FIESTA

SANTA FE 2011
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2 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
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2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 5
FIESTA
SANTA FE 2011
Inside
6
Royal court’s dresses make a bow to history.
8
A question-and-answer with La Reina and Don Diego
10
The history behind Don Diego’s cuadrila
15
Complete Fiesa schedule of events
16
Long-time volunteers keep Fiesa Council vibrant.
18
Lecture examines death on El Camino Real.
20
Zozobra escapes! Read al about it.
COVER PHOTO
Luis Sánchez Saturno
Samantha Antonia Tapia y Olguin, the 2011
La Reina de la Fiesta de Santa Fe, smiles
as she leaves the Cathedral Basilica of St.
Francis of Assisi after her coronation in July.
COVER DESIGN
Deborah Villa
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
Robin Martin
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Ginny Sohn
MANAGING EDITOR
Rob Dean
EDITORIAL
Magazine editor Inez Russell
986-3093, irussell@sfnewmexican.com
Magazine art director Deborah Villa
986-3027, dvilla@sfnewmexican.com
Director of photography Clyde Mueller
ADVERTISING
Advertising director Tamara Hand, 986-3007
Advertising layout Christine Huffman
DESIGNERS
Elspeth Hilbert, Scott Fowler,
Dale Deforest, Bill Jacobi
ADVERTISING SALES
Michael Brendel, 995-3825
Gary Brouse, 995-3861
Belinda Hoschar, 995-3844
Cristina Iverson, 995-3830
Alex J. Martinez, 995-3841
Jan Montoya, 995-3838
Art Trujillo, 995-3820
Rick Wiegers, 995-3840
COMMERCIAL PRINT SALES
Rob Newlin, 505-670-1315
printsales@sfnewmexican.com
SYSTEMS
Technology director Michael Campbell
PRODUCTION
Operations director Al Waldron
Assistant production director Tim Cramer
Prepress manager Dan Gomez
Press manager Larry Quintana
Packaging manager Brian Schultz
WEB
Digital development Henry M. Lopez
www.santafenewmexican.com
ADDRESS
Office: 202 E. Marcy St.
Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday
Advertising information: 505-986-3082
Delivery: 505-984-0363, 800-873-3372
For copies, please call Reggie Perez, 428-
7645, or email rperez@sfnewmexican.com
PUBLI SHED SEPT. 1, 2011
SANTA FE FIESTA SONG
Spanish
Music by Bily Palau,
Spanish Lyrics by Johnny Valdes, Jr.
Santa Fe, tus fiesas de setiebre
Se celebran en la capital
Con Zozobra queando las penas
Ya las fiesas an a comenza
Tus mujeres llenas de alegia
Pregonando an su nuevo ao
A a luz de grandes luminaias
Van cantando con place esa cancion
Si Seño, como no, aonos al acilon
A baila y goza de esa linda polacion
SANTA FE FIESTA SONG
English
Music by Bily Palau,
English Lyrics by Avalee Turner
In old Santa Fe e hae La Fiesa
‘Tis the time fo singing, dance and play
On this day e do not take la siesa
While Zozobra burns the gloom away
Steel uitars are softly struming music
Senoita, come along with me
Luminaias all are shining bightly
At the baile, fancy costumes you will see
Si Seño, como no, let’s go out and hae some fun
And e’ll see Santa Fe in Conquistaores ay.
6 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
By Sandra Baltaza Martínez
Carmen Valenzuela’s hands seem to caress the enless yards of wine-colored
fabric as she gently slides it under a neele that embroiders turquoise patterns.
She sent at least 20 hours behind her sewing machine on each of this year’s
Fiesa de Santa Fe royalty’s ric rac dresses.
And the same was true for seamstresses Dolores Garcia and Linda Medina, who
created and the formal gowns and a traditional velvet louse and skirt, resectively,
during a tight six-week window.
During that time the three seamstresses helped give Fiesa de Santa Fe 2011 a more
traditional Spanish look.
“I wanted the class As and the two class B dresses to be a little more reminiscent of
Spain,” said Fiesa Council President Herman Lovato.
The ric rac dresses, for example, are the type that grandmothers used to wear to
ROYAL WEAR
Top-notc seastreses design fo La Reina and he court
Luis Sancez Saturno
Seamstress Carmen Valenzuela sews a dress for La Reina and her princesas. The dress is a 1950s traditional ric rac dress.
Fiesa and their daughters and their grandaughters are stil
trying to fit into them, Lovato said.
“I wanted to capture that,” Lovato said about the ric rac models
created by Valenzuela, a Santa Fe native. The princesas wear
wine-colored dresses and La Reina Samantha Tapia wears a
white dress. Al the dresses are tea-length; the bottom of the
waist-fitted dresses are detailed with white, silver and turquoise
ric rac. The embroidery accents and gives a delicate finish to the
model, which includes a bolero jacket.
“I sew every night until midnight and then a couple more hours
in the morning before going to work,” said Valenzuela, 58, who
learned how to use a sewing machine in her home economics class
at the now-defunct Harington Junior High School in Santa Fe.
Valenzuela also worked on new ric rac louses and skirts for
Fiesa Council members; the men wil be wearing a fuchsia and
lack long-sleeve fiesa shirt with ric rac, Valenzuela said.
“I love making beautiful clothes. And what’s inspiring is that I
get to create. I don’t like the ordinary, I like things that pop,” said
Valenzuela, who curently works for a private suede and leather
designer in Santa Fe. The job alows her to travel to Italy and other
countries such as Moscow, Dubai and China to witness some of
the world’s high-end fashion.
But in Santa Fe, she is enthusiastic about participating in a
tradition her family has been a part of for years, she said.
The same is true for Dolores Garcia, 60, a Santa Fe native who
created the formal gown, known as the “class A” dress. What
distinuishes this year’s dress are the ruffles and lace, a look that “we
were used to seeing once upon a time,” said Garcia, who got help
fromher five grandaughters; some helped with the details on the
dresses, others used leftover material to make clothes for Barbie, but
they al stoped by to cheer for their grandmother’s work.
Garcia has been a seamstress for decades. She started sewing
for her brothers and their wives. Last year she made several
pieces for her son, Manuel Garcia y Gonzales, who took the 2010
Don Diego title. As she sews, she thinks of every person, sends
lessings and wishes that their Fiesa experience become a life-
changing event, she said.
“It’s just a lot of positive energy going into it,” Garcia said.
Working on attire for the Fiesa royalty is nothing but an honor
for seamstress Linda Medina, 67, who created this year’s velvet
skirts (broomstick style) and peasant louses. La Reina wil be
wearing a gray, teal green for the princesas and royal lue for
the Native American princesa. Medina, a Taos native, has been
sewing for Taos Fiesa royalty for decades, she said. She moved to
Abuquerque 12 years ago and stil remains involved with Taos
and Santa Fe fiesas. For Medina, making gowns for royalty is
much more than piecing garments together.
“I consider that this is our tradition,” she said, “something that
our ancesors left us.”
2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 7
Courtesy
New Fiesta outfits for La Reina (right) and her court (top) showcase
the ric rac style so popular in Fiestas past.
8 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
La Reina Samantha Antonia Tapia y
Oluin and Don Diego de Vargas Andy
Lee Lopez y Sandoval have been busy
al summer with their duties as part of
the Santa Fe Fiesa Royal Court. They
sat down to tak to Sandra Baltazar
Martinez about the Fiesa de Santa Fe
and their experience as royalty.
SAMANTHA ANTONIA
TAPIA Y OLGUIN
What two things hae you learned about you
culture through participating as La Reina?
The history. I’ve learned a lot, you realy
get to learn the true meaning of Fiesa,
about Our Lady. It’s also opened me up.
It’s helped me explain to my nieces and
nephews about Fiesa, about why I’m
doing this.
What has been the greatest callenge? What
hae you enjoyed the most?
Chalenge: Fitting everything into my
schedule, but thankfuly they’re lenient [at
work].
Enjoyed the most: For me so far, it’s
attending the Novena Masses. You realy
felt it in your heart...and then you have
the older people teling you, ‘thank you for
keeping our tradition alive.’
What hae you learned about yourself
through this proces?
That I can push myself to the limits. I
didn’t think that I could get up and give a
seech in both Spanish and English. Going
through this has made me apreciate Santa
Fe more than I ever have.
What’s the one asect of Fiesa that you would
ant you descendents to preserve?
To base (Fiesa) around La Conquistadora.
It’s al about her.
Do you conside Fiesa a comunitywide
event? What makes it so (o not)?
I do. Everybody attends, it’s a weekend
where friends and family get together...
and you always meet someone new. From
the Tapia side of my family, I always meet a
new cousin. It’s a big family.
ANDY LEE LOPEZ Y SANDOVAL
What two things hae you learned about you
culture through participating as Don Diego?
The one thing that I’ve learned is that
we’re al one, you can’t differentiate
between Anglos, Hispanics, Native
Americans. We’re just one. I’ve also
learned that deep in our hearts nobody
wants to let our traditions die out.
What has been the greatest callenge? What
hae you enjoyed the most?
Chalenge: Smiling al the time. It gets
trying toward the end.
Enjoyed the most: Working with Sam, she’s
a great person. And the unity we’ve formed.
We’ve bonded to the point that everyone’s
coming to posadas to my house this year.
What hae you learned about yourself
through this proces?
That I can’t get everything done by myself.
I’ve learned to become humle. It takes
a team, everybody pushing in the same
direction to accomplish something.
What’s the one asect of Fiesa that you would
ant you descendents to preserve?
That’s simple, that’s the Novenas and the
procession.
Do you conside Fiesa a comunitywide
event? What makes it so (o not)?
No. I see it’s lost a little bit of its
momemtum. The community could be
more united, between businesses, between
towns. People don’t do the entire Fiesa,
they pick and chose what they want to
attend. If you did have a ful community
effort, you wouldn’t want Fiesa to end.
(Santa Fe) is not a little town anymore, it’s
not close-knit like when I was a kid.
A LIVING TRADITION
La Reina and Don Diego: What Fiesa means to us
Luis Sáncez Saturno
Don Diego, Andy Lee Lopez y Sandoval, and La Reina de la Fiesta de Santa Fe, Samantha
Antonia Tapia y Olguin, after the knighting and coronation ceremony earlier this year.
2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 9
10 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
By Todd Bailey
Every year they are portrayed by co-workers, life-long
friends and lood relatives.
They are asked to join and told it wil be a commitment. They
are asked to dress like Spanish Colonial soldiers and clergy. They
are taught a little bit about the person they are portraying, and
then they are asked to take on that role for an entire summer.
Whatever the job, the reigning Don Diego de Vargas asks the men
of the Fiesa de Santa Fe Cuadrila to complete a task — just as the
original Don Diego depended on his Cuadrila back in 1692.
Who, exactly, were these people? Who made up this military
expedition that helped de Vargas re-enter Santa Fe without
injury? And who are the men who step into their shoes today?
There is no historical record of the size of the Cuadrila, but
Herman Lovato, president of the Santa Fe Fiesa Council, said
that during earlier years of the Fiesa, the Cuadrila was made up
of 30 to 40 people. Because of rising cost of costumes and upkeep,
that number has been trimmed to 18 to 20 people.
“There is a link between the Cuadrila used for the Fiesa and
the original Cuadrila,” said Lovato. “The council chooses who
portrays de Vargas each year and that person then recruits people
to portray the members of his Cuadrila. As the newly apointed
governor, de Vargas picked the members of his Cuadrila to re-
enter Santa Fe.”
It seems that de Vargas considered many factors when
choosing soldiers, men such as Fernando Duran y Chavez,
Francisco Lorenzo de Casados, Juan de Cacres and Pedro
Hidalgo. De Vargas also chose a military leader in Juan Paez
Hurtado, who also was a close friend and confidant.
Duran y Chavez was an exiled refugee from the 1680 Puelo
Revolt, which drove the Spanish out of Santa Fe. Years after the
re-conquest, Duran y Chavez became an alcalde, or municipal
magistrate, in Bernalilo in 1696. It was to Duran y Chavez’s home
A COMMONGOAL
Cuaila mebers on hand to help Don Diego de Vargas
Natalie Guilén
Members of Don Diego’s Cuadrilla carry the Virgin Mary as part of their duties. Flanking them are the men of Los Caballeros de Vargas.
2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 11
that de Vargas was brought to when he fel il and eventualy died
in 1704.
Another original Cuadrila member, de Casados, was a
low-ranking officer who eventualy became a captain. After
the re-conquest, de Casados became an acive member of
the Confraternity of San Miuel and a council member, or
regidor del cabildo, in the Santa Fe government. He is also the
progenitor, or originator, of the line of descent for the Casados
family of New Mexico.
A curent descendant of de Casados is Santa Fe lawyer Pat
Casey. He, along with other family members, researched the de
Casados line and understands the historical importance of the
original Cuadrila to Northern New Mexico.
“There is an immense sense of pride knowing that one of the
characers portrayed in the Fiesa de Santa Fe Cuadrila is an
ancesor of mine,” Casey said. “There is also a sense of community
that is felt when you know your roots come from Northern New
Mexico. To me, this is the greatest place on Earth.”
Arualy the most important tools de Vargas used during his
negotiations with the Puelo people were his interpreters, two
of whom were Juan de Cacres and Pedro Hidalgo. Both men had
extensive experience with the Puelo Indians.
De Cacres spoke the Tewa Indian lanuage and served as an
interpreter for Antonio de Otermin, the Spanish governor of Santa
Fe de Nuevo Mexico during the 1680 revolt. De Cacres helped
negotiate a safe retreat for the Spanish settlers out of Santa Fe.
Hidalgo escaped the Revolt of Tesuque and warned Santa Fe
citizens of the impending 1680 revolt. When he got to El Paso,
Hidalgo served as a scribe to friars.
Religion was an integral part of the Spanish way of life during
the colonization of the Americas. To assist the re-conquest, the
Cuadrila had at least two priests who served as chaplains, Fray
Francisco Corvera and Salvador de San Antonio. Corvera served
as the president of the army chaplains.
Their responsibilities included missionary work to the Indians,
while also taking charge of the spiritual wel-being of the Spanish
and their families. Before an impending battle, the priests held
confessions for the soldiers and sometimes would be asked to
take responsibility for a soldier’s articles and property, should he
die. The priests were also in charge of proper burial services and
caring for the soldier’s family.
“Their devotion to religion was the main reason why the
first fiesas were more of a religious celebration,” said Henrietta
Christmas, a genealogist and board member of the Historical
Society of New Mexico. “Today, the religious pracices are there,
but (are) lesser-known. That is because today’s society is not as
religious as life was when the first fiesas started.”
It was a promise during a prayer that is the genesis for the long
line of fiesas — the 2011 Fiesa de Santa Fe is the 299th such
celebration.
The night before the re-conquest, de Vargas prayed to the
Virgin Mother in the form of a 29-inch wooden statue that had
been housed in Santa Fe before the revolt. He asked for a re-
conquest without loodshed and promised an annual celebration
to honor Mary should his prayer be granted.
De Vargas died before he could keep his promise, but Cuadrila
member Juan Paez Hurtado folowed through. In 1712, eight
years after de Vargas’ death, Hurtado, then-lieutenant governor
of New Mexico, influenced Santa Fe officials to hold the first
Santa Fe Fiesa.
“Hurtado knew it was important to de Vargas to keep that
promise and when Hurtado was ale to be in a position of
power, he made that hapen,” said Christmas. “But it wasn’t just
important to those two. That promise was important to the
community, to the people who stil knew de Vargas. Folowing
the re-conquest, there were several smaler battles and revolt
attempts by the Puelo people, so the Spanish were constantly
in military mode. Having an annual celebration proved to be a
welcome sight.”
That statue, of course, first caled Our Lady of the Rosary,
then La Conquistadora, is now known as Our Lady of Peace.
Because of homage to her, La Fiesa de Santa Fe continues to
thrive as the oldest community celebration in the United States.
And each year, a group of men serving in Don Diego de Vargas’
Cuadrila — just as their ancesors did — continues to make that
celebration possile.
Natalie Guilén
Cuadrilla members attend church together as part of their Fiesta duties.
12 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 13
14 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
FIESTA MELODRAMA
Various times, through Sept. 11, The
Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E. De Vargas
St. Tickets, $20 call, 988-4262
FIESTA ZUMBA PARTY
6 p.m. Thursday (Sept. 1), Santa Fe
Community Convention Center, 201
W. Marcy St., $10 per person
FIESTA FINE ARTS
ANDCRAFTS MARKET
9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, Sunday; 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Monday (Sept. 3-5),
Santa Fe Plaza
MARIACHI EXTRAVAGANZA
DE SANTA FE
7:30 p.m. Sunday (Sept. 4) Mariachi
Extravaganza de Santa Fe, Santa Fe
Opera. Tickets, 1-800-280-4654
FIESTECITA
6-9 p.m. Tuesday (Sept. 6), the Santa
Fe Community Convention Center
Ballroom. $10 per person
MARIACHI MATINEES
10 a.m., 2 p.m. Wednesday (Sept.
7), Lensic Performing Arts Center,
211 W. San Francisco St. Tickets, $5,
988-1234
HISTORICAL LECTURE
6 p.m. Wednesday (Sept. 7), New
Mexico History Museum Auditorium,
113 Lincoln Ave. Tickets $5.
BURNINGOF ZOZOBRA
3 p.m.-dusk Thursday (Sept. 8), Fort
Marcy Park. Tickets online at www.
zozobra.com, $10 general admission,
$3 for children 4-6 years old.
PREGÓNDE LA FIESTA
6 a.m. Friday (Sept. 9), Rosario Chapel
ARTS ANDCRAFTS MARKET/
FOODBOOTHS
8 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, Saturday and
Sunday (Sept. 9, 10, 11) Santa Fe Plaza
CITY ANDSTATE
OPENINGOF FIESTA
Noon Friday (Sept. 9), Official
opening of Fiesta, Santa Fe Plaza
ENTRADA DE DONDIEGO
DE VARGAS
2 p.m. Friday (Sept. 9), Santa Fe Plaza
DESFILE DE LOS NIÑOS
PET PARADE
9 a.m. Saturday (Sept. 10), Around
the Santa Fe Plaza, staging area
moved to the New Mexico School for
the Arts. See Route Map.
LAMERIENDAFASHIONSHOW
3 p.m. Saturday (Sept. 10), James A.
Little Theatre, 1060 Cerrillos Road,
$8 per person, $3 under 12; at door.
Sponsored by La Sociedad Folklorica.
GRANBAILE
7:30 p.m. Saturday (Sept. 10),
featuring Gonzalo, Santa Fe
Community Convention Center.
Tickets, $15 per person, 988-1234
SOLEMNPROCESSION
9:30 a.m. Sunday (Sept. 10), Palace of
the Governors to Cathedral Basilica
of St. Francis of Assisi
PONTIFICAL MASS
10 a.m. Sunday (Sept. 11), Cathedral
Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi
REMEMBERINGTHE FALLEN
11 a.m. Sunday (Sept. 11), 9/11
Ceremony and Procession, starting at
Fire Station No. 1, followed by noon
ceremony on the Plaza Bandstand.
Sponsored by Santa Fe Fire Department
DESFILE DE LA GENTE
HISTORICAL/HYSTERICAL
PARADE
1 p.m. Sunday (Sept. 11) Through
downtown. See route map.
MASS OF THANKSGIVINGAND
CANDLELIGHT PROCESSION
7 p.m. Sunday (Sept. 11), Cathedral
Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi,
followed by the procession to the
Cross of the Martyrs.
FIESTA300
6 p.m. Sept. 16, the Cathedral Basilica
of St. Francis of Assisi, Mass of
Thanksgiving to commemorate the
300th anniversary of the Fiesta de
Santa Fe.
OFFICIAL SCHEDULE
299th Fiesa de Santa Fe
FRIDAY Sept. 9
10-11 a.m. MALDITOBABY
11–noon LOS AMIGOS
Noon-12:30 p.m.
OPENINGCEREMONIES
12:30-1 p.m.
MARIACHI NUEVOSONIDO
1–1:30 p.m.
MARIACHI NUEVOSONIDO/
REYNALDOMAESTAS
1:30-2 p.m.
NUEVOSONIDO/ THELMA
ARGUELLO
2-3 p.m. ENTRADA:
DE VARGAS &STAFF
3-3:15 p.m.
MARIACHI TAPATIODE
ALVAROPAULINO
3:15-3:45 p.m.
MARIACHI TAPATIO/
ANITA LOPEZ
3:45-4:15 p.m.
MARIACHI TAPATIO/
ORLANDOANTONIO
4:15-5 p.m. BAILE ILUSION
5–5:45 p.m. LUMBRE DEL SOL
5:45-6:30 p.m.
LOS NIÑOS DE SANTA FE
6:30-7:15 p.m.
JEFF ROMERO&THE RAINY
MORNINGBLUES BAND
7:15-7:30 p.m. FELIPE RUIBAL
7:30-8:15 p.m. LOS REFLECTIONS
8:15-8:30 p.m. FELIPE RUIBAL
8:30-9:15 p.m. LEGACY
9:30-10:15 p.m.
CAMINOOSCURO
10:30 p.m.-midnight
MIGUEL TIMOTEO
SATURDAY (Sept. 10)
9-10:45 a.m. PET PARADE:
MARIACHI TAPATIO
10:45-11:15 a.m.
MARIACHI NUEVOSONIDO
11:15 a.m.-noon ESTILO
Noon-1 p.m. INDIANDANCERS
1-2:30 p.m. GONZALO
2:30-3:15 p.m.
BAILE ESPAÑOL DE SANTA FE
3:15-4:15 p.m.
MARIACHI BUENAVENTURA
4:15-4:45 p.m.
MARIACHI BUENAVENTURA/
ANTONIOREYNA
4:45-5:30 p.m. BAILE
FOLKLORICO DE SANTA FE
5:30-6:15 p.m. SHONA SLOVAKIA
6:15-7 p.m.
SOCIEDADCOLONIAL
ESPAÑOLA DE SANTA FE
7-7:45 p.m. MONIKA EVETTE Y
CONFIANZA
7:45-8:15 p.m. JENNA MARTINEZ
8:15-9 p.m.
ERNESTINE ROMEROY
MALSANGRE
9-9:10 p.m. ISAIAHMARTINEZ
9:10-9:55 p.m. QUEMOSO
9:55-10:05 p.m.
ISAIAHMARTINEZ
10:05-10:50 p.m. SOL FIRE
10:50-11 p.m. ISAIAHMARTINEZ
11 p.m.-midnight
SEVEROY GRUPOFUEGO
SUNDAY (Sept. 11)
11 a.m.-noon GRUPOHERENCIA
Noon-1 p.m. 9/11 CEREMONY:
SANTA FE FIRE DEPARTMENT
1-3 p.m. PARADE REVIEW:
PRESIDENT&PASTPRESIDENTS
3-4 p.m. EQUAL CUT
FEATURINGJERRY LOPEZ
4-4:30 p.m. SANTA FE PUBLIC
SCHOOLS CHOIR
4:30–5 p.m.
MARIACHI NUEVOSONIDO
Y MARIACHI TAPATIODE
ALVAROPAULINO
5-5:30 p.m.
MARIACHIS/
JAVIER JURADO
5:30 p.m. CLOSING
CEREMONIES: THE VERY REV.
JEROME MARTINEZ Y ALIRE
BANDSTAND SCHEDULE
PLAZA
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Children’s Pet Parade
Desfile de los Niños
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Historical/Hysterical Parade
(Desfile de la Gente)
Historical/Hysterical Parade
Desfile de la Gente
2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 15
16 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
By Todd Bailey
George Gonzales has a lot of resect for
today’s members of the Fiesa de Santa Fe
Council.
Gonzales, a lifetime member of the council,
said he remembers the long days of
working in preparation for the next, great
Fiesa de Santa Fe.
“The greatest thing about Santa Fe is
the council,” Gonzales said. “They have
done so much for the city with its work and
volunteering. I admire them for the work
they do each year. It’s a lot of stuff. ”
At the age of 72, Gonzales, who portrayed
Don Diego de Vargas for the 1961 Fiesa, said
he is too old to continue with the day-to-day
operations of the council. These days you can hear
him running the family business as a voice for
KSWV-AM radio.
“I would go to the Fiesa for a day or two,
but I am just not ale to go for the entire
time,” Gonzales said. “It’s nice to see that
good people have taken on the responsibility
of making the Fiesa a great weekend for
everyone.”
Gonzales became a member of the 150-
member council in 1960, which makes his
membership 51 years, longer than anyone else
on the council. He is one of several long-time
Santa Fe residents who commit their time and
money to Fiesa de Santa Fe.
Before his political career, former Santa Fe
Mayor Lary Delgado became a council member
Former Mayor Joseph Valdes (center) has been taking part in Fiesta de Santa Fe his entire life. Below, Valdes at age 7.
KEEPING FIESTA ALIVE
‘One of the best events Santa Fe has to ofe’
2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 17
and served as council president in 1985
and 1986.
“The Fiesa Council does a great job of
preserving our culture and a part of Santa
Fe’s overal story,” Delgado said. “I think
it was me wanting to be a part of keeping
that culture going that interesed me in
joining the council. The role I looked to
play was to continue with the traditions
that have been going on since the Fiesa
started in 1712, and to hope that the
people who folowed us did the same.”
Delgado took a step back from his
responsibilities to run for Santa Fe city
council in 1990. After winning a seat, he
eventualy became Santa Fe’s mayor from
1998 to 2006.
Although he is a life member, he isn’t as
acive with the council as he once was. His
wife, Angie, continues to serve on several
council committees. And her husband tags
along with her to help.
“She loves to work on the Pet Parade,”
Delgado said. “When she works on things
like that, I like to suport her and help
out. When I was mayor, I made it a point
to make it to many of the Fiesa events. I
thought it was important to be there to
suport a cultural event in our city.”
Joseph Valdes understands the cultural
asect of the Fiesa as wel. As a child,
he dressed in a costume and went to the
Plaza with his parents.
“It was a family tradition for us,” said
Valdes, who turns 81 on Sept. 4. “What
I remember most about fiesas is that it
always started on my birthday or on the
first day of school. I had Fiesa lood in
my veins.”
Valdes’ family has strong ties to the
city of Santa Fe and the Fiesa de Santa
Fe Council. His grandfather, Manuel,
was mayor of Santa Fe in 1892. His older
brother, Johnny, was the first president
of Los Cabaleros de Vargas, the group
entrusted with the protection of La
Conquistadora, and was a Fiesa Council
president in the 1940s.
“He also wrote the Spanish lyrics to the
Fiesa song,” said Joseph Valdes, who was
just as acive as his past family members
with the council and the city. He was the
Cabaleros’ third president and joined the
Fiesa de Santa Fe Council in 1965. He
then became president in 1967 to 1969.
He steped away from acive service to
become a city councilor in 1970 to 1972.
He then became the first four-year term
mayor of Santa Fe from 1972-76.
Valdes believes the council continues to
work to produce a great Fiesa each year,
but the event is definitely different from
his chilhood.
“The times have changed and some
customs have changed,” Valdes said.
“Regarless, it stil goes on each year and
wil continue to whether you’re here or
not. That’s what is so great about fiesas.
Despite its changes, it is stil one of the best
events Santa Fe has to offer.”
FIESTA COUNCIL
BY THE NUMBERS
77 regular members
39 life members
17 past presidents
9 organizational members
4 provisional members
3 honorary members
Another form
er m
ayor, Larry D
elgado, in
a Fiesta parade back in
the 1980s.
Above, the current Fiesta Council, lead by President H.L. Lovato,
who is completing his second term.
18 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
By Kay Locidge
The Inquisition had a long reach: al the way from Spain to
the New World, secificaly New Mexico, and from the late
17th Century into the early 21st Century, right up to today.
Dr. Joseph P. Sanchez charts its course through the life of one
man in “Death Along the Camino Real de Tiera Adentro,
1670,” the 2011 Fiesa lecture scheduled for 6 p.m. Wednesday
(Sept. 7) in the New Mexico History Museum auditorium. It’s
a mystery that moved out of the mists of time by becoming part
of the continuing lore of the Land of Enchantment. Like al good
mysteries, the death of Bernardo Gruber has never been solved.
As Sanchez points out in his landmark book, The Rio Abajo
Frontie, 1540-1692, first pulished in 1987 and re-issued in 1996,
German merchant Bernardo Gruber was hunted by the Holy
Office of the Inquisition for aleged witchcraft. He subsequently
died in 1670 under mysterious circumstances while trying to
evade its local officials.
“Bernardo Gruber’s story is one that has perplexed modern-
day historians as it did his contemporaries,” Sanchez said. “Did
he commit a crime against the church and religion? Did the place
names of the Jornada del Muerto (Dead Man’s Journey) and El
Aleman (the German) result from his death along the arid terain
as he attempted to escape the grasp of the Inquisition?
“The Gruber story, which apeared closed to his
contemporaries, quietly resurected itself in New Mexico lore.
Since then, the name Jornada del Muerto has haunted every
colonial and modern map of New Mexico. It would be one of
hundreds of stories that emerged from the historical development
of the Camino Real between Santa Fe and Mexico City.”
Sanchez’s forthcoming book, From Mexico City to Santa Fe: A
Histoical Dictionary of Geographic Place Naes Along El Caino
Real de Tierra Adentro (compiled and edited with Bruce A.
Erickson, Rio Grande Books, 2011), spotlights this journey.
The Fiesa lecture, now in its ninth year, was created by the
Palace Guard, a suport group focusing on the New Mexico
History Museum and the Palace of the Governors.
“It (the lecture) brings together the entire community in
celebration of New Mexico’s colorful past,” said Dr. Frances
Levine, director of the history museum. “For instance, the
presence of the Fiesa court, including those portraying Don
Diego de Vargas, La Reina, the Indian princess and Tupatu
of Picuris Puelo (who is credited, along with de Vargas, with
creating the peace accords leading to the reconciliation of the
Puelo Indians and Spanish), ties the past and present together.
Al who attend the lecture can live and feel our history.
“The Palace of the Governors is, itself, a symbol of and witness
to the 400-year history of New Mexico, as wel as America. As Dr.
Sanchez has pointed out in his writings, ‘long before there was a
Jamesown, VI, or a Plymouth Rock, there was a San Austin in
Florida and a San Gabriel in New Mexico.”
The Fiesa Lecture, Levine points out, can educate people about
the early presence of Europeans in the United States.
“Between 1492 and 1821, the Spanish claim to North America
extended from Alaska to Florida and the Caribean, as wel
as California, Georgia and the Carolinas …al areas in North
America once claimed by Spain.’ Most Americans don’t get that
education; even some New Mexicans don’t,” Levine said. “The
Fiesa lecture aims to change that.
“We have a commitment to those who came before, as wel as
to newcomers to Santa Fe, whether they are visiting or just moved
here,” Levine said. This is not a pageant; it’s a deep connection
among the families of historic Santa Fe and between history and
life as we live it now.
Details
Dr. Joseph P. Sanchez, superintendent of Petroglyph National
Monument and the Spanish Colonial Research Center at the
University of New Mexico, will give the annual Fiesta Lecture at
6 p.m. Wednesday (Sept. 7) at the New Mexico History Museum
auditorium, 113 Lincoln Ave.
The lecture, “Death Along the Camino Real de Tierra Adentro,
1670,” will focus on the effects of the Inquisition in 17th-Century
New Mexico. Admission is $5 at the door and free to Palace
Guard members. More information at 476-5200 or
www.nmhistorymuseum.org.
Living history
Palace lecture connects pas, present
2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 19
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20 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
By Sandra Baltaza Martínez
When Andrew Leo Lovato was
growing up, he had mixed feelings
about the adults who burnt Zozobra
each year. And so did many of his
neighborhood friends who were
growing up in the 1960s and 1970s in
Santa Fe.
Those feelings have turned into a tal tale,
in which one Elvis Romero decides to take
matters into his own hands. He and his
cousin, Pepa, plot the perfect hijacking
scheme one night and drag the gigantic
fiurine with a tractor from Fort Marcy
Park onto the road that leads to Hyde
Park. They wrap Zozobra in old lankets,
tie it and haul it with a tractor driven by
10-year-old Pepa, hiding the buky, wood-
and-cloth fiure near the river.
Everybody in town finds out that
Zozobra is missing the next day, when The
Santa Fe New Mexican breaks the story.
“It’s magical realism,” Lovato said,
revealing his writing method. “It’s when
you tel a story that couldn’t realy hapen,
but that you can actualy believe.”
Okay, so Pepa and her cousin, Elvis, are
made-up in Lovato’s head, but there is
something very real about them.
“Elvis is not just me, Elvis and Pepa
are the Santa Fe kids that I grew up
with. They are not just one person, they
are a conglomeration of al of us, al my
amigos, al of us who grew up in Santa
Fe,” said Lovato during a recent interview
from his Santa Fe Community Colege
office. Lovato is a professor of seech
and communication at the colege and
has written two books. His most recent
work, Elvis Romero and Fiesa de Santa
Fe: Featuing Zozobra’s Great Escape, was
pulished by the Museum of New Mexico
Press in July.
He put into words a story that had
been floating around his mind for at least
a decade; when he was growing up in
Santa Fe, he realy did feel compassion for
Zozobra.
“We felt that this wasn’t right, we felt
that he was the victim and was being
treated unfairly,” Lovato recaled as
he describes his youth in the 1960s as
“magical.”
Santa Feans believe that with the
burning of Zozobra, the year’s bad
memories also turn into ashes. Old Man
Gloom has been cremated annualy since
1924 when Wil Shuster built the first
bogeyman. The marionette is now 50 feet
tal and each Fal, its burning leads into the
city’s annual Fiesa de Santa Fe celebration.
The 76-page book starts off with
Lovato’s memoirs of fiesas and ends
with about 23 pages of Santa Fe Fiesa
history, intertwined with lack-and-white
photographs of fiesas since the early
1900s.
Mary Wachs, editorial director at
the Museum of New Mexico Press, said
Lovato’s story was worth pulishing
because throughout Santa Fe’s history,
there is little known about Fiesa during
the 1960s and how they unfolded. Elvis
Romero and Fiesa de Santa Fe also alows
readers to see rarely shown photos
gathered from the Palace of the Governors
photo archives, Wachs said.
“(Lovato) is an adult who understands
history…but he realy has a child’s soul,”
Wachs said.
The book was designed by Las Vegas,
N.M., native, Jason Valdez, a 2009 New
Mexico Highlands University media arts
graduate interning at the museum through
Americorps.
For Lovato, the book is more than his
desire to highlight a chilhood memory. It’s
also a way to “capture the essence of Santa
Fe during its golden period in the 1960s
and 1970s, when times were simpler, Santa
Fe was smaler and people were more
trusting,” Lovato said.
Through his story, memoirs and
historical pages, he captures the many
dimensions that make-up Santa Fe.
“It’s a celebration of culture, but it’s also
a celebration of cultures; we have Zozobra,
a Fiesa queen, the pet parade, Native
American dances…It has evolved into a
celebration of culture and community.”
Details
Elvis Romero and Fiesta de Santa Fe: Featuring
Zozobra’s Great Escape by Andrew Leo
Lovato, published by the Museum of New
Mexico Press.
Price: Paper-over-board: $22.50
Available: All bookstores, by calling direct
800-249-7737 or www.mnmpress.org
Book-signing
Join Andrew Leo Lovato in the Palace of the
Governors Courtyard at 11 a.m. Saturday
(Sept. 10) as he reads from his new book.
The event includes music, refreshments and
a book signing, courtesy of Museum of New
Mexico Press. Free.
Capturing the magic
New Zozobra book bings fantasy to life
Andrew Leo Lovato and his newest book,
which features the escape of Zozobra.
Details
The burning of Will Shuster’s
Zozobra takes place at dusk on
Thursday (Sept. 8) at Fort Marcy.
Buy tickets online by going to www.
zozobra.com and clicking the tickets
link. General admission is $10 and
children 4-6 are $3. All tickets are
print-at-home eTickets. The event is
presented by the Kiwanis Club.
Geting there
Don’t forget — you can ride the
New Mexico Rain Runner Express
to and from Zozobra. The last train,
which leaves downtown at 9 p.m.,
will be leaving at 11 p.m. the night
Zozobra burns.
Buses
Santa Fe Trails will run its usual
routes from Santa Fe Place into
Sheridan Transit Center on
Thursday (Sept. 8) for the burning
of Zozobra. Two extra buses will
take passengers beginning at 5:45
p.m. from South Capitol Station,
off of Cordova and Pen Road, to
Sheridan continuously throughout
the evening. South Capitol Station
is the best place to park to have a
free ride and no-hassle free parking.
Last buses —final pickup —will
leave Sheridan Street at 10:30 p.m.
to get passengers back to South
Capitol Station and Santa Fe Place.
Handicap Parking
Handicap parking is accessible
through the entrance to the
Recreational Complex at Magers
Field at the intersection of Bishops
Lodge Road and Artist Road. Forty
spaces are reserved and available
on a first-come, first-serve basis.
Gates open at 3 p.m. Any vehicle
requesting Handicap Parking can
enter through this main gate from 3
p.m. until the road closes at 6 p.m.
The vehicle must display a State
of New Mexico-issued handicap
parking permit and everyone in the
vehicle must have an event ticket.
2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 21
Jane Philips
Zozobra, just before his fiery demise last year.
22 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE
DININGGUIDE
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r
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a
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f
a
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R
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r
v
a
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o
n
s
AMERICAN
Whole Hog Café
505-424-3375
320 S. Guadalupe St.
Chosen “West’s Best BBQ Top 10” – Sunset Magazine
Open Daily: Sunday-Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.;
Thursday-Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
San Francisco St. Bar & Grill
505-982-2044
50 E. San Francisco St.
Contemporary interpretation of southwest cuisine
served with a variety of tequilas and margaritas.
www.sanfranbargrill.com
Cowgirl BBQ & Western Grill
505-982-2565
319 S. Guadalupe St.
"NFSJDBO#BSCFRVFrwww.cowgirlsantafe.com
Hidden Chicken Café
505-474-4424
730 St. Michael’s Dr.
Home cooking without having to cook!
www.hiddenchickencafe.com
Doc Martin’s Restaurant - TAOS
575-758-1977
125 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos
Celebrating 75 years in Taos! Local foods to
nourish body and soul.
www.docmartinsrestaurant.com
Joe’s Restaurant, Fine Diner, Bistro
505-471-3800
2801 Rodeo Rd. A
Beer, wine, and Sunday brunch. Where
local farming and great food come together.
Continental, Italian. www.joesantafe.com
AMERICAN
The Pantry Restaurant
505-986-0022
1820 Cerrillos Rd.
Serving Santa Fe since 1948. Beer & wine,
American & New Mexican.
www.thepantrysantafe.com
Upper Crust Pizza
505-982-0000
329 Old Santa Fe Tr.
15-time Best Pizza winner (Best of Santa Fe). Wheat/
traditional crust. Beer & wine garden. Patio dining since
1979. FREE DELIVERY. www.uppercrustpizza.com
ASIAN
Lan’s Vietnamese Restaurant
505-986-1636
2430 Cerrillos Rd.
Delicious Vietnamese cuisine.
Chow’s Asian Bistro
505-471-7120
720 St. Michael’s Dr.
Award-winning Asian Bistro - fresh gourmet
Chinese cuisine made to order.
CONTINENTAL
Las Fuentes Restaurant & Bar
at Bishop’s Lodge
505-819-4035
1297 Bishop’s Lodge Rd.
Open 7 days a week for over 90 years! Experience
Nuevo Ranchero Cuisine – confuence of Spanish,
French, Mexican and Native American favors.
www.bishopslodge.com
315 Restaurant & Wine Bar
505-986-9190
315 Old Santa Fe Tr. (downtown)
Elegant, intimate Bistro serving classically
prepared French cuisine complimented
by a seasonally-driven global wine list.
www.315santafe.com

DININGGUIDE
B
r
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a
k
f
a
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L
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c
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P
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R
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s
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n
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B
r
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a
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L
u
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c
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D
i
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P
a
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E
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t
e
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a
i
n
m
e
n
t
R
e
s
e
r
v
a
t
i
o
n
s
AMERICAN
Whole Hog Café
505-424-3375
320 S. Guadalupe St.
Chosen “West’s Best BBQ Top 10” – Sunset Magazine
Open Daily: Sunday-Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.;
Thursday-Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
San Francisco St. Bar & Grill
505-982-2044
50 E. San Francisco St.
Contemporary interpretation of southwest cuisine
served with a variety of tequilas and margaritas.
www.sanfranbargrill.com
Cowgirl BBQ & Western Grill
505-982-2565
319 S. Guadalupe St.
"NFSJDBO#BSCFRVFrwww.cowgirlsantafe.com
Hidden Chicken Café
505-474-4424
730 St. Michael’s Dr.
Home cooking without having to cook!
www.hiddenchickencafe.com
Doc Martin’s Restaurant - TAOS
575-758-1977
125 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos
Celebrating 75 years in Taos! Local foods to
nourish body and soul.
www.docmartinsrestaurant.com
Joe’s Restaurant, Fine Diner, Bistro
505-471-3800
2801 Rodeo Rd. A
Beer, wine, and Sunday brunch. Where
local farming and great food come together.
Continental, Italian. www.joesantafe.com
AMERICAN
The Pantry Restaurant
505-986-0022
1820 Cerrillos Rd.
Serving Santa Fe since 1948. Beer & wine,
American & New Mexican.
www.thepantrysantafe.com
Upper Crust Pizza
505-982-0000
329 Old Santa Fe Tr.
15-time Best Pizza winner (Best of Santa Fe). Wheat/
traditional crust. Beer & wine garden. Patio dining since
1979. FREE DELIVERY. www.uppercrustpizza.com
ASIAN
Lan’s Vietnamese Restaurant
505-986-1636
2430 Cerrillos Rd.
Delicious Vietnamese cuisine.
Chow’s Asian Bistro
505-471-7120
720 St. Michael’s Dr.
Award-winning Asian Bistro - fresh gourmet
Chinese cuisine made to order.
CONTINENTAL
Las Fuentes Restaurant & Bar
at Bishop’s Lodge
505-819-4035
1297 Bishop’s Lodge Rd.
Open 7 days a week for over 90 years! Experience
Nuevo Ranchero Cuisine – confuence of Spanish,
French, Mexican and Native American favors.
www.bishopslodge.com
315 Restaurant & Wine Bar
505-986-9190
315 Old Santa Fe Tr. (downtown)
Elegant, intimate Bistro serving classically
prepared French cuisine complimented
by a seasonally-driven global wine list.
www.315santafe.com

2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE 23
24 2011 FIESTA de SANTA FE

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