You are on page 1of 12

MODEL

Framework

VISION ANAM MODEL MODEL LAND WATER

Model
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Logics Values & Goals Systems Agropolitan Concept Superblock Parcel

SOCIAL

Obodo Anam bu kwa obodo nwere obi umala na udi nile obula. Ani, ike, ezigbo, mmili na ihe ndi ozo. Udi njikota nmgbanwe jikotara ndi oru niile nuzo ohuru amaegosi ndi Africa.
Anam City is a city of flexible systems: Land, Energy, Social, Water and more. These systems connect, change together and work together in a new way to improve Africa.
ENERGY MOBILITY APPENDIX ECONOMY

. 22

. 23

MODEL

VISION

Logics
ANAM

The urgent need for sustainability today demands new systems of thinking and new approaches to problem solving new spheres of logic. Societies are no longer considered outside of or independent of the natural environment, and neither can exist outside of the influence of technology. The Logic of the ANAM model is the conceptual basis and theoretical underpinning of our sustainability perspective which lives in the confluence of three spheres: Sociologic, Ecologic and Technologic (SET). The three spheres together form a regime of sustainability in which all three interactively control performance, viability and outcome. Each strategy within the Master Plan is assessed by these mutually reinforcing logics.
Sociologic-Ecologic-Technologic SET*

MODEL MODEL

SOCIO

LAND WATER

SOCIOLOGIC: a strategy that is culturally relevant, collectively improves human quality of life and encourages responsible citizenship. A truly sustainable urbanism is facilitated and manifested through its social roots. It must be grounded in cultural heritage, both in practice and form. ECOLOGIC: a strategy that is a balanced and respectful management of natural resources that meets human needs, enhances natural beauty and mitigates natural hazards. The local ecology has been a source of physical sustenance, creative inspiration and a struggle for survival. These three experiences are independently significant but must be fairly and simultaneously addressed. TECHNOLOGIC: a strategy that is a practical, problem-solving application that supports resilience, optimizes processes (time, money, resources), and applies indigenous knowledge systems while advancing innovation. Appropriate technology facilitates solutions that are readily implementable, scalable and able to yield tangible results for the present generation.
*Economics, typically understood as the third sphere of sustainability, is excluded from this SET not as a devaluation of the global phenomena, but to advance the assertion that a system of production of material wealth is not central to, but results from the collective endurance and progress of humankind as derived from this SET. The model posits the Logical SET of interrelationships as the basis for articulating a truly sustainable city.

ECO

TECHNO

SOCIAL ECONOMY ENERGY MOBILITY APPENDIX

SET Sustainability Framework

. 24

. 25

MODEL

VISION

Value & Goals


COMMUNITY COMMUNITY EQUITY PRODUCTIVITY QUALITY

1: BUILD COMMUNITY
ANAM

1
DIVERSITY

=
MOBILITY

+
PROSPERITY

%
VITALITY

>

Community Development: Given that the attribute Anam people most laud is total unity of the community, the general mandate to build a cohesive community is the primary goal. Collective Progress: Community viability and unity correlate to human security and access to opportunity. If persons with shared means for self-improvement tend toward cooperation, then collective progress is an effective method to stabilize community. Cultural Heritage: The character and nature of all urban spaces within ANAM New City reflect traditional aesthetic values and spatial patterns. Culture should be legible in the image of the city, while building on indigenous knowledge systems.

MODEL MODEL LAND

Parameters: 8 shared values

Community, Equity, Productivity, Quality, Diversity, Mobility, Prosperity and Vitality are considered the eight shared values to maximize in the ANAM New City model (8 parameters). Together they convey a SET of general goals with respect to the nature of the Settlement, People and Mandate associated with this Master Plan document.

WATER

EQUITY

2: PROMOTE EQUITY Equality: The customary Anam practice of unimpeded production, protection and transfer of equity for all persons should remain enshrined. Platforms created to ensure equal access encourage active participation and value input. Shared Ownership: Anam community should act as stakeholders and shareholders with equity in the overall enterprise as well as component activities and businesses. 3: GENERATE PRODUCTIVITY
SOCIAL

ECONOMY ENERGY

PRODUCTIVITY

+
. 26 .

Pro-Productivity: ANAM New City adds to the Anam culture of agricultural and productive landscapes -- i.e. the dedication to cultivating Anam-administered lands and historically produce foodstuffs in excess of consumption -- to a broad commitment to productive lifestyle.

27

MOBILITY APPENDIX

MODEL
QUALITY

4: STANDARDIZE QUALITY Quality of Life: The primary driver behind ANAM city is to rapidly elevate quality of life to measureable worldclass standards and extend across future generations. The value of quality with respect to the new city should be broadly apparent in real and perceived quality of products, goods and services circulating and originating in ANAM; operation of urban amenities at international standards of quality; and standard delivery of high quality of life. Quality Infrastructure: Noting that shoddy and degraded buildings and environments devalue their urban context, high quality infrastructure and building construction should be demonstrated, promoted and supported by a culture of maintenance.

PROSPERITY

7: Propagate PROSPERITY Economic Growth: Economic success drives the viability of any city. Therefore, ANAM wi.. serve as a pro-business platform to support a culture of entrepreneurship from microenterprises to international commerce and medium and large-scale industry. Agriculture and agro-industry are of particular note for their prime significance within this economic structure. Promotion of a strong local economy will also be supported with intergenerational access to and transfer of assets. 8: Emanate VITALITY

VISION

ANAM MODEL MODEL LAND

VITALITY

DIVERSITY

5: Cultivate DIVERSITY City for Everyone: The factor of diversity can have a multiplying effect on the output of the city. In order to generate a dynamic urbanism, interaction and hybridity should be privileged over homogeneity. Thus, while zoning should be strictly enforced, mixed-use development and mixed-income neighborhoods should be encouraged. Resiliency: Diversity as applied to greenspace, urban design, land use as well as within demographics of ANAM New Citys permanent and transient population should draw inspiration from the ecological concept of resiliency in which greater heterogeneity of an ecosystem correlates to higher resistance to external stresses.

Balance: Comfort and health are among the most important characteristics of any urban environment. Since the preservation of natural habitats and ecology within the urban development is a key consideration, these same spaces should be used strategically to balance biological systems, regulate microclimate, weave greenspaces strategically into and throughout the city, and beautify the urban landscape. Creativity: Ultimately, this strategic synergy should not only maximize each of the above shared values within ANAM New City, but also crystallize as a creative nexus that allows for a uniquely vibrant urbanism that activates new possibilities by energizing people, landscapes and relationships.

WATER SOCIAL ECONOMY ENERGY

MOBILITY

6: Expand MOBILITY Future-Oriented: Free movement of all people and goods throughout the full extent of the city is for the greater good of urban performance and access. Navigability: Make urban layout easy to understand and navigate. Create a hierarchy of transportation that begins with pedestrians. TOD: Organize Transit-Oriented Development around programmatic and high use nodes.
. .

>

MOBILITY APPENDIX

28

29

MODEL

VISION

Systems
ANAM

E HE RITA GE MICR O-FIN AN FOOD SECU CE RITY

The design of the city and its supporting systems is modeled after natural ecosystems. It contains modular and eco-dynamic subsystems to sustainably manage the demand and supply of the region within which it exists. The holistic, closed-loop design approach considers a balance of inputs and outputs both from natural and man-made sources. In order to generate a dynamic urbanism, interaction and hybridity is privileged over homogenity.
T

ECONOMY
MODEL MODEL
TY M ICI OP TR EL EC DEV CY L R E ED IEN LA NT IC SO ORIE EFF GY IT NS ENER RA T EN

INF

OR

SOCIA L CA PITA L

MA T SM ION T AR EC T G HN RID OLO

GY

PEOPLE-POWERED

LAND

SYSTEM

ATTRIBUTES

Outcomes

ENERGY
LAND COLLECTIVE OWNERSHIP HERITAGE LANDSCAPE GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE OPTIMIZED DENSITY MODULAR SCALABILITY CONSTRUCTIVE IMPACT FLOOD INTEGRATION RAINWATER HARVESTING WATER TABLE RETENTION WATER JUSTICE
Community owns all land, individuals own improvements to it Respect sacred and historic sites in perpetuity Use ecology to manage environment Balance sprawl and overcongestion with walkability Design in pieces that allow for growth Improve the environment instead of degrading it
BIOG AS WAS TE T

LAND

SCAP

MOBILITY SOCIETY
PUBLIC PARATRANSIT RURBAN CULTURE

WATER

COLL ECT LAND IVE OWN ERSH REGIS IP COM T MUN RATION ITY B PROD ANK UC ING AGR TIVE LA O IND NDS CAPE US WAT ER T TRY ABLE RECH ARG E

Collect as much rainwater as possible Recharge the water table commensurate with use Guarantee everyone access to clean water Combine the best of urban and rural ways of living Actively promote total unity of the community Amplify the ethics (and economics) of local productivity Strive to use less energy than produced Convert sunlight into energy Build a decencentralized smart grid of energy sources Exploit closed loops to extract energy from waste Invest in people Focus on agriculture-based industry for job growth Ensure that the community can feed itself locally Engineer early businesses to grow secondary businesses Recycle inputs and outputs across businesses Build the city both physically and digitally in real time Prioritize human-powered modes of transportation Leverage technology for feedback and iterative improvement

RA

INW

AT

ER

HA

SOCIETY

RURBAN CULTURE UNIFIED PUBLIC LOCAL PRODUCTION ENERGY POSITIVE SOLAR FARMING DISTRIBUTED NETWORKS WASTE = ENERGY SOCIAL CAPITAL AGRO INDUSTRY FOOD SECURITY SEED PROGRAMMING LIFECYCLE RE-SOURCING

RV

ES

TIN

WAT

WATER

TS KE AR RKS L M TWO A UR NE D LT ICU UTE GR RIB A T DIS

ER T

RAN

SIT

WAT ER J

SOCIAL

O EN ERG Y

USTIC E

ECONOMY

LAND

ENERGY

FLOOD INTEGRATION RURBAN CULTURE MULTI-MODAL TRANSIT GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

WATER

ENERGY

ECONOMY

MOBILITY

MOBILITY

REALTIME DIGITAL PEOPLE-POWERED CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

APPENDIX

. 30

. 31

VISION

ANAM

MODEL MODEL

LAND

WATER

SOCIAL

ECONOMY

ENERGY

MOBILITY

APPENDIX

A CELL OF URBANISM

MODEL

. 32

33

MODEL

VISION

ALA OBI Illo Housing Markets School Agro-industry

Pa th of th eR

ALA + AGROPOLITAN TERRITORY


i

ANAM MODEL MODEL

un gS sin

IS AX AL GIC OLO EC
U

LAND

ALA ULO Hospital Community farms Wetland park Erosion control Groundwater recharge

WATER

BA R

NA

XIS

AL

B AO AL

I O G AA U
AGROPOLITAN TERRITORY
In Igbo tradition, ala (land) is conceptualized as literally living according to a gradient of three tiers:

L AU AL

SOCIAL ECONOMY

ALA AGU Fish ponds Hunting Ecological sinks Preservation areas Ecotourism

ENERGY

ILLO

ALA OBI - residential or domestic space ALA ULO - transitional farmland ALA AGU - wild or natural environment Taken at a different scale, this approach to spatial zoning can describe an agropolitan territory for living, in which inhabitants of any settlement must not only actively produce their own food, but also mediate the space of their collective living with the natural environment.

MOBILITY APPENDIX

. 34

35

MODEL

VISION

Concept Diagrams
ANAM

DENSIFY

In order to preserve avoid sprawl, Plan development that is compact by building for density, but designing for people. Overtime the city should become more vertical than horizontal to maximize efficient access and transportation corridors, as well as preserving farm and wetlands.

DECENTRALIZE

Plan for decentralized systems that are smaller, more numerous and scalable. This allow for more affordable, more efficient and sustainable technology types that are flexible as populations and needs change over time.

MODEL MODEL LAND WATER SOCIAL

ACCRETE

Accretion means a very gradual addition of land mass. In the case of Anam City, this relates to the water and flooded edges where land will be increased to mitigate erosion and protect the ecologic systems in conjunction with creating more stable ground protected from flooding.

SEED

Plant seeds within the city to invite and encourage economic and social development. Plant seeds of Anam City in other existing cities nearby to provide a framework for community infrastructure development at the local level and contextual to Africa.

ECONOMY ENERGY MOBILITY APPENDIX

. 36

. 37

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


MODEL
VISION

Superblock
ANAM

3.1 ha ala ulo 7.2 ha ala obi 3.1 ha ala ulo

Superblock is the urban module of a given agropolitan territory. This single unit of urbanism operates in isolation or as part of a larger network. In place of centralized infrastructure, superblocks feature smaller decentralized systems that are more costeffective, scalable, and able to be deployed on demand. A chain of superblocks forms a linear spine of urbanism with 400 meter (5 minute) walking radii.

MODEL MODEL LAND

400 m

WATER SOCIAL ECONOMY ENERGY MOBILITY

4 km
. 38 .

39

APPENDIX

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

MODEL

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

VISION

Superblock
Program

225 housing units 1000 residents 250 commercial units 500 workers
*represents a maximum planned density potential

Users

25 housing units 118 residents 68 workers

32 housing units 32 residents 144 workers

ANAM

b
PARATRANSIT

b d
PARATRANSIT

a c

14 housing units 68 residents 32 workers

MODEL MODEL

c f e
12 housing units 108 residents

LAND

34 housing units 159 residents 102 workers


PARATRANSIT PARATRANSIT

e
14 housing units 72 residents

f
WATER

PARATRANSIT

PARATRANSIT

Dimensions
30 m 30 m 30 m
450 m2

3,600 m2

Community center / utility block Commercial corridor Housing Paratransit routes and mobility hubs Bioswales for stormwater management Floodwater interchange Greenspace and infrastructure Ala ulo farm and wetland buffer
40 .

120 m
30 m

60 m

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


9m 18 m 9m
2,700 m2 2,700 m2 1,800 m2

SOCIAL ECONOMY

63 m

3m 12 m

ENERGY

3,600 m2

213 m

60 m

3m

3,600 m2

30 m

12 m

60 m

120 m

MOBILITY

3m

30 m 90 m 336 m 90 m 60 m

41

APPENDIX

MODEL

VISION

Superblock
ANAM

1-D CHAIN

CLUSTER

MODEL MODEL LAND

2-D TILE

WATER SOCIAL

CONSTELLATION

ECONOMY

BUFFERED
ENERGY MOBILITY APPENDIX

. 42

. 43

MODEL

VISION

Parcels
ANAM

Initially, each land transfer will pass two equal 15x30m parcels to Anam families. This will allow them to build a self sufficient home on one parcel, and then to preserve the second parcel, either as an income generator or for use by future family.

MODEL MODEL

permeable laneway

LAND

solar power future expansion

WATER SOCIAL

domestic garden bioswale filtration garden


tra ns

rainwater storage

biogas shared courtyard

ECONOMY

po

rta

tio

vacant lot under cultivation

ENERGY MOBILITY APPENDIX

. 44

. 45