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Appendir The Mathematics of Timewave Zero

by PeterMeyer

l. Generel mathematical considerations As usual, let the set of non-negtive real numberc be denoted by [0,-). Let v(x) be any finction v:(0,-) r (0,-) such that there exist positive real numbers c and d such that:

G) for all x, v(x)<c, and (u) for all x < d, v(x) = 0. Then the tunction fi[O,-) + {0,-) dennedbeloq wherea is a realnumthan 1, is calleda "Frctal tnntrorm" ofvQ. bergreater

r,-\ - +

' "{ra^ir^i ,

Clearly this definition is equivalent to:

r (Y' --) i=-

{v(/a^i)+a^i)

To show that f (x) is well defined we must show thar f (x) exists for all

Irt x be any element of [0,-). By condition (l), for all i, v (x'ta^i) < c, so
v(x*.^t i=0 i=0

.*[s r I _.'" r - | t-/ ,_1


^^i

so the left-rnost sum ocists.Since a > I therc exisa an integer n such that x/a^n < d, so for all i > n, x/a^i < d, so by condicion (z) for all i > n,

---f-.-'/-\_]lzr-

2I2

,{?PENDIX

Thus:

'1 t u 1 v" ^ 1 i )

= t

( ( x/a^i) + a^i)

which clearly erisa. Since

a#l=
f (x) exists.

{P -t

+ > (v(x/10''|1i)

As the first theorem ofTimewave Zero mathematicswe have: Propositionl: For all x >= 0, f(a*r) = a'rf(x). PRooF:Lctx>=0 then
r. L i=-v(rix*r^i) ___;i_

t tdzxt =

_ \. .xJ ycaa^(i+l)) I r_. - L r^(irt) I


IF

= ,-lt t-

t - ' ,in ) |
l which complaes the proof

L'=--

= a. fO

2, The mathematical de6aition of the timewar.e The tunction rhacrepresents timewave is c.cscnrially 6acal ransform the a ofa saw+ooth tuncrion. Fint we shall defne this latter tunction. C-onsider followiq set of 384natural numbers, traditionally known the x t\e daa poixx fot tIrc ttmewave:

rj, t, 26, 17, 24, zo, 16, J8, 19, 1.9, 1o, 27, 6r' tt, t7, So, ,1, 11., 42, 11, 4t, 19, tr, 40, 29, 26, 1o, ti' ,7, 49' jr, zt, 37, 28, lr., 27, ,r, tt, 40, ,t, tz, tr, 22, zr, 2J, 17, 19, tz, )'7' t4, ,8, t3, ar, 16, )7, )4, j6, )o, to, )2, 19, 17, 17,

7, 4' 24, rt, 61, 60, B, t9, 1t, 26, .6, '1, t7, ir, to, 61, 60, 60. 4r, 46, 4, 49, 29, 29, r5, 18, 14. zt, 2t, 'r, to, )2, 43, 47, B, to, )t, 4$ )6, 29, 24, 44, 42, 47, 47, t), tr, 4, 7r, 3, J8, )t, 61, J7, J7, 40, J1, ro 47' 3r, )4, 42, 6\, 4\, 47, 44, 34, )6, ,o, 20, 4r, 1\ 4t, p, 47, 40, 4, $, 1t. tt, 28, 61, )1, ..2, 44, j2, 44' 24, )r, 26, 64, la, 42, 44, 3A, )8, 19, zt, r),

), n, t6, zz, 21, 4c, 42, tt, )1, 66, 46, ao, tz, 10' 6t, z4 40, 42, 46, $, 48, u, 9, 10, 47, 41., 48, 21, 22,

2, 16, tt, 1.4, 19, 29, 42. )4, 40, 64. 47, J6, 49, 18, ]9, 22. 42. 4r, 44, 18, 29, ,2, t, 21, 62, 42, 47, zt,

6, 14, 47, a2, t7, ].8, 41, 2r, 16, 64, t6, l't, 4A, tS, 4r, z+ 26, 40, 44, 27, 17, to, )4 19, t2, 16, 4r, 7t, 68,

8, rg, t?, t, 62, 26, $, 21, ', ,6, tl, 22, I, 4r, 4\, 14, 27, 17, 16, 26, )6, t), 26, 2t,

t7, tt, i4, 12, )1, 41, 4t, )6, tr, t6, )8, 46, 41, ti. ,2, rt, n! 19, 1o, 27, 7, 66, 68, 79, .4, 2t. z?, 17, 25, J4, 10, 33, a1, 7t, 77, 7r, 47, 28, 18, ,9, '1, '2, )2, )), 33, 14, 4r, )1, 20, tz, \,

3a, $, 4:), 49, 49, )2, 4t, 41, )8, 41, 18, 4c, t2, 4, q, 37, 49. 47. zo, 17, t9, 12, 11, g,

4t, )8, 44, 11, J2, 7a, )8, 40, 4r, to, 4-8, 18, 4\, J4, )j, 26, )o, 26, 40, 4r, 49, 4+ tz. 18, 44, to, 4c., )2, 4a, )9, 72, zo, t6,

These velues are derivcd from certain transformations performed upon a set of64 numbcrs, the numbers oflines that change from cach hexagram

APPENDIX

213

- '1-^'Fa,-

--**--r*--"'1,,^r1",r-

'-\.r'1

- --,-/--'-

in the King Ven sequenceto the next, as etplained previously in this book. They provide the basicnumerical valuesused in this marhemadcal definition of the timwave. Definew(i) asthe ith valueofthis set,usingzero-based indexing.Thus:
i w( , ) o -i 4 ... ...

Fxtend w to a tuncdon wrQ such that for any non-negativeinteger i, w(i) = Er( i mod 38a), wherei mod 384is the remainder upon divisionofi by Thus, for example,ru(777) =,N( 777 ft'o4 38a) = w(q) = 8. .r'r0 is a 184. discretefunction defined only for integas, not for all real numbers. Now for any non'negative real number x, let v(x) be rhe value obtained by linear interpolationbetweenthe valueswr(in(x)) and wr(in(x)+r), where in(x) is rhe integral parr ofx. Formally v(x) is defined as *'r(in(x)) + ( x or in exPandedform: (*) =*( in(') m"d 18+ + ( (x- in(x) ) + ) ( w ( in(x+t mod 38a) - w ( in(x) mod 3s+) ). Now consider rhe fractal transform f(x) ofv(x) using a = 64, asfollows: \(,64'i) in(x) ) * ( *r(x+t - wr(x) )

frvr _ s

or, what is the samething,

,.,-,z- ,.,,-,.-, - t - , i)'64'i)


The tunction f(x) exisa because (r) fbr a x, v(x) < 80, ard (z) for a.llx < 3, v(x) = 0.

The fiactal tunction (x), which representsthe timewxve, and which is graphedby the software,is a simple transformation of f(x), asfollows:

flx/

,,

(t
64^l

where x = time in &ys prior to 6 A.M. on the zro dare.. The scalingfactor of 64^3 is used so as to produce conveniennalue, on the y-axis of the graph. Thus the va.lue ofr0 at 5 a.v. on rhe zero date is

do)=#=0.
The value of O at 5 a.v. on the day before the zero &te is

('=# =o o o o o o S 5 r5 o ttr'
The ralue ofr0 at 5 nu. on the day ten daysbefore the zero date is

t(Ss) -

oo.,

* f(9 t) = ooooo4-t8s69t

and the ralue at 6 A.M. on the day r,ooo,ooo,ooo,ooo &ys (about 2,77,888,267 ye rsl befor the zro date is r,192,046.511416. These valuesare independent ofthe acnral zero date. The ralue ofthe timewave at any point io time is not a function ofthat temponl location irself but rather of the difference betweenthat rime and the time assigned to th zem point ofthe wave.

' Th. tineww is zm onrye onepoint, wh.n r = 0. Forx ' 0 ihe Elue ofrhe wav. ir positir. Tbe u n poidtir rhpoidrin tine chcs to orcpond to rh. ra1u.0for x. Thc !i1poin(ukdn6^.M. on Dmb.r 2r, 2oD (LnM d rh. m daie). Thus th. tincRvc hs 3 positirc tu .1 poinb '"luc in iin. prior o rhezrc dar, n Fb only .t rherm point, md is u.de6ne,lalicr theano poilt.

,5

- *-XjJ;-

=-;*-

l"^rt..r-

"'rl.r -\-.,-----.-1

Note that the "direcrion"ofthe graph is rhe oppositeofwhat is usugl with Carresian coordinares. The graph of a tunction f(x) normally proceeds from left to righr alongthe x,ais for increasing In rhis case x. the graph proceeds from right to left for incrersing rhar is, for increasing x, numberofdavs arar to the zeroooint.

3. The mathernatical basisofresonance The phenomenonof resonance, wherebyregionsof the wave rt widely separared intewalsmay havecacdy the sameshape, a remarkable is fea, ture of the tinewave.+ The marhematiel barisfor rhis phenomenon as is follows: Considera point in time x daysprior to the zerodate,then the valueof rhe wavear rhar point is (x), ai definedabove. Now considerthe ulue, t(64*x), ofrhe wive at the point in time 6,{*x daysprior to rhe zerodate. Frornrhe resultprovedar rhe end ofSection I above havethat we

(ra*,) = f6ri:)

#-

- 6o-,(,).

Thus the valueofrhe waveat a point B, 64 timesasdistantfiom rhe zero point asa point A, is 64 tines the valueofthe waveat A. Sincethis is also rrue fbr the pointsin the neighborhoods and B, it is thus clearwhy a ofA regionaroundB hasthe sameshape a regionaroundA. as This resonance calledthe first higher major resonance, is sincethe re gion around the poinr C, 6+*6+ timesas distant from rhe zeropoinr a.s the point A, is alsoresonant with the regionaroundA and constitutes rhe scond higher major resonrnce ofpoint A. There are an unlimited numbd oahishermajor resonanas. Simildy for any point x, (t64) = (x)/64, and so the value of the wave at a poinr B, 64 times doser o the zero poinr thar a point A, is r/64 the
is gathidlly ilBtmted br meanrofthe soliwr, TimewrR Zero, ' The phenonenor ofconinc *hi.h denonnnres (hn thcory. Ir is dplai0ed in deftil in ch{ter ? ofthe mrnurl provtdd wnh the sotnerc. Tinemve z.ro, which rvs dsigned and oded by de rurl'or ofthn rppendix, is ayrilible hon Dolphn Softr'rre, 43 Sl*ru.t Squ2r #r 47. B.rlele', c:lif.rni. 94704i (5I o 4al 3009).

valLre the waveat A Thus the region amund B hasthe sameshapeas the of regjonJroundA ,nd fi!a consrirurc' 6r.r lowelnajolBonance of,hc rhe region around A. A: wirh higher resonances, there are also second,third, founh, and so on, lower major rcsonancs my region of rhe graph. The to lowr major resonances compressed are geometricallytoward the zeropoint, thrr onlv a fewsecondr mayseplarc rhe nth and ,he In+j )'h majo;tower 'o resonances some,not particularly large,value ofn. for

4. Further mathematiel

results

The mathematics of Timewave Zero srend considerablybeyond the initial proposirion proved above.' Lemma r: For any natural number x, v(x) = w(x mod 3s4). PRooF:This followsfrom the defnidon offinction v0, sincefor a natural numberx = in(x) ard so x - ;n(x) = 0. Lemma z: For any natural numbersx ard i, v(x/54^i)'!64^i is a narunl PRooI: By rhe definitionoffunction v0: v(xl64^i),\64^i = 64^i * w(int(x/64^i) mod jsa) + 64^i ''. ( t64^i - in(,i64^D ) * ( (w(in(x/da^i+t modl8a) - w(in(x/6a^i) mod j8a) ) = 6+^i * w(in(x/6+^i) mod t8+) + (x - 64^i*inr(>/64^i)) * ( ($(in(x/6a^i+, mod r8a) - w(in(x/64^i) mod r84) )

' Tne narh.mdi.:l rsls pqent.d in rhern2inder ofrhir rpFndix r bsed pdtl, onmd< done br Klau Schd$of B.+cFchdhach, cerhry. App.ndix V oathenruil lor TinMve tae peb
fnB,h.{6Jb |dIor -o dkin 'n8rmdLi. r.onrnr.d..ff,ed ITUmd"r.

A?PENDIX

Sinct the vatuesofthe firnction w0 are natural numbers, and x is a natural nurnber, the value ofthis expression a natunl number. is I-emma 3: For any natural number x that is divisible by 3

(,

= x

v(xl6a^l*6a^i w(xx6a 3s4)/6a. + mod

i=0

PRooF: Suppose is a natural number divisible by 3. By the de6nition of x f(x) above:

r t x l = Lv \ x | 6 4 ^ tl + 6 4 ^ r i=--

= l,{*t aa"iS*5o^l X (x*64^D/64^i +


i=0

=!
i=0

\i modj84)/64^i "t*rr,arrxe,"r. -,r"+64^i


i=l

by Lemma r, sincex*64^i is integral. Thus f qx7 = : )'(x/64^i,*64^i + w({}04 mod 184)/64 t${r}6a^' Sincex = t*y for somenaturalnumbery

mod r84)/6a^i.

= Zw(,D(x+64^i) modJ8a)/5a^i >wb*y+6a^2x6a^i mod.JB4)/64^i i=0

Zw{jE4*y*lr*64^j mod 184)/64^i i=0

384*y*32i.64^i mod t84 is 0, and w(0) = 0, so eachterm in this sum is 0.

Thu!fk)=tv(x/5a^i)*54^i + w(x*64 modrsa)/64.eED


Prcposition 2: For any.natural number x that is divisible by rhere h a 3 natural number k such that f(x) = k /5a. PRooF: Lt x b a naturel number divisible by 3 then by Lemma 3 f (x) =lvlxtsat'1*5r,'i i-0 + w(x*64 mod 384)164.

By kmma z each rerm in this sum is an integer, so the sum is an inceger, and so is an integral multiple of /ra. Thc second term in chesum is also an intgtal multiple of 64, and so f(x) is. On thc basisofProposirion z we have: Corollary r: For any natural number x that is divisible by 3 there is a nat_ ural nmbcr k such that (x) = k/6a^a. PRooF: Sincc (x) = f(x)/54^r. Propocition 3: For any natunl number x that is divisible by 3S4there is a nanral numbcr k such drat f(x) = 6a'rk. Proof kt x be a natursl number divisible by 384 then r is divisiblc by I

fG) = I v(x/61^t*54^i w(x*64 + mod3s4)/6a.


i=0 Sincc x is divisible by 384,x*54 mod 384 is 0, so at(x*64 mod .js4)t6a = w(0) = 0, so

fG) = t v(x/64^t*64^i = vG)+ X vG/54^0,k64^i.

APPENDIX

PPTNDIX

Now x is integral, so v(x) = w(x rnod r8a) = w(0) = 0, so =z r DL, v(x/64^riro4^r.

Since x is divisible by 384 there is some natural numbr k such that x =

f (x) - > \(6*6a*k /(64.04^(i-l))+{64+64^{i-ill

Now by kmma z each term in the sum is a narural number, so the sum is, so chereis a natural number k such rhat f(x) = 64*k. QED The mathematical results presentedabovar just a beginning. There are no doubt far more profound theorems that await discovery by rnarhematicians.