NG STEPS TO END THE NUCLEAR ARMS RACE

FRED SEGAL

FRED E. BASTEN

It is my abiding belief that peace must be the business s every man, woman and child f here in issues which on this plmet, Without the aroused involvemerat of people eve concern their very sanmival, there 6 1 1 be no peace. The h e r i c m Soviet Walk demonstrates WBPSPL: can happen when people take diplomacy into their own hands, They readily find the common haannaplie which binds each of them to the othen: The Peace Walk is a living s p b o l ofthe p o w r of people to accomplish what their governments have been unable, or unwilling to do: unite hummkind in a spirit s f healing m d cooperation.
Co-President, international Physicims for the Prevention of Nuclear War Nobel Peace Prize winner, 1985

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Russians m d h e r i e a n s , c a v i n g a Soviet Wag and an American one, walk side by side into Red Squlare. Something is happening. We are finally beginning to see the day, foreseen many years @o by Dwight Eisenhower7when the people of the world want peace so much that gowmments have to get out of the way and let them have it. h o p l e we not w&ti* mymore for governments to make peace. Instead, East and West, Nodh and South, they express not only the spirit of democraw but also the source s f democraw by taking peacemaking and justice-making into their o m hands. Secure peace with justice may not come in a day or a yearr. Yet it will come. can a I thank the Ameriem Soviet Walk b r bringing us closer to friendship and peace. B

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Executive Director, Peace Development Fund

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U R E S contribution to creating a peaceful world revolves around our efforts to help people help themselves out of poverlty. When people have food, education, and live in a heaPthEul enrvironment, the world will enjoy peace. We applaud the e f h d s of those citizens on the Sc~viet e r i c m Walk who are actively pursuing the goan w all have for a peaceful, h stable and just world. DR. PHILIP JOHNSmN Executive Director, U R E
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We mast find a way to protect ourselves and futulre generations from that final and cataclysmic nuclear disastep: Bur responsibilities for the planet and the future of the human race demand no less. Hurnanitarim/Businessmsan

NG STEPS TO END THE NUCLEAR ARMS RACE

FRED SEGAL

FRED Em BASTEN

FIRST PRINTING
IIIEPBOE H3HAH1"IE

A B T O ~ G K O ~ H3AaTenbCTBa United World of the JlPaBO Universe Foundation copyright 1988 Yn. EponBeG N0500, ~aHTa-MoHMKa,Kanr?@opamrrr 90401

Cowright O 1988 by United World of the Universe Foundation, Published by United World of the Universe Foundation, 500 Broadway9 Santa Monica, C 2 i 90401

PRINTED IN THE UNITED S'rATES OF AMERZGA
BASKHOE C ~ ~ & ~ E H E . P E YaCTb 3 O 0 KHIlrkI MOXeT : ~ ~ I ~ ~8~ R 6b1Tb BOCnpOM3BeAeHa n W 6 b 1 ~ ~ I O C O ~ O M , 1 ~ C n W 6 b YenOBeKOM HSIICIc~pawoji 6e3 nHcbMeHHoro pa3peuIewylR ~ s g a ~ e n b cTBa. M ~ HaGeeMca, YTO B cnysae, ecnH KonHR s~olti I Kar?rM Gyger npogaaa, secb g o x o ~ noiige~H pasawTse gpyx6b1, a ~ I O ~ BMHmipa.

1MH"Q)WTAJVT: Any po&ion of this book m q be reproduced by any means, loy anyone or any country, without written permission from the publisher. Our hope is that when reproduced and sold, the profit proceeds are used tovvilrd friendship, love and peace.

This real story is dedicated to all walkers. Each one of us makes a difkrence. One day soon our responsibility will be to keep the peace. God bless our differences. God bless us.

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What peaceful, loving ways are amilable to cut through the derrial and the self-propagdting parmoia which drives the arms mee? hate Marchers have vvalked across the United States, and from Lningrad to Moscow in the Soviet Union. They Itnow the dangers of the nuclear arms raee. They recognize its seriousness. They have embraced Alber~ Einstein's call for a new vvay of thinking. There are people across the country who fully understand what is needed, and the dangers that the policies of this administration and previous administrations have put us in, But there is a group of extremists in Washington who haw not yet understood. It is our job to explain it to them. It will be difficult, but 1 can assure you that there is a ehange happening at this moment - changing opinion, new sorts of political action - and vve are going to see a significant ehange in U.S, policy on nuelear weapons and on many other issues.

DR. GrlRL SAGAIV
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Director, Laboratory for Planetary Studies, Cornell University David Duncan Professor of Astronolny and Space Sciences
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Most dangerous of the risk factors threatening a human on this planet today is the nuelear arms raee. This is what jeoprprdizes the basic human right -- the right to lifeFe. W (International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuelear Wad were among the first to demolish the nuelear illusions that existed and to unveil the true face of nuclear weapons --- the mapons of genocide. We vvarned the peoples m d governments that medieinc would be helpless to offer even minimum relief to hundreds of millions of victims of nuelear vvar. From the first days of our association, Dr. Bernard Lovvn, of the United States of

Amesiea, and I[ s a e s t e d our presc~ption survival. It envisaged a ban on tests of nuelear for vveapons, a freeze, reduction and eventual elimination of nuelear weapons, non-first-use of nuelear weapons, ending the arms race on earth and preventing it from spreading to outler space, ereation of the amosphere of trust O;-retweern peoples and countries, and promotion of enose international cooperation. The people who are part of a big movement, andor a large organization, can move things ahead. The American Soviet Walk demonstrated this lcind of movement toward peace.

EVGUENT GHAZOV, MD
h r m e r l y Co-Chairman, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuelear War Presently, Minister of Health, Soviet Union Nobel Peace Prize winner, 1985
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As I walksed down the street in Moscow, with the Soviet and American flags crossed in front in me, B felt an ovemhelming sense 06 hope, longing, desire, arnd ecstasy Never in my life had I realized before that the two superpowers could come together with trust

and love and solve the nuclear problem. Women from the side of the street, middle-aged and oldey; rushed out in tears, grabbing me and huging me in the street. This was unique. II had never experienced such overwhelming passion and a deep sense of the longing for peace before, It vvas one of the unique experiences of my life.

DR. I3EI,EN U L D I C
President Emeritus, Physicians for Social Responsibility Humanitarian fog- World h a c e
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How can 1 hope to convey the passion that drove us to creak Ilnternielional Peaee Walk and attempt what became this remarkable Arnerican Soviet ventureP My motive m s strikingly simple, and may be understood t h r o ~ some questions basic t h e r i c a n Soviet h o relations: Can our securiky be ensured by making others feel insecure? Do we demorlstrate our civility by the amount of resources vsre can steal from our children to squander on instruments of death? 1s our humanity to be measured by h e m o u n t of hatred and ignorance we can direct at a heeless enenay, no less human than ourselves, no less sacred than any other life? The photographs you see in this book are of people and places we dared to come to know and in so doing h w e come to love. Like yourself, they will all be destroyed in the ernminent senseless holocaust of a simple human or computer error, or perhaps an act of arrogance or vanity or vengence. 'B'he fact that we have created this situation and accept it as reasonable seems cause enough to devote a lifetime to m r k s of tolerance and compassion. Every hour of every day the USA and the USSR spend over $10,BOO,OB)(P preparing to annihilate each other. This is done with our money, and in our n m e . It is important to keep in mind that the enemy is, and has always been, not nuclear weapons or weapons of any kind. Weapons are merely symptoms of a slingujarly human disease, a disease that feeds on fear, ignorance and, most importmtly, denial of personal responsibility. This malaise is perhaps best understood as an absence, in the sarne vvay that darkness is the absence of light. Human evil is simply the absence of compassion, and the arms race is the ultimate expression of our sickness. The beauty of this is that each of us can choose to be well, at any time, simply by acting with compassion. W need only to recognize our similarities and build from there, rather than to focus on our differences and defend from there.

The VValks are magic. They change the lives of thousands. And so vve at International h a e e Walk and Trade Peace continue to do more Walks, and eoneerts, and international business to fund international peaee vvork, and anything else we can think of. Because everything that we can do, and everything that you can do, spreads just a l i ~ l e more light .

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AELASV AIFIF;EL,rn
President, International Peaee Walk
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The road to Ideningrad, for the stark of the Ameriearr Soviet Walk, did not always run smoothly. Indeed, the historic event vvas a long time coming, the work of many dedicated individuals and groups following months of negotiations. R I early Novemben; 1986, Allan AfCeldt, a member oftke ,n Great Peace March and a graduate student from Galifornia, and Carlos de la Fuente, a fellow marcher and retired Los Angeles Municipal Judge, visited the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.G. There, before First &ache Anatoly Khrustaley they outlined a plan ~o walk for peace in the Soviet Union. The Embassy a r c e d to begin discussions, through diplomatie channels, on what had been described as "the lmgest non-military invasion by h e r i e a n s in Soviet history." Talks continued bemeen a delegation of Americans and members of the Soviet Peace Gommi~ec, official coorthe dinating body for all peace events in the Soviet Union. Before the end of the year, the SP6 had tentatively approved the Walk. The timing was ideal. Under the leadership of Mikhaill Gorbaehev, the most sweeping changes since the Revoluplace in the Soviet Union. New reforms tion =re ~aklng and policies were being initiated to revitalize the country. Glasnost (meaning "openness" or ""lpbllie airing9') and fierestroiha (""rebuilding"or "re~onsttrruetion'~) were malting international headlines, By Apnb, tl-nanlis to the efforlts of Allsen AfEe1dt9 presi~ ~ ~ b ~ f i dent of the newly formed Internationall Peace Walk, Ine., and his staff, the first American Soviet Walk was, at last, talting shape, Applications vvelre in the mail to interested pdieipants. A schedule was prepalred, describing the route of the Walk between Leningrad and Moscow, with stops at towns and villages in between, The walkers - 2363 Americans, joined by 200 Soviets in Leningrad - would

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cowr approximately BO to 24) kilometers a day on foot, the balance by bus and boat. My 13-year-olddaughtea; Annie, and I vvere privileged to be a part of the American contingent. On the fifth of June, Annie and I left Los Angeles for Virginia, .Ifor a wek-long briefing and an introduction to our fellow walkers. Among the group were adists, actors, writers, peace activists, students, teachers, attorneys, doetors, mechanics, marine biologists, a sheep farmer, a military ehaplin - people from all wdlks of life. Tn'hey ranged in age from eight months to 80 years. Here is the story of the long-awaited Amehcan Soviet Walk, and the peace-loving citizens of two distinctly different cultures, uniting to express their mutual desire to end an arms race nobody wants.

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Above: At Gladden School in Eeesburg, Virginia, the Americans
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Musicians enter(;&n a group of walkers moments beffore boarding a ehafier plane a Dulles Airpod in BrJashing t ton, DaC.for dimct flight to Leningrad. Another contingent left a day earlier, stopping in Ireland before continuing on.
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Sertled back for the long Right a b o a d an Aerof ot jetline5 shon%lyafter leaving Dulles Airport. Nefi stop, Ideningrad.
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June 15,1987, marked the official stalrlt of the inaugural American Soviet VValk. It was the day we landed at Leningrad airporl, to be greelted by our hosts, the Soviet Peace Committee. It was also the day vve first joined hands with our "partners in peaed' throughout the Walk, the 200 or more members of the Soviet contingent. During our stay in Leningrad, an incredibly lovely city ofvvatemays and palaces, our days were filled with ewnts scheduled by the Soviet Peace Committee that sometimes took us into the night. VC7e toured by foot, by bus and by boat. We met the smiling crosvds that lined the sidewalks, played our games of Hacky Sack, a d sang their songs of hope, friendship, and peace. We visited factories and memorials. The unforgettable moments were mounting quickly, .and we had only just arrlived.

With heads bowed, w embrace in a silent hug to celebrate our arrival in Leningrad.
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visit to Lningrad's Earned ENBermitage Museum, which houses numerous important art collections, ineluding those of Rernbrmdt, Rubens and Titian. Below: TFouring the summer palace of Peter the Great in Petrodvcprets, a LRningrad suburb. The sprawling grounds are landscaped with nearly 700 fountains m d 200 gilt statues.
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Hundreds of vvalkers, carrying anti-nuelear signs, approach the towering monument at Piskarevskoye Memorial Cemetery in Leningrad. More than 470,000 civilian and mililary victims of the W0-day siege of the city during World War blB are buried in common graves.

Ldt: Painful reminders of the tragedy of war are reflected on the
faces of the rain-soaked gathering at Piskarevskoyre. Below: h e r i c m and Soviet veterms of VVorld War I1 prepare to lay a wreath at the cemetery monument. "We want peace because we remember war," stressed the Soviets during the presentation.
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During the moving ceremonty at Piskarevskoye Memorjial Cemekry, two helrjicm vvar veterans unexpectedly dropped to their knees and remained frozen in prayer. The deepfelt gesture of compassion stunned many of the Soviet onlookers. Earlier, prior to leaving on the m l k , one of the men had fasted for 46 days as a statement for peace. B0 BpeMR T p o r a T e n b H o f i
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Pen and ilnlc drawing of the American and Soviet walkers in T~ningrad noted Soviet by adlist Valentina Anopova.

Leningrad-born Valentina Anopova studied with the famed Professor Savinova bllowing her graduation from Art Grafie P e d ~ o g i e a l College. A versatile artist, Valentina9sworks inelude monumental and decordive art as w l l as paintings and graphics.

A group of Soviet men watch quietly as we pass through the countryside leading to the town of Pushkin.
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Standing-room-omBy e l r o d vvelcorned us to Pushkin in the town's concert hall. The normally staid community9 steeped in old Russian cultural traditions, responded enthusiastically to the visiting walkers and to American music, pedomed by Collective Vision, a six-member vvalker group.
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Pushkin dancers, waring traditional folk dresses, await their turn on stage. The program also included a presentation of letters from American children to the youngsters of Pushltin, with an invitation to correspond with their new young American friends.

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Above: Eager youngsters line the roadside for their first glimpse of Americans. Large groups of children were usually aecornpanied by their teachers. Below: A smile and a friendly handclasp from an American to Soviet worlccrs near Seltso.
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Fresh flowers -re held out to us all along the route. The colorful bouquets vvere not for sale. h r the Russians, floral gifis or displqs signiEy friendship a'nd love.
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Hundreds of American and Soviet vvallkers proceed through rural h s s i a , side by side, forming a seemingly endless chain that stretches into the distance. The dedicated group made its way unrestricted. Several police cars were nearby to act as a buffer between passing traffic.
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"Miry Druxhba:' cried the elderly peasant woman. " k a c e and friendship:' Others, like the vvar widows pictured below, remained silent, but relayed their warm wishes through gestures.
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In nearly every village and town, Soviets il'nd Americans drew together in a harmonious and united "peace circlel'

Sleeping mats and plump pilloms transform the high school gym in Seltso, a state farm and training center, into an m r night dormitory for the traveling Americans and Soviets.
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Passing through the rernolte rural area outside Seltso in Leningmd Oblast (Gounq), with b e r i c m m d Soviet Rags leading the way* Villagers wave a friendly welcome.

l'raffic is blocked on the main highway as Russian folk dancers celebrate our arnival at the Novgorod Oblast (County) state line. Following the festivities, we moved on tomrd the ancient city of Novgorod.

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B Hosropoge

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Moving along the highway? surrounded by forest, a scatltering of people began to appear. They came to wave, to smile, and to offer a hand in friendship. These gentle villagers were b-ypical of the groups t h d gathered on the outskirts of towrls to wlcome us. But as vve drew closer to the ancient city of Novgorod, we began to sense that something special vvsls happening, 'VVe m r e about to experience the thrill of a lifetime. With each step forward the crowd grew larger. Masses of people w r e lining the roadway for miles ahead, all the way into the city itself. They clapped, offered gifts, asked for autographs, and chanted for peace. "Peace, peace: their voices rang from the sidelines. The sound was deafening, We crossed the city limits and found ourselves engulfed in the throng. It vvas a reception vvodlny of heroes. Old men fought back tears; women sobbed openly as they rushed to embrace us. ""No more Hiroshimas:' a young man cried. "No more Ntyfasakis19 Over 60,OOO people turned out to greet us in Novgorod, one-quarter of the city's population. If eveqone in the United States and Soviet Union, and the governments that represent us, could have witnessed that outpouring of friendship .and love, if only for a moment, it is doubtful there m u l d ever be any nuclear weapons in our two countries. For most of us on the Walk, our arrival in Novgorod, and the ovewvhelrning reception we received, will remain forever in our heads and memories.

Hosropoa u

orueno~nrlmryuriii

npaervr,

y c ~ p O e H ~ b 1T a M B H a m y YeCTb, HaBeKM OCTaHeTCR B C e p A Q a X fi M B n a M H T M ~ O E ~ U I H H C T YYaCTHMKOB n o X 0 f i a . B~

An Amerlrcm youngster meets a group of Novgorod children, vvplo ;turned
out to greet the visitors from faraway

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I& Beaming young people of Novgorod wave &om their balconies as the waB;: kers enter their city. Many thousaaads of claeerinlg spectators lined the roadway*

Placard-carrying throng packed the park inside the 11th-Century mils of Novgorod krernlin (fortress) for the official welcoming ceremony.

Novgorod9s largest turnout in years presses around the park's historic monument, adomed with 129 figwes of famous Russians, to voice their support for the American and Soviet peace mission.

On the outskirts of Proletarii, Soviet women descend on an American attorney and his young son.

Street dancing in Prsletarii. Similar welcomes awaited us in towns and villees all along the route to Moscowe

Young dancers, in traditional follk
costumes, perdiarm aiong the roadside in Zaitsevco, a. town farnous for its csyshal production,

A roaring bonfire erases the evening chill at
the campsite outside Zaitsevo. Hours later, drenching rains turned the open field into a muddy q u ~ m i r eThat night w4 a test of our . a5 metde, and we made the most of it. With no place to go and nothing to doo,many Americans and Soviets held long, intense conversations in their tents. It was a breakthrough experience that drew us even closer together. HbrnanowMG KocTep o c n a 6 n ~ e ~ sesepwai;i xonop( B wauletu narepe, HeganeKo OT ropoAa 3aii~eso. Yepes wecKonbKo traces nponaswoii JJOXCA~ rIpeBpaTHn ompbrroe nojIe B 6 o n o ~ o rpR3M. 3 ~ HOYb 6b1na MCnbITaHMeM Ha.IIIerO a Myxecrsa, M M ~ sbIp(epxanMero. T ~ KK MATH I K a 661.~10 HeKyga a Aenarb 661~10 Heuero, MHorae aMepMKaHqbI 11 p C K e BD JJOnrHe, MHTeHYC M eM CMBHbIe Pa3TOBOPbI B CBOMX nanaTKaX. ~ T M Pa3rOBOPbI C ~ R M ~ M ~ I HIC ewe 60nbIIIe. Ia

A. damp day did not diseouree the people of Krestsy from turning out to welcome us at their dramatie war memorial, a cantilevered replica of a soaring World War 1 fighter 1 plane.

A cluster of smiling gr~mdmokhers (babushkas) stmd patiently awaiting our arrival to their settlement. Many villBwrs opened their farm houses and cottages to us,imiting us in for tea and to exchange small gifLs.

Amiericm fi@,

Sov.iet World War 1 veteran proudly displays an 1 pinned nex(; to his combat medals.

An Anneriean woman hugs a Soviet war wid4 who is holding a globe with the United Sta pressed to her head.

In a seMing reminescent of a midvvest American town, a uniformed marching band escorts the vvalkers down "Main Street:'

With flags waving and a banner announcing our arrival, vve spread m e s s e s of peaee and goodwill. In t o m after town, sltreets m r e closed Ito allow our large group to proceed without interruption. C p a 3 s e s a m ~ ~ ~ un ca ~r a ~ ~n n a K a T a M u , B O ~ B ~ W ~ ~ W o H a lHr e M I I ~ H ~ ~ I T HM ,~ I G I? M M r H p a C n p O C T p a H R e M H a e m M H p a H ~oGpoii BOnH. B r Q p O A e 3a r O p O A Q M ynMLJ,bI 6 b m H 3aKpbITb1, ~ ~ 0 6 6 1 n o 3 ~ o n s ~arueii o n b m o i i rpynne r r p o r ; i ~6 e 3 s a ~ e p x ~ ~ . ~ b 6 ~

Bverleafi Before a turnout of local townblk in the summer reso& of Valdai, a small Soviet girl weleon the vvalkers. The placards and banners proclaim ""VVe Vote for 1Peace:' ""No IVlmclear War: .and ""No Star VVar Beyond the crowd, in a rustic eoufiyard, burns an eternal name surrounded by busts of vvar heroes.
Hu o6parn1-roLi crnopone: n e p e ~ rpynnoii
Gmcra~~ repoee
M e c T w o r o r o p o A c K o r o E r a c e n e H m B K Y ~ O P T H Q MM e c T e Y K e B a n p r][na~aTbl l4 J I O 3 y H r l l M a J I e H b K a R COBeTCKaR AeBOYKa HpHBeTCTByeT YYaCTHIlKQB n 0 X O ; l a . B O ~ ~ W Y ? ""JI,onoii 3Be3AHYIO B O ~ ~ H Y ! rJ[03a~M , ~' O T ~ Y ~ C T B ~ HBH O ~ ~~ I . O ~ H TOJ'InbI,

"JI,onoii

RAepII

B CenbCKOM C a A y TOpkiT BeYHOe n J I a M R , OKPY'WCCHI

FACES IN THE CROWDSlnMUA B TOnnE

Night after night, domed tents do~ced campgrounds, open fields and clearings along the road to Moscow. Above, a @pica1 ""tent ciw9' surrounds the newly christened Peace Street.

w :Picturesque lakshore encampment a -Vishnii Volochek. The steep rise, t t
over which boa& ;-arehauled to the mter9se&e, inspired the name. English translation: high portage.
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Pitching in to kelp prepare meals at one of the campsites. The day to day aetivities required vvalker t e a m r k .

Right: Makeshi& mess tent set up by villagers during a rainy stopover. Long plank tables, covered with white d a a s k cloths, w r e topped with such Soviet-prepared treats as cheese blintzes, eabbae rolls, garden vegertables, homemade bread, and freshly brevved tea, served from samovars.

With o w buses keeping pace nearby, grwps of Soviets and Americans move t b r o ~ h a light rain toward the industrial town of Tonhak. Each of the buses was decorated with peace symbols.
ham^ a ~ ~ 0 6 y c cneAymT 38 H ~ M rpynnbr PYCCKMIX II aMepHKawqeB ~ , q y r b1 M; nro~ 6onbuua~ AQxAeM no HanpaBneHMIW K npoMbImneHHOMy rOpOAKy T o p x o ~ . a x ~ b ~aBT06yc 6b1n K fi yKpamew cMMBonaMu Mupa.

The rain intensified as we entered Torzhak. Determined residents had mired hours under soggy skies for our arrival, then mingled among us to parade through town. f i 0 X ~ b yCHnH6ICR, K O r A a M b I BXOAHJIH B TOPXOK. n ~ b l P e W H M O C T H n o e x m T e n H n o A A o x A e M o x a p ( a n s aauuero ~ P H G ~ I T H R T e Y e a H e B WeCKOnbKHX YaCOB, a n O T O M npMCOeAkIHkInHCb K H a M , Y ~ 0 6 b BMeCTe C 1 H a M H npO$Tr? no r O p O A y .

An American Indian pnays his flute for Torzhak youngsters on the center for children. steps of the Young Pioneer Palace, a c o r n m u n i ~

*pica1 crowd photo reflects expressions on the faces of local residents as the American Soviet Walk passes through their t m n . One of the posters reads, "Value Peace A b m Enmity:'

Soviet youngster proudly displays the Rags of two nations.

As .vve approached the 12th-Century city of Kalinin, the curious began to gather. Kalinin was the one town on the Walk that had not alerted its citizens of our scheduled visit. Ward spread quickly, h o m e r , and soon everyone knew we were in town. The nearby vvaterway is the Volga River. K O r A a MbI FIOAXOAHnH K FOpOAY K ~ ~ M H I I I ? ~ ~ , IIOCTpOeHHOMY B BeKe, HaYanH C O ~ E I P ~ T ~ C R n1o60nb1THbre X u T e n H . K a n ~ w k ~6bm eAHHCT5eHHbIM TOpOAOM, H e n p e A y n p e A H B m H M C5OIIX X H T e n e G 0 w HarrreM ~ ~ H G ~ I T HTI eI M H e Mewee, c n y x H G ~ I C T ~pa3~ecnucb, BcKope Bee 3~an1.1, M ~ np116brnu B . O H YTO I r o p o f i . I t I a x o ~ R ~ a ~ c R n ~ 3 0 c T ~ - TO peKa B o n r a . no6 peKa

Fascinated residents of Kalinin watch as a procession of walkers enter a war memorial, while other snap photos to preserve this special happening in their town.
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The tremendous wlcorne vve received from the crowd at Kali~~in Stadium triggered cheers of our own.

Women of Kalinin listen intently during services at Belya 'kroitsa (White E i n i ~ )a Russian Odho, dox church. At one point, the metropolitan (IbishoyP) of the area interrupted to introduce and bless members of our peace group in attendance. .Another of the churcKs clergy, and one of the vvalkers, had earlier won the right for church bells to ring again in the town. He had also secured jobs for teachers who had been dismissed for being openly religious.
XewW~nbr KanHHmr-ra BHmMaTeJIbHo cnymamT 60rocny>~ew~epycc~oiir~pasocnas~oji B qeprclss B &en05 Tpomqe. M ~ l r p o n o n a ~ 0 % 3~ OGJI~CTH npepsan cnyxGy, 9 ~ 0 6 6 npeAcTaBlfiTb M Gnarocnoss~b 1 I I ~ M C ~ T ~ T B ~ TI O ~YneHoB ~ a m e i i ~ M~ X rpynIlbr sa Map. Gpyroii cBRWeHaHK 3 ~ 0 2 qepKBH m QAMH 143 y9aCTHHKOB IlOXOAa HOnysMnM paHbWe pa3pemelcIMe ewe pa3 3BOHMTb B UepKOBHbIe KOJrOKOna.

h r n Kdinin, vve boarded a boat h a t took us to at landing a l o the Volga River, A e h e e ~ n g ~ crowd awaited our arrival.

B KanIlwk~~e ~ cenM ~a napoxon, ~ ( o ~ o p b ~ i~ e 3 no peKe Bonre. n u ~ y r o w a ~ M I n o i Hac Tonna oxHAana waruero ~ P H ~ ~ I T U R .

A narrow road led from the river into the woods, where vve visited a pioneer
camp for children. The oldest vvalker was an 80-yearold American veteran of

World War HH (second from left, with cane).
Y ~ K gopora sena OT p K a o neca, rAe M ~ IIoceTkinr? nkio~epc~kiji ~ R eM I narepb. G~apefimkiMYraCTHHKOM IIOlrOAa 6b1n ~ O ~ b ~ r ? ~ e ~ R T r ?an~ee~p~ k ~fai ~ c ~ k i f i kii BeTepaH B~opoiirM M P O B O ~B~ O ~ ~ (BTOPOW H ~ I cneBa c nanos~ofi).

Overlea$ Drummer boys flank the gates to the pioneer camp as an American woman and a young Soviet, jointly carrying a flming torch, lead the parade of vvalkers inside.
Ila obopom~oii crnopoiae: R l a n e w b ~ ~ e 6apa6awwki~~ CTORT no 06e C T O P O H ~ I BOPOT B nM0HepcKkifi JIarepb, B TO BpeMR KI aMepkiKaHKa r? M Q ~ O A O Y C~C K I I ~ ~ aC P~ HeCyT nblnaltowkifi @aKen ki BeAYT napaA YsaCTHkiKOB nOXOAa H TePPMTOPUlto a narepH.

Wavhg American fliags, Soviet youths welcome the walkers to their camp. The Young Pioneers, members of an organization similar to the Boy and Girl Scouts of America, later put on an entertaining show
Pa3MaxklBaR aMePMKaHCKMMI? (PnaraMM, COBeTCICaR MOnOAeXb BCTpeYaeT YYaCTHMKOB rIOXOAa B CBOeM narepe. n ~ o ~ e p b r (qnewb~ ~ o n o ~ e x ~oo~ i~i ~ H M ~ ~ u (noxoxeii H a oprawusarr(sw> 6 o i i c ~ a y ~ o ~ M M , B A~epM~ce) nO3Xe OpraHM30BanM KOHU(epT CaMOAeRTenbHOCTM.

RigbEt: An h e r i c a n and a Soviet relax on the grassy banks of the Volga. T h r o e b o u t the Walk, it was customary for a Soviet to carry the American flag
and an h e r l i e a n to carnry the Soviet Rag.

Getting in and out of buses became routine afier a fevv days. Each of the adults had an assigned bus, while the children rode in bus Number One. The drivers were patient and caring, but not overly protective.

m:The traditional h s s i a n greeting of
bread and salt avvaited us at many settlements as vve stepped from our buses. BeEow: As smiling villagers look on, an American vvalker warmly embraces an elderly Soviet woman after receiving a gifi of flowers.
Cileea: Korpla
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Right: An American student gently wipes a tear from the cheek of a Soviet child. Below: A Soviet mother carefully positions her yourlg daughter, who is holding a banner that reads, USa\~e Children? Our
CnplJslJ: A ~ c p ~ ~ a w cCTyAeHTKa HeXHO rca~ 'jTMpaeT Cne3hI COBeTCKOMy ManbsklKy. B H U ~C O B ~ T C K ~ R OCTOPOXHO ~ : MaTb
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Ld~: Russian gra~~drnother her p u n g A and
grandchild. Below: Reaching, touching: a familiar sight wherever we vvent.
cfl6'@a: P Y C C K 6 a 6 y ~ k - a ee M a J I e H b K a R ~R M B H U ~ p O:T n i H y T b 1 e ~~ pyKM, rIpMKOCH0---

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' h o generations of proud Soviet women.

Soviet women, Birorn the town of Klin, enterlain. with a traditional dance at the Klin cmpsite.
~ ~ O B ~ T C KHH ~ H b I M 3 r 0 p O A a K n H H p a 3 B n e K a E o T H a C T p a A M q H O H H b I M H Xe wM

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We arrived in Moscow on the sunny afternoon of July first. Vl'e entered the city on a sleek, modern rliverboat, following a four-hour cruise down the Moscow Wixr. A huge crovvd, waving colorful balloons and peace placards, lined the dock fronting the picturesque passenger terminal. Other welcomers cheered ft-om the steps and rails of the old porl building, while a naval guard snapped to a~ention. A full week of activities, mostly planned, awaited us in the capital city - sightseeing and wmdering about ux~restncted (despite .e incident imlving a ken%e West G e m a n pilot, who, only weeks earlien; had landed his aircrafi: without authorization in Red Square), sessions wilth Soviet officials and peace organizations, dmces and folk festivals, and nelv friends. New friends, alwreys, wherever we went. We had looked forward to reaching Moscow. Our actual arrival was filled with unexpected emotions, however, for we knew that our journey was soon coming to an end.

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A jubilant crowd was waiting to wPeome us as our sleek riverboat pulled up to the dock across
from the Moscow River Passenger Terminal.
Ha

Koraa Ham pekrr~oiinapoxon ocTarioBuncn y npEcrawM MocKoRcKoro naccaxMpcKoro pesworo so~csana, 6epery C T O R n a RkfKyIomaR TOJIna, KOTOPaR co6panacb npIIBeTCTBOBaTb Nac.

Wlcome to Moscow?A handsome Soviet father applauds as his daughter, wearing a Mickey Mouse cap, waves an American Rag. Below: H@s, ~ s s e sand tears , avvaited as vve reached the final lap of our journey.
AoGpo noxanosaTb B MOCKBY! O~eu annonapyeT, a ero ManemKarr nosica, B manosKe M H K M Mayca, p a 3 ~ a x a s a eaMepuircaa~ CKkiM @ J I a r o ~ . BFIU~!': ~ ' ~ % T H R , O nouenyki m cne3b1 oxkinanu wac, KOrAa M b l AOCTkirJIM nOCneAHer0 3~ana Harrrero nyTemecTski2.

Authentically costumed Soviet youngster proudly displays a sign she made in school.
~ O B ~ T C KA~ B O r K a , e R
o H a cAenaJla B mrtone. B TPaAMukIOHHOM PYCCKOM KOCTWMC, C TOpAOCTbW n O K a 3 b I B a e T n J I a K a T , K O T O P ~ I ~ ~

A. group
in Mosei
rpyn~ra Kpacwog

~ r a d e urnphantly through Red Square
noxo

Across from the Kremlin, Americans and Soviets join hands to form an enormous circle of unity and love.

Lefi: The Capitol building of the Russian
Republic in Moscow as seen through the windom of our tour bus. Below: Entering the speeheular All-Union Exhibit of Eeonornie rlchievernent, foljowing a parade through Moseovv.

T h e eelremonies in Moscow =re highlighted by brass bands, folk singing and dancing, and the planting of a ""peace tree:'
Ha sepelvrowklnx B Mocrtse oco6ewwo 3 a n o ~ w ~ n ~ c b Mysbrrca gyxoeoro oprtecrpa, BbIcrynnewMc awca~6nrrwapo~wofinecwu a nnRcrcr? a nocanm "gepeea pa".

Supported by a network of steel, the familiar Soviet emblem rises above an industrial building in Moscow.

Stirring patriotic posters were prominently displayed along many streets in Moscow The bold graphics are of a style popular in 1930s America.
li)OnHy~~Me naTpMOTH.IsCCKMe n n a K a T b I BbICTaBJIeHbI H a BMAHOM MeCTe H a MHOTMX ynMqax

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"We ma& it;' someone shouted, "all the vvay from LA.to Moscow? Suddenly a band began playing "When the Saints Go Marching In" and vve were entering Ismailovo Stadium to roaring, cont~inuous applause. Thousands of fans had come to be a part of the world's first rock concert featuring American~ and Soviet performers. From the United States w r e : Garllos Santana, James Taylor (his singing of ""Ui>u9ve A Friencil" was especially movind, Bonnie Raitt, and the Doobie Brothers. R o m the Swiet Got Union were: the popular rock group, htograf, along with folk and jazz ensembles, Pakrovsky and Nazareff, among others. The marathon, seven-hour concert, held on Americds Independence Day9was sponsored jointly by the Soviet Peace Committee and International Peace Walk, a U.S. organizatlion. It could not have taken place without the expe~ise Arncrican impresario Bill Graham. Nor could it have been televised subseof quently across the United States without producers Bob Guenette and Fred Rosen, With figs flying, music filling the air, and masses of balloons in the grandstands spelling out the word peace in English and Russian, the concert was a fitting finale to the scheduled events on the VValk.
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A banner day - July 4, 1987 - as a lively trod welcomed
us to Ismailovo Stadium for the first joint Soviet h e r i c a n rock concert.

Musicians, singers and photographers compiletely fill the s@@eunder the huge stadium shell. Everyone joined together for a hearttugging version of John Lennon9s"Give Peace a Chance."

The rousing fitinale had the fans clapping and roaring their approval.
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The meetings took place with little advance vvarning, on the day prior to our return Bight home. Those fortunate to attend took pa& in an unprecedented series of discussions, held simuPtaneously over a four hour period, on Soviet life and policies. At the eerlter of attention -re twrelve Jewish refuseniks, three Hare Krishna members, and sixteen dissidents, part of an illdependent and unofficial peace group, The meetings did not always run smoothly or without heated debate, but the revealing open discussions were additional proof that positive changes w r e indeed takling place in the Swiet Union. W were listening; the essential ingredient to communication vvas happening. W were listening! e The American contingent departed Moscow for the United States on July 8, 1987. Upon our return, we gathered once again at B,eesburg, Virginia, for reorientation and to reflect on what had taken place during our landmark peace mission among the Soviet people and ourselves. Each of us came home with special memories, personal and emotional times that we were all willing to share. There were poignant recollections of that drizzly day at Piskarevskoye Memorial Cemetery in Leningrad, where Americans and Soviets stood silently, side by side; of that muddy night outside Zaitsevo, when we and our fellow Soviet walkers truly became "a family"; of the overwhelming outpouring of affection at Novgorod. We remembered being welcomed into Soviet homes, entering as strangers m d d e p ~ i n as f ~ e n d sthe group of fellovv Soviet vvalkers, g ; who spayed up all night to plan a wonderful farewell program (an entertaining look at American history) in our honor; and the tremendous spirit and camaraderie during
- . -

the first international rock concert. We talked of carrying the American Rag through Red Square; of grandmothers here; of smiling faces and tear-filled eyes; of reaching out, touching and being touched; and of making new friends. The moments were o&en simple, yet haunting and tender. Not a day passed without them. We learned so much about the Soviets, and they learned much about us as friendly, peace-loving Americans. While there are definite differences between our two countries and cultures, there are incredible similiarities among the people. The two words vve heard over and over vverefriendship and peace. The Soviet people do not m n t war. Hardly of anyone wants vvar, but to eliminak all possibili~ a vvorldending nuclear confrontation, the methods of prevention will change. lirorn fear and defense to friendship, love and peace. This is a par(: of our humm evolution to prevent vvar. As one of our group confessed at 1,eesburg: " h e n t to the Soviet Union with fear in mry heart. ]I came back with nny heart full of lovely

In 1985 a young man saved my life in the Grand Canyon. As he was carrying me out of the Canyon he said that we were created in an act of love and that our purpose in life ought to be to enhance and nu&ure that love. I believe that nuclear weaponry and the underlying fears that nations use to justifi this weaponry comprise the greatest threat to our lives and the life of our planet. The greatest act of l m that one can commit is e to m r k to calm the fears that d ~ v nations to rtlhreaten the plmet with a nuclear holocaust. Knmledge of Ibussian language and culture combined with nry organizing experience gained on The Great Peace March .for Global Nuclear Disarmament in I986 enabled me to continue vvorking for peace on International hate VValk9sI987 h e r i c a n Soviet VValk. As V Tl Director, I spent two weeks in Russia trmeling our proposed walk route beheen E ak Leningrad and Moscow to negotiate the walk program with the local and national orgmimm from The Soviet &ace cornmi~ee. During the walk itself, I worked with these same organizers around the clock to adjust the program to the needs of the walkers. We solved literally hundreds of problems through creative compromises as well as many tense confrontations. Through this intense interaction we came to understand eaeh others9 points of view. Both organizers m d wlkers learned that despite cukural and ideological differences, trust can develop and true cooperation can be achieved on an organizational as w l l as personal level. These bonds of trust and friendship are making it much easier for International Peace to Walk and the Soviet Peace C o m m i ~ e e organize more walks. America and the Soviet Union have ofken relakd to eaeh other by threats rather than for dialogue. Our vvalks offer an o p p o ~ u n i l y individuals of both nations to engage eaeh other in dialogue and action that can positiw'ly transform the ways in vvhich we see each other. We believe th& our example of trust and cooperation can influence our societies and governments.

JOE ITINGZIESE
%lk Director, International Peace Walk

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The common m y of the world is conflict --- vliollent and frequendy long-lasting. Tnip invent a viable alternative to armed conflict will require the sustained and public activity of thousands of individuals, hundreds of organizations, and scores of governments. But goodwill and even commitment, by themselves, are insufficient to bring about a fundamental change in the way human beings settle disputes, We must have inbrmation, knowledge, and understanding of the issues which divide us. And perhaps more importantly, we must develop an appreciation, a respect and an understanding of the people and the governments we have been calling our enemies. HE international disputes are to be seMled without resod to military weapons, then vve must create an environment which is conducive to negotiations and other forms of nonviolent conflict resolution. The current environment, poisoned by fear, hatred, distrust, and misinformation, exacerbates existing conflicts and bsters new ones. The quintessen--tial means for shifting that environment is commu~~ication people talking to people, people listening to people. We don9thave to be professional diplomats to effect that shift. It can begin anryuvhere, anflime, as simply as American and Soviet citizens walking along together, conversing as they go, Ordinary people around the vvorld can take the future into their own hands in their role as citizen diplomats, building bridges betwen communities in conflict. If Americans and Eaussians can work out their problems of a long and cold war then perhaps so can Jews and Arabs end their longrunning and bloody feud. And if the EastVVest and Mideast conflicts ---- two of the toughest, most energy-consuming conflicts of the tvventieth centuny - can be micably resolved, then the persistent problems of Northern Ireland, Central America, Southern Africa, Southeast Asia and elsewre around the world can also be brought to a long-overdue conclusion. with vvalking and talking and listening . . . And it all sttls~s

MICHAEL LAME
President, The handation for Mideast Communication

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It is not so easy for me to be unbiased while trying to objectively evaluate the results of the American Soviet Walk. 18 is somewhat similar to an attempt of a caring parent to judge his beloved child. First of all 1 consider our Walk to be one of the most remarkable and touching events of last summer. What 1 remember the morning of June 15 was not the heat or eonstant rain. But when vve - the Soviet delegation of vvalkers - arrived to the "Pulkovo I airpod and then greeted Y the Right from 'VVashington, D.G., the sun came out from behind the clouds. I believe our Big Brother - Nature itself -- m s really happy because representatives of the two great nations met and decided to walk from Ideningrad to Moscow for peace and disarmament. Our first impression (that of the Soviet wallaers) was: "Hey, listen, they look exactly like us!)) And the same words came out from the American pa&icipants: ""Look, here, they are iust like us!"

rlnd now as for h a t was especially great about the Lnimgrad-Mosccpvv Walk: during it there w r e no sides or parties m y more. The Soviet and American peace-suppoo&ers ijecanrle one and there vvns born a e c p m m u n i t y of a truly mighty power. And what role does the popular peaee movement play in the eontemporary vvorld? It used to be common knowledge that major political decisions are not made "in the streets'; brat in the quiet of governmenhl offices, away from prying eyes and ears. But after the JanneSully l" 8 h e r i c a n SoGet Peace Wdk, all ofUS l ~ n d e r ~hta t ~ d grass-root people, lP 7 ~ the when they get together, are able to do a lot. The American Soviet Peace Walk b e e m e a real sehool b r all of us. We hope that the New Y e a will become a yew of unparalleled w r k for peace, a year of joint effods to remove the threat of a nuclear war, which will be undertaken by peaeeBwing people both in the USSR m d USA. That is why 1 personally suppofi the idea of new h a e e Walks,

EGOR FILIIN
Executive SecretvJSoviet Peaee Gommittee
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Citizens of the U.S. and the USSR, who vvalked together from Leningrad t Moscovv, o have taken a major step in their many steps to demonstrate that hearts and hands can cross the barriers of land and sea, of fear, hatred and anger, thus leading to understanding and respect despite background, culhral and political differences. They have realized that peace is not made by weapons of war or even treaties, but only when human beings can come together for the common good of all humanie* Let each of us then, wherever we are, take the necessary actions to help heal the ea&h and all of its life.

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The Soviet Peace Committee feels highly positive about the results of the joint 1987 American Soviet Walk, and also about perspectives for further cooperation with Interndional Peace Walk, Inc. of the USA. The recent developments on the international arena, brought about by the outcomes of the Soviet American summits both in Reykjavik and Washington, D.C., haw urged the true peace chmpions world over to contemplate still deeper the present day situation as well as the ways of promoting the w r l d public movement in suppod of the disarmament process, for preventing the danger of a nuclear outburst and for the betterment of international cooperation in political, economical and humanitarian spheres, 1 am a firm believer that the m r l d public is increasingly concerned m r the affect the which is so Soviet comprehensive peace proposals will have on the fates of h u m a n i ~ ~ fundmental for the recent relaxation of international tension. The upsurge of anti-war sentiments can now be sensed both in the United States and W s t Europe and manifests itself in dramatic expansion of cooperation through channels of "citizens9 diplomacy" m o n g the peace-suppoders from the USSR and VGTestern countries. It is also illustrated by strivings of rank-and-file h e r i c a n s and West Europeans to comprehend whether or not the Soviet Union is really presenting for them an 66"inevitablemenace" and ""$ienger9' of which the mass media m d autho~ties have been ta;aliirargpains t convince them. II believe o it is namely going beycond the old stereotypes and prejudices a a i n s t each other9 which constitute the essence of our new events such as Peace Walks. The mae(;teris that during these Walks the atmosphere, which is more conducive for open communication and better understanding, is created among the Soviets and Americans. Still it is not true that as a result of these W l k s negative Ifeelings, which have been imposed for so long, should evaporate m d the rnaioritv of h e r i e a n s should cease treating the USSR as a ""dn&r9'

for themselves. But there is no deraying the fact that the parLicipants of the Walk have eoneeived the hear^-felt desire to bring about changes in the global situation and Swiet h e r i c a n relations to the end of their improvement, to aaain better understanding. That is exactly the reason for which the Soviet h a e e Committee is profoundly supportive of the new VValks across the USSR and the USA. We regard the enhanced efficiency of similar events as the only vvay to promote real geaee all over the world.

HENRICH BOROVIGK
President, Soviet k a e e Committee

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We need to be reminded anew that there are still operating among us individuals who embody ideals, traditions, purposes who tell us who we really are as a people, who w are meant to be - individuals who give us hope that we may still be moved to action by a vision of a cornmuni@ of persons dedicated to each other's fulfillment, by a passion for what one human being owes to mother. g7or the age in which we have been fated to live, the @e of Hiroshima, Auschwitz and Glaernoloyl, compels us to realize that the future lies vviith men and women who can live conscious offieir solidmi@vvjith others, the solid&ty of the human race, that consciousness r n a h s us care for one another, have compassion for one another in our common vulnerability. That awareness is what gives us a sense of the holiness of all existence. Such a vision can help us transcend the dangerous ianeery of vietory .md defeat, which has ruled over our thinking and feeling.

RABBI LEONARD 1 BEER .
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H preparing to visit the Soviet Union, my most common thoughts w s e recollections n of d e n 1was a fifth grader during the Cuban missile crisis. 1 remember being instructed . to br;ing a white bed sheet to use as a edlver while practicing air r d d drils. The white sheets, nny classmates and II -re told, muPd reflect the radiation from nuelear bombs away from us. Never wanting nngr children to lemn those lessons, 1decided to take my three children - Christina, 6 years; Michael, 4 years; Daniel, 3 yeam ---- and my wife, Mary, with me. VS/e left the white sheets at home. And so an Hispanic family of five traveled, greeted and w r e loved b the averee y Soviet citizen. Among the most vivid experiences vvas seeing my daughter, Christina, giving flowers to elderly Russian granhothers and grandfders, and watching them, in tulmn, cry and hao$ hen=Since returning from the Soviet Union, 1 continually rejoice at the gifts and memories my children have of their experience. And when I tuck them into bed and cover them with their blanket and white blbe sheet, I no longer haw bad thoughts of white sheets.

D m I E L E GHAVEZ
A@smey/AmericaamWalker

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B is not logical to assume that national statesmen will lead the way in the taming of t nations or in aehiwing world pea=. Do not expect n a ~ o nto * the initiative in dewlopkg s e restraints upon themselves. As President Eisenhovver once said, the people will h m to lead the way and force the world's statesmen to think beyond the narrow eonfines of national needs. A s a k r and more responsible m r l d is waiting to be created. Good luck in all your effo&s to create it.

NOR

COUSNS

AuthorlLecter~-er

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The Walk was the happiest time in m y life? and I =member it as a bright dream. Fve nemr thought before that Americans can be sincere, frmk and earehl kiends with me, a Soviet citizen. The most memorable event was the night at a little villlee near the tovvn of Valdai. Our eanmp was se(teledclose to several wooden pnivate houses, and we visited one of hem. There w r e about five Russims and eight Americans. A married couple and their grown-up son

lived in the house, They worked at the nearest collective farm. The house looked rather shabby outside, but inside it turned out to be very clean, cozy and bright. The host and the hostess =re not surprised or frightened by an unexpected invasion of a boisterous, international gang. They treated us vvonderdfully. We chatted, discussed things and watched TV, rend petLed their cat*Later, they gave us maMresses, pillows, linen sheets and blankets, and vve slept together on the floor. The Americans called it a "dumber parb:y:' The h s sians, in return, ealled it a ""salkal' And it was just terrific.

m Y A YEIRMOLENKO
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The key to m r l d peace lies in developing trust and friendly relations betmen the United States and the Soviet Union. Because I believe this, I have traveled extensively in the Soviet Union, gdlhering matecial for books. In my travels I learned that person-to-person contacts can be exceedingly valuable in building trust. Accordingly, I gladly suppofied the American Soviet VbTalk and joined the first committee that w n t to Moseow to negotiate with the Soviet &ace Committee. Then I put my eighty-.year old legs to work in the Walk itselP: In my whole life 1was never more moved t h m when thousands ;and then more thousads joined us as vve entered Novgorod, the oldest Russian city. There, as the oldest walker, I spoke for the Americans. I prophesied th& the day would soon come when Soviet and American citizens would no longer need to march against armments which are the common enemy of both our peoples. After I returned home, to help this prophecy come true, I began work on a book about the Great Peace March, a demonstration against nuclear w a p o n s that lasted nearly nine months and crossed the country from Los Angeles to the nation's capital. There, in Con-

gress, where all U.S. appropriations for arms are made, the arms race can be stopped. H hope our book will play a role in helping us to get a Congress that will do its share in bringing the world back from the verge of committing suicide.

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1had many great impressions of the American Soviet VValk. The Peace 'VValk was the real step to help our nations become closer and to understand each other better. Marching side by side, hand in hand, we shared difficulties and joy. H was surprised that the w American par~icipants r e deeply mom$ by the sufkrings of the Soviet people during World War HI. Many of them were crying at Piskarevskoye Gemetev. The most imporltant thing that we realized during our walk was that the Soviet and American palrltieipants had one aim ---- to prevent nuclear eatastrophy and never bring suG fering to each other.

GLllNA JPODOLYAKO
Soviet Peace GommitteelSoviet Walker

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I m s very inkrested when I heard about the first Peace Walk across the United States. I watched wire photos of it as they appewed in the pager where 1vvork (the G h i c a o Salrz T m s . I wished that BL could have been there when the wallkern crossed the C o l o r d o ie) Rockies. The best I could m a n e e was walking Ilhe final ~vvo e k s , from Philadelphia w to Washington, DG. II was impressed by the dedication send commitment of the walkem

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m e n t b e e m e much more i m p o h n t to me &an just anoher photo story to e a r . When H heard of the Soviet trip, I h e w 1wmted to be there. h a w ingly, H was able to get the time off &om work (fiw weeks leave without pay from a major metropolitan newpaper is not easy). The trip was illl incredible experience. rkhou~h h ~ i c a l l y p grueling, it is one trip B will never forget. The opposr~uni~y learn that a country vve have been taught to consider to our enemy is really very much like our own. That they want the same things vve do nannely, peace and a chance to live their lives with digniw, TJTo gain the understanding that we must m r k together and develop ties if this world is to survive. These are lessons I will never forget. The love ltlhese people poured out to us as h e y lined the roads for hours 1T in the r&n, just to t h r m flowers and greet the 66Americmskisl' will always know that " M i r y Dmr!8;hbaVmeans peaee and friendship in Efussian. Today I arn back at worlc doing daily assignments around the city. I put four months of sorling throUgPI 3,600 slides ofthe Walk h t o a 14-minute sliddau&o show. 1have shown a m it at several church groups a d it has bro~~ghkE team to the eyes of those viewing it, especially to those who have been to "Mother Russid9before. 1 hope to get the message of the Walk out to others through my photography, Photographs and music are two of the worldl's universal lxmgu&eges.

AIL PODGORSKI
Prokssional Photographer1 American Walker

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Our trip to Russia reaffirmed my belief that d r r e no difkrent than they are. They9re reaching out to blbud bridges of mutual understanding and trust. Neither 'one of our systems is perfect. But its nice to know that sane and gentle people live in bob great countries and are vvorlting toward a n a d ultimate d r e m of a world without violence. While both our countries are superpowers and can exercise enormous influence in the thrust for peace, 1find that lBI'rn more a citizen of the world first and that my commitment must be universall. rm concerned about Central h e r i i c a , South A&iea, southeast Asia, the Mddle East-to mention a fevv areas. M y general eoneern and eoneern for the Mideast parallel Fred $em&, because that's where the h s e seems to be the shorlest. Both of us vvorla as rnembem of the Board of Directors with the hundioliom For Mideast Comm~mieation, which brings Arabs and Jews together. Because ultimately, it's communication bemeen people, as individuals and as nations, th& will bring about peaee.

GASBY KASEM
Entertainment Personality Humanitarian
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II am an American of h s s i a n ancestry, and married to a Russian woman from Leningrad. I @reed to join the Walk because B saw it as a very tangible move for peace, and something that m u l d be great fun. But little did I expect the marvelous experiences that follovved. Having been to the Soviet Union over 40 times in the Bast 15 years, I guess I've seen more of the USSR &an 99% of h e ~ c a n sH.knew to e q e c t incredible hospihlity, open-hearltedness, and the great emotionality surrounding the memories of World V a Vr TI. What really impressed me about the Walk was that it was an indelible experience for those individuals who managed to see the Walk, both American and Soviet padieinants and the villae people along the road, who would wait for hours in the rain just to wave at the walkers. The fact that the walkers were there was in itself the main gesture of peace and friendship. The introduction of peace organizing techniques perfected in the W s t , happenings like the Walk itself, all brought something very beautiful and very useful to the Scbviet people, especially those that are vvorking in their own environments ofthe USSR for peace.

DIMITRI DEVYATIKBN
TvVideo Producer American Walker

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The Walk vvas the best of my 13 visits to the USSR over a span of 56 years, because it was the first time H lived with Russians 24 hours a day. It yielded the best of the 200 tapes I have recorded there, because there was an unprecedented sense of libefiy in the air. I m e i n e hearing a Russian addressing a street-corner meeting in these words (I m s the only foareigner present): ""VVe organized this so as for the first time in our lives to feel ourselves free? h d vve Americans felt free. The Walk was, in microcosm, what the world could be like, what it has to be like.

WILLIAM MANIDEL
Soviet Affairs Sehollarlhthor American Walker

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A family of Soviets and Americans? My son, Matt, his girl, Karen, and I knew vve three muBd have a special bonding by walking together through Russia. But the " b d Soviets9' "a and the "ugly Phmenicans" becoming like one? On a v a day a camp outside Leningrad, Vladimir Glushchenko, who became my vm t very special friend, and ]I sat taking and sharing a cold drink. We found ourselves delving into every question possible about our spiritual lives: communism, capitalism, relationship, marriage, children, education, work, play?our ambitions, our hopes, our dreams, 11ntnglledat each other's humor, appreciated each our ferns, and our miseoneeptia,nrs, other's swle of dress, and found we had read the same books and listened to the same music. As we exchange letters naw, we care aba-ssrtthe same things: each other, our friendship,

aknd our lives. This scene has been multiplied 239 times, over and then over e a i n . Yes, vve truly can be a family. All of us!

JUDY BROCK
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It is very surprising to remember now that it was raining during most of the Walk. H have a feeling that every day was full of sunshine and happiness, even though there w r e rnacny sad minutes during our last days when pa&ing became so real m d inevitable. Still, I never felt -elf so eomfortizlole as when 1 was walking along h o s e muddy and dusky roads, sumounded by the warmth and caring of friends. This 1Valk made me love people with whom I was walking, a m those who met us along the way*The Walk toeally eharrged nd Inay attitude toward h e r i e m ~ sThey appewed to be lrrore dadreamem than prr-ogm&ists, . more naive t h m businesslike, more generous than capitalistie, And my view of my own and t o m s along the way people has changed. H never expected the people in the villi~ges to be so enthusiastic, so concerned about peace, and so open-hearted, I was one of the interpreters on the Walk, and ifor the first time I realized that my job could be useful and impor~ant. was happy to help people to eomrnunicate and to make I friends. One can't imagine how wonderhl it vvas to hear words of gratitude from the wdkers. rrn much more courageous and much more of an olprtimist n w , knowing &at this w r l d is inhabited with very kind m d generous people.

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In our travels for peace, I ann ofrten asked: What e m you effect? What ccan vve accomplish? What can one pemon do? What can grassroots achieve, when gcpvernments, establishments and institutions ~ t their vaslt p o w r and opporluniities are failing to keep the world h &om sliding towards the deadly (I&resholdw r which there is but nothingness. Not for in&viduals. Nor for h e r i e m s or h s s i m s . Nothji~lgness all, For the whole of manEnd. for People are asking ""emwe?', and not "should we? or "do we have to?" In reply to this I sugest you imgine the complex w r l d we are living in as a simple ordinany mo-slide balance, one scale, with all the good that makes the humankind h m a n ; the other, full of mistrust, suspicion, nuelear weapons and other means of destruction. And the equilibrium is very shaky*So shaky9in fact, th& ewn a seemingly tnifling eontribution may, as the Bast straw that broke the canners back, oumeiglh the fal: monster narned "Mass hnihilation9: h d vice versa, it may eake a very minor, almost negligible con8;ribution to be admitted to the other pan for US all to perish The first h e r i e a n Swiet R l k has made us all richer. Rieher with new friendships. Rieher with the realization that vve dream of the same future: one honest, just, clever and kind world for all. Richer with the art we learned to -are without lapsing into quarrel, to contend one's point of view without being disrespectful to the views of the other. Richer with a cobblestone the Walk has laid into the road to our common nuclear-free homes. And richer with the undemtanding that there is so much paving still to be done. About all this 1spoke at our Club's Academy for Peace and Environment, at the rallies during this year's expedition from the Danube to the Lena, in the article for 2,708,000 readers of the "Voknag Swetd9magazine. This also m&s the plot of the documentary novel I'm writing now and which 1plan to finish n e a year, aEler the second Peace Walk in the USA.

...

.

GREGOW TEMKIN, Writer Vice-President, Travels for hiace and EnvironmendSoviet Walker

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When my dad, R e d Segal, asked me if I wianted to go with him to the Soviet Union for the h e r i c a n Soviet Walk, 1jumped at the chance. Then all the doeurnenkq m d booklets began to arrive ----so many papers! ----- and 1began to have doubts. T wasn't scared about going to Russia. It was being a m y firom all my friends at home, and missing the things d ' we'd be doing together during the weeks H be gone. We hadn't even llefi and 1 was geging homesick. When vve got to Virginia for the orientdion 1 met the other teenagers who were going on the WPk, along with some younger kids. I made marry new friends among the Americans, and when we got to the Soviet Union 1got close to two Russian girls. 1We vvere always together, arm in a m , as we walked from town to town, meeting so many wonder-

ful people of all ages. Standing in the middle of streets, vve reached out to strangers and held them in our arms. VVe laughed, we cried. My Soviet kiends showed me so much of their beautiful country. T saw where they lived, visited their schools, learned their songs, and even some of their language. We attended eoneeds eveny other night, the most wonderlful show, Everyone worked so hard, and the performances w r e so good. Long before going on the Walk, I had dreamed that I was on a giant stage somewhere, am \ngall the singers and dancers. T Moseow, nay dlreann earne true. I vvas backstage at n the rock conce& when (2arlos Santana motioned for me to come on stage. It was the most incredible time. Everyone was hugiing m d swaying to the musie. There was such a feeling of togetherness and love. kl knew we'd be leaving b home in a fevv days, but I vvouldn9tlet myself think about r the future. Il just wanted to enjoy the present. Then it vvas time to go, and vve vwre at the airpofl, I'd been klling rnyself that H vvasn9tgoing to cry unless other people did. Well, everyone was crying, and 1 couldn't hold back. Leaving the Soviet Union, and my new ai'riends, vvas so sad. Someday, somehow, H have to go back and see them e a i n . Going on the R l k was the best thing that has ever happened to me.

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I was in the midst of post production on my clocumentary about the Great Peace March across America, and I wanted to add an international flavor to the epilogue of that movie. My family is of Russian descent and I'd always wanted to go there. So when someone asked me if I'd be willing to document the American Soviet Walk, and donate all the proto ceeds from the documen~6al-y the peace mt~vernent,it m s an offer I couldn9trefuse. Before leaving, H sent a telex to Goskrleradio requesting that vve create a co-production to docmerat the h e r i i c a n SoGet 'VValk. They @reed. The h e r i e a n e r m met our e o u n t e ~ p ~ sthe Soviet ere% upon arrival in kningrad. I experienced fear (that they would try , to control me), frustration (because my e m e r a broke and H couldn't control how to fix it), elation (because they mm@ed to repair my cannera) and, most of aP1, a genuine deli&t in the d i s c m r y that we were far more similar. t h m different. The m o c r e w cooperated equipment and logistics together, As time by interpreting for each other and r n a n ~ i n g pmsed, we fomed fiendships based on looking a&er each other; jokes, lo* houm of work, and shared creativity. was cwedited in Moscow m1d the resulting how lo^ tape 6lP be shtavvn The docurnenin both countries. It represents compromises on both sides and shares both the love and the struggles of the A m e r i c a Soviet Wlk. We'll reach an audience of 84) million people in the USSR and many more millions in the USA. We911also contribute to the growing spirit of glasnost and citizen diplomacy, firsonally; my life has changed forever because 1 am now studying Russian, returning to the USSR to show the American Grreat Peace March, and involving myself with future Soviet-American co-productions.
CA'rHY ZHEUTLIN
CarnerawommlAmeriean Walker

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It was by accident that 1 became involved in the American Soviet Walk. Somewhere early in spring a Soviet Peace Cornmitl;eeexecutive mentioned this project to me. Of course H wanted to go and I remember we made cracks on a lack of vvallcing gear and a need to start early practice. But my wish was not enough. I had to con~vince boss to give my me a whole month assignment to walk from Leningrad to Moscow at the busiest time of summer vacations. 1 had to work on it, promising him extensive coverage of the W l k for my news desk of Radio Moscow exlternal broadcasting. And so I finished sending over at Peast three reports every God-blessed day, ever1 when our camp stood in the middle of nowhere. Quite a challenge, But that was the easiest part, On the eve of the Walk 1was asked to help out the hate Commieee as a chief translator. And that was THE JOB?Almost ~wund clock. It s t ~ e d the with my cheerful voice over the minces of the sound-truck wake-up at six on a rainy morning. Continued with answering at least two hundred questions in English and Russian. But maybe the worst part was that of trying in vain to make vvalkers take their buses when they were deep in comersation with solme nice people. And naturally the easiest task was the transldion of all major events. Still that was great! This crazy job gave me a unique chance to come to know practically everyone on the Walk. I was always in high demand and had not a millute for a reflection on whether i'was happy. As far as I remember this is a definitioll of happiness by British author Bernard Sham So you can easily guess my feelings, especially at the end of the Walk. As a reporter with over a dozen years in the field n'm generally rather skeptical. Rut the Soviet American event, the energetic and spiritual charge of the people involved made me vulmcrable and probably as stupid as a newly-born baby. Just one example (for my brothers in arms): Walkers were w i n g hands to local people on sidewalks. But I could not do the same. The old Russian ladies who greeted us, compared to me, were the salt of the Earth, Just to wave to thern in passing in an election style! No, So I was saying to every one of thern "Dobly den9' ---- ""Good day". The B Vl cured me of aray scepticism over peace work in general. My experience whispers P ak

me an advice -- ""Just say 'YES' and make it9'* From now on I call myself ""peacenik" when I lead round-table discussions through Znanbe (knowledge) Society in the Soviet Union. (This is a public society involving different professio~~als.) The Walk gave me better knowledge of Americans whom I really love and admire. What is most irnporlant ---- now Ib hope I ecmunderstand the striving for E a e e in my own country.

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The American Soviet Walk left me both afraid and hopeful. I saw the possibility of war as real for the first time because I came into contact with so many people who thinl~, about war. Soviets w u l d come to us with tears streaming down their faces, holding infiants, crying, ""The wodd has to be made safe for our grandchildren. Please, no war.'' I felt their fear and yet, X feel hopeful that people can work for and achieve peace. We walked in the rain, mud and cold, but nobody minded as long as we could sing. We walked into one town and it was raining so bad that it hurt. The people were lined up along the streets and wouldn't move - even though it vvas pouring --- because they wanted to brag us, to shake our hands, to give us flowers, and to talk. 1 vvas so touched 1 decided 1 was going to shake the h m d of eveq person there. If these people coraPr1 stand in the rain, B would be there for them. It took three ho~rrs w l k nearly a mile, but it was one to . of the most moving experiences of the Walk, The whole was bigger than the parts. The mud didn't matter; the cold, the rain and the mosquitoes didn't matter because there vvas a purpose to our being there, And that purpose was peace.

Gr4RC)LE SHAKELY
TeacherIDirector
- - .

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When Fred Segal lefifor llne Soviet Union, he camied with him a small tape rmordel: It was "on'9 thmughout most of the Walk, recordz'ng the sigh& and sounds9 evenb and emotions9 as he made hiiS way from Lningmd to Moscow. The tapes were to $provide infomation fir the text in this book. T h q provided that and more. There were times when Fred Segal was so moved by the crowds that he v e r b a l i d his passion for peace. There were ako quiet, iinlmspecdive moments, alone or with members of the press. TThe Jbllowing comments were exe@&d from the Fred Segal tapes. In-flight to besburg, Virginia, for orientation: ""B appears that the society on this planet is ready and willing to take a new approach to preserve our lives as well as this beautiful planet that vve live on. We can accomplish this through loving ourselves and one another, and taking responsibility as individuals. And, just for ourselves, do the best we can to feel good about ourselves, and have a rnore positive attitude about persons, places and things around us. "And now we are on our way to take part in the American Soviet walk with people countrgr, and of a different political view all of which of a difkrent culture, csf a differe~lr are secondary to the reality that these people have the same thoughts, attitudes and feelings in their heads. That is, to have happy, enjoyable, qualiw times in life. I honestly believe that we will experience these two difkrent cultures coming together as allies, allowing one mother to have dierences, just like individuals have in a relationship &at is wholesome and healthy* and nur~uring ""'ldlking and listening about difkrences of opinion, rather than being fearful and defensive as we have been in the past, will help a11 of us in expressing our desires for peace."
- - .

At the hesburg orientation: "We have been studying different cultures, what we might expect and what might be expected of us, and how to handle ourselves in a different cultural emironment. \IVe have found that there are differences in our cultures, but will probably and courfind that there are no differences in the heart. I'm sure some extra diseiplil~es tesies vviill be necessq, just like when you go into someone's home, We are guests in another country. At the same time, I belie% there will be vvarrnth and love and similar attitudes of philosophy~We are rnore alike than different. VGTe all m n t to end the arms race, create a climate of cooperation, and show that we can live and work compatibly. Exchanges like these, with frank, open discussions, can. lead to more trust. And once trust is established, change can come about, None of us is very prone to admit our weaknesses, or faults, or seriously consider changing ourselves if we are insecure, feel threatened or endangered, But we will take advice and sugestions from people who we feel have our own best hterests at hea&19

E a repohr outside Esno: "We are living in an age when it is difficult to locate environmental problems as well as 'people problems: All. are becoming global-wide. We cannot pollute the ocean on the Soviet's shores and know that the vvaters are safe along the United States9 shores. VVe live on one big globe which is ours to live on and to save for our children, We must keep it in adequate shape for the generation to come, so it is time to unite. VVe need to become the 'united countries of our globe9or the 'united countries of our planet.' We need to unite the countries so that they work simultaneously for a belt~er evolution, $11 effo&s should be coordinated together - nowW time h r our generation. We are responIn sible. All of us!"

On the enormous turnout at hvgorod: ""I eeveryone could see this, and feel the pulse of these people, not one more vveapon would be made - and no more tax money would be spent to m a k nuclear wapons. It is our money! VVe are paying the bill1 VV;e are allowing this $ 0happen! Somettlhing will be done immediately!"

:In leavling to return to the United stat^, when nsked I;ly a repoder f the Walk was successful ""now that it is over"":'F"Fist of all, the K l k is not over. H has really just starled. Ks Bike t
when you're going to build a house. First you make a drawing, then the architect lays it out. That's wh& we9vedone. The American Soviet W l k was an extension of the Great Peace March in 1986. The March didn't end, and the R l k won't end either. They are never over. They simply become a compounding continuation of effofis. "As for the success of the Ameriem Soviet Walk, yes, it was very successful. Many of us were fearhl of the Soviets when w start.ed out because w had been programmed to be afraid of one another. We are motivated by fear, most of us, and our fears are played upon ial order to build UP a. defense. But being in the Soviet Union has made a difference. We met the people?and they are not our enemy. VVe all make a difference-each and every OYlip ot US. "2%o m y close friendships were established during the Walk, and people who me friends won't war on each other. They e m get angry, have an argument, even a ra;c5ing debate, but they prob.ably won't kill or drop a bomb on someone they've learned to love. Or on a countxy, and a culture, they are learning to understand. Because of the Walk, and other on-going endeavors, there are novv hundreds of thousands of people - m d it ~ lbe lmillions - who esdt be hurtful in any m y . All of the mlkers are helping an untold number of that p a c e can come through love and understanding. In that respect, people to understa~ld the VValk was very, very successful. And the VValk, and walkers for peace, are continuing that suceess19 Y e 3 x a ~ Coecvnc~uu c C'0103, w e d C U Z c 3 ~In ~ 0 6 o i~ a n e ~ b ~ a z u u t n o g 5 f0 ~ m u ~~ c i ~u ~ iv . ec10 dopoz~f fir-lu~zpadado Moc~cblM Q ~ H U ~ O ~6614 H K A K I Y ~ Nu 3anucb1ca.z BGJ'KU, om ~ O B npoucurecms.uR u ~ M O ~ L I U . 3anucu d o n x ~ b 1 6b1nu 06e('nevumb U I L ~ ~ ~ O ~ diln ~ U K I M ~ rnercc3ma O 06ecne~iu~u x e 60/l~tue. da Eb~iluMoMelimbl, ~ o z d a@peO CUZU/I 6b1~ 3n?oii K H U Z U . H Z ~ HacsmonbKomporlym ~ , W O ~ U R Mizrodeii, wno ~ X I M K Ocbzpaxan csoe cmpacmHoe cmyc..wieHue U K ,WU[2y. 6 b 1 . d ~maKXe U CnoKo~Hble, UH~poCil~KmuGHblC MOMC'Iimb1 H Q ~ ~ (' CH M b l M ~ 0 6 0 ~ U U ~ u,7u npc~Oc~masume/l.q~zr npecacbl. I f u x c ~ c , ~ e ~ ~ 3a.uevu~iun ~oque c3~mbz~ 1 3 3anu~eii@yedo Cuzuna. M ~ I C + / Icpe,vt/-inonen?as Jluc@pr, tuamam B u p r u ~ ud , o p u e ~ m u p ~ s"Iloxoxe, YTO so U ~n ~ ~u: n m 3~0i-i~n a H e T b I ~ O T O B ~ I C o r n a c m I noi-i~uno HOBOMY n y m , Y T O ~ C O X ~ ~ I I M T ~ ~ n M ~ I CBOM XU3HM, a T a K X e 3TY n p e K p a C H y F O n J I a H e T y , H a ~ 0 ~ 0 M b I 0 M B e M . M ~MI X e M AOCTMYb 3 T O r 0 , ~ X % O
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Every gun that is made, evesy warship launched, every rocket fired, signals, in the final sense, a theh from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. The world in arms is not spendis~g money alone. It is spending the sweat of the laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hope of its children. T like to believe that people in the long run are going to do more to promote peace than our governments. Indeed, 1think that people want peace so mueh that one of these days e governments had better get out of the way and B t them have it.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER
Supreme Gornmander, Integrated European Defense h r c e s , World war 1 1 34th President of the United States
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Imagine how mueh the cause of peace would be served if more individuals and families from our respectiw countries could come to know each other in a personal way . . . We should broaden opporltunities for Soviet and American citizens to get to know each other better.

RONALD R E A G m
40th President of the United States

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The Ji,llowi;tg is a personal letter from Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorliachev to the American Soviet h c e Walken. W1.E'ttenupon the conclmion ofthe Walk, the document was published in Pravda, the Soviet nmspaper, and was shown on Soviet television. The SovBt Peace Committee says: "The Gorbachev letter of appreciation is a remarkable event in the history of P;oviet and Anzedcan peace movements, and convincing eviidence of the success of our joint walk."

MESSAGE FROM
Dear Friends,

I am thankful to you for the le@ers,cables and messages
in which you express gratitude for the cordialiw and hospitality accorded by Soviet people to the pa&icipants in the Soviet American W l k for peace.

II believe the meetings with thousands of Soviet citizens and lively discussions of the ways of ensuring peaceful future for our children and guaranteeing the survival of hurnanknd will innpress themselves for long in the memory of the par%icipantsin the VValk.
This joint Walk of Soviet and Anrerican citizens, the first of its kind in the history of relations between the USSR and the USA, is a specific contribution to strengthening mutual trust, understanding and friendship, and is a convincing exmple of citizn9sdiplomaey in action. The Soviet leadership suppo&s such initiatives because they lead to establishing good neighbourly relations m o n g common people of different countries, destroy old stereowpes and help to create the image of padner and friend rather than enemy image.

I share the feeling of deep concern expressed in many messages addressed to me over the threat of nuclear catastrophe looming over humankind and fraught with the destruction of everything alive on our planet. From all goin& of view cerctainly a moral one, the time has come to get rid of nuclear thinking, beat the svvords into ploughshares, and channel the funds thus released to social needs &at and creative puqoses. We are c o n ~ n c e d the only a l t e ~ native to the policy of nuclear suicide, and to guarantee the ivd of hurnmkind, is t build a non---violentworld free o &om nuclear weapons.
Everyone who holds dear peace has the Soviet Union as a f"lmand adamant ally in achieving these truly sacred objectives of humankind. All our policy is aimed at it. W shall continue to build up our efforts so as to make opening possibilities for advancing the elimination of nuclear vveapons.

1wish you and your families good health, happiness and well-being, and a world without wars and vveapons.

THE PHOTOGRAPHERS

0cDOTOTP
Meet the photographers, whose work has made muell of this book possible. P h o t o credits for each photographer are indicated below by p e e numbers.) LIPEJIEkI EAJIMK, 1 6 - n e r y s~ m q a rrrIconbI Y s c ~ n e iB ~ ~e~ i
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1986 rony, KorAa owa yvacTBosana B B ~ ~ H K noxoAe sa OM B KOnneAXe O H a C O ~ I I ~ ~COBMeCTRTb CBOR ~ T C R MHTepeCbI B 06nacTII @ O T O ~ ~ ~ @I? RIITepaTypbI C pa6o~oii U U 3a M H ~ (. 3 a r n a ~ ~ bC T ~ ~ H I I 12~/ I ,a s e p x y / , / ~ a e e p x y / , 1e ~ ~ 81 82 / ~ a s e p x y /89 / cnesa, B H I I ~ ~ / ) . ,
MIIP.

SHELBY IBALIK, a 16-year-old student at Westlake School in Los Angeles, first b e e m e imolved in the peace mmement when she pafiicjigakd in the 1986 Great Peace March. In college, she plans to combine her interests in photography and writing with peace work. (Title pages, 12 [above], 81 [above], 82 [above], 89 [left, belod)

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BRUCE BISHOP first became active in peaee work when he joined the Great Peace March across America. That exlperjience led t his vvork v\ath the homeless in Atlmo ta, Georgia. Following the American Soviet Walk, Bishop has been touring extensively, sharing his rememberances and photos wit11 audiences at universities, local churches, civic and youth groups. A Mennonite, he credits his Christian beliefs as the core of his peace work activities, (84) below11

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U E X FEDOROV v ~ a born in Moscow a d is employed s by the Moscow Nms. During his more than 26) years as a press photographer, he has covered a wide range of assignments. His concerns about young people, however, are strongly reflected in his work, which has also been featured in various Soviet youth publications. (42, 52-53, 55 Deft, below], 56,6Q,66, 76, 79 [ri&t], 106)-BOl,102De&, abow; right, below], 103 [left, below], 1104, 127)
IS NBONAIIV m s born in ]lorn, raised in California, and lives in Golorado, where photograph and mournlain climbing are his primary interests. His work has been exhibited in galleries, and vvas the basis for a book

AEW[HE/TC H'YHAH, POAElnCR B ulTare A g o ~ a B ~ I P ~B C , ICan~@op~u~, npoxHBaeT ceiisac B ruTare K o n o p a ~ o . Ero rnaBHb18 HHTepeC - @oTorpa@HR M anbnHHH3M. Ero @oTorpa@HH BbICTaBnRnMCb B raJIepeRX H RBHnMCb OCHOBOW er0 KHHrH 0 Gyp~x, ~ Y ~ ~ H K O B B 1982 reply.~ B A ~ H H ~ O ~ H I ~ ~ O MOMeHT OH pa60TaeT Hag BHAeO-AOKyMeHTanbHblM [PMJlbMOM 06 A M ~ ~ M K ~ H C K O - C O B ~ T G K O M H M ~ 38/ , ITOXOAe. (26 / B ~ / waeepxy/, 45 / ~ a ~ e p x y / , / waeepxyl, 84-85). 62

on storms, published in 1982. H e is presently producing a video documentary on the h e r i e a n Soviet Walk. (26 hfDelow], 38 [abed, 45 [abovd, 62 [above], 84-85)
I ~

A ~ T O A F O P C K M nonywn Mnoro npenl~iina ceoH ~ ~. @ o r o r p a @ u ~ 1986 roay O H nonywn 3 s a ~ @ o ~ o r p a @ a (B ~e roaa Y H K ~ ~ C K npeccbt; B 1986 roay npeMcrm " C a ~ o e O ~ ~ nysulee LLIOY" areHrcTsa "Accoul~sfiregnpecc9';B 1985 rony npemim @ o ~ o r p a @ roaa ~ n n ~ ~ o f i cnpeccbr H ~ p y r ~ e ) . ~oii E r o pa6orb1 I I Y ~ ~ M K O B ~ JTaKMX ~ B ~ ~ C IIpCCTMHbIIX xypHanax, KaIc JTuii@, Nbro-Noprc rnuiimc H IO. . H ~ N 31-id C )C yopnh punoprn. C 1984 roaa O H p a 6 o ~ a e r l p o ~ o r p a @B ~ i o %!uh"lZ20 Calf F??u~Mc. COTeH UBCTHbIX AHan03HTHBOB, M(3 KOTOPbIe OH CIIRn B 0 BpeMR r][o~Oaa, CAeJIan BMaeo@Hnb~, OH K O T O ~ p a c~ p o c ~ p a ~ ~ r r e rno ecen/n C O ~ A M I I ~ H H ~ I M ~ I n cn U T ~ T ~(13 . M /wasepxy/, 15, 17, 18 / B W H ~ 20, ,21, 24, 25 Y/ / B H M ~ Y / ,/HaBepxy/, 27, 29 / B H H ~ 31, ,47, 48, 49, 54 26 ~/ / waisepxy; cneBa, BHIMSY/,/ Hasepxy; cnpaea, B H H ~ Y / , 55 57, , 67 / waeepxy/, 70,71,76,79 / c n e ~ a /89 / cnpasa, swu3y/, 91, 94 / B H H ~ Y / , / Haeepxy, cneeal). 106
AXE@@UAP, B 1986 rosy ocTaBHn ceoho pa60Ty B h e Ar-ld.xcenec r n a u ~ c ,~ ~ 0 6 6 1 r r o r p a @ ~ p o e a ~ b @o Bena~k~W n0XOA 32% M P 170 ~ O ~ Q M H ~ H H LUM~ T ~ T ~ M H I AMepMKH. Ero noJrHbne a p a ~ a r ~ @ ~ ra r p a @ a non/rerrqeErwbreB r a s e ~ a x s o o ~, M[ NcypHanax ( e ~ n m s a ~ xypwan nunn), c o 3 g a n ~Iloxoay LLIHpoKyho H3BeCTHOCTb. B 1987 rony paGo~a WR XypHana J U G $ fiaznzasu~npmena fi)~(e@@a C o e e r c ~ ~Cow3 ,qnR B ii @ o T o ~ ~ ~ @ H ~ o B ~ ~ M R ~ H K ~ H C K O - C OnOXOp(a. K O ~ O H M ~ B~TC CegLfaC 013 p a 6 0 ~ a eC~ K ~ T ~ M ~ H Q ~ H K C , ~ H WTaTHhIM C ~ T ~ Y A H H K Ora3erbr J ~ ~ C - A I ~ C ~ X ~ J ZHap( rcauroii o M rncriimc, ~ C ' nByx noxonax 3a M H (19,29 / ~ a s e p x y /32-33,34,37,4041, ~. , 43,46,61,64 / wasepxy/, 90,92,106 / cneea, B H M ~ Y ( c H T ~ ~ / , Bu , 107 /cnpaea, B H H ~ ~ / ) .

AL,PODGORSKII has won numerous avvards for his photography (1986 Chicago Press Photographer of the "Kear; I986 Best of Show, Associated Press; 1985 Illinois Press Photographer of the Year, m o n g others). His vvork has appeared in such prestigious publications as Lge Magazine, the New Vork Emes, and US. N m s and World Reflo&. H e has worked as staff photographer for the Chicago S n T m s u - i e since 1984. From the hundreds of color slides he shot on the VbTal , he produced a video film that k has been distributed to all pa&s of the United States. (13 [above], 15, 17, 18 below], 20, 21, 24, 25 below], 26 [above], 27, 2melow1, 31, 47, 48, 49, 54 [above; left, helovv), 55 [above; night, below], 57,67 [ a b o d , 70, 71, 76, 79 neffl, 89 [right, below], 91, "P below], 106 [above, lefi])

JEFF SHARE Be& his job with the Los Angeles Times in 1986 to photograph the Great &ace Maseh as it crossed the United States. His d r m a t i e photos in nempagers and magazines (ineluding People) subsequently gave the March its greatest exposure. The following year, a photo commitment from L$e Mgazine took Jeff to the Soviet Union for the American Soviet Walk. He is n w collaborating with LA, i e st& w & e r Kathleen H e n d ~ x a book about Tms on the two peace mmches. (B9,29 [ h o d , 32-33,34,37,40-41, 43,46,61,64 [above], 90,922, 106 Deft, below; ceder], 107 [right, below])
DOUG STUBER is a freelance jomalist, pAmmily for the Romoke Wirginia) rimes and World Nms.He is also a published poet and an accomplished arlist, whose work is represented in several galleries on the East Coast. His interest in photograph is based on three generations of Smbers at Easl;nnan b d a k h e a d q u ~ e r in Rochester, Nevv s York. (44 [above], 62 fbelow], 65, 68, 83)

f l E W WWWERG shoo& assignmenb vvorld~de and is currently workin8 on a British film project that explores

n A T CTAEEP, HemTaTHb~fi )KypHaJIMCT, npewMy4ec.rBeHHO p a 6 o ~ a m w ~nJIR ra3eT T Q ~ M Cropople P O ~ H O K , Z B IUTaT B M ~ ~ J ~ I I Yop/Zd FlblO3. OH TaKXe n03T93aKOHYeHI? H R , H ~ I W XYplOXHMK, er0 pa6oTb1 BbICTaBneHbI B HeCKOnbKMX ranepegx Ha BOCTOYHOM6 e p e ~ b e .Ero r?aTepec K no @o~orpa@li.ru yHacneAoBaw OT rpex no~oneauii CraGepo~ 143 rJIaBHOr0 YIIpaBneHbiR KOMnaHkIM " H C T M ~ E I o ~ ~ K " K B Pouec~epe, mTaT ~ b w - f i o p(4/ ~ a s e p x y /62 / B H M ~ Y , ~. , 65, 68, 83).

the in-depth social perspectives of Soviet grouth and rock music. (96, 97)

VmIERII YAKOV lbelgan working as a correspondent in the Poiitied alfomaa~on Publiciw OEce of Pionmkaya iand Pravda upon his graduation from Moscow State Uraiversifcy in 1982. Today, he is an assistmt to the Deputy Secretary of the paper, and ae contributor to numerous periodicals, (54 [right, below])
ELHSSA ZHMMERMAN has been a professional photographer for eight years, three of which (from 1983 to 1886) w r e spent in the mcovie industry, shooting production stills. She came to the Anneriean Soviet Walk on assignment for Time Meazine, and has since begun photographing a feature s t o q on homeless teenagers in Hollyvvood. (12 [above], 13 b e l a d , 14, 66, 18 [above], 25 1 [above], 28,38 bellowl, 39, 44 below], 45 belovvl, 50,58, 59, 63, 64 [kbelow], 67 belovvl, 69, 72, 73, 74-75, 78, 80 [above], 81 below], 87, 88, 94 [above], 95, [right, above], 1103 UelF1, above; right, belo,vvl)

B A J I E P H ~ RKOB, B 1982 roply, rlocne OKOFiVaHMR ~/~OCKOBCK~~O rOCy,QapCTBeHHOrOYHMBepcHTeTa, CTan p a 6 o ~ a ~Bb r a s e ~ e" 1 7 u o ~ e p c ~npaepla" B o ~ n e n a x a~ " n o n r ? r ~ ~ e c ~ a@ o p ~ a r?q"O~,qenr n a c ~ o c ~ a ~ ~ . a ~ ~ ~ ~ " CeZqac OH p a 6 o ~ a e ~ M O ~ H M K O M ~ e c ~ ~ ~ e n r r ~O sa ceKpeTapR r a s e r b ~ I? coTpyAwHraeT BO MHorMx nepHonkiYecKHx I I S ~ ~ ~ H(54I/R X . M cnpasa, B H M ~). / ~ 3JIMCCA UHMMEPMAM, npo@ecckio~anbwbrfi @OTOrpa@B TeYeHHe 8 neT, T ~ I 1x3 K O T O ~ ~ (C 1983 no 1986 ropl) ? IX OHa rIpOBeJIa B KuHOnpOMhI~neHHOCTM, AeJIaR @0~0rpa@I?I? pa60Yer0 MOMeHTa. B A M ~ ~ J ~ K ~ H C I C O - IIOXoA ~ ~ ~ C K H ~ ~ C O B OHa 6b1na rrocnawa no sa~~aw~clr~, XypHana tau^, I? c Tex nop Haqana AeJrarb or or pa@^^ n n ~ ovepIca o G ~ ~ A O M W ~ I X n0,QpOCTICaX ToJ'IJIMBYA~./ H ~ B ~ ~13 /Y / I I M ~ Y / , B (12 x BI , 14,16, 18 / HaBepxy/, 25 / HaBepxy/, 28,38 / B H M ~ 39,44 / B H M ( ~ Y / , Y/, 45 / B H I ? ~ ~ / , 50,58,59,63,64 / B H H ~ Y / /, B H H ~ Y / , 67 69,72,73, 74-75, 78,80 / HaBepxy/ ,81 / B H M ~ 87, 88, 94 / H ~ B ~ P ,95, / Y/, X ~ 99, 102 / c n p a ~ a , wa~epxy/,103 / c n e ~ a ,Hasepxy; cnpaea, ~~a~epxy/ ).

ABOUT THE AUTHORS
I've known FRED SE(;;AL sinee he first started in business at his small store in West Hollywood some t h i r ~ years ago. And Il've watched hirn grow into one of the most successful and respected businessmer~ in the country. Known as a fashion designer and retailer, he has also designed and developed attractive shopping center environments in West Hollywood, Smta Monica and Malibu, California. His m r k has made hirn known intern&iosbally. Commensurate with his growl-mas an entrepreneur has been his growing sensitivity as a man of peace to the needs r m of humanity Through the years, l e has shared his good fortune with others, financially as vvell as his time and effort. Fred has given away many thousands of lboolts and tapes primarily concerned with the impact of the nuelear age, (Books by Harold Willens, The Trz'nztab Factor; Ken Keys, Jr., The Hundreth Monkey; Dr. HeBen Caldicott, Nuclear Madness; and tapes by Carl Sagdn, Do We f i v e a &&re?; and Vivienne Verdon-Roe, Oscar $r Peace.) Fred has donated considerable office space as meeting places where nuclear information groups can exchange ideas. He has sponsored fund-raisers for GARE, for the Great Peace Mareh (1986), and for various peace groups. And he established, operates and funds Your Camp in Ruidoso, New Mexico .-- a free camp b r childrer~ who are underprivileged, orlphgdned and mentally and physically handicapped. Currently, he is creating a 200-acre peace park - also free -- in Malibu, California. R e d and his daughter, Annie, m r e among 230 Americans taking part in the Ameriearl Sovliet Walk frorn Leningrad to Moscow in the summer of 1987. My wife, Sean, and dl m r e also among the American wallkers, and we got to know Fred really vvell, thanks to this joint venture for peaee. He has three other daughters, a son, and a granddaughter. He wants all his children and their children, and yours and mine to grow up in a s a k r world, one without the threat of war hanging over their heads. This book is a vivid memory of that Walk----one historic event in the greater march to that safer vvorld. HI will come about because of commitment and action, inspired by hurnani~arianslike R e d Segal. He's a man who builds bridges, who is forever in search of the truth for himself and for others. And &re all richer for it.

FRED E. BASTEN credits his iravolvement in the peaee movement to Fred Segal. "Wad followed the Great Peace M a c k ~ t interest:' s y Basten, "but it wasn't until E began h as hearing about the American Soviet Walk frorn Fred Segal that T felt a growing commitment to peace work." Fred Basten began his writing career as a copyriter for a leading advertising agency, Foote, Gone & Belding. He went on to become PulblieationdPubIici@Director for arn international franchise firm, a position he held for 12 years, before striking out on his own as an author. His first solo efforts were the regional bestsellers, Santa Moncia Bay: The First 100 Earn and Beverly Hilk: Portrait ofa Fabled C>i@. has since He written such critically acclaimed titles as Glorious Echnicolor: The Movies ' Magic Rainbow; Steve McQueen: The Final Chafitecer;Gringo: A %ung American's Flight from fill; and, most recently, the story of Hollyvvood's celebrity Chateau Marmont Hotel, L$e at the Mamont, and a pictorial history of Santa Monicds famed Palisades Park, Palisades Park Panorama.

06 ABTOPAX
R 3~am FOpega C ~ r a n a Tex nop, KK OH oKTpbrn GBOW c a Majrewb~MB Mara3MH B ~ ~ I I ~ ~ ~ HO O M M B Y A ~ D ~ JIeT TPMAqaTb Ha3aA. W 6b1~1CBMAeTeneM TOTO, KK OH a npespaTMncw B ogHoro a3 caMbIx npeycnesamwMx M YBaXaeMbIX ~ M ~ H ~ C M ~ B O B H wameii CTpaHe. ~ 3 5 e c ~ H b I ~ M O G H ~ I W g~saiiwepM POSHMYH~IB ToproBey, ow Tamice CnpoeKTupoean m nocTpoun KpacusbIe ToprosbIe IJeHTpbl B 3 a n a g w o ~r o n n ~ ~ y g C ,a ~ r a - N l o w ~ ~ Man~By, e M e B IJJTaTe Kan~@opwkiw. GBoefi p a 6 0 ~ 0 5 rlpOCnaBMnCR M OH 3a rpaw~qeii. hIo Mepe pocTa ero n p e g n p k i ~ ~ l ~ a ~ e n AewTenbHocrM bc~oii see 6onbrue M 6onbme ~ o s p a c r a n o B M a M K geny ero H M H e MMpa M H X IAM YenOBeYeCTBa. Ha rlpOTIIXeHMM MHOFHX Y C( a JIeT O H QKa3bIBan J l f o A I l M @ H H ~ H C O B ~ nOMOwb kI I ~ XCepTBOBan MM C O BPeMR M Y M M . Be C n R @peg p o s ~ a n MIIoro T ~ I C R Y IcHMr I? n n e ~ oKacamwMxcR, ~, rnaBHbIM 06pa30M9 BQIIpOCa HAepHOl'O CTOnKHOBeHMR, wanpulvrep, "The Trimtab Factor9' raponbaa Y m n e ~ c a , "Co~aw 06e3bw~a" K e ~ aKeiica Mnagmero, " R n e p ~ o e 6e3yMMe" Enewbr K ~ J I ~ M K o a T , T TaKXe M nJIeHKM, KaK, HanpMMep, 9 9 E ~JIM b Hac Gy~ywee?~ ~ y Kapna Carawa, "OcKap 3a Map" B M B L ~ Bepaow-Po. @ p e tlepegan B ~HH ~ nap rpynrlaM no ngepaofi ~ w @ o p ~ a q l .Bonbmoe rt~ nOMeweHMe, rAe OHM MOrYT BCTpeYaTbCR MI O ~ M ~ H H B ~ T ~ C R MAeRMM. OH @ M H ~ H G I ? ~ O B ~ ~ rpYIlnbII c 0 6 k i p a ~ ) w ~ e noxepTBoBaHli.Iw gnw opra~usaqur? CARE, A H Mexgyn waponworo noxona 3a M M (1986 r.) M nnw gpyrMx ~ opra~M3a~M8O ~ L 323 O B B UITaTe )I~Io-M~KcI?Ko ~ ~ MMP. H a cpegcma @ p e ~ O T K ~ ~ Gecnnar~brii a I T narepb An2 g e ~ e i i M 3 6eaHb1X cehlefi, CI?pOTM ~ e ~ e YMCTBeHHO M @ I ? ~ M Y ~ C K M fi, OTCTaJIbIX. HacTORwee BpeMR OH C P M RapK MMpa B TO T Man~Gy, wTaT KanM@op~Mw, Toxe Gecn~ra~wblii. @pea M ero n o ~ b AHHI? b 1 n ~ wcne 230 aMepMKawqeB, 6 B YYaCTI-IMKOBA M ~ ~ I I I C ~ H C I C O - C O B ~ T C KM ~ O IlOXOJJa3a O p OT M n e ~ ~ w r p a g a Mocrcsb~ go neToM 1987 rona. 5i a M w x e ~ a o ~ M TaKXe 6 b 1 n yYaCTHMKaMM U O X O A OYeHb 6n~3rco H ~ M ~ comnMcb c @ p e , q o ~ Gnaronapw ~arueWG O B M ~ C T H O ~ ~ , AeRTeJlbHOCTM 3a MHP. Y r-Iero ecrb ewe T ~ nosepH, C ~ I W BHyYKa. OH XoYeT, M M Y T O ~ eFO AeTM, AT er0 ~ e ~ e TaK Xe KK M BamM, M MOH ~ I eM fi, a neru, BbIpocnM B Bonee 6 e 3 0 n a c ~ o ~ MMpe, B R/rMpe 6e3
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All people have one thing in common: we want to live. Now, in the nuelear age, we are forced to face the fact that w all live on one small planet, w all breathe the same air, we all drink the same water. 'rogether we share one common destiny, War now thre&ens all of us, We have no choice but to eliminate vvar and violence as an acceptable way sf resolving our conflicts, Building a vvorld beyond war is the greatest task our species has ever faced. No one individual or group is up to the challenge. It will take all of us, working in our many ways, creating a symphony of human response, to ensure our collective survival,

RICHARD R K F H B W
President, Beyond VVar Foundation

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I am deeply indebted to each of the American and Soviet persons who participated in this march. The gratitude I feel is that of a &her, grandfallher and member of a human family which thermonuclear technology has transformed into an endangered species. My gratitude is also that of a businessman whose pr@matic experience makes it clear that . . . - we are faced with a choice betvveen co-existence and co-extinction; - co-existence can be assured only by rational Soviet American relations; - the journey described in this remwkdle book is an inspiring syanbol of a larger journey that our two nations must make together as t ~ v e travel from a perilous precipice to a safe, sane plateau of peaceful competition,
HAROLD WILLENS Wusinessman/AuthodHuraaanitarian

Peace will come to this earth when we truly understand our connectedness; that we share each other's pain and joy - when vve realize that to hurt another brings hurt to oaarselws - when we understand that love is the a n s w r to all our problems, every dilemma - and when we realize that to keep love oumefves we must give it away! But we can't love something about which we have had no experience - something that we do not knowW That's why the h e p i c a n Soviet Walk was such an impodant step. n t gave us an opportuni@ t know each other - to eat, sing, talk, laugh m d ePy together o - to exe"nan@ ideas, hopes, d r e m s - to realize that beneath the external differences, whether they be age, sex, color or culture, we are all the same. We all want happiness and we a 8 want peace. We al want a good and secure life for our children. 1 Our greatest threat is ignorance. Our greatest hope is truth. May the American Soviet Walk be the first of many cooperative international peace ventures.

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