries, the debate about defining ‘public benefit’ not withstanding. Another issue for the sector were the difficulties that beset the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund. The Foundation was involved in the ‘rescue’ scheme to safeguard funded organisations and is very pleased

Continuity and change
grant priorities developed in 2001. The mid-quinquennial review looked at what was working well, new developments in the field and rethinking the matters where progress has been slow. Overall, our Grants Programme is on target with good progress being made on the Count Us In disability programme and the Young Men’s Project. The Refugee Communities Histories Project run by the Evelyn Oldfield Unit has made significant progress. We believe that this innovative project will be of profound significance in decades to come. It seeks to record oral histories of members of the communities that have arrived in London since 1951 – the year the Geneva Convention on the status of Refugees was signed – on the subject of their arrival, settlement and economic, social and cultural contribution to London. We are happy to report the opening and first year of operation of the Bellingham Leisure & Lifestyle Centre. In contrast to the Refugees

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and I wish to thank all of my fellow Governing Body members for their tremendous support and encouragement. I would especially like to thank Professor Julian Franks, John Barnes, Jyoti Munsiff and Albert Tucker, members whose terms of office ended in April 2005. We also said goodbye to Edward Lord, who has decided to stand down after three years’ service. I am delighted to welcome to the Governing Body, Tzeggai Yohannes Deres, Robert Hughes-Penney, Martin Dudley, Paul Wates, Murziline Parchment, Ingrid Posen and Neville Walton, all of whom have joined us in the past year. We were pleased that my predecessor, Professor Gerald Manners, was elected to chair the Association of Charitable Foundations. We were doubly pleased when he was awarded an OBE in the 2005 New Year’s Honours List for services to the charitable sector. My thanks also go to the staff for their support and enthusiasm, their professionalism and commitment to the work of the Foundation. Despite a very long history, City Parochial Foundation can never be accused of resting on its laurels. It would be easy simply to provide grants for worthy causes which are already established. Instead the Foundation is at the forefront of tackling new issues and problems as they arise, and looking for new ways to approach them, and I believe this Review provides many examples of that proud tradition. It was particularly gratifying, therefore, that we were honoured in 2004 as Grant-maker of the Year in the Charity Awards. Every year brings new challenges and it is a credit to members of the Governing Body, past and present, that they have never shirked from taking on sometimes unpopular causes and pushing for innovative ways to tackle them. I am confident that they will continue to do so in the future. Maggie Baxter Chair
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Success for the Foundation and Trust came at the prestigious Charity Awards in June 2004 when they were announced as winners of the best Grant-maker category. The submission focused on the Foundation’s and Trust’s approach to developing and funding proactive initiatives to enable refugee communities to settle and integrate in London. It highlighted the work of the Employability Forum, the Evelyn Oldfield Unit, the Resource Unit for Supplementary and Mother-tongue Schools, the Refugee Education Awards Scheme, and the Refugee Communities History Project. Seen at the Awards ceremony are (left to right) judges Kathleen Duncan and Gerald Oppenheim, and – representing CPF and TfL – Maggie Baxter, Bharat Mehta, Carol Harrison and Sioned Churchill.

to see that the Diana Fund has recently been able to resume making grants. Internal change came about when the City Parochial Foundation Trustee, an incorporated body, adopted the role of Trustee of both, the City Parochial Foundation and the Trust for London from 1 January 2005. The incorporation assures individual trustees security from personal litigation, should that ever become an issue. To mark this, the word ‘Trustee’ is now only used for the new incorporated body. The incorporation should have important implications for the flexible and efficient working of both bodies. In addition, changes have been made to our governance procedures to ensure that we follow best practice, including working towards greater diversity amongst the Governing Body members. This was my first year as chair of the City Parochial Foundation Trustee

Grants Review 2004

Reviewing the programmes
Events 2004
January The value of voluntary work slumped by more than a quarter between 1995 and 2000, according to figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS). It found that voluntary activity across the UK was worth £17.7bn in 1995, but only £13.2bn in 2000 – a fall of nearly 26%. London remains the most racially diverse place in Britain, according to the Office for National Statistics. 45% of Britain’s non-white population lived in the city in 2001. It said 78% of black Africans and 61% of black Caribbeans lived in London, as did 54% of Bangladeshi people. February The public sector is now the biggest single source of funding for charities, accounting for 37% of their annual £20bn income, according to the National Council for Voluntary Organisations. Figures from the 2004 Voluntary Sector Almanac show that charities in the UK have assets worth £70.1 billion; more

continuing development of the Count Us In programme working with disability organisations; the Young Men’s Project jointly funded with the John Lyon’s Charity; the Bellingham Community Project (opposite); and for Trust for London the start of a new project with Evelyn Oldfield Unit documenting the histories of new refugee and migrant communities which have arrived in London since 1951.

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ity Parochial Foundation and Trust for London both use a five year ‘quinquennium’ approach to funding, where priorities are set. During the period, funding is monitored, the principal means being through a midterm review at which a detailed look is taken at grants made and other funding programmes. The aim is to consider how the priorities identified are being met – and what action may be needed to boost programmes which have not developed in the expected way – to see what new priorities may be emerging, and to look at wider issues affecting the voluntary sector which may require adjustment to the existing programmes or have implications for future quinquennia. The 2004 mid-term review showed that overall, the programme was on target and concentrating on areas in greatest need. Geographically, six of the Foundation’s ‘top ten’ funded boroughs were among the ten most deprived boroughs as identified by the Government’s Neighbourhood Renewal Unit. But poverty often resides cheek-by-jowl with affluence. CPF strives to alleviate poverty as and where it manifests itself rather than where it is considered to exist based on indices. CPF believes that funding needs to be balanced between boroughs considered the poorest, and poor communities in boroughs considered to be well-off. The mid-term report also reported on the successes in the Foundation’s pro-active work. Examples include

Strategic interventions
Many of these initiatives take an enormous amount of staff time, but CPF and TfL believe that they are strategic interventions which will have positive implications for the beneficiaries and enable the Foundation and Trust to pursue their missions and stay consistent with their histories of being far-sighted and alert to new issues. Two particular initiatives, started in previous quinquennia and still funded by the Foundation are the Refugee Education Awards Scheme and the Employability Forum aimed at assisting refugees into work. These are both projects that will be considered for further funding. Another which was approaching completion at the end of 2004 was the Count Us In disability project and consideration on further action will depend on the conclusion of the evaluation during 2005. One completed project was the study of terms and conditions of staff and employees in the voluntary sector, which led to the report Valuing potential (see page 10). Although the findings caused a stir at the Mayoral election voluntary sector hustings, the report has not generated the hoped-for level of publicity though the aim will be to encourage others to consider the issues at appropriate events such as the National Council of Voluntary Organisations Conference. Also completed was the Governance Project which looked at small organisations and a number of bodies have taken up the issues raised.

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Springboard for Bellingham
Provision of recreational facilities was a CPF priority in the 1930s to help towards wellbeing and physical health. One such scheme was playing fields at Bellingham, Lewisham in what is one of the most deprived wards in London. By the 1990s the facilities had become outmoded, and this led to a major rethink on what to do with the site. After several years of negotiation a £4.5 million funding package was put together with support from a wide range of funders including Sport England, the London Borough of Lewisham, Henry Smith’s Charity, London Marathon Trust, Bridge House Trust, and the New Opportunities Fund among others. Eventually work began in 2003 on demolition of the existing buildings and their replacement by modern sports facilities, a healthy living centre, and meeting and function rooms. The centre, run on a day-to-day basis by Greenwich Leisure, re-opened as Bellingham Leisure & Lifestyle Centre in April 2004. It has proved an immediate success – no fewer than 1,500 people passed through the doors in the first three weeks of opening. By the end of the year the Centre had 450 pre-paid members, 1,300 had taken out pay and play memberships and 400 young people held membership cards. The scheme also employs 30 local people. An official opening was held in October to celebrate the rebirth, attended by funders and other supporters. The event included a display by the Ladywell Gymnastics Club – one of the country’s leading clubs - which is now based at the centre. Although this is a rather unusual project, it falls within an important Foundation priority – to support established

communities, often predominantly white, in areas of longterm poverty. During 2004, CPF also agreed a grant towards an in-depth evaluation of the work and its impact on the local community.

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than half a million people are paid employees of the voluntary sector; the public believes charities raise nearly a quarter of their cash – 24% – from the business sector while in fact, private companies contributed just 4.3% of charities’ funds in 2001-02. A third of the public believes trustees are probably or definitely paid, according to the survey of nearly 1,000 people by voluntary sector think tank NFP Synergy. Concern about how much donated cash actually reaches the intended cause is the most annoying thing about charities. March The Balance Charitable Foundation is launched and aims to secure the release of up to £20bn of unclaimed assets from banks and other financial institutions so they can be used for charitable purposes. The National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) acknowledges a skills shortage in the sector, and says that organisations need to get more involved in staff development and training. A London Assembly report has found that 60% of Britons with HIV live in London. The virus is reportedly spreading fastest among heterosexual Londoners. It suggests that if HIV continues to spread in London at its current rate, the numbers of people infected could reach 50,000 by 2009.
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Southwark showcase
Support for refugees has been a recurring theme of the work of City Parochial Foundation and Trust for London. One group which benefited in 2004 was the Southwark Refugee Artists Network (SRAN) which supports the artistic and professional development of refugee artists – both visual and performing – through information, advice and training, and events at which refugee artists can present and promote their work. A highlight of the year was the Mosaic Festival, a day-long event where 100 artists performed for more than 3,000 visitors. Another was the Carnival of Animals pilot project which took place at Towerbridge Primary School in October 2004. Five artists worked with 29 children for one week, and an audience of parents, teachers and family attended a ten-minute final performance, which incorporated story telling, dance, music, mask making and mime. Trust for London funded the post of the part-time Refugee Arts Co-ordinator Sharan Dass, who, apart from organising events, has built partnerships with other local arts and community groups.

‘We artists may have come reluctantly to the UK. We follow a long tradition of artists from almost all parts of the world driven here by politics, or prejudice, or racism, or just the wish to persecute or murder people with artistic ideas. Following the massive contribution exiled artists have made to British culture in the past, through our art and the Network we also seek to add to the rich mix of Southwark and London’s cultural and artistic life.’ SRAN chair Tomorr Kokona, writing in the group’s annual report

PHOTOS: FREWINE SOLOMON

Grants Review 2004

There is no guarantee that all initiatives will work out as expected – that is the nature of such projects which involve risk. For instance, the Schools Exclusion Project in Merton which was a collaborative project with Equitable Charitable Trust and Bridge House Trust only achieved limited success. However, it provided many lessons that will be taken on board in setting up further initiatives. A report to this effect was produced by Julia Unwin on behalf of the Foundation. Current initiatives are ambitious in both scope and number, and as they deal with complex issues often take time to settle down and get off the ground. One such is the aim of establishing a Somali Community Forum to bring together the large number of Somali groups operating in London. Difficulties in co-ordination and information flow between groups have meant that progress has not been as rapid as expected. The initiative on tackling violence and hate crimes also took time to develop, but as reported last year, a number of projects were funded in 2003 and further progress was made in 2004. Work is proceeding on taking things further, including projects which aim to tackle the use of weapons by young people. Inevitably some projects gain early priority in the quinquennium. One which will be starting in the second half is a project to develop work with older people. Events can disrupt some programmes as has been the case with projects around the themes of image, identity and exclusion. Tentative discussion had already been held with the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund, but these had to be curtailed due to the litigation problems the Fund faced in the United States, which forced it to cease all grantmaking. CPF was closely involved in the launch of a rescue scheme for the fund and committed £250,000 to enable voluntary and community organisations to continue their work. (It is pleasing to report that since then, the issue has

Norman House 50 years on
Concern about prisoners and the need to ensure adequate support for their rehabilitation has been a recurring theme for City Parochial Foundation. Back in the 1950s, it was estimated that between one quarter and a third were homeless on release from prison. The problem led Merfyn Turner, a Welsh social worker in the penal field, to approach London Parochial Charities (now CPF) to provide funds for a ‘half way’ house – to provide a substitute home and ‘family’ where persistent offenders could start to rebuild their broken lives. CPF’s support led to the opening of Norman House in 1954. The project expanded and has been managed since 1994 by Stonham Housing Association, and still provides high levels of support to residents within a structure of group work, communal living and resident participation. In September 2004, Stonham held a celebratory seminar – again supported by CPF – to mark the half centenary of what is believed to be the longest running residential project for ex-offenders in the country, and to explore the future role of the voluntary sector in providing for the aftercare of ex-offenders.

been resolved and the money advanced has been returned with interest.)

Improving service
The mid-term review also looked at the operations of CPF and TfL. The Quality Framework developed by the Association of Charitable Foundations has been implemented and the Foundation is believed to be the first grant-making agency to have completed the framework and reached Level 3 – the highest – on all areas under scrutiny. As part of this process a new Grants Handbook has been developed. Another internal improvement has been the overhaul of the database including a new way to track the status of each funding application. This saves time and effort. The Foundation is also keen to ensure that applicants are

April More than £120m of government grants for voluntary and community organisations are put online at www.governmentfunding.org.uk. London will need £4bn over the next three years to plug its affordable housing gap, say the Chartered Institute of Housing, the Local Government Association and the National Housing Federation in a joint submission to the Treasury. A survey of Londoners shows 73% like living in the city, rising to 91% among Asians. The poll for the Commission on London Governance, showed 72% found the city's cultural and historical heritage the principal source of

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pride. When asked to choose one identity, many more respondents chose ‘Londoner’ than ‘English’. The Home Secretary announces an inquiry will be held into the murder of Asian teenager Zahid Mubarek by his cellmate at Feltham Young Offender’s Institution. May The £125m Futurebuilders fund set up to help England’s voluntary and community organisations get involved in the provision of public services through investment in technology, staff training and capital projects will change the way public services are delivered, home secretary David Blunkett says. The Parenting Fund, worth £15.5m over two years, is launched to support vulnerable and disadvantaged parents, but is “tiny in comparison to the extent of the need” across England, according to children’s charity NCH. Charity commissioner Geraldine Peacock is appointed as the Commission’s new chairwoman. June Under the government ChangeUp initiative, £72m has been given to the voluntary sector to promote its involvement in delivering public services. It will be used to build an infrastructure capable of providing extra capacity and delivering more services.
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Building confidence
Women in Merton who experience mental health distress or feel their mental health is at risk have a support agency in the form of Merton Women’s Drop-in to turn to. Working outside the traditional psychiatric framework the service supports and encourages members to participate as fully as possible in their communities. The Drop-In provides a relaxed, safe environment where a range of activities such as arts and crafts, computer training, yoga, a poetry group, talks by agencies and trips promote an ethos of mutual support, confidence building and selfempowerment. Weekly sessions help members who feel their wellbeing is at risk by identifying problems sooner and allowing early intervention. The group now goes out once a month to local venues, and the seaside. In 2004, it celebrated its tenth anniversary with a tour of the Houses of Parliament. Merton Women’s Drop-In last year employed a development worker through a Trust for London grant. Without this funding, the group says it would have been unable to continue – now it has evolved enormously and has considerable potential for immediate and long-term development.

Grants Review 2004

10 years success
Among the ‘umbrella’ and support bodies that CPF and TfL have established over the years is the Evelyn Oldfield Unit, set up in memory of a CPF field officer who died in 1992, to develop specialist support for refugee organisations, and enable them to tackle the needs of the communities they serve. Last year marked the 10th anniversary of the Unit, during which several events – including a party in February – were held to reflect on the achievements and review the work of the Unit. Another venture was an account of the Unit which is due to be published in 2005. Work also began during 2004 on a major new initiative – the Refugee Communities History Project for which Trust for London is a leading funder – to document and demonstrate the cultural, social and economic contributions made by members of refugee communities to London society since 1951. It will record the experiences of individual refugees from the time they first arrived in the city to the present day. These orally and visually recorded histories will be archived and exhibited at the Museum of London and the participating Refugee Community Organisations (RCOs) will also be encouraged to use the life stories creatively for their own purposes. Fifteen RCOs are participating in the two year project, seven in the first year (2004-5) and eight in the second (2005-6). For more information contact the Evelyn Oldfield Unit, The Resource Centre, 356 Holloway Road, London N7 6PA 020 7700 0100. email adminstrator@evelynoldfield.co.uk website www.evelynoldfield.co.uk

Dancers entertain at the Evelyn Oldfield Unit 10th birthday celebrations

satisfied with grant application procedures. Feedback from a survey about these was very positive. Not surprisingly perhaps, it was even more so among successful applicants. Because a very high level of applicants met the broad guidelines, it was necessary to refine priority areas. This has led to consideration of looking at ways of communicating changes, either through the web site or agreeing to tighter priorities at the start of the next quinquennium. A number of small changes have also been considered on administrative issues as a result of the feedback. For the remainder of the quinquennium, proactive work will focus on such areas as the Young Men’s Project which is due for evaluation in 2005, and as already indicated,older people. Another area for activity is a further boost for the work

associated with hate crimes. CPF is also looking at ways of working with perpetrators of hate crimes, particularly race crimes – the Runnymede Trust has already been funded to consider this issue.

Andrew Hind is appointed chief executive of the Charity Commission. His past employers include the BBC, Barnardo’s and Action Aid. London is the second most expensive city in the world – behind Tokyo – to live in, according to Mercer Human Resource Consulting’s survey. High accommodation and transport costs helped push it from seventh to second in a year. July Research by think tank nfpSynergy, based on a poll of 1,000 adults, shows that 58% of the public have “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in charities, a rise of 25 percentage points since 1996. The latest figures place charities third in a confidence league table of

Wider picture
The mid-term review also looked at wider issues affecting the voluntary sector and how these might impact on and influence CPF and TfL funding in coming years. For instance, London is encountering major demographic changes. One quarter of the population is from minority ethnic communities, and the capital has a higher than average number of both older people and young people under the age of 25 than elsewhere in the country. These have significant implications for social welfare policy as these sections feature disproportionately highly among the ‘poor’. Another is the merger of the Community Fund and New Opportunities Fund into The Big Lottery Fund which will

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institutions, behind the army and schools. London relies more on overseas-trained health staff than any other part of the UK, says a report by the King’s Fund. In the three London NHS trusts studied by the health charity, between 12% and 25% of nurses were not UK trained. High property costs are leaving Londoners “hard up, run down and stressed out” according to a report The Big Squeeze by the London Housing Federation. Salaries are up by 21% since 1999, but house prices leapt 58%. The amount of money owed by consumers has broken through the symbolic £1 trillion barrier for the first time. According to the National Consumer Council, about six million families are already struggling to keep up with credit commitments at a time when borrowing is rising. August Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell announces that the voluntary sector is to receive 60-70% of the Big Lottery Fund money. The BLF will have a free hand to set up its own grants programmes: government will no longer dictate how lottery cash is to be spent. An investigation by the Poppy Project has revealed that there are at least 730 licensed premises selling sex in the capital. The study also revealed that there are more than 8,000 women working as prostitutes in “off-street” venues.
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Valuing potential – recruiting and retaining staff
Over the past few years City Parochial Foundation’s field officers have noticed that a growing number of organisations had to delay taking up grants made by the Foundation for the purpose of employing workers in voluntary organisations. Time and again organisations report that they have been unable to appoint suitably experienced staff at the first attempt. Sometimes the posts have had to be restructured so that a higher salary can be offered; on other occasions the problem has been retention of staff rather than recruitment. Some exciting and badly needed initiatives have been blighted by these basic problems and have simply failed to achieve their objectives. The Foundation appointed two highly experienced voluntary sector consultants – Julia Unwin and Lucy Ball – to produce a discussion document which would attempt to identify the issues more clearly, explore some possible solutions, and, above all, provoke public debate on these important matters. This led to the publication in 2004 of the discussion document Valuing potential, which confirmed that the voluntary sector must look for new ways of attracting and keeping staff if they are to be fully effective in providing public services. The authors argued that the role of the voluntary sector as the initiator of new ways of dealing with desperate social problems needs to be preserved and enhanced but without adequately skilled people to do the work this is unlikely. They called on organisations to ‘fish in different pools’ and

‘use different rods’, in these ways broadening the numbers of potential recruits. Specific ideas put forward included: • more attention to pay and pensions issues; • greater flexibility in terms and conditions; • more attention to job design; • ‘brands’ need to be developed to attract recruits; • greater attention to meet individual preferences in styles of working; • adopting techniques such as university ‘milk rounds’ to attract graduates; • greater use of secondments from other sectors perhaps through joint approaches such as a voluntary sector agency; and • further efforts to promote diversity particularly at senior levels. The report acknowledges that none of the strategies will be cost free, requiring champions and supporters, both to promote new ways of working and to finance them. In his introduction to the document John Muir, chairman of City Parochial Foundation’s grants committee, pointed out that if the issues are not resolved they will have a perceptible, negative effect on the quality of public services, and the whole of the ambitious initiative to involve the voluntary sector would be imperilled. The document was issued at the hustings during the election for Mayor of London and efforts have been made to encourage others to consider the issues involved. Copies of Valuing potential are available from City Parochial Foundation, 6 Middle Street, London EC1A 7PH or can be downloaded as a pdf at www.cityparochial.org.uk/cpf/cpf_publications.html

Grants Review 2004

distribute 50 per cent of lottery proceeds. This may have implications for London’s voluntary sector. Similarly the Charities Bill, the first major change in charity legislation for centuries will raise issues for all grant-makers and beneficiaries, subject to it reaching the statute book. There are also significant changes in social policy including the Government’s target to eliminate child poverty over 20 years and associated pilot schemes such as SureStart and Connexions which may become universal. Merger of equal opportunities bodies into the Equality and Human Rights Commission is imminent. And the Neighbourhood Renewal, Social Exclusion and Homelessness Units are also due to amalgamate. It remains to be seen what the effects of all these will be, but with the Government committed to a wider role for the voluntary sector in delivering services, it is clear that there will be a lot of uncertainty and change over the coming years.

compared with 34% in the Trust’s first year of operation. This is partly due to the growth of alternative small grants programmes which have emerged in recent years. As a result of the review, for the remainder of the quinquennium the Trust will prioritise and support, among others, applications from: • black and minority ethnic communities for older people’s and women’s groups; • new communities from Eastern Europe which will require outreach work; • groups tackling Islamophobia; • creative educational activities and social education programmes; • small black disability groups and user-led disabled organisations; • new and emerging communities; • organisations applying for core costs rather than project funds; • estate-based organisations particularly those in isolated areas; and • groups which show the highest level of user involvement. In its proactive work the Trust will look back at previous pioneering work such as the Small Groups Workers Scheme and the Financial Fitness project to see whether further work is necessary in these areas.

Inequality in Britain has continued to increase according to the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR). Fewer people are living in relative poverty than in 1997, but the proportion of wealth held by Britain’s richest 10% rose from 47% to 54% during the 1990s, it said. September Voluntary work may hold the key to happiness in the community. Those areas with the best quality of life had high levels of informal voluntary activity. October Workplace-based volunteering schemes are clocking up more than £1bn a year’s worth of staff time for charity, Home Office figures reveal. The NCVO launches a new collaborative working unit to advise voluntary and community organisations on how best to make savings and improve their services through closer joint working – or even merging. Charities Aid Foundation research reveals that the average household spends three times as much on tobacco and more than three times on alcohol compared with the amount they give to charity. Women continue to give more to charity than men and the street tin collection is still the most popular way to make a donation. Charities could be fined in the future if they miss deadlines for preparing their annual reports and accounts for the Charity

Trust for London mid term review
Trust for London does not solely fund projects supporting the ‘poor’ of London; rather its aim is to support small, new and emerging groups throughout the capital. This is reflected in the quinquennnial review in the spread of grants and as a result there is not the same ‘concentration’ on the most deprived boroughs as is more the case for CPF. Overall, the review showed that the Trust is receiving more applications than ever and there is more demand than can be met – evidence also indicates that the number of community groups is growing. The review also reveals that the number of first applications – from groups that have not been funded by TfL before – remains high at 55%, well in excess of the target of 33%. At the same time it is worth noting that the number of applications from groups that have never been funded from any other source has reduced to six per cent,

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Looking ahead
Commission, under proposals the Commission is drawing up to give itself tougher powers. The Commission reveals that 13% of the top 200 charities had failed to submit their reports and accounts on time. November The top 100 companies on the London stock exchange gave just 0.97% of their pre-tax profits to charities and community projects, according to The Guardian’s annual survey of corporate responsibility. The cash value

The second stage which was completed at the end of December 2004, was the ‘incorporation’ of the Foundation which clarifies and simplifies the legal structure. The new structure means that the new ‘umbrella’ body for CPF and TfL is The City Parochial Foundation Trustee which has wider objects than currently and enable it to administer other charitable projects should these be considered appropriate in the future. In addition, the new body can amend its own constitution – within the usual parameters set by the Charities Act and subject to entrenched rights of nomination to its Central Governing Body. Other changes have also come into effect during the past two years, including new terms of reference for committees, some changes to appointments to the Central Governing Body by external bodies and codes of conduct in line with current best practice.

T

his quinquennium is seeing major changes to the governance of the Foundation and Trust aimed at ensuring that they both have appropriate constitutions for current circumstances, to achieve greater flexibility and maintain an efficient and innovative approach to the work of both CPF and TfL. The first change was the adoption in January 2003 of a ‘total return’ approach to investment which means it is possible to maintain a steadier approach to grant-making. This allows the Foundation to supplement its investment income with a proportion of capital gains that have accumulated. In this way peaks and troughs in the money that is available for grant-making can be evened out.
Employability is an initiative of the City Parochial Foundation and a number of refugee community organisations and Refugee agencies. It was established as a registered charity in 2000. Employability exists to provide practical help to qualified professionals from refugee communities in Britain. 2nd Floor Tower Building 11 York Road London SE1 7NX Tel: 020 7981 0375 Fax: 020 7981 0376 info@employabilityforum.co.uk www.employabilityforum.co.uk

Planning ahead
Another change has been the establishment in July 2004 of a new task–specific sub committee – the Future Issues
The Resource Centre Located in the old Jones Brothers department store building in Holloway Road with its distinctive clock tower, the Resource Centre is a purpose built Conference Centre and office space for the voluntary sector. It is a registered charity, controlled by the City Parochial Foundation, and has been designed to provide the support, facilities and services that the thousands of charitable organisations in London require in order to meet London’s needs. 356 Holloway Road, London N7 6PA Tel: 020 7700 0100 Fax: 020 7700 8121 www.theresourcecentre.org.uk

City Parochial Foundation and Trust for London have set up a number of ‘umbrella’ and support bodies to provide continuing help to other voluntary sector organisations and charities, often as a result of initiatives they have pursued. Alongside are details of three (others include Evelyn Oldfield Unit – page 9 – and Bellingham Community Project – page 5)

The Resource Unit for Supplementary and Mother-tongue Schools The Resource Unit originated from research undertaken by the Trust for London in 1996. The research revealed that many supplementary and mother-tongue schools needed not only financial support, but also additional skills to obtain and handle funding and run classes more effectively. The Unit is London-based and provides advice and training for community groups running supplementary and mother-tongue schools 356 Holloway Road London N7 6PA Tel: 020 7700 8189 Fax: 020 7700 8128 info@resourceunit.com www.resourceunit.com

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Grants Review 2004

Voice of the people
London Citizen is the biggest single organising group of grassroots members in London, giving a voice to some of the most marginalised people, and ensuring that the issues that matter to them are addressed by decision makers. It exists ‘so that the needs of the poor cannot be ignored by those in power’. The group brings people together as an active forum, enabling them to put forward agendas for change. It begins by bringing together different civil and faith groups so that they can develop lasting relationships. It is not a singleissue group: the agenda is determined by the collective leadership with votes taken at public assemblies. During 2004, six large assemblies involving 300 or more people were organised with many more smaller meetings. The largest was a London mayoral election hustings where more than 1,700 people turned up. Among issues currently being followed are the campaign for a Roman Catholic sisters from south London, Muslim brothers from London mosques, and trades unionists attend the mayoral hustings.

of their donations is £872m, almost 7% up on the previous year. Only 34 of the FTSE 100 gave 1% or more. As the line between the charity sector and the government becomes more blurred, the public may be deterred from making donations – and instead donate to charities abroad, according to the Charities Aid Foundation. Charities in the UK may find themselves becoming increasingly dependent on the public sector for their future funding. A new charity law that puts public benefit at the heart of charitable activity is announced in the Queen’s speech. It is the first time that charity law has been updated since the 1600s. The bill is likely to mean that charities must not only demonstrate that their purpose is charitable, but also of public benefit. A public benefit test, assessed case-by-case by the Charity Commission, will decide whether organisations should be granted charitable status based on the value their work brings to the wider community. Nearly 50% of young people living in London say they have been a victim of crime and one in five that they have been bullied, according to an ICM survey. London has the highest rate of child poverty of anywhere in England, according to a report commissioned by the Mayor of London. It found 38% of children in London are living in relative poverty compared with

living wage, support for the 2012 Olympics bid as a result of negotiation on ethical guarantees for local community benefits, and more public toilets in south London following closures in the Brixton area.

CPF has funded part of the core costs for the organiser in east London.

PHOTOS: CHRIS JEPSON

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Grants Review 2004

People

The past year has seen a number of changes. In January Maggie Baxter took over as Chair of the Central Governing Body following her election in Autumn 2003. She replaced Professor Gerald Manners who has served since 1996, and who remains on the Central Governing Body. Professor Manners’ service was marked by a lunch in February, and at the end of the year he was honoured with an OBE. He has also taken over as Chairman of the Association of Charitable Foundations. Also in January Nigel Pantling was appointed Vice Chairman. At the end of 2003 the Bishop of Willesden resigned. His replacement for the remainder of his term of office is the Archdeacon of London, The Venerable Peter Delaney. During the year Billy Dove resigned after five years’ service and was replaced as a Corporation of London nominee by Robert Hughes-Penney. Another new appointment during the year was Murziline Parchment, nominated by the Greater London Authority for a five year term.

During the year the Foundation was sad to learn of the death of Lord Henniker, who was with the Foundation from 1973 to 1990. He played a central role in the birth of Trust for London, the priorities of which were much influenced by his support for small groups. Another who will be missed is Lady Marre CBE who died in March 2005. She served on the Foundation’s Central Governing Body from 1975 to 1993, the last four years as Vice Chairman. She was described as “an inspiring colleague”. In the summer a presentation was made to Tina Stiff, Publications and IT Manager, who celebrated 20 years as a member of the Foundation’s staff. August saw the departure of Martin Jones, Director of Grants and Programmes since September 2000, following several months of ill health. This led to a small restructuring involving the replacement of the Director post with two new Principal Officer posts. These have been taken by Sioned Churchill and Mubin Haq who had both been covering the Director’s role during his absence.

April 2005 saw the retirement of Beulah Scott, personal assistant to the Director of Grants and Programmes after 15 years service. The occasion was marked by a reception and presentation. Beulah is seen here with John Muir and Bharat Mehta.
14

Tina Stiff

Martin Jones

Grants Review 2004

Group – which will advise the Central Governing Body on ways in which governance, management and operations could be amended and improved. Its purpose will not be to consider specific funding priorities for the next quinquennium but to provide a general steer on issues that the Foundation may wish to consider. Among improvements it has already recommended and which have now been put in place are ‘induction’ procedures including an introductory pack about CPF and TfL for new members of the Central Governing Body. This makes provision for them to accompany field officers on grants assessments and monitoring visits to groups applying or already being funded. The group’s recommendations for achieving greater diversity on the Central Governing Body have already been agreed. This may involve advertising specifically targeted to attract minority ethnic and other underrepresented sections of London’s population, where possible. One concern for many voluntary bodies is that many applications come from people who, for instance, are able to dictate their own time and attend daytime meetings. In future the Foundation will be looking at such issues to limit any barriers to involvement by potential members. For most people and in particular the groups applying for funds, these changes will have no observable effects, but CPF and TfL feel that the new structure provides a more modern and flexible approach, which will over time, assist in ensuring efficiency and accountability which will have long term benefits for funding programmes and the groups themselves. One problem that arose for a number of funders late in 2004 was evidence of alleged fraud by a number of groups, including a few funded by Trust for London. This is still under investigation by the police.

November saw the official opening of Bramble Close, at Chigwell, Essex, a scheme by Papworth Trust providing specialist accommodation to meet the needs of people with severe disabilities. CPF provided the land on which the project is built at a peppercorn rent.

an England average of 29%. It found poverty is most common among children from ethnic minorities. Child poverty rates in the inner city stand at 54% and at 30% in outer London. A survey carried out for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation by the New Policy Institute reveals that seven million workers in Britain earn less than £6.50 an hour – four million of them women. However, the number of families with incomes below the poverty line fell to 12.4m from 14m over the same period. December More than 100 charities, trade unions and campaign groups have joined forces to fight poverty. The Make Poverty History campaign says it wants

CPF and TfL believe that the methods used – principally visits to all groups (which are not made by all grant-makers) – do stand both organisations in good stead. Although things can go wrong, such procedures go a long way to ensuring as far as possible that funds are correctly applied. An innovation developed during 2004 was a series of lunchtime briefing seminars on topical issues. During the year, prominent people in their fields made presentations on HIV/Aids, Congolese communities in the capital, and race hate crimes. Another development has been twice yearly ‘learning’ seminars, bringing together groups working in similar

15

Grants Review 2004

Applying for grants
laws stopping big business from “profiting at the expense of people and the environment”. It wants an end to exports being “dumped” in ways that harm poor rural communities around the world. And it is also calling for the “unpayable debts” of the poorest countries to be cancelled in full and at least an extra $50bn to be given in aid each year. London and the South East have had the fastest growing populations in the past 10 years, the Halifax bank says. Britain’s smallest local authority area, the City of London, recorded the fastest growth rate at 51%. Four other London authorities were also in the top 10 for population increases: Westminster – 26%, Kensington and Chelsea – 23%, Tower Hamlets – 22% and Camden – 18%. London councils have the worst record in the country for prosecuting pet owners who let their dogs foul the streets, according to Keep Britain Tidy. London imposed just 13 of the 1,376 fines handed out nationally in the five-month period from November 2003. Almost nine out of 10 London leisure venues are not accessible to disabled people, according to disability group Scope.
City Parochial Foundation welcomes grant applications from registered charities or charitable organisations which tackle the causes of poverty or help Londoners to cope with, and find ways out of poverty. Particular priorities include tackling discrimination, isolation and violence. Applications are encouraged particularly from groups working with black, Asian and minority ethnic communities; disabled people; established communities, often predominantly white, living in areas of long-term poverty; lesbians and gay men; refugees and asylum seekers; young people aged 10-25; and women’s groups. Types of work may involve advice, information and individual advocacy; education, training and employment schemes; and organisations developing initiatives to tackle violence and hate crimes. The Foundation also supports work to change policy relating to its main aims; ‘second tier’ organisations providing support to other groups; and collaborative work between two or more groups.

areas to share knowledge and update each other. Topics covered were policy work and advocacy. Arising from one of these was an article published in Trust and Foundation News, the journal of the Association of Charitable Foundations (ACF), on ways of evaluating policy work. An important issue for the future of the charitable sector was the publication at the end of the year of the Charities Bill, heralding the biggest change in legislation governing the sector for centuries. It was heartening to see that representations by the ACF, strongly supported by CPF and TfL, had their effect, in that the Bill recognises the distinctive nature of independent grant-makers – compared to other charities – and the need to ensure that regulatory burdens do not discourage philanthropy.

Trust for London funds work with small new and emerging voluntary organisations that benefit people and communities in London. These are groups with no more than the equivalent of two full-time paid staff. Funding can cover delivery of services; access to training; and organising meetings, conferences, seminars and events to identify problems, raise awareness, identify solutions or promote good practice. Funding can also be used to cover everyday costs, buying equipment and paying some staff costs. TfL is particularly keen to work with black, Asian and minority ethnic communities; disabled people; groups providing educational activities for children and young people; refugee and migrant groups; and self-help groups. Maximum funding is £10,000 a year and for a maximum of three years. Leaflets giving full details are available on request from City Parochial Foundation or Trust for London, 6 Middle Street London EC1A 7PH Tel: 020 7606 6145. They can also be downloaded in Word or PDF format from www.cityparochial.org.uk

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Grants Review 2004

Tackling conflict
Leap – established in 1987 - works with young people aged 13-25 to explore the causes and consequences of conflict in their lives and to find solutions. Priority is given to people experiencing disadvantage and exclusion. It works through challenging and inter-active group work to help them develop individually, and to improve the quality of life in communities. Leap starts with the philosophy that conflict is an inevitable part of young people’s lives, and that if it is left unresolved it can be damaging to individuals themselves and those around them. The group believes that training young people in self-awareness, personal accountability, listening to others, communication and mediation skills, engages their intellect, heart and spirit, helping build confidence and skills and renewing enthusiasm and motivation for their work. One project is the ‘Quarrel Shop’ where 16-21 year-olds from inner city boroughs learn mediation, communication and conflict resolution skills using discussions, games, exercises and role play. The sessions take place in host agencies which often deal with young people who are experiencing specific problems such as homelessness or substance abuse.
PHOTO: JOHN DILLON

CPF has provided a two-year grant to cover the costs of two youth ‘animators’ who help make conflict resolution an interesting subject for young people.
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Grants Review 2004

cpf

CITY PAROCHIAL FOUNDATION

Name

Borough

Contributions

Period in Years

Amount £

Grants made during 2004

ADVICE, INFORMATION AND INDIVIDUAL ADVOCACY
Advocacy for Older People in Greenwich www.afop.org. Advocacy Partners www.advocacypartners.org.uk Greenwich towards salaries and running costs of the advocacy support programme for black and minority ethnic communities. towards the salary and running costs of the Elder’s Choice Project which will provide advocacy support for older disabled people in Sutton including prioritising working with individuals from BME communities. towards the salary costs of the Women’s Group Leader. towards the costs of a monthly newsletter, and to establish a support group for women affected by domestic violence. towards the salary costs of the Ethnic Minority Development Worker. towards the salary of the part-time Chinese Advice Worker. towards the salary costs of the two Community Dementia Workers. towards the salary and running costs of an Information, Advice and Advocacy Worker. towards part-funding the salary costs of two Legal Caseworker posts. towards the set-up and running costs of Barnet Refugee Service. towards the salary costs of the advice and information service. towards the salary and running costs of an additional Volunteer Co-ordinator to support people with learning disabilities. towards the salary and on-costs of a Debt Advisor. towards the Co-ordinator’s salary costs and development work to assess the feasibility of Help Desks at Camberwell Green and Greenwich Magistrates’ Courts. towards the salary and associated costs of employing a part-time advice and advocacy worker to work with elderly Cypriot women. towards the salary and on-costs of the Employment Worker. 1 10,000

Sutton

3

46,000

Afghan Association of London (Harrow) Africa Advocacy Foundation www.a-af.org Age Concern Hammersmith & Fulham www.achf.org.uk Age Concern Westminster Alzheimer’s Concern Ealing Anika Patrice Project Asylum Aid Barnet Voluntary Service Council Bell Farm Christian Centre www.bfcc.org.uk Bexley and Bromley Citizen Advocacy

Harrow London-wide

2 1

32,000 20,000

Hamm & Fulham Westminster Ealing Hackney London-wide Barnet Hillingdon Bexley

2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2

30,000 20,000 24,000 40,000 50,000 22,500 20,000 40,000

Bow County Court Advice Service www.bccas.org.uk Bromley Magistrates’ Court Support and Information Service www.bromleymagshelp.org.uk Camden Cypriot Women’s Organisation www.ccwo.org.uk Camden Tribunal Unit
18

Newham Bromley

2 2

15,000 14,000

Camden

2

25,000

Camden

2

25,000

Grants Review 2004

Camden and Westminster Citizen Advocacy www.advocacyproject.org.uk Care in East London and Essex (Caress) Chinese Association of Tower Hamlets Chinese National Healthy Living Centre www.cnhlc.org.uk Congolese Refugee Women’s Association Deafblind UK Detention Advice Service Disability Advice Service Lambeth Disability Croydon Disabled Living Foundation www.dlf.org.uk Disablement Information Advice Line Barking and Dagenham Disablement Information Advice Line Enfield Disability Action www.e-d-a.org.uk Fitzrovia Neighbourhood Association Food for All Friends United Network www.friendsunitednetwork.org.uk Howard League for Penal Reform www.howardleague.org Hoxton Trust Immigrants’ Aid Trust in support of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants www.jcwi.org.uk IndoAmerican Refugee and Migrant Organisation Irish in Greenwich www.irishingreenwich.com

Westminster

towards the salary and on-costs of an Advocacy Worker.

2

40,000

Bark & Dag Tower Hamlets London-wide London-wide London-wide London-wide Lambeth Croydon London-wide Bark & Dag Waltham Forest Enfield Westminster Camden Camden London-wide Hackney London-wide

towards the salary and on-costs of the Client Services Worker. towards developing an advocacy project for Chinese elders. towards the costs of employing an Advocacy Co-ordinator. towards the salary costs of a part-time Community Advocacy Worker. towards the costs of recruitment and on-costs of up to six Membership Support Workers. towards core running costs and the expansion of its work. towards the salary and running costs for the Welfare Benefits and Advice Worker. towards the salary and running costs needed to expand the Disability Advocacy Project. towards the costs of Advice Services. towards the salary of a Welfare Benefits Worker. towards the salary and associated costs of a part-time Information Officer. towards the running costs of the Deaf Project. for the salary and associated costs of a part-time Advice Rights Worker. for the salary and on-costs of a Drug Free Zone Worker. towards the salary and on-costs of a part-time Caseworker. towards the costs of providing a free legal telephone helpline for young Londoners in prison. towards the salary costs for the legal advice service. towards the post of Communications Officer and support costs.

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 1 1 2 2 2 2 2

30,000 14,000 26,000 34,000 19,200 40,000 40,000 24,000 20,000 30,000 29,699 15,000 7,000 36,000 35,800 20,000 30,000 38,000

London-wide Greenwich

towards the salary and running costs needed to employ a specialist caseworker to support asylum-seekers. towards the salary and running costs of the elders outreach and advocacy service.

2 2

35,480 28,000
19

Grants Review 2004

Island Advice Centre www.island-advice.org.uk Islington Pensioners’ Forum Kings Cross Homelessness Project Kingston Advocacy Group www.rights@kag.org.uk League of British Muslims Latin American Disabled People’s Project London Detainee Support Group www.ldsg.org.uk Markfield Project www.markfield.org.uk Notre Dame Refugee Centre Parents for Inclusion www.parentsforinclusion.org Positively Women www.positivewomen.org.uk Prisoners Abroad www.prisonersabroad.org.uk Refugee Council www.refugeecouncil.org.uk Refugee Project – Croydon www.refugeeproject.org.uk

Tower Hamlets Islington London-wide Kingston Redbridge London-wide London-wide Haringey London-wide London-wide London-wide London-wide London-wide Croydon Brent Southwark Westminster Sutton Newham London-wide Haringey London-wide Wandsworth

towards the salary costs of a part-time Bengali-speaking Advice Worker. towards the salary of the part-time Administrator. towards the salary and on-costs of the Advice and Outreach Manager’s post. towards the Support Worker’s salary and running costs for SHOUT! towards the salary of an Advice Worker. towards the salary and running costs of the Portuguese Advice Project. towards the salary and running costs of the Detainee Welfare Co-ordinator. towards the salary of the Family Support Worker. towards the salary and on-costs of a part-time Drop-in Co-ordinator. towards the telephone helpline. towards the salary and on-costs of the Outreach Co-ordinator’s post. towards the salary and running costs of the Resettlement Service. towards the salary and running costs of the Women’s Mental Health Project. to increase the hours of the part-time Caseworker so that this can be made into a full-time position. towards the salary costs of an Advice Worker. towards the salary and running costs of the Triage Service. towards the running costs of the Centre. towards the costs of a Welfare Advice project. towards the salary and on-costs of the Advice Worker. towards the employment of a Tax Adviser for London. towards the salary and on-costs of a Community Debt Support Project Officer. towards the salary costs of the Manager. towards the expansion of the Education Law team to develop services across South-West London.

2 2 1 2 2 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 3 2 1 2 2 1

25,000 15,000 15,000 16,000 30,000 29,246 30,000 30,000 30,000 22,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 10,800 28,000 30,000 25,000 18,450 30,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 15,000

Sangam Association of Asian Women Southwark CAB www.citzensadvice.org.uk South Westminster Legal Advice Centre Sutton Mental Health Foundation Tamil Welfare Association (Newham) UK Taxaid www.taxaid.org.uk Tottenham Law Centre Vietnamese Mental Health Services Wandsworth and Merton Law Centre

20

Grants Review 2004

WISH – Women in Secure Hospitals Women’s Link www.womenslink.org.uk Working Families

London-wide London-wide London-wide

towards the salary and running costs of the Community Link project and the salary costs of the Director. towards the salary costs of the Advice Service Co-ordinator. towards the costs of the Legal Advice Helpline/ Disadvantage project.

2 3 2

32,000 21,000 32,000

EDUCATION, TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT SCHEMES
Action Space London Events Advocate for Mental Health AGROFOREP Artsline www.artsline.org.uk Bang Edutainment www.bang-ed.com Barnabas Workshop Barnet African Health Organisation www.baho.org.uk Blackfriars Settlement www.blackfriars-settlement.org.uk London-wide Westminster Hackney London-wide to increase the number of dedicated studio spaces. towards the salary and on-costs of a part-time Self-Advocacy Worker. towards the salary and running costs of the London education and training programme. towards the salary of the Youth Project worker and a contribution towards the running costs of the Youth Project. towards the salary costs of the Project Director and part-time Administrator. towards the cost of training courses. towards the running costs of the supplementary school. towards the salary of a Resources Worker who will support people with mental health problems, with the aim of identifying opportunities and supporting them in outside training, education and work options. towards the salary of a Project Worker. 2 1 2 1 25,000 18,000 20,000 21,600

Brent Redbridge Barnet Southwark

2 2 2 2

30,500 25,000 15,800 25,000

Broadway Homelessness and Support www.broadwaylondon.org Children’s Music Workshop www.childrensmusicworkshop.org Chinese Community Centre www.ccc.org.uk Churches’ Commission for Racial Justice Common Purpose www.commonpurpose.org.uk Core Arts Ltd www.corearts.co.uk Crumbles Castle Adventure Playground Disablement Association of Barking and Dagenham

London-wide

2

30,000

London-wide Westminster London-wide London-wide Hackney Islington Bark & Dag

towards a song-writing, singing and performance programme in East London. towards the salary and costs of a development worker to work with Chinese women. towards the costs of the PEERS Project. towards the salary costs of the ‘Your Turn’ Programme Manager. towards a members’ supported volunteering programme. towards the salary and running costs of the Sparkplug Motorcycle Project. towards the salary of a Training and Administration Officer.

3 2 3 1 2 1 2

20,000 40,000 30,000 10,000 15,721 15,000 30,000
21

Grants Review 2004

Dyslexia Institute www.dyslexia-inst.org.uk Foundation for Young Musicians www.cym.org.uk Graeae Theatre Company www.graeae.org Hampstead Theatre www.hampsteadtheatre.com Hanover Foundation www.hanoverfoundation.org.uk Harold Hill Youth Motorcross www.hymx.co.uk Harrington Scheme Harrow Association of Voluntary Service Ileys Supplementary School Integrated Music Projects (IMPRO) www.impro.org Kenya Community Support Network National Literacy Trust www.literacytrust.org.uk National Pyramid Trust www.nptrust.org.uk New Economics Foundation www.neweconomics.org Ocean Music Trust www.ocean.org.uk One Nine Eight (198) Gallery www.198gallery.co.uk Panjabi Centre www.desiradio.org.uk PhotoVoice www.photovoice.org Quaker Social Action www.quakersocialaction.com Ragged School Museum Trust www.raggedschoolmuseum.org.uk Real Action
22

London-wide London-wide London-wide Camden London-wide Havering Haringey Harrow Southwark London-wide

for a pilot project for dyslexic adults at the Platform One learning centre. to help provide bursary funding for students unable, through financial hardship, to pay for their tuition. towards the salary costs of the Training and Education Administrator. towards the costs of an arts and drama project for people with disabilities. towards the cost of employing a Chief Operating Officer. towards the salary and on-costs of a Workshop Manager’s post. towards the salary of a Foundation Skills Team Leader. towards the running costs of the Trans-Age Project. towards the salary costs of the Co-ordinator and running costs. towards costs of an assistant workshop leader for an inclusion project and to enable the group to do more outreach work. towards the salary of a Youth Co-ordinator. towards the purchase of books and teaching materials for children living in refuges in London. towards the costs of the employment of a London Development Officer. towards the costs of running the London Time Bank College. towards the costs of the recruitment, training and salary of the General Manager (Deputy Director of Education) of Rising Tide. towards the salary costs of a part-time trainer/youth worker and on-costs. towards the costs of running a media-training course for young people. towards the costs of the PhotoLink project. towards the costs of a part-time Administrator for the Street Cred project. towards the salary and running costs of a sessional Bangladeshi Liaison Worker. towards the costs of supplementary classes.

1 3 2 2 1 2 2 3 2 1

21,000 20,000 22,000 20,000 20,000 40,000 30,000 30,000 20,000 30,000

Newham London-wide London-wide London-wide London-wide

2 2 2 2 2

20,000 16,000 22,000 46,925 30,000

Lambeth Ealing London-wide Tower Hamlets Tower Hamlets Westminster

2 1 2 3 2 2

19,750 15,160 45,000 28,500 7,600 30,000

Grants Review 2004

Refugee Education and Training Advisory Service (RETAS) www.education-action.org Refugee Therapy Centre www.refugeetherapy.org.uk Revolving Doors Agency www.revolving-doors.co.uk St Clement and St James Community Development Project St. Mungo Community Housing Association Limited Safe Ground

London-wide

towards a pilot scheme to provide work placements for refugees in the engineering sector. towards the costs of running ‘Introductory Course on Counselling Refugees’ towards the appointment of one part-time user -involvement worker and half of the project costs. towards the costs of English Language and IT classes. towards the salary and the on-costs of a resource worker to work with homeless people. towards the salary costs of a Manager to run the Family Man programme, a family relationships course for male prisoners in HMP Wandsworth. towards the salary and on-costs of a part-time Youth Worker. towards the salary costs of the full-time Co-ordinator. towards the costs of providing two courses – one vocational course and one personal development course. towards the salary costs of a part-time Men’s Worker and the costs of the social education programme. towards the costs of producing and performing ‘Burning’ to 11-13 year old students and their teachers in London schools. towards the salary and running costs of a project to support people with mental health problems back into employment. towards the salary costs of a Director. towards the salary costs of the Development Manager. towards the salary costs of the Mental Health Development Worker. towards the continuation and expansion of the employment project for disabled people. towards rental and running costs to continue and develop the training activities. towards the cost of the recruitment, assessment, placement and support of 10 new teachers towards salary and running costs for development of a secondary school curriculum.

2

48,000

Islington London-wide Ken & Chelsea Ken & Chelsea London-wide

2 3 2 2 2

30,000 51,000 10,000 40,000 28,500

Somali Advice and Resource Centre Somali Teachers Association South Acton Skills and Arts Collaborative

Newham Ealing Ealing

2 2 1 3

15,000 40,000 18,500 36,000

South Poplar and Limehouse Action Tower Hamlets for Secure Housing - SPLASH www.blackwall-community.co.uk/splash Spare Tyre Theatre Company London-wide

1

25,000

Springboard Community Enterprises

Kingston

2

9,827

Stitches in Time Stuart Low Trust www.slt.org.uk Sunnyside Community Gardens Association www.sunnysidegarden.org.uk Sutton Centre for Independent Living and Learning (SCILL) Ltd www.scill.org.uk Target 3 Teach First www.teachfirst.org.uk Treehouse Trust www.treehouse.org.uk

Tower Hamlets Islington Islington

2 2 3

27,300 26,000 24,000

Sutton

2

36,000

Lewisham London-wide London-wide

2 1 2

14,000 20,000 20,000
23

Grants Review 2004

Trinity Community Centre www.thetrinitycentre.org WORLDwrite www.worldwrite.org.uk Working Well Trust www.workingwell-trust.co.uk

Newham Hackney London-wide

towards the salary and on-costs of an Education Project Worker. towards the salary and running costs of a film-making training programme. towards the costs of the Supported Employment Project.

2 3 3

30,000 27,000 40,000

SCHEMES TO REDUCE/TACKLE VIOLENCE/HATE CRIMES
Addaction www.addaction.org.uk Black Women’s Health and Family Support www.bwhafs.co.uk Croydon Housing Aid Society London-wide London-wide towards the salary and related costs of a part-time User-Involvement Co-ordinator for the London region. towards the salary costs of the Operational Director. 2 2 40,000 30,000

Croydon

towards salary and promotion costs to establish a new housing advice project which will work with victims of racial and homophobic hate crimes. towards the salary costs of the Joint Co-ordinators. towards the salary and associated costs of employing an Outreach Worker. for the Director’s salary and related costs. towards the salary and running costs of the pilot Out of School Programme which focuses on violence and crime. towards the costs of the Play Area in the Visits’ Hall at HMP The Mount. , towards the salary of the part-time Administrator. towards the salary costs of two Youth Workers towards the salary and on-costs of the Adult Services Co-ordinator towards the salary costs of a Domestic Violence Caseworker, volunteers’ expenses and general project overheads. towards the salary of the Artistic Director. towards the salary of a Racial Harassment Worker. towards the salary costs of the Legal Officer (Sexual Violence). to complete the ‘Dealing with Perpetrators of Racist Violence’ project.

3

50,000

Domestic Violence Matters Door of Hope www.doorofhope.org.uk Female Prisoners Welfare Project: Hibiscus Futures Theatre Company www.futurestheatrecompany.co.uk Hertfordshire Association for the Care and Resettlement of Offenders (HACRO) Lambeth Mediation Service Leap Confronting Conflict www.leaplinx.com Newham Action Against Domestic Violence One Seventy – 170 Community Project Pan Centre for Intercultural Arts www.pan-arts.net Redbridge Racial Equality Council Rights of Women www.rightsofwomen.org.uk Runnymede Trust www.runnymedetrust.org
24

Islington Tower Hamlets London-wide London-wide

2 1 2 1

30,000 10,000 40,000 15,000

London-wide

3

22,000

Lambeth London-wide Newham Lewisham

2 2 2 3

20,000 40,000 .30,000 30,000

London-wide Redbridge London-wide London-wide

2 3 2 1

25,000 45,000 29,000 9,000

Grants Review 2004

Sikh Community Care Project www.sccp.co.uk Tolerance in Diversity www.tid.org.uk Trust Until the Violence Stops www.vdayuk.org Victim Support Kingston www.victimsupport.org.uk Victim Support Lewisham Victim Support Southwark Women’s Therapy Centre www.womenstherapycentre.co.uk

Waltham Forest Tower Hamlets Lambeth London-wide Kingston Lewisham Southwark Islington

for the salary of a part-time Domestic Violence Worker. towards rent, running costs and community workshops. towards the salary costs of a Project Manager. towards the costs of piloting ‘Trust’ in five London schools. towards the salary and revenue costs of the domestic violence project. towards the running costs of the SAFE Centre. towards the salary and revenue costs of work with victims of racial harassment. to provide therapy to women victims of domestic violence.

2 2 2 1 2 2 3 1

14,910 30,000 30,000 15,000 24,000 22,000 38,400 20,000

CORE COSTS
Bernie Grant Trust www.bgtrust.com Bosnia and Herzegovina Community Advice Centre Disability Action in the Borough of Barnet Eastsiders Hamden Trust Kairos in Soho www.kairosinsoho.org.uk Roundabout Drama and Movement Therapy UK Lesbian and Gay Immigration Group www.uklgig.org.uk Women’s Trust Counselling and Support Services London-wide Brent Barnet Waltham Forest London-wide London-wide London-wide London-wide Ken & Chelsea towards the costs of a part-time co-ordinator for the period September 2004 to March 2005. towards the rental costs of new premises for the organisation. towards the Director’s salary and on-costs. towards the salary of a part-time co-ordinator, sessional staff and rent. towards the post of Resource Centre Co-ordinator (Centre Manager). towards the salary costs of the Chief Executive Officer. towards the salary costs of administrative staff. towards core costs. towards the salary and on-costs of a part-time Office Manager. 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 6,325 24,400 30,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 36,000 30,000 30,000

POLICY CHANGE
Afiya Trust www.afiya-trust.org After Adoption www.afteradoption.org.uk London-wide towards the salary and running costs for a BME mental health network forLondon, which will be part of a national BME mental health network. towards the salary and on-costs of the part-time Birth Parent Worker. 1 25,000

London-wide

1

20,000
25

Grants Review 2004

Association of Greater London Older Women (AGLOW) Children’s Society www.the-childrens-society.org.uk Confederation of Indian Organisations (U.K.) www.cio.org.uk Crisis www.crisis.org.uk Fawcett Society www.fawcettsociety.org.uk Forum for the Future (including London Sustainability Exchange) www.lsx.org.uk London Citizens (formerly TELCO) www.londoncitizens.org.uk Maternity Alliance www.maternityalliance.org.uk

London-wide Tower Hamlets London-wide

towards the salary costs of the part-time Development Worker to support the Older Lesbian project. towards the costs of the Young Women’s Forum. towards the costs of a policy officer and associated administrative costs of the project. towards the total costs of an education, learning and skills project among London’s homeless population. towards the costs of the Parliamentary Policy Project. for the costs of the ‘Begin Environmental Justice in London: Linking the Environment and Equalities Policy in London’ project. towards the costs of an organiser in East London. towards the costs of a pilot project to improve the awareness and use of antenatal and postnatal care amongst pregnant women and new mothers among BME communities in London. towards the salary, revenue and project costs of the ‘Polari in Partnership’ Project.

2 2 1

25,000 20,000 21,000

London-wide London-wide London-wide

3 2 1

20,000 40,000 19,000

London-wide London-wide

2 1

40,000 35,000

Polari Housing Association

London-wide

2

25,000

SECOND TIER AND INFRASTRUCTURE
African Foundation for Development (Afford) www.afford-uk.org Barbara Melunksy Refugee Youth Agency Limited/Refugee Youth www.refugeeyouth.org.uk Brent Association for Voluntary Action (BrAVA) www.brava.org.uk Community Consortium Communities in Action UK Community Organisations Forum www.towerhamlets.org.uk Ealing Community and Voluntary Service www.ealing.cvs.org.uk Enfield Voluntary Action
26

London-wide

towards the costs of running the ‘Africans Influencing London: Capacity Building Project’ to enable selfadvocacy by London’s African communities. towards the costs of a Development Officer.

2

45,000

London-wide

2

40,000

Brent

towards the salary and on-costs of the small groups worker and a contribution to the core costs of the organisation. towards the costs of staff and running costs of the Enabler Project. towards the costs of a community accountancy project. towards the salary costs of an information officer over nine months. towards the salary costs of the Funding and Development Manager. towards salary and associated costs of a Community Accountancy Project.

3

30,000

Bark & Dag Bark & Dag Tower Hamlets Ealing Enfield

2 2 1 2 2

18,000 29,000 15,000 26,000 25,000

Grants Review 2004

Greater London Forum for Older People Housing Justice www.housingjustice.org.uk In Kind Direct www.inkinddirect.org.uk REACH www.reach-online.org.uk

London-wide London-wide

towards the salary costs of a Forum Development Officer. towards the operating costs of Church-based projects and the Housing Advice Centre Alliance for people in London. to subsidise the registration of up to 80 additional London organisations’ providing them and the people they serve with the goods they need. towards a project to increase the number of black and minority ethnic community-led organisations using REACH’s service and to improve the ratio of BME volunteers placed in London. towards the salary costs of the London School Manager. towards the salary and on-costs of a London Training Officer. to employ a Fundraiser. towards the salary and running costs of the capacity building and funding advice service. towards the costs of a long-term evaluation study to measure the impact of Summer Education. towards the salary and on-costs of the Development Officer working with small groups.

2 2

25,000 30,000

London-wide

3

40,000

London-wide

1

10,000

School for Social Entrepreneurs www.sse.org.uk SITRA www.sitra.org.uk South East London Community Foundation Southwark Community Care Forum Summer Education UK Ltd www.summereducation.org.uk Voluntary Action Lewisham www.valewisham.org.uk

London-wide London-wide London-wide Southwark London-wide Lewisham

1 2 1 2 1 2

10,000 30,000 15,000 50,000 10,000 30,000

COLLABORATIVE WORK
Share Community www.sharecommunity.org.uk Wandsworth towards a training project in life skills for Asian young women with learning difficulties. 2 24,000

EXCEPTIONAL NEEDS
Children’s Discovery Centre-East London www.discover.org.uk Maytree Respite Centre Ltd www.maytree.org.uk Newham London-wide towards core costs. towards running costs. 1 2 15,000 30,000

SMALL GRANTS
Bexley Trust for Adult Students (BTAS) Brentford Community Resource Centre Bexley Hounslow towards the salary costs of a part-time Adult Student Welfare Officer. to upgrade the current computers, purchase new computers, a server, networking facilities and translation software. 1 1 6,130 10,000
27

Grants Review 2004

Dystonia Society www.dystonia.org.uk Hainault Forest Community Association www.hfca.co.uk Kids Can Achieve www.kidscanachieve.co.uk Kids Company (Keeping Kids Company) www.kidsco.org.uk Lewisham Law Centre Ugandan Aids Action Fund www.uaaf.org.uk

City of London Redbridge

towards the salary of the London Regional Co-ordinator for London based work. for salaries of Tutors for IT classes for older people.

2 1

10,000 10,000

Harrow London-wide

towards the salary and on-costs of the part-time Youth Development Worker. towards the cost of conducting two independent research studies. towards improving information technology equipment. towards a strategic review.

1 1

6,000 5,000

Lewisham London-wide

1 1

7,000 5,000

FOUNDATION’S INITIATIVES
Bellingham Community Project Bellingham Community Project Lewisham Lewisham towards an in-depth evaluation of BCP’s work and its impact on the local community. towards the costs of the Project Director, the Project Administrator, on costs and the production of a publication on the project’s history. towards the salary and on-costs of the Director. towards the costs of an event to mark the 50th anniversary of the operation of Norman House. towards the costs of running PEEP . as a contribution to the Fund. 1 3 10,000 150,000

Evelyn Oldfield Unit www.evelynoldfield.co.uk Norman House – Stonham Housing Association www.stonham.org.uk Praxis Community Projects Ltd www.praxis.org.uk Lord Limerick Student Bursary and Hardship Fund of London Metropolitan University www.londonmet.ac.uk GRAND TOTAL

London-wide London-wide

3 1

100,000 3,000

London-wide London-wide

2 1

60,000 10,000

£5,347,023

28

Grants Review 2004

CPF: Funding breakdown for 2004
Grant Allocation of numbers and amounts considered and approved by the Foundation’s Grants Committee Major Category Discrimination Isolation Violence Other Total No of Grants 91 67 21 23 202 2004 £ 2,587,662 1,588,051 562,310 609,000 5,347,023 No of Grants 102 62 16 9 189 2003 £ 2,890,550 1,529,096 486,088 323,500 5,229,234

% 49 30 10 11 100

% 56 29 9 6 100

The ways in which the major categories are addressed is by: (a) Direct Work Advice, Information and Individual Advocacy 64 1,720,175 Education, Training and Employment Schemes 59 1,521,683 Schemes to Reduce/Tackle Violence/Hate Crimes 24 659,310 Total 147 3,901,168 (b) Indirect/Strategic Core Costs Policy Change Second Tier and Infrastructure Alliance Funding Collaborative Work Exceptional Needs Small Grants Total The Foundation has also funded: (a) Foundation's initiatives (b) Work continuing from the previous quinquennium 1997-2001

32 28 12 72

62 52 17 131

1,714,128 1,265,470 471,588 3,451,186

33 24 9 66

9 11 18 – 2 3 7 50

246,725 290,000 458,000 – 27,000 45,000 49,130 1,115,855

5 5 9 – 1 1 1 22

20 6 17 – – 1 5 49

458,915 162,324 444,000 – – 20,000 33,000 1,118,239

9 3 8 – – – 1 21

5 – 5

330,000 – 330,000

6 – 6

9 – 9

659,809 – 659,809

13 – 13

Applications not approved for grant aid by Grants Committee GRAND TOTALS Organisations not encouraged to proceed to Application Stage

4 206

– 5,347,023

– 100

14 203

– 5,229,234

– 100

250

140

29

Grants Review 2004

cpf

CITY PAROCHIAL FOUNDATION

Grants by Borough

Ranking by most deprived boroughs Barking and Dagenham 9 Barnet Bexley Brent Bromley Camden 8 City of London Croydon Ealing Enfield Greenwich 10 Hackney 1 Hammersmith and Fulham Haringey 5 Harrow Havering Hillingdon Hounslow Islington 3 Kensington and Chelsea Kingston Lambeth 7 Lewisham Merton Newham 4 Redbridge Richmond Southwark 6 Sutton Tower Hamlets 2 Waltham Forest Wandsworth Westminster Borough Total London-wide Total funded Applications not approved for grant aid by Grants Committee TOTAL

No of grants in 2004 5 3 2 4 1 5 1 3 5 2 2 5 1 3 3 1 1 1 7 3 3 4 7 – 7 4 – 6 3 10 3 2 7 114 88 202

2004 £ 137,000 68,300 46,130 112,900 14,000 141,800 10,000 84,800 123,660 40,000 38,000 132,721 30,000 90,000 68,000 40,000 20,000 10,000 160,000 80,000 49,827 109,750 263,000 – 155,000 110,000 – 163,400 100,450 213,400 64,609 39,000 180,000 2,895,747 2,451,276 5,347,023

Ranking by CPF funding 8

7

10

9

5

1 6

3 2

4

No of grants in 2003 3 4 1 7 2 4 – 1 5 3 5 5 5 5 2 2 2 6 5 3 1 6 3 3 3 2 2 5 – 8 4 4 6 117 72 189

2003 £ 60,000 152,500 10,000 153,420 59,000 76,100 – 40,000 128,000 90,799 99,000 147,000 138,000 103,000 52,000 50,000 79,000 151,000 137,750 54,000 10,000 228,500 70,000 103,022 85,000 70,000 57,000 128,000 – 200,960 96,000 74,000 127,000 3,030,051 2,199,183 5,229,234

Ranking by CPF funding 4 3

9=

6 7

5 8

1

9= 2

30

4 206

5,347,023

14 203

5,229,234

Grants Review 2004

CPF: Revenue and Capital Proportions
CAPITAL REVENUE for one year for two years for three years or more Total LOAN Applications not approved for grant aid by Grants Committee TOTAL No. 3 44 127 28 202 – 4 206 2004 £ 20,000 692,015 3,590,713 1,064,295 5,347,023 – – 5,347,023 % – 13 67 20 100 – – 100 No. 5 64 99 21 184 – 14 203 2003 £ 32,550 1,139,344 3,272,425 784,915 5,196,684 – – 5,229,234 % 1 22 62 15 99 – – 100

CPF: Analysis of Grants by size
Up to £10,000 £10,001-£25,000 £25,001-£50,000 More than £50,001 Applications not approved for grant aid by Grants Committee TOTAL No. 24 81 93 4 4 206 Collaborative work 1% 2004 £ 201,882 1,608,791 3,175,350 361,000 – 5,347,023 % 4 30 59 7 – 100 No. 24 75 86 4 14 203 2003 £ 167,510 1,353,948 3,169,467 538,309 – 5,229,234 % 3 26 61 10 – 100

Note: The average size of grant – excluding initiatives – made by the Foundation is £26,000.

Quinquennial categories 2004
Schemes to reduce/tackle violence/hate crimes 12% Policy change 5% Core costs 5%

Exceptional needs 1%

Advice, information and individual advocacy 32% Education, training and employment schemes 28%

Second tier and infrastructure 9%

Small grants 1%

Foundation’s initiatives 6%

31

Grants Review 2004

CPF Accounts Summary
2004 £000s Revenue funds brought forward Net incoming resources Expenditure Net income Available for distribution Grants made Other distributions Bellingham capital grant Write backs Net grants made Net movement in funds Transfer from endowment fund Balance carried forward 4,602 (527) 4,075 4,383 (5,347) – – 217 (5,130) (747) 1,085 338 2004 £000s 308 4,448 (494) 3,954 4,086 (5,228) (58) (1,200) 135 (6,351) (2,265) 2,573 308 2003 £000s 2003 £000s 132

Income and expenditure 2000-2004

£000 6,000

5,000

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Auditors statement to the Trustee of City P a r o c h i a l F o u n d a t i o n . We have examined the summarised financial statements set out above. Respective responsibilities of Trustee and A u d i t o r s. You are responsible as the trustee for the preparation of the summarised financial statements. We have agreed to report to you on their consistency with the full financial statements, on which we reported on 13 May 2005. B a s i s o f o p i n i o n . We have carried out the procedures we consider necessary to ascertain whether the summarised financial statements are consistent with the full financial statements from which they have been prepared. O p i n i o n . In our opinion the summarised financial statements are consistent with the full financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2004. KPMG Chartered Accountants, Registered Auditor 13 May 2005

These accounts are a summary of information relating to the Central Fund of the charity extracted from the Annual Accounts. These summarised accounts may not contain sufficient information to allow for a full understanding of the financial affairs of the charity. The full Annual Accounts, the Auditors’ Report on those accounts and the Annual Report were approved on 13 May 2005 and have been submitted to the Charity Commission. The Auditors’ Report was unqualified. Copies of the Report and Financial Statements can be obtained from the Clerk at 6 Middle Street, London EC1A 7PH. On behalf of the Trustee Ms Maggie Baxter Chair

32

Total income

Grants made

Running expenses

Capital grant

Grants Review 2004

Name

Borough

Contributions

Period in Years

Amount £

BLACK, ASIAN AND MINORITY ETHNIC COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS
Best of Friends Organisation Crystal Vision Trust London-wide Bromley Hounslow London-wide Havering Tower Hamlets Ealing Tower Hamlets towards Volunteers’ expenses and running costs. towards the running costs of the women’s group. a contribution to the running costs of the organisation. towards a workshop/consultation day costs, volunteers’ expenses and running costs. towards the salary and on-costs of a Development Worker to work with older women. towards rental costs, and salary costs of a Project Manager. towards the costs of one-to-one counselling, complementary therapy and administration costs. towards interactive basic skills software, books and a photocopier. towards establishing a lunch club. to purchase a laptop computer and camera, and to run four outreach residencies to help socially excluded people to exhibit their art. towards the running costs of the Elders Friendship club. 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 8,000 5,000 2,600 2,500 15,000 8,000 7,000 6,000

Grants made during 2004

Feltham Asian Women’s Group Friends of Maasai People Havering Asian Social and Welfare Association Kollun Mann Saffer New Step Training and Development Centre www.newstep.org.uk Ocean Women’s Association Other Side Gallery www.thothersidegallery.org Pathfinders Inspirational Croydon Community Project www.PICCP .org.uk Wise Thoughts www.wisethoughts.org Women’s Empowerment Network

Tower Hamlets Islington

1 1

6,000 3,515

Croydon

1

2,500

London-wide Bark & Dag

towards the organisation’s rent. towards rent and training.

2 1

10,000 5,000

DISABLED PEOPLE'S ORGANISATIONS
African Caribbean Support Group Barnet Blind and Partially Sighted Bowls Club African and Caribbean Children with Learning Difficulties Foundation (ACC-LED) Clusters Disability Integration Newham Barnet Lambeth for running costs. towards transport costs. towards rental costs. 1 1 1 3,000 1,500 8,500

Sutton Newham

towards volunteers’ expenses, lunchtime refreshments, publicity and a digital camera, camcorder and photocopier. towards the costs of music and drama workshops for people with disabilities over a period of 12 weeks. towards office rent and utility costs.

1 1 1

3,653 5,000 6,332
33

Mobility Europe Special Needs Tower Hamlets Transport and Services and Community Advice and Support Scheme

Grants Review 2004

Network ME www.networkme.org.uk Sparrows Wheelchair Basketball Club Shirikisho African Group (UK) Somali Elderly and Disability Association Triumph Over Phobia www.triumphoverphobia.com Venturers Drama Group for the Visually Handicapped

Enfield Hackney Enfield Brent London-wide London-wide

towards translated leaflets. towards transport, court hire, league costs and wheelchair maintenance. towards running costs. towards the rent and running costs of the organisation. towards continuing and expanding the number of self-help groups in London. to meet the production costs of a play for people with visual impairment.

1 2 1 2 2 1

5,000 10,000 4,000 17,000 15,000 2,500

EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE
Al Iman Arabic School Brune Bernard and Carter House Tenants and Residents Association (BBC Community Centre) Cabinda Community Association www.cabinda.co.uk Christ Family Assembly Supplementary School Esforal Greenwich Mandarin and Supplementary School Hermitage Mother Tongue Centre Jubilee Community Education Kurdish Children and Youth Centre Maiwand Afghan Association Meridian Women’s Association Newham Welfare Trust Orama www.orama4diversity.org Richmond Avicenna Supplementary School
34

Brent Tower Hamlets

towards the costs of employing teachers, purchasing stationery and teaching materials. towards tutors’ fees and running costs for the supplementary and mother-tongue classes. towards the costs of mother-tongue and supplementary classes. towards rent and running costs. towards rent. towards the salary costs of the head teacher and co-ordinator, volunteers’ expenses and training, teaching materials and running costs. towards Tutors’ fees. to extend the mother-tongue school opening times, and towards teaching equipment. towards volunteers’ expenses, rent and running costs for mother-tongue classes in Islington and Haringey. towards the salary and on-costs of the Supplementary and Mother-tongue School Manager. towards mother-tongue classes. towards the operating costs of mother-tongue and supplementary classes. towards the costs of an anti-racist training programme for young people. towards Tutors’ salaries. towards rent, volunteers’ expenses and stationery.

1 1

6,000 3,000

Haringey Lewisham Camden Greenwich

2 1 1 2

8,000 2,500 6,000 14,000

Tower Hamlets Hackney Haringey Barnet Greenwich Newham London-wide Richmond Hillingdon

1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 1

3,000 6,920 8,000 10,000 9,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 6,000

Somali Youth Education and Development

Grants Review 2004

Tamil Educational and Cultural Association Young News www.youngnews.com

Croydon Tower Hamlets

towards Teachers’ salaries. towards rental costs.

1 2

4,000 8,000

REFUGEE AND MIGRANT GROUPS
Active Women African Welfare Association All Afghan Association Anatolian Centre Angolan Community Association Bantu Welfare Trust Basantu Outreach Project Black Women’s Rape Action Project www.womenagainstrape.net Centre for African Development www.cfad.org.uk Community Active Support www.casupport.org.uk Community Relief Project Congolese Voluntary Organisation Eagle Eyes Association for Afghan Displaced Youth Enfield Central African Refugee Community Eritrean Community Support and Information Centre Ethiopian Development Association Ethiopian Support Group Centre Equatoria Women Self-Help Society Friends International Great Nile Trust Greenwich Kurdish Community Association HELP – Healing and Empowering Lone Parents www.thehelp.org.uk Lambeth Waltham Forest Ealing Waltham Forest Haringey Barnet Waltham Forest London-wide Croydon Bark & Dag Waltham Forest Croydon Brent Enfield Westminster Islington Hamm & Fulham Barnet Bromley Hackney Greenwich Hackney towards running costs. towards rent and running costs. towards rent and running costs. for rent and running costs. towards rent, volunteers’ expenses and running costs. to cover the costs of running, recording and evaluating four seminars on adoption and fostering issues. towards running costs. towards volunteers’ expenses, childcare, interpreting and running costs. towards office rent and running costs. towards rent, Volunteers’ expenses and running costs. towards rent and Volunteers’ expenses. towards employing a part-time Administrator. towards the costs of employing a part-time Administrator. towards the organisation’s rent. towards the costs of the integration promotion project. towards the salary costs of the Advice Worker. towards rent, running costs, Volunteers’ expenses and activities costs. towards rent and running costs. towards capital and running costs. towards the rent and running costs of the organisation. towards rent and running costs. towards rental costs and computer training, equipment and computer software. 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 12,000 4,000 6,600 4,000 4,000 2,500 2,000 14,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 7,864 6,000 4,000 8,000 6,600 5,000 5,000 4,000 6,000 16,000 3,500
35

Grants Review 2004

Home of Heart Action Horn of Africa Refugee Welfare Group Horn of Africa Somali Women’s Organisation IQRA – Somali Health and Education Development Ivorian Advice and Support Group Lewisham Churches for Asylum Seekers

Haringey Brent Hounslow Lewisham Westminster Lewisham

towards rent and running costs. towards the costs of employing a part-time Advice Worker. towards the rent and running costs of the organisation. towards rent and Volunteers’ expenses. towards Volunteers’ expenses, rent and running costs. towards the travel voucher scheme. towards the costs of running a series of workshops for people living with AIDS and HIV . towards running costs. towards the salary costs of the part-time Administrator and Information Support Worker. towards the salary and on-costs of the Co-ordinator. towards the hall rental and lunch club meals of the Association. towards the rent of premises.

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2

3,000 7,000 5,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 3,000 10,000 8,500 9,700 5,000 10,000

Means of Survival and Development London-wide Peace in Millennium Refugee Project Refugee Link and Training Agency www.rlta.co.uk Russian Immigrants Association South East London Tamil Elders and Family Welfare Association Somali Community Education and Employment Support (SCEES) www.scees.org.uk Somali Community Information Centre Southwark Refugee Artists Network Stockwell Refugee Women’s Centre Swahili Cultural Association Trampoline Wandsworth Congolese Community Association Watanzania Tuinuante Group Wings of Hope Community Association Newham Harrow Harrow Lewisham Greenwich

Westminster Southwark Lambeth Harrow Brent Wandsworth Redbridge Westminster

for the salary of part-time workers, Volunteers’ expenses, running costs, outings and cultural activities. towards the salary costs of a Co-ordinator and a contribution towards running costs. towards crèche provision for adult educational classes. towards the rent and running costs of the organisation. towards rent, volunteers’ expenses and insurance. towards rent and running costs. for rent and running costs. towards rent of an office.

2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2

10,000 8,000 8,000 7,000 5,000 3,600 4,000 8,000

SELF HELP GROUPS
Bosom Friends (Hillingdon) Brockley Cross Action Group www.brockley.com/bcag Clapton Common Day Centre
36

Hillingdon Lewisham Hackney

towards rent. to employ a part-time Administrator. towards transport, refreshments and admin costs.

1 1 2

3,000 3,600 5,000

Grants Review 2004

Easy-Access Jewish Helplink Iftiin Network Lady’s Creative Centre Langdon Gingerbread Merton Women’s Drop-In North Kensington Women’s Textiles Workshop People’s Club Positively Healthy www.posh-uk.org.uk Southwark Explorers Club Stoned Arts Streatham Festival Association www.streathamfestival.info

Barnet Barnet Ealing Newham Merton Ken & Chelsea Hackney Richmond Southwark Brent Lambeth

towards the part-time Administrator’s post, and for the costs of running six training workshops. towards the Tutors’ fees. towards the salary costs of a part-time Administrative Worker. towards the organisation’s rent. towards the salary and on-costs of a Development Worker. towards the salaries of part-time tutors for sewing classes. towards the rent and transport costs of the organisation. towards the healthcare workshops for HIV positive gay men. towards transport and administrative expenses. towards the rent and running costs of the organisation. towards the costs of the community outreach programme.

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1

5,000 7,000 5,000 3,840 6,845 4,000 4,000 7,000 3,350 7,000 4,863

FOUNDATION’S INITIATIVES
Refugee Communities History Project GRAND TOTAL London-wide to provide £1,000 to each of the participating agencies in the Refugee Communities History Project to cover overheads. 2 15,000

£625,382

37

Grants Review 2004

TfL: Breakdown with reference to status of organisation
The Trust for London recognises its responsibility to fund new, emerging organisations and those addressing long-established needs in new ways. Of the organisations which were grant funded by Trust for London in 2004: No of Grants (a) First application to Trust for London – organisations that do not receive funding from any other source (b) First application to Trust for London but organisation has received funding from other sources The average size of grant, excluding initiatives, made by the Trust for London was £6,000. (c) Repeat application to Trust for London but for a different purpose (d) Repeat application for continuation funding TOTAL 2004 % No of Grants 2003 %

£

£

7

37,840

6

4

15,700

3

53

280,063

44

57

287,595

42

20

97,884

16

32

269,800

27

26 106

209,595 625,382

34 100

31 124

378,200 951,295

28 100

38

Grants Review 2004

Grants by Borough

1 Ranking in each year by TfL funding *Includes grants of £191,500 for two TfL initiatives (Resource Unit for Supplementary and Mothertongue Schools £153,500 over three years; Refugee Communities History Project £38,000 over two years.)

Barking and Dagenham Barnet Bexley Brent Bromley Camden City of London Croydon Ealing Enfield Greenwich Hackney Hammersmith & Fulham Haringey Harrow Havering Hillingdon Hounslow Islington Kensington & Chelsea Kingston Lambeth Lewisham Merton Newham Redbridge Richmond Southwark Sutton Tower Hamlets Waltham Forest Wandsworth Westminster Borough Total London-wide Total Funded

No of grants in 2004 2 6 – 6 2 1 – 4 3 3 4 6 1 4 3 1 2 2 2 1 – 4 5 1 5 1 2 2 1 7 4 1 4 90 9 99 7 106

2004 £ 10,000 31,000 – 48,000 9,000 6,000 – 20,364 18,600 13,000 49,000 35,420 5,000 23,000 25,200 15,000 9,000 7,600 10,115 4,000 – 33,363 21,100 6,845 25,840 4,000 15,000 11,350 3,653 40,332 14,000 3,600 31,000 549,382 76,000 625,382

6= 2

1 4 10 9

5

8

3

6=

No of grants in 2003 3 5 – 6 – 1 – 5 4 1 3 4 1 3 4 – 1 4 5 – 1 8 2 2 8 4 – 7 – 9 7 3 1 102 8 110 14

2003 £ 22,500 37,850 – 51,600 – 5,000 – 39,300 26,700 5,650 14,765 20,000 10,000 16,000 36,630 – 5,000 28,050 36,800 – 12,000 63,650 6,100 14,350 55,000 26,000 – 57,000 – 46,550 50,000 11,600 5,000 703,095 248,200* 951,295

8 4

7

10

9

1

3

2 6 5

Applications not approved for Grant aid by grant Committee TOTAL

625,382

124

951,295
39

Grants Review 2004

Trust for London allocation of grants 2004
No of Grants Major Category Black, Asian and minority ethnic community organisations Org. providing Educational activities for children & young people Disabled People’s Organisations Refugee and Migrant Groups Self Help Groups Total Trust’s Initiatives Applications not approved for grant aid by Grants Committee TOTAL 11 16 12 44 15 98 1 7 2004 £ 72,600 106,420 81,485 276,864 73,013 610,382 15,000 – % 12 17 13 44 12 98 2 – No of Grants 13 35 5 36 19 108 2 14 2003 £ 101,000 236,300 19,700 266,845 135,950 759,795 191,500 – % 11 25 2 28 14 80 20 –

106

625,382

100

124

951,295

100

Trust for London quinquennial categories 2004
Disabled People’s Organisations 13%

Trust’s Initiatives 2%

Refugee and Migrant Groups 44%

Black, Asian and minority ethnic community organisations 12%

Org. providing Educational activities for children & young people 17%

Self Help Groups 12%

40

Grants Review 2004

TfL: Revenue and Capital Proportions
No. of Grants CAPITAL REVENUE for one year for two years for three years or more Trust’s Initiatives 7 2004 £ 10,743 % 2 No. of Grants 4 2003 £ 7,050 % 1

67 24 – 1

358,369 241,270 – 15,000

57 39 – 2

71 30 3 2

427,395 296,500 28,850 191,500

45 31 3 20

Applications not approved for grant aid by Grants Committee 7 TOTAL 106

– 625,382

– 100

14 124

– 951,295

– 100

TfL: Analysis of Grants by Size
No. of Grants Up to £1,000 £1,001-£5,000 £5,001-£10,000 More than £10,000 Trust’s Initiatives Applications not approved for grant aid by Grants Committee TOTAL – 49 42 7 1 2004 £ – 188,521 318,861 103,000 15,000 % – 31 51 16 2 No. of Grants – 48 49 11 2 2003 £ – 201,465 400,680 157,650 191,500 % – 21 42 17 20

7 106

– 625,382

– 100

14 124

– 951,295

– 100

41

Grants Review 2004

TfL Accounts Summary
2004 £000s Revenue funds brought forward Income from investment portfolio Other investment income less costs of generating income Expenditure Net income Available for distribution Grants made Write backs Net grants made Net movement in funds Transfer from endowment fund Balance carried forward Revenue assets Endowment assets Total assets Income and expenditure 2000-2004 440 136 (44) 532 (96) 436 436 (625) 5 (620) (184) 184 – – 16,004 16,004 Auditors statement to the Trustee of T r u s t f o r L o n d o n . We have examined the summarised financial statements set out above. Respective responsibilities of the T r u s t e e a n d A u d i t o r s. You are responsible as the trustee for the preparation of the summarised financial statements. We have agreed to report to you on their consistency with the full financial statements, on which we reported on 13 May 2005. B a s i s o f o p i n i o n . We have carried out the procedures we consider necessary to ascertain whether the summarised financial statements are consistent with the full financial statements from which they have been prepared. O p i n i o n . In our opinion the summarised financial statements are consistent with the full financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2004. KPMG Chartered Accountants, Registered Auditor 13 May 2005 2004 £000s – 2003 £000s 2003 £000s –

478 146 (42) 582 (97) 485 485 (951) 14 (937) (452) 452 – – 14,967 14,967 These accounts are a summary of information extracted from the Annual Accounts. These summarised accounts may not contain sufficient information to allow for a full understanding of the financial affairs of the charity. The full Annual Accounts, the Auditors’ Report on those accounts and the Annual Report were approved on 13 May 2005 and have been submitted to the Charity Commission. The Auditors’ Report was unqualified. Copies of the Report and Financial Statements can be obtained from the Secretary at 6 Middle Street, London EC1A 7PH. On behalf of the Trustee Ms Maggie Baxter Chair

£000 1.000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

42

Total income

Grants made

Running expenses

Grants Review 2004

City Parochial Foundation and Trust for London Central Governing Body
The Crown (5 nominees) Maggie Baxter (Chair) Professor Julian Franks (term ended April 2005) Peter Williams Elahe Panahi Nigel Pantling (Vice-Chairman) Tzeggai Yohannes Deres (from April 2005) (previously Co-opted member) Corporation of London (3 nominees) William Dove (resigned April 2004) Charles Edward Lord (resigned April 2005) Ian David Luder (resigned April 2005) (renominated to complete Edward Lord’s term of office until April 2007) Robert Hughes-Penney (from July 2004) The Revd Dr Martin Dudley (from April 2005) Church Commissioners (2 nominees) The Archdeacon of London The Ven. Peter Delaney Peter Dale Council of the University of London (1 nominee) Gillian Roberts University College London (1 nominee) Professor Gerald Manners City & Guilds of London Institute (1 nominee) John Barnes (retired April 2005) Paul Wates (from April 2005) Bishopsgate Foundation (1 nominee) Miles Barber King’s College London (1 nominee) John Muir Association of London Government (1 nominee) Cllr Raj Chandarana Greater London Authority (1 nominee) Murziline Parchment (from July 2004) City Parochial Foundation (4 nominees) Jyoti Munsiff (term ended April 2005) Lynda Stevens Albert Tucker (term ended April 2005) Jane Wilmot Ingrid Posen (from May 2005) (previously Co-opted committee member) Neville Walton (from May 2005) (previously Co-opted committee member) Co-optees Richard Martin – CPF Estates Committee Robert Laurence – CPF Estates Committee Clare Thomas – CPF Grants Committee Albert Tucker – CPF Grants Committee (from April 2005) Gillian Davies – TfL Grants Committee Tzeggai Yohannes Deres – TfL Grants Committee (until April 2005) Howell Harris Hughes – Asset Allocation Committee

43

Grants Review 2004

Staff of City Parochial Foundation and Trust for London
Clerk Bharat Mehta Director of Finance & Administration Carol Harrison Director of Grants and Programmes Martin Jones (until September 2004) Principal Officer (Grants) Mubin Haq (from October 2004) (Field Officer until September 2004) Principal Officer (Programmes and Evaluation) Sioned Churchill (from October 2004) (Field Officer until September 2004) Field Officers Helal Uddin Abbas Lynne Gillett (from February 2005) Publications and IT Manager Tina Stiff PA to the Clerk Ali Mackey PA to the Director of Grants and Programmes/Principal Officer Beulah Scott (retired April 2005) Senior Grants Administrator Jaspal Babra (from April 2005) (Secretary to Field Officers/Principal Officer until March 2005) Grants Administrator Laura Mansfield (from April 2005) (Administrative Assistant until March 2005) Office Manager Mara Normile Accounts Assistant Sue Caller Administrative Assistant Martin Reynolds Receptionist Michelle Russo (until June 2004) Pat Harrison (from August 2004)

44

Grants Review 2004

Living London history
S
adlers Wells, the Old Vic, Chelsea Physic Garden, Hampstead Heath, Whitechapel Art Gallery… these are all symbols of London, its heritage and culture. And all have direct connections with City Parochial Foundation. CPF has been operating in the capital for 112 years and during that time it has been associated with many innovative projects and institutions, not all of which were popular at the time, but which have since become firmly established and significant features of the London scene. Back in the early days, education for ‘the working man’ was an important priority. It was the time when polytechnics had just arrived, and CPF took an active part in providing funds for their expansion. Linked to this were a number of ‘kindred’ institutions which also attracted the support of Trustees – including Chelsea Physic Garden, Whitechapel Art Gallery and the Old Vic. The latter was supported on a number of occasions over the years. And CPF was also instrumental in backing the establishment of Sadlers Wells, an Old Vic offshoot, in the 1930s. Another early priority was maintenance of open space in the capital. Among the best known areas that Trustees supported were the expansion of Hampstead Heath, Hackney Marshes and Coram Fields. By the 1930s, this enthusiasm had developed into the provision of leisure facilities, some of these linked to large London County Council estates such as Dagenham and Becontree, and the development of Grange Farm holiday centre in Chigwell, which continues to thrive. Bellingham Community Project in Lewisham was another – it is still supported by CPF. In their time such projects were not considered appropriate for public funding but, as a result of their success and changes in attitudes, they have come to be regarded as important facilities that should be supported by central and local government. In the second half of the twentieth century Trustees began to direct funding increasingly towards organisations providing services to groups concerned with a wide range of social issues, many of them also unpopular at the time. This was a period of large scale immigration and racism began to be a serious issue. The need to do something led Trustees to provide support to organisations set up to tackle the problem. Poor housing was another serious concern after the second world war. After initially providing funds for direct provision, CPF later made funds available to organisations such as Shelter to provide advice to homeless people, and Housing Societies Charitable Trust (now HACT) which supported the establishment of housing associations – some of which have now grown to become multi million pound social businesses housing many thousands of Londoners. Greater London Association for the Disabled received backing, and support for GLAD and similar organisations continues today. Many other groups dealing with social problems such as child poverty, unemployment, drug and alcohol dependency and abuse, youth disadvantage and women’s welfare have been seen as priority groups by the Trustees. More recently, issues such as prison reform, and the needs of refugee and migrant communities have featured prominently, alongside support for very small voluntary groups that provide vital services for their often isolated and disadvantaged clients. This type of support has been a major feature of the approach adopted by Trust for London which was set up in 1986 to replace funding of voluntary bodies which had previously been supported by the defunct Greater London Council. If past experience is anything to go by, today’s funding by CPF and TfL will see benefits for many Londoners extending for years to come, through institutions that become established and vital contributors to London’s evolving heritage.

Produced and co-ordinated by Tina Stiff • Written and edited by Chris Bazlinton • Design by Ray Eden Printed by Gilt Edge Printing Ltd • Photography: Chris Jepson; Frewine Solomon; John Dillon; Chris Bazlinton • Published June 2005

City Parochial Foundation E-mail: info@cityparochial.org.uk Trust for London E-mail: trustforlondon@cityparochial.org.uk 6 Middle Street London EC1A 7PH Telephone: 020 7606 6145 Fax: 020 7600 1866 Website: www.cityparochial.org.uk Charity Registration Numbers: City Parochial Foundation 205629 The Trust for London 294710

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