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These dates are subject to change. SPRING TERM 2008 First day of classes: January 14 Martin Luther King Day: January 21 Spring Break: March 17 - 21 Last day of classes: April 28 Reading Days: April 29 - 30 Finals: May 1 - 2, 5 - 8 Commencement: May 10 SUMMER TERM 2008 First day of classes: May 27 Memorial Day: May 26 End of 1st 5-weeks: June 27 Start of 2nd 5-weeks: June 30 July 4: Friday Summer session ends: August 1 FALL TERM 2008 First day of classes: August 25 Labor Day: September 1 Thanksgiving: November 24 - 28 Last day of classes: December 8 Reading Days: December 9 - 10 Finals: December 11 - 12, 15 - 18 Commencement: December 20 SPRING TERM 2009 First day of classes: January 12 Martin Luther King Day: January 19 Spring Break: March 16 – 20 Last day of classes: April 27 Reading Days: April 28, 29 Finals: April 30, May 1, 4 – 7 Commencement: May 9 SUMMER TERM 2009 First day of classes: May 26 Memorial Day: May 25 End of 1st 5-weeks: June 26 Start of 2nd 5-weeks: June 29 July 4: Saturday Summer session ends: July 31 FALL TERM 2009 First day of classes: August 24 Labor Day: September 7 Thanksgiving Break: November 23 - 27 Last day of classes: December 7 Reading Days: December 8 - 9 Finals: December 10 - 11, 14 - 17 Commencement: December 19 SPRING TERM 2010 First day of classes: January 11 Martin Luther King Day: January 18 Spring Break: March 15 - 19 Last day of classes: April 26 Reading Days: April 27 - 28 Finals: April 29 - 30, May 3 - 6 Commencement: May 8 SUMMER TERM 2010 First day of classes: May 24 Memorial Day: May 31 End of 1st 5-weeks: June 25 Start of 2nd 5-weeks: June 28 July 4: Sunday Summer session ends: July 30

academic Calendar

Graduate Bulletin 2008-2010

Published by The University of Tulsa 800 South Tucker Drive Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104-9700 (918) 631-2336 1-800-882-4723 www.utulsa.edu Email Address: grad@utulsa.edu

Equal Opportunity Policy
The University of Tulsa is an equal opportunity employer and institution of higher education. The university endeavors to create and nurture an informed and inclusive environment in its workplace and educational programs. Affirmative action and equal employment opportunity are integral parts of The University of Tulsa, not just because they are legally mandated but because we recognize that the present and future strength of the university is based primarily on people and their skills, experience, and potential. The University of Tulsa does not discriminate on the basis of personal status or group characteristics, including, but not limited to, the classes protected under federal and state law. The University of Tulsa seeks to recruit, select, and promote students, faculty, and all other employees on the basis of individual merit. The University of Tulsa, an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity institution, recognizes the need to increase representation by underrepresented groups. The Associate Vice President of Human Resources and Risk Management at The University of Tulsa has responsibility for implementing and monitoring the Affirmative Action Plan of the University and assisting with the application and interpretation of pertinent laws. The university has made no statements contrary to this policy. If any such statements have been made, the university expressly disavows them.

Notice
The University of Tulsa Graduate Bulletin is published every two years as a guide to curricula, course descriptions, costs, University policies, and other information. In keeping with established procedures, the University may change programs of study, academic requirements, faculty, curricula, course descriptions, costs, University policies, other information, or the announced academic calendar without prior notice. The University also reserves the right to correct factual errors whenever they are discovered. It is the student’s responsibility to stay abreast of current regulations, curricula, and the status of the specific program being pursued. All University bulletins are available on the University’s website: www.utulsa.edu. Undergraduate programs are offered by all colleges and are described in the current Undergraduate Bulletin. Information concerning the University’s College of Law may be found in a separate bulletin.

The Mission of The University of Tulsa

The University of Tulsa is a private, independent, doctoral-degree-granting institution whose mission reflects these core values: excellence in scholarship, dedication to free inquiry, integrity of character, and commitment to humanity. The university achieves its mission by educating men and women of diverse backgrounds and cultures to • become literate in the sciences, humanities, and arts; • think critically, and write and speak clearly; • succeed in their professions and careers; • behave ethically in all aspects of their lives; • elcome the responsibility of citizenship and service in a w changing world; and • acquire the skills and appetite for lifelong learning.

Both TULAP and MSAP gather assessment data on student learning outcomes under the University’s six Mission Statement goals. (4) online student evaluations of courses. indirect measures that focus on processes. and Law Student Survey on Student Engagement (LSSSE). The School of Music is a member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The Ph. The graduate and undergraduate business programs of The Collins College of Business are accredited by AACSB International (The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business). The Athletic Training program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education and the Exercise and Sports Science program is recognized by the National Strength and Conditioning Association. This combination of measures ensures that all Mission Statement learning goals will be evaluated within a three year cycle. every course has the possibility of being included. program and course levels. and (5) ongoing review of graduation rates. degree program in Chemistry is approved by the American Chemical Society. The School of Nursing is approved by the Oklahoma Board of Nursing and is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. The various colleges and professional schools are accredited by their own professional agencies as well. At the institutional level. graduate school acceptance.Accreditation The University of Tulsa is a fully accredited national doctoral institution and is on the approved lists of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. The MSAP focuses on undergraduates while TULAP addresses all academic levels in all colleges. (3) National Survey on Student Engagement (NSSE). The B. The College of Engineering and Natural Sciences is an institutional member of the American Society for Engineering Education. and passage on licensing exams. program in clinical psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association. assessment is conducted through several programs: (1) Mission Statement Assessment Project (MSAP).S. All programs for the preparation of teachers and school service personnel are accredited by the Oklahoma Council for Teacher Preparation and by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council. engineering physics.D. mechanical engineering.S. The B. (2) Tulsa University Learning Assessment Project (TULAP). and petroleum engineering are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The curriculum in deaf education is endorsed by the Council on Education of the Deaf.S. . Student confidentiality is ensured by removing all identifiers from course-embedded artifacts prior to their review. Faculty Survey on Student Engagement (FSSE). The B. a direct measure that relies on externally developed instruments. electrical engineering. degree program in computer science is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET. an indirect measure that focuses on processes. placement rates. University Assessment The University has comprehensive programs for assessment of student learning at the institutional. a direct measure that reviews course-embedded artifacts under internally developed processes. degrees in chemical engineering. The College of Law is approved by the American Bar Association and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools. and the graduate program in speech-language pathology is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology.

. . . . . 117 Programs in The College of Engineering and Natural Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Joint Degree Programs . . . . . . . . 14 Information Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Graduate School . . . . . . and Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Support Services . . . . . Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Accreditation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Student. . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Special Opportunities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic. . Inside Back Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 History of The University of Tulsa . . . . Fees. . . 222 Certificate Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Housing. . . . . . . . 214 Combined Degree Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Resident Faculty . . . . . . 69 Programs in The Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences . 39 Financial Information: Tuition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover The Mission of The University of Tulsa. . . . . . . . . .Contents Academic Calendar . . . 143 Interdisciplinary Programs . . . . and Responsibilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 About The University of Tulsa . . . . . . . . 71 Programs in The Collins College of Business . . . Dining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 University Administration . . 250 Campus Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Other Academic Resources . . . . . . . . . . 43 Student Financial Services . . . . 61 Student Rights. . . . . . . . . . Freedoms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ann Graves. Chairman. With certain exceptions. Kyle. Community Volunteer Peter C. Retired Chairman. Community Volunteer Steven J. Fisher Investments Randy A. 1132 Investment Co. Community Volunteer Keith E. ACSW James Adelson. President. Jr. John R. Inc. William Lobeck. President and CEO. Chairman. ONEOK. Members hold office for a term of two or three years and election of approximately onethird of the total membership is held each year. Williams R.E. CEO. Retired CEO. III. David R. Case. Inc. Meinig. President.. LLC A. The president of the Tulsa Alumni Board and president of the National Alumni Board serve during the term of that office. LLC J. Rogers and Bell Chet Cadieux. Manager and Trustee. CEO. but a trustee who has served two consecutive terms (a total of 6 consecutive years) is eligible for reelection after one year off. Chairman. Coyle. Chairman and CEO. Nancy Meinig. Malcolm. H. President and CEO. CEO. Laredo Petroleum E. Chairman and CEO. Inc. Roxana Lorton. McElroy Manufacturing. President. Michelle Beale. Nadel & Gussman. II. Ellen Adelson. Capital One Auto Finance. Partner. Chapman Foundations Management. Case & Associates Properties Susie Collins. Inc. HM International. Esq. JMA Energy Company. James C. Senior Executive Advisor. President and CEO. Chairman and CEO. Fisher. William F. LLC Sharon Bell. Robert E. Chairman. conditions. Esq. Alliance Resource Partners J. Crestwood Holdings. P. Inc.. World Publishing Co. (Chip) McElroy.6 University Administration University Administration Board of Trustees The University of Tulsa’s Board of Trustees consists of 50 active members and 11 emeritus members. LLC Barbara Allen. R. Owner. Scott Dickman. One Communications David L. Michelle Beale. President. Oracle Packaging Co. Bailey. no trustee except the president can serve more than two consecutive terms. QuikTrip Corporation Julian Carr. MacroSolve. Both active and emeritus trustees are elected by a majority vote of the Board of Trustees. Foutch.. and qualifications of membership. Publisher. Williams Jeffrey J. Elmburg. Connor & Winters Joseph W. Beecken Petty O'Keefe & Co. Lawson. Craft.. Lorton. McGill. Jerry Dickman. which determines the terms. Community Volunteer Katherine G. Inc. Michael D. and CEO. McDougall. Community Volunteer Howard Janzen. . President.

of the Interior Clifton L. Stephenson. Inc. Schnake Turnbo Frank. Financial Manager. Community Volunteer Charles C. Monroe. Steadman Upham. Ballard Management Corp. Inc. Inc. Special Trustee for American Indians. President. Retired CEO. President. Norman Family Interests. Miller. Alumni Association President. President. CEO and Co-Founder. A. Leaders Life Insurance J. Duane Wilson. Norman. Wiley. Thomas. Taulbert. Ex Officio.. Jr. Michael E. Senior Star Living Steve Turnbo. Zarrow Family Office. Chairman of the Board. Junior League of Tulsa Ex Officio. Ross O. Dept. Swimmer. Burt B. Rex Public Relations Emeritus Trustees C. Thomas. Chapman Foundations Management Jill Zink Tarbel. The Building Community Institute William F. Winnercomm. Esq. Wilburn. 2007-2010 Ryan Rex.. Senior Pastor. James D. Charles S. Wienecke.University Administration 7 Rev. Office of the Secretary. LLC Richard Wiseley. President. Alumni National Association President. Vastar California LLC L. Chairman.. Inc. Monroe. James E. Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. Honorary Director. Inc. The University of Tulsa James W. Co-Owner. Senior Managing Director. Retired. LLC . CPA Jack Neely. Flintco John H.. Western Division. CEO. Williams. Wallis. 2008-2010 Laurie Brumbaugh. Stephenson Investments. Jr. First Presbyterian Church Charles S. President. KWB. The Williams Companies Henry H. Norman Wohlgemuth Chandler & Dowdell Donne Pitman. Arnold Brown. Community Volunteer Charles E. Holmes. LDW Services. Robert E. President. Norman. President and CEO. ExOk. Inc. Community Volunteer Robert E. Jo Buford Siegfried. Chairman. CEO. (Buddy) LaFortune. MAPCO. Edwin H. Zarrow. Inc. President.

Buck. Director of Development for the Collins College of Business Thomas J. Gale Sullenberger. Director of Annual Giving Richard V. KWGS/KWTU J. Director of McFarlin Library Melissa France. Vice President for Information Services and Chief Information Officer Allen R. Dean of the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences A. Nesbitt. Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Vice President for Research Paula Hogard. Alexander. Bellovich. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Kevan C. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dale Schoenefeld. Internal Auditor Heather Apodaca. Director of Petroleum Abstracts Jacqueline Caldwell. College of Law Lawrence R. Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services Janis I. Director of Broadcast Services. Dean of Lifelong Learning Adrian W. Cullem. Christel. Zink. Ackley. Associate Dean for Academics and Administration. Dean of the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Janet K. Director of Counseling and Psychological Services June E. President of the University Roger N. Entzeroth. Fisk. Soltow. Center for Student Academic Support John C. Associate Dean. Haggerty. Brian. Collins College of Business Michael W. Director of Development Gilcrease Museum Lyn S. Athletic Director Carolyn Dalton. College of Law Francine J. Director of Advising and Retention. Executive Vice President and Treasurer Duane H. Sorochty. Secretary to the Board of Trustees Thomas E. Associate Vice President for Institutional Advancement Cecilia I. R. Vice President for Research Roger W. Barnes. King. Dean of the Collins College of Business Steven J. Arrington.8 University Administration Administrative Officers Steadman Upham. Corso. Vice President for Museum Affairs and Executive Director of Gilcrease Museum Joan M. Senior Vice President for Planning and Outreach Academic Deans D. Director of Institutional Research and Records Amy Berry. Brown. (Bubba) Cunningham. Burchfield. Collins College of Business Jane R. Assistant Dean of Students and Director. Executive Assistant to the President Nona Charleston. M. and Ida McFarlin Dean of the Library Administrators Kayla K. Levit. Thomas Benediktson. Blais. Associate Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services Catherine M. Markham Collins. Dean of the College of Law Janet A. Associate Dean for Faculty Development. Corso. Director of Nationally Competitive Scholarships and Administrator of the Tulsa Undergraduate Research Challenge (TURC) Frank L. Director of Housing and Residence Life . Acebo.

Wafer-Johnston. Director of Student Financial Services James Hollanger. Director of Academic Computing Brian Kegler. Associate Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services.University Administration 9 Jeffrey C. Newton. College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Winona M. Tanaka. Hendrickson. Director of Research and Sponsored Programs Michael Volk. Shipley. Thesenvitz. Associate Director of Research and Sponsored Programs G. Director of Development for the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Hope D. College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Francine Ringold. Sharp Chaplain Amy Freiberger. Associate Vice President for Facilities and Campus Services Milt Jarrett. Matherly. Director of Networking Services Deborah K. Associate Dean for Student Affairs. Director of Stewardship Activities and Events Patricia L. Sorem. Thompson. Associate Dean of Students for University and Community Services Kalpana Misra. Registrar Vicki J. Associate Vice President for Operations and Physical Plant Pamela A. Gunnells. (Ginna) Langston. Lamb. Director of Allen Chapman Activity Center Ruth V. Hollingsworth. Redner. Director of Campus Recreation Patti M. Ray. Director of University Assessment Linda M. College of Law Cheryl A. Smith. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Graduate Business Programs. Director. Editor in Chief of NIMROD Stephen R. Reeder. Director of Development for Athletics Terry S. Director of Alumni and Donor Relations Sheila Givens. Kearns. Vice Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs Yolanda D. Director of Donor Services . Whitaker. Martin Page. Director of Academic Publications Richard P. Taylor. Director of Student Activities Richard A. Associate Dean. Moreland. Associate Dean. Director of the Golden Hurricane Club Robert W. Mills. Kerr. Assistant Provost for Academic Outreach Carol Kealiher. Paulison. Associate Vice President for and Controller Lisa L. Limas. Associate Dean for Global Education Laura McNeese. Dean of Students and Coordinator of Multicultural Student Programs Sarah Theobald-Hall. Collins College of Business Brian Scislo. Hossack. Senior Associate Dean. Director of Administrative Computing Wayne A. Executive Assistant to the Provost David Hamby. Dean of International Services and Programs James R. Managing Editor of Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature Michael D. Director of University Relations Vicki A. Director of University School Terrance P. Director of New Student Programs and Services Michael L. Manager of Research and Technology Development Mary K. Rockwell. Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Tricia D. Graduate School Richard L. Director of Development for the College of Law LeeAnna J. Associate Vice President for Human Resources and Risk Management Miranda Pugh. Francis.

• raduate. externships. and internships at Tulsa's vast array of major compap nies. and research. enriches the city. The university campus lies two miles east of downtown Tulsa: a handsome. • articipation in practica. and participates in NCAA Division IA. a national Carnegie Foundation Pew Scholar. technological. introducing them to e the pleasures and responsibilities of the life of the mind in a challenging world. and a system of parks and recreational facilities for citizens of all ages. outstanding performing arts groups. teaching. The University of Tulsa provides undergraduate. graduate. nursing. a balance between career preparation and liberal education. to participate in substantive research. set among the hills and lakes of northeastern Oklahoma’s “Green Country. southwestern city in a metropolitan area of over half a million people. and non-profit organizations. and extend the university’s international reach. doctoral-degree-granting institution with a covenant relationship to the Presbyterian Church (USA). and applied health sciences. just as the university. aerospace technology. .800. Tulsa’s founders – who developed a thriving economy based on petroleum. The city’s remarkable cultural. and professional education of the highest quality in the arts.300 students in its graduate programs and law. and health care – invested in nationally noted museums. and • bundant opportunities for students to undertake community service. and to study and reflect in ways that foster intellectual. internships. and study a abroad. enhance the quality of the faculty. and economic resources nourish the university’s mission and enrich its life. a Carnegie Foundation Professor of the Year for Oklahoma. business. doctoral and research universities. education. Its current undergraduate enrollment is about 2. telecommunications. sciences. • residential campus that fosters a sense of community and integrates curricular and extraa curricular life. medical facilities.S. and four Fellows of the Institute for Advanced Study. The University of Tulsa offers a diversity of learning experiences. in turn. who draw students into the pursuit of knowledge.” From the beginning. professional. and endeavors to instill in its students an understanding that stature as an individual and value as a member of society depend upon continual learning. vigorous. g promote professional preparation. and moral growth. spiritual. The University operates on a semester basis. law. engineering. with about 1. small- and medium-sized businesses. • ubstantial library resources and information technology that support research and classs room learning. a member of the National Academy of Engineering. humanities. and who include in their numbers the 1998-99 Carnegie Foundation Professor of the Year for all U.10 About The University of Tulsa About The University of Tulsa As a comprehensive. In its rich urban environment. The university’s mission is further nurtured and supported by • xceptional faculty. and research programs that foster advanced theoretical development.

the Collins College of Business (renamed in 2008). the College of Law. expanding the university’s reputation as the home of one of the leading special collections libraries in the country and bringing international acclaim. territory. (To date. the College of Business Administration. defined its academic programs with greater rigor and clarity. In 1943. and the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences were strengthened. Successfully courted by the business and professional community of Tulsa. Although the programs in engineering and geosciences continued to bring the institution international renown. which was booming after the discovery of oil at Glenpool. the number of students living on campus significantly increased. the University was awarded the Beta of Oklahoma chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. at the request of the Synod of Indian Territory. the year of Oklahoma’s statehood.” A charter for the university was approved on November 9. a small boarding school in Muskogee. became part of the university. the university established an innovative humanities-based general course of study called the Tulsa Curriculum that emphasizes the development of core skills in writing. James A. During the 1980s. In 1926. which was founded in 1882. In 1988.History of The University of Tulsa 11 History of The University of Tulsa The University of Tulsa – a private. After the 1970s. The College of Business Administration was established in 1935. In 1894. The university currently comprises the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences. recognizing the University's excellence in and commitment to liberal arts education for all students. carefully selected graduate programs were added in other fields. ten endowed chairs for faculty were established. . was proposed for the city. one U. sell the school’s land. financial difficulties prompted school officials to ask the Synod of Indian Territory to assume control. the Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church elevated the academy’s status and chartered it as Henry Kendall College. 32 chairs and professorships have been created. which regularly draw international scholars and archival materials to the university. and the Division of Lifelong Learning. In 1966.) The library was strengthened by accelerated development of the rare book and manuscript collections. the downtown law school. Several years later. the School of Petroleum Engineering opened and soon earned international recognition for its curriculum and faculty. In 1928. the Henry Kendall College trustees proposed that the contemplated McFarlin College and Kendall College affiliate under the common name “The University of Tulsa. and began recruiting highly qualified students nationwide. the character of the university changed. and the student body-which currently hails from 48 states. 1920. mathematics. These trends have continued into the present. increased faculty diversity. to be named after oilman Robert M. By the beginning of 2006. and seek a new location. 1894.S. Chapman died and bequeathed the university $34 million in endowment. Indian Territory. The first classes in the new college were held on September 12. the articles of incorporation were amended to create its modern structure as an independent school corporation governed by a self-perpetuating board of trustees. Henry Kendall College moved to Tulsa in 1907. McFarlin. a name that honored the first general secretary of the Home Missions Board. In the 1970s. enhanced its support for excellent teaching and research. the Graduate School. previously affiliated only loosely. total endowment funds and funds held in trust exceeded $800 million. the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. the Dimensions for a New Decade campaign raised an additional $43 million. and 63 foreign countries-became increasingly diverse. In the years following. In addition. advancing the university’s reputation for excellence. and foreign languages. non-sectarian institution that is formally related to the Presbyterian Church (USA) by a mutually articulated covenant with the Synod of the Sun – has its roots in the Presbyterian School for Indian Girls. Aware that Tulsa was not large enough to support two competing colleges. a new college. the College of Law.

was completed in 1999 with major funding in the form of a $14. The University of Tulsa renamed the business college as the Collins College of Business to honor the vision and leadership of Tulsa business man Fulton Collins. The business building was renamed Helmerich Hall in 2008 in honor of Walt Helmerich. including streamlining its management structure. anthropology. These facilities are heavily used by both the university and larger communities.000-seat arena. and archaeology to create a better understanding of the museum collection. The campus has continued its dramatic physical transformation during the past few years as TU completed a number of major construction projects including Bayless Plaza.000-square-foot facility to showcase TU’s fine and performing arts. the New Century Campaign. Lorton Village. 2008. advancing and preserving the collection. The partnership. ft. the Fulton and Susie Collins Fitness Center. twostory addition to McFarlin Library to be completed in 2009 and the Roxana Rozsa and Robert Eugene Lorton Performance Center expected to be completed in 2010. and the Genave King Rogers Fountain. alumni relations. will result in numerous strategic opportunities for the museum. building located on 4th Street. Collins Hall. Construction on a $10. the Michael D. a 77. Chapman Commons. and central administration offices. chairman of the board and director of Helmerich & Payne. there are twelve outdoor courts with stadium seating around the four center courts. ft. The City of Tulsa and TU agreed in October 2007 to a historic public-private partnership where TU will manage operations at Tulsa’s Gilcrease Museum. The university constructed the University Square Apartments in the northwest section of campus in 2001. the Case Athletic Complex. Several new buildings located west of Delaware Avenue constitute the Donna J. Construction of the Donald W.000-sq. For student recreation. The McFarlin addition will house its computer labs and student technology resources. it completed its most ambitious capital campaign in its history.000-sq.5 million Legal Information Center for the College of Law was completed in January 2000. multi-use facility with an 8.12 History of The University of Tulsa As the university continued into its second century. Completed in 2001. . Another addition to the college is the Boesche Law Clinic. During the past decade. home to the world's largest.75 million grant from the Reynolds Foundation. which houses the Golden Hurricane football offices and provides academic study resources for all TU student athletes. who chaired the TU Board of Trustees from 1997 to 2008. opened in the fall 2002.A. indoor facility with six courts. which includes the addition of more than 800 market-quality apartments since 2001. is expected to begin in fall 2008. 138. and Mayo Village – along the southern and eastern sections of campus in 2007. and then added three apartment communities – Brown Village. Hardesty Sports Complex. home of TU’s tradition-rich Kendall Bell. including a Starbucks coffee bar. Other major projects currently planned or under construction are a 12. as well as allow restoration of the library’s historic reading rooms and the addition of new amenities. financial aid. most comprehensive collection of art and artifacts of the American West.000-square foot. Inc. ft. The centerpiece of the Lorton Performance Center will be a grand concert hall with a full performance stage. and providing unparalleled opportunities for academic research of the museum’s extensive holdings. a 67.ft. art history. 2008. multipurpose recreation center. a complete renovation of H.000-sq. Chapman Stadium to enhance the football game day experience. Case Tennis Center includes a 64. which formally started on July 1. home to the undergraduate admission. In addition. Construction of the Lorton Performance Center. and a new south entrance along Eleventh Street that provides a grand front door to the university that includes Tucker Drive. a 4.000-sq. a $28 million. the university also has made a commitment to developing a vibrant residential campus environment. Reynolds Center. On May 10. The Hardesty complex also includes the Hurricane Soccer/Track Facility and a new softball park. The Gilcrease partnership will allow TU to leverage its nationally recognized academic resources in western American history. The facility will also be the new home to the School of Music and the Film Studies Department.

History of The University of Tulsa 13 In addition to supporting all the traditional liberal arts. risk management. The University of Tulsa was gratified to be designated a Truman Honor Institution by the Harry S. since 1995. TU students have been successful with the following national competitions: • 42 Goldwater Scholarships • 27 National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships • 7 Department of Defense Fellowships • 8 Truman Scholarships • 6 Fulbright Grants • 5 Morris K. computer security. . As a mark of this success. Udall Scholarships • 6 Phi Kappa Phi Graduate Fellowship • 4 British Marshall Scholarships • 1 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow • 1 Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship In September 2005. Also. Native American and Indigenous Peoples Law. the university continues to maintain and strengthen its academic standards by internationalizing its programs. including environmental studies and research. and seeking distinction in critical fields. developing substantive research opportunities. and taxation. the better to equip its students for life in a rapidly changing world. Truman Scholarship Foundation for producing graduates dedicated to public service. elevating the university’s regional accolades for excellence to national prominence is a primary focus of the present administration.

or rejection. subject to approval by the university administration. with full accreditation in 1972. • General concern for the Graduate School’s welfare and the quality of work offered. of new programs and curricula proposed for the E Graduate School. The general policies and regulations of the Graduate School are set and enforced by the Graduate Council and the Dean of the Graduate School. Council faculty members must hold at least the academic rank of associate professor. In 1987 the doctoral programs in biological sciences and computer science were approved by the Graduate Council. in 1988. The Graduate School sets standards for admission to graduate standing and recommends to the Board of Trustees for degrees those students who have completed work required for graduation. followed in 1985 by the Ph. The first master’s degree was granted in 1935. (See Petition Committee of the Graduate Council for details.D.D. the Ph. and that graduate education represents the highest reaches of university endeavor. • xamination and approval. or perceived academic impropriety arising from an action taken by faculty. The Board of Trustees approved a curriculum leading to the Doctor of Education degree in 1951. Ph. curricula in petroleum engineering. page 30. • ecommendation to the Dean of the Graduate School concerning the disposition of cases R filed by a student or faculty involving charges of academic misconduct involving graduate students. page 30. Functions of the Graduate Council include: • evelopment of policies and procedures for the Graduate School and the recommendation D of these policies and procedures to the university administration. chemical engineering. program in mechanical engineering.) . • Development of criteria for membership in the graduate faculty. and. and earth sciences (geosciences) were inaugurated and given preliminary accreditation by North Central Association in 1966. The Dean is chair of the Council. (See Petition Committee of the Graduate Council for details. A Doctor of Philosophy program was authorized by the Board of Trustees in 1963. The industrial/organizational psychology doctoral program was inaugurated in 1983.D. English.14 The Graduate School The Graduate School Graduate education at The University of Tulsa is based upon the principles that no objective lies deeper in a university’s tradition than the nurture of scholarship. The Graduate School supervises all graduate work offered by the university except that of the College of Law (College of Law information is published in a separate bulletin). in counseling psychology program (initiated in 1985) underwent a name change to clinical psychology. • Establishment of regulations for the administration of policies and procedures. and the president of the Graduate Student Association. which consists of graduate faculty members elected from each college. the deans of the colleges offering graduate work.) • earing of graduate student petitions that request departure from established Graduate H School policies and a resultant recommendation to the Dean of the Graduate School. The Board of Trustees authorized graduate study leading to the master’s degree in 1933.

engineering physics. Master of Fine Arts. education. chemical engineering. Specializing in biochemistry. Master of Business Administration Master of Science in Finance Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Finance. math/science education. Specializing in chemical engineering. clinical psychology. industrial/organizational psychology. A joint degree program offered through the Collins College of Business Master of Science in Finance/Master of Science in Applied Mathematics. mechanical engineering. computer science. and petroleum engineering. geosciences. biochemistry. biological science. Master of Taxation. and industrial/organizational psychology. The university offers its undergraduates the option to participate in combined Bachelor’s/ Master’s degree programs.The Graduate School 15 Degrees Master of Arts. and petroleum engineering. finance. English language and literature. Master of Science. chemistry. history. petrophysics. which give students the opportunity to complete both degrees in a reduced amount of time. art. mechanical engineering. and physics. Master of Science in Engineering. and speech/language pathology. clinical psychology. online Master of Teaching Arts. Specializing in biological science. English language and literature. A 60 credit-hour program specializing in art. Master of Engineering. Doctor of Philosophy. The university also offers joint programs between the Graduate School and the College of Law leading to a Juris Doctor/Master of Arts (specializing in anthropology. electrical engineering. mechanical engineering. A joint degree program offered between the Collins College of Business and the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. . or industrial/organizational psychology). history. Specializing in chemical engineering. English language and literature. physics. Juris Doctor/ Master of Business Administration. applied mathematics. engineering physics. history. clinical psychology. Juris Doctor/Master of Taxation. and petroleum engineering. computer science. computer science. electrical engineering. and geosciences). Specializing in anthropology. chemistry. geosciences. and Juris Doctor/Master of Science (specializing in biological science. chemical engineering. These combined degree programs are currently available in applied mathematics. Offered through the School of Education in cooperation with individual disciplines in art and secondary education specialties.

Each student must satisfy course prerequisites for the graduate program before being officially admitted to the degree program.toefl. (609) 771-7670. The University of Tulsa does not typically offer first-year international students financial aid. however.com. (609) 921-9000 or www. by purpose and design. The major program advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School may approve conditional admission. with the exception of its own Institutional TOEFL. a letter of financial support must accompany the application for admission to the Graduate School. An applicant must hold a baccalaureate or higher degree from a college or university approved by a recognized accrediting agency.0 scale in the undergraduate major is generally required. Transcripts sent to the Graduate School must be accompanied by a certified English translation. The student must use the graduate course number when enrolling in a course for graduate credit. therefore.0. Such applicants whose academic work has been superior are admitted upon approval by the major program administration and the Dean of the Graduate School. or www. at the discretion of the Graduate School. bachelor’s degree and must have a strong academic performance comparable to a “B” or above average grades. except in some cases when a limited number of undergraduate courses are required to satisfy deficiencies. A grade point average of at least 3.org.16 The Graduate School Admission The majority of graduate programs at the university are. upon petition. Fitness of character may also be considered. We use your institution’s grading scale and do not necessarily convert your grades to a four point scale. Enrollment must be approved by the major program advisor and is governed by individual qualifications and course loads.S. If. but a student is usually required to remove all such conditions before beginning the course of study leading to a graduate degree. but requirements may vary between programs and may be higher than 3. . A University of Tulsa undergraduate student with a distinguished academic record may enroll in graduate work in the final year before graduation.ets. having selected a major field of study. Applicants for admission to most graduate programs must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Tests. The student must apply for admission to the Graduate School and be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School to enroll in graduate courses. not large. the student has received his or her degree from a university in a country where English is the primary language. and a clear explanation of the grading system used at the undergraduate institution.org. the TOEFL may be waived. The number of students admitted each year is restricted to those with high qualifications. Applicants for admission to graduate programs in the College of Business Administration must take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Information regarding times and places where the GMAT is given is available by calling 1-800717-4628 or www. International Applicants International applicants must hold a degree comparable to a regionally accredited U.mba.0 on a 4. The University of Tulsa will not accept Institutional TOEFL scores to satisfy English proficiency requirements. Applicants. must meet requirements set by the major program and the Graduate School. Information regarding times and places where the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Tests are given is available from the Educational Testing Service. Applicants for whom English is not the first language must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) by arrangement with the Educational Testing Service.

it is understood that enrollment as a special student does not lead to a graduate degree. 213 on the computer exam or 550 on the paper exam for programs offered through the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences and 90 on the internetbased exam.The Graduate School 17 The minimum TOEFL score accepted by The University of Tulsa for international applicants is 80 on the internet-based exam. All international graduate students must check-in with the International Student Services Office upon first arriving on campus. Special Student Status It is possible to apply to the Graduate School as a special student. may also be admitted as special students. Students are admitted to this category for general course work or transfer purposes. not needing institutional endorsement.html.utulsa. This form must be presented to the Graduate School before enrollment can be completed.edu/iss/APPLYING/EIIS. who are seeking fewer than eight credit hours of graduate credit for specified certification requirements of the Oklahoma State Department of Education. For the fall and spring semesters.5 for all other programs. Applicants may also submit a test score from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) (323) 255-2771or www. Admission to the Graduate School as a special student is outside of any graduate program. Those interested in attending the Institute should contact the English Institute for International Students directly by phone at (918) 631-2535 or via the web at www.ielts.org in order to fulfill the English proficiency requirement. If the special student applies and is officially admitted to a degree program. international students must obtain a Health Insurance Verification form from the International Student Services Office confirming their insurance coverage. EIIS students are eligible for University housing. Admission to the English Institute for International Students does not guarantee a student admission to academic programs at the university.0 for programs offered through the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences and 6. and prior to enrolling for each semester. six hours of course work taken as a special student may be applied toward a master’s degree and up to 12 hours of course work taken as a special student may be applied toward a doctoral degree. Special students are required to meet the regular admission standards of the Graduate School. English Institute Admission Admission to the English Institute for International Students (EIIS) is open to all students who wish to improve their English proficiency. Failure to meet routinely with the International Student Services Office may adversely affect an international student’s visa status. Graduate students in education. . Eight-week sessions are available year-round. The minimum IELTS score accepted by the University of Tulsa for international applicants is 6. 232 on the computer exam or 575 on the paper exam for all other programs. then submit an application and the $25 application fee.

• ubmit official transcripts of all college work. 59 of this Bulletin. religious. • pplicant’s character. • ubmit a nonrefundable processing fee of $40 with each application. measles. (Transcripts submitted with an application S become property of the university. and personal exemptions are allowed by law and such requests must be made in writing using The University of Tulsa Certificate of Exemption form. More information about this requirement is available on p. application credentials will be destroyed if enrollment is not completed within one calendar year. mumps. Unless the Graduate School Office is instructed otherwise. However. Applications and transcripts will be held on file. Students living in on-campus housing must also provide proof of immunization again meningococcal disease. McNair Scholars program). at least three months should be allowed.edu/graduate. Students admitted provisionally must fulfill all of their provisional conditions within the first semester of graduate study. (This fee is waived for S individuals who have graduated from The University of Tulsa. two weeks are required to process an application after all materials have been received in the Graduate School Office. • International students must submit a letter of financial support at the time of application. Immunization Regulations Due to Oklahoma state legislation.) • Submit all required standardized test scores at time of application.18 The Graduate School General Admission Procedures All students seeking admission to the Graduate School must follow these steps: • ake application on a form provided by the Graduate School or electronically on the M application at the Graduate School website: www. or those who are participants in the Ronald E. . Failure to comply with these requirements will result in a hold being placed on future enrollments by the student. and admission will be valid for one calendar year. all students who attend Oklahoma colleges and universities must provide proof of immunization against hepatitis B. Normally. integrity. in the case of international students requiring visas. and general fitness to practice a particular profession may A also be considered in the admissions process.utulsa. Medical. and rubella (MMR). • Submit three letters of recommendation.

Special students must secure the signature of the appropriate instructor for each graduate course in which they wish to enroll. The last day of the semester is the day prior to graduation for the fall and spring semesters and the last day of classes during the summer semester. The card should then be presented to the Graduate School Office for final approval. a graduate student must be enrolled in at least nine credit hours on the Friday that concludes the fourth week of classes during a regular semester (fall and spring semesters). No student may attend classes after the first class session. students with full-time jobs are normally limited to a maximum of six credit hours during fall and spring semesters. For financial aid purposes. Spring term enrollment begins in early November. Any graduate student who has enrolled in the required number of hours for a degree but has not finished all requirements must enroll in Graduate Residency (see below). Online enrollment is currently available to approved students in graduate degree programs in the College of Arts and Sciences. the appropriate graduate program advisor. or graduate that semester unless properly enrolled. take qualifying exams.. . Completion of zero (as is the case when enrolled in 7990-Final Enrollment or 8800-Psychology Internship) to eight credit hours is acceptable for full-time status for two sequential regular semesters in a master’s program or four sequential regular semesters in a doctoral program when the student has completed at least nine credit hours per semester for the prior two sequential regular semesters.The Graduate School 19 Matriculation Exceptions to the following policies are rare and are granted only on a case-by-case basis and upon recommendation of the program administration and with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. and completed with the assistance of. However. Enrollment cards for all degree-seeking students should be obtained from. then the student will be disqualified from further reducedcredit-hour full-time status until the student has enrolled in at least nine credits per semester for two sequential regular semesters. unless indicated otherwise by the instructor. If a student does not complete his/her degree within these two reduced-credit-hour semesters for a master’s student or four reduced-credithour semesters for a doctoral student. Special (non-degree-seeking) students should obtain their enrollment cards in the Graduate School Office. Enrollment in zero to eight credit hours other than as described above constitutes part-time enrollment. Full-Time and Part-Time Status To be considered academically full-time. A student must be enrolled to make use of university resources (e. comprehensive exams. library or faculty time) during the fall or spring semester. Graduate students who are not United States residents and are attending the university on a student visa must be full-time students as required by federal regulations. half-time enrollment is enrollment in a minimum of five credit hours during the fall and spring semesters.g. A student may enroll in up to 12 credit hours during a regular semester and eight credit hours during a summer term. Enrollment Graduate enrollment for the summer and fall terms usually begins in April.

designated in this Bulletin by 6000-level course numbers. and the graduate program advisor for the discipline in which the course is offered. Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit (7000/5000) The University has select graduate courses taught at the 7000-level that are cross-listed at the 5000-level and may be taken by undergraduates for undergraduate credit with the approval of the undergraduate program advisor. have an oral defense of a thesis or dissertation). but before the start of the next semester are required to enroll in Final Enrollment (7990). the instructor of the course. Students may not receive credit for a course at the 5000-level and then later retake the same course at the 7000 level. undergraduate courses. . Students enrolled in these courses for graduate credit will be given assignments beyond those required for undergraduate students in the same course. This requirement is particularly applicable. or to be considered for graduation during that term or during a given semester. Undergraduate courses taken for graduate credit must be 6000-level courses approved for registration. Students who have previously enrolled in a course at the 4000-level may not enroll in the same course at the 6000-level. There is no charge for enrollment in 7990. Undergraduate students are evaluated in exactly the same way as the graduate students in that course. If a student is not enrolled in course work but wishes to make use of university resources (e. the student must be enrolled in Graduate Residency (7961). The faculty responsible for the program must submit a written justification for any master’s degree program containing more than 40 percent of its total credit hours (excluding the removal of deficiencies) in 6000-level courses. Undergraduate students in a 5000-level course must meet all the requirements and complete all of the same assignments as required for the graduate students in the 7000-level of the course. Students may only enroll in 7990 after all of the requirements for the degree have been met. This option is intended for exceptional undergraduates with at least junior standing.g. Undergraduate Courses for Graduate Credit (4000/6000) In some programs.. to complete other academic milestones required by the program or Graduate School (e. may be taken for graduate credit with the approval of the graduate program advisor.g. but not restricted. take a qualifying or comprehensive examination. Final Enrollment (7990) Students who enrolled in a semester and complete their degree requirements after the end of that semester.20 The Graduate School Graduate Residency (7961) When a student has enrolled in the required number of hours for the degree but has not finished all requirements for the degree. Graduate tuition must be paid for such courses. to the semester in which the student completes work for the degree. library or faculty time). he or she enrolls in Graduate Residency (7961).. Such justification must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.

It is financially and academically advantageous for students to follow the official withdrawal procedure. Students should contact the Business Office. Medical/Psychological Withdrawals. Students withdrawing from the University based on a medical or psychological reason should submit a written request to the Center for Student Academic Support of the Office of Student Affairs. Non-Voluntary Withdrawal from the University. The Center for Student Academic Support will maintain all documentation in confidential student files and will provide verification of appropriate documentation as needed. The schedule for auditing courses during a summer term should be obtained from the Records Office. Students must pay the same tuition rate for an audited course as they would if the course was taken for credit. . psychologist. The Graduate School will work closely with students to minimize the impact a withdrawal will have on their academic progress. Students who have been required to withdraw must apply to the Graduate School for readmission. Nonattendance of classes does not constitute official withdrawal. rather than repeating the entire semester when they return to the University. A medical/ psychological withdrawal does not negate the student’s financial responsibility to the University. Official withdrawal for any given term requires a standard procedure originated through the Graduate School Office. Additionally. which can be obtained from the Center for Student Academic Support. A request for medical/psychological withdrawal must be supported by documentation from the student’s physician. bills. or psychiatrist must complete the Medical Verification Form. students who are called to report for active duty near the end of a semester may choose to take “incompletes” in their courses. Students who are called to active military duty at any time during their enrollment will be eligible for a full refund or credit of their tuition for the semester of their withdrawal. A student originally enrolled in a course for credit may elect to change his or her status to that of auditor at any time within the first three weeks of a regular semester only if he or she is passing the course at the time the change in status is requested and the consent of the course instructor is secured. A grade of “W” will be entered for the course or courses in which the student was registered. or psychiatrist. Housing and Dining. Students withdrawing prior to the start of the seventh week of a regular semester are entitled to a partial refund of tuition calculated from the date of their official withdrawal. psychologist. An auditor may elect to take a course for credit at any time within the first three weeks of a regular semester if the course instructor and the Dean of the Graduate School give their permission. Students are strongly encouraged to discuss their situation with their academic advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School to consider alternate arrangements. refunds. The credit hours from audited courses are not counted when determining a student’s full-time status. Withdrawal from the University for Military Service. except taking the final examination or receiving credit for the course. and other charges related to their enrollment or withdrawal. the student’s physician. For example. Students may be required to withdraw from the university for habitual absence from class. or any other behavior that prevents them from fulfilling the purposes implied by their registration in the university. habitual idleness. Withdrawal Voluntary Withdrawal from the University. and/or Student Financial Services regarding outstanding fees.The Graduate School 21 Auditing A student may elect to audit a course and will have all the privileges of students taking the course for credit.

Transfer of Records The Office of Registration and Records will forward official transcripts to other institutions or prospective employers upon the request of students.22 The Graduate School Voluntary Withdrawal from a Course. The university does not issue unofficial transcripts or copies of transcripts from other institutions. A grade of “W” will be entered for the course in which the student was registered. Transfer Credit Transfer credit is limited to six hours at the master’s level and 12 hours at the doctoral level. Any formal withdrawal shall constitute a forfeiture of any and all rights to a subsequent make-up of incompletes. Withdrawals are not permitted after the end of the twelfth week of a regular semester. Transfer Credit forms are available in the Graduate School. Any such graduate credit must have been earned at an accredited graduate school and completed within the six-year statute of limitations. and the course is not shown on students’ academic records. Only credit hours are transferable. Withdrawal from a course after the start of the fourth week and up to and including the twelfth week of a regular semester will be considered a partial enrollment for which a grade of W (withdrew) will be recorded. . Withdrawal from a course prior to the start of the fourth week of a regular semester is considered a cancellation of enrollment. Credit for transfer work will be recommended by the major program advisor to the Graduate School only after the student has completed the same number of credit hours at The University of Tulsa with at least a 3. The major program advisor is responsible for determining the applicability of transfer work to the student’s program. Credits earned under the Study Abroad program will appear on the University of Tulsa transcript with grades of either “P” or “F”. Transfer credit will not be granted for any course work with a grade below B.0 grade-point average. Course work used to satisfy requirements for one graduate degree may not be used to meet the requirements for a second graduate degree. No transcript is issued for students who have not met their financial obligations to the university. Non-Voluntary Withdrawal from a Course. The schedule for withdrawal from courses and refund of tuition is printed in the schedule of courses for each semester. Students may be withdrawn from a class for habitual behavior that prevents the student or other students from fulfilling the purposes implied by registration in the university. All transfer credit is subject to final approval by the Dean of the Graduate School. any grades associated with transferred credit hours will not transfer and will not be included when computing the student’s GPA at the University of Tulsa.

Following the expiration of the contract deadline or one calendar year. including the initial grade in a course that is repeated. All course work taken for graduate credit is computed in the average. after consultation with the Graduate School. It is the responsibility of the student to fulfill the requirements for the course within a maximum of one calendar year from the date on which the course was originally to have been completed. certain College of Law courses. certain internship work. dissertation. to be signed by the instructor and by the student. a symbol (IZ) will be added to the transcript indicating that the course is no longer valid and the incomplete may not be removed. The faculty may give a maximum of one calendar year for completion of the work or specify less than one calendar year on the contract. . It is the graduate student’s responsibility to consult with her/his faculty advisor regarding such requirements and to meet such requirements in order to be properly certified or licensed.0 is required in all graduate work taken at The University of Tulsa. a Record of Incomplete form must be completed and filed in the Graduate School Office.The Graduate School 23 Scholarship Grades An overall scholastic average of 3. Thesis and dissertation enrollments are evaluated on a pass-fail basis. for an acceptable reason. The thesis or dissertation supervisor will submit a grade change form when the student has either ceased work on the research or completed all requirements for graduation. Thesis and dissertation enrollments are evaluated on a pass-fail basis. If the student is unable to do so because of circumstances beyond his or her control. When the instructor grants an incomplete. No graduate credit is earned for a course in which the student received a grade below a C. These regulations do not apply to theses or dissertations in which completion of the course work is not usually required at the end of the semester. This form. Grades earned in the College of Law are not computed in the graduate grade-point average. and credit earned through study abroad. the student may petition the instructor of the course and the Dean of the Graduate School for an extension of time. Certification or Licensure The process of certification or licensure in some disciplines may require that the graduate student submit to and pass a background check. The thesis or dissertation supervisor will submit a grade change form when the student has ceased work on the research or has completed all requirements for graduation. with the exception of thesis. An I (Incomplete) is assigned at the end of each semester when the thesis or dissertation is in progress. but. a grade of F (Fail) may be assigned in place of an I (Incomplete) by the thesis or dissertation advisor if the advisor does not believe that sufficient progress towards completion of the thesis or dissertation is being achieved. if an earlier deadline is not specified. at the time grades are reported. No graduate credit will be given for work receiving a pass/fail grade. should specify what must be done to remove the incomplete and give a deadline for completion of the unfinished work. certain master’s reports. Incompletes An I (Incomplete) grade indicates that some portion of the student’s work is lacking. An I (Incomplete) is assigned at the end of each semester when the thesis or dissertation is in progress.

a student on probation may be allowed to enroll in up to nine additional credit hours to achieve the required 3. Exceptions for additional hours beyond the 9 hours to achieve the required 3. Students should seek clarification from the Dean as to how this affects their academic status as a full-time or part-time student. Only courses taken at The University of Tulsa will be used to determine the grade point average for the purpose of removing probation.0 average in the first nine hours of graduate work and within a specified time period. The Graduate School will notify the student if the Dean approves the requested leave. it is possible to validate six of the out-of-date hours to be applied toward future work on the degree.24 The Graduate School Academic Standing Statute of Limitations The work for a degree must be completed within six years. A more stringent statute of limitations may be imposed under the particular requirements of individual programs. Probation and Dismissal Prospective students having a cumulative grade point average below a 3. The student should check with the Office of Student Financial Services regarding the effect of a leave on loan obligations. . When all work toward the degree is out-of-date.0 cumulative grade point average in graduate courses at the end of any semester or summer session will be placed on probation.0 or marginal test scores may be admitted on probation and must establish a 3. etc. Graduate work more than six years old must be validated by the department for currentness in the discipline. the student may be dismissed from the graduate program. the student’s knowledge resulting from this graduate work must be determined to be current and the student deemed competent by examinations. Upon approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.g. A student who allows the time limit to expire and is subsequently readmitted must also meet the new requirements for the degree as stipulated by the program at the time of readmission. All petitions for extension must be recommended by the student’s advisor and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. completion of specified graduate courses with specified minimum grades.0 after the additional nine hours. the six-year statute of limitations regarding course credit is still in effect. and within one semester of enrollment for full-time students or three semesters for part-time students. Students who have not maintained a 3. In addition. successful completion of deficiency courses. Leave of Absence A leave of absence will be considered for up to one academic year for medical or other extenuating circumstances upon submission of documents to the Dean of the Graduate School. If the average is not improved to 3. However. or by other means of evaluation at the discretion of the major program. This policy remains in effect even if a student is absent or not enrolled during several semesters. Additional requirements (e. Any financial support currently being provided to the student may or may not be available upon the student’s return.) may be placed on a student who is admitted probationally.0 average are granted on a case-by-case basis upon recommendation of the major program and with the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.0 graduate grade point average. Failure to meet any of the conditions of probation may lead to dismissal from the Graduate School.

the thesis or dissertation should be deposited with the library by April 15 for graduation in May. even if he or she is in good academic standing. If a student has not made satisfactory progress toward the degree program because of incompletes in course work.The Graduate School 25 If a student in a joint-degree program is placed on probation or dismissed by either the College of Law or the Graduate School. failure to maintain the standards of academic. the student must be enrolled the semester of graduation. the falsification of application materials. although the petition may come too late for their names to appear in that semester’s commencement program. The petition represents an exception to policy and will be considered only under extraordinary circumstances. but only under extraordinary circumstances. failure to satisfy stipulations imposed upon admission to the program. all incompletes for courses being applied to the degree must be removed from the student’s record. This includes. the student will be obliged to satisfy the normal requirements of the college selected. A student may be dismissed from the Graduate School for reasons other than poor grades. If a requirement for the degree is completion of a thesis or dissertation. as determined by the Dean of the College of Law or the Dean of the Graduate School. Each candidate is expected to attend the ceremonies. this includes having their names printed in the commencement program. and the student’s academic progress is evaluated. grades are submitted. or professional integrity expected in a particular discipline or program. The student may opt to continue pursuing studies within the other college. that action shall pertain only to the student’s status within the particular college taking the action. the student may be placed on probation and further enrollment may be affected until the work is submitted for the incomplete courses. In such cases. The Master’s and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are conferred at the first commencement exercises after the completion of all graduation requirements. To graduate and receive a diploma. However. A degree card should be filed in the Graduate School when a student enrolls for the final semester of the degree program. In such cases. all academic degree requirements must be completed. Enrolled students who complete all degree requirements and deposit the final drafts of their thesis or dissertation in the library after April 15 or December 1 but before the respective May or December commencement may graduate that semester upon review and approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. and all indebtedness to the university must be satisfied. which may include credit for some work done in the other college. May Commencement Policy Deserving non-thesis graduate students who have no more than six credit hours remaining to complete all the requirements for their degree by the end of the summer session will be permitted to take part in May graduation ceremonies. Please call the Graduate School for information about what the petition must include and when it is due. or by the last day of classes for summer graduation. the student must petition both the advisor and the Graduate School in writing. . by December 1 to graduate at the conclusion of the fall semester. Exceptions will be considered. Degree Card and Graduation Students who fulfill all requirements for their degree will be graduated at the end of the semester in which the requirements were met. students who wish to participate in commencement exercises must petition their advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School in writing by April 15 (for spring) or December 1 (for fall). ethical. but is not limited to. and failure to satisfy other program or Graduate School requirements in a timely fashion as defined by established policies.

from outside the university. No fewer than two and in most cases no more than six credit hours may be earned by the thesis or creative production. The student should submit three copies of the corrected thesis on 25 percent rag or cotton content bond paper to the Graduate School. time. Theses are graded on a pass-fail basis. Candidates must follow the guidelines for preparing a thesis set forth in “The Preparation of the Master’s Thesis and Doctoral Dissertation”. Not more than six credit hours of approved graduate work completed in residence elsewhere may be accepted for credit toward the degree. and programs may have additional requirements. The Graduate School will initiate the completion of an “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form and the student will complete a Thesis/Dissertation . with the Dean’s approval. It is strongly recommended that a student and his/her thesis advisor make prior arrangements to cover such costs. the requirement may be satisfied by a creative production of acceptable quality. Students are responsible for compliance with all Graduate School requirements as set forth in this Bulletin. At least one member of the committee shall be from outside the major program or discipline or. A copy of the thesis must be presented to the Graduate School. Residence Candidates for most master’s degrees at The University of Tulsa must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of graduate study. with a Signature Page signed by the student’s committee members. and place of the oral examination at least two weeks prior to the oral examination to allow time to process the appropriate paperwork in preparation for the student’s completion. The student will be notified when the manuscript has been reviewed and is responsible for making any necessary corrections. page 20. In the case of creative work such as art and writing.) Thesis Many programs require a candidate for the master’s degree to submit a thesis presenting the results of scholarly investigation of a topic connected with the major field of study. composed of at least three members of the graduate faculty for the purpose of providing advice and guidance.26 The Graduate School Master’s Degree Requirements The following are minimum requirements only. The committee will examine the thesis and report to the chair supervising the research or creative work. The thesis committee must be recommended by the program administration to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval. (See Graduate Residency. The establishment of the thesis committee. All graduate students must be enrolled during the final semester of completion of degree requirements. The Graduate School Office should receive a request to set the date. The thesis shall be presented before final typing to the thesis committee in preparation for the thesis defense or oral examination. An individual advisor or thesis director should be chosen as soon as practical in accordance with department policies. for review. available in the Graduate School Office and on the Graduate School website. Any travel-related or other associated costs for a student or faculty member to participate in a thesis defense are the responsibility of the student and will not be reimbursed by the Graduate School. should also occur early in the student’s research endeavor in order to maximize the committee’s benefit to the student.

For more information please see page 221 of this bulletin. Combined Bachelor’s / Master’s Degree Programs Outstanding students in Applied Mathematics. Engineering Physics. These are discussed in the appropriate sections on specific program requirements. Chemistry. These programs have been developed to allow exceptional students the opportunity to complete a Bachelor’s degree and a Master’s degree in a reduced amount of time. although their petitions to participate may come too late for their names to appear in that semester’s commencement program. Students who deposit the final draft of their thesis in the library after April 15 or December 1 but before the respective May or December commencement may graduate that semester upon review and approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. and the external funding source. Some programs offer curricula not requiring a thesis. History. The deadline for students graduating at the end of the fall semester is December 1. Comprehensive Examination or Qualifying Examination Candidates may be required by the major program to pass an oral or written comprehensive examination in the major and minor fields in addition to the regular course examinations. at the time of the thesis proposal submission or approval of the thesis topic by the advisor and prior to the commencement of the research. The student will then submit the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form to the Business Office and it must be signed and dated by the Business Office after payment of all fees. If the thesis is not deposited in the Library within six months after the successful completion of the thesis defense. one copy of which is to be bound with the thesis. an appropriate university officer. and the summer deadline is the last day of summer classes. The student should then return the completed “Approval and Binding of Thesis and Dissertation” form showing the signatures to the Graduate School. These combined degree programs encourage students to complete graduate level work as undergraduates and typically permit a restricted number of 5000-level courses to be applied to both the undergraduate and graduate degree programs. and additional copies are to be filed with the librarian and the Graduate School Office. Students graduating at the end of the spring semester must complete their oral examinations and deposit the final drafts of their theses in the library by April 15. Chemical Engineering. An abstract of not more than 150 words shall be prepared by the candidate. the student may be required to re-defend and update the thesis. if any. Biochemistry. Master of Fine Arts Degree The Master of Fine Arts degree is a 60-hour program offered only through the School of Art. All theses will be bound and available in the library upon submission and acceptance by the Graduate School. Any exceptions must be agreed to in writing by the Dean of the Graduate School. and Physics may be considered for admission to combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree programs. See requirements in the Art portion of the Graduate Bulletin for specific information. . The thesis copies and the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form are then delivered to the Periodical Desk in McFarlin Library and the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form must be signed and dated by the library to verify delivery of the copies for binding.The Graduate School 27 form.

Any exception to the doctoral degree requirements must be approved by the major program administration and the Dean of the Graduate School. Comprehensive Examination or Qualifying Examination Candidates may be required by the major program to pass an oral or written comprehensive examination in the major and minor fields in addition to the regular course examinations. English Language and Literature. At least two consecutive semesters in residence at The University of Tulsa as a full-time student are required.28 The Graduate School Doctoral Degree Requirements The following are minimum requirements only. Geosciences. Some doctoral programs require a minimum of 90 hours (60 hours beyond the master’s degree). and Petroleum Engineering. Not more than 12 hours of approved graduate work completed after the master’s degree and in residence elsewhere may be accepted for credit toward the degree. available in the Graduate School Office and on the Graduate School website. The dissertation committee must be recommended by the program administration to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval. Candidacy A student who is admitted to a doctoral degree program is not a candidate for a doctoral degree until he or she has passed a qualifying examination or comprehensive examination. After approval of the dissertation topic by the appropriate committee within the program. . After the recommendation is approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. A doctoral student must enroll in at least one credit hour of Dissertation. Information regarding comprehensive exams. should also occur early enough in the student’s research endeavor to give the student the full benefit of the committee’s counsel. Students are responsible for compliance with all Graduate School requirements as set forth in this Bulletin. Computer Science. Industrial/Organizational Psychology. The dissertation shall be presented before final typing to the dissertation committee. and has an approved proposal or prospectus for a dissertation topic. Clinical Psychology. Candidates must follow the guidelines for preparing a dissertation set forth in “The Preparation of the Master’s Thesis and Doctoral Dissertation”. composed of graduate faculty for the purpose of providing advice and guidance concerning the student’s research. Mechanical Engineering. and other specific requirements may be found under Biological Science. the student’s department will recommend the student for candidacy. Dissertation An individual advisor or dissertation director should be chosen as soon as practical in accordance with department policies. Chemical Engineering. Residence Candidates for doctoral degrees must complete a minimum of 72 credit hours of graduate study. dissertation committee structure. the student is then a candidate for the doctoral degree. programs may have additional requirements. The establishment of the dissertation committee.

the student might have missed the deadline for having their name printed in the respective commencement program. . for review. All dissertations will be bound and available in the library upon submission and acceptance by the Graduate School. A copy of the dissertation must be presented to the Graduate School. All dissertations must be microfilmed and an abstract published in Dissertation Abstracts. The dissertation copies. The student should submit three copies of the corrected dissertation on 25 percent rag or cotton content bond paper to the Graduate School. The deadline for students graduating at the end of the fall semester is December 1. and the external funding source. Any exceptions must be agreed to in writing by the Dean of the Graduate School. Students who deposit the final draft of their dissertation in the library after April 15 or December 1 but before the respective May or December commencement may graduate that semester upon review and approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. Dissertations are graded on a pass-fail basis. The committee will examine the dissertation and report to the chair supervising the research or creative work. time. An abstract of not more than 350 words shall be prepared by the candidate. if any. an appropriate university officer. at the time of the dissertation proposal submission and prior to the commencement of the research. It is strongly recommended that a student and his/her dissertation advisor make prior arrangements to cover such costs. The student will then submit the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form to the Business Office and it must be signed and dated by the Business Office after payment of all fees. The Graduate School will also provide doctoral students with a Microfilm Agreement form that must be completed and submitted to the Library. and additional copies are to be filed with the librarian and the Graduate School Office. Students graduating at the end of the spring semester must complete their oral examinations and deposit the final drafts of their dissertation in the library by April 15. The Graduate School will initiate the completion of an “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form and the student will complete a Thesis/Dissertation form. Microfilming costs must be paid by the candidate unless a signed contract for commercial publication of the entire dissertation can be produced. and Microfilm Agreement form are then delivered to the Periodical Desk in McFarlin Library and the “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form must be signed and dated by the library to verify delivery of the copies for binding.The Graduate School 29 The Graduate School Office should receive a request to set the date. The student will be notified when the manuscript has been reviewed and is responsible for making any necessary corrections. Any travel-related or other associated costs for a student or faculty member to participate in a dissertation defense are the responsibility of the student and will not be reimbursed by the Graduate School. one copy of which is to be bound with the dissertation. In such cases. and the deadline for summer graduation is the last day of summer classes. with a Signature Page signed by the student’s committee members. “Approval and Binding of Thesis or Dissertation” form. If the dissertation is not deposited in the Library within six months after the successful completion of the dissertation defense. The student should then return the completed “Approval and Binding of Thesis and Dissertation” form showing the signatures to the Graduate School. and place of the oral examination at least two weeks prior to the oral examination. the student may be required to re-defend and update the dissertation.

For further details concerning jurisdiction. that member participates in the deliberations regarding the petition. . and the Dean of the Graduate School. The Committee conveys its findings and recommendations in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School. When a committee member is from the department where the petition originates. the Chair of the Department. along with any written statements of evidence presented. The petitioner has the right to see contrary evidence submitted to the committee and to write a rebuttal. Committee membership includes at least one graduate faculty member from each college offering graduate study. The Committee makes recommendations to the Dean regarding the disposition of: • student petitions requesting departure from established Graduate School policies. the Committee elects the vice-chair. but neither chairs the Committee nor votes on the disposition of the petition. and a majority of three committee members is needed to sustain a charge. who presides in the absence of the chair and also in cases in which the petition being considered originates in the chair’s college. the Graduate Program Advisor. A copy of the written record is available to the petitioner upon request. The petition is available to anyone against whom allegations are made so that those individuals may have the opportunity to respond. A tie vote indicates that the charge was not proven and is therefore rejected. Costs incurred in producing the copy are the responsibility of the petitioner. The Dean of the Graduate School designates the chair. procedures. a department. and confidentiality issues concerning The Committee for Petitions of the Graduate Council. The person bringing the complaint must file the petition with the Graduate School during the semester in which the incident occurred. The Committee elects a secretary who keeps the minutes of all meetings. but only at the Committee’s invitation. Only academic issues involving procedures and affecting status in the graduate program are considered. Written records of the proceedings are preserved for three years. call the Graduate School Office. The petitioner and any accused person may see the final report and may write a response to be kept with the final report. • etitions involving charges of academic misconduct involving graduate students (these p cases may be brought by the student or by the faculty member involved). and the Committee may also invite other concerned parties to attend. Any appeals concerning the outcome of the petition may be addressed to the Provost of The University of Tulsa and must be submitted within one month after the petitioner or accused person has been notified of the outcome. • etitions involving a perceived academic impropriety arising from an action taken by an p instructor. The petitioners may appear before the Committee. Three or more committee members constitute a quorum. or during the subsequent two semesters. or a committee charged to administer academic policies of a particular department or college. but only after attempts have been made to resolve the problems by discussions with relevant faculty members.30 The Graduate School The Committee for Petitions of the Graduate Council The Committee for Petitions of the Graduate Council considers petitions submitted in writing by any person who believes that he or she was treated improperly on a graduate academic matter.

semester and year-long programs. Study Abroad The University of Tulsa is committed to offering its graduate students opportunities to acquire international and cross-cultural experience and learn a foreign language. and plans are underway to take advantage of additional exchange opportunities. The University of Tulsa chapter. In 1900. as well as satisfy other graduation requirements. This is held during the spring semester to give students additional public speaking experience and to encourage their research endeavors. Inductees may include a maximum of 10 percent of the graduate students in the university. in conjunction with the Graduate School. Phi Kappa Phi elects members from all recognized branches of academic endeavor. Graduate Student Association The Graduate Student Association helps organize the Annual Student Research Colloquium as well as other campus functions. TU offers a wide selection of international study options where students can choose courses in all disciplines and apply them towards their majors. Honor Societies Phi Kappa Phi was founded in 1897 as the Lambda Sigma Eta Society at the University of Maine. . Annual Student Research Colloquium Students. TU has international exchange partnerships with universities throughout the world. These programs aid students with their research expenses (Student Research Grant Program) and assist with expenses associated with attendance at professional meetings to present their scholarly research (Student Travel Grants and Chapman Graduate Scholar Presentation Awards). The winners are announced and cash awards are presented at a Student Research Colloquium Awards Banquet. the society added chapters at the Pennsylvania State College (now Pennsylvania State University) and the University of Tennessee and was renamed Phi Kappa Phi. The student members elect the association’s president. The Center for Global Education office can also arrange overseas internships for credit. organize an Annual Student Research Colloquium. For details. Students can choose from several study abroad options. The purpose of the programs is to encourage students in their research endeavors and in the presentation of their scholarly works in a professional forum. The students’ presentations are judged according to criteria that are commonly used at scholarly professional meetings. is one of over 250 chapters in the United States. who conducts the organization’s meetings and also serves as a student member on the Graduate Council. inquire at the Graduate School Office or the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. Members are selected on the basis of high academic achievement and good character. chartered in 1990.The Graduate School 31 Special Services and Programs Available to Graduate Students Competitive Research Grants and Awards The Graduate School and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs offer several programs in which students may compete for awards. including summer.

utulsa. Life Skills Workshop Series This workshop series provides TU graduate students with skills outside their disciplines that will build their professional competencies and maximize their options to succeed in their careers and lives. the series also deals with issues such as stress. which allow them to acquire proficiencies in a specialized area of study without having to fulfill all of the requirements of a degree program. or visit the Center’s website: www.edu/graduate/LifeSkillsCalendar. interested students must visit the Center for Global Education office six months prior to the semester in which they wish to study abroad and must submit a special application form. Most certificate programs require completion of 15 to 27 credit hours of advanced coursework. Room 210. Each workshop. The Center for Student Academic Support All students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with. such as tutoring. call the Graduate School Office (918) 6312336 or visit the Life Skills workshop website: www. For details about workshop dates. Many of the hours that count toward a certificate may also count toward a degree should the student decide to enroll in a degree program. Certificate Programs Graduate students may complete certificate programs. Students with disabilities should advise the Center for Student Academic Support of their needs in order to facilitate their rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Certificates are currently offered in Finance. and other topics. Information Security. academic counseling. Call (918) 631-2315 for more information. Certificates can be earned by individuals who already possess one or more college degrees or who have otherwise been admitted as special students. The Graduate School recognizes the unique pressures that graduate students encounter during their academic studies. and developing study skills. . seminar. The center also provides confidential consultations for any student with academic concerns as well as for students with disabilities. ethical decisions. or panel discussion focuses on an issue that relates to the student’s academic career and beyond.edu/academicsupport. services provided by the center. and locations.32 The Graduate School In addition to consulting and securing approval from their graduate program advisor and the Graduate School. topics. as well as Respecialization in I/O Psychology.htm. In addition to career development skills. The center is located in Lorton Hall.utulsa. and take advantage of.

or visit the ORAU Home Page www.org. such as the Ralph E.The Graduate School 33 Career Services The Office of Career Services provides a comprehensive set of services to assist students and alumni in the development of career plans and specific strategies leading to a desired employment goal.htm. Monnie E. and to organize research alliances among its members. Activities include faculty development programs. employment and recruitment. Department of Energy (DOE) located in Oak Ridge.and engineering-related disciplines. career counseling and assessment. This office specializes in career planning. Many of these programs are especially designed to increase the numbers of underrepresented minority students pursuing degrees in science. the CSGS Master’s Thesis Award. ORAU is a consortium of 98 colleges and universities and a contractor for the U. ORAU’s Office of Partnership Development seeks opportunities for partnerships and alliances among ORAU’s members.orau. undergraduates. consortium research funding initiatives. and major federal facilities. which is available at www. In addition. and offers a Graduate School admission workshop. as well as faculty enjoy access to a multitude of opportunities for study and research. and mathematics. A comprehensive listing of these programs and other opportunities. since 1993 students and faculty of the University of Tulsa have benefited from its membership in Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). and the MAGS Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award. ocean sciences. physics. Awards include the CGS/UMI Distinguished Dissertation Award. to keep its members informed about opportunities for fellowship. and details on locations and benefits can be found in the ORISE Catalog of Education and Training Programs. and research appointments. their disciplines. Tennessee. scholarship. the Visiting Industrial Scholars Program.gov/orise/educ. epidemiology. nuclear chemistry. For further information contact the office at resume@utulsa. job fairs and career days. or by calling either of the contacts below. Graduate School Memberships The Graduate School is a member of the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS). the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS).orau. Champion. . earth sciences. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Awards. Appointment and program length range from one month to four years. Haggerty. ORAU works with its member institutions to help their students and faculty gain access to federal research facilities throughout the country. geological sciences.edu or call 918-631-2549. internships. postgraduates. Through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). the DOE facility that ORAU operates. biomedical sciences.S. engineering. and the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) and enrolled students are eligible for awards offered by these groups. graduates. Students can participate in programs covering a wide variety of disciplines including business. pharmacology. For more information about ORAU and its programs contact: Janet A. ORAU Corporate Secretary at (865) 576-3306. private industry. Dean of the Graduate School at (918) 631-2336. faculty research. and support programs as well as services to chief research officers.

34 The Graduate School Financial Assistance Fellowships and Teaching and Research Assistantships The university offers a number of different fellowships and assistantships to full-time graduate students. be in good academic standing. awards are made upon the recommendation of the applicant’s discipline. and may therefore jeopardize the continuation of the student’s good academic standing. Any request for an exception to this policy must be submitted in writing to the Graduate Program Advisor and the assistantship supervisor and must receive their approval as well as that of the Dean of the Graduate School. Foster Brooks Parriott Graduate Scholarships. The Dean will consider only requests for exceptions when employment will benefit the student’s career development or in instances of severe financial need. Any violation of this policy may result in the immediate termination of the assistantship. The application deadline for most types of assistance is February 1. Awards that are competitive outside a specific degree program are initiated by student self-nomination and are determined by the administration. Students awarded financial assistance must be enrolled in at least nine but not more than 12 credit hours of graduate work during a regular semester (fall and spring). Application and reference forms are available from the Graduate School in Lorton Hall 201. Students must apply for the teaching and research assistantships. and Bellwether Fellowships have an application deadline of January 15. Special permission is required to deviate from these hours except for two sequential regular semesters in a master’s program or four sequential regular semesters in a doctoral program when the student was enrolled in at least nine hours per semester for the prior two sequential regular semesters.0 grade point average. No assistantship or combination of assistantships for a given student may exceed 20 hours of duties per week. John S. The Ben Henneke Research Fellowships. . Tuition scholarship awards of up to nine credit hours remission of tuition per semester will be based on academic achievement. Recipients of an assistantship must reapply in order to be considered in subsequent years and must satisfy all reporting requirements. fellowships.edu/graduate/Forms. and recipients will be announced in early April. Stipends vary according to the amount of work required and the experience of the student. Zink Fellowships.htm. Wilfred Woobank Graduate Assistantships. Reapplication is not automatic. Students must also maintain a 3. Employment beyond the 20 hours associated with assistantships may place either the student’s academic performance or that individual’s performance on the assistantship at risk. Students on probation are not eligible for consideration. The University of Tulsa maintains that a full-time graduate student receiving a graduate assistantship has a full-time commitment.utulsa. and be on-track to complete their degree program. and scholarships may be downloaded from the following website: www. Any employment in addition to the assistantship is specifically prohibited. Forms for graduate assistantships.

These positions. application forms are available from the Graduate School Office. but may vary by college or department. are available only through the English Department and are designated for English graduate students. John S. established in memory of Foster Brooks Parriott by the Parriott family. Application deadline is January 15. Graduate Assistantships in Publications. The award carries a 9-month stipend of $12. or psychology). you must be admitted to The University of Tulsa. art. Open to students pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees. Zink Fellowship for Students with Physical Disabilities. These include positions as editorial assistants to the editors of the James Joyce Quarterly and Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature. Foster Brooks Parriott Graduate Scholarships. The recipients . Application deadline is January 15. The applicant must be a citizen of the United States and either be seeking full-time enrollment or be enrolled full-time in a master’s degree program within the Arts and Humanities (anthropology. Wilfred Woobank Graduate Assistantships. speech-language pathology. The award carries a minimum stipend of $15. Stipend: $11. as well as six credit hours of summer tuition when appropriate. Stipend: at least $11. The applicant must be a citizen of the United States and either be seeking full-time enrollment or be enrolled full-time in a graduate degree program within the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. Bellwether Fellowships. intended to foster interaction between the scholar and the department. Application deadline is January 15. This award honors the university’s first Trustees Professor of Humanities and President Emeritus. are awarded annually on the basis of scholastic achievement and need. be in good academic standing. English language and literature. The awards may be designated for one year or may be awarded for up to three years of study for the master’s or four years for the doctoral degree.020 and tuition scholarship for nine credit hours each semester. To qualify. Collins College of Business. Application deadline is January 15. Ben Graf Henneke. applications are available from the Graduate School Office.000 and nine credit hours of tuition for each of the fall and spring semesters. at least $12. Bellwether fellowship recipients are expected to be leaders in their respective disciplines and trendsetters for The University of Tulsa doctoral degree. and the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. history. Ben Henneke Research Fellowships. The scholarship includes up to 24 credit hours of tuition for the year. applications are available from the Graduate School Office. Fellowship amounts are variable and awarded on the basis of need.020 for two semesters and remission of tuition for nine credit hours per semester for a student pursuing a doctoral degree program within the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. There is a 10-hour per week service component to the Wilfred Woobank Assistantship. not typically awarded to first semester students. Recipients must carry at least nine credit hours of course work per semester. This endowed fellowship is available to aid TU students with physical disabilities. qualify for services provided by The Center for Student Academic Support. Workload: Teaching two courses or the equivalent in research activities or administrative office activities for approximately 20 hours per week.000 for 9 months and includes 18 or 19 credit hours of tuition scholarship.594 to $12. applications are available from the Graduate School Office. A number of these scholarships. and is given to students in any graduate program. and be registered to receive those services.594 for two semesters and remission of tuition for nine credit hours per semester for students pursuing a master’s degree program within the Colleges of Arts and Sciences.The Graduate School 35 Types of Assistance The stipends in this section are typical of stipends awarded to graduate students at The University of Tulsa. education. Teaching/Research/Administrative Office Assistantships.

Any enrolled graduate student who is a senior author on an abstract and orally presenting research conducted at the University of Tulsa may apply.000 for 12 months. All full-time. Application deadline is January 15.36 The Graduate School will receive an award up to 21 credit hours in tuition. milestones. The maximum amount of an individual award will be $1000 at the master’s degree level and $1500 at the doctoral degree level. Loan Funds. and individuals offer a variety of graduate scholarships. Recipients are often chosen only from among applicants interested in fields prescribed by the donors.) . Inquiries regarding loans should be made to the Office of Student Financial Services. businesses. fees. Educator Tuition Scholarship.D. Applications for support during an academic year must be submitted by the end of the second week of classes during the fall or spring semesters. applications are available from the Graduate School Office. (See pages 49-56. To be eligible for an award. for a summer presentation. a doctoral student must be admitted to candidacy (passed all qualifying or comprehensive exams and successfully defended the prospectus or dissertation proposal) and can demonstrate a good track record with respect to timely completion of Ph. Other Scholarships. and University housing for up to 12 months. the request must be submitted by the end of the second week of the spring semester. or books. Candidates for the award are expected to be in the writing stage of their dissertation work with the majority of the research (and data collection where applicable) completed. These may include full or partial payment of tuition. Chapman Graduate Scholar Presentation Awards. stipend of $12. Certain corporations. Information on these awards may be obtained from the Graduate School Office or from the discipline in which the student plans to study. The University of Tulsa Chapman Graduate Scholar Presentation Awards Program provides assistance for graduate students to present their scholarship in a national or international forum to enhance the student’s career opportunities. Oklahoma elementary or secondary school teachers and administrators who qualify for admission to the Graduate School and wish to enroll on a part-time basis may apply for a two-thirds tuition scholarship by completing the scholarship form and returning it to the University of Tulsa Graduate School on or before the time of enrollment.

Open stacks provide easy access to materials. patents. notably in petroleum. which allows patrons to conduct much of their library business online. . Offices for Information Services staff are located in Zink Hall and in McFarlin Library. and a wide-reaching Interlibrary Loan system. government documents. microforms.edu. includes a complete file of U. Graduate students at The University of Tulsa have direct access to the library’s holdings of more than three million items that include more than 10. maintains an extensive collection of articles. which provides patrons with materials from libraries around the world. which consists of over 500. serves as the academic heart of the University. serials.Information Services 37 InformatIon ServIceS The Information Services homepage is at www.000 electronic journals. Library McFarlin Library. McFarlin Library is open more than 95 hours each week. digitized University of Tulsa dissertations. McFarlin Library staff provides a wide variety of services including a library instruction program.000 print items and numerous electronic collections pertaining to engineering and physical sciences. maps. Robert McFarlin. 2. British. which strengthens the information literacy skills of members of the university. The document unit also supports the growing body of information issued in electronic format by the government.000 rare books and 3.utulsa. More than 128.lib. It serves the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences with more than 300. literary manuscripts. housed in the library. This collection supports teaching and research across many academic departments and is routinely used in graduate instruction. census reports. 21.utulsa. The Federal Document Depository collection. and Mrs. a flexible circulation system. and Irish literature of the late 19th and 20th centuries and on Native American history and law. In addition.S.000 print journals.is. The homepage can be located at www. These growing collections.500 linear feet of literary and historical manuscripts are shelved in Special Collections.edu. named in honor of the original donors Mr. have achieved an international reputation in the scholarly community. and reports. historical archives. and other materials. focused on American. and extensive collections of electronic reference sources and databases as well as print resources such as books. papers.000 electronic books. McFarlin Library houses and provides access to an outstanding energy collection. the Petroleum Abstracts Document Delivery Service.000 items issued by the Congressional. Judicial and Executive branches.

which is exclusively focused on higher education information technology. including voice mail. and other academic software. The University maintains centralized Unix and MS Windows-based academic and administrative servers that host the enterprise e-mail server. a variety of web services. The central student computer laboratory. faculty and staff have telephone service. All students living in residence halls or in University Square Apartments. A Microsoft Campus Agreement provides all students with licensed access to certain Microsoft desktop products. to the commodity Internet and to Internet2.38 Information Services Computing and Networking Services All students. a variety of development environments. faculty. Administrative information services at the university. This account is used for e-mail access. All students living in residence halls or in University Square Apartments and all faculty and staff are able to connect to a robust university fiber optic Intranet. On the Plaza Level of McFarlin Library. . used to access numerous digital instructional and research materials. tools to support instructional technology and distance education. provides assistance by answering numerous routine user questions and routes other calls to appropriate individuals. the Campus Computer Store personnel have significant expertise in using the web to locate hardware and software from university vendors. All colleges have numerous computer laboratories and high technology classrooms to support contemporary teaching and learning strategies. This lab is available on a 24-hour basis during the week and on a reduced schedule on weekends. is located in McFarlin Library. and staff members automatically receive an access account at The University of Tulsa. including webbased information access. A help desk. database management systems. located in McFarlin Library. are maintained on site and licensed from Datatel. access to university enterprise computing servers and may be required to access other resources across campus.

featuring a solid general legal collection and specialized collections in energy and environmental law and Native American Law. The College of Law. has three legal clinics. The College of Law and the Graduate School offer eleven joint J. or in cozy lounges. a faculty office suite in support of the Writing Program. an alumni suite. College of Law Programs and Admission Requirements.utulsa.Other Academic Resources 39 Other Academic Resources The College of Law The university’s College of Law is a graduate-level college offering a curriculum leading to the juris doctor degree. . three law journals. All faculty members and students of the university have full access to the MLIC. and selected law students may take courses through the Graduate School. 259 electronically wired carrels and tables. Selected graduate and undergraduate students not enrolled in joint degree programs may be permitted to take law courses. faculty. Now with wireless capacity as well. Although its primary constituency is the law faculty and students and members of the local bar. the Student Bar Association and other student organizations. a classroom. by the number of joint graduate-law degree programs it offers.edu/library is an excellent introduction to the many resources and services provided by the staff of nine librarians and a strong support staff. Supreme Court Records and Briefs. functional and award-winning Mabee Legal Information Center which opened in 2000.law. Congressional Information Service publications. (Law students. and three popular computer labs. and United Nations Documents and Publications (Readex Law Library Collection and Human Rights segments). which enrolls about 540 students. special programs. the Board of Advocates. the College of Law offers a number of lectures. The involvement of the College of Law in the life of the university is exemplified by the number of its students who have received their undergraduate education at the university. Alumni returning to their College of Law alma mater to research are still in awe when they see the beautiful. Please contact the Admissions Office at 918-631-2406. and space for NELPI. and by the availability of its legal information center to other students and faculty. All MLIC users have access to a vast number of law related electronic resources in either web based or CD-ROM formats. carrels.) The MLIC has an electronic classroom with laptops. Remote access through the homepage at www.utulsa. In addition./masters degrees.edu.S.000 volumes. and conferences that are open to the entire university community. An extensive collection of materials on microfiche includes U. maintains a 400.law.000volume legal information center. patrons use laptops throughout the MLIC at any of the varied and numerous seating options at tables. The facility is a hub of activity for students and faculty. or view their website at www. inviting reading rooms featuring Native American and International and Comparative decor and collections. and staff also have access to LEXIS and WESTLAW. The MLIC holds more than 400. Mabee Legal Information Center (MLIC). and offers seven certificate programs. It houses three student journal offices.D. the MLIC is also increasingly a campus-wide resource for interdisciplinary programs created jointly by the College of Law and other colleges and departments. Native American Reference Collection.

Each program seeks to expose students to and encourage the adoption of the professional ethics that facilitate good lawyering. second and third-year students. state. Accordingly. TU law students work on these publications and other programs with NELPI. This courtroom is designed for the future of legal instruction. factual investigations. NELPI provides the Tulsa community and students with the opportunity to learn about energy and environmental issues related through symposia and presentations as well as publications. negotiating with other attorneys. the Boesche Legal Clinic offers two clinical programs: the Immigrant Rights Project (opened in fall 2006) and the Social Enterprise & Economic Development (SEED) Law Project (beginning spring 2008). NELPI’s primary focus is the nexus between energy and the environment. Although each of these areas has independent significance. broadcast and recording capabilities.40 Other Academic Resources Boesche Legal Clinic.800 square foot. NELPI promotes energy reliability. several offices for staff attorneys and legal fellows. and international legal regimes are squarely within NELPI’s mission. Considerations of general principles of governance and compliance with regulations. Through the various clinical programs of the Boesche Legal Clinic. .law. including local. Depending on the clinical program. National Energy-Environment Law and Policy Institute (NELPI). and researching legislation and public policy. regional. Energy and Resources. and a healthy environment. The Boesche Legal Clinic was established in 1994. students gain experience interviewing and counseling clients. engaging in a robust educational program through The University of Tulsa College of Law. The room is no longer called a “moot courtroom” because it is a working courtroom. as they begin to develop their professional advocacy skills. Price Turpen Courtroom. It publishes the Year in Review. It includes such things as a state-of-the art sound system. The Boesche Legal Clinic functions much as a real law firm does. Students may earn a certificate in resource. case planning. sustainable use of natural resources. Currently. natural resources. examination and preparation of witnesses. and a student workroom with working space for 16 law students. students explore and begin to develop the fundamental professional skills involved in practicing law. The faculty of the Boesche Legal Clinic exposes students through direct experience to the formation and development of the attorney-client relationship and accompanying professional obligations. document drafting. energy and environmental law.utulsa. please contact Professor Cathy Cullem at (918) 631-2464. written and oral advocacy. federal.edu/nelpi/. being the venue for several Oklahoma civil and criminal appeals cases each year. NELPI publishes the Energy Law Journal in conjunction with the Energy Bar Association. The National EnergyEnvironment Law and Policy Institute (NELPI) serves the public interest through education and research in energy. During their time in the Clinic. offices for three faculty members. as well as videoconferencing technology and wireless network access. or visit the NELPI website at www. in conjunction with the ABA Section on Environment. and environmental law and policy. For more information. represent clients in a wide variety of matters. state of the art clinic building that includes two client interview rooms. a conference room. representing real clients with real problems. working closely with faculty members. The Law School’s new Price Turpen Courtroom was dedicated in April 2003. It is located in a 3.

Also. workshops. through the division’s unabridged education program. The Mabee Legal Information Center employs a law librarian whose primary job is to manage the world class collection of Indian and Indigenous materials. Lifelong Learning at The University of Tulsa The Division of Lifelong Learning at The University of Tulsa serves as the academic outreach for the university. contact: (918) 631-3088. Engineering and Natural Sciences. and an active Native American Law Students’ Association. (918) 631-2215. The University of Tulsa College of Law boasts several full-time faculty specializing in Indian law. The Native American Law Center (NALC) is the umbrella organization overseeing various aspects of TU’s Indian law programs. . It offers twelve specialized Indian law courses. In addition.D. Operating within the colleges of Arts and Sciences. and professional certificate programs. degree) in Indian law. For Business. individuals in the Tulsa community may attend selected courses for personal enrichment at a greatly reduced cost. Opportunities are available for students to work with the NALC Professors on cutting edge issues of Indian law. conferences. as well as several academic programs for interested students. Business. many of which are taught each year. A wide range of non-credit courses is offered. The library includes a study room especially dedicated to the Native American Collection. Its programs represent each of the university’s academic colleges. The College of Law also offers a summer study abroad program focusing on international Indigenous peoples’ issues. short courses. For additional information regarding any of our programs. within the original borders of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Lifelong Learning serves a world-wide market through the provision of non-credit public and customized in-company seminars. and the Provost’s office. please contact: (918) 631-2070.Other Academic Resources 41 Native American Law Center (NALC). Lifelong learning professionals at the university recognize that the information individuals need to prosper increases every day and that continuing education at any age is an investment in the future. as well as work with students using those materials. It was the first law school to offer a certificate program (a specialization as part of the J.M. For Continuing Science and Engineering Programs. humanities and science and professional development. The Tulsa Law Review publishes a wellrespected annual symposium on Indian law. in the arts. (Masters in Law) in American Indian and Indigenous Law. TU College of Law is located in Indian Country. contact the Center for Executive and Professional Development. Many courses meet the mandatory continuing education requirements of professional licensing and certification boards. it has an LL.

. University School The University School at The University of Tulsa was established to offer the city of Tulsa and the state of Oklahoma leadership and service in the field of gifted education. industry. national. Faculty. provides information on program guidelines and procedures. any research project involving human subjects must be submitted to ORSP for approval by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). which train students (undergraduate and graduate) for security careers as professionals in the federal government. students. Student Research Grant Program).utulsa.42 Other Academic Resources Office of Research and Sponsored Programs The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) is responsible for the administration of all research and sponsored program activity. Paralleling the goals of The University of Tulsa of providing excellence in education for academically able adults.utulsa. TU receives funding from various sources including private foundations. and funds student research grants (see the ORSP website www. the University School serves as a model of excellence in education for academically able children.edu/research/ for the full listing of certifications). As a federally funded research institution TU must provide certification for certain assurances (see the ORSP website www. participating in both externally-funded and university-funded scholarship. The University of Tulsa provides University School as a service to the community to demonstrate the high value it places on academic excellence and to provide an alternative educational option for gifted children.edu/research/ under the Internal Funding tab. For example. It is the purpose of ORSP to facilitate your interactions with our office and other administrative offices and to encourage you to further your scholarly pursuits at the University. administers grants and contracts. and international recognition for The University of Tulsa. and federal and state agencies. The mission of University School is to serve as a national model of excellence in pre-college education for students with high academic potential. When animals are to be used in research. TU’s Center for Information Security is the leading institution in the NSF and DoD Cyber Corps programs. and staff at The University of Tulsa (TU) engage in a wide variety of research activities. assists in proposal development. prior approval must be obtained from the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). A by-product of this service and leadership has been local. ORSP helps identify sources of support.

. . . . . .00 Copyright . . . . . . . . required of all students. . . . . . . . . . . . . .065. . . . . . . . . . .00 . . . . . for students in communication disorders courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . or provide proof of equivalent insurance coverage. . . .00 Spring semester. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . nonrefundable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .00 Dissertation and Thesis Fees: Binding (3 required copies) . . . . . . . .00 Motorcycles and mopeds . . . . . . . .00 per credit hour Special Fees Art laboratory supply fees. . . . . . . . required of all international students on temporary visas. . . .annual rate . $ 100. . .annual rate . . . . Proof of insurance must be submitted to the Director of International Student Services. . . . based on 2007-2008.00 Tuition per semester hour.00 Tuition per semester hour. . . . . . . . $ 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application fee. . . .00 Microfilming (required for doctoral candidates) . .00 Parking permits. . . . . graduate studies start date Fall 2008 or later (including audit courses) . . . . . . . . . . .00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .00 Chemistry laboratory fee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .00 . . . . . . .00 Bicycles . . . . . . nonrefundable. . . . Ranges from $25. . $ 15. . . . . . . . spouse. . . and children . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3. . . . $ 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 40. . .Financial Information – Tuition and Fees 43 Financial Information Tuition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .00 Professional liability insurance. . . . . . . . . Housing and Dining Tuition and Fees Figures in this section are for the Fall 2008 semester and are subject to change without notice at the beginning of any semester or summer term. . . . . .00 Student Association Fee-10 or more credit hours . . . . . . . . . .$ 3. . . . . . . . $ 100. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Placement fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and staff (part-time. . . . . . . . . . . . per year . . . . . $ 45. . . . . . . . . . . . . faculty. . . . nonrefundable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rates are estimated. . . . . . . . $ 30. . day. . . $ 940. . . . . . . . . . . . .00 Student Association Fee-1 to 9 credit hours . . $ 856.00 International Student Services fees: Fall semester. . . . . . . . . . . . $ 55. .00 Student and spouse . . . . . . . . .per year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 25. . nonrefundable 10. . Free ID card replacement . . .00 to $500. . . . $ 30. . . . . . . . . .00 (includes maternity) Student and children . . . $ 817. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Single student . . . . . . . . . . . $ 17.00 Summer term. . . . . .per year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . International students are required to participate in the University International Student Group Health Insurance Program. . . . . . .50. . .00 Student. . . . . full-time. . .150.annual rate . . . will vary by course 15. . . . . . . . . . . . nonrefundable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Applications for health insurance coverage must be filed with the Director of International Student Services. . . . . . . .00 Hospitalization insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . $ 5. . . . . . . . . . . nonrefundable . . . . . . . . . . .025. . . . and evening) who park motor vehicles on University property: Automobiles . graduate studies start date prior to Fall 2008 (including audit courses) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 50. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

edu/controller/BusOff. or a combination.m. and nontraditional students. If the account remains unpaid. or Discover credit cards. transcripts. Payments not made when due will be subject to a finance charge of 1. and diplomas. Each residence hall room has computer network access. The university accepts Visa. The university shall follow federally mandated refund schedules as they apply. and expanded basic cable connection (these services are also available in the University Square Apart- .44 Financial Information – Tuition and Fees/Housing and Dining Payment of Accounts It is each University of Tulsa student’s responsibility to ensure that all educational expenses are paid during the semester in which they are incurred. www. Please call the University of Tulsa Business Office (918-631-2600). pending financial aid. American Express. phone and voice-mail service. A nominal fee will be assessed to establish a monthly payment plan. LaFortune House for about 108 women and men in suites. Federal Perkins Loan program. and approximately 754 campus apartments for upper class undergraduate students and graduate. and to other Student Financial Aid Programs.html for information regarding the monthly payment plan. Payment of current semester charges or payment arrangements must be made by 5:00 p.5% per month. If financial aid does not cover all of your expenses. Refund Schedule-Continuing Students First day of classes 100% Day 2 through end of first week 90% Second and third week 50% Fourth through seventh week 25% Remainder of semester 0% Refund schedule is subject to change. married. withhold grades. Non-attendance of classes does not constitute an official withdrawal or drop. The reduction shall be calculated from the date on which application for withdrawal is processed. Financial aid recipients receiving refunds will have their refunds returned to the proper aid accounts as determined by the Student Financial Services Office pursuant to Federal guidelines. MasterCard. the university reserves the right to suspend or withdraw students from classes. The prescribed order of refund distribution is to FFEL programs. Payment arrangements may include the monthly payment plan. or visit the Business Office website. Housing and Dining Services The university maintains the following residential facilities that are open to both graduate and undergraduate students: Lottie Jane Mabee Hall for approximately 231 women. Federal Pell Grant Program. you may either pay the balance in full or participate in the university’s Monthly Payment Plan. and require that the student move from student housing. deny future enrollments. he or she may receive reduction of tuition based upon the following schedule. law. John Mabee Hall for 244 men.utulsa. on the first day of classes. Refunds If a student withdraws from courses at the university.

and referral assistance. Dining plans are available to all students. If you sign an application/license. A reception desk is staffed in each hall to provide information and check out recreational equipment to residents. and 3. A la carte facilities are available in ACAC and Collins Fitness Center. this total fee ($250.Financial Information – Housing and Dining Services 45 ments). Live-in professional residence directors and student assistants work with student hall governments and staff to schedule programs and activities each semester and are available for general information. Refunds are not available on housing or dining application/licenses. during the summer term. The residence hall/ dining application/license extends for the entire academic year. which include exercise equipment. eliminating the need for additional housing deposits in future years. . a $250. The Residence Hall Association (RHA) is hall government’s umbrella legislative body and represents student views to the administration. Residence between academic semesters (as determined by the published undergraduate calendar). develops policy recommendations. In extreme cases you may apply to the Housing and Dining Services Office for an exception to the no refund policy. For residence halls and apartments. Each residence hall provides laundry and vending areas. and television. 2. The apartment deposit is forfeited entirely if the applicant cancels the agreement prior to actual occupancy. 1. you agree to use said services for that academic year unless you either graduate in December or the university requires you to leave for reasons described in the agreement/publications. In accordance with student recommendations. during the summer term and pre or post opening/closing is not covered by the basic agreement (extra charges apply in residence halls. In apartments. The halls feature designated study lounges and recreational/social areas. The housing/dining reservation fee is refundable in whole or in part to the applicant if there are no damages or cleaning assessments necessary when the student leaves the system having honored all terms of the agreement.00) remains on deposit until a student leaves the housing system. the University Bulletin(s). Apartment agreements are available as annual or academic year licenses. for housing prior to the published opening dates or for periods after closing dates. and the Housing and Dining Services application/license. The same rules apply to the dining portion of the agreement. counseling. Residence Hall Application/Policy Information Students living in the residence halls or apartments are subject to the terms and conditions of the Guide to On-Campus Living. Meal plans are required for all residence hall students and second year students residing in apartments. for residence between academic semesters.00 one-time deposit must accompany each application as a reservation fee/deposit. Dining facilities for residential students are provided in the Twin Towers. and plans educational and social programs for all residence hall students and the apartment advisory council provides similar communication for apartment residents. The housing agreement permits residence from the published opening date of housing for the semester to 24 hours after withdrawal from the university or to the published closing date of the housing system for each semester. extra charges apply for housing prior to or following published availability dates on the undergraduate calendar). the Student Handbook. even those not residing in university housing.

Lorton.00 per semester. The first column in each case refers to the semester cost. Rates vary by complex.338.700. two. Prices are based on the published academic calendar of classes and are subject to change without notice. Charges are for the entire application/license period selected and are assessed by semester. law.00 Double Room as Single (space permitting) $ 2. Dining service agreements provide a variety of options. 2009.040. The approximate academic lease period is August 22. Applications and additional information on housing and dining services may be obtained from the Office of Housing and Dining Services in Twin Towers Hall.00 $ 3. and 216 market quality one.820. *(Residents of suites occupied doubly will be charged the single room rate per person.* Each student will be assessed a $25 per semester non-refundable Residence Hall Association fee. Arrangements for electric utility service for all apartments must be completed prior to receipt of key and check-in.00 $ 2. and nontraditional students. and are available online at www. 2008-09 Residence Hall Housing Costs (Prices are subject to change without notice.00 $ 4. and Brown Villages). Each student will be assessed a $25 per semester non-refundable Residence Hall Association fee.00 $ 5. (918) 631-2514.utulsa.196. Annual arrangements are available. Semester Academic Year Double Room $ 2.00 $ 3.edu/housing.770.46 Financial Information – Housing and Dining Services All appeals must be submitted in writing with appropriate documentation.May 11. The agreement does not include meals during the summer term. The dining service agreement provides food from the published beginning date of the dining program (usually in conjunction with the beginning of undergraduate classes) to the last day of undergraduate exams for the semester.166. Law/Graduate offerings include 150 market quality one and two bedroom units (University Square). holidays. Residents occupying a suite privately will be charged $2. The university may suspend participation in dining programs or remove students from housing for failure to pay charges when due or if disciplinary problems arise.022.) LaFortune House rates per person. 2008 . depending on date of availability. Undergraduate apartment offerings include 388 newly constructed (Fall 2007) one and two bedroom.00 Apartment Housing.) Double Room Single Room Double Room as Single (space permitting) $ 1. and the second to the cost for the academic year.00 John Mabee and Lottie Jane Mabee Hall rates per person. (Rent payments are due the first of each semester and are payable at the Business Office in McClure Hall).540. and three bedroom units (University Square South and West). or vacation periods.400. married. as described below and tremendous flexibility in support of student schedules.00 $ 2. market-quality apartments in three different villages (Mayo. University apartments are available for upper class undergraduate students and graduate.540. Graduate and law calendars that exceed the parameters of the undergraduate calendar result in additional charges based on the actual length . Following is the current cost schedule for the residence halls and dining for the 2008-09 academic year.00 $ 5.

028.00 $ 3.348. Telephone and premium cable television services are available through Cox Communications.032.062.00 $ 4. preferably thirty (30) days in advance.00 $ $ $ $ $ 2. Washer/dryer units are available for an additional $115/semester.014.00 $ 1. and access to the wired and wireless campus computer network is arranged through the university and included in the semester rental rate. For non-family members. Expanded basic cable television.00 a semester.236. 2008-09 University Square Apartment Costs (includes the Law/graduate and “intensive study” area only). Telephone and premium cable television services are available through Cox Communications.972. 2008-09 Mayo.358. Students are responsible for electric utility costs through AEP/ PSO.174.220. rent charges increase if the number of occupants exceeds the number of bedrooms.Financial Information – Housing and Dining Services 47 of stay.00 to three-bedrooms at $5. and wired and wireless access to the campus computer network is arranged through the university and included in the semester rental rate.657.00 1.00 *Meal plans are required for all 1st and 2nd year residents and all students residing in the residence halls. Students are responsible for electric utility costs through AEP/PSO.586. (If accepted later. they do not transfer to the following academic year. Meals are served in Twin Towers Dining Hall.00 a semester. Washer/dryer units are available for an additional $115/semester. Lorton. Students who plan to arrive earlier than/stay later than the designated opening/closing dates should submit their request in writing to the Apartment Office. please send such requests as soon as possible.00 to two-bedrooms at $4.516. Rental prices range from one-bedrooms at $3.00 $ 3.077.716.00 2118. Dining Dollars are nonrefundable per academic year.231.124. Please use all Dining Dollars each academic year. . rent charges increase if the number of occupants exceeds the number of bedrooms. Rental prices range from one-bedrooms at $3. and Brown Village Apartment Costs.00 $ 2.00 $ 1.482.00 4.00 Academic Year $ 3. Traditional Plans 19 Meals per week 15 Meals per week 10 Meals per week Unlimited Access Meal Plan As many times as you wish “Combination” Plans 230 Meals per semester with $300 Dining Dollars 190 Meals per semester with $400 Dining Dollars 165 Meals per semester with $500 Dining Dollars 110 Meals per semester with $250 Dining Dollars 80 Meals per semester with $300 Dining Dollars Semester $ 1.314. Expanded basic cable television.) Daily pricing in apartments varies depending on apartment type (call for specific costs for your unit: 631-5248).00 $ $ $ $ $ 4. All apartment residents are charged a $25 per semester Apartment Community fee in support of community programs and services.00 4. For non-family members.00 1.00 2.00 2. Dining Dollars may be used in ACAC eateries for flexibility and snack and beverage vending machines.00 2. 2008-09 Dining Options* Residence Hall service is provided at Twin Towers.741.110.

page 60. and Allen Chapman Activity Center. Smaller dollar increments can be added to your account through the automated terminal in McFarlin Library. for additional information on related policies. the Dining Services Office. and guests and can provide a wide variety of menus and ideas for receptions. Dining Services handles all on-campus catering for faculty. located in the administrative offices on the second floor of Allen Chapman Activity Center. Faculty and staff may also deposit funds to their Hurricane Gold accounts to be used in any campus dining facility or wherever Hurricane Gold is accepted.48 Financial Information – Housing and Dining Services “Hurricane Gold” Account Dining and Extra Convenience. meals. Each time the card is used (in the bookstore. or the Business Office in McClure Hall. staff. All students may wish to consider using the declining balance debit card feature (Hurricane Gold Account) of the campus identification “one card” to complement dining arrangements and for convenience and safety in transacting other campus business. Summer Term Housing and Dining Housing locations and rates for summer term sessions will be determined and published during the spring semester. Payment in full is due prior to check-in. John Rogers. etc. and charges are calculated until an individual officially checks out and turns in appropriate keys. located in Twin Towers Hall. Specific meal plans are not offered during the summer due to student class and work schedule demands. Purchases will be deducted from this amount as they are made upon the presentation of your ID card. Students are encouraged to deposit money on their Hurricane Gold accounts to use at their convenience in facilities operating during the summer months.) the sale is deducted. (See Identification Cards and Hurricane Gold account policies. or special organizational functions. at snack or dining locations. Hurricane Gold is easy to buy. Simply prepay $25 or more on your account at the ID/Parking Center. students. Commuter students are welcome in all student-dining areas on a cash or debit card basis. . When you reach your Gold limit. Call the office well in advance to assure the greatest possible flexibility in meeting the program requirements. purchase more. Any remaining balance is refundable at year-end or withdrawal from the university. copiers. in vending or laundry machines.) Catering. Placing money on deposit with the university activates the account.

Students receiving financial aid who reduce their course loads below the required minimums after enrollment must inform the Office of Student Financial Services. The University of Tulsa offers financial assistance in the form of scholarships. Recipients of aid must reapply each year to be considered for continuation in the following year. Enrollment in audit classes does not count toward eligibility for financial assistance. The University of Tulsa reserves the right to reduce or rescind award packages if federal allocations to the university are insufficient to cover expenditures. All information contained in these credentials is held in strict confidence. Financial need represents the difference between the cost of attending the university and the amount that the student is expected to contribute toward the educational costs. loan. loans. The FAFSA form along with the TU Financial Aid Application are required for consideration for loans. This aid packaging concept enables the University to make more funds available to a larger number of applicants.Financial Information – Student Financial Services 49 Student Financial Services General Information To make high quality private higher education accessible to all qualified students. financial records are protected in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. There are minimum academic course-load requirements for the various types of financial assistance available through the Office of Student Financial Services. You must be enrolled in at least one credit hour to be eligible for federal financial aid. High academic performance is usually required for scholarship consideration. (2) the student’s financial need. Also. credit-based loan. Students must submit the FAFSA directly to the processor. Financial Need Determination The Office of Student Financial Services uses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine financial need. you are only eligible to borrow a private. for each fall and spring semester during the degree program. grants. which may cancel awards at any time if students fail to maintain satisfactory academic progress or minimum course-load requirements. and (3) the student’s classification and record of academic performance. Financial Aid Packaging Packages of aid may consist of a combination of scholarship. . Applicants desiring first consideration should submit their applications as soon after January 1 as possible to assure timely consideration for the next academic year. Timely submission of the FAFSA and all information requested is required to receive the largest award possible. 5 credit hours. If you are enrolled in an internship to complete your degree requirements and have no tuition charges. The only exception is the last fall and spring semester prior to completion of a master’s degree or during the last four semesters (last two fall and last two spring semesters) before completion of a doctoral degree. and part-time employment. and employment. Summer eligibility is based upon the number of weeks enrolled so please contact the Office of Student Financial Services for questions regarding summer enrollment requirements. Academic Requirements All students who receive financial assistance must demonstrate the ability to do satisfactory college work. a graduate student must be enrolled at least half-time. The factors considered in determining the types and amounts of aid received by an applicant are: (1) the availability of funds. as amended. To be considered for financial aid. and part-time employment opportunities.

during the summer. Fs (failing grade).) 90 Law 135 .50 Financial Information – Student Financial Services Transient students and those who only attend summer term are ineligible for financial aid. Graduate Law Cumulative GPA Required 3. The number of hours required is based on the number of hours for which a student initially received financial assistance at the beginning of each fall and spring semester (prior to the refund period). each student is allowed a maximum number of deficiencies in pursuit of a specific degree: Graduate Law Maximum Number of Deficient Hours 15 30 IV.00 2. Deficient Hours Accumulated To complete a degree plan in the specified number of hours allowed. they should consult the Office of Student Financial Services immediately.00 II. Each student is required to pass a minimum of 75% of their credit hours enrolled during the preceding fall and spring semesters at the university (rounded to the next higher number). If extenuating circumstances interfere or prevent students from meeting these requirements. I. Eligibility for continued financial assistance depends upon maintaining satisfactory academic progress and good standing. Maximum Number of Hours Allowed to Complete a Degree Each student enrolled in a degree program is eligible for financial assistance for a maximum number of hours specific to the completion of the degree. Drops and withdrawals from classes will count toward the accumulated deficient hours for a student. In accordance with federal regulation.D. a student cannot accumulate a significant number of Is (incomplete). All aid recipients must be admitted as regular students pursuing a degree program. III. or Ws (withdrawal). It involves the annual review. of the number of hours successfully completed in a program and the cumulative grade point average earned by a financial aid recipient while attending The University of Tulsa. Satisfactory Completion of Semester Hours Transcripts are reviewed once yearly. Students who do not meet satisfactory progress and good-standing criteria are not eligible for financial assistance for the next academic period. Maximum Hours Allowed to Complete Graduate (Master’s) 45 (Ph. Grade Point Average Requirement Each student must meet a cumulative grade point average standard to remain eligible for assistance. the four components of The University of Tulsa policy are described below. Satisfactory Progress Requirements Satisfactory academic progress is defined as the reasonable progression toward the successful completion of degree requirements. Therefore.

Financial aid is disbursed through the university’s Business Office at the beginning of each semester. placed on financial aid probation and given the ensuing semester to make up deficiencies and meet the necessary satisfactory academic progress requirements. Various local employment information and beginning salary levels for University of Tulsa graduates are also available at the Office of Career Services. Also available is the completion rate for athletic students. Study Abroad. Refunds. Special Circumstances Summer Course Work. A student who is denied assistance based on the satisfactory academic progress policy may submit a written appeal to the Office of Student Financial Services.g. Information concerning prevention of drug and alcohol abuse is available through the office of the Dean of Students. Grades do not transfer. The appeal should address mitigating or extenuating circumstances that have affected the student’s academic performance (e. Grades do not transfer. Campus Security Report. Information regarding employment projections can be reviewed through the Office of Career Services. Employment Projections. Transfer Students.utulsa. Summer credits earned either at TU or transferable from another institution into the student’s program may be used to meet the credit hours earned requirement. Students who withdraw receive tuition refunds according to the following schedule. Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention. Students may be placed on financial aid probation only once during their academic career at TU. Information concerning the completion and graduation rates is available through the undergraduate Office of Admissions.edu/financialaid/forms to read the disbursement procedure for each aid program. Please review the “Your Financial Aid Award” publication at www. The appeal and any supporting documentation must be received by the Office of Student Financial Services within two weeks of the date of the suspension notification letter. The refund policy may change without notice. Financial aid is available for Study Abroad programs. severe physical injury or mental trauma). Information regarding campus security policies and campus crime statistics is available through the Campus Security Office. Nonattendance does not constitute official withdrawal. Action taken on a financial aid appeal is final. Written notification is sent to the student within two weeks of the receipt of the appeal by the Office of Student Financial Services. Completion and Graduation Rates. Students transferring into TU will have all credits accepted into their program used to position them in the satisfactory academic progress components. which is calculated from the date an application for withdrawal is processed by the Business Office.. Students whose appeals are approved will receive a one-time waiver of the requirements. Other Information Financial Aid Disbursements. Please contact the Office of Student Financial Services for more information.Financial Information – Student Financial Services 51 Students not meeting the credit hour and GPA requirements (components I and II) are automatically placed on one-semester of financial aid probation. Regular Semester Up through the first day of classes Second day through end of first week Second and third week Fourth through seventh week After seventh week 100 percent 90 percent 50 percent 25 percent None .

returns are distributed back to the programs in the following order up to the full amount received from each program for the term. The University of Tulsa will return the unearned aid to the Title IV programs. If the student has completed 60 percent or less of the semester. Students withdrawing from all classes during a semester will have their Title IV funds returned to the federal programs according to federal guidelines. This calculation will be the earned aid. contact the Office of Student Financial Services Failing to complete verification by the deadlines will result in loss of any eligibility for Federal Aid funds. The earned aid will be subtracted from the total disbursed aid to determine the amount of unearned aid to be returned to the federal Title IV funds. the return of funds calculation will be used. The University of Tulsa will apply the calculated completed percentage to the total awarded Title IV aid for which the student established eligibility before withdrawing. a valid EFC must be received by TU before the last day of enrollment. Federal Stafford loan applications must be certified by the Office of Student Financial Services before the last day of enrollment each academic period to receive loan funds. Additional documentation may also be required. For all students receiving federal Title IV funds. If this percentage completed is 60 percent or less. TU does not disburse awards for students who are selected for verification until the process is complete. all tax returns and forms required on the incomplete notice letter must be received and be complete. Students eligible for campus-based programs and Federal Stafford loans must complete verification prior to the last day of enrollment. Title IV Return of Funds Distributed Policy. The percentage completed will be the number of days attended divided by the number of days in the semester. If you have questions concerning verification and the required documents. . Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan Federal Perkins Loans Federal PLUS Loan Federal Pell Grants Academic Competitiveness Grant National Smart Grant Federal SEOG Verification. To complete verification. In addition. The University of Tulsa will first determine the percentage of the semester the student completed. You must complete a verification worksheet along with submitting the required federal tax returns.52 Financial Information – Student Financial Services Summer Term Courses of eight weeks in duration One to five days into session Six to ten days into session Eleven to fifteen days into session After fifteen days into session 80 percent 50 percent 25 percent None Return of Title IV Funds. Students are selected randomly for verification of the information they supplied on the FAFSA by the federal processor.

This will allow you to electronically sign the online FAFSA.gov if you have not already done so.Financial Information – Student Financial Services 53 Application Procedure Students must be admitted to the university before final consideration for financial aid is possible. applications for admission and financial aid may be submitted and processed simultaneously.ed. making the application process simpler and faster. However. you will be sent an acknowledgement report via email from the processor.pin.fafsa. Students applying for financial assistance through the Office of Student Financial Services are required to submit: • The Free Application For Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) • The TU Financial Aid Application.gov. . Students may complete the FAFSA at www.ed. It is designed to be your financial aid application for the Federal Perkins Loan. and the Federal Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford Loan program. Federal Work-Study program. We encourage you to apply for a PIN at www. Once your FAFSA is processed. The FAFSA is used as the university’s application for consideration of most sources of financial assistance. For Best Consideration The FAFSA should be completed as soon after January 1st as possible.

Repayment begins nine months after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time and the minimum monthly payment is $40. loan. File the FAFSA and complete the TU Financial Aid Application form. Application procedure. The interest rate is 5 percent simple interest. Federal Family Education Loan Programs Federal Stafford Loan Subsidized and Unsubsidized Awards. T • ou have a maximum of ten years to repay the loan. The maximum amount that can be borrowed from the Federal Loans is $20. Other information: • he federal government pays the interest on a subsidized Stafford loan while you are in T school and during the six month grace period.500 per academic year. Complete the FAFSA and the TU Financial Aid Application form.8%. Expected family contribution is also used in determining eligibility for the subsidized Stafford Loan. The loan must be repaid within 10 years from the date payments begin. A processing fee may be deducted from the loan proceeds.000 per year. . You can choose to pay the interest quarterly while in school or have it capitalized to your principle balance which is done at repayment.54 Financial Information – Student Financial Services Loans Federal Perkins Loan Awards. Made on a limited basis to graduate students of up to $6. If you choose to consolidate your loans Y after graduation. Eligibility. your years of repayment are extending according to your loan debt. Loan amounts may not exceed reasonable college costs. 2006. Subsidized Stafford is determined on the basis of need by the Office of Student Financial Services. Other information.) Eligibility. and gift assistance. beginning nine months after the student ceases to be at least a half-time student. as of July 1. Borrowers are responsible for the interest during in-school and deferment periods on an unsubsidized Stafford loan. Determined on the basis of need by the Office of Student Financial Services. There is no interest while the student is enrolled at least half time. The MPN is good for ten years. (Priority is given to undergraduate applicants. • he current interest rate is a fixed rate of 6. Application procedure. When the loan is processed you will receive a Master Promissory Note that must be completed and returned to the lender. less other scholarship.

Accompanying tuition scholarships of up to nine graduate credit hours per semester are based on academic achievement. Upon receipt of any scholarship funding. Other information: Students are employed in academic or administrative offices on campus. and the Graduate School have information on a limited number of scholarships for which graduate students may be eligible. It is important to notify the Student Financial Services office when you receive an assistantship or fellowship. please contact the Student Financial Services Office to inquire about the affect of the scholarship on the Federal aid package. the individual programs offering graduate work.utulsa. Assistantships. Fellowships. See pages 35-36 of this Bulletin for information on these awards. All federal aid programs require U. The listing of agencies is available in the Office of Student Financial Services. Complete the FAFSA and the TU Financial Aid Application form. KWGS radio station and Allen Chapman Activity Center may have work available to students.090 per year. Stipends vary according to the amount of work required and the experience of the student. Range is normally from $700 to $3. Size is determined by need. The Office of Student Financial Services maintains the available positions on the World Wide Web at: www. Apply at Housing & Dining Services. Application procedure.S. Each year the off-campus agencies contract with the university to hire FWS students.Financial Information – Student Financial Services 55 Employment Federal Work-Study Program (FWS) Awards. Other departments such as the libraries. . Determined on the basis of need by the Office of Student Financial Services. citizenship or permanent resident status. Eligibility.edu/financialaid/studentemployment/ Part-time Work for Students Not Receiving Aid The Office of Housing and the Office of Dining Services often have part-time work available to students not on the Federal Work-Study Program. and Scholarships Assistantships and Fellowships Graduate financial assistance awards are made upon the recommendation of the applicant’s discipline. but subject to congressional change without notice. Additional off-campus positions are available in community service agencies. This could affect the amount of Federal aid a student is eligible to receive. Scholarships The Office of Student Financial Services. Scholarship policies are reviewed annually and are subject to change from year to year. Information regarding federal financial aid programs is accurate at the time of publication.

eligible full-time students at The University of Tulsa may participate in Air Force ROTC (AFROTC). please call the U. They are commissioned through the AFROTC program at OSU-Tulsa but remain students at TU and graduate from TU.56 Financial Information – Student Financial Services Air Force ROTC By agreement with the United States Air Force.) For further information. . be awarded scholarships. (Note: AFROTC scholarships are not administered by The University of Tulsa. S. Air Force ROTC office at OSU-Tulsa. and receive officer’s commissions in the Air Force upon graduation.

and maintains credential files. language. and Hearing Testing and Therapy. maintains job vacancy information from a variety of sources. to determine if a significant communication problem exists. A major goal is to help all students gain the information and skills needed to select a career and conduct a job search that will lead to desirable employment. and consultation. . Faculty members are encouraged to send students with such problems directly to the center. Services for students. Located in the Holmes Student Center. Language. where their situations are evaluated and appropriate assistance is given. They also coordinate campus tutoring efforts and act as a liaison with other student services. The center serves as an initial reference point for students who need academic assistance.5:00 p. Providing access to information through its active website. The university’s program in speechlanguage pathology provides diagnostic testing in speech. located in the Alexander Health Center. and other kinds of help. Advising for Careers and Personal Development Career Services and the Office of University and Community Service.m. by appointment. Confidentiality is protected by psychologist-client privilege. psychoeducational programs. There is a fee for these services. Career Services maintains information on internships and other pre-professional work experiences. (918) 631-2200. (8:00 a. Although these screenings do not include detailed diagnostic or therapy services.-9:00 p. arranges campus interviews with prospective employers. The center also helps faculty and staff function more effectively in their roles.Student. tutoring. and staff include psychological counseling. and hearing along with therapy services for individuals of all ages. Appointments may be made in person or by telephone. A free screening clinic is available on Fridays. assessment. Academic. The center is the central location for students with disabilities who are seeking appropriate accommodations. Center personnel are trained to detect and deal with problems that place students at risk. Helping students cope optimally with tensions that arise amid the changes and transitions of college life is the special concern of the Counseling and Psychological Services Center. and referrals. on students’ behalf. hosts career fairs that provide information on potential employers. Counseling and Psychological Services. both academic and personal. Students are encouraged to meet with staff members and begin the career planning process as soon as they arrive on campus.m. and Support Services 57 Student. The office supports each individual in developing a career plan and specific strategies that will lead to his or her employment goal. this office provides services for all students and alumni of the university.m. Center for Student Academic Support. Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00 a. and Support Services All students are encouraged to make full use of the academic resources of the university and to seek advice on specific academic issues in areas of particular interest to them. they do include appropriate counseling. Provisions are also made for anyone requesting counseling immediately. recommendations. Academic. The office also assists students with finding public service internships with local and state social service agencies. on Tuesdays).m. Speech. faculty.

Asian.58 Student. Specific programs. This office provides individual counseling and support for African. and staff to schedule programs and activities each semester and are also available for student counseling and referral assistance. Residence Directors. Throughout the year. and activities include Student Association. International Student Services. Student Activities. services. the Residence Hall Association. and educates the campus community on student policies and procedures. Hispanic.S. Multicultural Student Programs. The office also assists international members of the faculty. administers the alcohol policy. contact the office by phone. and activities that focus on African. and provides cross-cultural activities to promote understanding among students of all racial and ethnic groups. In the case of borderline students.S. For the fall and spring semesters. The needs of students who are citizens of other countries are the concern of International Student Services located in Westby Hall. admitted conditionally for an improved TOEFL score. advises student organizations related to these cultural groups. Upon completing the recommended courses and receiving a satisfactory score on their level testing. and Native American cultures. . encourages involvement of students in these groups in all aspects of university life. offers guidance and direction to student organizations. seminars. the applicant may request reevaluation for admission to a graduate program. professionally trained residence directors work with all resident students. English Institute for International Students. citizens are required to register with this office. counsels individual students regarding their problems. and provides a variety of extracurricular and co-curricular activities that broaden the student’s educational experiences. Asian. This office also handles student disciplinary matters. investigates complaints of sexual harassment or sexual assault. student hall governments. and Support Services Office of Student Affairs. The office coordinates undergraduate admission. issues government and immigration documents. speaking. (918) 631-2329. Academic. In the residence halls. peer mentoring. and Native American students. Multicultural Student Programs include academic study groups. classmates. and a wide variety of celebrations. and offers various programming activities throughout the year. and the Co-Curricular Transcript. and understanding the English language for international students and community residents. The institute’s primary objective is to provide international students with a sufficient command of English to function on a level comparable to that of their U. The Office of Student Affairs is located in the Holmes Student Center. may satisfy the TOEFL requirement. coordinates commencement activities. The English Institute offers an intensive course in writing. All University of Tulsa students and faculty who are not U. Hispanic. international students must obtain a Proof of Health Insurance form from the International Student Services Office confirming their insurance coverage. Multicultural Student Programs. All international graduate students must register with this office upon first arriving on campus. may be referred to the English Institute for International Students (EIIS) for course work in English. For more information. counsels students on academic and personal matters. Leadership Education. successful completion course work at EIIS and a satisfactory score on level testing. Student Affairs provides programs that enhance academic endeavors. Some international students who do not present a satisfactory TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score for admission to Graduate School. houses the ombudspersons. This form must be presented in the Graduate School before enrollment can be completed. Failure to meet routinely with the International Student Services office may adversely affect visa status.

the student must complete a health history. Students who are first-time enrollees and who reside in on-campus student housing (residence halls. This legislation requires that students at Oklahoma’s colleges and universities beginning with the 20042005 academic year provide written documentation of vaccinations against hepatitis B. A physician is available for three to four hours daily. waivers.-5:00 p. Participants should study the policy carefully. who must either present written evidence of their own coverage or enroll in the program described above.m. The center is open Monday through Friday. Renter’s insurance is recommended for all students living in on-campus or other away-fromhome accommodations. A student may sign a waiver (provided by Alexander Student Health Center) stating that they have received and reviewed the information regarding the meningococcal vaccine and has chosen not to be vaccinated against meningococcal disease. A women’s clinic.edu/alexhealth. All medical records are kept confidential.. If the student is a minor the student’s parent or guardian would need to sign the waiver. (918) 631-2241. All currently enrolled students are entitled to use the Student Health Center. hospital costs. Information concerning special services and facilities for students and student employees with disabilities in need of accommodation may be obtained by students from the Center for Student Academic Support. measles. University apartments. Services for People with Disabilities. clinic hours vary. if the student is a minor. the student’s parent or guardian would need to sign the exemption. Academic.utulsa. The university has granted an insurance carrier the privilege of advertising its program among students via brochures. For more information regarding these immunizations. Fees for which the student is directly responsible include referrals to physicians. Students not receiving this brochure by mail may secure it from Alexander Health Center or International Student Services. and is staffed by registered nurses. or call Alexander Student Health Center for more details. is available one afternoon a week. Most services are charged to the student’s account and include such items as prescription and some non-prescription medications dispensed at the center. prescription medications not dispensed at the center. and x-rays or other diagnostic testing. and fraternity or sorority houses) shall be vaccinated against meningococcal disease. 8:00 a. mumps. it is always wise to conduct an insurance review to assure that one has the appropriate amount of coverage. and rubella (MMR). and Support Services 59 Student Services Health Services. Monday through Friday. Student Health and Renter’s Insurance. A student may also be exempt from the vaccination if the student signs a certificate of exemption (provided by Alexander Student Health Center) declaring that the administration of the vaccine conflicts with their moral or religious tenets or. health insurance is required of all international students. In many cases. and laboratory procedures. Students can also receive a copy of the 504/ADA Policy for Students with Disabilities by calling (918) 631-2315. Holmes Student Center. During vacation periods and summer school.D. Students wishing to see the physician or physician assistant need to make an appointment. However. . staffed by a licensed physician assistant. The Alexander Student Health Center provides care and treatment of minor illnesses and minor emergencies. The 2003 Oklahoma legislature passed Senate Bill 787. parents’ homeowner policies will cover expenses related to dependents’ expenses in external locations. which is kept on file.Student. Although participation in the plan offered through the university is voluntary. Counseling and Psychological Services are also available at the Alexander Student Health Center.m. and present a valid student I. To receive services. A health insurance program is available to students. A written statement from a licensed physician indicating that a vaccine is medically contraindicated shall exempt a student from the vaccination. and exemptions please go to www. Because it is designed specifically for college students. some of the coverage and benefits may not be similar to those offered under regular family insurance programs. Immunization Policy. Participation is voluntary.

the account number can be changed and the account reactivated. and selected classrooms. staff. or in the Business Office in McClure Hall. If a student loses an ID card. at the bookstore. Hurricane Gold can be purchased by simply prepaying an amount ($25 or more) on the student’s account at the ID/Parking Center in Twin Towers Hall. The cards are required for admission to and checking books out of the libraries and residence hall dining. The ID/Parking Center in Twin Towers issues identification cards to all students and university employees. a $20 per day spending limit has been established via the computer for all vending locations. and Support Services Identification Cards. Any request for withdrawal of funds must be presented in writing. to minimize loss. All enrolled undergraduate and graduate students (except faculty and staff ) are entitled to one free admission and one-half price admission to each athletic event. entry to residence halls. and for identification at campus business offices and campus activities.60 Student. Then. The charge for replacement cards is $15. Loss of an ID after normal business hours can be reported to any Hurricane Gold location with a cash register . he/she may purchase more. If this is not convenient. ID cards should not be loaned to anyone at any time. Parking permits are required for residents of university apartments. Parking and Bicycle Permits. the student should leave a message on the voice mail at the ID/Parking Center. Smaller dollar increments can be added to accounts through the automated terminals in McFarlin Library. The Hurricane Gold account on the card may be used at all dining locations. Purchases will be deducted from the student’s account each time he/she presents their ID card. Invalidation of the card will occur on the morning of the next business day. Whenever students are on university property or at university events. The debit account feature of the student ID card allows students to use their cards for planned purchases. The TU ID card is used for admission to all athletic events and Student Association-sponsored programs. When the student reaches their deposited limit. All students. Hurricane Gold and Dining Dollars Account Policies. the Hut or Twin Towers Cafeteria-which can “lock-out” use of the missing card.. Parking permits and copies of parking regulations should be obtained from the ID/Parking Center in Twin Towers Hall. The card reduces the need to carry or keep cash on hand. For many reasons. who can obtain them from the ID/Parking Center after obtaining an authorization form from the Apartment Office in the University Square Apartments. Hurricane Gold is not a credit card or a checking account but a non-interest-bearing convenience account. for which there is a charge. Banking regulations and university policy prohibit cash withdrawal during the academic year. With a TU ID.e. The student will be responsible for all transactions made by the student or by anyone else who uses the card. However. in the Dining Services Office in the administrative offices of the Allen Chapman Activity Center. streets or bicycle racks. they must carry their TU Student Identification Cards and be prepared to present them to university officials to verify their identity. The University of Tulsa is not responsible for cash balances of lost cards. but remaining balances are fully refundable at the end of the spring semester. and Allen Chapman Activity Center. when the ID/Parking Center reopens. even if lost. The ID/Parking Center can instantly change the account number to protect the account from excessive unauthorized use and will also issue a replacement ID card. in vending and laundry machines. Disciplinary action will be taken against a student fraudulently using another’s card and against the owner who permits fraudulent use of his or her card. specific athletic tickets may be picked up at the TU Ticket Office. John Rogers Hall. . Dining Dollars can be purchased through the Housing and Dining Office in Twin Towers. labs. he or she should notify the ID/Parking Center immediately.g. Dining Dollars are non-refundable. Business Office in McClure Hall (except for the first football game in the fall). Activity Card. Academic. Faculty and staff may use their ID cards to purchase up to four half-price tickets for each athletic event. and faculty members must register motor vehicles and bicycles that are to be parked/utilized on university parking lots. and in copiers. especially when there is money in his or her Hurricane Gold or Dining Dollars account.

The gallery program is combined with the School of Art’s Visiting Artists Program. and special events. . scenery. Internships and apprentice programs are available with arts organizations in the Tulsa community and students have the opportunity to engage in interdepartmental and interdisciplinary studies. are announced in the student newspaper and on the bulletin boards in the Allen Chapman Activity Center. and contemporary repertoire. Graduate degree programs in English and Art foster professional careers in the arts as well as the appreciation and understanding of the fine and performing arts. regardless of whether or not they major in one of the arts. lighting. Auditions. Jose Quintero. Electra. Visual Arts. Facilities. to create and exhibit art work. housed in Phillips Hall and run by the School of Art. The Division of Fine and Performing Arts comprises the School of Art. which brings to campus both established national and international and emerging artists to talk about their work. Hal Prince.Special Opportunities. as well as numerous guest designers and acting teachers. film rights. modern. performance art. and co-edited two volumes of Monologues for Men by Men and The Student’s Guide to Playwriting Opportunities. have many opportunities to do so. global. There are also opportunities in costumes. The University of Tulsa Theatre. crafts. Pride’s Crossing and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. and special effects. the School of Music. Students are encouraged to discuss these options with their advisors and to take part in the rich variety of arts activities on campus. to make music. and observers. Visiting critics and art historians add a scholarly dimension to this program. Anthony Zerbe. The Laramie Project. Each season. Writer-in-residence Michael Wright and Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko teach and encourage new students of fiction. nonfiction. including productions of the musical theatre program described below. and media coverage. the gallery also offers exhibitions of historical. Donald Feagin Distinguished Visiting Artist program and the Darcy O’Brien Distinguished Chair annually bring to the campus guest artists in the humanities. students are given the opportunity to experience the arts as creators. serves as the chief focal point for the university’s engagement with the visual arts. and the Department of Theatre. Literary Arts. and Services 61 Special Opportunities. Through campus activities and programs described below. The university also publishes NIMROD International Journal of Prose and Poetry. most recently Sky Tumbling. poetry. the University of Tulsa Theatre presents several plays from the classical. They also offer expertise in the legal complexities of publishing. give workshops. and multicultural significance. The theatre is consistently chosen to represent the state of Oklahoma in regional American College Theatre Festival competitions. Visiting artists have included such notables as Edward Albee. Call or visit the theatre office in Kendall Hall for more information. such as Seamus Heaney. Recent productions have included Far Away. The Importance of Being Earnest. The multi-purpose Alexandre Hogue Gallery. and plays. described on page 63. Facilities. The Alexandre Hogue Gallery is open every day except Saturday and Sunday without charge. The J. It is also the site of the annual Gussman Student Art Exhibition and numerous shows by prominent artists. and Services The Fine and Performing Arts Students who wish to act. The university offers creative writing instruction through the Department of English and Theatre and occasional opportunities for all students to publish their work in a student-edited journal or literary supplement. which publishes writers from all over the world but is also open to competitive submissions from graduate students. open to all university students. and poetry. performers. to write and publish fiction. and can be comfortably used for poetry readings and chamber music performances. and work with students in the studios. Used year-round for the exhibition of arts. Wright has published ten plays. David Lehman and Colleen McElroy. and Carole Shelley.

Productions are sometimes given both on and off campus.62 Special Opportunities. These include Jazz Guitar Ensemble. and the Big Band. Auditions are held on designated audition dates in February and March or by special appointment. A collaborative undertaking of the School of Music and the Department of Theatre. The Orchestra performs on campus and in other locations such as the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. Vocal Jazz. Chamber Ensembles – a variety of smaller student ensembles. drawing from the standard and contemporary literature of opera and operetta. An audition is required. made up of strings. at commencement and for other University convocations. Symphonic Band – The TU Wind Ensemble forms the nucleus of this larger ensemble. Jazz Combos. The orchestra also performs in selected productions of the musical theatre and opera programs. the jazz program brings prominent professional artists to TU to perform and tour with the student ensembles. Jazz groups perform regionally as well as on campus. Opera Workshop – Opera Workshop is open through audition to all qualified students interest in exploring the opera experience. the Chamber Singers also perform at university functions and tour throughout the region. Sound of the Golden Hurricane – Distinguished by its exciting corps-style half-time entertainment. and operettas such as The Vagabond King. woodwinds. Character and music development are stressed as well as backstage organizations and proper stage deportment. brass or percussion. Auditions for the jazz ensembles take place during the first week of the fall semester. TU Cappella Singers – This is an auditioned smaller ensemble that performs chamber literature from the Renaissance through Twentieth Century and beyond. Programs of opera scenes are given. . The jazz ensembles at the University are recognized as among the nation’s best. and Services Musical Theatre. the Sound of the Golden Hurricane features contemporary music and drill at every home game and selected away games. Each concert features masterworks from the orchestral repertoire and outstanding faculty or student soloists. The most select vocal ensemble. with placement based on audition results. Vocal Ensembles TU Concert Chorale – The TU Concert Chorale is the largest choral ensemble in the School of Music performing standard major works as well as smaller choral pieces. Bands TU Wind Ensemble – Composed of nearly fifty wind and percussion players. and qualified students are invited to participate as performers or stage technicians. the Sound of the Golden Hurricane serves as a pep band in the student spirit section of the Reynolds Center and accompanies the team during post-season tournaments. call or visit the theatre office in Kendall Hall. Literature is chosen to increase the student’s knowledge of repertoire and to supply a well-rounded body of choral music over a four-year period. Placement auditions are required. For more information. During basketball season. Facilities. They play several concerts each year both on and off campus. Roles are filled by audition. operas such as Die Fledermaus. Orchestra – Membership in the Orchestra is open to all qualified students through auditions held during the first week of each semester. Jazz Ensembles. the Musical Theatre program offers an active production season that includes staging of musicals such as The Fantasticks and Songs for a New World. this prestigious concert ensemble is assembled in the early fall and draws participants from throughout the university. Each year. The Symphonic Winds performs in campus concerts. is formed to provide experience in this media.

Publications. Sharp Westminster Student Center for Presbyterian campus ministry. Sharp Memorial Chapel. a new bell tower and carillons. East Indian. The Collegian. Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry. the JJQ bring together a wide array of critical and theoretical work focusing on the life. beyond its other striking architectural features. Its location at the center of the campus is a fitting metaphor for the university’s historic and continuing covenantal ties with the Presbyterian Church (U. In the tradition of the influential “little” magazines that first published Virginia Woolf. reviews.). Call the Collegian Office for information. the chapel sanctuary has been refurbished and a new wing now stands in place of the original west wing of the chapel complex. and The City. presentations. The journal provides employment opportunities for graduate students as well as a forum for students to submit essays. adds its distinctive identity and voice to the university’s rich and vibrant religious life. The journal takes advantage of the extensive Richard Ellmann collection of Joyce materials held in the university’s McFarlin Library to attract leading modernist scholars to campus. Chinese. work. and James Joyce. and Services 63 Religious Life Because of the The University of Tulsa’s founding as an institution of higher education of the Presbyterian Church (USA).S. Eliot. have featured Arabic. the Buford Atrium for group meetings. lunch and dinner gatherings. Published twice yearly. shares the plaza with McFarlin Library. the student newspaper.Special Opportunities.utulsa. the university encourages the full. including competitive work by graduate and undergraduate students. seminars and workshops – and the Offices of the Sharp Chaplain. The publication has received numerous national and state awards for overall newspaper excellence and individual writing. the works of writers over age 65. implementing. A number of campus ministries provide programs of outreach and nurture for their respective constituencies at the university. James Joyce Quarterly. and sponsoring religiously oriented programs. and reception of James Joyce. and layout and paste-up staff are available. biographical. T. Thematic issues. welcoming archival. Radio. and critical research by established scholars as well as students. On the first floor of the new wing is the Robert C. The Office of the Sharp Chaplain provides for and supports the expression of the life of faith on campus: planning. With renovations completed in April 2004. and Russian writers. Salaried positions on the paper for editor. On the new wing’s second floor is the Martha S. and notes. and a full kitchen. (www. The James Joyce Quarterly was founded in 1963 at The University of Tulsa and has been the flagship journal of international Joyce studies ever since. which are listed on pages 67-68. and assisting the campus community in nurturing a caring and respectful environment for its diverse expressions of faith. writers.edu/JJoyceQtrly) . is published on Tuesday during the fall and spring semesters. the journal sponsors the national Nimrod/Hardman Awards competition in fiction and poetry. and Television Collegian. the Josephine P. home to the ministries of the Sharp Chaplain. Native American. Kendall Hall. business manager. The Chapel complex also offers. Each of these ministries. Buford Canterbury Suite – a seminar room for group meetings. Sharp Reception Suite for formal receptions and other special events. and Tyrrell Hall. The journal encourages submissions of all types. diverse expression of religious life. Facilities. serving as a liaison with other religious groups through the Council of Campus Ministries. providing counseling and pastoral care.A.S. the Arctic Circle. Nimrod publishes excellent writing. In each issue. historical. one each year.

It appears biannually. The journal offers internship and editorial opportunities for students interested in gaining experience in the field of publishing and exposure to cutting-edge feminist scholarship. video editing facilities. KWGS was the first FM station to sign on in Oklahoma and KWTU is the state’s first HD Radio station. The journal’s web site is www. historicist. This on-campus broadcast TV channel was developed to bring students up-to-date campus information. and substantive contributions are welcome but. to be germane.edu/tswl. The subject is broadly conceived . three control rooms. Public Radio 89. This program allows students to call in questions and a tutor is ready to provide answers. and Services Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature. Public Radio Tulsa. ResLife TV. are northeastern Oklahoma’s National Public Radio affiliates. and theoretical work by both established and emerging scholars. Administered by six professional staff members. free hit movies. e-mail answers@publicradiotulsa. In addition.org.utulsa.org or visit the web site at www. the studio and facilities are used for classes in video and film production taught each semester. Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature was one of the first academic journals devoted entirely to the historical and literary lives of women of every period and in all languages and continues to be at the vanguard of feminist scholarship. Lithic Technology. and management aspects of broadcasting are encouraged to audition and apply for employment in Kendall Hall.publicradiotulsa. 24 hours a day. Tulsa Studies publishes path-breaking literary. Occasionally. other campus-related videos are produced. ResLife TV. educational videos/vignettes. For more information. engineering. and campus programs. Lithic Technology is a peer-reviewed journal concerned with the dissemination of knowledge about archeological stone tools. Public Radio International. Founded by noted feminist Germaine Greer. KWTU-FM.5. One television studio. Channel 24. American Public Media and the British Broadcasting Corporation. Room 160. these stations offer students opportunities to experience broadcasting in actual work settings. Students throughout the university who are interested in the production. in the spring and fall. Facilities. and Classical 88. Movies are shown every three hours starting at 6pm. and a TV classroom are located in Kendall Hall.64 Special Opportunities. The stations are affiliates of National Public Radio. KWGS-FM.7. seven days a week. Physics and Math two nights a week. RLTV also provides live tutoring for Spanish. is sponsored by residence life. Students from any major can do extracurricular work to produce TUTV: a weekly half-hour information and entertainment program about the university. their results should be generalized and interesting to researchers in parts of the world other than those in which the material in the article originates. . Students are the on-camera talent and also operate all of the equipment. TUTV.

The shop is located in the lobby of Collins Fitness Center. Hours (unless the building is closed): 8:00 a. programming. smoothies. indoor track.10:00 p. educational and community service activities for students living in the halls and on a campuswide basis. . cardio theater. gourmet soups.m. the student government strives to represent the needs of the entire student body. Monday through Friday 4:30 p. published and distributed annually by the Office of Student Affairs. grab-n-go sandwiches. social. and executive officers are elected in an “all hall” election each spring to serve the following academic year. acting as a catalyst for change within the university.Special Opportunities. The Student Association promotes and provides intellectual. This group looks for ideas for programming and provides a format for residents to offer ideas to improve the apartment community. Services include. . whose goal is the improvement of the quality of life for resident students. The University of Tulsa’s student government. huge fitness area. and cultural opportunities for the entire campus community. All students living in university residence halls are members of the Residence Hall Association (RHA). .m. It houses multipurpose rooms. The Fulton and Susie Collins Fitness Center is available to students. Located at 8th and Florence just north of Skelly Stadium. Apartment Council. executive. Full details on the structure and activities of the Student Association can be found in the current Student Handbook. Facilities. Italian ice. and informational recreation. Apartment Council is a monthly meeting in which Complex Managers meet with apartment residents to seek feedback concerning their living environment. Residence Hall Association (RHA). A list of schedules is available by calling (918) 631-3232. The Starbucks at Collins Fitness Center offers gourmet salads. RHA sponsors social. but are not limited to. fitness. the Mabee Gym has an indoor heated pool and racquetball and squash courts available for student use. and judicial. three courts.edu/recreation. lounge and equipment check out. and the ever popular world famous Starbucks coffee and espressos. All full.m.m. The Student Association consists of three branches: legislative. as well as information regarding intramural sports. and legal services. It is located at 5th and Delaware. RHA acts as a liaison between the residents and the administration.10:00 p.and part-time graduate students are members of the Student Association (SA). In addition. pastries. Please check out their website at www. and Services 65 Campus Fitness and Recreation Collins Fitness Center. Sunday Mabee Gymnasium. Student Government Student Association. and serves as the legislative government overseeing residence halls. Each hall elects representatives to serve on the legislative board. support for other student organizations. A complete schedule of hours is available in the Campus Recreation Office. as well as in the Student Activities office located in Allen Chapman Activity Center.utulsa.

and Support Services Campus Organizations and Activities The following campus organizations and activities. Inc. Academic. Costumers and Technicians) American Bar Association. which appeal to a broad spectrum of interests and needs. Law School Division American Chemical Society American Institute for Chemical Engineers (AIChE) American Society of Heating. have been officially recognized by the Student Association’s Student Activities Board. Honor Societies Alpha Epsilon Delta (Pre-med) Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting) Beta Beta Beta (Biology) Beta Gamma Sigma (Business) Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) Honors Program Kappa Delta Pi (Education) Kappa Kappa Psi (Music) Lambda Alpha (Anthropology) Lantern (Sophomore) Mortar Board (Senior) Mu Epsilon Delta (Natural Sciences) National Residence Hall Honorary Omicron Delta Kappa (Leadership) Order of Omega (Fraternities and Sororities) Phi Alpha Theta (History) Phi Beta Kappa (Liberal Arts) Phi Delta Phi (Law) Phi Kappa Phi (All disciplines) Phi Lambda Upsilon (Chemistry) Phi Mu Alpha (music) Phi Sigma Iota (International Foreign Languages) Pi Gamma Mu (History/Sociology) Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) President’s Ambassador Council (PAC) Psi Chi (Psychology) Scroll (Junior) Sigma Alpha Iota (Music) Sigma Delta Phi Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics) Sigma Theta Tau (Nursing) Tau Beta Pi (Engineering) Theta Alpha Phi (Theatre) Pre-Professional ACT-TU (Actors.66 Student. and Air-Conditioning Engineers. As new organizations are formed. (ASHRAE) American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropological Society Art Student Society Association of Black Collegians Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) Association of Women in Communication Black Law Students Association Deaf Education Association of TU (Deaf TU) Environmental Law Society Ethnic Minorities in Psychology Exercise Sports Science Club Finance Association Financial Management Association Geoscience Club Graduate Association for Students in Psychology Graduate Student Association in English Graduate Business Society Hurricane Sports Medicine Club Information Technologies United (iTU) Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) International Law Society Jewish Law Student Society Kappa Kappa Iota (Education) Law and Medicine Society Le Cercle Francais/French Club American Marketing Society Mathematical Student Association of America National Art Education Association National Association of Black Accountants Native American Law Student Association Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Psychology Club Public Interest Law Society Public Relations Student Society of America Russian Club Sigma Alpha Iota (Women’s Musical Society) . Refrigerating. Further information on these organizations and activities is contained in the Student Handbook. they are added to the list throughout the year.

Academic.Student. Beta Pi Chapter (service) Angolan Student Association American Indian Cultural Society (AICS) Amnesty International Asian American Student Association Association of Black Collegians Association of International Students Association of Unmanned Vehicular Systems BACCHUS Bisexual Lesbian Gay & Transsexual Alliance (BLGTA) Board of Advocates (Law)/Trial Lawyers Chinese Student Association College Republicans Earth Matters Energy Law Journal Film Appreciation Society German Club Habitat for Humanity Hispanic Law Student Association History Club Hurricane Chess Hurricane Toastmasters Indian Students Association of TU Indonesian Student Union International Relations Club (Model UN) International Student Outreach (ISO) Japanese Student Association Korean Students Association Kuwaiti Student Association Language House Latin American and Hispanic Student Association Malaysian Student Association Moot Court Board Multicultural Affairs Committee Muslim Student Association Native American Student Association Oklahoma Intercollegiate Legislature Paintball Club Peer Education Program Persian Student Association Saudi Student Association Spanish Club Student Athlete Advisory Committee Student Mobilization Students Active for the Environment (SAFE) Tulsa Area Human Resource Association (TAHRA) TU Academic Bowl Team TU Automotive Enthusiasts TU Big Brothers and Sisters TU Cares TU Global Network TU Outdoors Club TU Peace and Justice Fellowship TU Secular Humanists Turkish Student Association TU Women’s Robotics Tulsa Gaming Society University Ambassadors Venezuelan Student Association Vietnamese Student Association Womyn’s Collective Women’s Law Caucus Young Democrats Religious Groups Baptist Collegiate Ministries Campus Crusade Canterbury Episcopal Student Fellowship Chi Alpha (Assembly of God) Christian Legal Society College Hill Presbyterian Church Campus Ministry Crossover Bible Church Campus Ministry Fellowship of Christian Athletes Friends of Internationals . and Support Services 67 Society of Automotive Engineers Society of Petroleum Engineers Society of Physics Students Society of Women Engineers Sociology Club Student Bar Association Student Economics Association Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) Student Oklahoma Education Association TU Council on the Hearing Impaired TU Speech. and Hearing Association TU Student Education Association TU Student Nurses Association Tulsa Journal of Comparative and International Law Tulsa Law Journal TUTSATA (Student Athletic Training Association) Special Interest Groups ACT-TU Alexander Health Center Student Advisory Board Alpha Phi Omega. Language.

and Support Services Gateway Campus Ministry .5 FM) TU-TV (student cable television show) Governing Bodies 5th Place House Apartment Advisory Committee Honors House Hall Government Interfraternity Council John Mabee Hall Government LaFortune Hall Government Lottie Jane Mabee Hall Government Panhellenic Council Residence Hall Association Student Association Student Association Senate Student Athlete Advisory Council Twin South Hall Government Special Interest Sports Groups Hurricane Chess Club Fencing Society Paintball Club Recreational Sports Clubs Hurricane Volleyball Club Outdoor Club Fitness Programs (through the Collins Fitness Center) Aerobics (these vary annually) Cardio Boxing Yoga Fitness and Lifestyle Improvement Program Intramural Sports Badminton Singles and Doubles Basketball (One on One. Putt Putt. Academic. Tip-Off Basketball Classic) Bowling Darts Competition Eight Ball Pool Flag Football Frisbee Golf Golf (Championship Doubles. Sand Triples) Walleyball . premium movies. Antony Orthodox Church Campus Ministry Student Mobilization Unitarian/Universalists Campus Ministry . tutoring. Tulsa International Student Ministries Jewish Students’ Association .First Presbyterian Church. Par 3) Inner Tube Waterpolo Mystery Event Racquetball Singles and Doubles Soccer Softball (Two Pitch Classic) Spades Squash Table Tennis Singles and Doubles Tennis Singles and Doubles Volleyball (Sand Doubles.68 Student. educational vignettes) The Underground (101.All Souls Church United Campus Ministries University United Methodist Church Campus Ministry Wesley Foundation Westminster Society/Presbyterian Student Fellowship Music Jazz Ensembles The Sound of the Golden Hurricane (includes flags and twirlers) Symphony Orchestra TU Wind Ensemble Symphonic Winds TU Concert Chorale TU Cappella Singers TU Women of Song Opera Workshop Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Sigma Alpha Iota Communication Baculus (College of Law student -newspaper) Collegian (student newspaper) KWGS Radio (National Public Radio affiliate) Res Life TV (campus channel 24. Two on Two. Three on Three.Hillel Latter Day Saints Student Association Lutheran Student Movement Muslim Student Association Newman Catholic Campus Ministry Park Plaza Church of Christ Campus Ministry Reformed University Fellowship St.

Student Rights, Freedoms, and Responsibilities

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Student Rights, Freedoms, and Responsibilities
The University of Tulsa maintains a statement of rights, freedoms, and responsibilities, which sets forth general guidelines suggested for members of the university community. The document outlines university policy in the following areas: freedom of academic inquiry, freedom of expression, freedom of association, right to privacy, off-campus freedom, student self-government, right of students to participate in university government and the decision-making process, and standards in disciplinary proceedings. More detailed information concerning any of these areas may be obtained from the Student Affairs Office, Holmes Student Center, and the current on-line Student Handbook at www.utulsa.edu/studentaffairs.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
The Congress of the United States enacted into law the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act on August 21, 1974. This act sets out requirements of educational institutions designed to protect the privacy of students and their records. The act governs access to educational records maintained by educational institutions and the release of information contained in such records. The Federal regulations resulting from the original Act have been modified, and the final regulations appear in the Federal Register, May 9, 1980, Vol. 45, No. 92. The University of Tulsa policy that was written to comply with the act is on file in the Student Affairs Office, Holmes Student Center, and is printed in the current Student Handbook. The act addresses the following areas of student rights: • The right to inspect and review information contained in education records. • The right to challenge the contents of their education records. • The right to a hearing if the outcome of the challenge is unsatisfactory. • The right to submit an explanatory statement for inclusion in the education record if the outcome of the hearing is unsatisfactory. • The right to prevent disclosure, with certain exceptions, of personally identifiable information. • The right to secure a copy of the institutional policy, which includes the location of all education records. • The right to file complaints with the Department of Education concerning alleged failures by institutions to comply with the Act. Written complaints should be directed to The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA), Department of Education, Room 4074, Switzer Building, Washington, D.C. 20202. The University is entitled to release “directory information” which includes the following: the student’s name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. The University may publish each year a student directory to include the student’s name, local address, local telephone number, college of enrollment, and year of attendance. Students not wishing to be included in the directory may so indicate by completing a “Request to Withhold Student Directory Information Form” available in the Office of Student Affairs.

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Student Rights, Freedoms, and Responsibilities

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)
This act includes provisions to protect the privacy of individually identifiable health information. To review the University’s policy, refer to the following: www.utulsa.edu/generalcounsel/compliance/.

General Standard of Conduct
In keeping with the ideals and standards of higher education and the mission of The University of Tulsa, students are expected to treat one another and other members of the university community with mutual respect, dignity, honor, and trust. Specifically, students are expected to respect order, fairness, morality, and the rights of others; obey the laws of the land and the regulations, rules, and policies of the university; and conduct their activities with high regard for the ideals of higher education, which include personal honor, academic honesty, and intellectual freedom. Behavior that runs contrary to these expectations provides sufficient cause for the university to initiate disciplinary proceedings, as specified in the current Student Handbook. The full text of the “General Standard of Conduct” as well as the rules and regulations governing student life and policies governing such issues as drug and alcohol use, sexual harassment, and sexual assault can be found in the current on-line Student Handbook at www.utulsa.edu/studentaffairs. A summary statement on academic honesty appears below.

Academic Honesty
In keeping with the intellectual ideals, standards for community, and educational mission of the university, students are expected to adhere to all academic policies. Cheating on examinations, plagiarism, and other forms of academic dishonesty violate both individual honor and the life of the community, and may subject students to penalties ranging from failing grades to dismissal. Academic misconduct also includes unauthorized or inappropriate use of university computers, vandalism of data files or equipment, use of computer resources for personal reasons unrelated to the academic and research activities of the university, plagiarism, violation of proprietary agreements, theft, or tampering with the programs and data of other users. Specific policies exist in the various colleges in addition to the overall university policies published in this Bulletin and other campus policy guides.

Student Responsibility
The university strives to provide stimulating instruction, rigorous curricula, and challenging academic standards. Graduate program advisors, as well as the Dean and Associate Dean of the Graduate School, are willing to help explain available options, describe requirements, and plan degree programs. Nonetheless, students ultimately are responsible for proper enrollment, attainment of acceptable academic standards, and fulfillment of graduation requirements. Students who fail to maintain minimum standards are subject to probation or dismissal from the university, according to circumstances. At the first sign of academic difficulty, responsible students should ask instructors for help and should seek the assistance of their graduate program advisor and the Center for Student Academic Support.

Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

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Programs

in the

henry Kendall College

of

arts

and

sCienCes

Anthropology
Chair Lamont Lindstrom Professors Garrick A. Bailey Donald O. Henry Lamont C. Lindstrom George H. Odell Michael E. Whalen Associate Professor Peter G. Stromberg Graduate Program Advisor George H. Odell

The M.A. program in anthropology provides students with the necessary theoretical and technical background for pursuing professional careers or continuing graduate studies at the doctoral level. Concentrated course work is offered in archaeology, cultural anthropology (including ethnohistory), and Native American studies. The program emphasizes development of analytical and writing skills in all areas of course work. Admission. Candidates for admission to the graduate program in anthropology must either hold a bachelor’s degree in anthropology or archaeology or hold a bachelor’s degree in another subject with significant course work in anthropology or another social science. Candidates without this background may apply to receive conditional admission to the graduate program. Applicants for admission should have a minimum grade point average of 3.0. Applicants with GPAs of less than 3.0 may be admitted on probation at the discretion of the faculty. Applicants must submit scores from the General Tests of the Graduate Record Examination. General Requirements. For students who write theses, the program entails 30 credit hours, including six credit hours of thesis work. The non-thesis option entails 36 credit hours of course work. Candidates who select this option must complete the specified 24 credit hours of course work plus an additional 12 credit hours of classes selected in consultation with the graduate advisor. All graduate students are also expected to develop field research skills through participation in the department’s ongoing research programs. There is no formal language requirement for the M.A. degree. Students, however, will consult with their advisors regarding the development of pertinent linguistic and/or computer skills necessary for thesis research and analysis. Students are reminded that most Ph.D. programs and many research positions require proficiency in one or more foreign languages. Students focus on one of three tracks: archaeology, cultural anthropology, and Native American studies.

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Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

Archaeology Track
Thirty credit hours required (including 6 credit hours thesis) for thesis option; no more than 12 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. (Students pursuing this option are required to present a thesis proposal, approved by a faculty member, to the graduate advisor). Thirtysix credit hours for non-thesis option; no more than 15 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. Core Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours Anth 7103, Archaeological Theory Anth 7113, Design and Administration of Archaeological Research Methods Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 hours Anth 7203, Ceramic Analysis Anth 7213, Analysis of Lithic Artifacts Anth 7233, Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology Topical and Regional Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 hours Selected from available 6000- and 7000-level courses in anthropology. Tutorials/Independent Research (Anth 7991-3) Specialized training and information not provided in regularly scheduled courses. With consent of advisor, tutorials may be taken in lieu of topical and regional courses. Thesis (Anth 7983-6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours The thesis is expected to involve field and/or laboratory research.

Cultural Anthropology Track
Thirty credit hours required (including 6 credit hours of thesis) for thesis option; no more than 12 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. (Students pursuing this option are required to present a thesis proposal, approved by a faculty member, to the graduate advisor). Thirty-six credit hours for non-thesis option; no more than 15 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. Core Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours Anth 6263, Contemporary Anthropological Problems Anth 7123, History of Anthropological Theory Methods Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours Anth 7233, Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology Anth 6403, Qualitative Research Methods Topical and Regional Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 hours (At least 6 hours must be taken at the 7000 level) Selected from available 6000- and 7000-level courses in anthropology. Tutorials/Independent Research (Anth 7991-3) Specialized training and information not provided in regularly scheduled courses. With consent of advisor, tutorials may be taken in lieu of topical and regional courses. Thesis (Anth 7983-6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours The thesis is expected to involve field research.

Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences

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Native American Studies Track
Thirty hours required (including 6 hours thesis) for thesis option; no more than 12 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. (Students pursuing this option are required to present a thesis proposal, approved by a faculty member, to the graduate advisor). Thirty-six hours for non-thesis option; no more than 15 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. Core Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours Anth 6263, Contemporary Anthropological Problems Anth 7123, History of Anthropology Theory Methods Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours Anth 7253, Techniques of Ethnohistoric Data Collection Anth 6403, Qualitative Research Methods Topical and Regional Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 hours (At least 6 hours must be taken at the 7000 level) Selected from available 6000- and 7000-level courses in anthropology. Tutorials/Independent Research (Anth 7991-3) Specialized training and information not provided in regularly scheduled courses. With consent of advisor, tutorials may be taken in lieu of topical and regional courses. Thesis (Anth 7983-6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours The thesis is expected to involve field research.

Anthropology (Anth) The number of credits allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number.
7103 Seminar in Archaeological Theory: Archaeology as Anthropology Examines the development of archaeological theory in relation to the larger body of general anthropological theory. Emphasizes current theoretical orientations within the discipline, including: systems theory, classification schema, ethnoarchaeology, processual archaeology, and cultural ecology. 7113 Seminar in the Design and Administration of Archaeological Research Introduces the procedures of conducting archaeological research. Discussions focus on the development of research designs, methods of obtaining research funding, and the administration of a research project.

7123 History of Anthropological Theory Anthropological thought from the 19th century through the present is surveyed, concentrating on the major evolutionary, historical, psychological, functional, and structural orientations of European and American anthropologists. Prerequisite: 15 hours of anthropology or permission of instructor. 7203 Ceramic Analysis Presents several approaches to the study of ceramics: identification of clays and tempering materials; determination of vessel size, shape, and form from fragmentary remains; and design element analysis strategies. Provides tools for both the functional and chronological aspects of ceramic analysis. 7213 Analysis of Lithic Artifacts Examines various procedures employed in the analysis of chipped stone artifacts. Specific topics include morphological typologies, lithic technologies, functional attributes, and raw material characteristics.

and Asia. 6043 Old World Prehistory Examines the prehistoric cultures of Europe. and zooarchaeological studies as a means of reconstructing past environments. Topics include collections-based research in archaeology and ethnology. Sequences of cultural development are defined by considering technological. 6053 Archaeological Analysis Focuses on the principal types of questions in which archaeologists are interested and the analytical techniques necessary to answer them. cataloguing. 6223 Geoarchaeology Focuses on understanding the application of geological principles and techniques to the solution of archaeological problems. The course combines traditional and contemporary issues with a substantial laboratory component. focusing on the integration of geomorphological.74 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7233 Quantitative Analysis in Anthropology Instruction in the use of computer and statistical analyses for the solution of anthropological problems. 7243 Paleoenvironmental Reconstructions Techniques used in collecting. and South America. and geochronology are surveyed and discussed as approaches to understanding prehistoric human ecology. Early hunting cultures. and social change over the long prehistoric record. and conserving cultural objects. Geomorphology. collecting. developing exhibitions. 6013 Methods and Techniques in Museum Anthropology Methods distinctive to anthropological work in museums and other repositories are examined. and (where applicable) the rise and collapse of complex polities are evaluated and compared for North. the elaboration of society. plant domestication. Middle. 7961 Residency (See page 20. 7253 Techniques of Ethnohistoric Data Collection and Analysis An introduction to the approaches employed in studying sociocultural systems through archaeological and documentary evidence. stratigraphy. economic. sedimentology. 6033 Archaeology of the Americas Analysis of sequences and processes of cultural development in the Americas. pedology. and undertaking community collaborations.) 7983-6 (3-6 hours) Thesis 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Research Approved Undergraduate Courses Undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with the approval of the program advisor. analyzing. Africa. A student enrolling in these courses will be assigned work beyond that required of undergraduate students. Emphasis on the fundamentals of computer usage and the application of relevant statistics to anthropological data. . and interpreting paleoenvironmental evidence. palynological.

multi-disciplinary research techniques.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 6263 Contemporary Anthropological Problems Examines current issues in anthropology with particular emphasis on recent theoretical developments in cultural anthropology and archaeology. including the peopling of an area. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. collections. the Near East. including student presentations on selected theoretical problems. early and developed hunting cultures. Oceania. Students design and implement a qualitative research project. and others depending on the interests of the faculty. Prerequisite: Anth 2053. 6603 Topics in Cultural Anthropology Explores a traditional area of inquiry in anthropology. and symbolic anthropology. staffing. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. and the origin of states. Topics alternate among geographical areas such as North America. fundraising and other issues central to museum work are examined. Prerequisite: Anth 2053. elaboration of society. participant observation. . culture and personality. culture change. 6403 Qualitative Research Methods An introduction to qualitative methods of research and analysis such as in-depth interviewing. social organization. economic anthropology. Europe. and political organization of native societies of such regions and periodically include the areas of Mesoamerica. acculturation. conservation. These courses survey the economy. May be repeated for credit when areas vary. history. 6503 Topics in Prehistory Explores particular theoretical and methodological problem areas in archaeology. South America. registration. and Europe. exhibitions. community relations. technology. with particular focus on art. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. depending on research interests of faculty. Sub-Saharan Africa. prehistoric cultural ecology. Africa. Museum mission statements. Topics include. Topics may include the origins of food production. approaches to prehistoric demography. focus groups and discourse analysis. 75 6713 Regional Studies in Prehistory Human cultural development analyzed in selected areas of the world. development of village life. culture materialism. Prerequisite: Anth 2043. Prerequisite: Anth 2043. 6833 Regional Studies in Cultural Anthropology Intensive studies of the historic cultural development of societies in a specific geographic or cultural area. and anthropology settings. domestication of plants and animals. but are not limited to. the rise of civilizations. and others. political anthropology. 6413 Introduction to Museum Work Introduces students to museums as organizations and examines career opportunities across the range of museum disciplines. technological development. governance. South America.

degree is considered the professional terminal degree in studio art and is recommended for those individuals seeking professional careers or teaching at the university or college level. The M. or equivalent degree from an accredited college or university.A. three letters of recommendation.A. Transfer credit of up to six credit hours is allowed for the M.A.A. General Requirements.A.A. Students seeking candidacy for the M. only). at the discretion of the art program’s graduate faculty.F. A representative portfolio in 35mm slides. degree must complete a residency requirement consisting of no less than nine credit hours in one semester at The University of Tulsa.A. The time limitation for completion of the M. drawing. degree is six years. photography.T.A.A. The M. Applied Associate Professors Mark Lewis M. Glenn Godsey Michelle Martin Whitney Forsyth Assistant Professors Glenn Herbert Davis Michaela Merryday Binod Shrestha The graduate program in art offers curricula leading to the Master of Teaching Arts. degree before embarking on the M.T. prints. degree toward requirements for the M. degree is recommended for individuals who are committed to teaching art at the primary and secondary school levels. Teresa Valero Graduate Program Advisor Whitney Forsyth .76 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences School of Art Director Susan M.A.A. The graduate faculty may extend full credit for hours earned in an M.A. and a letter of intent must be approved by the Graduate Art Faculty and will remain on file in the graduate advisor’s office. Students must have a B.A.F.A.F. an artist’s statement. Dixon Associate Professors Susan M.A. M.. printmaking.A. B. The M. Should the candidate hold an M.F. and Master of Fine Art degrees.F. the completion requirement is limited to four years.. or CD/DVD-ROM. degree in art is the professional degree for those pursuing careers in art-related fields. Admission. Master of Arts. or M.F. degree and 12 credit hours for the M. Dixon M. painting.F. or M..T. program.A.. The applicant’s transcript must be equivalent to the curriculum requirements of the art program and any undergraduate deficiencies must be removed. and graphic design (M.. with emphases in ceramics.

. If the student does not pass the formal review. 6 hours The maximum number of credit hours that a student can take at the 6000 level is 15 hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours Art History . . Master of Arts The Master of Arts curriculum consists of at least 36 credit hours of graduate study as follows: Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . may be met with courses within or outside of the art program. . . . 9 hours Electives (Art Studio) . . . . . . students at the end of the second and fourth semesters or at the completion of 18 and 36 credit hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours Electives outside area of emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to be determined by the master’s project director. . . . The committee will conduct an oral examination. . . . . . . . . . . 18 hours Seminar. . . . . .A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . with the approval of the graduate advisor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The evaluation committee consists of three professors – two from studio art. . . . The student will select a graduate professor to be director of the master’s thesis and chair of the thesis committee. . . . . . . . . . 6 hours Master’s Thesis Project . . . . . . . . . evenly divided between professional education and studio art. . . . Also see the M. . . . . . . . . . . . . curriculum consists of at least 36 credit hours of graduate study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and one from a discipline outside of the studio art area. prints. . . . . . . . . . . Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Master’s Thesis. . Education and Art Education . . . . . . . The student is required to present a body of work and an artist’s statement to discuss with their thesis committee. .T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Studio work must include a minimum of three credit hours with at least three different faculty professors. . . . . . . . . . at which time the student will defend and discuss the work presented. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A. . . . . . The project must adequately display the proficiency of each candidate in that field. . . 18 hours Art History . Formal reviews are required of all M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . requirements in the Education section of this Bulletin. . . .A. . 6 hours The maximum number of credit hours that a student can take at the 6000 level is 15 hours. Candidates will present projects from their major areas of concentration consisting of a specified number of works. . Failure to pass any probationary review will result in dismissal from the program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The written component and images must be submitted to the Graduate School and follow the thesis preparation guidelines. .Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 77 Master of Teaching Arts The M. . a probationary review will take place at the end of the next semester. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elective hours. . . . . . The format for the submission of the thesis work consists of professional documentation in 35mm slides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . or CD/DVD-ROM and a written master’s statement. . 3 hours Major (Art Studio) . . . The master’s thesis is defined by the student in consultation with the major professor and consists of a body of creative works in an identified area of emphasis and a written component discussing the works. . . . .

. . . .. . . . . . . Candidates will participate in a solo or group exhibition at the university. . . degree is required and will be maintained in the candidate’s file in the graduate advisor’s office. . . . . . . and procedures for teaching art in elementary and secondary schools. . . . . .F. . . . a probationary review will take place at the end of the next semester. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A written artist statement of the candidate for the M. . . . . . . . . . . . The student is required to present a body of work and an artist’s statement to discuss with their thesis committee.F. . .e. . . . . . Art (Art) 7002-9 (2-9 hours) Life Drawing Study of the human figure with emphasis on the visual relation in its attitudes and movements. .A. . . . . . . . .78 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Master of Fine Arts The M. . Studio work must include a minimum of three credit hours with at least three different professors. . . . Creative thinking and technical proficiency are emphasized. . . . .A. . . . . The evaluation committee consists of three professors. . degree are encouraged to participate in national or regional exhibitions prior to their oral examination. . . If the M. The format for the submission of the thesis work consists of professional documentation in 35mm slides. . . . The MFA Thesis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . If the student does not pass the formal review. . 7062-9 (2-9 hours) Printmaking A concentrated study of selected printmaking processes. . Candidates for the M. . . . . . The master’s thesis is defined by the student in consultation with the major professor and consists of a body of creative works in the student’s identified area of emphasis and a written component discussing the works. . . . . . . . . . . .F.F. . . 7022. . . . candidate is deficient in art history. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . prints. . . .A. . . . . . i. . . . . . . Candidates should consult with the graduate advisor concerning specific requirements for the completion of the degree. . . . . . . . . . . . .A. . . . . . . . . . Work with the living nude model with further application to special problems. then the candidate must take an additional 3 hours of art history coursework. . . . . The committee will conduct an oral examination. . . . . . . . . . 6 hours Art History . at which time the student will defend and discuss the work presented in his or her exhibition. . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours Thesis . . . . 7032 Art Education Theory. . . The number of credit hours allotted a course is designated by the last digit of the course number. . . . . . . The written component and images must be submitted to the Graduate School and follow the thesis processing guidelines. . and one from a discipline outside the studio art area. . Failure to pass any probationary review will result in dismissal from the program. . 7042-9 (2-9 hours) Painting Creative problems in painting in any medium chosen by the student. . curriculum consists of 60 credit hours of graduate study as follows: Studio . . . . . . . . . or CD/DVDROM and a written master’s statement. . 3 hours Classes outside of Art . . . The student will select a graduate professor to be director of the master’s thesis and chair of the thesis committee. . . 9 hours Studio Art Seminar . . . . students at the end of the second and fourth semesters or at the end of 18 and 36 credit hours. . . . . . has less than 15 hours of undergraduate credit in this area. . . . . . . . . . . Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Formal reviews are required of all M. . .A. . . . . . processes. 6 hours The maximum number of credit hours that a student can take at the 6000 level is 24 hours. . . two from studio art. . 30 hours Studio outside major area of emphasis .

7172-9 (2-9 hours) Photography Creative problems. 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis 7991-9 (1-9 hours) Independent Study 79 Art History (ArtH) 7961 Residency (See page 20. 2023. Prerequisites: Art 1103. Basic and advanced techniques will be addressed as needed. 7333 Web Site Design Evaluations and critiques of existing websites and the creation of websites using a variety of multimedia software applications. 1113. Prerequisites: Art 1103. 7991-4 (1-4 hours) Independent Study Approved Undergraduate Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with the approval of the program advisor. The class will encounter basic exercises in performance with elements of improvisation. 2023. moving on to the viewing of several video examples from around the world. 1113. with emphasis on composition. 2023.) 7973 Seminar Selected topics. 7152-9 (2-9 hours) Ceramic Design Research and experimental work with individual choice of problems in various ceramic materials.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7073 Portfolio: Graphic Design Reviews and evaluations of previous graphics work with emphasis on overcoming identified areas of weakness and continuing development and refinement of techniques. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by undergraduate students in the course. 7132-9 (2-9 hours) Sculpture Research and experimental work with individual choice of problems in various sculptural media. research and experimental exploration of photographic processes and materials. or permission of instructor. plastics. 1113. Prerequisites: Art 1103. 7214 Performance Art Discussions concerning fundamental precepts of performance art. including ceramics. or permission of instructor. stone. 2103. form and space. which change each semester. Six hours lecture and laboratory per week. color. Art 6003 Life Drawing Human form in a variety of media. 6033 Watercolor Studio Creative problems in watercolor painting. . which change each semester. cast and welded metal alloys. Concluding projects are expected to meet professionally acceptable standards of quality. 7433 Advanced Web Site Design A concentrated study of the power of web motion graphics.) 7973 Seminar Selected topics. Semester course emphasis is indicated in the respective fall/spring schedule of courses. Instruction focuses on the manipulation of these programs as it pertains to design. 7961 Residency (See page 20. 6013 Sculpture Studio Various sculptural media.

or 3323 Photography II Digital. pointof-purchase display. and illustration. 6133 Creative Arts for Elementary Teachers Basic fundamentals of art methods. exhibition graphics and container design. both aesthetic and technical. Creative thinking is encouraged with emphasis on the technical problem solving and aesthetic use of display and text type. Two hours lecture and two hours methods laboratory per week. methods. Individual expression. monotype. Prerequisite: Art 3243 or permission of instructor. and philosophy of music for the elementary classroom teacher. art education. 1113. art history. Prerequisite: Admission to the teacher education program. and miscellaneous projects. 6223 Early Childhood Elementary Art Education Theory. diversified program of art experiences in basic content areas. and philosophy to enable the elementary teacher to build a broad. and methods. Prerequisites: Art 1103. 6072-3 (2-3 hours) Crafts Basic art media. Prerequisites: Art 2153. Open to elementary. will run concurrent with detailed critiques. This course involves designing a corporate symbol that is then implemented in stationery. Four hours lecture and laboratory per week. 6323 Use of the Photograph Exploration of contemporary possibilities for the photograph using the structural study of recognized contexts as a departure point. This class prepares the student for significant design challenges in virtually all areas of communication design. 6063 Printmaking Studio Intermediate level work in intaglio. and studio work. In-class projects investigate a wide range of media and attitudes toward drawing. 6243 Graphics Communication I Introduction to graphic design as a medium of communication. architecture. Prerequisite: Art 3243. The package as a marketing tool and as an aesthetic object is explored. education.1113. Semester course 6053 Drawing: Advanced Studio Stresses individual explorations of the language of drawing. Techniques of pre-print production. materials. with the use of typography. recreation. Intensive critique and readings required. and procedures for teaching early childhood elementary art education. or relief. . 6293 Packaging Design This course explores graphic design for threedimensional formats such as packaging. Prerequisite: Art 3243 or permission of instructor. A designer must create the personality/ voice for a company that manufactures a product or provides a service. and design are stressed. 6273 Typography and Graphic Production All aspects of typography are covered through lectures. This class provides appreciation of the visual tools and principles that lead to exploration and personal methodology. 3313 Photography II Traditional. marketing. or permission of instructor.80 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 6253 Graphics Communication II Corporate design is the process of creating and disseminating the image or identity for a collective entity. materials. MUSIC-Basic skills activities. 6412-6 (2-6 hours) Sculpture Studio Advanced problems in three dimensions with emphasis on expanded explorations and materials and technical applications. processes. tools. or permission of instructor. 1103. 2023. lithography. Emphasis on printmaking as an extension of drawing. brochures. and special education majors. billboards. packaging. Principles combined with a general history. 2023. effective use of materials. Students are taught the effectiveness of visual communication and its practices in the professional world today. photography. Marker and finished comprehensives are executed for advertising and specialty graphics. demonstrations. secondary. or permission of instructor. Emphasis on innovative and personalized approaches and in the development of highly involved student-directed content. This course clarifies the process of developing graphic and visual articulation in package design.

series and edition work) in the areas of relief. Students engage in a creative inquiry of their own design. nature and nation. Slide lecture and discussion. and production. and political context touching on subjects such as art and conquest. 300-1300. intaglio. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. and poetic use of color (light). lithography. 1113. Islamic. 6543 Advertising Design Through lectures. Carolingian. Prerequisites: Art 2023. or per-mission of instructor. 6902-6 (2-6 hours) Internship On-the-job training in a professional environment. Slide lecture and discussion. color printing. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 6432-6 (2-6 hours) Painting Studio Advanced creative problems in painting. Emphasis is placed on presentation of all concepts as they are presented to the clients. representation of republican virtue. 6422 Design Studio Advanced problems in design emphasizing individual projects. planning. Some assignments are comparable in specifications and deadlines to those of a working illustrator. experimenta- 81 tion. The student. on the recommendation of his or her advisor.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences emphasis is indicated in the respective fall/ spring schedule of courses. Prerequisite: Art 1103. This course will put the work of these artists into a broader cultural. 2153. students explore all facets of realistic advertising campaigns. machine aesthetics. art and commerce. Highly intensive critique and readings required. 6093 American Art This course will introduce students to American art from the 16th to the 21st century. Art History (ARTH) 6053 Medieval Art In this course. 6443 Illustration Problems involving the techniques and visual vocabulary of contemporary illustration. 6462-6 (2-6 hours) Printmaking Studio Printmaking utilizing advanced techniques and concepts (photo-methods. . senior standing. Six hours lecture and laboratory per week. defining identities in a multicultural America. 2023. Others stretch these limitations to encourage inventive thinking. Ottonian and Romanesque arts with a focus on the theological. Emphasis solely on the highly involved development of student-directed creative inquiry including the management of criticism and reception. c. and studio work. supported by research. the mapping of new terrain. The course proceeds from market research and sound. and also explore principles of advertising design and layout. defining America. and permission of instructor. social. may earn two to six hours credit. or monotype on individual problems. Students gain familiarity with methods of creating advertising concepts via text and image. with emphasis on the composition and functions of color in achieving form and space. Readings required. demonstrations. Explorations include advanced glaze chemistry and research at various temperature ranges. field trips. Prerequisite: Art 3242 or permission of instructor. and from the Cold War to the culture wars. structural. 6523 Student Directed Projects Examination of the artist’s relationship to the authority and established standards of the creative fields. historical. we examine the visual arts of various media from the Early Christian period to the Gothic period. Instructor and student group form an atelier and act as secondary assistants and critics to each student’s efforts. By arrangement only. social and political forces that molded their production and reception. 6482-6 (2-6 hours) Ceramic Studio Advanced problems in the use of clay as a medium of expression. Emphasis will be placed on the creative. including the Byzantine. 6452-6 (2-6 hours) Photography Studio Advanced creative problems emphasizing individual investigation of various photographic techniques and materials. and paint. form. valid visualizations for advertising media through comp presentations. Migration. modernism.

the encounter of new cultures. Slide lecture and discussion. the impact of photography. the impact of the mass media. social. from woodcut to lithography. social. Slide lecture and discussion. and political context and examine various discourses that shaped the art of the twentieth century such as Modernism. Slide lecture and discussion. social. 6133 Greek and Roman Art This course examines Greek art from the Archaic to the Hellenistic period and Roman art from the Early to the Late Empire. interior decoration. 1880 to the mid-20th century covering artistic developments such as Post-Impressionism. stage design. etc. primitivism. and the increasing globalization of culture. We assess the social. Slide lecture/discussion. 1780 to 1880 covering developments from Neo-Classicism to Impressionism. sculpture. and philosophical contexts in they were produced and consumed.e. It offers a critique of the historigraphic presentation of Greek works of art as developmentally progressive. Cubism.) of Italy. and the two World Wars.g. France and Spain (primarily). the rise of Romanticism. we explore printmaking from c. 6713 Italian Renaissance Art This course examines the visual arts from c. Slide lecture and discussion. Grunewald. and the complex iconographic language of Bosch and Bruegel. the classical revival. with an emphasis on the social and political uses of prints. 1300 to 1550 in Italy. and Multiculturalism. historical. 6923 Post-Impressionism through Abstract Expressionism This course covers developments in art and visual culture from ca. Conceptual Art. Slide lecture and discussion. Constructivism. This course will put the work of these artists into a broader cultural. This course will put the work of these artists into a broader cultural. In the Netherlands. in Germany.82 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 6723 Northern Renaissance Art Painting. the development of the Eyckian tradition. political. we examine the form and content of the two-dimensional arts of the Protestant Northern Netherlands and the Catholic Southern Netherlands. 6733 17th-Century Dutch and Flemish Painting In this course. and the emergence of the avantgarde. . industrialization and urbanization. sculpture. Pop Art. focuses on Jan van Eyck. 16001750. Surrealism. Slide lecture and discussion. 1400 to 1800. and an examination of the use of Roman form and content for political purposes. focuses on Durer. architecture. historical. Dada. and printmaking of Northern Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries. Postmodernism. Minimalism. painting. Expressionism. This course will put the work of these artists into a broader cultural. i. 6413 Baroque and Rococo Art Presents and offer analysis of the full range of visual arts (e. and Abstract Expressionism. We will examine various discourses that shaped the art of the second half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century. gardens.. and the Danube School. and political context. such as the impact of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. 6913 19th-Century European Art This course will introduce students to major developments in art and architecture from ca. Slide lecture/discussion. the impact of modern technology and science. and colonialism. with a focus on the art patronage system and the art market as they shape the painting of the 1600s. 6423 Art Since Mid-Century This course covers developments in art and visual culture from the mid-20th century to the present covering artistic developments such as Neo-Dada. with a focus on some of the social. the rise of the civil rights movement and the women’s liberation movement. historical. 6353 History of Prints In this course. Slide lecture and discussion. political and religious contexts in which these works were created. the Cold War. prints. and political context and examine various discourses that shaped the art of the 19th century.

Hipsher. students master the central concepts of their chosen programs as well as develop the ability to empirically analyze. but not required for admission. and speak and write clearly in the appropriate genre for their educational field. Coursework and research projects are defined by our faculty’s expertise in both teaching and scholarship. Admission to the School of Education’s graduate degree programs is selective. and scholarly research. faculty. educational policy. an undergraduate grade point average of 3. Graduate students may pursue Oklahoma certification as part of a degree program or as an independent certificationonly plan. Thomas Benediktson Professor Warren L. principals. and satisfactory test scores on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination. the sociology of education. Alumni of the School of Education’s graduate programs include numerous teachers. education in the humanities. at least three letters of recommendation from college instructors or other individuals qualified to testify about intellectual and professional abilities. Robards Assistant Professor Tao Wang Graduate Program Advisor Tao Wang The graduate programs in education are designed to strengthen and deepen students’ analytical understanding of education while preparing them for futures in teaching. and superintendents. Minimum requirements for admission include a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. international comparative education. educational technology. To achieve this level of flexibility. a satisfactory statement of purpose. and international education agencies. Brown Shirley N. Beals David S. state. attorneys specializing in education law. Undergraduate coursework in education. Associate Professors Diane E. policymaking. think critically. pedagogy and curriculum development. or advanced writing is recommended. Students who do not meet these minimum requirements may be considered for provisional or probationary admission at the discretion of the Graduate Program Advisor. each student works closely with the Graduate Program Advisor as well as specific faculty whose areas of expertise align with the students’ particular interests and professional goals. federal. The statement of purpose should be at least 1000 words in length and address the applicant’s scholarly interests and/or professional goals in education as well as how the applicant’s interests and goals fit with those of the faculty of the School of Education and the specific degree program to which they are applying. . the social sciences. statistics. and Graduate Studies Committee in the School of Education. The School of Education’s graduate programs are flexible by design in order to encourage our students’ individual growth and specialization in education. In so doing. Jr. The faculty make every effort to help students integrate research and theory with educational policy and practice. and school-to-work transition. the philosophy of education.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 83 School of Education Director D. math and science education. human development.0 or better (on a 4-point scale). Admission. Specific fields of study that carry the advantage of faculty depth and the potential for original research are: language acquisition. university professors. educational researchers. and others in local.

The Master of Arts is a research-based program with concentrations in research and evaluation.A. but are perhaps most evident in the M. therefore. Two members must be from the School of Education with the thesis advisor as the committee chair. and secondary education. programs of study. and to prepare graduates for educational research and/or doctoral study. On completion of the research. the student must complete a minimum of three and maximum of six hours of thesis credit. Applications to graduate programs in education are evaluated once a year for Fall admissions and once a year for Spring admissions. Techniques of Research and Evaluation Educ 7173. be practitioner researchers and educational leaders. elementary education. Discourse. Core Courses (18 credit hours) Educ 7003. and Development. the student will write a thesis that conforms to the Graduate School’s recommended procedures. program. and Development. degree program. In carrying out the thesis project. Application packets should be submitted directly to the Graduate School at The University of Tulsa. With the advisor’s . Reflection and inquiry are embedded in all graduate programs in the School of Education.A.A. An expert from outside the university may be used with the approval of the Graduate School. Master of Arts The faculty in the School of Education believe that professional practice must be guided by inquiry and reflection in order to yield understanding and action that promote positive educational change. Concentration in Educational Policy Studies. Research and Thesis M. The Graduate Studies Committee in the School of Education begins review of application packets immediately following each deadline. Eighteen credit hours are selected from the professional education core in addition to eighteen credit hours in one of the concentration areas. Philosophy of Education Educ 7123.84 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Students seeking admission to any of the graduate programs in education should contact the Graduate Program Advisor in the School of Education with further questions about fit. and admission procedures. as professionals. By the end of the second semester and in collaboration with the thesis advisor. the student should identify a three-member thesis committee.A. Advanced Child and Adolescent Growth and Development Educ 7153. Concentration in Language. the third member must be from outside the School of Education. M. By the end of the first semester. and Educational Policy Studies are thesis-driven programs designed to provide graduates additional theoretical background for educational practice. We believe that committed educators should value and incorporate systematic inquiry and reflection into their practice using these skills to help them act as agents of change within their professional community. program requires 36 credit hours of graduate-level coursework. The M. the student should select a research area and a thesis advisor who will supervise the research and the remainder of the student’s course work in conjunction with the Graduate Program Advisor. The concentrations in Language. Educ 7983. Statistical Methods for Research I Educ 7913. The application deadline is March 1 for the following Fall semester and October 15 for the following Spring semester. Research Proposal Educ 7183.A. we believe that it is important to prepare candidates to engage in educational research with the idea that they will. Concentration Courses (18 credit hours) Consists of electives in the student’s chosen concentration. Research and Paper or. Discourse. Within the M.

Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 85 approval.A. The elementary and secondary education concentrations are both field and research-based. Those seeking elementary teacher certification concurrently with the M.A. The concentrations in elementary or secondary education allow students to pursue Oklahoma certification as part of their M. but additional coursework may be required to qualify for the Oklahoma teaching certificate. Those students seeking secondary teacher certification must have completed a baccalaureate degree in a field approved for certification by the Oklahoma State Department of Education. All thesis and oral examination requirements must be scheduled and completed to meet Graduate School deadlines.T. may have to complete additional coursework depending on their completed undergraduate or graduate coursework. Specialized undergraduate courses leading to teacher certification may be taken for graduate credit in some instances. The concentration in research and evaluation does not lead to teacher certification. Concentrations in Elementary or Secondary Education. the program’s purpose is to develop teachers who are leaders in their school communities. and incorporate the most recent social science and educational research into their own teaching. While students concentrating in these areas are non-thesis. the M. Students seeking certification in these concentrations are also required to pass the Oklahoma General Education Test (OGET) and be formally admitted to the School of Education’s Teacher Education Program by the end of their first semester of study. interpret.A. degree program.A. As such. all students do complete a research project. students are not required to complete a final research project or thesis.A. Specifically. The research project consists of a series of research-related coursework that includes the preparation of an approved research proposal and a final research paper reporting on original empirical research conducted in the final year of the program. The oral examination is comprehensive.T. the student must pass an oral thesis examination. covering the student’s entire graduate program and emphasizing the research work and content of the thesis.T. After the thesis has been reviewed and judged ready for defense by the advisor and by the other members of the thesis committee.T.A.” Master of Teaching Arts The Master of Teaching Arts (M. degree program with concentrations in elementary or secondary education requires a minimum of 36 credits of graduate-level coursework. Although M. program is designed to encourage and develop the passion and potential of certified and practicing teachers.A. The M. the M.A. degree program and Oklahoma teacher certification requirements are selected from an approved list and are designed to enhance the teacher’s expertise as well as fulfill the state requirements for certification. the core educational component of the program emphasizes the teacher as researcher—one who is able to locate. and who prepare their own students to be socially active and morally conscious citizens in this new century. was developed to provide practicing K-12 and secondary school teachers the opportunity to jointly study professional education and a specific academic discipline in the liberal arts or sciences. who demonstrate advanced knowledge and expertise in their academic subject area. a draft of the thesis will be forwarded to the other members of the thesis committee for examination and review.) program reflects the School of Education’s long-standing commitment to excellence in teaching. Courses counting concurrently toward both the M. . Although not a degree program leading to initial teacher certification. These 6000-level courses are listed at the end of this section under the heading “Approved Undergraduate Courses.

one that filters into the broader community over the years.S.S.A. The M. students in this program are jointly advised by the Graduate Program Advisors in both the School of Education and in the designated subject area. theatre. Most of all.A. The research project consists of a series of research-related coursework that includes the preparation of an approved research proposal and a final research paper reporting on original empirical research conducted in the final year of the program. They take seriously their role as citizens. The approved subject areas are art. By the end of the first semester. As a result. Students in this program are driven by a reasoned.E.A.T. history. Advanced Child and Adolescent Growth and Development Educ 7153. program is intended for certified and practicing elementary and middle school teachers who wish to enhance their subject matter knowledge and skill in science and math. educational research courses. is a research-based program designed to provide a solid background in mathematics and science principles and their application in the classroom. English.E. core and six credit hours of education electives. or mathematics Master of Science in Mathematics and Science Education The Graduate School. It includes a core of professional education and educational research courses and electives to be selected based on the student’s interest and background. Because the M.S.S. and realize that they do not know everything they will need to know to be influential teachers and public intellectuals.86 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences M. It includes a core of professional education courses. and articulated philosophy of education. they have a foundation in the liberal arts and sciences that allows them to locate their subject area in the appropriate historical. the thesis student should select a research area and a thesis advisor who will supervise . and leaders in our society.S. Philosophy of Education Educ 7123.A. As such. social. servants. The eighteen credit hours in professional education include twelve credit hours from the M.M. Statistical Methods for Research I M.S. program may be pursued with the thesis or non-thesis option. as public intellectuals. is a thirty-six credit hour degree program that provides for graduate study in eighteen credit hours of professional education plus eighteen credit hours in a liberal arts and sciences subject area. justified.E. the eighteen credit hours in the approved academic discipline are determined based on the recommendations of the Graduate Program Advisor in the student’s subject area.T. Subject Area Electives (18 hours) Consists of electives in either art. and mathematics.A. Non-thesis students are still required to complete a research project.S. and electives in math and science. biology. English. is a cooperative program between the School of Education and graduate programs in other university departments defined by the student’s academic discipline. M. The thesis option prepares graduates for entry level positions in educational research and evaluation or to pursue doctoral study in their chosen field. history.T.S.). The M.S.M.S. In addition. degree program does not lead to teacher certification. Education Electives (6 credit hours) Consists of electives in professional education M. theatre. the coursework and faculty in the School of Education help students develop the skills and dispositions for lifelong learning. The M. The M. students master the central concepts of their chosen academic discipline. as well as develop the ability to think critically and speak and write clearly in the appropriate genres for their field of study.T.A.E.A. and philosophical context.T.T.T. Core Courses (12 credit hours) Educ 7003. offers an interdisciplinary program leading to a Master of Science in Mathematics and Science Education (M.M.M. Techniques of Research and Evaluation Educ 7183. they recognize and embrace this calling to create an impact beyond the classroom. The M.E. biology. through the School of Education and the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences.M.

On completion of the research. students must complete a total of thirty credit hours for the degree.M.M. After the thesis has been reviewed and judged ready for defense by the advisor and by the other members of the thesis committee.S. the student must complete a minimum of three and maximum of six hours of thesis credit. Statistics Requirement (3 credit hours) Consists of an approved graduate-level course in statistics . The total includes eighteen credit hours of core courses. All thesis and oral examination requirements must be scheduled and completed to meet Graduate School deadlines. the third member must be from the other department.S. M. Because the M. By the end of the second semester and in collaboration with the thesis advisor.S. In carrying out the thesis project.M. Research and Paper or. No more than twelve credit hours may be taken at the 6000 level.M. The oral examination is comprehensive.S.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 87 the research and the remainder of the student’s course work in conjunction with the Graduate Program Advisor. is an interdisciplinary program between the School of Education and the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. a draft of the thesis will be forwarded to the other members of the thesis committee for examination and review.E. Research and Thesis M. the student will write a thesis that conforms to the Graduate School’s recommended procedures. Instructional Design and Curriculum Integration Educ 7123.S.E. Two members must be from the thesis advisor’s department with the advisor as the committee chair. Advanced Child and Adolescent Growth & Development Educ 7153.S. All M. covering the student’s entire graduate program and emphasizing the research work and content of the thesis. Research Proposal Educ 7913.S. Techniques of Research and Evaluation Educ 7173. Math and Science Courses (9 credit hours) Consists of MSE courses and other electives offered through the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences M.E. another nine credit hours in approved graduatelevel electives in math and science courses offered through the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. Educ 7983. With the advisor’s approval. the student must pass an oral thesis examination.S. Introduction to Educational Technology Educ 7053. and three credit hours in an approved graduate-level course in statistics.M. students in this program are jointly advised by the Graduate Program Advisor in the School of Education and by an advisor in the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences.S. the student should identify a three-member thesis committee.E. Core Courses (18 credit hours) Educ 7043.S.E.

sampling theory. and applications of basic data analytic techniques. teaching strategies including computer capabilities. problem-solving with algorithms and heuristics. Extensive preparation and revision of instructional plans and assessment materials is expected. data collection. and moral development through the lenses of different cultures. teaching strategies using technology and supervised final project. 7133 Legal Aspects of Education Considers litigation involving constitutional. 7043 Introduction to Educational Technology Survey of educational computing topics including functional hardware components.88 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7153 Techniques of Research and Evaluation Studies of the nature and functions of research and evaluation featuring characteristics of the most common types of investigation. and evaluation of student performance. . Students demonstrate competence in achieving congruence among learning objectives. ethics. realism. and case law within the school context. Emphasis upon developing a better understanding of education in all of its ramifications. Includes the study of operationalism. middle. Class time will consist of lecture and one-to-one conferences. 7173 Research Proposal Development of a research question into a proposal for research paper or thesis. pragmatism. A basic premise of the course is that children construct their own knowledge through interaction with their physical and social world. statutory. Full-time assignment (30 hours per week) for one semester is required for nine hours credit with credit for part-time assignments prorated. parameter estimation. Examines issues of cognitive. Final projects are formally presented to teachers at local/state/regional professional meetings. 7123 Advanced Child and Adolescent Growth and Development An overview of development of children and adolescents from a constructivist view. linguistic. social. 7183 Statistical Methods for Research I Study of descriptive statistics. elementary.) 7971-3 (1-3 hours) Seminar The number of credits allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. multiple regression. experimental and quasi-experimental design. Investigation of chi-square. trends and issues in educational technology. simple analysis of variance. Prerequisites: Educ 7153 and 7183. 7283 Statistical Methods for Research II Extension of Educ 7183 including analysis of variance. and existentialism. hypothesis formulation and testing. Education (Educ) (Core courses and professional education) 7003 Philosophy of Education Selected contemporary problems in education as they relate to the philosophies of idealism. administrative. or secondary levels as appropriate. multiple and partial correlation. Prerequisite: completion of one elementary statistics class. history of computing in education. 7473-9 (3-9 hours) Internship in Teaching Classroom teaching experience in area schools at early childhood. Approved project requires the participant to prepare an instructional component for relevant subject matter using computer capabilities based on sound instructional design principles. 7053 Instructional Design and Curriculum Integration Learning/instructional design. bivariate correlation and regression techniques. behaviorism. 7912-3 (2-3 hours) Research and Paper A non-thesis option requiring an approved research project and formal paper/presentation. Graded on a pass/fail system. and evolving roles of teachers for the 21st century. probability. analysis of covariance and some nonparametric methods. and hypothesis testing. theory development and verification. 7961 Residency (See page 20. t-test.

speech. and cultural perspectives. transcribing. Theories of discourse will be studied in order to develop methods for analyzing a specific form of interaction. cultures. teacher professionalism. mathematics. curricular planning. and government education policy related to teachers and teaching. from ethnographic and linguistic perspectives. and society. and the organizational structure of schooling. In particular. subject areas. classroom interaction processes. Language and literacy will be viewed from a cognitive. 7373 Vygotsky’s Theory of Development Examines the sociocultural theory of Lev Vygotsky through engagement with his writings and his methods of study. social. Students compare the differing types of discourse across classrooms. speaking. Students compare the differing types of discourse across classrooms. 7293 Research Methods in International and Comparative Education Development of research skills through theoretical and methodological issues in comparative and international education including special attention to cross-national comparisons. and Development (Educ) 7333 Classroom Discourse Examination of the types of interaction shaping learning in content areas that take place in classroom. and the misuse of comparative data. subject areas. and analyzing interaction between human beings. and nations. international datasets and the importance and methods of qualitative and narrative study in cross-national. Topics for reading and discussion include instruction. cross-sectional analysis of large. and writing.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7981-5 (1-5 hours) Research and Thesis 7991-5 (1-5 hours) Independent Study 89 Language. theories and methods for research. . 7393 Reading in Content Areas Focus on research-based strategies for enhancing students’ literacy in core content areas. Students will collect and analyze discourse. 7333 Classroom Discourse Examination of the types of interaction shaping learning in content areas that take place in classroom. and nations. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. History. cultures. and the zone of proximal development will be discussed in terms of their impact on schooling and child rearing. concepts of tool. Discourse. patterns of school organization. social studies and science. We will examine the components and structures of oral and written language in order to trace the links between the development of listening. 7343 Language and Literacy Development Provides an overview of development of language in children and how this development provides the foundation for the development of literacy. reading. performance assessment. individual educational attainment. including English. 7243 Education as a Global Institution The worldwide effects of schools and schooling on individuals. comparative sets. 7363 Discourse Analysis Survey of methodology for recording. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling. the stratification system. teaching contexts. Students examine processes of reading and writing for specific subject areas and gain experience in incorporating literacy instruction through traditional curriculum and technology. and National Systems in International Comparative Education Traces the evolution of the international and comparative education by focusing on the historical development of comparative education. 7233 Comparative Approaches to Teaching and Teacher Preparation International and comparative analysis of the characteristics and preparation of teachers in specific nations and regions of the world. Educational Policy Studies (Educ) 7213 Theory.

7163-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Astronomy Focuses on sun. 7113-4 (3-4 hours) Earth’s Physical Environment Major issues in earth science. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. and using information management systems. light and sound appropriate for the elementary classroom. 7143-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Chemistry Topics in atoms. comets. Language (LANG) 6003 Methods of Teaching Languages Theory and practice of teaching second languages. galaxies and big bang. Focus on Communicative Language Teaching grades K-12. stars. including award winning literature in various genres. solar system. utilizing hands-on activities. Project will be developed in consultation with instructor and address a curriculum area appropriate for the student. Emphasis on literature appropriate for culturally diverse classrooms. chemical properties and reactivity appropriate for the elementary classroom. moon. telecommunication and networking. Topics include software evaluation. 7133-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Biology Environmental or cellular biology appropriate for the elementary classroom. . simulation and modeling. planets. statistics. 7123-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Physics Topics in mechanics. or equivalent. Prerequisite: sufficient proficiency in the target language to teach practice lessons. Education (EDUC) 6103 Children’s Literature A survey of children’s literature. eclipses. molecules. meteors. normally attained through at least one 4000-level course. integrated applications. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Mathematics/Science Education (MSE) 7013-4 (3-4 hours) Contemporary Physical Science Current problems in chemistry.90 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7213 Technology Project Project involving application of technology to curriculum implementation. based on the students’ background and teaching interests. or discrete mathematics appropriate for the elementary classroom. curriculum integration. Required for teacher licensure in foreign languages. 7043 Classroom Computer Applications Enables teachers to effectively use educational technology in the classroom. multimedia applications. 7153-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Mathematics Advanced topics in analysis. 7831-3 (1-3 hours) Special Topics in Mathematics and Science 7973 Seminar: Problems in Modern Science and Mathematics Discussion of major contemporary issues in science and mathematics as they pertain to the classroom. Approved Undergraduate Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval of the program advisor.

Field experiences in culturally diverse settings. Includes field experiences in culturally diverse settings. Understanding the psychological. listening. including diagnosis and assessment of reading problems and selection of teaching strategies for remedial reading in the classroom. sociological. integrating educational technology. and materials for teaching and development of reading skills in relation to children’s language and thinking abilities. activities. Interdisciplinary curriculum planning and educational technology applications. 91 6403 Education of the Exceptional Child The educational implications of exceptional children and youths as they relate to regular educators and the normal educational environment. Practicum includes application of course content with at-risk readers. 6514 Teaching Methods for Middle and Secondary Schools Combines general and specialized methods for middle school/junior high school and senior high school teachers. 6133 Creative Arts for Elementary Children Fundamentals of art methods. development. Teaching scientific concepts using inquiry-based. Field experiences in culturally diverse settings. . and philosophical aspects of each type of exceptionality is emphasized. educational. Includes 40 clock hours of field experience at two different levels. Includes mechanics and nature of writing. and reading. and anthropological perspectives. problem-solving. writing. and philosophy to enable the elementary teacher to build a broad. and role of computers and technology in writing in the elementary classroom. skill development. diversified program of art experiences related to the basic content areas. the process approach. psychological. concrete activities in the biological and physical sciences. 6333 Child and Adolescent Development and Learning Examines views of childhood. art history. 6143 Social Studies for Elementary Children Materials. and teaching reading and writing in subject areas. 6433 Mathematics for Elementary Children Quantitative thinking. and educational technology applications. Includes planning instruction. but also other cultures’ views of childhood and adolescent development. and variations in life-span experiences both within American culture and across other cultures. 6423 Science for Elementary Children Understanding and developing positive attitudes toward science. Application of course content in field experiences with unit and lesson planning. multicultural education. Observation of educational services being provided by certified professionals is required. 6313 Reading for Elementary Children Curriculum objectives. applied mathematics. Emphasis on theories. Interdisciplinary curriculum planning and educational technology applications. and application of the reading process. 6303 Writing and Language Development for Elementary Children How children learn to communicate through speaking. Prerequisite: Educ 3713 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. classroom management. Field experiences in culturally diverse settings. instructional strategies. and strategies for teaching social studies concepts in grades one through six. Field experiences in culturally diverse settings. methods. sociological.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 6123 Literacy Assessment and Intervention Emphasizes remedial reading. modes of writing. Interdisciplinary curriculum planning. and positive attitudes toward mathematics for learners in kindergarten through the intermediate grades using inquiry-based concrete activities. and education using historical. Focuses not only on Western views of childhood.

92 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences English Language and Literature Chair Lars Engle Professors Hermione de Almeida George H. General Requirements. student works closely with the Director of Graduate Studies and the faculty to develop an area of emphasis suited to his/her particular interests and professional goals. or the equivalent. British and European Romanticism. Taylor James G. and American literatures.A. The M. program requires 36 hours of graduate-level course work. defined by the student in consultation with the graduate director and a member of the faculty. Matthew Jenkins Distinguished Visiting Professor Yevgeny Yevtushenko Graduate Program Advisor Sean Latham Master of Arts The Faculty of English offers a flexible program leading to the M.A. is a non-thesis program: in place of a thesis each student elects. all of which is drawn from the full range of graduate offerings (7000. The M. . Admission. Applicants must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with at least 18 hours. Course work is offered in the full range of subjects defined by our faculty’s expertise and by our internationally renowned archival holdings of manuscripts and books in McFarlin Library. Victorian literature.A. Kestner Holly A. These projects are meant to build upon the student’s individual interests and program of courses. in critical theory. African American literature. in the pedagogy of composition.ante-bellum and post Civil War literature. Seminars are also offered in Early Modern and 18th-century literature. Irish. (2) 19th-century literature . degree. and in the creative writing of fiction and poetry. Laird Gordon O. and women’s literature. in his/her final term. Adams G.A.Modern and Contemporary British. an independent research project. of undergraduate work in literature and language (exclusive of basic composition and basic foreign language courses). and so range widely in subject and approach. A strong undergraduate grade point average and acceptable scores on the General Tests of the Graduate Record Examination must be presented. Watson Associate Professors Lars Engle Sean Latham Laura Stevens Assistant Professors Katherine A.and 8000-level). providing both opportunities for creative expression and professional preparation for teaching and for doctoral study and scholarly research. cultural and gender studies. Specific clusters of study that carry the advantage of faculty depth and the potential for original research are these: (1) 20th-century literature . Each M. (3) American studies. Gilpin Joseph A.

Residence Requirements.A. As preparation for the Qualifying Examination.Modern and Contemporary British. All members of the Faculty of English participate as instructors and on student committees. degree in English or a closely related field from an accredited college or university to apply. a detailed personal statement. The student must spend at least two consecutive semesters in residence as a full-time student in work toward the doctorate.A. at least three courses in literary periods prior to 1800 and three in periods after 1800 are required. the program requires between 18 and 36 hours of coursework to be followed by 24 hours of directed study and dissertation research. The minimum period in which the Ph. cultural and gender studies. or the M. and American literatures.D. The qualifying examination is taken at the end of the first semester following the completion of required coursework. and 3) a 60-minute oral exam.. Victorian literature. To assure adequate breadth and depth of preparation during doctoral coursework.D. 2) written exams in two declared fields. The standard is a capacity to translate accurately a representative critical or scholarly passage with some bearing on the student’s field of interest. British and European Romanticism. In the latter case.. program in English is designed to develop knowledgeable scholars. Admission. doctoral students must take at least two courses in each of their declared primary fields. in critical theory. The doctoral program is administered by the Director of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Program Committee. The requirement should be met as early as possible in a student’s career and must be fulfilled prior to taking the qualifying examination. in the pedagogy of composition. It consists of three elements: 1) a statement of research interests. (2) 19th-century literature . and in the creative writing of fiction and poetry. as demonstrated by passing a translation test set by program faculty. degree can be earned is two full academic years of study. The doctoral program requires a minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate. African American literature. Language Requirements. For students entering with the M. Ph. Candidates must hold either the B.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 93 Doctor of Philosophy The Ph. The doctoral program is designed to be a five-year program for students entering with the B. Seminars are also offered in Early Modern and 18th-century literature. and women’s literature. Qualifying Exam Preparation. and a writing sample of approximately 15-25 pages in length. Irish.D. the precise requirements for coursework are established by the Graduate Program Committee as part of the admission process. Specific clusters of study that carry the advantage of faculty depth and the potential for original research are: (1) 20th-century literature . candidates enroll in a minimum of 9 hours of Engl 8791.A.antebellum and post Civil War literature. Doctoral students are required to achieve a sound reading knowledge of one classical or modern language. . During exam preparation.A. (3) American studies. Qualifying Examination. Course work is offered and dissertations directed in the full range of subjects defined by our faculty’s expertise and by our internationally renowned archival holdings of manuscripts and books in McFarlin Library. such students will complete 54 hours of coursework (including 3 hours of Directed Reading in the second year) and at least 18 hours of directed study and dissertation research. All applicants must present acceptable scores on the General Tests of the Graduate Record Examination. Course Requirements. Students must propose for approval the language on which they intend to be examined. and teachers of English literature. critics.

Upon completion. Students passing the examination are invited to apply for candidacy and proceed directly to the preparation of a dissertation prospectus. accompanied by a bibliography. all doctoral students will be reviewed annually by the Graduate Committee. . select a committee consisting of three faculty members chosen on the basis of relevant expertise. the members of which are usually chosen by the student after the qualifying examination is passed. Students and their advisors may establish clear emphases in the chosen fields. and for assessing the examination. The committee is formally responsible for defining the candidate’s fields of study. The exam process begins with the submission of the statement of research interests that will in most cases consist of one or more important questions that fall within the two fields. an expression of concern about the current progress toward the degree that contains recommendations for improving a candidate’s standing. upon formal approval. The purpose of this review is to assure that students are making good progress to the degree and to provide students with candid feedback from the faculty about their performance. and familiarity with current critical issues in the two primary fields. Grading is pass/fail. Procedures. In the final semester of coursework. the student’s qualifying exam committee convenes a one-hour oral exam which covers both the written portion of the exams and the statement of research interests. Competence is understood to consist in mastery of recognized primary texts. and American Contemporary British 19th-Century American 20th-Century American African American Students should compile reading lists for each of the fields in consultation with faculty advisors. Irish. Within two weeks following the end of the written exam. for overseeing the qualifying preparation. Beginning in their final semester of coursework. The prospectus is understood to be a substantial (chapterlength) piece of writing. The prospectus is prepared in consultation with the supervisory committee. a broad knowledge of historical context. Based on these reviews. appoint the dissertation committee to supervise the writing of the dissertation. proceed to the writing of the dissertation. Prospectus and Dissertation. Failing to pass the exam a second time will lead to the termination of doctoral candidacy. The following literary-historical periods or areas may be used as primary fields for the Qualifying Examination: Renaissance Restoration and 18th-Century British 19th-Century British Romantic Victorian 20th-Century British and Irish Modern British. The Director and Graduate Program Committee. Examination. and final approval by this committee. in which the tenability of a dissertation-thesis is shown through argument and through a convincing survey of relevant criticism and scholarship. the Graduate Committee will make one of several recommendations which might include: approval to continue work in the PhD program. The reading lists should not substantially overlap with each other. and. in consultation with the Director. Annual Review. indicating both their strengths and their opportunities for improvement. the candidate then sits for two written exams lasting four hours each given within the course of a week. Within ten days. Candidates failing the exam are offered one opportunity to repeat in the succeeding term. or a recommendation of dismissal.94 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Literary-Historical Periods. in consultation with the student. Students formally present the prospectus to the Director and the Graduate Program Committee at a prospectus meeting and. candidates submit a proposed list of fields along with evidence of sufficient coursework in those fields to the Director of Graduate Studies. the dissertation will be submitted to the Graduate School.

Plato. Marlowe. the Gawain poet. and others. Mary Sidney. Foxe. Finch. Longinus. Figures taught may include: More. Langland. . drama.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 95 Spring Colloquium. Cary. Puttenham. Marvell. with attention to plays by writers such as Nashe. Middleton. Webster. Marlowe. Spenser. Fletcher. with attention to relevant institutional contexts and theoretical problems. Chapman. Margery Kempe. Horace. Thrale. Cowper. Swift. chosen from works by Dryden. Philip Sidney. Defoe. Shakespeare. Addison. and Juvenal. Beaumont. Thomson. Apuleius. Gray. Ford. 7113 16th-Century British Literature Tudor poetry and prose. Bacon. Wyatt. Henryson. The number of credits allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. the Director of Graduate Studies will convene a departmental colloquium at which all candidates at the dissertation proposal stage and beyond will be asked to present a portion of their research in a conference-style setting. the Greek dramatists. Egerton.and 20th-century materials with attention to earlier texts. Participation can be waived by the Graduate Director if this presents an unusual hardship. 7213 African American Literature Origins and development of African American literature. the Levellers. 7193 Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature Poetry. Pope. a body of writing defined both within and against the American literary tradition. 7063 Theory II Studies in 20th-century theory. with emphasis on a contemporary theory or theories. Herbert. Burton. Smart. Historical. each engages selected aspects of African American writing. Sappho. with attention to the work of such writers as Donne. Collins. English (Engl) 7023 Creative Writing Workshop A workshop for those who wish to develop their skills as writers (and readers) of fiction and nonfiction prose. stressing 19th. Ovid. and Anon. with attention to the evolution of myth and its constructions. Gower. Wroth. Steele. Gibbon. 7093 Middle English Literature Major 14th-century and early 15th-century poetry and prose. Jonson. 7073 Feminist Theory Studies in theory and criticism by feminist writers. cultural and theoretical contexts are considered. While the focus shifts among particular offerings of the course. Gay. and Milton. including work by such writers as Chaucer. More. Montagu. Fielding. 7153 Shakespeare A selective survey of Shakespeare’s career and of contemporary Shakespeare criticism. 7163 English Drama. Each spring. Boswell. Marston. Philips. 7053 Theory I Studies in the history of criticism from Plato through the 19th century. Virgil. Johnson. Aristotle. Shakespeare. Raleigh. 7183 17th-Century British Literature Non-dramatic poetry and prose of the 17th-century up to the Restoration. and prose of the Restoration and 18th century. 1558-1642 History of the rise of diverse theatrical institutions. 7083 The Classical Tradition A study of the evolution of genres by examination of the works of Homer. as well as anonymous romances and lyrics. and Dunbar. Congreve. and others.

Disraeli.. Osborne. Williams. Richardson. Swinburne. Sitwell. Coleridge. Wordsworth. 7293 Romantic Poetry Readings of poetry from the Romantic period. Emerson. Mackenzie. Lennox. R. Mill. Sinclair. Chopin. Gregory. 7453 Modern British Fiction May include Conrad.G. Shaw. Brontë. Wollstonecraft. Field. Austen. Hemans. Rhys. and others. O’Casey. Whitman. Nightingale. Hopkins. E. Hughes. Bennett. F. representative works by writers such as Whitman. 7493 Modern British and Irish Drama A survey including the work of such writers as Yeats. and others. Coleridge. Hawthorne. Hardy. Wright. 7533 American Literature. and others. chosen from novels by Lennox. with attention to shifting social and cultural conditions. and others. Shelley. Blake. Melville. Hemingway. DuBois. Radcliffe. M. Lewis. Warner. concentrating on writers such as Carlyle. R. 7403 Rhetoric and Composition Studies in the contemporary theory and practice of rhetoric and composition. Sterne. Mansfield. O’Flaherty. and Huxley. Walpole. Hughes. Norris. Gaskell. Edgeworth. Manley. Eliot. Smith. E. Defoe. Burney.D. Maturin. and Mew. Bunyan. Inchbald. Clough. especially prose essays. Scott. Beckett. Dickinson. Hays. tracing and critically considering the canon against a background of national and world events. Newman. S. 1914-1960 Modern American literary culture. chosen from works by Behn. 7513 American Literature. 7473 Yeats and Modern Irish Literature A survey including the work of such writers as Yeats. 7413 Victorian Poetry May include Tennyson. Clare. Stevens. Stoppard. Heaney. Goethe. Christina Rossetti. 7483 Modern British Poetry A survey including such writers as Hardy. 1776-1836. Ford. Sade. Arnold. 7373 19th-Century British Prose Readings of nonfictional prose during the Victorian period. Auden. Orton. Sarah Fielding. Wexler. Ruskin. representative works by writers such as Pound. Goldsmith. de Staël. H. to the fiction’s intertextual relation to Victorian writing. Haywood. Braddon. Browning. Constant. and Pater. Faulkner. Swift. Kiely. Wilde. chosen from works by Burns. Eliot. Thackeray. 1776-1836. George Eliot. representative works by writers such as Irving. Cooper. 7523 American Literature. 1820-1865 The “American Renaissance” and other aspects of 19th-century literary culture to the Civil War. D. and to other modern genres. E. Thoreau. Wharton. and Norton. Wells. Browning.B. O’Brien. Hardy. Fuller. 7223 18th-Century British Fiction Readings of British prose fiction of the 18th century. Smollett. Friel. Spender. Forster. Attention also to these writers’ affiliations with their Anglo-Irish and American cohorts. Ellison. including essays by George Eliot. including texts chosen from Austen. Douglass. Barbauld. Howells. Crane. Larkin. Lawrence. Stein. Smith. 7383 19th-Century British Fiction Intensive readings of British fiction during the 19th century. Arnold. Crane. S. Synge. with attention to Romantic theories of poetry and art. Hurston. West. Henry Fielding. Murphy. James. Rossetti. Mary Shelley. Dickens. the Brontës. Scott. to the poetry’s intertextual relation to Romantic verse. Adams. Baillie. Ferrier. O’Neill. Trollope. Opie. Poe. Dreiser. Woolf. 1865-1914 Literature from the Civil War to World War I. Stowe. Keats. . Pinter. Moore. with additional attention to periodical literature. H. Kavanaugh. Byron. O’Brien. with attention to the women writers of popular Romantic fiction. especially selected prose essays. 7283 Romantic Fiction Readings of fiction from the Romantic period. Richardson. Hemans. Fitzgerald. Twain. Bowles.96 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences and to other Victorian genres. P. Attention also to the aesthetic movement.

) 7993 Directed M. Research. and interpretation of the literary history of America. texts variously drawn from a wide range of writers and genres. contemporary theory (Discursive Economies of the Renaissance). topics vary. motif (The Body in Women’s Literature). politics (Literary Representation and Social Conflict in the English Renaissance). Heaney.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7543 Contemporary American Literature American writing since 1960. long poem. Graves.A. Naipaul. 8123 Gender Formation in Modern Literature Inquiry into the construction of gender in texts written in the 19th and 20th centuries. 8203 Special Topics in Modern Literature Special topics on bodies of literature. Fowles. etc. topics vary. Gunn. One such project is required of all M. etc. Pinter. 7573 Contemporary British Literature Readings of fiction. 15301642). etc. 8143 19th-Century Women Writers A study of women’s writing in the 19th century from the perspective of genre. 7563 American Literary Histories Problems in the construction.A. 97 8133 Restoration and 18th-Century Women Writers A study of women’s writing in the Restoration and 18th century from the perspective of genre. exploring the “postmodern” in relation to the “modern” consciousness and craft in a contemporary cultural context. Amis. Lessing. novel. 1939 to the present. . 7961 Residency (See page 20. etc. 8213 Studies in Genre Examination of theories of genre in connection with a particular kind of writing such as pastoral. Stoppard. literary movements. Larkin. Drabble. Osborne. and culture. topics vary. and culture. Lowry. with attention to the issues of canon formation. Byatt. and diverse methodologies. 8183 Special Topics in 19th-Century British Literature Special topics in literature from the perspectives of history (The Industrial Revolution). 8173 Special Topics in Literature before 1800 Special topics in literature from the perspectives of cultural change (Literature and Literacy. theoretical approaches. 8163 Special Topics in Women’s Literature The study of special topics in women’s literature from the perspectives of theme (The Female Subject). 8103 Representative Figures The art and life of major literary figures drawn from all periods and from all literatures written in English. Hughes. with attention to the multicultural diversity of the late 20th-century American literary scene. history. autobiography. gender (The New Woman). literary movements (Fin de Siècle). chosen from Orwell. Greene. 8153 20th-Century Women Writers A study of women’s writing in the 20th century from the perspective of genre. Murdoch. history. Rushdie. and others. poetry. Directed Writing Independent study on a project approved by the Graduate Director. students in lieu of a thesis. 8113 Gender Formation in Early Modern Literature Inquiry into the construction of gender in texts written before the 19th century. 8193 Special Topics in American Literature Special topics on bodies of literature. description. and drama from Contemporary British literature. lyric. Walcott. aesthetics (Literature and Art in Victorian England).

D.) 9981 (1-9 hours) Dissertation . 8991 (1-9 hours) Directed Doctoral Readings Independent study to be used during the 36 hours of required course work toward the Ph. 9961 Residency (See page 20.98 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 8791 (1-9 hours) Qualifying Exam Preparation Independent study in areas under preparation for the doctoral qualifying examination.

and the skill to develop a reasoned interpretation of past peoples and events. Bush. Rahe James P. • 3. Students may apply throughout the year. Students can utilize a number of important archival collections. The program offers specializations in United States history. There is no deadline for admission to the MA program in History. modern European history. or comparative history.0 average in undergraduate A history courses is required. T including at least 12 hours of work at the junior and senior level and sufficient courses to provide a basic understanding of American and European history. Bradley Professors Joseph C.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 99 History Chair Joseph C. Buckley Paul A. • Applicants are required to take the General Tests of the Graduate Record Examination. Bradley Thomas H. Ronda Associate Professors Thomas Buoye Jay Geller Christine Ruane Andrew Wood Assistant Professor Jan Doolittle Wilson Graduate Program Advisor Christine Ruane The Master of Arts degree in History imparts to students an understanding of the complexity of human interaction. Johnson. GRE scores. a sense of the uniqueness of time and place.0 grade point average in all undergraduate work and a 3. All applicants must fulfill the following requirements for admission to the MA program: • he student must have at least 30 credit hours of acceptable undergraduate history courses. • pplicants must submit a Graduate School application. and Clinton Presidential Libraries with their vast holdings are all within driving distance from the University of Tulsa offering students an unparalleled opportunity to study recent American history. and three letters of A recommendation to the Graduate School. Eisenhower. The Truman. The Graduate School notifies students who have been accepted into the program. . Admission. • tudents who are deficient in history credits but meet grade-point requirements may be S admitted on a conditional basis. The Gilcrease Museum offers substantial holdings in the history of the American West.

. Coursework outside the major field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours These courses can be in history. . . . . the humanities. . . . . . • rack 2. .The Nature of History Major field of concentration (including one research seminar) . . . social sciences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 hours Maximum credit hours of 6000-level coursework . . . This requirement may be met in one of the following ways: a. .Research and Thesis The student selects a topic and works with a committee composed of three members. . . . . . 6 hours Hist 7981-6 . . . . Students can also enroll in: • Cooperative Program in Education and History” for students who want to develop their “ historical understanding while working for a Master of Arts in Teaching (MTA). There is a thesis option and a non-thesis option.0. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours Hist 7003 . . . . 15 hours Research and Thesis . By successfully completing an intermediate college course in a language appropriate to the student’s course of study. . . • Joint Degree Program in Law and History” for students who want to pursue historical “ studies at the same time that they attend law school. . . Russia. . . . . . . . . • Track 1. . . . . . . . . . These exams are taken in the last year of graduate work. . . By passing a proficiency examination b. . . . • Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Program Predoctoral Track Students enrolled in the predoctoral track must complete a minimum of thirty credit hours of graduate course work with a grade point average of not less than 3. Upper level undergraduate history courses for deficiencies (as needed) . . . . . . . . . “Predoctoral. . Pass a written comprehensive examination in the major and minor areas. . . . .” is for students wanting an intellectual challenge or professional T credential. . . . . .100 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum There are two tracks available for the MA in History. .” is for students whose final goal is a Ph. . .D. . . . . . . . Primary Fields: Ancient World and Europe to 1700 Europe Since 1700 United States Asia. . . . and Latin America Comparative History: thematic field defined by advisor and approved by graduate committee Thesis Option: 30 credit hours Requirements Method and Historiography . . . . 12 hours Reading proficiency in a European language. . . . . . . . . . Students participate in an oral defense of their thesis upon completion. . . . . . . “Enrichment. . . . . or law. . . . . . . . . as well as a written comprehensive examination. . . . . . . . Students are expected to demonstrate competency in a foreign language. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . By successfully completing an intermediate college course in a language appropriate to the student’s course of study. . . By passing a proficiency examination b. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Primary Fields: Ancient World and Europe to 1700 Europe Since 1700 United States Asia. . . . . . . . . . . .Research and Thesis The student selects a topic and works with a committee composed of three members. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the humanities. . . . . . . . . 15 hours Course work outside the major field . . . . . . 6 hours These courses can be in history. . 15 hours Research and Thesis . . . . These exams are taken in the last year of graduate work. Enrichment Track Students enrolled in the enrichment track must complete a minimum of thirty credit hours of graduate course work with a grade point average of not less than 3. . . . . . . . . . . 6 hours These courses can be in history. . . . . . . . 15 hours Reading proficiency in a European language. . . 3 hours Hist 7003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The Nature of History Major field of concentration (including one research seminar) . . . . Pass a written comprehensive examination in the major and minor areas. . . .The Nature of History Major field of concentration (including one research seminar) . . . and Latin America Comparative History: thematic field defined by advisor and approved by graduate committee Thesis Option: 30 credit hours Requirements Method and Historiography . . . . . . . . . . Upper level undergraduate history courses for deficiencies (as needed) . . . . . . . . . . Additional coursework in history . 6 hours Hist 7981-6 . . . . . Coursework outside the major field . . . . . . . . . . . social sciences. Students participate in an oral defense of their thesis upon completion. 9 hours Maximum credit hours of 6000-level coursework . . . . Russia. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 hours Upper level undergraduate history courses for deficiencies (as needed) . . . . . . . There is a thesis option and a non-thesis option. . . . .Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 101 Non-Thesis Option: 36 credit hours Requirements Method and Historiography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the humanities. . . . . . . . . or law. . . . . . . . . . 12 hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours Hist 7003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 hours Maximum credit hours of 6000-level coursework . . This requirement may be met in one of the following ways: a. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . or law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . social sciences. Students must pass written comprehensive examinations. .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 hours Hist 7003 . . . . . . . . . . . social sciences. 6 hours These courses can be in history. . . . . 9 hours Maximum credit hours of 6000-level coursework . Non-Thesis Option: 36 credit hours Requirements Method and Historiography . . . . These exams are taken in the last year of graduate work. . . . . In addition to submission of a graduate school application. . . The combined program requires the same number of credits and level of work as the current BA and MA (thesis option) degree programs. . Additional coursework in history . . . . . . . . . . . . . only students who enter TU with an IB diploma or at least 24 credit hours of AP credit can reasonably be expected to complete both degrees in five years. . . 12 hours Upper level undergraduate history courses for deficiencies (as needed) . . . . . . . . . three letters of recommendation and GRE scores. . applicants to the combined Bachelor’s/Master’s program in History must have the following: • a minimum cumulative GPA of 3. . . . . . . . . . . . .102 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Pass a written comprehensive examination in the major and minor areas. . .The Nature of History Major field of concentration (including one research seminar) . . . . . . . . . . transcripts. . . . . . . . . Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Program The combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree program enables highly motivated students to earn a bachelor’s and master’s degree in five years. . . . . . . 15 hours Pass a written comprehensive examination in the major and minor areas. . . . . . . . Thinking and Writing as a Historian Students interested in the combined degree program should contact the Graduate Advisor or any faculty member of the History Department to find out more about the program. . . . . . . . . . . All students admitted to the combined Bachelor’s/Master’s program will write a master’s thesis as part of their program of study. . As a result. . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 hours Course work outside the major field . . . . . . the humanities. . . . .5 • a writing sample (a paper from a history class) • statement of purpose which clearly outlines the student’s research interests and why he or a she wants to pursue the combined degree program • wo of the letters of recommendation must be from History faculty and one must be from a t professor who will work with the student • successful completion of History 3903. . . . The typical student will apply for admission to the combined program in his or her junior year. or law. . . . . These exams are taken in the last year of graduate work. .

Research Seminars Primary source research on topics in each primary field. Reading Seminars Emphasis on the historiographical issues basic to each primary field. History (Hist) 7003 The Nature of History Investigation of questions raised by historians. European social and cultural history. imperialism. ancient Greece. the assumptions they make. labor history. No more than forty percent of a student’s course work can be at the 6000-level for credit toward the MA degree in history. military history. . Latin American history. Native American history. Normally taken during the first year of graduate study. Chinese history. Russian and Soviet history. 7313 Readings in the History of the Ancient World and Europe to 1700 7333 Readings in the History of Latin America 7413 Readings in the History of Europe since 1700 7513 Readings in the History of the United States 7613 Readings in the History of Russia 7643 Readings in the History of China 7713 Readings in Comparative Social and Cultural History Other Courses 7961 Residency (See page 20.) 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Approved Undergraduate Courses Students seeking course work in areas not being addressed by scheduled or planned reading and research seminars may petition to enroll in an undergraduate course (6000 level). and the nature of evidence. 7323 Research in the History of the Ancient World and Europe to 1700 7423 Research in the History of Europe since 1700 7523 Research in the History of the United States 7623 Research in the History of Russia 7633 Research in the History of Latin America 7653 Research in the History of China 7723 Research in Comparative Social and Cultural History Reading and Research Seminars Course offerings are organized under the following topical and chronological categories: The American West. Specific topics change with each offering. the Middle Ages. modern Germany. 20th-century American diplomatic history. and French history. and the variety of methods (including quantitative techniques) used to explain the past. Close reading of selected historical texts and critical discussions. Specific topics change with each offering. The graduate advisor will approve such requests after reviewing with the undergraduate course instructor the assignments to be given graduate students.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 103 The number of credit hours allotted a course is designated by the last numerical digit of the course number.

1800 to Present Examines political. European and Native American rivalries. industrialization. 6453 Russia: Reform and Revolution Russia from 1825 to 1917. World War I. Peter the Great. Kruschev reforms. cultural. and revolution. 6553 The Modern American West The American West in the 20th century. and Spain’s lasting legacy in America. and Nietzsche The development of 19th-century German philosophy. 6563 The Old West The American West from before the arrival of the Europeans to the beginning of the 20th century. cultural. and the Gorbachev years. with emphasis on the processes of repression. elite and masses. peasant life and serfdom. and Vietnam. Marx. . political. with emphasis on the evolution of state and society. Includes the forging of a Hispanic empire. Africans. missionary and military frontiers. 6133 Seminar in the History of Political Thought An upper-level seminar focusing on selected topics in the history of political thought. 6403 Spain in America A topical approach to Spain’s settlement and influence in North America. economic. and Nietzsche. the Kaiser’s empire. the Stalin Revolution. or a theme or school of thought. and the revolutions of 1905 and 1917. and Schopenhauer. social. with attention to the region’s growing cultural. Topics include the Revolution and Civil War.104 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 6483 Hegel. the Brezhnev era. Same as Phil 4453. Analyzes these changes from the perspectives of power-holders and dissidents. 6473 Soviet Russia The Soviet Union from 1917 to 1991. the development of German national identity. and contemporary perspectives on Germany’s past. and economic role in national life. the political thought of a particular time and place. and Spaniards. German unification. foreign and domestic issues. with emphasis on the Kievan and Muscovite states. the Great Reforms. including the problem of the nature and significance of history. Emphasizes the interrelationships among military. populism and terrorism. with additional readings from the works of Fichte. Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or related area with permission of instructor. 6773 Modern Japan. art and culture under dictatorship. the world wars. Feuerbach. and biological exchange between Indians. Emphasis on the tension between the urban West and traditional rural values. Marx. reform. Topics include the Russian intelligentsia. the roles of women. Korea. a single author. Emphasis on Hegel. and the postwar era. with emphasis on the West as a culturally complex and diverse region. early rebellions against autocracy. the building of the Russian empire. and economic changes in Japan from the last years of the Tokugawa shogunate to the present. 6343 Modern Germany The transformation of central Europe from the era of the Enlightenment through the revolutions of 1848. 6443 Emergence of Modern Russia Russia from ancient times to 1825. The strategies and tactics used to implement these policies are studied through an analysis of American participants in the following wars: Spanish American. 6603 American Diplomatic History since 1914 American foreign relations from the rise of Woodrow Wilson in 1914 to the present. 6793 America at War in the 20th Century The evolution of American military policies during the 20th century. World War II. New Economic Policy. Emphasis on political and social events.

Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 6803 Topics in Greek History A discussion course focused on a narrowly defined historical period. the Thutmosid Succession). 6853 Topics in American History Seminar on a specific historical period. emphasis on the various narrative and epigraphic sources (in translation) and how to use them. country. or set of problems in American history. 105 6833 Topics in Latin American History A discussion course focused on a particular time period. Mesopotamia. and documents. or the Holy Lands. theme.. 6823 Topics in Ancient Near Eastern History Seminar on selected topics on the history of ancient Egypt. Emphasis on a critical analysis of historical works. literature.g. 6973 Seminar . Special emphasis is placed on the analysis of the ancient evidence and on the various scholarly controversies to which it gives rise. or set of problems. Close reading of texts with emphasis on the analysis of sources and the modern scholarly controversies to which they give rise. theme. in translation. theme. and evaluations of problems of past and current scholarship (e. films. and on current scholarship. or set of problems in European history. 6813 Topics in Roman History Seminar on selected topics and problems in Roman history. readings and interpretations of narrative and epigraphic sources. Emphasis on critical analysis of historical works and on modern scholarly controversies. 6843 Topics in European History Seminar on a specific historical period. and/or topic in Latin American history.

D. training. tests and measurements. work motivation. Candidates for clinical programs typically have completed a minimum of 18 credit hours of undergraduate course work in psychology including courses in abnormal psychology. satisfactory letters of recommendation. not all qualified applicants can be admitted. . employee selection. Minimum requirements for admission include a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. leadership. Admission to the programs is selective.106 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Psychology Chair Judy Orth Berry Professors Judy Orth Berry Pawel Lewicki Associate Professors Michael Basso Joanne Davis Allan Harkness John McNulty Elana Newman Robert Tett Assistant Professors Jamie Rhudy Amy Nicole Salvaggio Graduate Program Advisors Elana Newman. degrees in industrial/ organizational psychology and in clinical psychology. degree in I/O psychology is suitable for those seeking to develop the applied skills necessary for basic consulting projects in business and government. and a variety of methods topics. such as psychological measurement and statistics. and research methods is recommended for applicants to the I/O program.A. Clinical Psychology John McNulty.0 or better (on a 4-point scale). We offer a broad array of courses. an adequate background in psychology. and because of high demand. organizational development. or experimental psychology. statistics. and satisfactory test scores on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination. Applications for admission to the graduate psychology programs are evaluated once a year for a Fall entering semester. Undergraduate coursework in I/O psychology. and Ph. and either statistics. Industrial/Organizational Psychology The Psychology Department offers courses leading to the M. including but not limited to job analysis. Industrial/Organizational Psychology Master of Arts An M. an undergraduate grade point average of 3. as well as applicants who have completed a master’s degree. The application deadline for the clinical psychology graduate program is December 1 and the application deadline for the I/O psychology program is January 15. Admission. Graduates of our master’s program typically find jobs involving analysis of jobs and people as a basis for improving the fit between them. Admission to the doctoral programs is open to applicants who have completed a bachelor’s degree.A.

and pass a comprehensive exam covering all major aspects of I/O psychology as an applied discipline. usually in their second or third year. The M. with subsequent coursework. Our Ph. 18 hours of I/O core courses (e.g. Work Motivation). as well as for research and university (i. Graduates of the program are prepared to assume entry-level clinical positions in agency. data collection. personality and psychopathology. including six hours of non-applied psychology courses (e. but not required. program follows the scientist-practitioner model of psychological training. academic) positions. and professional issues in clinical psychology. nine hours of research methodology (e.D. Although much of the program is prescribed. degree requires completion of 90 approved credit hours of graduate credit beyond the baccalaureate.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 107 General Requirements. and consultation skills. job analysis. Students must also complete a 200-hour internship (3 credit hours). principles of psychological assessment and intervention. and nine hours of electives. government. Multivariate Statistics). They must also successfully complete a comprehensive exam consisting of written. It requires formation of a dissertation committee. Our doctoral program prepares students for a wide range of employment opportunities in industry. Personality). students are allowed some flexibility in choice of electives and practicum placements. Successful completion of all of these requirements.D. Students are also required to complete six hours of practicum training.g. Interested students are encouraged to participate in research projects under faculty supervision. and practice directed to improving organizational effectiveness and worker well-being. and oral components. under faculty supervision on an I/O psychology topic. The first two years of the program are structured to offer key foundational courses (e.A. Doctor of Philosophy A doctoral degree in I/O psychology is suitable for those seeking deeper understanding of the principles and methods of fitting people and jobs. program in clinical psychology is a 45-credit-hour degree program that allows students to develop basic intervention. a proposal defense. and organizational settings. work motivation). General Requirements. Licensing laws of states vary widely. Personnel Selection. research methods. The Ph. Coursework meeting these requirements is designated by the program director. research. and consulting settings. A thesis option is available. Clinical Psychology Master of Arts The M. There is no thesis requirement. incorporating a synergy of theory. The dissertation is the last phase of the doctoral program. write-up.e. the program requirements satisfy prerequisites for many doctoral programs in clinical psychology.g. degree requires completion of 42 credit hours.A. In addition to providing a solid foundation for a career in clinical psychology. but doctoral students must complete a pre-candidacy paper. is required before students are formally admitted to doctoral candidacy. and internships tailored to individual needs and interests. health-care. and students should consult the licensing body in the state in which they intend to practice to determine opportunities and requirements for licensure at the master’s level. evaluation. except the dissertation. research. A Master’s thesis is not required. .g. The program includes formal course work in the core areas of psychology. and an oral defense before the committee. covering all major areas of I/O psychology. General Requirements. The program of study is fully described in The Handbook of Graduate Programs in Clinical Psychology at the University of Tulsa. data analysis. quantitative.

and resolution of human problems in agency. and case presentation in the domain of intellectual functioning. The doctoral training program at The University of Tulsa does not provide this internship. It is the responsibility of the student to apply for and be accepted by an internship that meets the training requirements listed in The Handbook for Graduate Programs in Clinical Psychology. a 24-hour clinical core. consisting of a general written and a clinical oral portion. health-care. consulting. Students complete a 15hour core in general psychology. Psychology (Psy) 7003 Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychopharmacology Introduction to human neuroanatomy. allowing students to tailor the program to meet their individual needs. attitudes. 7113 Clinical Assessment: Intellectual Introduction to psychometric theory. at least 12 hours of practicum. Program requirements are officially described in The Handbook For Graduate Programs in Clinical Psychology at the University of Tulsa. and the analysis of problems in applied settings.D.D. Students develop a broad range of skills for the identification. biological foundations of several major behavioral systems. Concurrent enrollment in associated laboratory is required. and the remainder of the program’s credit hours in seminars. and the doctoral dissertation. Students must pass a comprehensive examination for the Ph. nine hours of courses in methodology and statistics. Specialized issues in clinical psychology are addressed in topical seminars that are offered each semester. General Requirements. or private practice settings. at least one hour of dissertation research. 7043 Social Psychology Survey of theory and research in social psychology. The number of credit hours allotted a course is designated by the last digit of the course number. and findings of scientific psychology to clinical problems. Survey of current issues in the neurosciences. and of psychopharmacology. issues of human diversity. report writing. . all students are required to complete a one-year pre-doctoral internship in a setting and training program approved by the clinical program committee. Although a master’s thesis is not required. and research. 7033 Systems and Theories of Personality Survey of central contributions and current issues in the psychology of personality. the proposal for the dissertation. methods. program in clinical psychology has been continuously accredited by the American Psychological Association since 1991. academic. nervous system functioning. Special emphasis is given to assessment of personality and behavior. 7053 Psychometrics Discussion of principles and techniques of measurement and scale development/validation. The doctoral program requires 90 credit hours of graduate work beyond the baccalaureate. students must demonstrate research competence through completion of the pre-candidacy project. evaluation. Students must pass a final oral examination on the dissertation. In addition to the 90-hour program. electives. with particular emphasis on theory and research relevant to applied problems. Training is based on the assumption that practice involves application of the theories. ethics of assessment.108 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Doctor of Philosophy The Ph. emphasizing group dynamics. emphasizing topics of particular relevance in applied settings. the structure of mental abilities. The program prepares graduates to become scientist-practitioners of clinical psychology. Flexibility exists in the choice of electives and practicum training experiences.

and reviews the laws regulating psychological practice. and physiological levels of analysis. Investigation of chi-square. issues of ethnic. attendance is required. memory. 7283 Statistical Methods for Research II Advanced statistical techniques. training. multiple regression. ethics and test standards. along with methods used in applied research to solve realworld problems. along with the etiology and course of major disorders. and linguistic diversity issues in clinical work are presented. probability. 7223 Theory and Practice of Clinical Psychology Introduction to scientist-practitioners model of clinical psychology. motivation. & Clinical Practice Examines ethical principles and standards that provide a guiding framework for professional behavior. Enrollment limited to matriculated clinical students. and interpretive issues of multivariate techniques using computer solutions. psychometric theory of tests. Examines fundamental concepts in measurement and design. scoring. Site placement must be individually arranged with practicum coordinator. job analysis. Students work on projects under faculty supervision. selection. 7193 Clinical Assessment: Personality Introduction to personality assessment with emphasis on objective techniques. computational. cultural.. cognition. parameter estimation. thinking. 7143 History and Systems of Psychology A survey of contemporary systems and major theories of psychology. performance appraisal. 7463 I/O Practicum Hands-on experience in various I/O consulting projects (e. Introduction to major theories of clinical intervention and ethnic. internship) in private or public sector organizations. psychological.. and gender and ethnicity issues in psychopathology. supervised work experience (i. multiple and partial correlation. and interpretation of several widely used personality tests.e. canonical correlation and other commonly encountered multivariate techniques. sampling theory. analysis of covariance and some nonparametric methods. Introduces students to the practice of ethical decision-making across a variety of hypothetical contexts and helps them identify behaviors that reduce the risk of misconduct and promote the ethical practice of psychology. bivariate correlation and regression techniques. Prerequisite: An introductory statistics course. 7183 Statistical Methods for Research I Study of descriptive statistics. multiple discriminant analysis. Issues include methods of test construction. supervised work experience with actual clinical populations. factor analysis. including analysis of variance. 109 7343 Research Methods in Applied Psychology Designed to serve as a foundational research methods course in both I/O and clinical psychology to develop students’ theoretical and empirical understanding of psychology. and hypothesis testing. 7451-6 (1-6 hours) Clinical Practicum Practical. simple analysis of variance. 7153 Psychopathology Intensive survey of clinical theory and research concerning various psychiatric disorders at the social. regression. and the administration. Topics include multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) and covariance (MANCOVA). 7543 Ethics. . while learning relevant theory and research methods. Because course meetings are essential for integrating science with practice.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7133 Cognitive Psychology A study of major concepts and current issues in learning. treated as evolutionary developments from their historical roots. Intake interview and Mental Status Examination skills are developed. perception. and emotion. problems in clinical judgment. 7441-9 (1-9 hours) Fieldwork in I/O Psychology Practical. Emphasis differs across different placements. Law. t-test.g. Emphasis varies across different placements. organizational development). 7383 Multivariate Methods for Research Considers theoretical. and linguistic diversity in assessment. cultural. Issues of classification and diagnosis are emphasized.

7613 Clinical Supervision and Program Consultation Examines theoretical and practical issues in developing and implementing evidence-informed clinical supervision and consultation. recruitment. and use in applied and basic research. cultural competence. coaching and development. motivation. organizational development. 7961 Residency (See page 20. and the design of equipment and facilities for human use. 7653 Performance Appraisal Examines theoretical and practical issues in the development and implementation of performance appraisal systems. 7633 Survey of Organizational Psychology Presents an overview of research and theory within organizational psychology. Practical applications for team building and team development will also be emphasized. organizational commitment. techniques to improve performance ratings and reactions to performance appraisal. Topics include job satisfaction. Test development. including job analysis. validation. Topics include theories of supervision. 8023 Human Factors Analysis of individuals in human-machine systems. team and organization functioning. semester-long study of special topics in I/O and clinical psychology. diagnostic models and designing interventions. selection. and the assessment of job attitudes within organizations. 7623 Survey of Industrial Psychology Survey of theory and research on the major elements of industrial psychology. supervisory relationship issues. development of environments. Topics include socialization. . 7663 Teams Explores and assesses the current state of teams research and the implications of this knowledge for organizational effectiveness. Topics include planned change models. and special issues. and training. The focus is the child within the family and the family within the community and broader social environment. practical guidelines. 7703 Child Development Addresses development from the prenatal period through adolescence. practitioner skills. interviews. performance appraisal. design of performance appraisal systems.) 7973 Seminar Intensive. implementation models. organizational surveys. criterion theory. Covers complex systems. 7643 Job Attitudes Examines theoretical and methodological issues related to job attitudes. This course is designed for students who have worked with supervisors as supervisees on clinical work for at least one year. 8013 I/O Assessment Lab Administration and interpretation of widely used instruments for assessment of individual. The legal and ethical context in which personnel decisions are made is emphasized throughout the course. leadership. and organizational theory. and the legal context. and reengineering and downsizing. 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis 7991-9 (1-9 hours) Independent Study 8003 Introduction to Industrial/Organizational Psychology Survey of theory and research on the influence of individual and organizational factors in personnel psychology and organizational behavior. Topics include performance measurement. and focus groups.110 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7673 Organizational Development Provides an overview of the field with special emphasis on the application of OD approaches in the world of work.

g. Students must register during the internship. structural equation modeling. attendance is required. assessment centers) as well as strategies for test validation. and behavioral components. design of training programs to meet organizational needs. abilities.. personality and cognitive ability tests. compensation. and scientific efficacy issues related to intervention. issues of internal and external equity in reward systems. 8551-6 Advanced Practicum in Clinical Psychology An advanced doctoral practicum for students who meet standards for exception to regular practicum requirements. Emphasis varies across different placements. 8800-9 (0-9 hours) Clinical Psychology Internship Intensive. 8991-9 (1-9 hours) Pre-Dissertation Research 9981-9 (1-9 hours) Dissertation Research . and evaluation of program effectiveness. Enrollment limited to matriculated clinical students. Typical topics include linear and non-linear regression analysis. fairness. Includes professional work with clients. Site placement must be individually arranged with practicum coordinator. 111 8113 Applied Multivariate Statistics Covers applications and extensions of the general linear model. full-time experience in an approved training facility engaged in clinical service delivery. including physiological. biodata. design. Course focuses on case material illustrates theory. and close supervision by licensed psychologists. practical considerations. and utility analysis are emphasized. special training opportunities. Because course meetings are essential for integrating science with practice. supervised work experience with actual clinical populations. selection. brain behavior relationships. 8063 Introduction to Scientist-Practitioner-Based Psychotherapy Examination of evidence-based psychological interventions and evidence-based clinical decision-making. and methodological strategies for the design of effective compensation systems. psychological principles in the acquisition of knowledge. and evaluation of contemporary organizational reward systems. 8973 Doctoral Level Seminar Rotating topical seminars on current issues of professional relevance. 8133 Emotion Review of the dominant theories of emotion. Students will apply techniques to contemporary psychological problems. training. as well as the basis for developing job tasks and knowledge. Students become proficient in all major job analysis techniques that are the foundation for test development. confirmatory factor analysis. ethical. Topics include linking compensation strategies to broader issues of organizational mission and strategic purpose. Examination of current topics and application of theory to understanding and ameliorating human problems. and job design. Students learn major selection procedures (e. and cognitive/behavioral procedures for assessing brain functioning. with overview of major brain disorders and recent developments. interviews. in clinical psychology. 8093 Job Analysis Examines processes through which job requirements are researched and identified. and they must satisfactorily complete the internship for the Ph. 8451-6 (1-6 hours) Doctoral Level Practicum in Clinical Psychology Practical. Admission to this practicum is by application/petition to the practicum coordinator prior to the beginning of the proposed semester. and meta-analysis. 8103 Personnel Testing and Selection Examines theory and applications of employment testing. cognitive. and skills.D. characteristics of individuals that facilitate and/or inhibit training program success. performance evaluation. 8073 Compensation Focuses on the structure. Topics include assessment of training needs. diversity.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 8053 Clinical Neuropsychology Examination of neuroanatomy. 8083 Training Examines theoretical and practical issues in the development and implementation of training programs. Other evaluation topics such as bias.

g. and specific research methods using computers and other psycho-physical equipment. child abuse). and current theory and research on the biological correlates of behavior. 6443 Aging and Society Examines the nature and implications of aging. the psychological impact of racism and sexism. Exposure to research paradigms. 6493 Children and Families with Special Needs Emphasis on psychological.112 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 6433 Cognitive Psychology An examination of cognitive processes involved in human perception. knowledge and critiques about how gender influences development and behavior from a variety of perspectives. and practice of health psychology and behavioral medicine emphasizing the prevention and modification of health compromising behaviors. disabilities. skills. and psychoanalysis. personality. chronic illness. 6483 Biological Foundations of Behavior Structure and function of the nervous system and related structures. educational. declining health and independence. the acculturation and assimilation of immigrants. intervention and prevention programs for community development among marginal groups. emphasizing the roles of leader traits. with a focus on theories and research on human information procession. fundamental paradigms. 6463 Multicultural Community Psychology Examines theories of culture. functionalism. care giving. research. the special problems of refugees. . philosophical. A family system approach is used to study the special needs accompanying problems in childhood (e. sociological. thinking. Emphasis on competing theoretical perspectives on later life as well as practical issues (coping with stress of bereavement. with emphasis on neuron conduction and transmission.. 6423 Psychology of Women Course reviews psychological research and theory pertaining to gender with an emphasis on examining facts. families in later life. sensation. and assorted situational factors. abuse. Approved Undergraduate Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit within the limits of the degree program and with the approval of the program director and the instructor. and ethical aspects of children and families with special needs. Gestalt. 6223 Health Psychology Overview of the theory. ageism). 6403 Psychology of Personality Examines the major issues and methodological approaches to the study of personality. 6273 Leadership Examines theories of leadership in work settings. behaviorism. and ethnicity. and learning. 6413 History of Psychology The history of psychological thought from the pre-Socratic Greeks to the present and the development of psychology in the schools of structuralism. 6213 Advanced Cognitive Research Methods Designed as an in-depth research methods course related to the study of human cognition and information processing. Graduate students enrolling in these courses complete assignments in addition to those completed by undergraduate students in the course. with emphasis on the biological and social factors that contribute to enduring tendencies and to human individuality.

(3) and licensure/certification as a public school Speech-Language Pathologist by the Oklahoma State Department of Education Admission Minimum admission requirements to the department for graduate study include: • a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university. Students must also have a course in statistics. Degrees include a minimum of 40 credit hours of work. Students completing the non-thesis degree option must successfully complete comprehensive examinations to qualify for graduation with a Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology. (2) licensure as a Speech-Language Pathologist from the Oklahoma Board of Examiners in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 113 Speech-Language Pathology Chair Paula Cadogan Associate Professors Paula Cadogan Lori Davis Assistant Professor Carol Lambert Clinical Instructors Ronda Marfechuk Mary Moody Suzanne Stanton Graduate Program Advisor Mary Moody The Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology program is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology.0. assume total client management responsibility. develop innovative procedures and methods. The statistics course is a requirement that may be met as part of an undergraduate degree or may be taken as a graduate course. . The curriculum is designed to meet academic and clinical practicum requirements current at the time of this Bulletin’s publication for: (1) certification as a Speech-Language Pathologist from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA CCC-SLP). and • admission to the Graduate School. General Requirements Both thesis and non-thesis degree options are offered by the faculty in consultation with the student. Students lacking a bachelor’s degree in speech-language pathology must take undergraduate leveling courses in the discipline before being considered for admission to the graduate program. The four semesters of class work and clinical education (two fall and two spring) include off-campus clinical experiences in a medical and a school setting. Students learn to make professional judgments. • an official copy of scores from the GRE General Test submitted to the Graduate School. • three letters of recommendation. The 40 credit hours include a research methods course. and understand and use research information. plan clinical programs. • an undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.

114 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7123 Motor Speech Disorders This course is an in-depth study of the nature of dysarthria. prosthetic. Communication Disorders Speech-Language Pathology (CDSP) 7083 Orofacial Anomalies An in-depth study of the nature of congenital craniofacial anomalies including clefts of the lip and palate and velopharyngeal dysfunction in both children and adults. and treatment. and behavioral interventions are discussed. 7113 Cognitive Communication Disorders This course is a study of cognitive-communication disorders caused by different types of neurological damage. 7181 Graduate Clinical Practicum Supervised diagnostic/therapeutic experiences designed to meet specific student needs and ASHA requirements. Management strategies for clients of various ages and with diverse speech characteristics are stressed. and cognitivelinguistic skills are included as well as the latest research into brain injury. direct access and scanning devices. and other motor speech disorders in both children and adults. evaluation techniques. The nature and effects of these conditions upon speech. 7281 Graduate Clinical Practicum Supervised. and switch types will be studied. and right hemisphere dysfunction. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Direct and indirect management and intervention techniques for the speech-language pathologist are discussed. A variety of high and low tech products. and other motor speech disorders and between dysarthria subtypes is emphasized. Anatomical and physiological substrates of language are also presented. The role of the speech-language pathologist as part of an interdisciplinary team is emphasized. apraxia. as well as reading and writing disabilities are investigated. Prerequisite: CDSP 2023 and CDSP 3033 or equivalent. symptomology. 7162 Assistive Technology and Augmentative Communication This course addresses the philosophy. 7143 Aphasia and Neurology Nature. including their etiology. . Classroom discourse: instructional discourse. Communication Disorders Audiology (CDAU) 7181 Graduate Clinical Practicum Supervised diagnostic experiences in audiometric procedures. Prerequisite: CDSP 4163 or 6163 or its equivalent. and criteria used to prescribe and fit alternative communication devices and systems. 7153 Voice Disorders Disorders of voice resulting from organic and functional changes in the vocal mechanism. Prerequisite: CDSP 3053 or equivalent. Credit hours allotted a course are indicated by the last digit of the course number. Differential diagnosis between dysarthria. Surgical. Prerequisite: CDSP 3053 or permission of instructor. language. Management strategies and assessment for clients of various ages and with diverse speech characteristics are addressed. and treatment of aphasia. diagnosis. advanced diagnostic experiences in audiometric evaluation techniques. apraxia. 7133 School Age Language Disorders Methods of assessment and management of language disorders with preschool and school age children. traumatic brain injury. This course covers assessment and treatment issues related to dementia. diagnosis.

7912-4 (2-4 hours) Research and Paper Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. data collection. parent counseling. and degree of hearing loss. 7253 Techniques of Research and Evaluation Studies of the nature and functions of research and evaluation featuring characteristics of the most common types of investigation. and treatment of swallowing problems in children and adults including videofluoroscopic and endoscopic evaluations with case studies will be addressed. experimental and quasi-experimental design. 7273 Dysphagia This course covers anatomy and neurophysiology of the swallowing mechanism in relation to pediatric and adult swallowing. the early intervention team. Graduate students enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by undergraduate students in the course. a familycentered approach to management. current technology and assistive devices. Consideration of appropriateness of each method relative to age of individual. Diagnostic and treatment procedures are given. Topics include auditory skill development. classroom acoustics. Educational needs will be addressed. theory development and verification. Prerequisite: CDSP 7181. Includes the study of operationalism. age of onset. 7381 Graduate Clinical Practicum Supervised advanced diagnostic/therapeutic experiences meeting student needs and ASHA requirements. neurogenic stuttering. nature. CDSP 7381 and permission of offsite practica director. CDSP 7281. 115 Approved Undergraduate Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the graduate advisor. 7281 Graduate Clinical Practicum Supervised intermediate diagnostic/therapeutic experiences meeting student needs and ASHA requirements. and techniques to maximize functional hearing. . 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. and theories of idiopathic stuttering. Prerequisite: CDSP 7181. Prerequisite: CDSP 7281. 7863 Special Topics Variety of topics reflecting changes in the knowledge base of the field and/or alteration in requirements of certification and licensure. and cluttering are presented. Communication Disorders Audiology (CDAU) 6353 Auditory Options for Children who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing Overview of auditory options for communication for children who are deaf and hard of hearing. Evaluation. 7961 Residency (See page 20. hypothesis formulation and testing.) 7971-3 (1-3 hours) Seminar 7981-5 (1-5 hours) Research and Thesis Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 7482-4 (2-4 hours) Clinical Externship and School Practicum Placement in a medical setting and public schools for an extensive and concentrated diagnostic/ therapeutic experience. 6473 Audiologic Rehabilitation Methods used in teaching speech reading and auditory discrimination skills to the deaf and hard of hearing.Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences 7213 Fluency Disorders The development. diagnosis. and applications of basic data analytic techniques.

Family issues and writing the IFSP are considered. 6163 Evaluation of Speech and Language Disorders Designed to acquaint the student with basic standardized tests used in the diagnosis of speech and language disorders.116 Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences Communication Disorders Speech-Language Pathology (CDSP) 6033 Infants and Toddlers at Risk The development. . assessment and management of infants and toddlers at risk.

but are not limited to: • ndergraduate grade point average (both overall coursework and upper division courseU work are considered). For all programs. offers the following graduate degrees: Master of Business Administration. Master of Science in Finance. through creating and disseminating knowledge.The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Refer to the International Applicants section. and the Master of Science in Finance/Master of Science in Applied Mathematics in conjunction with the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences (see page 228 of this Bulletin). Applicants to the Master of Taxation program may substitute the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) for the GMAT. Graduate Academic Programs The Graduate School of The University of Tulsa. and Juris Doctor/Master of Taxation degrees in conjunction with the College of Law (see pages 222-227 of this Bulletin). and • Professional references Program admission requirements and offerings are subject to change. Juris Doctor/Master of Science in Finance. for more information. Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Finance. The College also offers the Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration. applicants from non-English speaking schools must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and receive a score of 90 or higher (internet score). or 232 (computer score). • rofessional/business experience as evidenced by such factors as a record of employment at P increasing levels of responsibility. Admission Criteria The programs are open to students with baccalaureate degrees in any field of study. 575 or higher (paper score). • Graduate Management Admission Test score (or LSAT or GRE score if applicable). page 16 of this Bulletin. Contact the Graduate Business Programs office for updated information. with two exceptions. and Master of Taxation (online). Admission is limited to applicants who show high promise of success in business study.Collins College of Business 117 Programs in the Collins College of Business Mission Our mission. is to educate and mentor business and healthcare professionals for leadership roles in the international arena. through the Collins College of Business. Pre-Admission Testing The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required of all applicants to graduate business degree programs. Admission criteria include. Accreditation All graduate business programs are fully accredited by AACSB International . . and applicants to the Master of Science in Finance program may substitute the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for the GMAT. The business administration programs are part of a select group of programs nationally that have been accredited at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.

market structures. Students may earn the degree through either full-time or part-time study. an initial evaluation. the importance of globalization and international law. and interpretation of data. is completed at the time of application. The primary goal of the MBA program is to provide a quality graduate-level education that will prepare graduates for professional management careers in the private and public sectors. The curriculum is designed to: 1. The number of credits per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. analysis. regression. and for positions of leadership and responsibility in business and society. Ph. theory of the firm. The following foundation courses are available only to students with baccalaureate degrees. Foundation Courses To determine if a student will need to take any foundation courses. and time series analysis. and price behavior. the important role of property as the foundation of our legal system. the field of regulating securities. emphasizing capabilities of different statistical techniques and business applications. or students who have obtained prior approval from the Director of Graduate Business Programs. QM 0713 Statistics Basic concepts in collection. Bus 0712 Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business Overview of the structure of the legal and regulatory environment. presentation. rovide general management graduate-level education for students with baccalaureate P degrees in any field of study. business organizations and regulating agencies. and the demands of cyberlaw in the information age. all 071X courses must be completed before enrollment in 072X courses. the interrelationship between ethical management and legal mandates.D. Econ 0713 Economic Concepts Introduction to micro and macroeconomic theory involving consumer behavior. hypothesis testing. with emphasis on intellectual property. factor markets. including the relationship between internal organization and governmental corporate governance. national income. 2. Topics include statistical estimation. . based on transcripts. Mathematical proficiency required. employment. Acct 0712 Accounting Concepts Introduction to financial and managerial accounting concepts emphasizing the nature and purpose of accounting techniques for selecting and measuring economic events and financial information needed for various types of administrative decisions. Normally.118 Collins College of Business Master of Business Administration (MBA) Director of Graduate Business Programs Steve Rockwell. Develop and strengthen managerial tools and decision-making capabilities for those individuals in managerial positions who wish to improve their effectiveness and enhance their career advancement.

or Self-study following TU prepared material. . Extensive career experience using the subject matter that builds on prior coursework in the subject area. distribution channels. However. with a grade of B or higher.Collins College of Business Fin 0722 Finance Concepts Basic principles and practices of managerial finance. motivation. Completion. Mgt 0722 Management Principles Basic processes and concepts of management and organizational behavior (i. control systems. evaluation of alternative courses of action and strategy in profit terms. Additional coursework. job design. All requirements for the degree must be completed within six years from the date of enrollment in the program. pricing. Students who do not make satisfactory progress may be dismissed from the program.). organization design and change. Emphasis placed on effective methods for managing productive systems. The 31 credit hours of advanced courses must be completed within the four years prior to graduation. etc.e. QM 0722 Operations Management Salient topics of production/operations management. 3. Prerequisites: Acct 0712 and Econ 0713. 2. admitted students requiring foundation courses will enroll in those courses at The University of Tulsa. planning and budgeting. beyond the principles or introductory courses covering the comparable material. work attitudes. demand analysis. as well as financial instruments and markets. Passing a proficiency exam after preparation with: Non-credit short courses. with a grade of B or higher. and financial decision-making in a corporate context. leadership. 119 Mktg 0722 Marketing Principles Managerial considerations in marketing decisions. of a course or courses covering comparable material within the past six years from an AACSB accredited business program or as part of a four-year bachelor’s degree in business administration. in the subject area. Satisfactory Progress A candidate for a Master of Business Administration degree is expected to complete the program in a timely manner. A successful score on the proficiency exam for the subject. product development. Traditional classroom courses 2. and promotion areas. Attention is devoted to tools and models such as time value.. Waiver Note: Foundations may be satisfied in different ways: 1. communication. Foundation Waiver Policy Normally. 4. any of the following may qualify a student for a foundation course waiver: 1. Online courses 3.

Advanced Core Courses Bus 7001. Financial Administration Mgt 7003.120 Collins College of Business Curriculum In addition to demonstrating knowledge of and competency in the basic skills and areas of business through completion of or waiver from foundation courses. Must complete all requirements for the MBA. The MBA: Doing It Right Acct 7003. . the student: 1. Must satisfactorily complete an additional one-semester internship course (BUS 7021. Behavioral Sciences in Administration MIS 7003. The remaining six hours are electives. Introduction to Operations Research Mgt 7883. Corporate and Business Strategy Electives—6 hours (may include 3 hours of Independent Study) *For students with an undergraduate accounting degree. Monetary and Fiscal Policy Fin 7003. A minimum of 25 hours must be in 7000-level courses reserved exclusively for graduate students. 2. Twenty-five credit hours of the advanced course work consist of required courses. Business Applications) which is graded P for Pass (A or B) or F for Fail and in which satisfactory performance in the internship is required for a passing score. Such a waiver will require the student to take a different. Advanced Marketing Management QM 7003. Will be responsible for securing the internship. candidates for the Master of Business Administration degree must complete 31 credit hours of advanced study in business. Management Information Systems Mktg 7003. Managerial Accounting* Econ 7043.0 or higher for those courses) may be granted by the faculty of that academic discipline. following the College’s Guidelines for Administration of Student Internship Programs. Management Control Systems will be substituted. elective course in that discipline. Core Course Waiver Policy: Waiver of core courses (for students who have four or more undergraduate courses in the discipline with a grade point average of 3. A thesis is not required for the Master of Business Administration. To earn the MBA Applied Option. Faculty of each discipline will decide whether or not to allow this waiver. but the firm and internship must be approved by the MBA program advisor and faculty member guiding the internship. Acct 7073. 3. MBA Applied Option Students are required to apply business principles in an actual business environment through a formal Collins College of Business internship.

Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders I Acct 7143. Investment Analysis and Management Fin 7033.Collins College of Business 121 Concentrations Available in the MBA Program MBA students may enhance and focus their graduate program of study by selecting a concentration in Accounting. Database Design and Programming MIS 7143. or Taxation. Trading and Risk Management FIN 7223. Management Control Systems Acct 7113. International Financial Management Fin 7133. Concentration in Taxation (12 hours—select 4 courses)** Taxation concentration will be completed via online courses. In addition. Financial Systems and Corporate Applications Concentration in Cybersecurity (15 hours) Select graduate level work in Computer Science that will enable the student to receive five federal (CNSS 4011-15) information assurance certifications. A CIS advisor will approve course selections. Students selecting a concentration must complete all of the foundation and advanced courses. students with an undergraduate major in Accounting will replace Acct 7003 in the advanced core with a higher-level accounting course. Concentration in Finance (9 hours—select 3 courses) Fin 6113. E-Commerce Infrastructure Option: Students may develop their own MIS concentration by selecting graduate electives in MIS with prior departmental approval. Concentration in Accounting (12 hours)** Acct 6053. . Tax Research **In addition to the two concentrations listed above in Taxation and Accounting. Working Capital Management Fin 7053. Tax Accounting Methods Acct 7163. Managerial Aspects of Taxation Acct 7073. MIS. Empirical Methods in Finance Fin 7093. Information Security: Auditing and Assurance Services Acct 7213. Cybersecurity. Concentrations in Accounting and Taxation require students to complete Acct 4233 or equivalent as a prerequisite. Risk Management Fin 7043. Student Investment Fund I Fin 7013. Fixed Income Analysis Concentration in MIS (9 hours—3 required courses) MIS 7093. Taxation of Partnerships and S-Corporations Acct 7153. Long-Term Financial Decisions Fin 7023. Advanced Topics in Risk Management Fin 7153. students may develop their own accounting concentration by selecting graduate electives in accounting that are relevant to their career goals and objectives. Strategic Information Systems MIS 7133. Portfolio Management Fin 7073. Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders II Acct 7233. Acct 7063. Finance. A concentration is achieved through the selection of elective courses in one of the specified fields. Completion of a concentration may require one or two additional courses beyond the MBA degree requirements.

based on transcripts. Curriculum options for corporate finance and investments and portfolio management are designed for students with an undergraduate degree in business administration. • nowledge of the primary areas of finance: corporate finance. analytical tools. The MSF program prepares students for a professional career in a range of specialized areas: corporate finance. Acct 0712 Accounting Concepts Introduction to financial and managerial accounting concepts emphasizing the nature and purpose of accounting techniques for selecting and measuring economic events and financial information needed for various types of administrative decisions. The program furnishes skills. and price behavior. typically with undergraduate degrees in mathematics. investments. market structures. . national income. an initial evaluation.122 Collins College of Business Master of Science in Finance Director of Graduate Business Programs Steve Rockwell Finance and Operations Management Department Chair Roger Bey The primary goal of the Master of Science in Finance (MSF) program is to provide a high quality graduate business program concentrated in finance and other related areas. an MBA. Normally. Foundation Courses To determine if a student will need to take any foundation courses. employment. and perspectives that serve as a sound foundation for financial decision making in an increasingly complex financial world. The following foundation courses are available only to students with baccalaureate degrees. portfolio management. investments/portfolio manK agement. investments and portfolio management. all 071X courses must be completed before enrollment in 072X courses. or risk management. factor markets. financial institutions. the physical sciences. is completed at the time of application. In particular. or students who have obtained prior approval from the Director of Graduate Business Programs. the MSF curriculum is designed to provide each student with: • A rigorous body of coursework that includes current financial theory and practice. theory of the firm. The risk management option is designed for students with strong quantitative backgrounds. • n opportunity to develop specialized knowledge in one of the following areas: corporate A finance. and risk management. and engineering. The number of credits per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. and risk management. or undergraduate or graduate degrees in other disciplines. Econ 0713 Economic Concepts Introduction to micro and macroeconomic theory involving consumer behavior. statistics. • he quantitative and analytical skills necessary to work effectively in a rapidly changing T financial world. This program is designed for students who desire an opportunity for in-depth study of the sophisticated analytical techniques and market transactions that drive financial innovation.

and interpretation of data. hypothesis testing. All requirements for the degree must be completed within six years from the date of enrollment in the program. 123 Math 2014 Calculus I Theory and application of the differential calculus of polynomial. in the subject area. and analytical solutions to applied problems involving derivatives. However. numerical. any of the following may qualify a student for a foundation course waiver: 1. Simple regression. Correlation. Students who do not make satisfactory progress may be dismissed from the program. Additional coursework. admitted students requiring foundation courses will enroll in those courses at The University of Tulsa. Random variables and distributions. regression. or Self-study following TU-prepared material . Passing a proficiency exam after preparation with: Non-credit short courses. infinite series and introduction to differential equations. Introduction to the integral. Satisfactory Progress A candidate for a Master of Science in Finance degree is expected to complete the program in a timely manner. of a course or courses covering comparable material within the past six years from an AACSB accredited business program or as part of a four-year bachelor’s degree in business administration. and financial decision-making in a corporate context. Emphasis on applications of calculus and problem solving using technology in addition to symbolic methods. Test of hypotheses. beyond the principles or introductory courses covering the comparable material. Math 2024 Calculus II Definite and indefinite integrals of functions of a single variable. Prerequisite: Math 2014. Elementary experimental design. with a grade of B or higher. Mathematical proficiency required. 4. Online courses 3. Prerequisites: Math 1164 or equivalent. Improper integrals. logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Waiver Note: Foundations may be satisfied in different ways: 1. Prerequisite: Math 2014. emphasizing capabilities of different statistical techniques and business applications. Completion. 3. Extensive career experience using the subject matter that builds on prior coursework in the subject area. analysis. and passing score on the university mathematics placement examination. and time series analysis. 2. Tests of significance. Foundation Waiver Policy Normally. presentation. The 36 credit hours of advanced courses must be completed within the four years prior to graduation. Stat 4813 (alternative to QM 0713) Statistical Methods for Scientists and Engineers Elementary probability. Fin 0722 Finance Concepts Basic principles and practices of managerial finance. exponential. Topics include statistical estimation. Graphical. with a grade of B or higher. as well as financial instruments and markets. Attention is devoted to tools and models such as time value. Traditional classroom courses 2. A successful score on the proficiency exam for the subject.Collins College of Business QM 0713 Statistics Basic concepts in collection.

The curriculum requirements for each option of study are shown on pages 124-126. Investment Analysis and Management Fin 7033. Must complete all requirements for the MSF. 2. Introduction to Operations Research Corporate Finance Option Required Courses (12 hours) Fin 7013. 3. International Financial Management Math 7503. A minimum of 27 credit hours must be completed in advanced (7000-level) courses reserved exclusively for graduate students. Working Capital Management Or Fin 7123. Must satisfactorily complete an additional one-semester internship course (BUS 7021. Stochastic Modeling and Simulation Or QM 7053. Financial Administration Fin 7023. but is an option for the degree. To earn the MSF Applied Option. Core Courses (18 hours) Acct 6153. and the Director of Graduate Business Programs. following the College’s Guidelines for Administration of Student Internship Programs. the Chairman of the Finance and Operations Management Department. Risk Management Fin 7213. Research Tools in Finance QM 7003. the student: 1. Business Applications) which is graded P for Pass (A or B) or F for Fail and in which satisfactory performance in the internship is required for a passing score. A thesis is not required. but the firm and internship must be approved by the faculty member guiding the internship.124 Collins College of Business MSF Applied Option Students are required to apply business principles in an actual business environment through a formal Collins College of Business internship. Long-Term Financial Decisions Fin 7043. Enterprise Risk Management Fin 7093. Computer Simulation . Analysis of Financial Statements Fin 7003. Will be responsible for securing the internship. Curriculum All candidates for the Master of Science in Finance degree must have completed or complete the foundation courses and 36 semester hours of advanced study.

Enterprise Risk Management Math 7503. Management Control Systems Econ 6063. Fixed Income Analysis Fin 7073. Probability Risk Management Option Required Courses (12 hours) Fin 7073. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations Math 6603. Independent Study Law 5413. Monetary and Fiscal Policy Fin 7163. Pricing and Managing Derivatives Fin 7193. Student Investment Fund I Fin 7053. Probability Investments and Portfolio Management Option Required Courses (12 hours) Fin 6113. Empirical Methods in Finance Fin 7133. International Business Transactions Math 6523. Numerical Optimization Stat 7423. Numerical Optimization Stat 7423. Computer Simulation . Managerial Accounting Acct 7073. Advanced Topics in Risk Management Fin 7123. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory Math 6543. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations Math 6603. Introduction to Numerical Methods Math 7253. Seminar in Finance Fin 7983-6. International Economics Econ 7043. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory Math 6543. Stochastic Modeling and Simulation Or QM 7053. Applied Finance Project Fin 7973. Pricing and Managing Derivatives Fin 7193. Management Control Systems Econ 6063. International Business Transactions Math 6523. Monetary and Fiscal Policy Fin 7163. Master's Thesis Fin 7993. Empirical Methods in Finance Elective Courses (select 6 hours from the following): Acct 7003. Master’s Thesis Fin 7993. Managerial Accounting Acct 7073. Independent Study Law 5413. Applied Finance Project Fin 7973. Portfolio Management Fin 7223. International Economics Econ 7043. Introduction to Numerical Methods Math 7253. Seminar in Finance Fin 7983-6.Collins College of Business 125 Elective Courses (select 6 hours from the following): Acct 7003.

Probability . Numerical Optimization Stat 7423. Applied Finance Project Fin 7973. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory Math 6543. Monetary and Fiscal Policy Fin 7163. Pricing and Managing Derivatives Fin 7193. Master's Thesis Fin 7993. Management Control Systems Econ 6063. Managerial Accounting Acct 7073. Seminar in Finance Fin 7983-6.126 Collins College of Business Elective Courses (select 6 hours from the following): Acct 7003. Introduction to Numerical Methods Math 7253. Independent Study Law 5413. International Business Transactions Math 6523. International Economics Econ 7043. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations Math 6603.

Estates. Tax Accounting Methods Acct 7163. A thesis is not required for the Master of Taxation degree. The program uses technology such as CDs. The program is appropriate for persons who plan to enter tax practice as well as for persons already practicing in the tax area. Many students who work in professional tax settings choose to take fewer courses (or no courses) during the tax season. and the Internet for course delivery. The 30 credit hours of taxation courses are as follows: Required Courses: Acct 7063. Trusts. International Aspects of Taxation Acct 7253. e-mail.Collins College of Business 127 Master of Taxation Director of Graduate Business Programs Steve Rockwell Program Advisors Patrick Hennessee Wray Bradley The Master of Taxation (MTAX) program is completely administered through information technology with no campus visits. Practice and Planning* Elective Courses (choose five): Acct 7123. Taxation of Partnerships and S-Corporations Acct 7153. Federal Income Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders I Acct 7143. Instructors for this program are full-time faculty from the School of Accounting and qualified tax professionals. Students receive course material. State and Local Taxation Acct 7263. Employee Compensation and Advanced Individual Taxation Issues Acct 7183. For students with prior legal or tax training: a. Taxation of Natural Resources and Energy Acct 7133. CPA firm. roof of successful completion of a training program in a professional tax environment P (e. and Fiduciary Taxation Acct 7173. Issues for Tax Exempt Organizations *Must be taken during the first semester . Director of School of Accounting and Management Information Systems Karen Cravens Curriculum The foundation requirements for the Master of Taxation are as follows: 1.g. or b. Taxation of Property and Security Transactions Acct 7193. candidates for the degree must complete 30 credit hours of graduate taxation courses. complete assignments. but this choice does not allow completion of the degree within a two year period.) After meeting the above foundation requirements. and interact with professors and classmates via these media. etc. The typical sequence for degree completion is for students to take two classes each semester for five semesters. Tax Research. Federal Income Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders II Acct 7233. or 2. Completion of “Accounting for Lawyers” and “Federal Taxation” (or equivalent courses) in Law School. federal or state government tax training program. The program is designed for professionals who wish to undertake graduate study in taxation with a flexible. self-directed study schedule. One university course in Introductory Accounting (undergraduate or graduate) with a grade of ‘C’ or better and one university course in Federal Taxation (undergraduate or graduate) with a grade of ‘C’ or better. All courses must be completed within six years.

internal reporting for business segments. S Corporations are compared to partnerships along with the use of S Corporations. Prerequisite: Acct 3133/6133 or equivalent and permission of the instructor. Topics include job order costing. governmental accounting and/or not for profit accounting. and the sale of a partnership interest. Topics include income tax and estate tax issues of estates. 7093 Graduate Accounting Seminar Critical analysis of selected topics in financial accounting.128 Collins College of Business Accounting Director Karen Cravens Professors Karen Cravens Patrick Hennessee Associate Professors Wray Bradley Dennis Hudson Tracy Manly Steve Rockwell Applied Assistant Professor Anna McColl Adjunct Professors Lisa Croley Anthony Rackley Accounting (Acct) The number of credits per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. . 7063 Federal Income Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders I Study of concepts and principles of federal income taxation of corporations and their shareholders. auditing/assurance services. international accounting. Prerequisite: Acct 0713 or equivalent. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. differential costs and revenues. accounting theory. 7003 Managerial Accounting Study of cost accumulation systems. standard costing. and behavioral aspects of managerial accounting. Acct 7003. activity-based costing. 7123 Taxation of Natural Resources and Energy Designed to develop competence in applying federal tax law and regulations to the oil and gas industry. strategic management accounting. 7073 Management Control Systems Study of design and use of management control systems. Emphasis on the production phase of the oil and gas industry. partnership operation. Security issues are researched and discussed. Trusts. budgetary control and profit planning. and cost accounting in the new economy. Prerequisite: Acct 4223. and Fiduciary Taxation Deals with Federal tax issues of estates and trusts. bequests. Not open to students who recently have completed Acct 4223 or equivalent. partnership distributions. routine planning and control. gifts and trusts. or permission of instructor. non-routine decisions. Topics include: The Balanced Scorecard. Key features are case studies and research projects. 7143 Taxation of Partnerships and S-Corporations Tax treatment in relation to the formation of a partnership. Students are expected to apply their knowledge to solve advanced tax problems. starting with the search for oil and gas and ending when the products of the wells are delivered to pipelines for transportation to refineries or customers. process costing. 7113 Information Security: Auditing and Assurance Services A critical analysis of the data and information flows in a variety of information system architectures. cost-volume-profit analysis. 7133 Estates.

S. standards. tax services and periodicals. educational savings incentives. life insurance. capital gains and losses. 7973 Seminar in Accounting Issues A critical analysis of selected topics in accounting.S. Issues relevant to tax practice before the Internal Revenue Service are explored. scholarships. accounting for interest. personal income taxation at the state level. regulations. bequests. nontaxable exchanges. taxation of aliens. unstated interest. Emphasizes basis determination. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 7193 International Aspects of Taxation International taxation of U. DISCS. personal credits. business issues. controlled foreign corporations. accounting for inventories. and tax planning. deferred compensation. Includes basis computation. 7173 Employee Compensation and Advanced Individual Taxation Issues Focuses on the main areas of employee compensation and advanced individual income tax issues. effects of liabilities on property transactions. Web tools (including tutorials). Includes foreign source income. personal exemptions and itemized deductions. Examination of the accumulated earning tax.S. 129 7213 Financial Systems and Corporate Applications Intensive study of the evolution of financial/ accounting information systems and corporation applications such as enterprise resource planning systems (ERP). wash sales. citizens living abroad and of U. emphasizing taxation of U. foreign tax credits or declarations.S. compensation for personal injuries and sickness. Sample topics include legal issues. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IRAs. Practice and Planning Development of tax research skills and their application to tax practice and planning. 7253 State and Local Taxation Topics covered include: income taxation of multistate business. divorce issues. foreign personal holding companies and sales corporations. U. and permission of instructor. death benefits. and collapsible corporations. like-kind exchanges. 7223 Business on the Web Student research and project seminar that explores the growing number of businesses on the Web and business transactions completed using the Internet. recognition of gains and losses. gifts. Topics include prepaids. Prerequisites: MIS 0713 or equivalent with at least a B. sale of personal residence. and tax planning considerations. disposition of business property.-based corporations. 7163 Federal Income Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders II A continuation of Federal Income Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders I (Accounting 7063) with emphasis on corporate reorganizations and liquidation of subsidiaries. Prerequisites: Permission of graduate advisor and supervisory professor. design issues. personal holding companies. Regulations for donating to tax-exempt organizations are also covered. Prerequisite: Acct 7063. and develop knowledge of the use of computerized tax databases. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study in Accounting Individual study in a specialized area of interest. electronic commerce infrastructures and architectures. ad valorem taxation. 7233 Tax Research. and state inheritance taxation. sales between related parties. foreign tax laws.Collins College of Business 7153 Tax Accounting Methods Problems relating to tax accounting emphasizing income recognition under various accounting methods such as installment reporting. 7183 Taxation of Property and Security Transactions Tax consequences in property transactions. sales and use taxation. Topics include income issues. Factual cases are analyzed to isolate critical facts and tax questions. annuities. employee fringe benefits. support partners and Internet support vendors. involuntary conversions. tax planning.S. foreign currency gains and losses. cost and accrual method of accounting. accounting for longterm contracts. and the alternative minimum tax. 7263 Issues for Tax-Exempt Organizations Topics related to obtaining and maintaining taxexempt status as issued by the Internal Revenue Service. Section 1231 sales. recapture provisions. entities and U. .

service and not-for-profit organizations. problems. managerial. legal liability. merchandising. Includes an understanding of contracts. utilizing actual statements. or equivalent. Prerequisite: Acct 3113 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: Acct 3113 with a grade of C or better. The focus of the course is on strategic tax planning for the decision-making manager who does not have a tax background.130 Collins College of Business 6213 Financial Accounting Research Applications Impact of technical considerations of business events on financial statements. Includes accounting theories that may conflict with one another and thereby lead to different conclusions in different circumstances. rulemaking processes. 6223 Internal Reporting Issues Conceptual and practical aspects of designing and using management information systems for planning. Focuses on impact of information technology on flow of information. Offered spring semester. control. and cases. Emphasis on the analysis (as opposed to the construction) of financial statements. Offered spring semester. common to the energy industry. and tax accounting as applied to the energy industry. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: Acct 3113 with a grade of C or better. 6243 Auditing Assurance for Accounting Systems Designing and auditing traditional automated systems and information-age systems. with related accounting treatment. and extensions of the attest function. 6163 Financial Reporting in the Energy Industry Financial analysis concepts from financial. 6233 Topics in Federal Income Taxation Principles and concepts of federal income taxation as applied to various taxable entities. 6083 Professional Accounting Issues Study of issues and forces influencing the development of both private and public elements of the accounting profession. ethics. and decision making in manufacturing. and financial and internal auditing issues. or equivalent. or equivalent. 6153 Analysis of Financial Statements The analysis and interpretation of financial reports. Prerequisites: Acct 2113 and 2123 or equivalents. Topics covered include certification. or equivalent. specialization. Prerequisite: Acct 3113 with a grade of C or better. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the course. Emphasis on tax planning and research skills to provide solutions for business and individual tax situations in a constantly changing business environment. or equivalent. cost. Inductive-deductive method of inquiry and empirical studies cast in a pragmatic framework. auditing accounting systems. . 6053 Managerial Aspects of Taxation Examines the tax implications of transactions as they occur throughout a company’s life cycle. Offered fall semester. Typically offered spring semester. Prerequisite: Acct 3113 with a grade of C or better. business and accounting controls. Approved Undergraduate Accounting Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the graduate advisor.

teamwork. This course is graded P for Pass (equivalent to an A or B) or F for Fail.Collins College of Business 131 Business (Bus) The following interdisciplinary courses are offered in the Collins College of Business: 7001 The MBA: Doing It Right A residential seminar focused on business ethics and teamwork as an introduction to the MBA program. The student will complete an internship at an organization off campus that is consistent with the Guidelines for Administration of Student Internship Programs of the Collins College of Business. Normally an intern will work full or part-time during 7 to 15 weeks. 7021 Business Applications An application of graduate business principles in the environment of a business organization. and managing ethics in the workplace. . Satisfactory completion of the internship will be determined based on the evaluations of the organization’s internship supervisor and the faculty internship supervisor. Covers program protocols and expectations. Internships usually will be undertaken after the student has completed at least one full academic year of study including at least one semester of advanced (7000-level) coursework.

statistical techniques. Employing modern decision and probability theory. 7013 Long-Term Financial Decisions Emphasis on the optimal acquisition and allocation of long-term sources of capital. and mergers. from the analysis of individual securities to the final combination of securities into portfolios. Prerequisite: Fin 7003. 7063 The Behavior of Financial Markets Analysis of current trends and recent developments in financial intermediaries and financial markets. and cash management. and portfolio management. Specific emphasis is placed on developing practical decision-making approaches for solving financial problems. capital structure. Integration of quantitative techniques and microeconomics to financial decisions. Markham Collins Robert Monroe Associate Professors David Enke Larry Johnson Finance (Fin) The number of credits per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. Prerequisite: Fin 7003. Prerequisite: Fin 7003. lease-purchase decisions. options. financial forecasting. bond and foreign currency options.132 Collins College of Business Finance Chair Roger Bey Professors Roger Bey Richard Burgess J. the course investigates the entire process of investing in financial assets. 7053 Portfolio Management Development and application of modern portfolio theory to the selection of financial assets. Futures. accounts receivable. 7033 Risk Management Introduces the use and pricing of derivative assets. 7003 Financial Administration Devoted to an understanding of the numerous financial decisions confronting the modern business firm. 7023 Investment Analysis and Management Theory and tools of analysis required in managing financial assets. implied binomial trees. the institutional structure of derivative markets and contracts. cash flow analysis. Covers mathematical concepts underlying derivative asset analysis. Emphasis on profit planning. the binominal and Black-Scholes options pricing models. elementary pricing relations. Prerequisite: Fin 7003. 7043 Working Capital Management Financial planning and management of shortterm assets and liabilities. Prerequisites: All foundation MBA courses. portfolio construction and revision. . Topics include diversification. abandonment. diversification. Prerequisite: Fin 7003. Topics include capital budgeting evaluation models. portfolio approaches to capital budgeting. and the computer. cost of capital. and alternative option pricing models are explored. Prerequisite: Fin 0723.

factor sensitivities. how traders manage their exposure. etc. construction. settlement measurement techniques for contracts such as duration. apply these statistical methods to a variety of financial situations. (2) the structure and behavior of interest rates. and management of fixed income portfolios. and liquidity risk. Prerequisites: Fin 0722 and QM 0713. Introduces financial databases and estimation application software (Matlab. total portfolio market exposure limits. and extreme value analysis. SAS.Collins College of Business 7073 Empirical Methods in Finance Reviews probability and statistical techniques used in quantitative finance. Value at Risk(tm). performance measurement. an industry sponsor. and diversification. Prerequisites: Fin 7073. 7961 Residency (See page 20. (3) the tools and analysis of individual fixed income asset valuation. dynamic portfolio distribution analysis. 7133 Advanced Topics in Risk Management Risk measurement and management. Pre-requisites: FIN 7033. and the department chairperson. including market. and CEV distributions. Covers estimation and non-parametric techniques used in finance. international treasury functions. understand the composition. market maker. and normal. and (4) the analysis. Complexities of real world markets are incorporated into complex risk management strategies and the pricing of exotic options. interest rate risk. Prerequisite or corequisite: Fin 7133. Prerequisites: Fin 7073 and 7133. 7213 Research Tools in Finance Attain a working knowledge of advanced statistical analyses commonly used by financial professionals. Topics include a review of the financial products used for hedging and risk reduction. Prerequisite: Fin 7033. . compete against each other in trading exercises. and manage their own investment portfolios. 7123 Enterprise Risk Management An understanding of the risks faced by banks and other financial institutions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. and financial analyst. 7223 Fixed Income Analysis Provides an in-depth understanding of (1) the institutional aspects of debt securities and debt markets. 7193 Applied Finance Project An applied project exploring a quantitative finance problem that might be met in practice and involves the development or use of a quantitative financial technique. and counterpart credit exposure limits. credit. credit derivatives. Includes techniques for trading desk risk management. portfolio Beta. 7153 Trading and Risk Management Case studies and historical market simulations teach key principles of finance theory. and retrieval of data from financial databases. Emphasis on foreign exchange. Prerequisite: Fin 7003. log-normal. risk and price volatility. financial intermediary.) 7973 Seminar in Finance A critical analysis of selected topics in finance. Prerequisites: all required graduate business foundation courses. bank regulation and Basel II. international risk. hedger. 7093 International Financial Management Examines the international business environment and the challenges and opportunities it presents for financial managers. Students implement their own trading strategies.) for exercises in estimating volatilities and correlations and their stability. structure. Fundamentals of trading and the nature and uses of financial instruments introduced through the Financial Analysis and Securities Trading (FAST) system computer-based simulation trading program. Stochastic processes underlying energy prices are analyzed. and using Value-atRisk for managing market risk. volatility. Students assume roles of speculator. Requires prior approval of the supervising faculty member. and develop the ability to analyze financial data using statistical software. and credit risk. operational risk. Develop financial models in SAS and MATLAB. 133 7163 Pricing and Managing Derivatives Pricing and risk management of energy derivatives. Fin 7003. Prerequisites: Math 2024 and QM 0713.

Students are required to plan their program of study and prepare a formal report of their findings. Approved Undergraduate Finance Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the graduate advisor. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study in Finance Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of a field of finance. *May not be used as an MBA elective. an application form. and place the trades. .134 Collins College of Business 6113 Student Investment Fund Actual management of a financial asset portfolio. Emphasis on contemporary economic and political relationships. Prerequisites: Acct 0712 and Econ 0713. and a web site. accounting records. Students are responsible for maintaining and updating all policies. allocate assets. Attention is devoted to tools and models such as time value. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate advisor. 6022* Finance Concepts Basic principles and practices of managerial finance. International Business (IB) The following interdisciplinary course is offered in the Collins College of Business: 6013 Topics in International Business A critical study of selected topics in international business. select securities. and financial decision-making in a corporate context. procedures. Prerequisite: Permission of international business coordinator. 7983 Master’s Thesis Directed research on a problem in an approved area. Written thesis and formal defense before graduate committee is required. as well as financial instruments and markets. and instructor’s approval. Students determine the investment style. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. Prerequisite: Fin 7003. The field of interest selected for study may not be that investigated in meeting thesis requirements.

conflict. Emphasis on understanding the free enterprise system and what it takes to start and build a new venture outside (entrepreneurship) as well as inside (intrapreneurship) an existing organization. integrative and distributive strategies. functioning.Collins College of Business 135 Management Chair Ralph Jackson Professors P.) 7973 Seminar in Management A critical analysis of selected topics in management.A. 7883 Corporate and Business Strategy An integrative course focusing on the perspective. with permission of the graduate advisor. Ordinarily taken in the student’s last semester. and persuasion. with emphasis on decision-oriented problem solving in a business environment. 7093 Problems in Applied Business Research Applied research practices and techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. and small group exercises allow the student to internalize the conceptual material necessary for management excellence. . 7083 Organizational Change: Strategy and Techniques Techniques and theories of organization change from the standpoint of both the change agent and the manager or administrator responsible for effecting changes in the organization’s structure. case study. procedures. skills. Topics include motivation factors. 7023 Negotiation and Influence Theories and skills relevant to negotiating and bargaining in a wide range of business and organizational situations. 7961 Residency (See page 20. bargaining tactics.B. 7033 Entrepreneurship Provides an understanding of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process. and integrating the plans and activities of the organization’s functional and technical areas to achieve those goals and objectives. Actual real world business problems are addressed and studied through the application of legitimate research procedures. Prerequisite: Mgt 7003. Prerequisites: 15 graduate credit hours and permission of instructor. power. Students with an undergraduate major in management may. and responsibilities of management in setting organizational goals and objectives. communication issues. Smith Larry Wofford Associate Professors Jill Hough Ralph Jackson Arthur Rasher Applied Assistant Professors Susan Boyd (Business Law) Jim Senese Management (Mgt) The number of credits per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. etc. Prerequisites: All 7003 M. select a management course approved for graduate credit other than Mgt 7003.C. core courses. 7003 The Behavioral Sciences in Administration An overview of pertinent theories that deal with the behavioral aspects of the management of formal organizations. Lecture. Prerequisites: All foundation MBA courses.

motivation. organization design and change. . Approved Undergraduate Management Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the graduate advisor. leadership. *May not be used as an MBA elective. planning and budgeting.e. 6022* Management Principles Basic processes and concepts of management and organizational behavior (i. job design. communication.. control systems. Students are required to plan their program of study and prepare a formal report of their findings. work attitudes.). etc. Available only to students with baccalaureate degrees. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate advisor.136 Collins College of Business 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study in Management Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of a field of management. Prerequisites: Acct 0712 and Econ 0713. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. The field of interest selected for study may not be that investigated in meeting thesis requirements.

how systems are currently applied both domestically and internationally. 7093 Strategic Information Systems A study of important management issues for MIS including application development. Management Information Systems (MIS) The number of credits per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. data mining. ethics. CRM (customer relationship management).. and management issues that should be considered before completing business transactions over the Internet. Prerequisites: MIS 0713 or equivalent with at least a B. The goal of this course is to examine developments in ERP (enterprise resource planning). and permission of instructor. Language/tools for building these systems are also examined. Students learn conceptual and logical data modeling techniques as well as the skills necessary to create. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. data warehousing and knowledge management concepts are investigated. software. Focus is on integrating information systems with organizational objectives. security. 7213 Financial Systems and Corporate Applications Intensive study of the evolution of financial/ accounting information systems and corporation applications such as enterprise resource planning systems (ERP). including the different technologies available. query. analysis and design of databases. Includes coverage of hardware. retrieval of data using query languages. 7113 Information Security: Auditing and Assurance Services A critical analysis of the data and information flows in a variety of information system architectures.Collins College of Business 137 Management Information Systems Director Karen Cravens Professors Karen Cravens Gale Sullenberger Associate Professors Akhilesh Bajaj Lori Leonard Assistant Professors Jeff Crawford Kiku Jones 7133 Database Design and Programming Examines organizational data needs. etc. and administer databases using client applications. Prerequisites: MIS 7133 with at least a B. and evaluating new technologies. and what the future trends are likely to be. . costing. and attempt to determine the future impact of the web on business technologies. Security issues are researched and discussed. and organizational issues related to telecommunication networks and e-commerce applications. 7003 Management Information Systems Examines the theories and principles of management information systems. and administration of data resources within an organization. Fundamental decision support system. business. and standards used to support business processes. SCM (supply chain management). 7123 Decision and Support Strategies for Businesses Seminar dealing with information systems designed to support decisions. outsourcing. Prerequisite: MIS 0713 or equivalent with at least a B. 7143 E-Commerce Infrastructure Seminar in the management. design. Explores legal. applications. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 7223 Business on the Web Seeks to develop and demonstrate an understanding of web technologies in business. Prerequisite: MIS 0713 or equivalent with at least a B. update.

and study of IT trends. modeling techniques. or equivalent. Language/tools for building DSS and data warehouses are also examined.138 Collins College of Business 6173 Network Administration Addresses issues relevant to managers of telecommunications networks. 6013 Systems Analysis and Design Introduces the analysis and logical design of business processes and management information systems focusing on the systems development life cycle. 6163 Internet Development Project Develops the skills necessary to build Internetbased commerce infrastructures. Students staff a systems analysis and design project team involving implementation of computer-based solutions to actual individual and organizational problems. . Prerequisite: As determined by instructor. A graduate student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the course. Project management skills are emphasized. 6133 Software Systems A series of modules designed to deepen learning in topics covered throughout the MIS curriculum concerning new technologies and trends. Sample topics include development methodologies. 6403 Systems Development Project Involves application of IS skills and knowledge developed throughout the curriculum. Includes lab work and participation in network hardware/software projects. Fundamental DSS and data warehousing concepts are covered. Students learn about the design and implementation of data networks and administration of network operating systems. Approved Undergraduate Management Information Systems Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the graduate advisor. feasibility. Provides students with hands-on exposure employing an enterprise modeling tool for analysis and design of enterprise wide systems to allow the evaluation of a build versus buy decision. or equivalent. emerging IS thought and tools. 6413 Decision Support Strategies Examines information systems designed to support management decisions. Prerequisites: MIS 6013 or MIS 4053 with a grade of C or better. or equivalent. Prerequisite: MIS 3053 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite or corequisite: MIS 3053 with a grade of C or better. and permission of instructor. costbenefit and requirements analysis. project management. and documentation of current and future system designs. A variety of web tools and concepts are introduced and applied. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. object-oriented modeling and programming. 6233 Development and Acquisition of Enterprise System 7973 Seminar in Management Information Systems A critical study of selected topics in management information systems. comparisons of programming languages and paradigms. Prerequisite: MIS 3043 with a grade of C or better. Topics include study of corporate applications (including ERP).

*May not be used as an MBA elective. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and graduate advisor. markets. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.) Approved Undergraduate Marketing Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the graduate advisor. evaluation of alternative courses of action and strategy in profit terms. Marketing (Mktg) The number of credits per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. formal strategic planning methods. 7043 International Marketing An introduction to and an examination of the application of marketing concepts. and promotion areas. 6093 International Marketing International marketing operations. Prerequisite: Mktg 0722. 6022* Marketing Concepts Managerial considerations in marketing decisions.Collins College of Business 139 Marketing Chair Ralph Jackson Professor Saeed Samiee Associate Professors Ralph Jackson Charles Wood Assistant Professor Brian Chabowski 7973 Seminar in Marketing A critical analysis of selected topics in marketing. 7961 Residency (See page 20. Emphasis on the analytical prerequisites for strategic marketing planning. legal. Prerequisites: Acct 0712 and Econ 0713. Available only to students with baccalaureate degrees. 7003 Advanced Marketing Management An advanced course that integrates managerial marketing concepts. focusing on the modification of marketing thinking and practice occasioned by international cultural. pricing. courses. Prerequisites: All foundation MBA courses. 7023 Marketing Research Application of the systems approach to marketing information problems. product development. Students are required to plan their program of study and prepare a formal report of their findings. 7013 Problems in Consumer Behavior Consumer behavior patterns with emphasis on the implications for marketing analysis and executive action. Study of research concepts and techniques and the application of research findings to the formulation of marketing policies. and other environmental differences. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study in Marketing Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of a field of marketing. and implementation and control issues. demand analysis. and institutions and export management. Prerequisite: Mktg 7003. Focuses on the impact of global factors on marketing decision-making including international agreements.B. The field of interest may not be that investigated in meeting thesis requirements.A. and strategies in the international business environment. distribution channels. principles. A graduate student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the course. Prerequisites: All foundation M. . theories.

advanced topics in project management. discriminant analysis. Emphasis placed on effective methods for managing productive systems. Prerequisite: All foundation MBA courses. Prerequisite: QM 7003. network models. multiple objective decision-making and goal programming. Students are required to plan their program of study and prepare a formal report of their findings. scheduling. Topics include fundamentals of mathematical programming.A. Prerequisites: MIS 0713. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study in Quantitative Analysis Open to graduate students who wish to pursue individual study or investigation of a field of quantitative analysis.140 Collins College of Business Operations Management Chair Roger Bey Professors Wen-Chyuan Chiang Robert Russell Gale Sullenberger Timothy Urban 7973 Seminar in Quantitative Analysis A critical analysis of selected topics in quantitative analysis. Specific techniques emphasized are multiple regression. simulation. Prerequisites: Acct 0712 and Econ 0713. inventory control systems. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate advisor. synchronized manufacturing. *May not be used as an M. 7013 Multivariate Analysis A computer-based approach to conceptual implications of the analysis of relationships among observations in multivariate systems and their application to the process of decision-making. and factor analysis. simulation methodology. and other deterministic and stochastic modeling techniques. Prerequisites: All foundation MBA courses. developing and validating simulation models. QM 7003. 7043 Problems in Operations Research A second course in operations research. 6403 Advanced Operations Management Advanced topics in production/operations management including logistics systems. elective. facility layout analysis. . 7053 Computer Simulation Coverage of Monte Carlo simulation with emphasis on learning a simulation language. 7961 Residency (See page 20. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. and total quality control. Prerequisites: QM 0713 and 0722. JIT (just-intime manufacturing). and stochastic processes.B. Operations Management (QM) The number of credits per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number 7003 Introduction to Operations Research A survey of the field of operations research or management science including such topics as linear programming. 6022* Operations/Production Management Salient topics of production/operations management.) Approved Undergraduate Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the graduate advisor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The field of interest selected for study may not be that investigated in meeting thesis requirements. integer and dynamic programming. and supporting statistical concepts. Available only to students with baccalaureate degrees.

These include third party payment. interpersonal relations. federal funding. planning and control. Associate Director. Topics include licensure.Collins College of Business 141 School of Nursing Director Susan Gaston Professors Susan Gaston Barbara Martin Associate Professor Kristie Nix Athletic Training Clinical Associate Professor Greg Gardner. 7033 Nursing Administration III Emphasis on significant issues that impact on the delivery of nursing care within the context of the healthcare institution/system. and financial planning. healthcare system and introduction of concepts and techniques of management. Nursing (Nsg) 7003 Methods of Research in Nursing The development of research studies within a nursing framework. The development of a research proposal is the expected outcome. 7013 Nursing Administration I Examination and theoretical application of administrative principles and functions in the organization and management of the delivery of nursing services in public and private healthcare agencies. the federal legislative process. quality assurance models. The following graduate courses may be taken for graduate credit within the limits of the graduate degree program and with the approval of the graduate program advisor and the instructor. . 7013 Health Management Techniques Overview of the U. and social welfare in the U.S. selected research designs. consumer rights. and human rights considerations. and career planning. malpractice. 7023 Nursing Administration II Examination of the phenomena that interact to influence the nurse executive role. data analysis. Emphasis on nursing care delivery models. organization. using both qualitative and quantitative methods. licensure. patient care management issues. certification. research interpretation and application. 7023 Health Law and Legislation Legal responsibilities and liabilities in relation to consumer and providers of health services. leadership theory and strategies. negligence. School of Nursing The School of Nursing offers graduate courses that may be used as electives in other majors.S. problem solving. resource competition and allocation. Prerequisite: Nsg 7013. and personnel management as they relate to the healthcare system. Applied Health Science (AHS) The number of credit hours per course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. networking and spheres of influence. health policy. and evaluation of nursing services. These include role theory and role behaviors. budgeting. Emphasis on problem formulation.

. family. intermittent compression unit. environmental. nursing service administration. nursing software. paraffin. and special therapeutic techniques. and genetic. including terminology and mechanical concepts. 6453 Legal Aspects in Athletic Training Analysis of the legal system and major problems/ issues in sports medicine. Includes analysis of fundamental and current issues. nursing education. Basic computer structures and functions are introduced. and cultural influences upon diagnoses/syndromes of children with special needs. prenatal. and research. 6463 Biomechanics Introduction to the biomechanics of human movement. The development of a theory of nursing administration is the expected outcome. Athletic Training (ATRG) 6053 Therapeutic Rehabilitation Essentials of rehabilitation programs. with students working with an administrative mentor. ultrasound. hydrotherapeutic modalities. muscle reeducation. For students in any field that involves caring for children with special needs. Approved Undergraduate Courses The following undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit within the limits of the graduate degree program and with the approval of the graduate program advisor and the instructor. The approach is from the general to the particular. 7033. Nsg 7003. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by undergraduate students in the course. ontological and epistemological issues. International experiences include the use of technology in nursing compared between the United States and other countries and examination of relevant contributions to the promotion and adaptation of technology. 7023. 7063 Theories of Nursing Practice Theory development in nursing. The seminars provide an opportunity for examination and open discussion of issues of healthcare agency management. 6403 Nursing and Computers The use of computers in nursing practice. 7045 and 7055 Nursing Administration Practicum I and II Each practicum includes a minimum of 160 hours administrative experience and 15 hours seminar. education. and 7063. and other contemporary modalities. clinical computers. and hospital information systems. techniques of rehabilitation. Experiences include use of microcomputers and mainframe computers. 7023. Emphasis on anatomical and mechanical considerations as applied to injured and noninjured athletes. massage. 7013. cryotherapy. and nursing research.142 Collins College of Business 6413 Challenges of Childhood Challenges presented by developmental disability to child. Principles of electrophysics and biophysics. Nursing (Nsg) 6133 International Nursing and Technology Focuses on the use of technology particularly computers in nursing practice. The practica are designed to provide an overview of the healthcare administrative functions. principles of therapeutic exercise. physical examinations. Some of these courses may be taken concurrently with permission of instructor. Prerequisites: AHS 7013. 6063 Therapeutic Modalities Theoretical background for clinical application of therapeutic modalities. specific physiological effects and therapeutic indications and contraindications associated with use of electrotherapeutic modalities. Emphasis on family-centered care as the cornerstone of intervention. and community. service administration. and theory application. Assessment of organizational structure and outcome evaluation using theoretical frameworks.

engineering physics. engineering physics. applied mathematics. computer science. mathematics. mechanical engineering. chemistry. and petroleum engineering. Two interdisciplinary masters’ degrees are also offered – a Master of Science in Mathematics and Science Education in cooperation with the School of Education and a Master of Science in Petrophysics. mechanical engineering. computer science. chemical engineering. electrical engineering. and physics. The Master of Science in Engineering and Master of Engineering degrees are offered in chemical engineering. and physics. Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree programs are offered in biochemistry. geosciences.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 143 Programs in the College of engineering and natural sCienCes The College of Engineering and Natural Sciences offers Master of Science degrees in biology. . biochemistry. chemistry. chemical engineering. Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in biology. geosciences. and petroleum engineering.

flow cytometry. In such cases. physiology. Brown Glen E. Research opportunities exist within the areas of animal behavior. microbiology. physiology. microbiology. ecology. A score of 6. Admission.0 on the IELTS examination may be substituted for a TOEFL score. Applicants should have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.144 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Biological Science Chair Estelle Levetin Professors Charles R. histology. 4) Three references or evaluations from qualified individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic and/or technical background. confocal microscopy. Credit for courses required to correct deficiencies cannot be applied to the graduate degree requirements. or 550 on the paper exam for students from countries where English is not the primary language. Buchheim Peggy S. automated DNA sequencing. specific interests in biological science. molecular. with 20 credit hours of biology or equivalent. 3) A letter of intent describing the applicant’s background. Applications should be made through the Graduate School and must include the following: 1) Results from the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination. and developmental biology. degrees are offered in biology.0 or better on a 4-point scale. two semesters of physics. Research facilities include well-equipped laboratories for molecular biology. three semesters of chemistry. and Ph. and math through calculus. Both degree programs are research-oriented and require a combination of appropriate course work and independent study leading to completion of a thesis. course work required to make up deficiencies will be determined by the Departmental Graduate Committee and will be undertaken during the first year. Reeder Associate Professors Mark A.D. Assistant Professors Akhtar Ali Ron Bonett Eun-Soo Han Maria Pereyra Graduate Program Advisor Harrington Wells . Miller Harrington Wells M. microarrays. Hill Kenton S. and long-term professional objectives. Students not meeting all of the specific course requirements at the time of application may be admitted on conditional grounds. 2) A minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam. genetics. Collier Estelle Levetin Richard L. 213 on the computer-based exam.S. and cell. and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The grade point average must be 3.

the examinations may be retaken once. and government. and a detailed research proposal must be submitted to that committee for approval by the end of the third semester. a student must qualify for Ph. The research should be of adequate originality and quality to be recognized by the faculty as meeting criteria usually applied for publication in a scientific journal.D. industry. In the event of failure. Doctor of Philosophy Program The Faculty of Biological Science offers a program of study leading to the Ph. Students admitted to the program will work with a professor in a specified area of research. candidacy by passing a set of qualifying examinations. course work for the Ph. To qualify for the M./M. The remaining hours will be selected from Directed Doctoral Readings. Students in the Ph.D. degree as determined by the Departmental Graduate Committee and approved by the Graduate School. level is intended to prepare students for career opportunities in education. General Requirements. Following successful completion of course requirements and not later than 30 months after entering the program. or for continued graduate studies. By the end of the third semester of full-time study. with remaining hours from Research Experience and thesis research. Seminar in Biology (6 hours). A joint Juris Doctor/Master of Science program also is available for students interested in an interdisciplinary degree encompassing training both in law and biological science.D. Research Experience.D. Not more than 30 percent of the student’s course work may be at the 6000-level. in biology. The written examination consists of questions submitted by the graduate faculty and will be evaluated by the departmental Graduate Committee. Students must spend at least two consecutive academic years in full-time residency. degree is a non-thesis program.S.S. Changes in the program thereafter will be subject to the approval of the advisory committee. a variable number of hours may be applied toward the Ph. which will then recommend or deny Ph. the student’s advisory committee must be declared. An in-depth understanding of one area of specialization is achieved through elective courses. including six elective courses and Seminar in Biology (9 hours). candidates must meet the general residence and academic requirements outlined in the Graduate Bulletin and: 1) Complete 30 credit hours of graduate work. The J. Students entering the program with a master’s degree will take these examinations within 20 months.S. For students already holding a Master’s degree.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 145 Master’s Degree Program Graduate training in biology at the M. including three elective courses (9 hours). 2) Complete a research thesis. and dissertation research. Qualifying Examinations. and Dissertation Research. degree. subject to approval by the Dean of the Graduate School. candidacy. Residency Requirements.D. Students must plan a program of courses and overall research goals in consultation with their supervising professor. Course Requirements.D. After the written examination is passed. By the end of the second semester of full-time study. The examinations will include both written and oral segments. Upon admission to candidacy and presentation of an acceptable research proposal. in biology consists of 72 credit hours. the student must select a supervising professor and advisory committee. two additional members shall be added to the student’s advisory . 3) Present the results of their work in a public seminar and defend the thesis satisfactorily in an oral examination.D. For students without a master’s degree. Course requirements are designed to provide a breadth of knowledge in the field of biology. independent study. an oral examination based on the student’s dissertation research proposal will be administered by the student’s advisory committee. The advisory committee will be chaired by the supervising professor and will include two other members of the graduate faculty. program are initially advised by the departmental Graduate Advisor.

candidate will present a seminar on their research to the university community. thus demonstrating the student’s ability to conduct independent investigation in the selected areas of specialization. Stat 3813 or equivalent or consent of instructor. receptors. the advisory committee will recommend the candidate to the Dean of the Graduate School for the Ph. Each Ph.D. followed by a final oral examination before the advisory committee. Vertebrate hormones are emphasized. 7263 Seminar in Cell/Molecular Biology Selected topics in cell and molecular biology. development and differentiation in representative microbial systems. and genetics of development. Prerequisite: A course in plant or animal physiology. Candidates are expected to make adequate progress toward their degree each semester that they are enrolled in the program. At least one of these two members must come from outside the department. and behavior. 7153 Endocrinology Hormones: sites of production.D. Chem 3013. The number of credits allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. Dissertation. The examination will include a defense of the dissertation and questioning in areas related to the research. Suggested: Biol 4093. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Biol 2123 and 2143. cancer. Emphasis on metabolic pathways and regulation of growth. or equivalent. biochemical genetics. with the approval of the Graduate Dean. Prerequisite: A course in genetics. 7233 Bacterial Diversity Molecular aspects of microbial structure and function. 7123 Human Genetics An overview of the current knowledge in human genetics: topics include cytology. immunogenetics. growth and differentiation. Prerequisites: Math 1084. candidate must write a dissertation on the results of their research. and regulation. 7173 Environmental Physiology Physiological responses of plants and animals to environmental stimuli and stresses. The dissertation must follow the general procedures and format approved by the Graduate School and must be presented to the full advisory committee for review and examination. chemistry. Chem 1023. Topics vary. actions. CS 1033. Elective Graduate Courses for Biological Science (Biol) 7103 Mathematical Biology Introduction to mathematical models of biological processes. Upon acceptance of the dissertation and successful completion of the oral examination. Prerequisites: Biol 2054. Prerequisite: A course in genetics. 7143 Molecular and Developmental Genetics Molecular aspects of eukaryotic gene regulation and the molecular genetics of development in selected systems. degree. Emphasis is on integrating form and function at the organellar and molecular levels.D. 7223 Advanced Cell Biology Current concepts and techniques in the analyses of cell structure.146 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences committee. Topics vary. Phys 1023. 7253 Seminar in Organismic/Environmental Biology Selected topics covering organismic and environmental biology. . Prerequisite: A course in animal physiology. population genetics. 7193 Biological Chemistry An examination of biological problems from a biochemical perspective. 3023 and 3053 (or equivalent). Each Ph.

Prerequisites: Biol 7104. Single and multiple regressions. 7503 Ecological Genetics Interfacing of population genetics and the adaptive forces placed on populations by the environment. 3124 (or equivalent). with detailed consideration of enzyme kinetics. mating systems. inbreeding. as well as analysis of variance. or Biochemistry 4133. Prerequisite: Statistics or permission of instructor. as prescribed by the instructor. and protein-protein and protein-nucleic acids interactions. . mutation. that are more advanced than those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. foraging. Prerequisites: Biol 1604. Correlation of structure and function is emphasized. evolutionarily stable strategies. community organization. 147 6063 Population Genetics Population genetics deals with the genetic composition of populations and the forces that lead to allele frequency change as well as equilibrium. Approved Undergraduate Courses Certain undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit. 6174 Ornithology An examination of evolution. Prerequisite: Biol 3084 (or equivalent). or its equivalent. Prerequisites: Biol 1504. behavior. 6153 Animal Behavior Topics include animal communication. sexual selection. migration. and natural history of birds. 6164 Field Ecology Emphasizes ecological principles through field experiments. 6043 Protein Structure and Function An examination of the relationship between structure and function in protein chemistry. Includes design and implementation of field studies and analysis of data and hypothesis testing on topics such as population size. 6143 Evolution Patterns of biological diversity and processes that produce and maintain diversity. selection and stochastic processes on the genetic structures of populations. pollination biology. Topics include the effects of random mating. demography. a previous physiology or anatomy course is helpful. An important aspect of the course focuses on the theoretical models that form the foundation of population genetics. animal behavior. morphology. ecology. Laboratory emphasizes identification and systematics of species found in Oklahoma. 2604. randomized block designs. factorial experiments. and response surfaces are emphasized. Three lecture hours per week. or their equivalents. Prerequisites: Biol 3084 or Biol 3314 (or equivalent). Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). 1604 (or equivalent). A student enrolling in these courses will complete additional assignments. spacing patterns. Required: an understanding of Mendelian and chromosomal aspects of genetics.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7303 Experimental Design Fundamental concepts in the design of experiments for biological research. habitat selection. learning. four hours per week. covariance. conservation biology. 3013. Independent research project required. 6023 Environmental Microbiology Problems in environmental biology and their solutions are examined as they relate to microorganisms. both biotic and abiotic. Prerequisites: Biol 2504. social organization. Three lecture hours per week. Lecture and laboratory combined. and Chem 3011. 6054 Histology Microscopic anatomy and histophysiology of tissues and organs of mammals. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). including hypothesis formation and sampling design to control variance. alternative mating tactics. physiology. 6183 Experimental Microbiology Lecture/laboratory course that emphasizes methods in microbial genetics and microbial physiology. and human sociobiology. laboratory four hours per week.

Prerequisites: Biology core courses. 6343 Introduction to Virology This course is an introduction to the biology of viruses. 6314 The Fungi and Algae Diversity and basic biology of the fungi and the algae including those aspects that influence human activities and health. protein targeting and transport and specialized cell physiologies. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). The value of viruses as organisms to study genetic defects and molecular events will be discusses. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). reading assignments. 6224 Vertebrate Physiology Vertebrate organ systems: their modes of action. 6333 Experimental Design Exposure to the three elements of biological research: understanding the questions asked. 6263 Selected Topics in Molecular Genetics Current research in a selected topic in molecular genetics. including the concept of a “land ethic. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). cell:cell interactions and environmental factors that influence development. 6283 Selected Topics in Molecular Cell Biology Current research in a selected topic in molecular cell biology. interactions. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). The topic varies. pathology. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). and contributions to homeostasis. students will learn to think ethically and critically about issues they encounter in class. Three lecture hours per week. 6253 Molecular Evolution The evolution of macro molecules. Through individual writing and a team presentation. We will discuss the origin.148 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6254 Comparative Vertebrate Embryology Comparative developmental anatomy of the vertebrates. . 1604 (or equivalent). 6204 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Comparative study of the structure and function of chordate organ systems with emphasis on vertebrates. DNA replication and control of chromosome structure and function. 6234 Comparative Animal Physiology Comparisons of bodily functions of major vertebrate and invertebrate groups with special emphasis on adaptations for survival and for maintenance of homeostasis in a variety of environments. Chemistry (or equivalent). Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). the theoretical models used to mimic the system. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). A “hands-on” course where students are actively involved in these processes during class. and the statistical processes used to analyze the data obtained. and student presentations. and molecular mechanisms of these viruses.” Lastly. 6243 Mechanisms of Animal Development Analysis of mechanisms of differentiation and development in several model animal systems. Chemistry (or equivalent). students will focus on specific current environmental ethical questions. Basic math skills required. The student will become familiar with the terminology and nomenclature used in virology research. 6213 Environmental Ethics and Conservation Students will explore their own ethical position(s) upon entering the course and the basis for such positions. but is drawn from such areas as control of transcription in eukaryotes. Emphasis on the genetic contribution to the developmental program. The topic varies. including algebra. Biology core courses (or equivalent). Prerequisites: Biology core courses. but is drawn from such areas as cell-cell signaling. Prerequisites. Prerequisites: Biol 1504. the rates and patterns of change in DNA and proteins and the mechanism responsible for these changes.

Emphasis is placed on the impact that plants have on the health of humans. 1604. The emphasis of both lecture and 149 laboratory is on regional flora.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6444 Advanced Molecular Biology Extends the basics of molecular biology. regulation of transcription. Lecture three hours per week. 1604 (or equivalent). Topics encompass the organization and function of cellular structures and organelles. and systematics. Prerequisites. evolution. Chem 3013 (or equivalent). 6454 Plant Anatomy Vascular plant structure emphasizing microscopic anatomy of tissues and organs and utilizing both light and electron microscopy. crustaceans. their physiologically active constituents. 6524 Plant Systematics Introduction to plant identification. structure. Biochemistry Laboratory Chem 6533. and laboratory experiments. 6623 Medical Botany Integrated study of medicinal. laboratory three hours per week. birds and mammals. Prerequisites: Biol 1504. 1604 (or equivalent). Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). and developmental processes of higher plants including use of plants in biotechnology. Probability . reptiles. reading and interpretation of primary literature. biochemical. but are drawn from field ecology. 1604 (or equivalent). auto immunity. 6614 Selected Topics in Vertebrate Zoology Topics and taxa vary from semester to semester. the following are also approved electives: Chem 6431. 6473 Advanced Cell Biology Explores cell biology. 6464 Plant Physiology Physical. Biol 1504. behavior. behavior. and poisonous plants. and translation. systematics and physiology of insects. and writing of professional papers in the fields of microbial ecology and diversity. Biochemistry I Chem 6543. taxonomy. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). and immunopathologic processes. Instrumental Analysis Chem 6531. 1604 (or equivalent). 6823 Selected Topics in Microbiology Senior seminar that provides experience in critical reading. chromosome structure. including DNA structure. Combines both lectures and discussion/paper presentations. 1604 (or equivalent). 6793 Population Ecology Quantitative approach to the study of plant and animal populations with emphasis on such concepts as density. Geomorphology Stat 7423. In addition to biology courses. discussion. Prerequisites: Biol 1504. and molecular evidence. and dynamics. 6504 The Higher Plants Diversity and morphology of the true plants from the mosses through the flowering plants with emphasis on the evolutionary history of these organisms using fossil. Prerequisites: Biol 1504. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). Prerequisites: Biol 1504. Biochemistry II Geog 6053. psychoactive. evolution. and others. dispersal. Prerequisites: Biol 1504. systematics and physiology of fish. 6604 Selected Topics in Invertebrate Zoology Topics and taxa vary from semester to semester. mollusks. but are drawn from field ecology. structural. Techniques of Instrumental Analysis Chem 6433. Examines the Central Dogma of Biology (DNA to RNA to protein) using lecture. and their role in historical and modern medicine. Prerequisites: Biology core courses (or equivalent). Biology core courses (or equivalent). 6833 Immunology Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in host immune protection.

Recommended prerequisite: Administrative Law.D. land use planning. Prerequisites: Chem 1024 and permission of instructor. and design of alternative institutional models for the generation and implementation of effective environmental policy. including such aspects as water and air pollution.D. Law 5473 Environmental Policy The protection. administrative action. degree under the supervision of a major professor. and restoration of a habitable environment. public and private litigation. 7961 Residency (See page 20. risk assessment. 7203 Introduction to Biological Research Biological research methodologies. . techniques to enforce policies and relevant jurisdictional problems. preservation.150 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Thesis Directed research within an approved area of study. Law 5443 Environmental Law Topics include economic analysis of law. taxing schemes and current trends. rights of nature. regulatory theory. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Individual selected study is done in association with a member of the faculty. emphasizing laboratory and/or field experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph. program. program. Examination and written thesis required. valuation of lives. 8991-9 (1-9 hours) Directed Doctoral Readings Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph. Additional Graduate Courses for Biological Science 7011-9 (1-9 hours) Research Experience Research training in a laboratory or field setting typically directed toward the Masters or Ph. Supporting Graduate Courses for Biological Science Geology 7433 Organic Geochemistry Geochemistry of organic substances with emphasis on the origin and diagenesis of petroleum. 9981-9 (1-9 hours) Dissertation Research Directed research on some problem within an approved area of the discipline.) 7971-3 (1-3 hours) Seminar in Biology Reports and discussions of advanced biological topics.D. Students will conduct or participate in research projects.

All applicants from non-English speaking countries who have not received a degree from a U. Master’s Programs The objective of the master’s programs is to prepare the student for professional work in chemical engineering at a more advanced level than the B.S. Applicants are selected for admission on or about February 1 and October 1. Ford The Chemical Engineering Department offers both master’s (Master’s of Science in Engineering and Master’s of Engineering) and Ph. Luks Francis S. Patton Graduate Program Advisor Laura P.D.S.0 minimum overall GPA in undergraduate study. degree. or for further study leading to the Ph. degree in chemical engineering or a closely related field and satisfy the general admission requirements of the Graduate School and specific requirements of the discipline as follows: • ither a 3. • tudents may be asked to take a number of remedial courses at the undergraduate level S . Crunkleton Applied Associate Professor Christi L.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 151 Chemical Engineering Chair Geoffrey Price Professors Kraemer D. Applicants from non-English speaking countries may submit a minimum score of 6. A non-thesis program in chemical engineering is available and is particularly suited for non-chemical engineers and non-engineers. and independent study or research in an area of specialization. Admission. Study at the master’s level includes a range of fundamental courses in chemical engineering and allied areas. degree in chemical engineering.S.D. degrees. • minimum score of 650 on the GRE General (aptitude) Quantitative Test and a miniA mum combined (verbal plus quantitative) GRE score of 1000. or • minimum score of 600 on the GRE General (aptitude) Quantitative Test and a minimum a combined (verbal plus quantitative) GRE score of 1000. Manning Geoffrey Price Kerry L. and approval by the discipline graduA ate coordinator and Graduate Dean. Non-Thesis Master’s Program. an engineering discipline other than chemical engiA neering or in one of the physical sciences. or 550 on the paper exam. as described below. Wisecarver Assistant Professor Daniel W. 213 on the computer-based exam. Both thesis and non-thesis options are available. Applicants must have a B.0 minimum overall grade point average in an ABET-accredited chemical engiE neering program.S. Admission may be denied to maintain the desired balance of students in various interest fields. university must have a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam. The admission requirements for this program are more rigorous than for the thesis degree and are as follows: • B.0 on the IELTS exam in place of the TOEFL. • 3. Ford Keith D. Sublette Associate Professors Laura P. Applicants should designate their major fields of research interest.

. . . . 3 Core chemical engineering curriculum (ChE 7003. . . . . . 9 Maximum credit hours in chemical engineering at the 6000 level . .0 on the IELTS exam in place of a TOEFL score. . 12 Maximum credit hours at approved 6000 level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the thesis-option student must select a general research area and a research advisor for the thesis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Applicants from non-English speaking countries may submit a minimum score of 6. . . . . 7033. . . Curriculum Requirements Thesis option leading to the Master of Science in Engineering degree Minimum total hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 on the computer-based exam. . . . 30 Required credit hours of master’s project . . . . . . . . . .0 average in their major field of study. . The student’s advisor will select elective courses to strengthen the student in areas not stressed at the undergraduate level. . . . . . 3 Maximum credit hours outside of major department . . . . Upon completion of the research. . . . . . . . . Not more than six hours of C grades in course work can be applied to a master’s degree. . for the Dean of the Graduate School’s approval. . A passing grade in all thesis hours is required. . 9 By the end of the first semester after enrollment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . physics. . . . . . . . . . or 550 on the paper exam. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Maximum credit hours of independent study . . . . . . . . . . with emphasis on the research work and content of the thesis. . . . . .6-9 Core chemical engineering curriculum (ChE 7003. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . subject to the approval of the advisor. . . . . . . . . . . . At least one member of this committee must be from outside the major discipline and may be a qualified expert in the research area from outside the university. . . . 30 Credit hours of thesis . . . The advisory committee will consist of the project advisor and at least two other graduate faculty members. General Master’s Degree Requirements. . • ll applicants from non-English speaking countries who have not received a degree from A a U. 6 Maximum credit hours of independent study . . . . Students must maintain a 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . which covers the student’s entire graduate program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thesis grades are recorded on a pass-fail basis and are not computed in grade point averages. . .S. 7023. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7033. . and 7043) . . .0 overall grade point average and at least a 3. . . an advisory committee consisting of the advisor and at least two other graduate faculty members. the advisor recommends. . . . . . . . Independent study must be approved by the Graduate Program Advisor. . . . . . . . . . . and 7043) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . After consulting with the student. . . . . . 3 Non-thesis option leading to the Master of Engineering degree Minimum total hours . . . .152 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences to make up for deficiencies in mathematics. . . . . chemistry. The student’s advisory committee conducts this examination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . the student must pass a comprehensive oral examination. . 12 Maximum credit hours at approved 6000 level . . Students choosing the non-thesis option are required to choose an advisor and form an advisory committee for the master’s project before the end of their first semester of residence. . . . and/or engineering. Initial advisement of all master’s program students is done by the Graduate Program Advisor. . . . . . . . . . . university must have a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam. . . . . . .0 grade point average is the minimum normal for the master’s degree program. . . All courses taken for graduate credit in these programs shall be selected from those listed in this Bulletin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . At least half the total committee must be full-time chemical engineering graduate faculty members at the University of Tulsa. . . 7023. . A 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . work requires approval of the graduate program advisor and the Dean of the Gradute School. . . Students may pass the Master’s comprehensive exam during the final semester of the combined program instead of completing the ME project course (ChE 7913). . . . . Applicants from non-English speaking countries may submit a minimum score of 6. . . . Applicants are selected for admission on or about February 1 and October 1.D. . . . . is awarded primarily on the basis of research. or 550 on the paper exam). . 6 Other Coursework (minimum) . . . . . .D. . . . . . . . . . . Applicants from non-English speaking countries who have not received a degree from a U. . . . . . . . Degree requirements for the combined master’s of engineering degree are the same as for the usual master’s of engineering degree. .D. . Students complete the regular coursework for the bachelor’s degree with the exception that 5000-level courses are taken for the Advanced Science Elective and the Advanced Engineering Elective. . . and • ither a 3. . Interested students should contact the graduate advisor for chemical engineering as early as possible and before taking any elective courses. . . . . . Admission for Ph. Curriculum Requirements The Ph. . . Applicants should designate their major fields of interest. . . . . . . . . . . Admission. program requires at least 72 approved credit hours of graduate credit above the baccalaureate level. .5. . . program are to provide students with an opportunity to reach a critical understanding of basic scientific and engineering principles underlying their fields of interest and to cultivate their ability to apply these principles creatively through advanced methods of analysis. 12 6000-level or 7000-level mathematics (minimum) . . including ChE 3084 (Mass Transfer) and ChE 3084’s prerequisites. . . . . Applicants must have a baccalaureate or master’s degree in chemical engineering or a closely related field from an accredited institution. . . . . . . . .D. . . . . . . . . . . 18 • Maximum of 12 hours outside of ChE • Maximum of 12 hours at 6000 level (not including the minimum mathematics requirement) • Maximum of 6 hours of independent study . . . . . . 7033. .D. . . . . . Admission may be denied to maintain a balance of students in various interest fields. . . or • minimum combined (verbal plus quantitative) score of 1100 on the GRE exam with a a minimum score of 700 on the Quantitative portion. The number of candidates in this program is limited. . . .5 minimum overall grade point average in an ABET-accredited chemical engie neering program. Students may apply for the program when they have completed 96 hours toward the bachelor’s degree. . . research.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 153 Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Program The combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree program allows students to earn a Bachelor’s of Science degree and a Master’s of Engineering degree in five years. . 213 on the computer-based exam. . . . and 7043 . . . The Ph. . generally distributed in the following manner: Minimum Total hours . . . . . . 72 Research and Dissertation (minimum. . . . with the two 5000-level courses taken as undergraduate electives counting toward the master’s degree as well as the bachelor’s degree. . . . . . . Program Requirements The principal objectives of the Ph. . . . university must satisfy English proficiency requirements (minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam. 23 A core chemical engineering curriculum of ChE 7003. . Ph.S. . . . . may include master’s thesis) . . . 7023. . . . . . .0 on the IELTS exam in place of a TOEFL score. and synthesis. . . . with a GPA of 3. .

degree may apply 30 credit hours to the Ph. after consultation with the advisor or co-advisors. program (including 21 credit hours of course work and 9 hours of thesis work). The advisory committee recommends the candidate to the Dean of the Graduate School for the Ph. The examination will be given normally in December and May. The proposal is presented orally before the advisory committee in a forum open to any students or faculty who wish to attend. This exam can be retaken only once. The student.D. The dissertation shall be presented orally before the advisory committee in a forum open to any students or faculty who wish to attend. After passing the qualifying examination. The advisory committee approves the dissertation and administers the final dissertation oral examination. The dissertation is graded on a pass-fail basis. The dissertation must follow the Graduate School’s recommended procedures for submission to the student’s advisory committee. Candidacy. Other Requirements Language and Residence. students must take the written qualifying exam at the end of their second semester of enrollment. consisting of at least two members from the department of chemical engineering and one member from outside the department of chemical engineering.154 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences These requirements are not variable except under special circumstances and with permission of the student’s Advisory Committee and the Graduate Dean. students submit and defend a research proposal on their intended dissertation topic before the end of the semester following the qualifying examination. . degree. Students are strongly encouraged to have completed the core curriculum at this time. The dissertation must demonstrate the candidate’s abilities in independent investigation in the area of interest and must contribute to some field of science or engineering technology. candidate must write a dissertation on the results of his or her research. One member of the advisory committee may be a qualified expert in the research area from outside the university. the general field of the dissertation. Each Ph. and before it is finally typed or reproduced it must be presented to the full advisory committee for examination and review. There is no foreign language requirement for the Ph. The examination will consist of a defense of the dissertation. and other parts of the program which may be chosen by the committee. Students will normally not be allowed to transfer any graduate credits for the M. Students in the Ph.D. The advisory committee must have at least four graduate faculty members. Advisory Committee.D. The dissertation must be microfilmed and published in Dissertation Abstracts. This exam is based on the core curriculum of chemical engineering and mathematics.S. Final Oral Examination. Dissertation Proposal. Students with an M.D. Qualifying Examination. For teaching fellows and research assistants. four consecutive semesters of nine credit hours per term are required. Passing grades must be obtained in all the dissertation hours to fulfill degree requirements.D. degree upon successful completion of the final oral examination and acceptance of the dissertation.D. recommends the other members of the advisory committee to the Dean of the Graduate School by the end of the third semester of enrollment. Dissertation. program cannot apply for candidacy until the qualifying examination has been passed.S. At least two consecutive semesters in residence at The University of Tulsa as a full-time student are required. At least half the total committee must be full time chemical engineering graduate faculty members at the University of Tulsa. The student must select a research area and a research advisor or co-advisors by the end of the second semester after enrollment in the program.D. degree in chemical engineering. Each candidate must pass a final oral examination before the advisory committee. Prospective Ph. Ph. Transfer Credits. program will be advised initially by the graduate program advisor.D. A student in the Ph.

7113 Biochemical Engineering Advanced topics in the design. Flow through conduits. heat and mass transfer effects.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 155 The number of credits allotted a course is indicated by the last digit in the course number. 7013 Petroleum Microbiology Microbiology of oil and gas production and processing including causes. catalyst preparation and evaluation. and fluidized-bed reactors. Newtonian. 7023 Thermodynamics An advanced study of the laws of thermodynamics with special emphasis on application to physical properties and phase transitions. 7063 Phase Equilibrium Thermodynamics An advanced treatment of chemical thermodynamics as related to chemical equilibria. Turbulence and boundary-layer theories. homogeneous catalysis. 7863-9 (3-9 hours) Special Topics in Chemical Engineering Presentation of special-interest topics of an advanced nature. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 7123 Computer-Aided Chemical Process Design Introduction to computational tools for the synthesis. Prerequisite: Permission of department. analysis. 7173 Multiphase Reactor Design Design of multiphase reactors. microbial enhancement of oil recovery. prevention. vector and tensor variables. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. and non-Newtonian fluids. mass. . and treatment of souring. instrumentation and control. with frequent reference to historical and current literature. Chemical Engineering (ChE) 7003 Fluid Mechanics Motion of ideal. series solutions and Bessel functions. catalyst deactivation. Bioprocess economics. 7043 Heat and Mass Transfer Basic transport equations as applied to momentum. and non-ideal reactors are emphasized. Continuity and Navier-Stokes equations. and risk-based corrective action management of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 7213 Problem-Solving in Chemical Engineering Introduction to the Reynolds Transport Theorem. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. catalytic surfaces and surface phenomena. modeling. 7913 Master’s Project Directed research or project on some problem in applied chemical engineering. and the nuts-and-bolts of fermenter design. and heat transfer. Applications to the design of catalytic reactors. Pass-fail basis only. multiphase systems. Emphasis on multiphase reactor hydrodynamics. Catalytic reactions. Boundary layers. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. reactor stability. The design of batch and flow reactors. Use of process simulators for the design and operation of chemical plants. Engineering applications of scalar. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. coupled transport processes. gas-liquid-solid. including gas-liquid. Analysis of heatexchanger networks and separation systems. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Solving chemical process models with an emphasis on stability and advanced solution methods including Green’s functions. downstream processing. heat and mass transfer. analogies. and analysis of bioreactors. 7103 Catalysis Kinetics of catalytic processes. Heat and mass transfer coefficients in laminar and turbulent flow and for binary and multi-component systems. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. and evaluation of chemical processes. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils and groundwater. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 7033 Reaction Kinetics A study of chemical reaction rates and mechanisms. Models. and modeling.

.) 7971-3 (1-3 hours) Seminar Reports and discussions of advanced topics in chemical engineering.D. level. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. 7991-6 (1-6 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics pertaining to chemical engineering.D. including PID feedback control. Prerequisite: Admission to Ph. Municipal and industrial water and wastewater treatment. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. safety. Evaluation of the economic. 6463 Chemical Reactor Design Application of the rates of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions to the design and the engineering evaluation of chemical reactors. Use of spreadsheets and stateof-the-art process simulators. including invited guest speakers. depreciation. and design of catalytic reactors. Ground water protection and remediation. 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis Directed research on some problem in the field of chemical engineering. includes use of state-of-the-art simulation packages. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. program. 6504 Process Component Design Open-ended problems in economic design of chemical process components. Air pollution sources and remediation. Solid waste management. 9991-9 (1-9 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics at the Ph. Selected study is performed by appointment with the faculty. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator.156 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6423 Natural Gas Plant Design The application of chemical engineering and economic principles to the design of natural gas plant equipment. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. Pass-fail basis only. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. replacement analysis. Selected study is performed by appointment with the faculty. level pertaining to chemical engineering. including evaluating alternative courses of action. health. 9981-9 (1-9 hours) Research and Dissertation Original research on some problem within the field of chemical engineering on the Ph. and cascade control. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. Examination and written thesis required. Lecture 3 hours per week. Approved Undergraduate Courses Many undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the program advisor. Environmental law and regulations.D. Properties and manufacture of catalytic materials. laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. feed-forward control. Economic aspects of engineering.D. and process optimization. 6563 Environmental Engineering Pollution control and waste management. 7961 Residency (See page 20. program. 6483 Chemical Engineering Plant Design Design of chemical and petrochemical plants and process equipment. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. Hazardous waste management and treatment. 6513 Process Control Principles of the design of automatic control for chemical processes. Pass-fail basis only. and environmental aspects of a proposed project. Oral and written reports. 6133 Industrial Catalysis Heterogeneous catalysis from a practical perspective. industrially important catalytic reactions.

College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6583 Petroleum Refinery Design The application of chemical engineering principles to the design of petroleum refinery equipment. rheology and mechanical properties. including crude fractionators. Topics include polymer synthesis reactor engineering. 6593 Polymer Engineering Basic principles of science and engineering applied to polymer technology. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. Prerequisite: Approval of graduate coordinator. polymer processing and technology. structure and properties of polymers. Computer simulation is emphasized. 157 . heat exchangers. and fired heaters.

These programs provide graduates with the advanced knowledge necessary to continue in Ph. or 550 on the paper exam. To be admitted to the program an applicant must have a bachelor’s degree and an adequate background in chemistry or biochemistry. Purser The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers two master’s degrees: The Master of Science in Chemistry and the Master of Science in Biochemistry. Admission. Howard William T.158 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Chemistry and Biochemistry Chair Dale C. however. Teeters Professors Robert E. the student should select a research area and a thesis advisor who will supervise the research and the remainder of the student’s course work. Teeters Associate Professors John C. An undergraduate grade point average of at least 3. Baures Kenneth P. programs at other institutions and the skills and expertise needed by those who will use master’s-level training in industry. 213 on the computer-based exam. students with industrial experience in chemistry and averages below 3. Assistant Professors Paul W.D. the curriculum emphasizes essential principles and basic knowledge. DiCesare Gordon H.0 may be admitted on probation at the discretion of the graduate advisor and with permission of the Graduate School. including a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam. Takach Dale C. Potter Nicholas E.0 grade-point average is the minimum needed for continuance in the program.0 is required. While research is oriented towards applications of chemistry and biochemistry. . By the end of the first semester. Roberts Robert Sheaff Graduate Program Advisors Chemistry: Dale C. Applicants must achieve acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination. No more than 40 percent of the degree program’s total credit hours may come from 6000-level courses. No more than six hours of transfer credit beyond the bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution may contribute toward fulfilling these requirements. level and for those tending to pursue research-oriented employment. Teeters Biochemistry: Robert Sheaff Thesis Master’s Programs The thesis program is strongly recommended for those planning to pursue graduate study at the Ph. Applicants from non-English speaking countries may submit a minimum score of 6. the student will confer with the appropriate graduate advisor to plan course sequencing and discuss research or report options.D. General Requirements for Masters’ Programs. No more than six hours of independent study will be allowed. Students without the necessary prerequisite undergraduate courses will be required to take these as deficiencies. Applicants from non-English speaking countries who have not received a degree from a United States university must satisfy English proficiency requirements. Satisfactory progress in course work is required and a 3. Upon admission.0 on the IELTS exam in place of a TOEFL score.

Chem 7113. the third member must be from outside the department. a draft of the thesis will be forwarded to the other members of the thesis committee for examination and review. Biochemistry of Disease • Minimum of six hours of graduate level Biology courses. After the thesis has been reviewed and judged ready for defense by the advisor and by the other members of the thesis committee. In carrying out the thesis project. Master’s In Chemistry Thesis Program Requirements: All students must complete the following curriculum requirements: • ine hours of graduate core courses: Chem 6043. Master’s In Biochemistry Thesis Program Requirements: All students must complete the following curriculum requirements: • ine hours of graduate core courses: Chem 7143. The oral examination is comprehensive. On completion of the research. • Minimum of six hours of elective graduate level courses in biochemistry. the student will write a thesis that conforms to the Graduate School’s recommended procedures. Chem 7113. the student must complete a minimum of three and maximum of six hours of thesis credit. Biochemistry of Cell Fate. Of these a minimum of six hours M must be graduate chemistry courses. All thesis and oral examination requirements must be scheduled and completed to meet Graduate School deadlines. AdN vanced Organic Chemistry. the student must pass an oral thesis examination. Advanced Physical Chemistry. it is recommended that they take six hours of graduate credit outside of the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry • Three hours of graduate seminar. chemistry or biology. For students with an undergraduate degree in chemistry. and Chem 7123.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 159 In collaboration with the advisor. • A minimum total of 30 graduate credit hours are required to complete the thesis option. • Three hours of graduate seminar. • Three to six hours of thesis credit. With the advisor’s approval. Inorganic Chemistry. covering the student’s entire graduate program and emphasizing the research work and content of the thesis. • inimum of twelve hours of elective graduate courses. An expert from outside the University may be used with the approval of the Graduate School. N Advanced Organic. Two members must be from the department with the advisor as the committee chair. Chem 7193. the student should identify a three-member thesis committee. • A minimum total of 30 graduate credit hours are required to complete the thesis option. . • Three to six hours of thesis credit.

the student will select a general area in which to write a report and a member of the faculty to supervise it. The combined program requires the same number of credits and level of work as the current bachelor’s and master’s (thesis option) degree programs. • minimum total of 33 graduate credit hours are required to complete the Biochemistry A non-thesis option. Master’s In Biochemistry Non-Thesis Program Requirements: All students must complete the following curriculum requirements: • ine hours of graduate core courses: Chem 7143. and preparation of a master’s report. For students with an undergraduate degree in chemistry. and Chem 7123. Master’s In Chemistry Non-Thesis Program Requirements: All students must complete the following curriculum requirements: • ine hours of graduate core courses: Chem 6043. Chem 7113. Advanced Physical Chemistry. Completion of this option will result in six additional credit hours of course work.160 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Non-Thesis Master’s Programs This option is provided for students who desire a stronger foundation in chemistry for professional schools or personal knowledge. • Three hours of report. it is recommended that they take six hours of graduate credit outside of the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry • Three hours of graduate seminar. . Students in this option must enroll in Master’s Report 7913 for the report portion of their study. AdN vanced Organic Chemistry. Chem 7113. The report must follow the general guidelines for writing a thesis and is subject to the advisor’s approval. N Advanced Organic. During the first semester of enrollment and in consultation with the graduate advisor. Inorganic Chemistry. Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Program: The combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree program allows highly motivated students to earn a bachelors’ degree and master’s degree in chemistry or biochemistry in five years. • Three hours of graduate seminar. Chem 7193. • Three hours of report. Biochemistry of Cell Fate. Of these a minimum of nine hours M must be graduate chemistry courses. or review of an area. • inimum of fifteen hours of elective graduate courses. laboratory work. chemistry M or biology. • minimum total of 33 credit hours are required to complete the Chemistry non-thesis A option. The report is a result of independent study and may involve extensive literature search. Biochemistry of Disease • Minimum of six hours of graduate level Biology courses. • inimum of nine hours of elective graduate level courses in biochemistry.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 7123 Advanced Physical Chemistry Theory of chemical bonding. heterogeneous reactions. The number of credit hours allotted a course is designated by the last digit of the course number. theories of bimolecular reactions and reaction dynamics. Both gas phase and solution phase kinetics are presented. a minimum of a 3. Prerequisites: Chem 4133 or equivalent course and permission of instructor. 7153 Materials Chemistry Relationships between chemical bonding and the physicochemical properties of materials including selected high-performance metals. signal transduction. and cell fate determination contribute to development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. Prerequisites: Chem 4133 or equivalent course and permission of instructor. neurotransmitter syntheses/degradation and molecular and human cell biology. Prerequisite: Chem 3021. 7173 Chemical Kinetics A detailed presentation of chemical kinetics including methods of measuring reaction rates. and tissue and organ metabolism. nutrition. Because of the rigor and pace of this program. Chain reactions. Prerequisites: Chem 4023 and 4093. 7193 Biochemistry of Disease An advanced course that will take a mechanistic approach to understanding how disruption of basic biological processes like gene expression. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 7913 Master’s Report Directed research or project on some problem in an approved area. Students will apply the biochemical principles to maintaining wellness and treating disease states. and advanced topics in spectroscopy and kinetics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. ceramics. 7143 Biochemistry of Cell Fate An advanced course discussing biochemical principles that underlie biological processes determining mammalian cell fate. Chemistry and Biochemistry (Chem) 7113 Advanced Organic Chemistry Emphasis on current theories of reaction mechanisms as they apply to organic reactions. 7863 Advanced Topics in Chemistry and Biochemistry Advanced study of an area of research activity. Pass-fail basis only. statistical mechanics. and multi-step mechanisms will be explored. 7213 Clinical Biochemistry Coordinates the understanding of the biochemical concepts relating to cellular metabolism and energy. the importance of elementary reactions. Emphasis will be on understanding how different signal transduction mechanisms influence gene expression and protein activity to modulate cell cycle control and cell fate decisions. . Important concepts. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 3023.4 undergraduate GPA is required for admission. Students interested in the combined BS/MS should contact the Graduate Advisor or any faculty member of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry for more information concerning the program. Examination and written report required. Prerequisite: Chem 4023 and 4021. the contribution of modern instrumentation. and physical properties of polymers. A minimum of 60 hours of undergraduate course work is required.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 161 The typical undergraduate student will apply to the Graduate School for admission to the combined program at the end of the sophomore year or the beginning of the junior year. protein activity. and relevance of the research will be emphasized. 7163 Advanced Polymer Chemistry Advanced topics in kinetics. and electronic materials. thermodynamics.

kinetic molecular theory. Math 2073. and physical properties are assigned. Selected study is performed by appointment with the faculty member. gas properties. thermodynamics. Three hours of laboratory per week. and Chem 3011. or Biochemistry I 4133. colloids. Three lecture hours per week. or permission of instructor. 6193 Chemical Nanotechnology An overview of nanotechnology. with detailed consideration of enzyme kinetics. or their equivalents. thermodynamics. 6043 Protein Structure and Function An examination of the relationship between structure and function in protein chemistry. Prerequisite or corequisite: Chem 3033. Prerequisites: Chem 3011. 6101 Inorganic Synthesis and Characterization A laboratory course involving synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds. chromatography and electrophoresis. Prerequisite: Chem 2014. and protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. Pass-fail basis only. Prerequisites: Chem 1023. self-assembly and other techniques. 7961 Residency (See page 20. sensors. Prerequisites: Chem 3033 or ChE 3063 and Chem 4023. and invited guest speakers. 6301 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I Laboratory experiments to accompany Chem 3033. Prerequisites: Chem 3023. . advanced chemical equilibria. Prerequisite: Permission of department. colligative properties. Experiments related to thermochemistry. Includes separation of mixtures and the preparation of derivatives of unknowns. the properties of nanomaterials and the fabrication of nanostructures and devices by nanolithography. NMR. UV and mass spectroscopy in the identification of organic compounds. Prerequisites: Chem 3013. 3011. 1021. Prerequisites: Chem 3013. 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis Directed research on a problem in an approved area. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses.162 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6181 Analytical Chemistry II Laboratory Laboratory experiments supplementing Chem 6183. One lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Phys 2063. 3013.) 7973 Graduate Seminar Reports and discussions of advanced topics in chemistry and biochemistry given by students. phase behavior polymers. Written thesis and formal defense before graduate committee is required. 4102. 7991-6 (1-6 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics pertaining to chemistry. and phase behavior. 6183 Analytical Chemistry II Overview of spectroscopic techniques for chemical analysis. with emphasis on instrumental techniques. faculty. 6413 Qualitative Organic Analysis Theory and practice of IR. 6213 Medicinal Chemistry An introduction to the principles of drug design and the mechanism of drug action from the chemical perspective. Approved Undergraduate Courses Many undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the program advisor. Topics to be discussed are instrumental methods of importance to the field. the synthesis of the “building blocks” used for nanomaterials. Emphasis on the disciplines involved in the drug discovery process. 6303 Physical Chemistry I Quantitative relationships in chemical systems including gas laws. 3023. Prerequisites: Biol 1703. Prerequisites: Chem 3021. 6083 Analytical Chemistry I Theory and practice of quantitative chemical analysis.

6443 Inorganic Chemistry An introduction to the field of inorganic chemistry at an advanced level. step-growth and chain-growth polymerization. molecular weight measurements. and redox equilibria. or permission of instructor. 6493 Polymer Chemistry Introductory polymer chemistry including theory of polymerization. complexation. proteins. and viscoelastic properties. 6423 Physical Chemistry II Modern physical chemistry topics including molecular quantum mechanics. lipids. 4023. Prerequisite: Chem 3023 and 3021. electrochemistry. with experiments related to spectroscopy. Prerequisites: Chem 3021..3033. and thermochemistry. atmospheric monitoring. and nucleic acids. 4021. microbial processes in aquatic systems. spectroscopy. Prerequisites: Chem 3031. and reactions of biological materials. . Three lectures per week. Prerequisite or corequisite: Chem 4133. Three hours of laboratory per week. 163 6531 Biochemistry I Laboratory Introduction to the isolation. Prerequisites: Chem 3023 and 3021. polymers. Prerequisite or corequisite: Phys 2063. Prerequisites: Chem 3013. Prerequisites: Chem 3033 or ChE 3063. 6533 Biochemistry I An introduction to the chemical aspects of biological systems with emphasis on structure and chemistry of carbohydrates. Math 2073. 6863 Special Topics in Chemistry Presentation of special topics of an advanced nature. kinetics.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6421 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II Laboratory experiments supplementing Chem 4023. diffusion. 3023. Three lectures per week. 6543 Biochemistry II Selected advanced topics in biochemistry with an emphasis on structure and function relationships. 6453 Environmental Chemistry Chemical issues related to aquatic and atmospheric environments. polymer structure and physical properties. identification. and kinetics. colloids. Topics include acid base. and atmospheric photochemistry. Emphasis on quantitative understanding of chemical systems. 3033. Prerequisite or corequisite: Chem 4023. Prerequisite: Chem 4133.

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College of Engineering and Natural Sciences

Computer Science
Chair Roger L. Wainwright Professors J.C. Díaz Rosanne F. Gamble Dale A. Schoenefeld Sandip Sen Sujeet Shenoi Roger L. Wainwright Associate Professors John C. Hale Mauricio Papa Graduate Program Advisor Rosanne Gamble

The Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences offers programs leading to the M.S. degree with thesis and non-thesis options and to the Ph.D. degree in computer science. A joint degree (J.D./M.S. in Computer Science) is also available through a combination of coursework from the College of Law and the Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences.

M.S. Program
Admission. An applicant must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university in computer science or a related discipline. In addition, the following requirements must be met: • A 3.0 undergraduate GPA. • At least 15 hours of computer science. • At least 15 hours of mathematics and statistics at the level of calculus and above. • An acceptable score on the Graduate Record Exam. Upon the recommendation of the Graduate Dean, students who fail to meet all the above requirements may be admitted conditionally, pending removal of deficiencies. All applicants from non-English-speaking countries must submit a TOEFL score of at least 80 on the internetbased exam, 213 on the computer-based exam, or 550 on the paper exam. Non-English-speaking students may substitute a minimum score of 6.0 on the IELTS examination for the TOEFL. Requirements. A student who has been fully admitted to the Graduate School should meet with the graduate program advisor of the computer science program to plan a program through to the completion of the degree requirements. This program is subject to change by mutual consent, but a current version remains on file. The core requirements for the master’s degree include at least six courses at the 7000+ level, subject to approval of the graduate program advisor. In addition, students who have not completed equivalent undergraduate courses must complete the following courses: CS 1043, Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving; CS 2003, Fundamentals of Algorithm and Computer Applications; CS 2123, Data Structures; CS 3013, Discrete Mathematics; and CS 3053, Operating Systems. Up to 12 credit hours of 6000-level courses may be taken with the approval of the graduate program advisor. Each student must complete 30 credit hours, which may optionally include up to a six-credit-hour research oriented master’s thesis. Up to six hours may be non-computer science courses subject to the approval of the graduate advisor. CS 6413, Compiler Construction, is required.

College of Engineering and Natural Sciences

165

Additional computer science courses needed to meet the above requirements are chosen as electives by the student from the list of graduate and approved undergraduate courses. Other courses may be selected subject to approval of the graduate program advisor. Each student producing a master’s thesis must pass an oral examination, including presentation of the research results, upon completion of all other degree requirements.

Ph.D. Program
The primary focus in selecting and training candidates for the doctoral program is to ensure breadth of knowledge and to develop the student’s ability to do independent and productive research, synthesis, and design. The basic objectives of the program are: 1) to ensure skills in the use of the tools of computer science and a broad understanding of the discipline’s basic areas; 2) to ensure a firm foundation in computational mathematics; and 3) to provide opportunities for advanced specialization and creative research in computer science. Admission. The applicant for the doctoral program in computer science must hold a baccalaureate degree and a master’s degree from accredited institutions in the United States or a recognized institution in another country, with a 3.0/4.0 GPA in each degree. Each application must include a letter of intent describing the applicant’s interests and career objectives, plus three letters of reference. All applicants must also submit Graduate Record General Examination scores. International applicants whose native language is not English must submit, in addition to the above, a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam, 213 on the computerbased exam, or 550 on the paper exam, with a departmental preference for TOEFL scores of 90, 232, 575 or higher. Non-native English speakers may substitute a minimum score of 6.0 on the IELTS examination for the TOEFL, with a departmental preference for an IELTS score of 6.5. Admission to the doctoral program in computer science is open to degree holders in all branches of science and engineering. Applicants who lack only a few of the computer science undergraduate proficiency courses may be admitted conditionally to the doctoral program, but they will be required to remove those deficiencies by taking prescribed undergraduate courses and obtaining a grade of B or better in each deficiency course. No graduate credit is allowed for courses taken to remove deficiencies. A complete list of the computer science undergraduate deficiency courses is available from the department. Curriculum Requirements. A minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree is required for the Ph.D. These may include a maximum of 30 credit hours applied from the master’s degree. The following conditions apply: A minimum of 18 research and dissertation hours must be earned, which may include a maximum of six thesis hours applied from a computer science master’s degree. Research and dissertation hours also include a maximum of six hours in research internship. A minimum of 48 credit hours must be earned in course work and independent study, which may include a maximum of 30 graduate course hours with grade of B or better applied from the master’s degree. Course work and independent study hours also include a minimum of 27 graduate computer science hours, of which 21 must be 7000-level or above; a minimum of six graduate mathematics hours, to form part of a minimum core of 42 graduate computer science, mathematics hours, or courses from other disciplines associated with information assurance, which may include independent study; a maximum of 12 hours of 6000-level computer science courses; a maximum of 18 hours of 6000-level courses. All courses outside of computer science must have the approval of the student’s doctoral committee and must be taken for a letter grade. Language and Residence Requirements. Because research is a full-time activity and technology changes very rapidly in this field, part-time study for the Ph.D. is not encouraged. Every doctoral student is required to satisfy a one-year, full-time residence (nine hours a semester) in work towards the doctorate. There is no foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. degree in computer science.

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Comprehensive Requirements. Every computer science doctoral student is required to satisfy five of the eight areas of the comprehensive examination as described below. The eight areas are: Algorithms, Database/Programming Languages, Artificial Intelligence, Scientific Computing/Graphics, Systems, Software Engineering, Information Assurance, and a subject area outside of computer science (with approval of the student’s committee). A student may pass up to four of the required five subject areas by taking courses in the subject area and earning a grade of “A”, or by passing an examination in that subject area. All doctoral students must pass a written examination in the student’s indicated area of research emphasis. If a student passes four areas by examination, then a fifth area is not required. Failure to pass written examination(s) of the comprehensive requirements within the two allowed opportunities will result in dismissal from the program. Advisory Committee. No later than eight weeks after passing the comprehensive examination, the student shall secure the agreement of a graduate faculty member to serve as the candidate’s major professor and shall request an advisory committee. (Students who fail to secure a major professor will be dropped from the program.) The members of the advisory committee are selected with the assistance of the candidate’s major professor, the computer science graduate program advisor, and the department chair with the intent that this committee will become the student’s doctoral committee. When appropriate, the advisory committee may suggest alternate graduate faculty members for the doctoral committee. The doctoral committee must consist of at least five graduate faculty members, including at least one member from outside the Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences. The candidate’s major professor chairs the doctoral committee. The purpose of the advisory committee is to assist the applicant in planning the proposed program of study for the doctoral degree. This includes identifying any deficiencies in the applicant’s graduate record to date, scheduling a research internship, and scheduling the qualifying examination. Qualifying Examination. Within one year of passing the comprehensive examination, the student must attempt the qualifying examination, which is administered by the student’s doctoral committee. The student must apply for the examination at least four weeks before it is to be held. At the time of the application, the student must furnish the members of his or her committee with 1) an in-depth written proposal for research in an area of scientific or technological importance and should relate any progress to date, and 2) a written report of a scholarly or research nature that demonstrates the student’s ability to explore the topic in depth. The report should be of at least master’s level quality and may be undertaken as a research course of three credits. A master’s thesis, a properly documented computer project, or the report from a research internship may also be acceptable. The report must be accepted by the committee. The qualifying examination consists of two parts, one written, one oral. The written component, prepared by the members of the doctoral committee, is in the student’s major and, if any, minor field. It could be the analysis of a significant problem in some aspect of the student’s field of specialization. It will also include advanced material in the area in which the student contemplates producing a dissertation. The oral portion consists of the oral defense of the written proposal the student submits; however, the examiners may also ask questions covering the student’s major, minor, and related topics. Following the exam, the chair of the doctoral committee then submits a report to the Dean of the Graduate School, signed by all the members of the student’s committee, indicating whether the student has passed or failed. If the student fails, he or she may, at the discretion of the doctoral committee, repeat the examination within three months. One dissenting vote is permitted to grant a pass to the student on the first attempt at the qualifying exam, but a unanimous vote of approval is required to pass the second attempt. A third attempt at the qualifying examination may either be postponed or not allowed.

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Research Internship. Each prospective candidate for the doctoral program is strongly urged to participate in a research internship prior to admission to candidacy. The research internship consists of at least three full-time months (or the equivalent) of research participation in an industrial or government research laboratory. The internship does not have to be in the exact area in which the dissertation research is planned, but should be in a closely related area. During the internship, the student enrolls in up to six credits in CS 8981-6, Research Internship. The student should consult his major professor, the members of his committee, and other computer science faculty members for possible opportunities to secure an internship. Admission to Candidacy. A doctoral student in good standing and not on probation can apply for candidacy. Admission to candidacy is recommended by the advisory committee upon passing five areas of the computer science comprehensive examination, successful completion of a minimum of 45 acceptable course work credit hours, and passing the qualifying examination. Doctoral Dissertation. The doctoral dissertation is the final and the most important component of the series of academic goals which culminate in the awarding of the doctoral degree. The dissertation is to be a work of original research scholarship which represents a patentable invention or material publishable in an archival publication. It should demonstrate the student’s ability to address a significant intellectual problem and arrive at a successful conclusion. Final Oral Examination. The final oral examination is a defense of the dissertation and is open to the public. The candidate will prepare and distribute reading copies of the dissertation to each Doctoral Committee member four weeks prior to the oral examination. Time Limitations. Any doctoral student not completing all degree requirements within four years of passing the qualifying examination will be dropped from the program.

The number of credits allotted a course is indicated by the last digit in the course number. Computer Science (CS)
7013 Programming Languages Detailed examination of the key concepts and constructs of modern programming languages including imperative, functional, logic and objectoriented paradigms; concurrency. Also focuses on critical language design and implementation issues. Prerequisite: CS 4013. 7043 Information and Text Retrieval Basic and advanced techniques for text-based information systems: efficient text indexing; Boolean and vector space retrieval models; evaluation and interface issues; Web search including crawling, link-based algorithms, and Web metadata; text/Web clustering, classification; text mining. Prerequisites: CS 4043 or consent of instructor.

7053 Operating Systems Theory Formal analysis of concurrent processes synchronization, protection and recovery issues, management policies for system components, operating systems for parallel and distributed systems. Discussion of implementation issues, and operating system performance evaluation. Prerequisite: CS 3053. 7063 Parallel Architectures Advanced treatment of parallel computer architecture covering new technological developments, including details of multiprocessor systems, shared memory, distributed memory, interconnection networks, clusters, and specialized machines. Prerequisite: CS 4063.

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College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7243 Computational Linear Algebra Computational techniques for the solution of systems of linear and non-linear algebraic equations. Emphasis on the intelligent use of existing software packages. Laboratory exercises using matrix computation environment required. Cross-listed with Math 7243. Prerequisite: Math 4123. 7263 Scientific Computing Provides in-depth presentation of issues central to numerical computing: the effect of finite precision on numerical computation, the theory and application of splines, and the theory and applications of computational differentiation. Prerequisites: CS 4533, or Math 2024 and CS 2003, or equivalent. 7313 Advanced Artificial Intelligence Detailed overview of research issues relevant to computational approaches to understanding and creating intelligent behavior. Includes philosophical foundations, knowledge representation, planning, machine learning, multi-agent systems. Students work in groups on final research project. Prerequisite: CS 6613. 7323 Multi-Agent Systems A thorough introduction of the research and application of techniques for coordination of multiple, autonomous agents sharing common resources and/or goals. Students will work in groups on a final research project. Prerequisite: CS 6613. 7333 Machine Learning Comprehensive survey of computational mechanisms that allow autonomous agents to acquire knowledge and expertise and enables them to improve performance on a given set of tasks from experience. Covers symbolic and sub-symbolic schemes; supervised, reinforcement, and unsupervised learning; single agent and multi-agent systems; robot learning; learning information agents; practical applications. Students work in groups on final research project. Prerequisite: CS 6613.

7183 Information System Security Engineering Engineering methods for the development of safety and security critical information systems. Secure software design and implementation. Information infrastructure maintenance and reliability. Specification, design, and analysis of mission-critical system properties. Certification, accreditation, and validation processes. Prerequisites: CS 4423. 7193 Risk Management for Information Systems Risk analysis and threat profiling for mission critical information systems. Adversarial analysis and countermeasure synthesis. Policy development and implementation. Incident and handling response. Prerequisite: CS 4423. 7213 Software Project Management Formal approach to state-of-the-art techniques in software design and development including structured programming, top-down design, stepwise refinement and reorganization, documentation, and standards. Students work in teams in organizing, managing, and developing a large software project. Prerequisite: CS 2123. 7223 Software Architecture and Design Patterns This course will focus on software architecture and design patterns. Compare and contrast various pattern languages, patterns, and their usage. The class will study architecture patterns and systems of patterns, along with pattern categories and taxonomies. Students will discuss, present, write, specify, and implement patterns. Concentration will be placed on architectural and integration patterns. The course will include assignments, projects, and at least one exam. Prerequisite: CS 2123. 7233 Knowledge Base Systems Various symbolic data structures for representing knowledge. Design and performance issues for knowledge utilization. Knowledge acquisition, automatic problem solving issues, real-time systems, object-oriented programming. Prerequisite: CS 2123.

Computationally hard problems. and social responsiveness. and security. Accreditation. Algorithms range from visual enhancement and pseudo coloring. Software and hardware validation. 3013. Topics include concurrency. Design and analysis of selected aspects of distributed algorithms governing these components. 7353 Analysis of Algorithms Design and analysis of efficient algorithms. Frame Relay Networks. Anomaly and misuse detection. and dynamic programming. 7453 Advanced Computer Security Advanced topics in computer security. Intrusion detection and response. certificates. 7463 Enterprise Security Management Managerial aspects of computer security and risk management for enterprises. Prerequisite: CS 4253 or equivalent. Prerequisite: CS 4153. scientific approaches. 7473 Network Security Comprehensive study of current and developing communications systems and networks. Hostbased and network-based intrusion detection. PSTN. Specification of mission critical system properties. verification. Prerequisites: CS 2123. Malicious code detection. Particular emphasis is placed both on recognizing the opportunity and feasibility of developing novel and significant applications of agent based systems as well as principled theoretical underpinnings. Math 2073. mechanisms. Introduction to security architectures for electronic commerce including digital signatures. Prerequisite: CS 3053 or permission of instructor. dynamic structures. Prerequisite: CS 7443. NP-completeness. Cryptographic protocol verification. 7413 Advanced Computer Graphics An in-depth study of the hardware. Prerequisite: CS 2123 or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: CS 4153. Converged network security architectures. through feature extraction. distributed communication. and public key infrastructure (PKI). extension and operation principles for secure computing systems. scene analysis. . and algorithms used in computer graphics. fast multiplication. Prerequisites: CS 2123. learning. and infrastructures necessary to develop such applications.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7343 Intelligent Agents A thorough overview of agent based system concepts including analysis of key agent characteristics like autonomy. etc. Prerequisites: CS 2123. proactivity. and failures. 7443 Information System Assurance Design and analysis methods for high assurance information systems. path finding. Design techniques including recursion. Database security. 7423 Image Processing Study of algorithms and hardware for processing images. reliability. 4613. and certification. models and issues. procurement. ATM. searching. divide-and-conquer. Network security appliances including firewalls and access control devices. Principles and case studies of electronic commerce. Prerequisite: CS 7443. Non-deterministic algorithms. Legal and national policy electronic commerce issues. and visual pattern recognition. Designing real world solutions to problems in distributed computing. software. 169 7433 Distributed Algorithms Components in a distributed system must communicate and cooperate toward the solution of a complex problem. Interactive graphics systems and image processing. 7403 Secure Electronic Commerce Electronic commerce technology. Topics are covered with all networks in mind: Internet. 3053. Applications include sorting. Graphics information storage and retrieval. Safety.

Prerequisite: CS 4353 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of topic. System configuration. Queuing networks. Selected study is done by appointment with the faculty. Development of tools and environments for programming homogeneous and heterogeneous parallel processors. Pass-fail basis only. Pass-fail basis only. selection and characterization. Prerequisite: Permission of department. Prerequisite: CS 4153. 7911-3 (1-3 hours) Master’s Report Project-oriented research on some problem within an approved area of computer science directed by the faculty. 7493 Secure System Administration and Certification Provisioning. An oral presentation and written report are required. and maintenance. Little’s and other operational laws. CS 3053. and installation of network. 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis Directed research on some problem within an approved area of computer science.) 7971-3 (1-3 hours) Computer Science Seminar Reports and discussions of advanced computer science topics. security. Prerequisites: CS 2123. Prerequisites: CS 3013. 7861-3 (1-3 hours) Special Topics in Computer Science Devoted to various advanced topics of general computer science not covered by the regular curriculum. data structures. . simulation and modeling for performance analysis of computer systems. measurement. Prerequisite: CS 7443. Incident handling and response. Planning and benchmarking. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics in computer science. Course open to students from other disciplines with strong mathematics background. and software systems for mission critical enterprises. matrix operations. hierarchic. or permission of instructor.170 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7613 Networking Data communications techniques and protocol. hardware. maximum credit six hours. Automatic detection of parallel sections for procedural languages. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 7483 Computer and Network Forensics Procedures for the identification. procurement. 7543 Parallel Languages and Environments Overview of language standards for parallel programming. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Examination and written thesis required. network data models. Distributed system software and architecture. Prerequisites: CS 3053. 4323. Prerequisite: Permission of department. Stat 4813 or permission of instructor. Prerequisites: CS 3053. sorting algorithms. 7553 Parallel Algorithms Design and analysis of parallel algorithms with emphasis on distributed memory parallel computation. Prerequisite: Permission of department. 7961 Residency (See page 20. and extraction of electronic evidence. 7513 Advanced Topics in Database Systems Relational databases. Discussion of shared memory and message-passing paradigms. 7533 Quantitative System Performance Techniques for experimental design. Topics include numerical problems. graph theory and combinational algorithms. Load-dependent service centers and hierarchical decomposition. Auditing and investigation of network and host intrusions. Workloads. Forensic tools and resources for systems administrators and information system security officers. 4163. preservation. Distributed database systems. integration. concurrency control.

College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 8241-3 (1-3 hours) Advanced Topics in Scientific Computing Advanced topics in scientific computing such as QZ algorithm for the generalized eigen value problem, frontal methods for sparse matrices, multigrid method, domain decomposition method, local grid refinement, curvilinear grid refinement and hybrid finite elements. May be repeated with a change of topic; maximum graduate credit nine hours. Prerequisite: Math 7243 or consent of instructor. 8341-3 (1-3 hours) Advanced Topics in AI and Databases Advanced topics in artificial intelligence and databases. May be repeated as a seminar course as often as needed, or as an organized course with change of topic and maximum graduate credit of nine hours. Prerequisite: CS 7233 and consent of instructor. 8411-3 (1-3 hours) Advanced Topics in Computer Graphics and Image Processing Advanced topics in computer graphics and image processing such as ray tracing, object description construction, scene analysis and computer vision. May be repeated with a change of topic; maximum graduate credit nine hours. Prerequisites: CS 7413, CS 7423. 8541-3 (1-3 hours) Advanced Topics in Parallel Processing Advanced topics in parallel processing such as cellular automata, advanced parallel programming techniques, and other topics. May be repeated with a change of topic; maximum graduate credit nine hours. Prerequisites: CS 4543, CS 7553. 8981-6 (1-6 hours) Research Internship Research participation in an industrial or government research laboratory. Internship should culminate in written report for evaluation by the instructor. Independent evaluation by the immediate supervisor at the research laboratory where the internship took place is also used in assigning course grade. Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. program, completion of comprehensive examinations, consent of major professor. Pass-fail basis only.

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9981-9 (1-9 hours) Research and Dissertation Original research on some problem within the field of computer science on the Ph.D. level. Prerequisites: Admission to Ph.D. program, completion of comprehensive examinations, consent of instructor. Pass-fail basis only. 9991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Individual studies of advanced topics at the Ph.D. level. Selected study is performed by appointment with the faculty. Prerequisite: Admission to Ph.D. program, consent of instructor. Pass-fail basis only.

Approved Undergraduate Courses

Several undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the program advisor. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. The courses include the following: 6043 OnLine Communities Computation over unreliable and anonymous protocols such as the web. Problems of persistence, concurrency control, transactions, and transactions across multiple servers. The relational database management system as a tool for attacking these problems. Students work in small teams on diverse projects. Prerequisites: CS 3043 and either CS 4503 or MIS 3053. 6103 Programming Languages and Structures An intensive introduction to computer science concepts required for graduate work in computer science. Topics include basic concepts of data, lists, strings, arrays, B trees, AVL trees, hashing, and algorithm analysis. Detailed analysis of the concepts and constructs of modern programming languages. This course is intended for incoming graduate students with a strong academic background in technical disciplines other than computer science.

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College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6363 Distributed Computing Concepts and architectures for distributed and concurrent computing. Distributed transaction processing, process synchronization, and concurrency control. Quality of service, fault tolerance, and security. CORBA, DCE, and DCOM middleware. Coordination languages and distributed programming systems: Linda, PVM, JINI. Distributed Operating Systems. Prerequisite: CS 3053. 6413 Compiler Construction Algebraic language syntax and semantic definition. Languages, grammars and parsing algorithms. Semantics processing. Attribute grammars and syntax-directed translation. Declarations processing, type-checking, storage allocation, code generation. Prerequisites: CS 2123 and CS 3003. 6423 Computer Architecture Operating systems strategies and architecture features required to support them. Alternative implementations. Survey of advanced topics in a variety modern computer and microprocessor architectures. Prerequisite: CS 2033 or permission of instructor. 6453 Computer Law and Policy Legal and political aspects of computers in society. Computer crime, cyber-terrorism, copyright and Internet privacy, access, and freedom legislation. Public policy for cryptographic export controls, critical infrastructure protection, and global digital economy development. Prerequisites: CS 2123. 6483 Theory of Computing Finite automata. Regular languages and grammars. Properties of regular languages. Context free languages and grammars. Pushdown automata. Properties of context free languages. Chomsky hierarchy. Turing machines. Limits of algorithmic computation. Prerequisite: CS 3013.

6113 Operating Systems and Discrete Structures An intensive introduction to computer sciences concepts required for graduate work in computer science. Topics include theory and applications of mathematical models fundamental to analysis of discrete problems. Introduction to set theory, relations and functions. Principles of counting and other combinatorial problems. Introduction to graph theory and its application to algorithm analysis. Formal logic, methods of proof and correctness of algorithms. Recursion and recursive definitions. Introduction to operating system design. Views of operating system as a computer resource manager and as coordinator of competing processes and threads. Process synchronization and deadlock avoidance. Memory management and File Systems. Comparison of several current operating systems. This course is intended for incoming graduate students with a strong academic background in technical disciplines other than computer science. 6153 Computer Security Introduction to security problems in computing, basic encryption and decryption techniques, secure encryption systems, cryptographic protocols and practices, security in networks and distributed systems, legal and ethical issues in computer security. Prerequisites: CS 3013 and CS 3053. 6333 Computer Networks Foundations of computer network design: requirements, architecture, and software. Layering and protocols. OSI and Internet architecture. Direct link networks: building blocks, encoding, framing, error detection, reliable transmission and media access control. Prerequisite: CS 3053 or permission of instructor.

College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6523 Database Systems Thorough introduction to the theory and practice of database systems. Emphasis on theoretical considerations in modeling data and in designing efficient, easy-to-use database systems. Also covers practical issues of query languages and optimization, transaction processing, concurrency control and recovery techniques as well as embedding structured queries in high-level language. Prerequisites: CS 2123 and CS 3013. 6573 Object Oriented Software Concepts and techniques of object-oriented software construction are motivated by improving quality, reusability, and extendibility. Classes, assertions, genericity, inheritance, polymorphism, and dynamic binding are illustrated using contemporary environments. Prerequisite: CS 2123 or permission of instructor. 6613 Artificial Intelligence Comprehensive introduction to principles and techniques of artificial intelligence (AI). Emphasis on scientific and technological motivations for AI. In-depth coverage of agents and environments, search techniques, game playing, knowledge representation, rule-based reasoning, logic, planning, learning, reasoning under uncertainty. Programming in LISP and rule-based languages. Prerequisites: CS 2123 and CS 3013. 6623 Evolutionary Computation This course provides basic knowledge of new methods in computer science inspired by evolutionary processes in nature. This includes: evolutionary computation, fundamentals of genetic algorithms, representations, genetic operators, and selection mechanisms. Theory of genetic algorithms. The schema theory and extensions. Genetic programming, and representation and genetic operators. Applications of evolutionary computation techniques to combinatorial optimization problems. Prerequisites: CS 2123.

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6673 Data Communication and Networking Overview of networking issues. Topics include discussion of physical media used in modern networks and of wireless technology. Networking standards such as Ethernet and fast Ethernet. Networking protocols such as DHCP, TCP/IP, IPX/SPX, SNMP, ICMP, RIP etc. Networking hardware such as routers, bridges, receivers and transceivers. Prerequisite: CS 3053 or permission of instructor. 6683 Software Specification and Design Formal and semi-formal methods of specification and design are used to describe the various requirements of a non-trivial software system. Prerequisites: CS 2123 and CS 3013. 6693 Scientific Software Environments Scientific software environments discussed, focusing on case studies that illustrate the interplay of mathematical modeling, scientific computing, and applied sciences and engineering. Issues of high performance architectures, software engineering methodology for large-scale codes, and visualization of large data sets. Emphasizes high performance computing science and engineering problems. Extensive use of electronic textbooks. Computer projects required. Prerequisites: Math 3073 and either CS 2503 or CS2003. Same as Math 4533. 6753 Robotics Basic theories of robot mechanisms and their implications for engineers involved in the analysis or design of robot manipulators. Kinematics, dynamics, and control aspects of designing robot arms. Spatial descriptions and transformations. Hands-on laboratory experiences using both openloop and closed -loop robots. Autonomous Mobile Robots. Joint-listed with EE 4353. Prerequisites: EE 2163/2161, CS 1043 or CS 2503, and Math 3073 or Math 4123.

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6763 Robotics Design and Implementation Students participate in the design, component construction, assembly and programming of FIRST-class robot applying engineering and project management concepts to produce and deliver a working robot capable of participating in FIRST robotics competitions. Students propose a design incorporating improvements from other robots in the competition. Robot construction changes over time, hence the course may be repeated again for up to six credits.. Prerequisites CS 4753 or EE 4353. 6783 Parallel Programming Discussion of languages and environments for programming parallel processors including program annotations, language extensions, and software tools. Discussion of shared and distributed memory paradigms, and homogeneous and heterogeneous parallel computing. Issues of vector and data parallel computing. Portability and performance evaluation, concepts, and tools. Prerequisites: CS 2503 or CS 3003, and consent of instructor. 6813 Fundamentals of Computer Graphics Introduction to computer graphics software and hardware. Two and three-dimensional object descriptions and transformations, clipping scan conversion, and visible surface computations. Raster and vector organized display systems, hardcopy devices, interactive input devices. Emphasis on design of interactive systems. Prerequisite: CS 2123.

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Electrical Engineering
Chair Gerald R. Kane Professors Kaveh Ashenayi Marcus O. Durham Gerald R. Kane Heng-Ming Tai Associate Professors Peter G. LoPresti Surendra Singh Assistant Professor Theodore Manikas Graduate Program Advisor Heng-Ming Tai

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers programs leading to the Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E) and Master of Engineering (M.E.) degrees in electrical engineering. The Master of Science in Engineering program is research-oriented and requires a formal research thesis. The Master of Engineering program is course work oriented. The programs provide advanced preparation in specialized areas of electrical engineering for recent graduates and working engineers who wish to improve their technical capabilities.

Master’s Program
Admission. An applicant must have a baccalaureate degree in engineering or applied sciences with exemplary grades and a satisfactory score on the GRE General Tests. An applicant must satisfy the general admission requirements of the Graduate School and receive the approval of the program advisor and the Graduate Dean. A minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 is required for admission to the program. Additionally, applicants must submit acceptable scores on the GRE General Test. Applicants from non-English speaking countries must also present a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam, 213 on the computer-based exam or 550 on the paper test. A minimum IELTS score of 6.0 is also acceptable for applicants from non-English speaking countries. Students who do not satisfy these requirements but have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher in electrical engineering courses in their last two years of study may be considered for probationary admission. A student having a degree in a field other than electrical engineering may be required to take deficiency courses. General Requirements. Both the M.S.E. and M.E. programs require completion of 30 credit hours. No more than 40 percent of the total credit hours in either degree program may come from 6000 level courses. Acceptance in the M.S.E. option requires the approval of the departmental graduate faculty and will be decided on the basis of individual merit after receipt of a formal written request from the student. Upon completion of nine hours of 7000-level course work within the program, the student interested in the M.S.E. option must select an area of research and a faculty advisor. In addition, the student must file an application with the department graduate faculty for admission to the M.S.E. program. The advisor approves the remainder of the student’s study program and supervises the thesis. The advisor, after consulting with the student, recommends at least two other graduate faculty members (to serve as committee members) to the Graduate Dean. At least one member of this committee must be from outside the department and may be recommended as a qualified expert from outside the university community.

although a passing grade is required.176 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences A 3. per unit parameters. Electrical Engineering (EE) * = Core courses in the master’s program. The remaining 9 hour requirement may be met by taking any three of the following six classes: EE 7013. A formal defense of the master’s thesis is required. Uniqueness. Students in the M.S. option may undertake a three-hour design project under the supervision of a faculty advisor and write a design report. Upon completion of the thesis. scattering by cylinders. miscellaneous topics of energy conversion.E. and an introduction to estimation and queuing theory. expected values and moments. Elective courses: 18 hours Elective courses must be approved by the graduate advisor and/or the department chair. Prerequisite: EE 4133 or equivalent. Reflection and transmission of waves. Topics include probability theory. scattering by spheres. 7013* Random Processes in Engineering A review of probability and an introduction to stochastic processes as used in communication and control. EE 7033. Optimization Techniques. Solid State Electronics and Devices. oral. model expansion of fields. random variables. Prerequisite: EE 4073 or equivalent. and all the graduate faculty of the college are invited to attend. The comprehensive examination will cover the student’s entire graduate program with emphasis on the thesis. Grades for the design report and thesis hours are recorded on a pass-fail basis and are not computed in the grade point average. image theory. candidate must pass a comprehensive examination. Random Processes in Engineering. EE 7053. Fundamentals of Engineering and Management. symmetrical components. The examination can be written. The number of credits allotted a course is indicated by the last digit in the course number. methods of unbalanced faults. Computer Engineering. and system control. Electric Power Systems Design. equivalence principle reciprocity and Green’s Functions. Transmission line analysis. The M. Spherical wave functions. Electromagnetics. partially filled waveguide. EE 7043. circular waveguide.S. the M. in electrical engineering requires that six of these 18 credit hours be dedicated to thesis. multivariate Gaussian distributions. autocorrelation and power spectral densities. No more than six hours of electives may be taken outside the department. Prerequisite: EE 3023 or equivalent. All students in either option are required to complete the following: Core courses: 12 hours Each student is required to take EE 7073.E. Students receiving three C grades in nine hours of course work during their graduate studies may be dismissed. . rectangular waveguide. or both at the discretion of the committee members. economical optimization of systems. 7033* Electrical Power Systems Design and Protection Analysis of balanced and unbalanced polyphase systems. stochastic processes. EE 7063. Oral examinations must be scheduled at least two weeks prior to their occurrence. EE 7023. load flow analysis. Cylindrical wave functions.0 overall grade point average is the minimum acceptable performance level for the program and must be maintained for all courses applied toward the degree. transmission. Plane wave functions. 7023* Electromagnetic Theory Introduction to waves.E.

Computer-aided analysis and optimization of microwave circuits. Iterative Circuit Synthesis. Prerequisite: EE 4153. Prerequisite: EE 4073 or permission of instructor. 7053* Optimization Techniques Analysis of linear and nonlinear optimization methods. information measures. optimal output feedback and dynamic compensator. dynamic programming. linear codes. 7213 Coding and Information Theory Source coding. Transformation of distributed parameter continuous systems to multidimensional digital models. its properties and applications. Multiconductor transmission lines. TEM directional couplers. Microprocessors. 7113 Advanced Signal Processing Multidimensional sampling theory. professionalism. Systolic Arrays. robustness. Near Neighbor and Global Communication tradeoff. entropy. active filters. Tessalation. dynamic programming. or permission of instructor. including management of technology. Scattering matrix. interconnected and DC system reliability evaluation. . Calculus of variations. Computational methods and algorithms are an important part of the course. and digital controller architecture. sample and hold circuits. encoding and decoding. matrix representation of multiports. 7153 Optimal and Adaptive Control Systems Analysis and design of model reference adaptive systems. and video amplifiers. numerical methods used in computer analysis. 7163 Cellular Logic and Iterative Systems Sequential Machines and Cellular Automata. minicomputers. the simplex method. gradient techniques. A/D and D/A converters. equivalent circuits and modeling. 7143 Linear Electronics Topics in analysis and design of circuits. Kalman filtering. technology transfer. and microprogramming. Minimum principle. The objective to develop understanding and skills relevant to important but non-technical issues facing engineers in modern competitive global business environments and international standardization of product design. Prerequisite: EE 4043 or equivalent. 177 7123 Passive and Active Microwave Circuits Equivalent currents and voltages in waveguides. Prerequisite: EE 7033. read only memories. convolutional codes. and field effect transistors. probability and Markov processes. Pontryagin’s minimum principle. Prerequisite: EE 7063. Z and Fourier transforms.and short-term reliability of any system. and intellectual property. optimal stabilization and regulator design. frequency and duration techniques. ethics. reciprocal and non-reciprocal networks. composite. 7133 Power System Reliability Fundamental techniques and concepts for evaluating the long. static spinning generation capacity. phase-lock loops. nonlinear time solutions. comparators. 7073* Fundamentals of Engineering and Management Issues facing engineers in the modern industrial environment. total quality management. Topics include biasing. project management. Shannon’s theorems. and linear quadratic problems. design criteria of random access and mass storage memories. arithmetic codes. Prerequisite: EE 7023. cyclic codes.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7043* Semiconductor Devices and Circuits An intensive study of electronic circuit design based on semiconductor diodes. error-correcting codes. transmission lines. Stat 4413. 7063* Computer Engineering Design techniques and components of programmable digital systems. Prerequisite: EE 4043 or equivalent. bipolar junction transistors. Emphasis on the application of these concepts to problems in exploration seismology and image processing. frequency synthesis. Prerequisite: EE 4263 or equivalent. channel capacity. Prerequisite: EE 4213 or equivalent. modulators and demodulators. Input/output interface methods. Theory and design methods for optimal control.

advanced circuits. and applications in optical communications systems. 7313 Pattern Recognition Decision functions. adaptive control systems and optimization problems. Pass-fail basis only. rectifiers. microelectronics. Public design review with committee is required. Prerequisite: EE 7013.E. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.E.178 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7413 Neural Networks Analysis of various artificial neural network models. Topics covered include associative memories. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. or permission of instructor. Pattern classification by distance and likelihood functions. choice of basis functions. unsupervised and supervised learning. wave propagation.). Computers for process control and automation. Design of discrete controllers. System design and evaluation techniques and tools. and transportation systems. 7253 Computer Control Systems Sampling of processes and Sampling theorem. Cylindrical antennas and scatterers. Prerequisite: EE 4253 or permission of instructor. Clustering and feature selection. 7243 Power Electronics Rigorous study of solid-state power electronic devices.) 7971 Graduate Seminar 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis Directed research on a problem in an approved area. Electric field and magnetic field integral equations for cylindrical structures. Typical topics include advanced analysis and design of communications and signal processing systems. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. and power supplies. Simple numerical methods for solving I. . multilayer perceptrons. basic principles. 7223 Numerical Methods in Electromagnetics Formulation of integral equations (I. TE and TM polarizations. Syntactic pattern recognition. frequency response. finite length tube. analysis and design using Z-transform. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics. and applications to signal classification. Prerequisite: EE 7043. 7323 Fiber-Optic Transmission Systems Components. Solution of strip equation. converter. Three-dimensional electrostatic problems. Optimal feedback control for linear processes with quadratic performance criteria. question and answers machines. Utilization of symmetry. Approved Undergraduate Courses Some approved undergraduate courses can be taken for graduate credit. cylinder of general cross-section. pattern recognition. Over current protection requirements and cooling requirements. thin wires. compensators. and observers. 7913 Design Report Individual report on individual or group design studies.’s. Implementation of control strategies. Pass-fail basis only. Written thesis and formal defense before graduate committee is required. Trainable pattern classifiers using deterministic and statistical methods. learning algorithms such as backpropagation. 7961 Residency (See page 20. 7863 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering Content varies yearly. game-playing machines. Selected study is done by appointment with the faculty. and state variable methods. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. energy conversion. Prerequisite: EE 7023 or permission of instructor. Recent technological advances pertinent to future systems. Stability of discrete systems. Prerequisite: Permission of department. choppers.

Ideal versus practical dipoles.Diffraction. learning algorithms. Prerequisites: EE 4053 or permission of instructor. chemical processes. Transmission media. Prerequisites: EE 3033. 6273 Optical Networking First and second generation networks. Topics covered include sampling. Physics of MOS devices. Prerequisites: EE 4043 and EE 2163. channel allocation. its meaning and quantification. digital filters. etc. emphasizing architectural developments of the processor family. Radiation patterns. congestion. adaptive. Detection. Impedance of antennas. Design rules checking computeraided design tools. Prerequisites: EE 2003 or permission of instructor. modeling and analysis of digital filter design. Lasers. Image theory. Prerequisites: EE 3113 or permission of instructor. Pattern multiplication techniques. 6473 Introduction to Neural Networks An introduction to artificial neural network models. Both single chip complete systems and large word length multichip systems are discussed. performance issues. . aircraft. Prerequisites: EE 3113 and Stat 3813 or 4413 6423 Radio Frequency Engineering CW and pulse response of transmission lines. concepts of controllability and observability. Traffic modeling. state variable feedback compensation. Prerequisites: EE 4053. Polarization-based systems. 179 6463 Antennas Maxwell’s Equations. quantization. error control. supervised and reinforcement learning. Network management. Aperture antennas. Propagation of radio waves and transmission path analysis. Prerequisites: EE 4073 or permission of instructor. and optimal control systems. Nonlinear and discrete data systems. design using state variable techniques. Arrays. routing.Opto-electronics. Prerequisite: EE 4023. Adaptive Resonance Theory.Interferometry.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6173 Computer Networks Principles of modern network communications. 6453 Modern Control Systems Analysis and design of analog and digital control systems. Prerequisites: EE 3113 or permission of instructor. 6563 Microprocessors in Digital Design Major microprocessor families. and system identification. The OSI model from the physical layer to the application layer with emphasis on engineering limitation and solutions. Introduction to pattern synthesis. Hopfield nets. Prerequisites: EE 3023. Scanning. 6403 Information and Communication Systems Information. Associative memories. 6623 Electro-Optics Basic optical systems and design. Prerequisites: EE 3023 or permission of instructor. Feeding techniques. computer-aided design. Coherence. Waveguide analysis and design. Higher layer design. Introduction to the signal extraction problem. design using transform techniques. Fiber optics. transport protocols. security. Protection and routing. Prerequisites: EE 2163 and either EE 2063 or CS 2033. Antenna types and characteristics. and modern network resource. component models and parameters. 6433 Power Systems Analysis Principles of balanced and unbalanced poly-phase AC power systems. Topics include sampled data systems. Yagi Uda Antennas. 6553 Digital Control Systems The use of digital computers in the real time control of dynamic systems such as servomechanisms. 6513 Digital Signal Processing An introductory course in digital signal processing and digital filtering. Introduction to parameter identification. Modulation and transmission of information. implementations and applications. Physical layer design. Load flow. classification and modeling of noise sources and their effects in communication systems. Z-transform. and application of the minimal or near minimal microprocessor systems to realistic engineering as opposed to stand alone computer facility. the microcomputer system consisting of the microprocessor and its support chips. 6443 VLSI Design Hierarchal design methodology for very large scale integration of nMOS and CMOS. Course material is applicable to a wide range of data processing applications.

6763 Robotics Design and Implementation Students participate in the design. Prerequisites: EE 4053 or permission of instructor. Robot construction changes over time. hence the course may be repeated again for up to six credits. component construction.180 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6723 Robotics Design and performance analysis of robots and manipulators as applied in automation.. Prerequisites CS 4753 or EE 4353. Students propose a design incorporating improvements from other robots in the competition. . assembly and programming of FIRST-class robot applying engineering and project management concepts to produce and deliver a working robot capable of participating in FIRST robotics competitions. Mechanical and electrical components as well as software and hardware needed for their control.

Exceptional applicants with TOEFL scores below 80.0 or higher in one semester for a full-time student and within three terms for a part-time student. Admission. in Geosciences. • robationary status is removed by completing nine credit hours of approved graduate study P with a GPA of 3. Master’s Degree Programs A master’s degree can be earned through either a thesis or a non-thesis program.0 from the IELTS examination.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 181 Geosciences Chair Bryan Tapp Professors Janet A. Non-native English speakers may also submit a minimum score of 6. as determined by the Graduate Advisor. • n undergraduate grade point average of at least 3. environmental geoscience. a non-thesis report is substituted for the thesis and six credit hours of course work are added. before reevaluation for admission. • All applicants are required to take the General Graduate Record Examination./M. or 550 on the paper exam. may be admitted conditionally and required to take deficiency courses in English or retake the TOEFL examination. The major areas of emphasis in the graduate program include sedimentary geology and reservoir characterization. Students who do not satisfy this reA quirement but have at least a 3. 213. They must also be approved by the Graduate Advisor and satisfy the following requirements: • Bachelor’s degree in natural science. under certain circumstances and with the approval of the Graduate Advisor. • f the student’s undergraduate major is not in one of the geological sciences. mathematics. or an IELTS score below 6. Haggerty Peter J. Applicants must satisfy the general admission requirements of the Graduate School. geophysics. These deficiencies may.S. Bellovich Dennis R. or 550.0. • pplicants whose native language is not English must also take the TOEFL examination A and score at least 80 on the internet-based exam. admission to I the Graduate School may be deferred and the student required to take appropriate undergraduate geosciences courses. Kerr Bryan Tapp Assistant Professor Kumar Ramachandran Graduate Program Advisor Peter J. Michael Kerry Sublette Associate Professors Steven J.D. . see page 226).0 GPA in their major field may be admitted on probation at the discretion of the Graduate Advisor.0. Michael Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in geology. In the non-thesis program. geochemistry. • etters of recommendation from at least three professors or former supervisors who are L familiar with the applicant’s work performance and academic potential. be made up after admission to the Graduate School. Joint degree programs are also offered in conjunction with the College of Law (J. and structural geology. 213 on the computer-based exam. or engineering. physical science. and geochemistry. geophysics.

12 Minimum total credit hours . . . acting as chair of the committee. . . . . . . . . . . .0 grade point average is the minimum needed for all master’s degree programs. Thesis and report grades are recorded on a pass-fail basis and are not computed in grade point averages. . . a draft of the thesis will be forwarded to the other members of the thesis committee for examination and review. . . . . . . . . The thesis committee is recommended by the advisor. Initial advisement of all master’s program students is by a departmental Graduate Program Advisor. . . . . . . but a student planning to graduate at the end of the spring semester needs to complete the oral defense and deposit the final. . . . . . The oral defense will cover the research work and content of the thesis. With the advisor’s approval.182 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences General Requirements. . . 6 Minimum credit hours of at least 7000 level. . . . The student will also be expected to present his or her research proposal orally to the thesis committee. All courses taken for graduate credit in these programs shall be selected from those listed in this Bulletin. . . . . . . . . resulting in a program of more than 30 credit hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . and the choices are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor. . . . . After the thesis has been reviewed and judged ready for defense by the advisor and all members of the thesis committee. . 30 Students may be required to complete prerequisite undergraduate courses and remove deficiencies without graduate credit. . . . . Under the guidance of the research advisor. the student will write a thesis that conforms to the Graduate School’s guidelines. . . . 9 Maximum credit hours of independent study . . . . . . . 12 Minimum credit hours in major discipline. . . . On completion of the research. . . . . . and a minimum of two other graduate faculty members. . . . . . . . . . A reading copy of the thesis that has been judged ready for oral defense by the advisor must be delivered to all members of the committee at least 14 calendar days before the date of the oral examination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thesis Program Requirements Minimum credit hours outside major discipline . . . . . . . . excluding thesis . . . the thesis committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . which will be taken pass/fail and counted as courses outside the major discipline. . . . except for students concentrating in environmental geoscience. The thesis committee consists of the research advisor. and the Graduate Advisor. A 3. . . . . . . . . . . . one member may be a recognized expert in the research area from outside the university. . . . . . Students are expected to select a general research area and to make arrangements with a research advisor during their first year. the student must pass an oral defense of thesis. . . . the student will prepare a thesis research proposal acceptable to prospective committee members. . . . . . . . . . . The research advisor approves the remainder of the course of study and supervises the student’s research. . . . . . . although a passing grade in all thesis or report credit hours is required. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Students concentrating in environmental geoscience may take up to 6 hours in the College of Law. . excluding thesis . . . . . . No graduate credit is allowed for a course in which a grade lower than C has been received. . This must occur by the end of the second semester in the master’s program. . . . . . . . . . The oral defense should be scheduled for a date at least one week prior to the start of final examinations in any given semester. . . to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval. . . 6 Maximum credit hours of 6000-level course work . . . . . At least one member of the committee must be from outside the specific area of research. . . . . . . after consultation with the student. . . typed version of the thesis in the library by April 15. . . 6 Required credit hours of thesis . . . . .

. Ph. . . . . . . Students in the non-thesis option must enroll in Geol or Gphy 7913 for the report portion of their program. . . . . The oral defense should be scheduled for a date at least one week prior to the start of final examinations in any given semester. Although not required. . . . . An applicant must have a baccalaureate or master’s degree in physical sciences. and the appropriate appendices. . . . . . . . The report must follow the general guidelines for writing a thesis and is subject to the advisor’s approval. . the student must select both a general area in which to write a report and a member of the graduate faculty willing to supervise the report and approve the remainder of the study program. Students intending to take the non-thesis option should declare to the Graduate School at the end of their first semester (or for part-time students. . The manuscript must be approved by the committee. . excluding report . . . A copy of the manuscript. . with the approval of the thesis committee. . . . 15 Minimum credit hours in major discipline. . . . . . . . and the student is required to document acceptance of the manuscript for publication. . . . . The committee may require that the student include appendices in the final document in order to preserve data and techniques that are not described in the manuscript. . . . . The final document must include the manuscript. . . . . . . . in journal format. . . . . After the manuscript has been reviewed. . A student enrolled in the thesis option master’s program may.D. . excluding report . . 9 Maximum credit hours in independent study . . . 6 Required credit hours of non-thesis option report. and synthesis. . . . . . 6 Maximum credit hours of 6000-level course work . 3 Minimum credit hours of at least 7000 level. . . program are to provide students an opportunity to reach a critical understanding of basic scientific principles underlying their fields of interest and to cultivate their ability to apply these principles creatively through training in advanced methods of analysis. . . . . . . . . . This option requires the approval of the departmental chair and the Dean of the Graduate School.D. . . . . . . The oral defense will cover the research work and content of the manuscript. . or similar effort. . . . . . . . . . . . . . it is expected that the thesis committee will be involved in the review and revision of the manuscript prior to publication. . . Admission. engineering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . At the time of enrollment in a non-thesis option. . . . . .College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 183 Published Manuscript Option. . 15 Minimum total credit hours . . . . . . . . . . 36 Students may be required to complete prerequisite undergraduate courses and remove deficiencies without graduate credit. . . . . . . . . the student must pass an oral defense. . . resulting in a program of more than 36 credit hours. . . . . . . . . . laboratory work. . . . plus any required appendices. or a copy of the published paper. . . . . . . . . . . . research. . . Non-Thesis Program Requirements Minimum credit hours outside major discipline . . . . . but a student planning to graduate at the end of the spring semester needs to complete the oral defense and deposit the approved manuscript and appendices in the library by April 15. . . . . . . . . . . Program The principal objectives of the Ph. . . . . . . . . fieldwork. . . . and judged ready for defense by the advisor and all members of the thesis committee. . . . . . . . . . after completing nine credit hours). . or mathematics from an accredited college or university. must be delivered to all members of the committee at least 14 calendar days before the date of the oral examination. The report is the culmination of independent study and may be the result of an extensive literature search. . . submit a manuscript that has been accepted by a peer-reviewed journal as a substitute for a formal thesis. natural sciences. . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .3 must be maintained. Exceptional applicants with TOEFL scores below 80. .D. 213 or 550. . may be admitted conditionally and required to take deficiency courses in English or retake the TOEFL examination. Students who fail will be permitted to retake the examination once in the following semester at the regularly scheduled time. . . These requirements are not variable except under special circumstances and with permission of the student’s advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School. At least two consecutive semesters in residence as a full-time student at The University of Tulsa are required. The qualifying examination will be taken on a designated date at the beginning of April or November in the second semester of the student’s Ph. . . subject to approval by the Dean of the Graduate School. .3 minimum grade point average in their master’s work and be approved by the Graduate Advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School. . . . program requires 90 approved credit hours of graduate credit above the baccalaureate level. A GPA of at least a 3. . . as outlined above. . . The written examination and subsequent oral examination will result in either a pass or fail as determined by a consensus of the committee. • pplicants whose native language is not English must take the TOEFL examination and A score at least 80 on the internet-based exam. . . The Ph. 24 Students may be required to complete prerequisite undergraduate courses and remove deficiencies without graduate credit. If approved by the advisory committee (see below). . . Admission to Ph. . work requires at least a 3. . . . . degrees in disciplines other than geology may wish to take the Advanced Graduate Record Examination in their major. . . program on a probationary basis. Non-native English speakers may also submit a minimum score of 6. . . . In addition. Students A with B. . . . . . . 20 Minimum credit hours of graduate credit in course work and independent study. . . Qualifying Examination. or an IELTS score below 6. . The examination will consist of two segments: (1) a closed-book.0. . . 54 Minimum credit hours of course work outside the major area . may be transferred from another institution. 12 Maximum credit hours of 6000-level course work . . . Residence Requirements.D. . written examination prepared by a committee made up of three geosciences faculty members and not to exceed one day in length. program. . . . .S. . . . . . . . Curriculum Requirements. distributed in the following manner: Minimum credit hours of research and dissertation. . . . . .184 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Students with baccalaureate degrees must meet the requirements for admission to the master’s program. .D. . .0 from the IELTS examination. . resulting in a program of more than 90 credit hours. . . . . . . which may include 6 hours of master’s degree thesis credits . . . . . . . . among the 90 hours of graduate credit. . including master’s degree course work . In addition the following requirements must be met: • ll applicants are required to take the General Graduate Record Examination. . . . . Exceptional students whose grade point average does not meet these standards may be admitted to the Ph.3 grade point average in the first 30 credit hours of graduate work and approval of the Graduate Advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School. as many as 30 credit hours of course work and research completed in a master’s degree program at any accredited institution may be distributed.S. Students with master’s degrees must have a 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and (2) an oral examination that follows within two weeks. . . the examination committee may make recommendations to the student’s advisor for specific graduate courses to satisfy recognized weakness in the student’s preparation. . . . . . A second failure results in dismissal from the program. . Not more than 12 credit hours of approved doctoral-level courses beyond the M. . . or 550 on the paper exam. . . . . . . . .D. . . . . 12 Maximum credit hours of independent study . . . 213 on the computer-based exam.

The proposal must be of professional quality. The research advisor. reviews progress. Major changes in research direction must be approved by the advisory committee. description of the significance of the research. The dissertation must demonstrate the candidate’s abilities to conduct independent scientific investigation in his area of interest and must be a contribution to the understanding of geology. the student has the responsibility to see that all rules and requirements have been met. Before scheduling the defense. Subject to the research advisor’s approval. A favorable vote of a majority of the advisory committee is required for approval of the proposal. and time budget. The proposal is submitted to the advisory committee two weeks before an oral defense is scheduled. All members of the advisory committee will review the research proposal before the proposal defense. One committee member may be a recognized expert in the research from outside the university. The student should select a general research area and make arrangements with a research advisor. Dissertation Research Proposal. program cannot apply for candidacy until 45 credit hours of required graduate course work have been completed. The research advisor approves the student’s program of course work and the advisory committee reviews recommendations from the qualifying examination committee. Each Ph.D. must be from the Geosciences Department with the additional member(s) providing breadth to the committee by adding experience from other disciplines. The student prepares a dissertation research proposal. before the qualifying examination. Each student in the Ph. after consultation with the student. candidate must write a dissertation based upon the results of original research. approves program changes and evaluates the dissertation research proposal. and with the oversight of the advisory committee. After the dissertation has been reviewed and judged of suitable quality by the advisory committee. acting as chair of the advisory committee. or geochemistry. Admission to candidacy is recommended by the research advisor upon successful completion of the qualifying examination and acceptance of the dissertation research proposal. Dissertation. The student is expected to present periodic progress reviews in a colloquium setting. geophysics.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 185 Advisory Committee. A student in the Ph. detailed methodology. the student can proceed with the planned research leading to preparation of the dissertation. failure to do so will result in their loss of right to make further modifications to the dissertation. Students should note that several dissertation drafts may be necessary before the defense can be scheduled. At least three of the members.D. Admission to Candidacy. At least one week prior to the defense a reading copy should be deposited in the departmental office for faculty and student review. the student schedules a dissertation defense. including the chair. The dissertation must also conform to the Graduate School’s guidelines. which must be completed by the end of the semester following the satisfactory completion of the qualifying examination. a draft of the dissertation is submitted to the members of the advisory committee for review. advisory committee members must return all comments and recommendations to the student within 14 calendar days. recommends the other members of the advisory committee to the Graduate Dean. and the student should maintain contact with the committee during all stages of the research. A research proposal detailing the planned course of research for the dissertation is developed under the supervision of the research advisor. Barring unusual circumstances. After successful defense of the proposal.D. Advisory committee members are not required to act as editors but may require that the student seek professional editorial help. program is initially advised by a Graduate Program Advisor. It should include a literature review. The reading copy of the dissertation that has been judged ready for defense must be delivered to the committee members at least 14 calendar days before the scheduled date of defense. The advisory committee must have at least five graduate faculty members but no more than six members. research justification. .

When field trips are required. 3153. The advisory committee then meets in closed session and awards the dissertation an evaluation of unconditional pass. Geology (Geol) 7113 Plate Tectonics Seminar style course covering global tectonics. . conditional pass. 3151. if so. Prerequisites: Geol 2003 and 3153 or permission of instructor. 7313 Clastic Sedimentology and Depositional Systems An overview of the mechanics of detrital transport and deposition. 3153. 7333 Advanced Stratigraphic Analysis Application of quantitative methods to stratigraphic analysis. structural associations and assemblages. Prerequisites: Geol 3063. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. typed version of the dissertation in the library by April 15. diagenesis. or permission of instructor. Prerequisites: Geol 3063. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. chemostratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy. 7363 Advanced Carbonate Petrology Advanced topics in the genesis. the student is responsible for revisions recommended by the committee. Survey of clastic depositional environments and facies. candidate must orally defend his or her dissertation in a public setting before the advisory committee. Field trip required. A letter grade is not given for the dissertation. The defense of dissertation must be scheduled for a date at least one week prior to the start of final examinations in any given semester. The number of credits allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. 7353 Sandstone Petrography Study of the classification. the advisory committee recommends the candidate for the Ph. a nominal fee over an above tuition will be assessed to cover expenses. The oral defense of the dissertation will consist of a presentation of results and conclusions followed by a public session in which the student will be expected to answer questions about the dissertation. After acceptance by the Graduate School. A Ph.D. 4144. degree. petrologic associations and assemblages and the mechanics of plate motion and interaction. Term paper required. Geol 4313 recommended but not required. Course activities emphasize hands-on exercises. porosity evolution. texture. Survey and application of sequence stratigraphy. Questions may cover all aspects of geosciences pertinent to the dissertation research. Prerequisite: Geol 3153 or permission of instructor. the dissertation must be microfilmed and published in Dissertation Abstracts. Prerequisites: Geol 3153 or permission of instructor. or failure. At this time. 7263 Carbonate Sedimentology Study of carbonate depositional environments and the description and classification of limestones. and diagenesis of sandstone and related clastic sedimentary rocks. a nominal fee over and above tuition will be assessed to cover expenses. Upon successful completion of the dissertation defense and approval of the final written version of the dissertation. which is graded on a pass-fail basis.186 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Defense of Dissertation. 7303 Tectonics and Sedimentation Combination lecture and seminar style course directed at the relationship between tectonic deformation and sedimentation processes. but a student planning to graduate at the end of the spring semester needs to complete the oral defense and deposit the final. composition. Laboratory exercises emphasize microanalysis. minor changes to the dissertation may be required.D. members of the advisory committee meet privately with the candidate for further questioning. After the public session. a fee over and above tuition is assessed to cover expenses. In the case of a conditional pass.

7453 Isotope Geochemistry Basic concepts of nuclear structure and reactions applied to cosmic and geologic problems including geochronology and stable isotope fractionation. 9981-9 (1-9 hours) Research and Dissertation Original research on some problem within the field of earth sciences at the Ph. 7513 Microanalysis Theory and application of microanalytical techniques to the chemical and structural characterization of solid materials. 7713 Regional Tectonics Review course covering structural styles.D. and permission of instructor. Topics covered include stress. A nominal fee will be charged to cover travel expenses. program and permission. Prerequisite: Chem 1023. level. term papers required. 3061. Phys 2063.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7401-6 (1-6 hours) Special Topics in Geochemistry 7413 Geochemistry Study of the chemical principles that govern the distribution of elements among the atmosphere. 7961 Residency (See page 20. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph. Uses and limitations of thermal models.) 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis Directed research on some problem within an approved area. Seminar format. Prerequisites: Geol 3063. One lecture per week plus independent lab projects. level. Prerequisites: Chem 1023. 9991-9 (1-9 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies in advanced topics at the Ph. Selected study is undertaken by appointment with the faculty. Involves extensive reading on geology of selected areas. Also. micro-vibrational spectroscopy and optical microscopy.D. 7991-4 (1-4 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics. Pass-fail only. or permission of instructor. Geol 4063. Pass-fail only. Term paper and field trip required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. . associations. program. A maximum of 12 hours can be taken in one semester.D. X-ray diffraction. 7861-6 (1-6 hours) Special Topics in Geology 7913 Geology Report Non-thesis option report in geology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Pass-fail only. bending. strain. 7463 Thermal Modeling of Petroleum Generation Comprehensive introduction to thermal models including methods for constraining temperature histories through time and constructing burial histories. and models. Prerequisite: Permission of discipline. 187 7723 Geomechanics Introduction to the application of continuum mechanics to geology. Examination and written thesis required. Selected study is performed by appointment with the faculty. hydrosphere. fracturing.D. Primarily electron beam imaging and X-ray microanalysis. isostasy. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 7433 Organic Geochemistry Geochemistry of organic substances with emphasis on the origin and diagenesis of petroleum. and solid earth. Prerequisites: Geol 3063 and permission of instructor. buckling. Prerequisite: Admission to Ph. Math 2073. Prerequisite: Permission. and heat conduction.

Geophysics (Gphy) 7133 Exploration Seismology The exploration seismology course will offer mathematical treatment of wave propagation theory pertinent to hydrocarbon exploration. level. Examination and written thesis required.D. Utilization of aerial photographs and topographic maps. The course will cover the methodology of integrated interpretation of seismic. 7301-6 (1-6 hours) Special Topics in Geophysics 7913 Geophysics Report Non-thesis option report in geophysics. analysis and presentation of spatial data from a wide range of disciplines using industry standard software tools. 9981-9 (1-9 hours) Research and Dissertation Original research on a problem within the field of earth sciences at the Ph. Prerequisite: Admission to Ph. Time series analysis will focus on conditioning the acquired data. or permission. 4143. level.D. Geography (Geog) 6053 Geomorphology Description. gravity. Pass-fail only. magnetic and well log data. 4143. Approved Undergraduate Courses Several undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the program advisor. Involves both lecture and computer lab components. analysis. The course will focus on field design criteria for data acquisition and theoretical aspects of seismic data processing. Geol 4063. .D. and interpretation of landform on the earth’s surface. Gphy 4003 or permission. 7153 Integrated Seismic Data Interpretation The course will focus on the aspects of seismic data interpretation for detailing the subsurface structure and rock properties for hydrocarbon exploration. Prerequisite: Geol 1013 or Geog 2003 Geology (Geol) 6083 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Fundamentals of the design and use of spatial datasets in computerized mapping and analysis of spatial data. 7173 Time Series Analysis and Inverse Theory The course will cover the aspects of digital data processing for signal extraction. Prerequisites: Gphy 4003. A maximum of 12 hours can be taken in one semester. 9991-9 (1-9 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics at the Ph. Pass-fail only. Selected study is undertaken by appointment with the faculty.) 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis Directed research on some problem within an approved area. Prerequisites: Gphy 7133 or permission. Concentrates on technical and scientific aspects of the collection.D. Prerequisites: Math 4123. program. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. CS 2053 or equivalent. or equivalent. senior/graduate standing or permission of instructor. Selected study is performed by appointment with the faculty. Pass-fail only. 7961 Residency (See page 20. Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph. 7183 Special Processing of Seismic Data The course will focus on processing real seismic data on a workstation to deliver practical experience in advanced seismic data processing for detailed imaging of the subsurface.188 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7991-4 (1-4 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics. or permission. Prerequisites: Math 4123. Prerequisite: Permission. Prerequisites: Geog 2003 or Geol 1014. program and permission. query. Prerequisite: Permission of discipline. The course will also cover parameter estimation through linear and non-linear inverse modeling of geophysical data.

Chem 6421. Introduction to well logging theory and interpretation of subsurface logs. Discussion of specific areas of application include hydrology. Chem 6301. Physical Chemistry Lab II. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 4143. When field trips are required. and enhanced oil recovery. trace element. Advanced Physical Chemistry. geophysics. Both surface and groundwater systems are covered in addition to exploration techniques. Filter theory and the Z-transform. Analytical Chemistry II Laboratory. 6753 Marine Geology A study of the rocks. Environmental Chemistry. shallow stratigraphy. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory session each week. and the rock/soil system. buried objects and probing man-made structures. contaminant plumes. Prerequisite: Geol 2143. and magnetic techniques. surface and subsurface waters. 6513 Environmental Geophysics Introduces theories and fundamentals of noninvasive geophysical techniques applied to environmental and related problems. 6544 Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks and Processes The important igneous and metamorphic rocks of the earth’s crust and their processes of formation. Prerequisites: Gphy 2053. acoustic and radioactive properties of rocks. 6433 Seismic Data Processing Fourier Transform theory in continuous and discrete time. Phys 2063. Laboratory stresses the coordination of megascopic and petrographic studies of rocks. petroleum production. 6513 Hydrogeology Introduction to the properties of water and the hydrologic cycle. a nominal fee over and above tuition is assessed to cover expenses. magnetic. Chem 7123. Advanced Organic Chemistry. well hydraulics and aquifer tests. Math 2024. and isotopic compositions of the atmosphere. Includes a laboratory to learn to solve exploration problems in gravity. and stratigraphy of the ocean basins and their margins. Prerequisites: Geol 1013. Emphasis on recent advances in seismic. Gphy 4004. sediments. gravity. Includes major. After an overview of all applicable geophysical methods. Chem 6181. Prerequisites: Geol 1013 and 3153. and seismic exploration. 6463 Well Logging for Geologists and Geophysicists Study of electrical. Chem 6453.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6463 Petroleum Geology A synthesis of geology. alteration. Introduction to Partial Differential Equations (Geology majors only). 6553 Environmental Geochemistry Geochemical processes controlling the composition of the natural system and its response to natural and man-made disturbances. Physical Chemistry II. Math 6543. filter stability criteria. Inorganic Chemistry. Chem 1021. 6861-6 (1-6 hours) Special Topics in Geophysics Supporting Courses for Graduate Geosciences Curricula Chem 6303. geophysics. Chem 6183. structure. and geochemistry as applied to petroleum exploration. well design. Chem 6423. Prerequisites: Math 4123. Chem 6443. Physical Chemistry Lab I. 6861-6 (1-6 hours) Special Topics in Geology 189 Geophysics (Gphy) 6403 Petroleum Seismology Detailed study of the theory and application of geophysical methods for petroleum and mineral exploration. Prerequisites: Geol 3153. . 4133. the topics of shallow reflection seismology and ground-penetrating radar are developed in detail. Prerequisites or corequisites: Geol 3153 or permission of instructor. and occurrence in space and time. Chem 6413. and Chem 1023. Analytical Chemistry II. Physical Chemistry I. Qualitative Organic Analysis. Chem 7113. introduction to the wave equation. Prerequisite: Geol 3153.

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College of Engineering and Natural Sciences

Applied Mathematics
Chair Roger L. Wainwright Professors Thomas W. Cairns Igor Chudinovych Christian Constanda J.C. Díaz Dale R. Doty Richard A. Redner Albert C. Reynolds Dale A. Schoenefeld Associate Professors William A. Coberly Peyton J. Cook Kevin A. O’Neil Shirley B. Pomeranz Graduate Program Advisor Christian Constanda

The Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences offers a program leading to the M.S. degree in Applied Mathematics. This program is a Professional Mathematics degree designed to prepare students for work in business and industry. Students graduating from this program will be proficient with modern computation tools and will have experience in solving problems of a practical nature. Admission. An applicant must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university in mathematics, computer science, engineering, or science, with a 3.0 grade point average in the major field of undergraduate study. Undergraduate courses required for official acceptance are Multivariable Calculus and Ordinary Differential Equations, plus a further six credit hours of mathematics in addition to Calculus. Some programming experience and an acceptable score on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination are also required. Requirements. A student who has been fully admitted to the Graduate School first meets with the Graduate Advisor for Applied Mathematics to plan a program of study through to the completion of the degree. The program is subject to change by mutual consent, but a current version remains on file. Students admitted to the program without adequate background in Linear Algebra will be required to take Math 6523 Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory. All students are required to take Math 7013 Advanced Mathematical Modeling and Math 7913 Master’s Report. Students must also choose three courses from the following core list: Math 7023 Discrete Modeling; Math 7103 Advanced Differential Equations; Math 7243 Computational Linear Algebra; Math 7253 Numerical Optimization; Math 7503 Stochastic Modeling and Simulation; Math 7533 Applied Regression. Other courses used to meet the total program requirement are elective, subject to approval by the Graduate Advisor. Up to six hours may be non-mathematics courses. The total requirement for the degree is 30 credit hours. No more than 12 credit hours of 6000-level course work will be counted for the graduate degree.

College of Engineering and Natural Sciences

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Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Program
The Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences has also introduced a combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree program in Applied Mathematics. The graduate requirements for this program are identical to those for the current Master’s Degree program in Applied Mathematics. Undergraduates participating in the program must meet additional undergraduate requirements. Suitably qualified students can acquire the necessary number of graduate credits by taking: (i) the maximum allowed of four 4000/6000-courses at the 6000-level; (ii) six 7000-courses, of which three (the maximum allowed) to be taken in the senior year (as 5000-courses) and double-counted; one of the three 7000-courses taken in the graduate year may be replaced by the Group Report. Undergraduates in any of the undergraduate mathematics degree programs at the University of Tulsa are eligible for admission to the Combined Degree program. However, the requirements of the program are more consistent with the degree of Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics. Specifically, undergraduate students in the Combined Degree program are required to take Math 4503 (Introduction to Numerical Methods), Stat 4813 (Statistical Methods for Scientists and Engineers) or Stat 5423 (Probability), and Math 4143 (Introduction to Partial Differential Equations). Almost any 4000-level course not needed for the undergraduate degree may be taken for graduate credit through enrollment in the appropriate 6000-level course. However, the undergraduate modeling course Math 4213 should not be taken. Instead, students in the Combined Degree program should enroll in the graduate modeling course Math 7013 (Advanced Mathematical Modeling) or its 5000-level version. It is recommended that Math 4123 (Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory) should be taken as early as possible, preferably during the sophomore year. Students interested in the Combined Degree program should seek enrollment advice from the Graduate Advisor for Applied Mathematics. Students who are admitted to the Combined Degree program will have the Graduate Advisor for Applied Mathematics assigned as their advisor for both the undergraduate and graduate portions of their Combined Degree curriculum.

The number of credits allocated a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. Mathematics (Math)
7013 Advanced Mathematical Modeling The process of construction, analysis, and validation of dynamic and discrete mathematical models for the physical sciences. Computer implementation and subsequent assessment of mathematical models. Introduction to the Mathematica programming environment. Prerequisites: Math 3073 and Math 4123 or consent of instructor.

7023 Discrete Modeling An introduction to the application of discrete mathematical models to the social, behavioral, biological, environmental, and physical sciences. Special emphasis will be placed on graph models and optimization strategies applied to engineering problems in communication and transportation. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 7103 Advanced Differential Equations Series solution techniques. Dimensional analysis. Calculus of variations. Perturbation methods for ordinary and partial differential equations. Integral equations. Elements of distribution theory. Nonlinear waves. Population dynamics. Prerequisite: Math 3073.

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College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7913 Master’s Report Students work individually or in groups to research in depth a topic in applied mathematics. Individual or joint final reports and individual presentations are used for final assessment. 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study

7243 Computational Linear Algebra Computational techniques for the solution of systems of linear and non-linear algebraic equations. Emphasis on the intelligent use of existing software packages. Laboratory exercises using matrix based computational environments required. Prerequisite: Math 4123. 7253 Numerical Optimization An introduction to numerical techniques for unconstrained and constrained optimization. Applications to nonlinear regression and science and engineering problems. 7273 Numerical Differential Equations Numerical analysis of engineering and scientific problems with special emphasis on discrete techniques for ordinary and/or partial differential equations and on problem formulation and solution. Prerequisites: Math 3073, familiarity with CS 1043 or CS 2503 and Mathematica, or consent of instructor. 7283 Applied Functional Analysis Metric spaces. The fixed point theorem and its application to linear algebraic systems, differential equations, and integral equations. Normed spaces. Inner product spaces. Operators on abstract spaces. Approximation theory. 7353 Discrete and Integral Transforms Fourier, Laplace, Wavelet, and other discrete and continuous transformations with applications to the analytic solution of partial differential equations, data compression, image processing and filtering. 7503 Stochastic Modeling and Simulation Random number generation and stochastic simulation with applications. Prerequisites: Stat 4813, Stat 5413 or consent of instructor. 7533 Applied Regression Methods for fitting deterministic models to data in the presence of noise. Least squares. Statistical analysis. Empirical response. Surface optimization in the presence of noise. Nonlinear models. Prerequisite: Stat 4813. (This class is cross-listed as Fin 7073 Empirical Methods in Finance).

Approved Undergraduate Courses

Several undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the Graduate Advisor. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those given to the undergraduate students in the same courses.

Mathematics
6053 Differential Geometry The geometry of curves and surfaces from a modern point of view. Frenet frames. Curvature. Fundamental forms. Invariants. Applications to architecture and engineering. Prerequisites: Math 2073, Math 3033, or permission of instructor. 6333 Teaching Methods for Mathematics Methods for teaching problem-solving. Study of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics professional curriculum and evaluation standards. Appropriate for students working toward a Master’s degree in Mathematics and Science Education. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 6353 History of Mathematics An overview of the history of Mathematics from the time of the ancient Egyptians to the present day. Appropriate for students working toward a Master’s degrees in Mathematics and Science Education. Prerequisite: Math 2014 or permission of instructor. 6403 Advanced Calculus I Rigorous review of elementary calculus. The real number system. Continuous functions. Taylor’s formula. Infinite series. Convergence criteria. Prerequisites: Math 3033 and Math 3073.

College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6413 Advanced Calculus II Coordinate transformations. Vectors. Multiple integrals. Green’s theorem. Theory of integration. Fourier series. Prerequisite: Math 4003. 6483 Introduction to Topology An introduction to point-set topology. Sets. Cartesian products. Relations. Mappings. Sequences. Topological spaces. Metric spaces. Prerequisite: Math 3033. 6523 Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory Systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Finite dimensional vector spaces. Linear transformations with applications. Numerical solutions of systems of linear equations. Prerequisite: Math 2024. Note: Not allowed for the M.S. program in Applied Mathematics. 6533 Introduction to Complex Functions Algebra of complex numbers. Properties of complex functions. Derivatives. Complex integrals. Cauchy’s integral formula. Conformal mapping with applications to potential theory. Prerequisite: Math 2073. 6543 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations Fourier series. Sturm-Liouville problems. The heat, Laplace, and wave equations. Separation of variables. Eigenfunction expansion. Fourier and Laplace transformations. Green’s functions. Canonical forms of second-order linear equations. Method of characteristics. Asymptotic expansion techniques. Prerequisite: Math 3073. 6603 Introduction to Numerical Methods Error analysis of computer arithmetic. Solution of nonlinear equations. Roots of polynomials. Interpolation and Approximation Methods. Numerical Differentiation and Integration. Initial value problems for ordinary differential equations. Prerequisites: Math 2073 and familiarity with Mathematica, or permission of instructor. 6633 Scientific Software Environments Selected case studies from the sciences and engineering are used to discuss the interplay of mathematical modeling, scientific computing, and the applied sciences and engineering. Issues of high performance architectures, software engineering

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methodology for large-scale codes, and visualization of large data sets are discussed. Prerequisites: Math 3073 and either CS 2503 or CS 2003. Colisted with CS 6693. 6673 Mathematical Concepts and Reasoning Topics in mathematics relevant to the teaching of mathematics in elementary and middle schools, including geometry, logic, mathematical problem solving, and use of technology in the teaching of mathematics. 6703 Numerical Methods for Initial and Boundary Value Problems Basic numerical methods for solving initial value problems and boundary value problems for differential equations arising in science and engineering are studied. Finite difference methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations are emphasized. An introduction to the mathematics and use of the finite element method is included. Prerequisites: Math 2073 or consent of instructor. Math 3073 and Math 4143 are recommended but not essential, provided that the student has had exposure to ordinary and partial differential equations in applications or previous courses. Familiarity with the computer algebra system Mathematica is recommended. 6863 Special Topics in Mathematics

Statistics (Stat)
7423 Probability Introduction to probability theory. Probability spaces. Random variables. Distribution functions. Expectation. Conditional probability. Conditional expectation. Prerequisite: Math 2073. 6813 Statistical Methods for Scientists and Engineers Elementary probability. Random variables and distributions. Tests of significance. Test of hypotheses. Elementary experimental design. Simple Regression. Correlation. Prerequisite: Math 2014.

194

College of Engineering and Natural Sciences

Mechanical Engineering
Chair Edmund F. Rybicki Professors John M. Henshaw Ram S. Mohan Edmund F. Rybicki Siamack A. Shirazi James R. Sorem, Jr. Steven M. Tipton Associate Professor Brenton S. McLaury Assistant Professor Jeremy S. Daily Emeritus Professors John R. Shadley Kenneth C. Weston Graduate Program Advisor Siamack A. Shirazi

The graduate programs of study in the Department of Mechanical Engineering lead to the degrees of Master of Science in Engineering, Master of Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy.

Master of Science in Engineering and Master of Engineering Degree Programs
Graduate programs are offered leading to the Master of Science in Engineering degree and the Master of Engineering degree. The objective of these programs is to enhance the student’s professional skills through a deeper understanding of the principles of mechanical engineering and their applications. The Master of Science in Engineering degree requires a thesis and offers the opportunity for independent investigation and creative research. The Master of Engineering degree does not require a thesis, but requires nine more credit hours of course work than the thesis program. Admission. An applicant must have a baccalaureate degree in engineering from an accredited institution and a minimum score of 600 on the Quantitative Section of the GRE General Test. Applicants must also satisfy the general admission requirements of the Graduate School. All applicants from non-English speaking countries who have not received a degree from a U.S. university must demonstrate English proficiency through a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam, 213 on the computer-based exam or 550 on the paper-based test. Applicants may substitute a score of 6.0 on the IELTS examination to fulfill the English proficiency requirement. An undergraduate grade-point average of at least 3.0 is normally required. However, a student who does not satisfy this requirement but has at least a 3.0 grade point average in his or her major field may be admitted on probation at the discretion of the Graduate School. Probationary status is removed by completing nine hours of approved graduate study with a 3.0 grade point average within a specified time period. General Requirements. At least one 6000 or 7000-level course in thermal sciences and one in solid mechanics areas are required. All courses taken for graduate credit in these programs shall be selected from those listed in this bulletin and the choices are subject to the approval of the advisors.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the student must pass a comprehensive oral examination. . . 3 Maximum credit hours of approved 6000-level courses. . . . . . . . Qualified applicants must meet the following minimum requirements: • n applicant must have a baccalaureate or master’s degree in engineering from an accredA ited institution. . . 6 Credit hours of thesis . . 9 Maximum credit hours of independent study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . program on a competitive basis. . . . . . . The comprehensive oral examination covers the student’s entire graduate program with emphasis on the research work and content of the thesis. . . . 12 Minimum credit hours outside mechanical engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . an oral examination committee consisting of the advisor and two other graduate faculty members. . excluding thesis . . . . . . . Admission. . . 18 Minimum credit hours outside mechanical engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • ualification for the Ph. After consulting with the student. . . . . . . . . . . . . Program The principal objectives of the Ph. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Ph. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Minimum credit hours of at least 7000-level courses (excluding thesis) . . . . . . . . . . . . .D. 30 Upon completion of the thesis. . . and to develop research skills. . Applicants must make a minimum combined (quantitative and verbal) score of 1100. . . . . 9 Minimum credit hours of at least 7000-level courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . with a minimum quantitative score of 700. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D. . . . . program are to provide students an opportunity to reach a thorough understanding of the scientific and engineering principles underlying their fields of interest. . . . 15 Minimum credit hours of 6000-level or 7000-level mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to develop the ability to apply these principles creatively to engineering problems. . . . . . . . for the Graduate Dean’s approval. . The number of qualified applicants selected each year depends on the number of students already in the program. . . . . . • ll applicants must take the General Tests of the Graduate Record Examination prior to A admission. . . . . . the advisor recommends. . 3 Maximum credit hours of project and report . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Maximum credit hours of independent study . . 3 Maximum credit hours of approved 6000-level courses. . . . . . . . . . 3 Minimum total credit hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Minimum total credit hours . . . . . .D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Master of Engineering Non-Thesis Program Minimum credit hours in mechanical engineering . . . . . . . . . 21 Minimum credit hours of 6000-level or 7000-level Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • student without a master’s degree must meet the requirements for admission to the A master’s program. . program requires at least a 3. Applicants are selected for admission to the Ph. . . .5 grade point average in the first Q 30 credit hours of graduate work and approval of the graduate faculty in the department and the Graduate Dean. . . . . . . . . . . . . At least one member of this committee must be from outside the mechanical engineering faculty and may be a qualified expert in the research area from outside the University. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 195 Curriculum Requirements Master of Science in Engineering Thesis Program Minimum credit hours in mechanical engineering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . 42 Minimum credit hours in mechanical engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Qualifying Examinations. The advisory committee must have at least four graduate faculty members.D. it can be taken a second time in the following semester. . . . recommends the student for candidacy upon completion of requirements. . . . . . . . degree. . . . . . . . . 6 Maximum credit hours of 6000-level courses . 72 Minimum credit hours of research and dissertation (including master’s degree thesis) . General Requirements: At least one 6000 or 7000-level course in thermal sciences and one in solid mechanics areas are required. . . . . . . . . . . recommend the other members of the advisory committee to the Graduate Dean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences • ll applicants from non-English speaking countries who have not received a degree from a A U. . . . The advisory committee approves the rest of the student’s course work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 on the IELTS examination to fulfill the English proficiency requirement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Not more than 12 hours of transfer credit beyond the master’s degree from an accredited institution may be counted toward the course requirements and must be approved by the mechanical engineering graduate advisor. . . . . . .D.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . university must demonstrate English proficiency through a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam. . . . Examinations are given each year . . . . . in mechanical engineering. 24 Minimum credit hours of graduate course work and independent study distributed as follows: . . . . . . . . . . 213 on the computer-based exam or 550 on the paperbased test. . . . . approves program changes and the dissertation topic. . . Other Requirements Language and Residence. . . . Applicants are selected for admission on March 1 and November 1. and administers the final dissertation oral examination. . . . . . There is no foreign language requirement for the Ph. . . . . .D. . . All courses taken for graduate credit in this program shall be selected from those listed in this bulletin and the choices are subject to the approval of the advisors. two of whom must be from outside the discipline of concentration. . . . . reviews progress. . . . . . . . The student must present a research proposal for approval by the advisory committee before completion of the second year of study. . . . . Advisory Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A student must take a written qualifying examination during the semester after completing nine hours toward the Ph. . Students in the Ph. . . . . . . . . . . . . If the student fails the examination. . 24 Minimum credit hours outside mechanical engineering including 6 credit hours of 6000-level or 7000-level mathematics . . . . . Applicants may substitute a score of 6. . . . . . . . . The student should select a general research area and a research advisor or co-advisors for the dissertation within two semesters following enrollment in the program. . . . . . resulting in a program of more than 72 credit hours. . . . . . . . . . 12 Maximum credit hours of independent study . The advisor or co-advisors. . . . . . At least two consecutive semesters in residence at The University of Tulsa as a full-time student are required. program are advised initially by the mechanical engineering graduate program advisor. after consultation with the student. . . . . . . Curriculum Requirements Minimum total credit hours of graduate credit above the baccalaureate level . . . . . . and one of whom may be a qualified expert in the research area from outside the university. . . . . . . . . . . 15 Students may be required to complete prerequisite undergraduate courses without graduate credit. . . . .

the qualifying examination has been passed. transition. Linear stability theory. Prerequisite: Knowledge of one-degree-of-freedom systems or permission of instructor. Candidacy. and other parts of the program selected by the committee. and numerical approaches. Each candidate must write a dissertation on the results of his/her research. Derivation of finite elements by direct and energy methods. The dissertation must be microfilmed and published in Dissertation Abstracts. The dissertation must demonstrate the candidate’s abilities to independently investigate the area of interest and must contribute to some field of science or engineering. and turbulent boundary layer. dynamics of turbulence. Prerequisite: One intermediate or advanced class in fluid mechanics. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. . The examination will consist of a public defense of the dissertation. The advisory committee recommends the candidate to the Graduate Dean for the Ph. 7133 Turbulent Flow Analysis of turbulent transport of momentum and heat. degree upon successful completion of the final oral examination and acceptance of the dissertation. 7093 Introduction to Finite Element Methods Introduction to theory and application of finite element methods in solid mechanics. The dissertation must follow the Graduate School’s recommended procedures for submission to the student’s advisory committee. sound measurement and analysis. The number of credits allotted to a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. sound sources. Onedimensional flows and normal shock waves. The dissertation is graded on a pass-fail basis. Dissertation. and the method of characteristics. plane wave reflection. Discussions of application to stress analysis. Analytical and numerical solution techniques. 7123 Acoustics The wave equation. laminar and turbulent flows. 7103 Theoretical Vibration Multi-degree-of-freedom and continuous vibration systems. Prandtl-Meyer expansions. Introduction to the finite element method and approximation methods in vibration systems analysis. Mechanical Engineering (ME) 7023 Conduction Heat Transfer Theory of steady and transient heat transfer in solids. the general field of the dissertation. and the research proposal has been approved. transmission and excitation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 7043 Gas Dynamics Fundamentals of compressible fluid flow.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 197 during the fall and spring semesters and are administered by the mechanical engineering graduate program advisor. fracture mechanics. classical solutions. The Reynolds equations. 7033 Boundary Layer Theory Fundamental equations of fluid motion. and before final typing or reproduction must be presented to the full advisory committee for examination and review. Final Oral Examination. Introduction to two-dimensional supersonic flows including oblique shock waves. Passing grades must be obtained in all the dissertation hours to fulfill degree requirements. Each candidate must pass a final oral examination before the advisory committee. and heat transfer are included. boundary-free and wall-bounded shear flows. A student must apply for candidacy after a minimum of 45 hours of course work has been successfully completed.D. The Mechanical Engineering graduate faculty determine whether a student passes or fails the qualifying examinations. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

research. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. stress-strain equations of plasticity. Off axis testing. and Advanced Materials. Assumptions and formulation of Laminated Plate Theory. Forced and free convection in internal and external flow. brittle coatings. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Stresses in laminates. 7851-6 (1-6 hours) Project and Report Design. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. mean and residual stress effects. Prerequisite: ES 3023. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. gears. Strain measurements techniques are presented and then utilized in the laboratory. or other approved mechanical engineering project topics. iterative methods. and fatigue crack propagation. compatibility. Equilibrium.198 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7353 Plasticity Review elasticity equations. . 7961 Residency (See page 20. Crack initiation. Turbulent Flows. and associated instrumentation. fatigue of mechanical components (weld. 7283 Mechanics of Composite Materials Stress-strain-temperature equations for orthotropic and anisotropic materials. Prerequisite: ES 3023. photoelasticity. springs. 7223 Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the behavior of materials containing flaws. crack opening displacement. crack propagation. Effects of plasticity on stress distributions. Example courses: Experimental Stress Analysis. cumulative damage. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Yield surfaces and associated plasticity flow rules. A final project is required and provides an opportunity for demonstration of acquired experimental skills. Behavior of symmetric and unsymmetric laminates. 7163 Structural Fatigue New and conventional fatigue design approaches. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Free-edge effects and delamination. 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis Directed research on some problem in an approved area. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Extension-shear coupling. Examination and written thesis required. cyclic stress-strain behavior. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Orthotropic materials that behave differently in tension than compression. environmental effects. and constitutive behavior are discussed. Numerical methods and problem solutions are reviewed. Major topics include: electrical resistance strain gages. Plastic strains and residual stresses. Mechanics of Composite Materials. 7861-6 (1-6 hours) Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering Content varies yearly. Topics include the stress analysis of cracked bodies. Topics may include a variety of mechanical engineering subjects selected for their relevance to current departmental research interest. 7173 Experimental Stress Analysis Review of elementary elasticity prior to experimental work. Transformation of stress-strain equations to different coordinate systems. Passfail basis only. 7573 Convection Heat Transfer Analysis of convection in laminar and turbulent flows. applications to cylindrical and spherical problems.) 7971-6 (1-6 hours) Seminar Reports and discussions of advanced topics in mechanical engineering including invited guest speakers. multiaxial fatigue. Fracture theories. notch effects. mean stress effects. analysis. 7143 Theory of Elasticity Fundamental laws of the deformations of solids. Thesis for master’s program only. Mechanics of fiber reinforced lamina. crack tip plastic zones. fracture toughness testing. Non-thesis master’s program only. microscopic aspects. 7543 Computational Fluid Mechanics Formulation and numerical methods of solution of fluid dynamic problems in inviscid and viscous flows. Report required. bearings). energy and compliance methods.

Thick-walled cylinders. Instruction and guidance is provided by faculty through individual or group appointment. Degradation of polymers. Prerequisite: ME 4024 or equivalent. students. Energy methods. Fundamentals of corrosion thermodynamics and electrode kinetics. Implementation of analysis into design applications emphasized with case studies. Pass fail basis only. Prerequisite: ME 3212. Design problems on vibration isolation systems and absorbers. level on some problem of interest and importance in the field of mechanical engineering. and motion systems under feedback control. fluid. Computer integrated manufacturing including design for manufacturing. 9981-9 (1-9 hours) Research and Dissertation Original research at the Ph. ME 3053 and 4024. Emphasis on thermal. Case studies of manufacturing-oriented problems. Instruction and guidance is provided by faculty through individual or group appointment. 6404 Machine Dynamics Kinematic and force analysis of machines and machine elements. Torsion and bending. and others. and computer vision. power interfacing. Shear center. Curved beams.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics. statically indeterminate structures. Survey of digital theory. instrumentation design and actuation processes. Stress concentrations. Prerequisites: Math 3073. critical speed. The many forms of corrosion and how they are controlled. Practical applications to professional practice. 6513 Mechatronics in Manufacturing The application of microprocessor technology to manufacturing processes. that are more advanced than those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. with the approval of their advisor. elastic deflection. Master’s degree students. 6453 Mechanical Control Design Control system design of mechanical systems. digital control. Design and computer problems. 6533 Corrosion Engineering Degradation of engineering materials (metals and polymers) due to their reaction with the environment. and dynamic measurement. Prerequisites: Math 3073. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A student enrolling in these courses will complete additional assignments. s-plane and frequency-based design. Vibration isolation and transmission applied to problems of rotating and reciprocating machinery. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. ES 3023. 199 6483 Advanced Mechanics of Materials Multiaxial failure criteria.D. Approved Undergraduate Courses Certain undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the program advisor. real-time process control. Contact stresses. Machine monitoring systems. data acquisition. . assembly language programming.D. machining. as prescribed by the instructor. system modeling. Prerequisite: ME 3034 or ES 3013 or permission of instructor. program. molding. 9991-6 (1-6 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics. Ph. balancing. take courses in other graduate programs that enhance their particular course of study. Prerequisites: ME 3053 and 4053 or permission of instructor. Emphasis on statistical methods and quality control applications in manufacturing. Safety.D. Vibration isolation. computer communications. students may. flywheel design. stability theory. In addition to these courses. Flat plates. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph. 6523 Quality Control and Manufacturing Technology Survey of manufacturing processes. Emphasis on actual engineering failures caused by corrosion. 6503 Vibration Forced and free vibrations of systems with one or more degrees of freedom. casting. Classical control topics including Laplace transforms.

and machines. Determination of heating and cooling loads. 3053. Prerequisite: ME 3043. entrepreneurship. Air conditioning system design and analysis. Prerequisites: ME 3014. Problem-solving techniques. 6663 Mechanical Engineering Design Application of the engineering design process to the design of mechanical components.200 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6633 Gas Turbines Design and performance of stationary and propulsion gas turbines. subsystems. psychrometrics. 3212. 3043. ethics. patents. heat pumps. . 6643 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Principles of vapor compression and absorption refrigeration. Principles of thermal comfort and environmental aspects. 6861-3 (1-3 hours) Special Topics in Design Topics of current interest in mechanical engineering design. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prerequisites: ME 3034.

Assistant Professors Gaoming Li Jaganathan Mahadevan Mengjiao Yu Hong-Quan (Holden) Zhang Graduate Program Advisor Hong-Quan (Holden) Zhang Master’s Program The objective of the master’s program is to educate the student in both professional engineering and research. Applicants must take the GRE General Test and have an official copy of the scores submitted to the Graduate School. The total number of students pursuing graduate degrees will be limited. separation technology. well test analysis. Reynolds. mechanics of tubulars. (2) All applicants from non-English speaking countries who have not received degrees from U. production. Applicants are selected for admission throughout the year. Cem Sarica Ovadia Shoham Associate Professors Mauricio G. Applicants must designate their major fields of research interest. degrees as described below. The qualifications of students entering the program are expected to substantially exceed the minimum requirements. cuttings transport.0 minimum overall grade point average in undergraduate study or approval by the graduate program advisor and the Dean of the Graduate School. and improved oil recovery. Jr. and reservoir engineering. Kelkar Stefan Miska Albert C. Admission.D.0 average in his major field of study. Kelkar Professors Mohan G. They must also satisfy the following requirements: (1) A 3. A 3. The curriculum covers the essential areas of drilling. formation damage. multiphase flow in pipes. The degree programs are designed to produce graduates with a high level of competence in the broad field of petroleum engineering. A minimum score of 6. reservoir characterization.S. 213 on the computer-based test. Applicants must satisfy the general admission requirements of the Graduate School. universities must also have a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam. Thompson The Department of Petroleum Engineering offers both master’s and Ph. The non-thesis master’s program will be required if a thesis advisor is not available. A passing grade in thesis hours is required. Thesis grades are recorded on a pass-fail basis and are not computed in grade point averages. Graduate research is conducted in reservoir simulation. A student must maintain a 3. It is emphasized that the above requirements are minimum requirements.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 201 Petroleum Engineering Chair Mohan G. or 550 on the paper-based exam. Prado Leslie G. General Master’s Degree Requirements.0 grade point average is the minimum for the master’s degree program. .0 overall grade point average and at least a 3. artificial lift. Not more than six hours of C grades in course work are acceptable in the master’s program. A student who meets only the minimum requirements in each of the above areas will normally be denied admission.0 on the IELTS examination may be substituted for the TOEFL.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . All courses taken for graduate credit in other programs shall be selected from those listed in this Bulletin and the choices are subject to the approval of the advisor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In addition to the advisor. . . . . Curriculum Requirements Thesis Option Leading to Master of Science in Engineering Degree Minimum credit hours outside major department . . . 3 Credit hours of thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The remaining committee member may either be a University of Tulsa faculty member from a department other than petroleum engineering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . at least one other committee member must be from the Petroleum Engineering Department. . . . . . .3-6 Minimum credit hours of at least 7000-level courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Credit hours of Master’s Project (PE 7913) Optional . . . . the advisor recommends. . . . . . . 18 Maximum credit hours of approved 6000-level courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7023. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Minimum credit hours in major department including core courses: PE 7013. . . . . . No more than six credit hours of approved courses can be transferred. . . . . 6 Maximum credit hours of independent study . . . . 6 Maximum credit hours of independent study . . . After consulting with the student. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . but excluding Master’s Project . . . . . . . . . .202 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences All non-thesis master’s program students are initially advised by the graduate program advisor appointed by the chair of the department. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Maximum credit hours of approved 6000-level courses. . . . . . . excluding thesis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Non-thesis option leading to Master of Engineering Degree Minimum credit hours outside major department . . . 33 Upon completion of the research. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and 7063. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . excluding thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Minimum credit hours of at least 7000-level courses. . . . . . . . . an oral examination committee consisting of the advisor and two other graduate faculty members. . . 3 Minimum total credit hours . . . . . . . . . . 18 Minimum credit hours in major department including core courses PE 7013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the student pursuing a thesis must pass a comprehensive oral examination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . for the Graduate Dean’s approval. . . . . . . . . . . or a qualified expert in the research area from outside the university. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . excluding Master’s Project . . 7023 and 7063. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The comprehensive oral examination covers the research work and content of the thesis. . . . 3 Minimum total credit hours . . . . . . .

D.S.0 on the IELTS examination may be substituted for the TOEFL. It is emphasized that the above requirements are minimum requirements. both part-time and full-time. Applicants usually are selected for admission on February 1 and September 1. The Ph. and 7063. degree represents the highest degree awarded by universities in the United States. but is primarily characterized by the Ph. to formulate the solution to the problem utilizing state-of-the-art knowledge and creativity. A student who meets only the minimum requirements in each of the above areas will. university must satisfy English proficiency requirements (minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based test. program requires at least 90 approved credit hours of graduate credit above the baccalaureate level. but will be considered throughout the year. A student with a baccalaureate degree must meet the requirements for admission to a master’s program within the division.D. dissertation. Applicants must designate their major fields of research interest. including a maximum of 9 hours of approved 6000 level courses listed in this Bulletin for graduate credit. the Ph. The Ph. 7023.D. Program The Ph. work then requires at least a 3. dissertation requirement. generally distributed in the following manner: (1) At least 20 credit hours of research and dissertation (including master’s degree thesis). . or mathematics from an accredited institution. Admission for Ph. degree usually requires course work beyond that required by a master’s degree program in the same discipline. is limited. The Ph. 213 on the computer-based exam or 550 on the paper test). to formulate a significant intellectual problem. The core courses. All applicants from non-English-speaking countries who have not received a degree from a U. Normally. PE 7013. (2) At least 54 hours of graduate credit in course work and independent study. It is expected that the qualifications of students entering the program will substantially exceed the minimum requirements.D. The recipient of a Ph. degree should possess a broad knowledge of his or her discipline and should be prepared for a lifetime of creative intellectual inquiry. An applicant must have a baccalaureate degree in engineering. dissertation should contain significant original research and should contain material suitable for publication as a refereed manuscript. Curriculum Requirements.D. professional document.D.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 203 Ph.D.5 grade point average in the first 30 hours of graduate work and approval of the graduate faculty in the department and the Dean of the Graduate School. The Ph. A minimum score of 6. A maximum of six hours of independent study will be allowed.D. part-time students are not admitted to this program. must be included in the first 30 hours of graduate work. normally. physics. Admission. All applicants must take the General Tests of the Graduate Record Examination prior to admission and have an official copy of the scores submitted to the Graduate School. and to communicate the findings in a lucid. be denied admission. dissertation should establish the candidate’s ability to read and comprehend the literature.D. normally as a research journal article or articles. (3) At least 12 credit hours of course work must be taken outside the discipline. The number of candidates in this program.D.

The advisory committee must have at least four members. 7023 and 7063. immediately preceding the first week of the Fall semester.204 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Students working in the areas of reservoir simulation and well test analysis are expected to acquire necessary mathematical knowledge in differential equations and numerical analysis.S.D. Qualifying Examinations. Questions may also assume that the examinee has taken the core courses. These requirements are not variable except under special circumstances and with permission of the students advisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate School.D.D. Questions on Ph. qualifying exam should be different from problems that the students taking the exam have seen before. Other Requirements Language and Residence. A student in the Ph.D. and one of whom may be a qualified expert in the research area from outside the university. Students wishing to take Ph. approves the dissertation topic. resulting in a program of more than 90 credit hours. The Ph. In the event that a candidate (or candidates) needs to retake the exam (see discussion on grading). A candidate for the Ph.D. The advisor or co-advisors. Each full-time petroleum engineering faculty member will prepare two or three questions upon the request of the department chair. Each of the three exams consists of six questions and the examinee is asked to solve exactly four questions on each exam. at least one of whom must be a University of Tulsa graduate faculty member from a department other than Petroleum Engineering. Advisory Committee. . research. qualifying exams are designed to indicate whether a student has the intellectual creativity necessary to do Ph. Students may be required to complete prerequisite undergraduate courses without graduate credit. No more than 12 hours of transfer credit beyond the master’s degree from an accredited institution may be counted toward the course requirements if acceptable to the advisory committee. qualifying exams consist of three four-hour exams. recommend the other members of the advisory committee to the Dean of the Graduate School. a second exam will be offered prior to end of the Fall semester following the August exams.D. degree in petroleum engineering who has also taken undergraduate courses in partial differential equations and either linear algebra or matrix theory. the dates for this exam will be set by the department chairman. PE 7013. Problems on a Ph. At least two consecutive semesters in residence at The University of Tulsa as a full-time student are required. The exams will normally be administered once per year. qualifying exams must so inform the department chair in writing four weeks prior to the exam week.D. program will be advised initially by a graduate faculty member recommended by the graduate program advisor and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. two of whom must be petroleum engineering graduate faculty members. after consultation with the student. qualifying exams presume background knowledge normally held by the holder of a B.D. The advisory committee assists with the student’s program of course work. Material for this requirement is selected with the approval of the candidate’s advisory committee. and administers the final dissertation oral examination. The student should select a general research area and a research advisor or co-advisors for the dissertation by the end of two semesters after enrollment in the program. degree in engineering must demonstrate competence in a computer language and/or in one foreign language through readings of material in his or her major field of study. The Ph.

Which of the preceding options will apply will be determined by a secret ballot of all full time petroleum engineering graduate faculty members who attend the meeting at which the results of the Ph. qualifying exams offered after his or her first semester in petroleum engineering at The University of Tulsa. For a student who has passed his/her Ph. A student who enters the doctoral program directly from the M. Option (b) will be voted on first. The selection of Option (b) or (if applicable) option (c) will require an absolute majority vote of the faculty. degree requires that he or she prepare a typed research proposal five to fifteen pages in length which outlines the research proposed for the Ph. Since each examinee is asked to solve a total of 12 problems.D. Any exception to this policy must be approved by a two-thirds majority of the full-time faculty by a secret ballot. Option (c). i.D.S. A student who enters the doctoral program after having completed an M. (c) the student shall be required to take the next set of Ph. A student who enters the doctoral program after having completed a M.D.D. (2) A grade less than 65/120 shall constitute a failing grade. decisions regarding students who take a second qualifying exam during the Fall semester and whose grades are greater than or equal to 65/120 and less than 75/120 shall be based solely on options (a) and (b) above. The Department Chair shall notify the Graduate Dean of all results. For students receiving a grade greater than 70/120.S. Any student who has scored less than 65/120 will be dismissed from the program at the end of the fall semester immediately following the August qualifying exams. namely.S. This option will only be available to students taking the August exam. if applicable. qualifying exams are discussed. The faculty shall consider three options for any student who receives a grade on the qualifying exams greater than or equal to 65/120 and less than 75/120. the student will be dismissed from the program. The completed research proposal must be submitted to each full-time faculty member and members of the dissertation committee.D. qualifying exams.D. or. The student’s advisor may provide general suggestions on the preparation of this proposal but should not write the proposal. the maximum grade possible is 120. qualifying exams. dissertation. Research Proposal. (1) A grade of 75/120 or more shall constitute a passing grade. the final step for admission to candidacy for the Ph. degree in a discipline other than petroleum engineering must take the first set of Ph. (a) the student shall be dismissed from the program at the end of the fall semester following the August qualifying exams which he or she failed. If Option (b) or (c) is not selected by an absolute majority vote. degree in petroleum engineering at another college of university must take the first set of Ph. Each student shall be informed of the outcome by his or her advisor. . in the absence of the advisor. Each question is graded on a zero to ten basis. then. Option (a) shall prevail.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 205 The Graduate Program Coordinator formulates the three exams at his discretion with the provision that no individual exam will contain more than one question prepared by an individual faculty member. Option (b) will be be permissable only if the student has received a grade greater than 70/120. by the Department Chair. qualifying exams offered after his or her second semester in petroleum engineering at The University of Tulsa. qualifying exams offered after he or she is admitted to the doctoral program..e. (b) the student shall be awarded a passing grade.D. program at The University of Tulsa must take the first set of Ph.D.

. Fractional flow theory and displacement efficiency.D. Each candidate must write a dissertation on the results of his research. Candidacy. 7023 Advanced Production Design Total system associated with production and transportation of oil and gas. plunger lift. evaluation of stimulation treatments. The dissertation must demonstrate the candidate’s ability to conduct independent research in the area of interest and must contribute to some field of science or engineering technology. Petroleum Engineering (PE) 7003 Artificial Lift Systems Design and comparison of present-day artificial lift systems including sucker rod pumping. The dissertation must follow the Graduate School’s recommended procedures for submission to the student’s advisory committee. steady state multiphase flow through pipes and restrictions. A student cannot apply for candidacy until the language requirement has been fulfilled. and the research proposal has been approved. degree. degree upon successful completion of the final oral examination and acceptance of the dissertation. and well deliverability. identification of wellbore storage and fractured wells using pressure derivatives. Areal and vertical sweep efficiencies and recovery efficiency. A letter grade is not given for the dissertation. Pressure build-up. Math 4143. and before final typing or reproduction. electrical submersible pumping. Prerequisites: PE 3023. drawdown. 7013 Advanced Reservoir Engineering Advanced petrophysics for multiphase flow in porous media. it is graded on a pass-fail basis. The advisor will notify the department chair upon the student’s successful completion of all requirements.D. must be presented to the full advisory committee for examination and review. Prerequisites: ES 3003 and PE 3073 or permission of instructor. The examination will consist of a public defense of the dissertation and cover the general field of the dissertation as well as other parts of the program which may be chosen by the committee. inflow performance relationships. hydraulic pumping.D. Mathematical development of fluid flow equations in porous media and analytical solutions to single-phase flow problems. and fall off. pressure interference in multiple well reservoirs. 7033 Well Test Analysis I Development and applications of solutions to the diffusivity equation. application of superposition. jet pumping. 4113 or permission of instructor. All faculty members are invited to this presentation. gas lift. Subsequent to this meeting. flow through completions. Prerequisite: PE 3073. Dissertation. and other lift methods. This meeting should take place at least a year before the student’s graduation. Comprehensive design project. degree. Prerequisite: PE 3023. Final Oral Examination. the dissertation committee shall recommend one of the following: 1) The student shall be admitted to candidacy for the Ph. Prediction of phase behavior and fluid physical properties.206 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences The advisor will convene a meeting with the student and the dissertation committee at which the student will present the research proposal. The number of credits allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. Passing grades must be obtained in all the dissertation hours to fulfill degree requirements. 2) The student shall make committee-recommended revisions to the proposal prior to being admitted to candidacy for the Ph. qualifying examinations have been passed. The advisory committee recommends the candidate to the Dean of Research and Graduate Studies for the Ph. Each candidate must pass a final oral examination before the advisory committee.

Prerequisites: Petroleum Engineering 3023. Prerequisites: ChE 7003 or permission of instructor. rejection-acceptance. 7133 Inverse Problems Overview of inverse theory with emphasis on flow in porous media. Applications of optimization techniques to drilling cost minimization. 7083 Modern Reservoir Engineering Advanced improved recovery processes with emphasis on CO2. Prerequisites: PE 7013 or (Math 6523 and Stat 6613). Prerequisite: PE 4053 or equivalent. 207 7103 Advanced Formation Evaluation Qualitative and quantitative analysis and interpretation of well logs involving shale formations and complex lithologies. The state-of-the-art transient multiphase flow simulator will be introduced through workshops and will be used to complete homework and comprehensive design projects. or Gphy 7063.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7043 Reservoir Simulation I Development of the equations for multiphase. Use of cross-plots and computer models in comprehensive formation interpretations. Monte Carlo. Model resolution. Prerequisite: PE 3043. Factors affecting rate penetration. multidimensional flow in porous media and the mathematical procedures required for their solution using finite-difference methods. C. Computation of sensitivity coefficients and the maximum a posteriori estimate for nonlinear problems. as well as new techniques to quantify reservoir data will be evaluated with major emphasis on definition of uncertainties in characterizing reservoirs. Design considerations for improved oil recovery processes by incorporating reservoir characterization. drilling fluid rheology. Dynamics of drill string. and recent advances in drilling fluid systems. Mathematical model of drilling rate and bit wear. Prerequisite: PE 3043 or permission of instructor. Phase behavior analysis on ternary diagrams. Modeling of drag and torque. 7143 Transient Multiphase Production Design A combination of theoretical modeling and design applications. Review of the early black box general models. and proficiency in either Fortran. drilling fluids contaminants. 7063 Advanced Drilling Drilling fluids rheology and hydraulics. drilling problems related to drilling fluids. clay chemistry and shale stabilization. 7123 Advanced Drilling Fluids Drilling fluids fundamentals. Monte Carlo methods and conditional simulation. Application examples. hole stability mechanics. Sampling from the posterior distribution function using Markhov chain. horizontal and inclined pipes. drilling fluids additives and chemicals. or permission of instructor. Introduction to two phase flow phenomena and the recent modeling approach. cost trends. Prerequisites: Geol 1013. Flow of non-Newtonian fluids. PE 3023. Prerequisites: PE 7023 or PE 7053. or permission of instructor. Directional well trajectory predictions and design. Math 4143. and estimation. 7113 Drilling Optimization Drilling economics. Mechanics of BHA in vertical and directional holes. and randomized maximum likelihood algorithms. Flow pattern transition prediction and flow pattern modeling for vertical. Computer applications. 7073 Geostatistics Application of statistical methods to reservoir characterization. Prerequisites: PE 4113 or 7013. The probabilistic solutions of inverse problems. . Transient multiphase flow modeling techniques will be reviewed. Theory and techniques of optimization. Stat 3813 or permission of instructor. Several conventional. Unified Models. surface chemistry of drilling fluids. Lectures will be supplemented with current literature on optimized drilling. Industrial practices of transient multiphase production design will be covered through special seminars given by experts from oil companies. The method of Backus and Gilbert. Several flow assurance topics related to transient multiphase production will be discussed. Prerequisite: PE 3043. 7053 Two Phase Flow Modeling A theoretical treatment of two phase flow. polymer and steam flooding. or C++ programming languages.

The following are the approved senior-level petroleum engineering courses: . Prerequisites: PE 7013 and 7043.208 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 8033 Well Test Analysis II Determination of wellbore pressure for a wide variety of conditions by analytical techniques and simulation methods. Corequisties: PE 7073 or MATH 7053. Such credit is limited to six credit hours on the master’s level and an additional three credit hours on the doctoral level. 9991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics at the Ph. Pressure behavior in anisotropic systems and heterogeneous reservoirs. and review of numerical methods for both models. Pass-fail basis only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prerequisites: PE 7133 and PE 7043. program. 8023 Assisted History Matching Overview of LBFGS and other optimization methods. 8013 Reservoir Simulation II Design and implementation of a multiphase flow reservoir simulator. program. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. well posed problems and stability.) 7981-6 (1-6 hours) Research and Thesis Directed research on some problem within an approved area.D. Extension of single-phase flow systems to multiphase flow. level. Prerequisite: Admission to Ph. Prerequisites: PE 7023 or permission of instructor. Analysis of characteristics. Prerequisite: Admission to Ph. Examination and written thesis required.D. 7961 Residency (See page 20. Transient flow of gas in reservoirs and analysis of gas well test data. level. 8053 Transient Two-Phase Flow Detailed derivation of the two basic models for transient two phase flow in pipelines: The Two Fluid Model and the Drift Flux Model. Selected study is performed by appointment with the faculty. Design of compositional reservoir simulators using a generalized Equation of State. Prerequisite: Permission of department. Recent advances in reservoir simulation. 7913 Master’s Project Directed project in petroleum engineering.D. Data assimilation in a Bayesian framework using randomized maximum likelihood and Bayesian updating methods including the ensemble Kalman filter for generating plausible reservoir descriptions and assessing the uncertainty in reservoir description and performance predictions. Permission of the student’s graduate advisor is required to take and receive credit for these courses. 7813 Special Topics in Petroleum Engineering Content varies depending upon student and faculty interests. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. Presentation of the recent trend of simplified models for transient flow in pipelines. Prerequisites: PE 7033 and 7043. Passfail basis only. Selected study is performed by appointment with the faculty. including interphase mass transfer and variable fluid saturation pressure.D. Approved Undergraduate Courses Some senior-level undergraduate courses in the major and minor fields can be used for graduate credit. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics. 9981-9 (1-9 hours) Research and Dissertation Original research on some problem within the field of petroleum engineering on the Ph.

2123. PE 3073. Prerequisite: PE 2113. 209 . interaction of gravity. hydraulic fracturing. PE 2113. engineering analysis and prediction of cash flows in oil and gas properties. and application of a commercial reservoir simulator in design of water flooding and gas injection projects and in predicting reservoir performance. acoustic. PE 3073. international contracts. 6573 Artificial Lift Methods Theory. sand control and acidizing. and design of the most important artificial lift methods. beam pumping. and electrical submersible pumping. Prerequisite: PE 3013. Prerequisite: PE 3013. 6473 Production Engineering II Design and analysis of surface production processes. principles of cementing. Prerequisites: Geol 3153. 6453 Formation Evaluation Electrical. pumping and compression. and radioactive properties of rocks. profitability measures. Phys 2063. PE 3023. 6463 Well Completion Design Casing program. PE 3023. fractional flow and frontal advance theory. casing and tubing design. well perforating. capillary and viscous forces on flood performance. Introduction to well logging theory and interpretation of subsurface logs. effect of depreciation and taxes on cash flow. 6513 Reservoir Engineering II Oil trapping. application. introduction to the fundamentals of reservoir simulation. completion added skin. risk and uncertainty analysis. PE 2123. including gas lift. Fluid separation. Prerequisites: PE 3013. inflation. 3043. areal and vertical sweep efficiencies. Prerequisite: PE 3013. measurement and treatment of production fluids.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 6413 Petroleum Economics and Property Evaluation Time value of money. and computer logs.

Miller Professors Roger N.0 or higher is required. The core curriculum provides the essential principles and basic knowledge required.0 on the IELTS exam in place of a TOEFL score. programs and the skills and expertise needed by those seeking terminal master’s-level training in industry. 4) Three references or evaluations from qualified individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic and/or technical background. The degrees provide physics and engineering physics graduates with the advanced knowledge necessary to continue in Ph.D. Both degrees are research-oriented and require a combination of appropriate course work and independent study leading to completion of a thesis. the student will confer with the department graduate advisor to plan course sequencing and discuss research options. Applications should be made through the Graduate School and must include the following: 1) A baccalaureate degree in physics or an ABET-accredited engineering physics degree from an accredited institution. Applicants from non-English speaking countries may submit a minimum score of 6. Miller Associate Professors Scott A. condensed matter. plasma physics. students with industrial experience in Physics or Engineering Physics and grade point averages below 3. or 550 on the paper exam.210 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences Physics and Engineering Physics Chair George P. optics and laser applications. however. 2) Results from the Graduate Record Examination. and the Master of Science in Engineering Physics. General Requirements.0 may be admitted on probation at the discretion of the graduate advisor and with permission of the Graduate School.0 grade-point average is the minimum needed for continuance in the program. Upon admission. Satisfactory progress in course work is required and a 3. Holmstrom Saibal Mitra Assistant Professors Dylan Brennan Parameswar Hari Sanwu Wang Graduate Program Advisor George P. An undergraduate grade point average of 3. 213 on the computer-based exam. including a minimum TOEFL score of 80 on the internet-based exam. 3) Applicants from non-native English speaking countries must satisfy English proficiency requirements. Miller The Department of Physics and Engineering Physics offers programs leading to the Master of Science degree in Physics. Research opportunities exist within the areas of nanotechnology. Blais George P. . Admission To be admitted to the program an applicant must satisfy the general admission requirements of the Graduate School and be approved by the Graduate Advisor.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Minimum semester hours Mathematics: . . . . 7083) . . . . . 3 Maximum semester hours of approved physics 6000-level courses: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7063. . . . Interested students should contact the graduate advisor for Physics and Engineering Physics or any faculty member of the Department of Physics and Engineering Physics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the student must select a general research area and a research advisor for the thesis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Students without the necessary prerequisite undergraduate courses will be required to take these as deficiencies. . 6 Minimum semester hours of thesis: . . . . . . . . . After consulting with the student. . . . 7083) . . . . . . . which is comprehensive. . . . . Typically. . . . . . . . . . 3 Maximum semester hours of approved 6000-level courses: . . . . . . . . . . . . . A minimum of 60 hours of undergraduate course work is required. 3 Master of Science in Engineering Physics Minimum total hours: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . an oral examination committee consisting of the adviser and two other graduate faculty members. . . . . the student must pass a comprehensive oral examination. 6 Maximum semester hours of independent study: . . . . . . . an undergraduate will apply to the Graduate School for admission to the combined program at the end of the sophomore year or the beginning of the junior year. . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Core Physics curriculum (PHYS 7003. By the end of the first semester after enrollment. . . . . . . . . . covering the student’s entire graduate program and emphasizing the research work and content of the thesis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Minimum semester hours of 6000-level or 7000-level Mathematics: . . . . . . Combined Bachelor’s/Master Degree Program The Combined Bachelor’s/Master degree program allows highly motivated students to earn a Bachelor’s/Master’s degree in Physics or Engineering Physics in five years. . . . . . 7043. . No more than six hours of transfer credit beyond the bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution may contribute toward fulfilling these requirements. . . . . . the adviser recommends. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upon completion of the thesis. . . . . 7063. At least one member of this committee must be from outside the Physics and Engineering Physics faculty and may be a qualified expert in the research area from outside the University. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 211 Curriculum requirements Master of Science in Physics Minimum total hours: . . . . 12 Minimum semester hours engineering (including EE 7073): . . . . . . . . All thesis and oral examination requirements must be scheduled and completed to meet Graduate School deadlines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Because of the rigor and pace of this program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Maximum semester hours of independent study: . . . . . . . . . . . . . The combined program requires the same number of credits and level of work as the standard bachelor’s and master’s require. . . . The student’s advisory committee conducts this examination. . . . .4 undergraduate GPA is required for admission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Core Physics curriculum (PHYS 7003. . . . . . . . . . . . for the Graduate Dean’s approval. . . . . 7043. . a minimum of a 3. . . . . . . . . 12 Minimum credit hours of thesis: . . . .

Thermal shape fluctuations of polymers and membranes. and relativity. 7573 Condensed Matter Physics Crystal symmetries. exact solutions. group theory. photoemission. 7083 Statistical Mechanics Review of basic statistical mechanics: harmonic oscillator. metal nanoclusters. diffraction. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: PHYS 4063 or equivalent. theory of dielectrics. Dirac Equation. carbon nanotubes. Dynamics of thermal fluctuations: detailed balance. Klein-Gordon Equation. 7863 Special Topics in Physics Study of developing subject matter in areas not covered in existing courses. methods of measuring structural properties (X-ray. CVD). semiconductor materials. Langevin equation for harmonic oscillator. Strum-Liouville theory. tensor analysis. and rigid body dynamics. the negative energy states and the positron theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 4043 or equivalent. Ising model. orderings and closures. moments of the distribution function. Selected problems in MHD stability theory. function space and orthogonal polynomials. Fourier analysis. AFM. Symmetries: parity. diffusion. scattering theory (the Lippman-Schwinger equation and the Born approximation). biological materials. Coulomb collisions and the equilibrium distribution. applications of carbon nanotubes. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. multipole moments. mean-field theory. Pulsed laser. manyparticles problems. Canonical transformation. self assembly. Prerequisite: PHYS 7063. linear vector spaces. 7563 Electrodynamics Electromagnetic radiation. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. quantum wells. Drift kinetics and drift wave instability theory. symmetries and conservation. Prerequisite: PHYS 4003 or equivalent. methods of synthesis (RF plasma. Hamilton-Jacobi Theory and introduction to nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Waves in magnetized plasmas. the single particle approximation and density functional theory. Perturbation theory. and magnetic resonance). Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability. Prerequisite: PHYS 7043. 7123 Plasma Physics Motion of charged particles in electromagnetic fields and plasma confinement. semiconductor nanoclusters. and nanostructures. 7043 Advanced Quantum Mechanics Postulates of quantum mechanics. lattice transformation. Plasma as a conducting fluid. integral transforms. Heisenberg. waveguides. Basic phenomenology of phase transitions. variational principles and Lagrange’s equations. Boundary value problems in electrostatics. The Schrödinger. 7063 Electromagnetic Theory Maxwell’s theory of electromagnetism. but may include analytic functions. macroscopic electromagnetism. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. two-body central problems. carbon nanoclusters. 7553 Modern Quantum Mechanics Identical particles. Cuachy’s integral formula. and interaction pictures. reflection. Infrared and Raman microscopy. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Fermions and Bosons. Kinetic description of magnetized plasmas. SEM. Physics and Engineering Physics (PHYS) 7003 Advanced Classical Mechanics Covers elementary principles. Bose and Fermi gases Interacting classical gas. . partial differential equations and integral equations. magnetostatics. Waves in cold un-magnetized plasmas. scattering. 7503 Introduction to Nanotechnology Basic solid state physics. the Hartree-Fock approximation and density functional theory. Theory of angular momentum. surfaces and interfaces. Monte Carlo calculations. The Hamiltonian equations of motion. time-reversal. field ion microscopy. organic compounds and polymers. electronic states and the band structure. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. residue theory. wires and dots. Green’s functions. The number of credit hours allotted a course is designated by the last digit of the course number. lattice vibrations and their quantization.212 College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7153 Methods of Theoretical Physics Topics will vary. magnetohydrodynamics.

photon optics. A student enrolling in these courses will complete assignments in addition to those completed by the undergraduate students in the courses. . Solutions of the time-independent Schrödinger equation in 3 dimensions. 6523 Fundamental of Photonics Classical and quantum description of light. Beam optics. Prerequisites: PHYS 3053. Bloch functions. and high energy physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 4033. free electron Fermi gas. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 4033. MATH 3073 Approved Undergraduate Courses Many undergraduate courses may be taken for graduate credit with approval from the program advisor. 213 6503 Solid State Physics Crystal structure. Particular attention will be paid to models of stellar life cycles including energy production and stellar nucleosynthesis. Selected study is performed by appointment with the faculty member. and cosmic nucleosynthesis. statistical optics.College of Engineering and Natural Sciences 7961 Residency (See page 20. 6033 Quantum Mechanics I Introductory quantum mechanics. the Big Bang model. and nonlinear optics. Prerequisites: PHYS 3053. 7991-3 Independent Study Individual or group studies of advanced topics pertaining to Physics or engineering physics. Approximation techniques and applied topics in nuclear. Prerequisite: Permission of department. lasers. photon sources and detectors. Wiedemann-Franz law. and magnetic materials. concept of band gap. phonons. Pass-fail basis only. crystal binding. and invited guest speakers 7981-6 Research and Thesis Directed research on a problem in an approved area. solid state. semiconductors and superconductors. model of stellar corpses and supernovae. Brillouin zones. Written thesis and formal defense before graduate committee is required. imperfections in crystals. 6563 Astrophysics Investigates the physics of stellar evolution and cosmology. 6043 Quantum Mechanics II Continuation of Physics 4033. Angular momentum and identical particles. nearly free electrons.) 7971 Graduate Seminar Reports and discussions of advanced topics in physics given by students. faculty. Kronig-Penney model. MATH 3073.

By the end of the first semester. The M.E. the student will write a thesis that conforms to the Graduate School’s recommended procedures.M.S. program is intended for certified and practicing elementary and middle school teachers who wish to enhance their subject matter knowledge and skill in science and math.).S. On completion of the research.S. another nine credit hours in approved graduatelevel electives in math and science courses offered through the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences.E.S. the student should identify a three-member thesis committee. program may be pursued with the thesis or non-thesis option. the third member must be from the other department. The M.E.E. is an interdisciplinary program between the School of Education and the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. offers an interdisciplinary program leading to a Master of Science in Mathematics and Science Education (M.S. It includes a core of professional education courses. . The M. the student must pass an oral thesis examination. through the School of Education and the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences. a draft of the thesis will be forwarded to the other members of the thesis committee for examination and review. degree program does not lead to teacher certification.S.S.M. All M. and three credit hours in an approved graduate-level course in statistics.S.S. educational research courses.S. The thesis option prepares graduates for entry level positions in educational research and evaluation or to pursue doctoral study in their chosen field.E.M.214 Interdisciplinary Programs InterdIscIplInary programs The following interdisciplinary programs are designed from courses that cross two or more separate programs. • Master of Science in Mathematics and Science Education • Master of Science in Petrophysics Master of Science in Mathematics and Science Education The Graduate School.E.E. It includes a core of professional education and educational research courses and electives to be selected based on the student’s interest and background.M.S. After the thesis has been reviewed and judged ready for defense by the advisor and by the other members of the thesis committee. No more than twelve credit hours may be taken at the 6000 level. The oral examination is comprehensive. and electives in math and science. In carrying out the thesis project. With the advisor’s approval. Because the M. is a research-based program designed to provide a solid background in mathematics and science principles and their application in the classroom. students must complete a total of thirty credit hours for the degree.S. the thesis student should select a research area and a thesis advisor who will supervise the research and the remainder of the student’s course work in conjunction with the Graduate Program Advisor. covering the student’s entire graduate program and emphasizing the research work and content of the thesis.M. students in this program are jointly advised by the Graduate Program Advisor in the School of Education and by an advisor in the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences.S. Two members must be from the thesis advisor’s department with the advisor as the committee chair. By the end of the second semester and in collaboration with the thesis advisor. The M. The research project consists of a series of research-related coursework that includes the preparation of an approved research proposal and a final research paper reporting on original empirical research conducted in the final year of the program. All thesis and oral examination requirements must be scheduled and completed to meet Graduate School deadlines.S. the student must complete a minimum of three and maximum of six hours of thesis credit.M. The total includes eighteen credit hours of core courses.M. Non-thesis students are still required to complete a research project.

E. meteors. comets.E.M.S. telecommunication and networking. and using information management systems. galaxies and big bang.S. Research and Paper or. Advanced Child and Adolescent Growth & Development Educ 7153. curriculum integration. Project will be developed in consultation with instructor and address a curriculum area appropriate for the student. statistics. eclipses. moon. 7043 Classroom Computer Applications Enables teachers to effectively use educational technology in the classroom. Statistics Requirement (3 credit hours) Consists of an approved graduate-level course in statistics Mathematics/Science Education (MSE) 7013-4 (3-4 hours) Contemporary Physical Science Current problems in chemistry. light and sound appropriate for the elementary classroom. stars.Interdisciplinary Programs 215 M. or discrete mathematics appropriate for the elementary classroom. Math and Science Courses (9 credit hours) Consists of MSE courses and other electives offered through the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences M. 7143-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Chemistry Topics in atoms. chemical properties and reactivity appropriate for the elementary classroom 7153-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Mathematics Advanced topics in analysis. simulation and modeling.E. 7133-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Biology Environmental or cellular biology appropriate for the elementary classroom.M. utilizing hands-on activities. planets. 7123-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Physics Topics in mechanics. based on the student’s background and teaching interests.S. 7831-3 (1-3 hours) Special Topics in Mathematics and Science 7973 Seminar: Problems in Modern Science and Mathematics Discussion of major contemporary issues in science and mathematics as they pertain to the classroom. Research and Thesis M. Instructional Design and Curriculum Integration Educ 7123.S. molecules. soar system.S. Topics include software evaluation. Introduction to Educational Technology Educ 7053. 7113-4 (3-4 hours) Earth’s Physical Environment Major issues in earth science.S. Educ 7983. Research Proposal Educ 7913. 7213 Technology Project Project involving application of technology to curriculum implementation. Core Courses (18 credit hours) Educ 7043.M. 7163-4 (3-4 hours) Concepts and Applications in Astronomy Focuses on sun. multimedia applications. integrated applications. Techniques of Research and Evaluation Educ 7173. 7991-3 (1-3 hours) Independent Study .

we have created this Masters program. the student can either choose to emphasize Geoscience or Petroleum Engineering courses in completing the requirements of the program. he or she will be admitted on a conditional basis.216 Interdisciplinary Programs Master of Science in Petrophysics The objective of Masters of Science in Petrophysics (MSP) program is to provide a professional student with sufficient background and understanding in integrated reservoir description. physical science. but desires to continue his MSP degree. 213 on the computer-based test. Requirements may vary slightly depending on whether the student is completing the MSP program with an emphasis in either Petroleum Engineering. The program is interdisciplinary in nature. Until the GRE requirement is satisfied. or in Geosciences. Admission. By combining NSIP with graduate level courses at the University of Tulsa.0 minimum overall grade point average on a 4 point scale in undergraduate study and A a bachelor’s degree from an accredited American University or its equivalent.). universities must also submit a minimum TOEFL score of at least 80 on the internetbased exam. ll applicants are required to take the General Graduate Record Examination and submit A acceptable scores. geology and petroleum engineering in the course work. Applicants must satisfy the general Graduate School admission requirements including submission of an acceptable TOEFL or IELTS score. or 550 on the paper-based exam. or engineering from A an accredited American University or its equivalent. ll applicants are required to take the General Graduate Record Examination and submit A acceptable scores. or 550 on the paper-based exam. bachelor’s degree in natural science. A minimum score of 6.0 on the IELTS examination may be substituted for the TOEFL requirement. Inc. 3. the applicant is required to satisfy the following requirements: 1. Inc. mathematics. 4. A minimum score of 6. NExT is an organization jointly formed by Schlumberger. NExT currently offers an eleven month intensive training in subsurface integration program (NSIP) to industry professionals at its Tulsa facility. For the MSP degree program with an emphasis in Petroleum Engineering. and involves elements of geophysics. a service company. A total of 30 credit hours are required to complete the degree program.S. Texas A&M University and Herriott Watts University. the applicant is required to satisfy the following requirements: 1.0 on the IELTS examination may be substituted for the TOEFL requirement. 3. 2. A degree in Petroleum Engineering or significant experience (more than five years) in the industry is required 2. 3. A student who is in the NSIP program. will be allowed to complete the GRE and TOEFL requirements within the first semester of NSIP after satisfying other requirements. Depending on the students’ background. This program is a result of a unique relationship between the University of Tulsa and NExT (Network of Excellence in Training. For the MSP degree program with an emphasis in Geosciences. and the University of Oklahoma..0 on a 4 point scale. ll applicants from non-English speaking countries. 213 on the computer-based test. . pplicants whose native language is not English must also take the TOEFL examination A and score at least 80 on the internet-based exam. who have not received a degree from a A U. An undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.

NExT Subsurface Integration Program (NSIP) (All courses are one credit hour. their evolution in time and space. geological modeling and the deepwater petroleum system. new concepts in understanding transport and depositional processes. know the location of the clays in the pore system. It is an intensive program where each course is taught over a week to two week period and entails the whole day. Also covered are geologic controls on reservoir quality. All the students will be advised by a graduate program advisor appointed by the chair of the department. and the susceptibility to porosity modification via diagenetic reactions. The course covers analysis and interpretation of seismic. Participants gain experience using both the Dunham and the Lucia systems. Curriculum Requirements.Interdisciplinary Programs 217 General MSP Requirements. The NSIP program is instructed differently than University of Tulsa graduate courses. The students enrolled in this program are required to take the following NSIP courses. geological and geophysical information as part of exploitation. and calibrate between engineering. know the habits of the clays. In-class exercises are completed to demonstrate principles and techniques. The goal is to demonstrate that there is a significant level of predictability associated with carbonate plays. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. The course relies heavily on a combination of current research that is published and personal research relating outcrops to subsurface characterization and development of deepwater reservoirs.0 grade point average in the courses taken at the University of Tulsa. The course will be followed by a comprehensive examination. The University of Tulsa faculty will also be responsible for ensuring that grading of the students is appropriate for The University of Tulsa Graduate School’s standards. how do I know clay abundance. If the course is taught by outside faculty. In addition. how is clay present in the reservoir. except NSIP 7163) NSIP 7011 Clastic Depositional Environments This course examines all aspects of deepwater depositional systems from their exploration. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. reservoir engineers and log analysts involved in carbonate exploration or development geology. How successful one’s prediction is depends. sea floor images. and development. appraisal. Petrophysical interpretation focuses on integrating lithofacies. on how well one understands carbonate depositional systems. the examination shall be approved by The University of Tulsa faculty with expertise in that particular area. and outcrop characteristics of the component elements of deepwater reservoirs. You will understand to ask such questions as is there a clay presence. to a large degree. geophysicists. depending on the physiographic setting and the level of detail used to resolve them. Not more than six hours of C grades in course work are acceptable in the master’s program. NSIP 7031 Carbonate Pore Types and Clay Mineralogy Carbonate pore type and system classification is presented in a practical and concise format. The course content and the courses in the NSIP program are discussed in the section below. emphasizing internal architecture as related to reservoir performance. NSIP 7021 Carbonate Depositional Environments This course is designed to address a number of recurring questions that face geologists. This course will help you know what types of clay are present. rock type and pore geometry for reservoir characterization. through discovery. Students are required to complete the NSIP program with a satisfactory grade of B or above. the student is required to maintain a 3. The overall curriculum is divided into the NSIP program and the University of Tulsa graduate course work. . well logs (including borehole image logs). Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. and are there potential completion problems. This course will provide the understanding the role of clay minerals in formation evaluation. core.

one data set. Techniques presented will emphasize integrating surface seismic data. seismic wave propagation. Techniques presented will emphasize outcrop and subsurface rock data. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. NSIP 7101 Applied Core Analysis and Relative Permeability Petroleum professionals need to understand the intrinsic reservoir properties that core and core analysis provides. and experience the “team” approach (one room. models. and elastic rock properties. rock mechanic principles. and reservoir performance data. and then do a regional evaluation. Course objectives are: Integration of multidisciplinary skills to optimize assets. log. NSIP 7081 Stochastic Methods for Reservoir Modeling This course demonstrates how deterministic and stochastic modeling methodologies are used to quantitatively integrate diverse data. illustrated with case studies. field appraisal. and workshops are used to illustrate key concepts. and reservoir management. Learning objectives are at a basic awareness and knowledge levels. outcrop. Participants learn how each step fits into the modeling workflow. Data examples. NSIP 7051 Fundamentals of Seismic Key concepts and principles that form the basis for value-added seismic applications in exploration. An evaluation procedure is a tool to aid in project planning and team integration to scope the problem. perme- NSIP 7041 Naturally Fractured Reservoirs This course covers the basic elements needed in the evaluation of fractured petroleum reservoirs from both an exploration and development point of view. and flow capacity along with the distribution of porosity. It addresses the practical requirements and workflows for modern 3D reservoir characterization. and extraction of geological and petrophysical information. A general sequence of study will be presented as well as the data types needed to complete the study. Participants should leave the course with knowledge of what controls short-term and long-term performance in fractured reservoirs and the types of data necessary to evaluate and manage them. The modular course design allows ready adaptation to shorter or longer versions and direct linkage to advanced treatment of specific topics. imaging. reservoir storage capacity. rock composition and structure and advances to the interactions among these topics. The problems of scaling and calibrating core. interactive discussion on current topics. Emphasis is on practical understanding of seismic acquisition processing. develop a method of asset evaluation. and technology to predict performance. The course exposes the participant to the latest developments in the field of seismic rock physics and develops an appreciation of the limitations of seismic data inversion from fundamental principles of rock physics. fluid PVT behavior. capture reservoir heterogeneity. A general sequence of study will be presented as well as the data types needed to complete the study. and one report). Evidence of hydrocarbon presence. and create more realistic reservoir models as input to flow simulators. geologic framework. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. .218 Interdisciplinary Programs NSIP 7071 Seismic Stratigraphy This course covers the basic elements needed to apply seismic sequence stratigraphy in the evaluation of reservoirs from both an exploration and development point of view. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. NSIP 7061 Seismic Rock Properties The course starts with the fundamentals of stress strain. and pitfalls as they affect the interpretation and integration of seismic data and information into E&P workflows. VSP and surface seismic data are treated in the course. petrophysical data. Throughout the course. A multidisciplinary approach to the study of these reservoirs will be stressed. Converging a study team to diagnose a reservoir or exploratory play has great potential when properly expedited. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. NSIP 7091 Reservoir Integration and Performance This course is a team exercise for convergence of data. Course emphasis is on the first order seismic sensitivities to rock and fluid parameters. lab and field observations are tied together emphasizing the role of rock physics in understanding seismic response. select and evaluate a key well. concepts. They also gain an appreciation for each discipline’s data and reservoir modeling requirements. practical issues. exercises. select and evaluate a key cross section. The presentation includes an informal. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. petrophysical data.

in turn. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. the layered model presented by Thomas-Steiber. porosity. NSIP 7131 Applied Risk Analysis and Reservoir Characterization Using Geostatistics Risk. reservoir. The underlying uncertainty and assumptions used in reservoir analysis tools are discussed. The course also includes a field-based workshop. which is an “integration field trip”. This course builds upon the standard Archie methodology and demonstrates how to handle heterogeneous systems that require methods to account for bound water. and in knowing how long production will continue. NSIP 7121 Integrated Reservoir Analysis and Field Workshop Understanding the subsurface integration process. The basic statistical principles are explained. permeability and reservoir thickness. Participants will explore the homogeneous model presented by Waxman-Smits. a subsurface integration process model is used as the basis for problem-solving processes. Students are exposed to complex fluid flow dynamics for which analytical alternatives are not available. where petrophysical. estimation using kriging and the use of conditional simulation procedures.e. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. and logs only methods of Haley and Juhasz. To properly evaluate a reservoir. Students will asses alternative reservoir development strategies in complex reservoirs to evaluate competitive forces and determine the best way to quantify effects of infill drilling. i. Discussion on why to use reservoir and simulation is covered. geological. manifest themselves as the colligitive properties which we can sense with wireline/ MWD logging tools. This segment of the course provides the basic information on pressure responses and well test analysis. This course covers the usefulness of core data in reservoir description. fluid saturation. . Relative permeability provides fractional flow and total flow data as a function of saturation determining the cost of hydrocarbon production. Various well tests from draw down to multi-rate build-up test are presented. NSIP 7141 Gas Reservoirs and Single Phase Reservoir Simulation The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of uses for reservoir simulation (modeling) and demonstrate the concepts using singlephase simulator GAS 3D and to gain experience in GAS 3D use. The venue is the Guadalupe Mountains. and production engineering aspects are developed through applied exercises. USA Worldclass outcrops and subsurface examples of clastic deep-water turbidites and shelf-margin carbonates form the basis for the exercises.Interdisciplinary Programs ability. fundamentals of routine 219 core analysis. wireline/drillstem formation testers and core analysis. The focus of this course is to understand the importance of flow regimes and interpreting the responses under different conditions to estimate reservoir parameters. followed by spatial analysis (variogram estimation and modeling). and geological descriptive information can be directly obtained from core material. This course covers the use of geostatistics in integrating various sources of data. Throughout the workshop. NSIP 7111 Non-Conventional Formation Evaluation and Applied FE using Well Test Analysis This course is a series of lectures intended to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of the physical processes that shape a particular rock’s properties which. This course examines the effect of relative permeability and wettability on reservoir performance. understanding of scales and data analysis are important activities within integrated teams. relative permeability and capillary pressure must be considered together.. The focus of this course is to understand the range and types of uncertainties that are associated with subsurface data and to explain the importance of these uncertainties. capillary pressure and relative permeability. seismic and production information. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. in sizing surface equipment. integrating geology and intrinsic petrophysical data. field examples and exercises used. Relative permeability and capillary pressure are interrelated because both depend on the relation of pore throats and pore bodies. determining pore geometry and petrophysical rock types. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. integrating wireline core. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students.

the student will work closely with the assigned University of Tulsa faculty member. PE 7013 Advanced Reservoir Engineering is a required course. the mechanics of reservoir simulation. NSIP 7151 Reservoir Simulation and History Matching Theory and practice of reservoir simulation. ECLIPSE 100 will be utilized during the tutorials but prior experience with ECLIPSE is not required. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students. Advanced topics. Geosciences. In addition. the participant is required to complete four additional courses at the University of Tulsa. Petroleum Engineering. upscaling. the student can choose any three of the following courses: PE 7033 Well Test Analysis I PE 7043 Reservoir Simulation I PE 7073 Geostatistics PE 7103 Advanced Formation Evaluation PE 7133 Inverse Problems Any graduate course in another department with approval from the Graduate Advisor. A student who emphasizes Petroleum Engineering is required to take four graduate level courses with emphasis in Reservoir Engineering. are also discussed. The courses chosen will depend on the emphasis of individual participant. and use appropriate software to develop a detailed reservoir description. . the student can select from the following courses: Geology 6463: Petroleum Geology Geology 7313: Clastic Sedimentology and Depositional Systems Geology 7333: Advanced Stratigraphic Analysis Geology 7353: Sandstone Petrography Geophysics 6403: Petroleum Seismology Geophysics 6433: Seismic Data Processing Geophysics 7153: Integrated Seismic Data Interpretation Geophysics 7173: Time Series Analysis and Inverse Theory Geophysics 7183: Special Processing of Seismic Data Any graduate course with approval from the Graduate Advisor. calibration of the reservoir model using observed performance data. the development of simulation programs. selection of the proper model for a simulation study. including pseudo-relative permeability and capillary pressure. The participant is expected to submit a comprehensive final report and give a formal presentation at the end of this study. and simulation techniques. A student who emphasizes Geosciences must complete four graduate level courses in Geosciences.220 Interdisciplinary Programs NSIP 7163 Integrated Field Project This course allows the students to utilize all the coursework and apply it to develop an integrated field description using the data supplied by the student. and interpretation of simulation results. Traditional Graduate Segment In addition to completing all the NSIP courses as discussed above. With the approval of the student’s faculty advisor. limitations and structural aspects of the models. understanding the role of simulation in reservoir management. Upon approval of the scope by TU faculty. forecasting of future performance under primary and secondary recovery schemes. data preparation and grid design. A maximum of two 6000-level courses are permitted. Enrollment is restricted to MSP students.

Interdisciplinary Programs 221 Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs Outstanding undergraduates in Applied Mathematics. Admission to an undergraduate degree program does not ensure admission to a graduate degree program at The University of Tulsa. they must be admitted to the Graduate School. are eligible to apply to the Graduate School. Chemistry. The process for applying to the Graduate School is identical to the application for any graduate degree program. Biochemistry. may also be applied to the graduate degree with the approval of the Graduate Program Advisor for the master’s program. Before students enroll in any graduate coursework. Chemical Engineering. Undergraduate students who apply to a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program and are admitted into the graduate portion of the program. these credit hours are in addition to the maximum of 9 credits taken at the 5000 level. Students who have completed more than 96 undergraduate credit hours may petition the Provost for an exception in order to apply. Not more than 6 graduate credits (6000 and 7000 level) taken as a Special Student will be applied to the Master’s degree. Undergraduate students who have completed at least 60 undergraduate credit hours but not more than 96 undergraduate credit hours. 2) any and all required standardized test scores. and Physics may be considered for admission to combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree programs. Double Counting Restrictions. Admission. The 5000-level course work taken for undergraduate credit by students who are admitted to the graduate portion of a combined bachelor’s/master’s program. Students applying to the combined bachelor’s/ master’s degree program must declare their intention prior to or during their junior year by making application to the Graduate School. Individual departments and programs may impose more restrictive requirements. Transfer students must have completed a minimum of two consecutive semesters as a fulltime student at TU with a minimum of 24 completed TU credit hours. including credits earned from advanced placement examination. Undergraduate students are admitted to the appropriate undergraduate college so that they can begin the undergraduate portion of the program.0 cumulative GPA in both their undergraduate and graduate work at The University of Tulsa and have met the additional requirements for admission to the graduate portion of their program as specified in their admission letter.4 at The University of Tulsa. A maximum of 9 credit hours of 5000-level work may be applied to the graduate degree program. Engineering Physics. Upon completion of the Bachelor’s degree. may also apply to the Graduate School for the Master’s degree portion of a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program. . Students who have completed at least 96 undergraduate credit hours and have an approved petition from the Provost. History. 3) three letters of recommendation and 4) transcripts for work done at universities or colleges other than The University of Tulsa. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of at least 3. Eligibility Requirements. These combined programs encourage students to complete graduate level work as undergraduates and typically permit a restricted number of 5000-level courses to be applied to both the undergraduate and graduate degree programs. These programs have been developed to allow exceptional students the opportunity to complete a Bachelor’s degree and a Master’s degree in a reduced amount of time. students will matriculate into the Master’s degree program if they have maintained at least a 3. The process of applying to the Graduate School for the Master’s degree portion of a combined bachelor’s-master’s degree program is identical to the application for any graduate degree program and will generally require the submission of 1) a Graduate School application. Undergraduates admitted into a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program may take 6000- and 7000-level courses for graduate credit. Students potentially interested in a combined bachelor’s/master’s degree program should notify their department as early as possible. will be admitted as a Special Student in the Graduate School until the completion of their Bachelor’s degree.

At the conclusion of the program. financial aid must be applied for from the college in which the student holds current enrollment./M. is offered in biology.).D. Students will be required to pay all fees of both programs.D.D. By eliminating overlapping subject area courses./Master of Science in Finance. a candidate for the joint degrees can reduce the total requirements by 15 to 19 credit hours./Master of Business Administration./ Master of Taxation).D./M.D. clinical psychology. which consists of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs from the College of Law and the designated graduate program advisor from the complementary discipline. and the program is administered by a Joint Degree Committee./M. Joint degrees offered in the areas of business administration (J.D. Each business joint-degree application is reviewed.D. and the Collins College of Business offers a J. Since the student may enroll in either college. and a J.A./Master of Taxation. industrial/organizational psychology. ./M.B. the candidate will be awarded both the juris doctor and the master’s degree. in cooperation with the Dean of the Graduate School.S. and English Language and Literature.D.A. and the program is administered by a Joint Degree Committee. in cooperation with the Dean of the Graduate School.222 Joint-Degree Programs Joint-Degree Programs Juris Doctor/Master of Arts Juris Doctor/Master of Science Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration Juris Doctor/Master of Taxation Juris Doctor/Master of Science in Finance Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Finance Master of Science in Finance/Master of Science in Applied Mathematics Juris Doctor and Master’s Degrees These programs are designed to offer full-time students an interdisciplinary degree which encompasses training in law plus expertise in a complementary field of study. a candidate for the joint degrees can reduce the total requirements by at least 15 credit hours./Master of Science in Finance) are designed to provide legal education so that the business students’ skills can be exercised with full knowledge of the legal environment in our society. and using the electives of each program for work in the other.S. a J. By eliminating overlapping subject area courses and using electives of each program for work in the other. is offered in anthropology. and J. a J. which consists of the Director of Graduate Business Programs in the Collins College of Business and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the College of Law. Candidates for a joint degree must meet the academic standards of both the College of Law and the Graduate School. Class rank for the College of Law shall be computed for law courses only. and geosciences. taxation (J. Tuition will be paid for each course at the rate currently in effect for the respective colleges. Law students are provided further training in business so that their legal knowledge can be more effectively applied in current business situations. A joint-degree student will be eligible to participate in all extracurricular activities of both colleges. The J.D.A./M. Each J. and finance (J. history. application is reviewed. computer science.D.

Normally. Due to the residency requirements of the College of Law. students will be admitted on a full-time basis only. Students in the joint-degree program are permitted to terminate plans for a joint degree. Students should meet with their graduate program advisor during each subsequent semester. as determined by the Dean of the College of Law or the Dean of the Graduate School. even if not enrolled in any graduate course work that semester. Admission to the joint-degree programs requires two separate applications: a) a formal application to the College of Law b) formal application to the Graduate School (please attach a formal letter requesting admisa sion to the joint-degree program and responding to the question “Why do you desire to pursue this joint degree?”) Only after the respective colleges have acted affirmatively on the separate applications will action be taken to admit the student to the joint-degree program. . it is recommended that the first year of the program be taken in the College of Law. The remaining semesters are spent pursuing both degrees within the limitations of residency of the College of Law which requires that. the student must be enrolled in ten hours of law courses for both semesters. All business programs are accredited by AACSB International - The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Residence Requirements. if any. Admission to the joint-degree program is under exclusive control of the respective Joint Degree Committee. The program is not open to students who have previously completed one of the degrees. The student may take the first year in the complementary discipline with the understanding that any courses taken from the College of Law will be acceptable for the law degree only with prior approval of the College of Law faculty. American Association of Legal Services. The student is expected to enroll full time. The joint-degree programs are accredited by the American Bar Association. and the proper accrediting agencies of the complementary disciplines.Joint-Degree Programs 223 Students are expected to participate in a joint meeting with both the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs from the College of Law and their graduate program advisor early in the first semester of study in a joint-degree program. which may include credit for some work done in the other college. Students will be obliged to satisfy the normal requirements of the college selected. Admission. in the final year. The joint-degree program may be completed in three years and two summers and must be completed within six calendar years. and to opt for either one or the other of the degrees.

and 24 hours of prerequisite undergraduate history courses.A. in Clinical Psychology Joint Degree Committee in selecting elective courses and must agree to take all courses recommended by the Committee.A. as approved by the graduate English advisor and the Graduate English Program Committee./M. including all required subjects as established by the College of Law.224 Joint-Degree Programs J.D. This program eliminates 16 to 19 hours of course work which would be required if the law and history programs were taken separately. A maximum of 9 credit hours of 6000-level course work may be applied to the anthropology portion of the joint-degree. in Anthropology The curriculum consists of 78 credit hours of law courses. The student must consult with the J. in Clinical Psychology The curriculum consists of 78 credit hours of law courses. 24 hours (thesis option) or 27 hours (non-thesis) of graduate courses in history. 24 hours (thesis option) or 27 hours (non-thesis) in the graduate anthropology program.D. J./M.D./M./M./M. in Anthropology Joint Degree Committee in selecting elective courses and must agree to take all courses recommended by the committee. This program eliminates 16 to 19 hours of course work which would be required if the programs in law and anthropology were taken separately. and 18 to 24 hours of prerequisite undergraduate anthropology courses. including all required subjects as established by the College of Law.A. The student must consult with the J./Master of Arts Degrees J.D. The student must consult with the J. This program eliminates 16 hours of course work which would be required if the programs in law and clinical psychology were taken separately.D.A. including all required subjects as established by the College of Law and 39 credit hours of specific program requirements in the Graduate Clinical Psychology program as established by the Clinical Psychology Department.D. in History The curriculum consists of 78 credit hours of law courses as established by the College of Law. J.A.A.D. This program eliminates 19 hours of course work which would be required if the programs in law and English were taken separately.D./M.A. A maximum of 9 credit hours of 6000-level course work may be applied to the history portion of the joint-degree. English Joint Degree Committee in selecting elective courses and must agree to take all courses recommended by the committee. and 18 to 24 hours of prerequisite undergraduate English courses stipulated by the Graduate English Program Committee./M. 27 credit hours in the graduate English program. . J. in English Language and Literature The curriculum consists of 78 credit hours of law courses.

Option 2 consists of 33 credit hours of psychology and 78 credit hours of law.D. This program eliminates 19 hours of course work which would be required if the programs in law and industrial/organizational psychology were taken separately.D. Both options include all required subjects as established by the College of Law for the Juris Doctorate degree and all required subjects in Industrial and Organizational Psychology as established by the Department of Psychology.A. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology There are two curriculum plans./M. .Joint-Degree Programs 225 J.A. students are assigned academic advisors in each program and are expected to consult with those advisors prior to selecting elective courses./M. Option 1 consists of 30 credit hours of psychology and 81 credit hours of law. These advisors are members of the Joint Degree Committee in cooperation with the Dean of the Graduate School. J.

D. This program eliminates up to 19 credit hours of course work that would be required if the programs in law and computer science were taken separately.D. and 78 credit hours of law courses. The student must consult with the J.D.226 Joint-Degree Programs J./Master of Science Degrees J. . in Geosciences As litigation involving technical issues becomes more common. 27 credit hours in computer science as established by the graduate computer science faculty.S. in Computer Science The curriculum includes 78 credit hours of law courses including all required courses as established by the College of Law.S. which would be required. in Biology The curriculum consists of 78 credit hours of law courses. in Biological Science Joint Degree Committee in selecting electives and must agree to take all courses recommended by the committee. including all required subjects as established by the College of Law./M. including all required subjects as established by the College of Law.S. water and environmental concerns. knowledge of the geosciences provides an important advantage in cases that involve energy. A maximum of 9 credit hours of 6000-level course work may be applied to the geosciences portion of the joint degree. This program eliminates 19 hours of course work.D. The student must consult with the J. The curriculum consists of 27 credit hours (including a three-hour technical report) in the graduate geosciences program as approved by the chairman of the geosciences department.S./M. A maximum of 9 credit hours of 6000-level course work may be applied to the biology portion of the joint-degree. This program eliminates 16 hours of course work which would be required if the programs in law and biological science were taken separately.D. if the programs in Law and Geosciences were taken separately. in Geosciences Joint Degree Committee in selecting electives and must agree to take all courses recommended by the Committee. 24 credit hours in the biological science program as approved by the graduate advisor./M. A candidate for the joint Law/Geosciences degree is able to complete the requirements for both degrees with 105 credit hours./M.D.S./M. J./M. Students must consult with the J. mining.D.S. J. and prerequisite undergraduate computer science courses required by the computer science faculty. in Computer Science joint-degree committee in selecting elective courses and must take all courses recommended by the committee. prerequisite undergraduate courses as required by the faculty of the graduate program in geosciences. and prerequisite undergraduate courses as required by the faculty of the graduate program in biological science.

Students must satisfy 16 credit hours of Foundation MBA courses before being fully admitted to the second year of the MBA program. Federal Income Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders II. ACCT 7143. Tax Research. including all courses required by the College of Law. The Foundation and Advanced courses of the MBA program are listed on pages 118-120 of this Bulletin. Specializations are available in Corporate Finance. .D./MBA Program The curriculum consists of 78 credit hours of law courses. and Gifts (replaces ACCT 7133). The two courses are LAW 5453./Master of Taxation The curriculum consists of 79 credit hours of law courses. Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders (replaces ACCT 7063) and LAW 5503. and Risk Management. J. including all courses required by the College of Law. The three courses are: ACCT 7233. and 24 credit hours of graduate level taxation courses in the Collins College of Business. and 24 hours of MSF courses.D. The student must consult with his/her academic advisor in each discipline when selecting elective courses and must take all courses specified by the respective advisors. Nine credit hours from the Master of Taxation program count toward the juris doctor degree. J. Students must consult with the Joint Degree Committee in selecting courses and must take all courses specified by the Committee. Investments and Portfolio Management. and ACCT 7163. and Planning. Trusts. Students must consult with the Joint Degree Committee in selecting courses and must take all courses specified by the Committee.D. and 25 credit hours at the graduate level in the Collins College of Business.Joint-Degree Programs 227 J. Six credit hours from the College of Law may be counted toward the Master of Taxation.D./Master of Science in Finance The curriculum consists of 79 credit hours of law courses. Taxation of Estates. including all courses required by the College of Law. and Business Related Master’s Degrees J. Taxation of Partnerships and S-Corporations. Practice.

Investments and Portfolio Management. Students must meet admission criteria of both programs. MSF specializations are available in Corporate Finance. . and must take all courses specified by the Committee. must consult with the Joint Degree Committee in selecting courses. Investments and Portfolio Management. MSF specializations are available in Corporate Finance. including 24 hours of MSF courses and 18 hours of graduate level math courses. Students must meet admission criteria of both programs. or Risk Management. and must take all courses specified by the Committee. Master of Science in Finance/Master of Science in Applied Mathematics The curriculum consists of 54 credit hours. including 19 hours of MBA courses and 24 hours of MSF courses. must consult with the Joint Degree Committee in selecting courses. or Risk Management.228 Joint-Degree Programs Joint Master’s Degree Programs Master of Business Administration/Master of Science in Finance The curriculum consists of 55 credit hours.

Curriculum. Economic Concepts QM 0713. Admission. Admission criteria include. • Graduate Management Admission Test or Graduate Record Examination score. Contact the Graduate Business Programs office for updated information. The condition for such a waiver is based on completion of equivalent courses within the last six years. • rofessional/business experience as evidenced by such factors as a record of employment at P increasing levels of responsibility. Students with prior course work or equivalent learning may be eligible for waivers from one or more of the Foundation courses. and • Professional references Program admission requirements and offerings are subject to change. This program is designed for students who desire an opportunity for a concentrated study in a specialized area of finance but do not wish to pursue a graduate degree in finance or business. Course descriptions for the courses listed below are available in the College of Business Administration section of this Bulletin. investments and portfolio management. but are not limited to: • ndergraduate grade point average (both overall coursework and upper division courseU work are considered). A maximum of three prior graduate credit hours may be applied toward the GCF. Finance Concepts Math 2014. for a professional career in a range of specialized areas: corporate finance. with a grade of ‘A’ or ‘B’. Calculus II . Admission is limited to applicants who show high promise of success in business study. Foundation Courses The number of credits hours allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number.Certificate Programs 229 Certificate Programs The University of Tulsa Graduate School offers a number of certificate programs to supplement its degree offerings. All candidates for the GCF must have completed or complete the Foundation courses and 15 credit hours of advanced study. The last 12 credit hours must be taken at the University of Tulsa. Accounting Concepts Econ 0713. Calculus I Math 2024. Acct 0712. An initial waiver evaluation is completed at the time of application based on all available transcripts. The programs are open to students with baccalaureate degrees in any field of study. Waivers. Graduate Certificates in Finance The Graduate Certificate in Finance (GCF) program prepares students who have an undergraduate degree. and risk management. Statistics Fin 0722.

International Financial Management Fin 7133.230 Certificate Programs Certificate in Corporate Finance Required Courses (12 credit hours) Fin 7003. Portfolio Management Fin 7073. Long-Term Financial Decisions Fin 7033. Student Investment Fund Fin 7073. Fixed Income Analysis QM 7003. Advanced Topics in Risk Management Fin 7153. Analysis of Financial Statements Acct 7003. Risk Management Fin 7053. Management Control Systems Econ 7043. Monetary and Fiscal Policy Fin 7023. Trading and Risk Management Fin 7223. Empirical Methods in Finance Fin 7093. International Financial Management Fin 7133. Investment Analysis and Management Fin 7053. Enterprise risk Management Elective Courses (3 credit hours) Acct 6153. Investment Analysis and Management Fin 7033. Financial Administration Fin 7023. Introduction to Operations Research Certificate in Investments and Portfolio Management Required Courses (12 credit hours) Fin 7003. Analysis of Financial Statements Fin 6113. Advanced Topics in Risk Management Fin 7153. Fixed Income Analysis QM 7003. Risk Management Fin 7123. Empirical Methods in Finance Fin 7093. Introduction to Operations Research . Portfolio Management Elective Courses (3 credit hours) Acct 6153. Trading and Risk Management Fin 7223. Financial Administration Fin 7013. Managerial Accounting Acct 7073.

Long-Term Financial Decisions Fin 7023. Trading and Risk Management Elective Courses (3 credit hours) Fin 7013. Risk Management Fin 7133. Advanced Topics in Risk Management Fin 7153. Working Capital Management Fin 7053. International Financial Management Fin 7163. Financial Administration Fin 7033. Fixed Income Analysis Math 7503. Portfolio Management Fin 7073. Computer Simulation . Pricing and Managing Derivatives Fin 7223.Certificate Programs 231 Certificate in Risk Management Required Courses (12 credit hours) Fin 7003. Empirical Methods in Finance Fin 7093. Stochastic Modeling and Simulation QM 7003. Investment Analysis and Management Fin 7043. Introduction to Operations Research QM 7053.

(An option for working non-traditional students is to demonstrate proficiency in systems areas by passing comprehensive examinations in those areas. the following: • Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science or related area.232 Certificate Programs Certificates in Information Security The Center for Information Security at the University of Tulsa offers certificate programs in Information Security at all federal training levels. Admission. CS 4333/6333 (Computer Networking). or government experience in information technology and/ S or computer security. CS 7053 (Operating Systems Theory). The program certifies that students satisfying program requirements are trained to the federal NSTISSI 4011. 4011 Certificate Curriculum CS 4153/6153. Admission criteria include. or • eclared major in Computer Science or related area and proficiency in C. Secure Electronic Commerce Systems Course 1 (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Systems Course 2 (or demonstrated proficiency - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Total: 18 credit hours . The core of the program includes CS 4153/6153 (Computer Security) and CS 5403/7403 (Secure Electronic Commerce). graduate students and nontraditional students. and/or • ignificant industrial. CS 4163/6163 (Database Systems). students take two Systems courses - CS 3053 (Operating Systems). 4012. Students participating in the program must register as such for each Systems course to receive specialized INFOSEC training/assignments in these courses. Each of these courses is conjointly listed at the graduate level. C++ or Java D programming languages.) The number of credits hours allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. 4014. CS 7513 (Advanced Topics in Database Systems) and CS 7613 (Networking) - and two Information Assurance (IA) electives. military. 4013. and 4015 standards. 4011: Information Security Professional This 18 hour certificate program is available to undergraduates. Computer Security CS 5403/7403. but are not limited to. Beyond the core.

Enterprise Security Management Systems Course 1 (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Systems Course 2 (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Total: 21 credit hours 4013: Administration in Information Systems Security The 4013 certificate program. databases and networks must be demonstrated. proficiency in operating systems. aimed at certifying Information Systems Security Officers. Secure Electronic Commerce CS 5493/7493. Secure System Administration and Certification Operating Systems Course (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Database Systems Course (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Network Systems Course (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Total: 24 credit hours 4014: Information Systems Security Officer The 4014 certificate program. This course provides the additional body of knowledge required to accredit. CS 5463/7463. extend and operate as administrators of information systems in a secure mode. 4012 Certificate Curriculum CS 4153/6153. on secure system administration and certification. CS 5463/7463. extends the 4011 program with an additional course. extend and operate enterprise information systems in a secure mode. 4013 Certificate Curriculum CS 4153/6153. extends the 4011 program with an additional course. Computer Security CS 5403/7403. CS 5493/7493. extends the 4011 program with an additional course. Secure Electronic Commerce CS 5463/7463. Moreover. extend and operate enterprise information systems in a secure mode. 4014 Certificate Curriculum CS 4153/6153. on enterprise security management. aimed at Administration in Information Systems Security. aimed at Designated Approving Authorities (DAAs). Computer Security CS 5403/7403.Certificate Programs 233 4012: Designated Approving Authority The 4012 certificate program. This course provides the additional body of knowledge required by DAAs to accredit. Secure Electronic Commerce CS 5463/7463. Computer Security CS 5403/7403. on enterprise security management. This course provides the additional body of knowledge required to accredit. Enterprise Security Management Operating Systems Course (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Database Systems Course (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Network Systems Course (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Total: 24 credit hours .

Computer Networks CS 7053. Networking IA Core Courses: CS 4153/6153. Secure System Administration and Certification Operating Systems Course (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Database Systems Course (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Network Systems Course (or demonstrated proficiency) - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Information Assurance Elective - 3 credit hours Total: 27 credit hours Certificate Program Course Offerings The number of credits hours allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. Enterprise Security Management CS 5493/7493. Information System Security Engineering CS 5193/7193.234 Certificate Programs 4015: Systems Certifiers The 4015 certificate program. Information System Assurance CS 5473/7473. Advanced Computer Security . Operating Systems CS 4163/6523. databases and networks must be demonstrated. 4015 Certificate Curriculum CS 4153/6153. Secure Electronic Commerce CS 5463/7463. Risk Management for Information Systems CS 5443/7443. Systems Courses: CS 3053. Computer and Network Forensics CS 7453. extend and operate as systems certifiers in a secure mode. Operating Systems Theory CS 7513. CS 5463/7463. These courses provide the additional body of knowledge required to accredit. Database Systems CS 4333/6333. on enterprise security management and CS 5493/7493. Enterprise Security Management CS 5493/7493. Computer Security CS 5403/7403. proficiency in operating systems. Secure System Administration and Certification IA Electives: CS 5183/7183. Network Security CS 5483/7483. Moreover. Advanced Topics in Database Systems CS 7613. Secure Electronic Commerce CS 5463/7463. extends the 4011 program with additional courses. aimed at certifying systems certifiers. on secure system administration and certification. Computer Security CS 5403/7403.

and/or applied research as well as successful completion of a comprehensive exam in I/O psychology. Personnel Selection Industrial Psychology Electives (15 credit hours) I/O electives include approved business electives.0 or better (on a 4-point scale). . • nd satisfactory test scores on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record a Examination. fieldwork experience. a Certificate of Re-specialization in Industrial/Organizational Psychology is awarded. • satisfactory letters of recommendation. A total of 24 credit hours are required for successful completion of the program.e. and oral components. covering all major areas of I/O psychology. quantitative. Job Analysis Psy 8103. Students must also successfully complete a comprehensive exam consisting of written.Certificate Programs 235 Certificate of Re-specialization in I/O Psychology The Psychology department offers a respecialization in industrial and organizational psychology. fieldwork credits. have completed a doctoral dissertation) the opportunity to acquire training in industrial and organizational psychology. The number of credits hours allotted a course is indicated by the last digit of the course number. Admission. or other graduate level psychology courses. Upon completion of all requirements of the program. level psychologists who have previously demonstrated an ability to perform doctoral level work (i. Industrial Psychology Core (9 credit hours) Psy 8003. These courses are designated by the I/O program director. I/O seminars. Certificate Curriculum The certificate in I/O psychology requires nine credit hours of core courses and 15 hours of electives. Introduction to I/O Psychology Psy 8093. This program is designed to be completed in one to two years and involves completion of 24 credit hours of course work.. This program affords Ph.D. • an undergraduate grade point average of 3. Minimum requirements for admission include: • a graduate degree in psychology from an accredited institution.

. Kansas State University. Ph. Ph.A. Seattle Pacific University. Garrick A. B.A.F. Susan M. Swarthmore College.S..S... Sharon. Winona State University. B. Applied Associate Professor of Deaf Education.D. Boston University Ali. Professor of Anthropology. University of Nebraska Benediktson.. Kaveh. Gary D.Sc.S. Oklahoma State University Bailey.A. D. Ph.. M. Assistant Professor of History.A... Applied Associate Professor of Theatre.... M. M. Paul W..D. Ph... Indiana University-Bloomington Arnold. Assistant Professor of Biological Science.. B. A.. M.A. B..D.S.A. Jane E.A.A.N. Jennifer L.. Indian Institute of Technology. M.S.B. B. Ph.. Steven... expected 2008. B.D. University of Oklahoma. Associate Professor of Education.D. Mills College.. University of Oregon Bajaj. B.Ed. M. Michael R. M. M... Southern Illinois University.A. Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing.D. University of Michigan Ashenayi.A.. University of the South. Assistant Professor of Law. Harvard Law School Basso. Associate Professor of English.. Instructor in Mathematics.A. Charles W. University of Michigan Arnold. University of Oklahoma Adams. Professor of Law...A.A. University of Oklahoma Airey.D.. University of Kentucky. B.D. University of Washington.. M.M. Ed. Diane E.. University of Agriculture. Ed. Austin State University.. Thomas. Brandeis University.... Katherine. J. M.S. J. University of Tulsa . J. Ph.. M. Dean of the College of Engineering and Natural Sciences.S.. Ph. Harvard University Bellet.A... University of Arizona Baker. University of Wisconsin Ahrens. B. M.A.. Ohio University.A... University of California-Berkeley Adams. McFarlin Professor of Psychology. M.. Seattle. Professor of Electrical Engineering.D. M. B. M.Sc.B.. Texas Tech University Basas. University of Illinois. Associate Professor of Religion. Valparaiso University..236 Resident Faculty Resident Faculty Ackerman. Ph...D.. J..N. Stephen F. B. Columbia University Anderson. M.A. Ph. M.... Jonathan J..F.A. Tech.. M. B.A. Oklahoma College of Liberal Arts.. Professor of Psychology..S. Associate Professor of Geosciences.. B.. Judy Orth.D. Ph.Ed.D. University of Kentucky Adams. Vassar College. Langston University Urban Center Tulsa. Assistant Professor of English.. B. University of California-Santa Barbara.. B. Professor of Law. Cornell University.A. University of Cincinnati Baures. Marie H.A. D. LL. Chapman Associate Professor of Management Information Systems. Ph. Assistant Professor of Theatre.A. Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature. Professor of Law. Akhtar.A. University of Oklahoma. University of Memphis Bellovich.. M.. University of Tulsa. B. Associate Professor of Psychology. M. Ph. Akhilesh.... A. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry. M...D..A. Amy N. University of California-Berkeley. M. University of Texas-Austin Berry. Thomas. Bombay. B. University of Oklahoma Barrett..B. Associate Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature. India..A. Northern Illinois University. B. University of MissouriColumbia. B. B. Carrie Griffin. D. Dean of the Henry Kendall College of Arts and Sciences..A. University of Maine..D.. B.A. Ashley.A. Christopher. Ph.A. University of Minnesota Beals. M.S. University of Adelaide Allison... B.D..A..D. D.

. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs.D.A. University of Pittsburgh.D. Richard C.Resident Faculty Bey. J.A. Professor of Finance. Jean. Applied Assistant Professor of Cello. University of Chicago Brown. M..D.S.. George Washington University Buckley.. University of Tulsa Bradley. Columbia University Blair. M. Ohio State University Blais...M. Michigan State University .A. University of Oklahoma Blocker.A. Associate Professor of History.W..... Columbia University. M. M.. Calvin College.S..D.... State University of New YorkBinghamton. Mark. Arkansas State University. Ronald. Ph.. B. B.. expected 2008.A.S..S. Ph. Mark A.S. Joseph C.D. M.A.M. Valparaiso University.A. Harvard University Bradley. J.. Ph. Ph.A. University of Arkansas Brennan. University of Wisconsin. Assistant Professor of Marketing. Manhattan School of Music Buchheim. Ph. Austin College. University of Kentucky. Jay P.A... Iowa State University. Ph. LL. J.A. M. Indiana University. Pennsylvania State University Blair.D. B.A... Ph. B.. M. Barbara K... University of Tulsa Boyd. Professor of Law..A. D.S.S. New School for Social Research.. Professor of Mathematical Sciences. Ed. Assistant Professor of Physics.. J.. M. University of Central Florida.D. Pace University. John F. D.. B.D. Marianne. B. M. University of Missouri-Kansas City 237 Brummel.. Associate Professor of Law. University of Texas-El Paso.S.. Muskingum College. B. Ph. University of Kentucky Butkin. University of Manchester Brewin.. University of South Florida.. East Carolina University.. Bradley Oxley Professor of Business Administration. M.A.D. David S.S... Professor of Legal Writing.S.. M..A. T. Harvard University Cairns.S.. M.A... B.. Applied Associate Professor of Communication Disorders. Ph. B.D. B. Ph. B. Associate Professor of Athletic Training.M. Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences.A.. Oklahoma State University Carter.A. Ph. B..A... Paula M. Ph. Scott.D.D. J. University of King’s College.B. B..A. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Bucholtz.. Ph.A.S..D. B. East Stroudsburg University.A. J... Ph... Boston College. Professor of Physics. Harvard University. J..D...D. B.D. B. M.. Ohio State University... Cleveland State University..S. B.A. B. Roger P.. Walker Chair of American History. Northwestern University. Professor of History.. New York City Caruso.B. Professor of Law. Robert A. B.S. Associate Professor of Biological Science. DePauw University.S.S.A.B.. J. Susan C.B.M. Charles R. Professor of Law... Associate Professor of Communication. University of Pennsylvania Cadogan. Jr. Bradley J... Associate Professor of Education. Temple University. Diane M... B. Thomas H.A.. University of Tulsa.D. Ph. LL.. Dylan.. M. M.. Rutgers University. Michigan State University.D. B. Applied Associate Professor of Business Law.. Wartburg College. Thomas W. Thomas M.. B. M..B. University of Connecticut.. Assistant Professor of Psychology. University of Michigan Burgess.B.D. Professor of Biological Science. D. Christen R. Professor of Finance.. Assistant Professor of Economics. Professor of History. University of Miami Chabowski.A.. University of Minnesota. Associate Professor of Sociology. Wray E. Monmouth College..D.. B.. Indiana University Buoye. B. Roger N. M. M. M. M.A... Ph.....A. Kent State University. University of Illinois Bucchianeri.A. Ph. Princeton University Brown. B. Yale University. M..D. M.D.D.. University of TexasArlington Boudreau. Brian R. B... M.. Associate Professor of Accounting. Daniel J... Oklahoma State University.A.S.D.S. North Carolina State University Bonett. J.. B.A.

. B.D. B.S.S.A. M. Purdue University Crowder...A.Sc.A..N. Southwest Texas State University. Oklahoma State University Cornell.. Rutgers University Crunkleton. Ph.. Bogazici University. University de Valladolid.. Texas Tech University Collier. Selen.D. National Taiwan Normal University.A.D.. Ph. D.. B.A. Ph... University of Oklahoma Cremaschi. M. Associate Professor of Law.A. Susan E. D. Harvard College.A. Karen S.238 Resident Faculty Conway. Spain Chapman.D. Markham. Marta M. M. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. C. Institute for Theoretical Physics. Romanian Academy of Sciences. J. University of Kansas Cook.. B. J.. Ph..D.A. Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems. B. B. Arleen M..S. David B.A. expected 2008. Catherine.A. Professor of Theatre. Daniel W.. M..Mus.. Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences. M. J. B. Professor of Operations Management.S.. B.. M. Stanford University Coward. Dickinson College... Post College. Wright State University Chamorro.. M.S.. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering...D. Long Island University.. B. Chapman Professor of Accounting. J. University of Texas. University of Tulsa.D. Spain. Christian. John M. Oliphant Endowed Chair in Mathematical Sciences.. Texas Christian University. B. Kharkiv State University. B... University of Tulsa. B.D.A.. J.. Ph. Toronto Chiang.. M.. M.A. B. University of Strathclyde. J. B. York University. Ph... Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering Christopher. Cornell University Collins. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering.D. M.. A. Professor of Finance.D. University of Houston. Peyton J. Charles W.. University of Florida Crutcher. B..D. D. M.Mus.. Professor of Legal Writing..B.D. M.. Marguerite A. M.S.A. Southern Methodist University Chudinovych.A.A.... Kim. East Texas State University.A. Oral Roberts University. B.A. B.. Glen E. University of Oklahoma.. Scotland .A. University of Michigan Coberly.Sc.A. Université des Sciences Humaines de Strasbourg Cook..D.A.B.S. Georgetown University.. William A.. M. University of Texas-Austin Cravens. Oklahoma State University. Associate Professor of Sociology..S... Texas A&M University Crawford. Wen-Chyuan. East Tennessee State University. Sc. University of Oklahoma Constanda..A. University of Tulsa Daily.. Professor of Law. Ph.S.... Ph.D..B... B. Professor of Mathematical Sciences.D.D. University of Arkansas. Ph.D. Ph.. Instructor in Geosciences. Ph. Ph. Assistant Clinical Professor of Law. Hamilton College.. University of TexasAustin Childs. M. Professor of Biological Science.B. Professor of Mathematical Sciences.W. Winton.Sc... University of Tennessee. B. Assistant Professor of Choral Activities and Voice. Jeffrey R.. Applied Instructor in Spanish. Patience A. B. M.S.S. D.. Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences. Ph.. Russell... Ph.. Ph. Josh.S.S. Vanderbilt University.S.A.. Ph.. University of IASI... Jeremy. University of Rhode Island Corngold.D. M.A.D. LL. Associate Professor of Communication. M.B.M. University of Oklahoma Cullem. Applied Instructor in French.S. Igor. University of Houston and Madrid Business School. M. B. George Washington University Chase.. Véronique M.. Texas A&M University. State University of New York-Brockport.. Ph. B.. Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing.D. M.. Assistant Professor of Education.

.D. Vassar College. University of Georgia.. B.. New England School of Law Dugger.S.M. Ph. B.S. Professor of Mathematical and Computer Sciences.. Louisiana Technological University.. A. Oklahoma City University. A. Lars D.. Ph. M. Columbia University Deaver.Resident Faculty Davis.. Vanderbilt Divinity School.... Ph. B.. Elena..F. Laura P. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering..B.S. Ed.. Oklahoma State University Foley. Tulane University Faingold.A..D...D. University of Texas Durham. Ph.. Ph.A. Eduardo D.A. Associate Professor of Psychology. Pennsylvania State University Doshlygina. Oklahoma State University.S. David L..M.D. Simmons College. Professor of Electrical Engineering. M. Harvard University Doolittle. Associate Professor of English. Zagazig University......E.. Associate Professor of Art History.. University of Arkansas Dixon... Assistant Professor of Art. Dale R. Professor of Mathematical Sciences. Joanne L..D. Oklahoma State University Ducey.B.D.A. Ph. B. B.. Associate Professor of Chemistry. Pauline Walter Chair in English and Comparative Literature...A. Oklahoma State University de Almeida.S..S.. Sonoma State University. B. State University of New York. Jan L. J. University of Nebraska.A. Associate Professor of SpeechLanguage Pathology.S.D. Cambridge University. M.D. William M... University of Central Florida.S.. Mohamed K. University of Florida Ford. Associate Professor of Finance. B.A.B.. M... Universidad de Los Andes.D. Harvard University. University of Tulsa. Applied Instructor in Piano.. M. Ph.D. J.. Glenn H. B. M.A.. Sverdlovsk Pedagogical Institute. John Charles.. University of Tulsa Engle.F..S. Instructor of Mathematical Sciences.D.D. M.D.. Yale University Enke... A. Ph.D. Ph..A. Michigan State University 239 Drever.D.A. Rice University DiCesare.A. Associate Professor of Spanish..S. M.D.A.. Professor of Law. D... Robert.A..D.S. Assistant Professor of Biological Science.S. Ph.. Stuart. University of Kansas Díaz. University of Tulsa. Assistant Professor of Religion. University of Missouri-Rolla Entzeroth.. Robert H. Associate Professor of Communication. M..D. Associate Professor of Sociology.S. Albany.D. M. B.. Janica.T.. University of Wisconsin. expected 2008. Georgia State University.M. Ph. Hermione. Marcus O. B. M.B..A.. Associate Professor of Athletic Training. University of Chicago Divinity School Drummond. Oklahoma City University.S. University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign Forsyth. Ph..S..A. M.S. B.. A. M..F.. University of Arkansas Davis. Professor of English.A. Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Matthew.S.A.S. Ph. M. University of Arkansas. Associate Professor of Law. Richard E. Licenciado en Matematicas. M. Southeast Missouri.. Lori A.D. B. C. Ph. Oklahoma State University Edmonds... Ed.... B. Georgia Institute of Technology Dill.S... M. M.....D. B. Ph. Tel Aviv University Fakhr.A. Ph.. Cornell University Donaldson. Machele Miller. Ph.M. Ph. New Mexico State University .. Trustees Professor of Political Science. Professor of Economics. M. Western Connecticut State University. Whitney Wallace.S. Susan M.D. M.. M.. Laura.D. Associate Professor of Art. B. B. Oklahoma State University. Lyn S.S. Applied Assistant Professor of Musical Theater..A. B. A. J. B. Temple University. Applied Assistant Professor of Russian. B. Moscow State Pedagogical University Doty. B. M. M..S.A.F. B. Cranbrook Academy of Art Davis.. Ph. M..

B. Ohio University. Princeton University. M.. Stephen. M. Oklahoma Baptist University. Northeastern State College.S..A. Princeton University. M. Professor of English. D. Ph.. Dean of the Graduate School. M... Applied Associate Professor of Vocal Music Education. Associate Professor of Philosophy.D.. Ph..A. Associate Professor of Art.. St. B.. Applied Associate Professor of Operations Management.. Syracuse University. University of Tulsa Hittinger III.. Vanderbilt University. Zita J. M. Ph..D. Ph.S. University of Tulsa Goldman-Moore. Hartford.S.. Peggy M.. Ph.A.. Ph.A. B.... Western State College of Colorado.E. University of Southern Mississippi Gaston. Allan R. B.A. Associate Professor of Psychology. Mississippi State University.A.D.. A. B. Applied Associate Professor of Music. Knox College.D. M. B.S. B. University of Utah Harkness.. University of Tulsa. University of Oklahoma Hipsher. Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing.. M. Ph.. Ph.. Professor of Mechanical Engineering.. Warren L.S.N...M. B.D. A.S. Kansas State University Gebhart. M. Associate Vice President for Research. Pennsylvania State University. B. Moorhead State University Gilpin. Westminster College. M.A.B. B. B...D.. B. Patrick A. M. University of Oklahoma. University of North Texas Haggerty.D.... M..S.S.. John M.A.S. Michael J. Friends University..N..D.A. Louisiana State University Hansen. Professor of Computer Science.M. Associate Professor of Biological Science.. Susan K.... University of Hawaii . University of Arizona. University of North Texas Henry. Tania.D..D. Donald O..D.A. Assistant Professor of Philosophy.A... Jay H. University of Virginia Holland. M. B..D. B. George H. B.S. Jr.B.A.. M.. University of Rochester. B... Ph. University of Delaware Hill. M.. Professor of Nursing..A. M.D. Clinical Associate Professor of Athletic Training. B.Ed. B.. Visiting Laboratory Curator and Instructor of Physics. Syracuse University Grass. Ph.D... Janet A. Professor of Geosciences..A. Ewha Woman’s University....Ph.. J... University of California-San Francisco.. University of Tulsa. Ph.D.A...S.. Francis Russell. Parameswar. Professor of Computer Sciences. M. Tommy L.N.D.A. Associate Professor of Political Science.. John Chandler. Ohio University.. University of FloridaGainesville.S.A.A. B. Greg A..S... Louis University Hockett. M.B.N. Washington University Gardner. Professor of Education..A. Oklahoma State University Han. Rosanne F. B. Carroll College. Warren Chair in Catholic Studies..A.. Ph. Assistant Professor of Physics.S.. Professor of Law.. University of Southern Mississippi Gardner.M. University of Tulsa. University of Tulsa. Yale University Gibson.A. University of Tulsa Geller. M. M. Ph. Pennsylvania State University Garmy.S. M.S. Ed.S.. Associate Professor of History. D.A.S. Ph.A. Richard P. M. M. Assistant Professor of Biological Science. Lake Forest College. University of Tulsa. University of MinnesotaMinneapolis Hennessee. J. B.. Susan. Professor of Religion. Helen L.D. University of Illinois Futch..C.S. Texas Woman’s University Harikumar.A. Trinity College. University of Oklahoma.. University of Notre Dame.. B. B. Rice University Godsey.. Ph.. B. Kenneth G. M.D..D. LL. M. Ph... M. M. Eun-Soo. Emory University Gamble..D. Professor of Anthropology.. Jeffrey D.B.. Professor of Accounting. Glenn.. Ph. M. University of Oklahoma... University of Tulsa Halka. Ed.S. Applied Instructor in Spanish.S.. Applied Instructor in French..S.. Arty Everett. University of Wyoming. South Korea. Southern Methodist University Henshaw.. B.Ed. Jr.. University of Arkansas.S.240 Resident Faculty Hale..

University of Tulsa Kruse. Scott A.. M. Associate Professor of Economics. Houston Baptist University. Western Kentucky University. Ph.. M.S. B. Ph.. M..S. University of Illinois Johnson....S.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing... Professor of Electrical Engineering.S. B. Williams Chair in Petroleum Engineering..D. Associate Professor of Management.A.... Ph. Professor of English and Film Studies. Ph.A. Albany. Larry J.S... M. University of Tulsa. Indiana University Jones. Columbia University Hough.. University of Illinois-Chicago.. M.S. B...S... University of Pittsburgh Keller...D. Associate Professor of Geosciences.S. J.A. Evelyn..B. Gioia M.D.. Ph. Oklahoma State University. Pennsylvania State University Hudson.. University of Tulsa Jackson.. Southern Methodist University. Ph. M... William G.. Arizona State University. San Diego State University. B.A. University of Texas.A.B.. B. B. University of Nebraska. Southwest Missouri State University. Swarthmore College. J..Resident Faculty Hollingsworth. B.S. M. Professor of Political Science. Hazel Rogers Professor of Arts and Sciences.S. Dennis R. A.. B.B. M.. Yale University 241 Johannes. Grant M..S. Jill R... Indiana University Howard. Assistant Professor of English. Bobbie L. M. Professor of Chemistry. University of Tulsa. University of Bombay.A. Ph. Ph. Ph. Vernon.S. B.. Ralph W... Iowa State University Horne... University of Illinois Kelly-Rehm. B. Ph.Ed.M.S. Oklahoma State University. Ph.. B.... Ph..... M. Joseph A..D. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.Sc. Associate Professor of Legal Writing.D. Cornell College.. Kiku G.. B.. Associate Professor of Accounting.. University of Oklahoma. M.M.A... B.D. Assistant Professor of Spanish. Assistant Professor of Physics..B. Stanford University. Tyler W.A. Merry C.B. Yale University Holmstrom. Rice University Kelkar. Professor of Philosophy.. Professor of Petroleum Engineering.. LL.. Assistant Professor of Communication.A. M. Michael W.. Johns Hopkins University.D.M..S.D. M. University of Illinois .D.A.Ed. Ph. Jacob. University of Florida.. University of Utah Kerlin. University of Tulsa. D. Applied Associate Professor of Music... M. Associate Professor of Sociology.A....D.A. B. B. University of Tulsa. B. University of Tulsa Howland. M. University of Arkansas Hutchison.S.A. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering.. B. M.A. University of Kentucky Kane. Professor of Law..S...A. University of Illinois Jepperson. B.. University of Missouri-Columbia.A..N. Robert E. M....S.. Holly.D. M. McFarlin Professor of English. University of Colorado Kerr. B. Ph.. Ronald L.. University of Notre Dame Jensen.A..D. B.. Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems. M. B. University of Missouri-Kansas City. Professor of Communication.S.A. M.D... Balmohan A. Gerald.D..D. Joli. B. Dennis H. Ph. Washington University.... Columbia University Kohlbeck. Australian National University Horn. McFarlin Chair in Philosophy. B. J. B. California State UniversityFresno.D.S. Ph.D.A. B.. Texas Christian University. University of Iowa. Ph. Thomas A. Texas A&M University Jenkins.S..D. B.D.. Senior Instructor in Electrical Engineering.S.D.D.A. State University of New York.D.D. Associate Professor of Marketing. Ph. University of Wisconsin-Madison Kestner. M. Jeffrey G.A.S.S. London School of Economics. Oklahoma State University Howard. Associate Professor of Finance. Ph.

University of Oklahoma. China.. Assistant Professor of Management. Janet K.A. B.D. A... M.. Holly A.D.D.. B. Associate Professor of Art/ Printmaking. University of Illinois.D. B.B. Ph. B. Michigan State University. Visiting Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering.S..B. Vicki J.. Elizabeth M.B... Ph.E.. Ph.B. Gaoming. M.S. Princeton University Laird. Ph. University of Arkansas Levetin.. M.. Michael. Carol. Kansas City Art Institute. Applied Associate Professor in Art.S. B.. Mark. State College.S. University of Oklahoma Martin.S.. Bryn Mawr College. Ph.D.S. Applied Assistant Professor of Accounting. Kraemer.. University of Tulsa Luks.A.. Jagannathan. Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering.D.. A.242 Resident Faculty Mahadevan.D. M.D. Yale University Lewicki. M.D.S. M.. Princeton University. J. Pennsylvania State University Luks.. India..D. Rhonda R.N.A.F.S..S. Dean of the College of Law..E.S. Associate Professor of English. Washington University. John.D.D.. Applied Assistant Professor of Physics. B. Professor of Law. University of Tulsa Laird.... Ph. K. J... McGill University.M.S.. Boston. B...... B.. Tracy S. University of Delaware. B. Ph.T..A..A. Pawel. B.. University of Petroleum.E.F. Texas A&M.A. Professor of Chemical Engineering...F. University of Arkansas Manning.. Professor of Law. Jr.E. M. M..A.. Oklahoma State University McLaury. University of Texas-Austin Mailler. Associate Professor of Management Information Systems. Northwestern University Lindstrom.S.. Associate Professor of Accounting. Estelle.E. New York University. University of Oklahoma McCampbell. Roger.D. M. University of Tulsa. Arkansas Tech University. Barbara C. University of Tulsa McCrary.....S. Yale University Li. University of Warsaw Lewis.S.. M. Fordham University.. M. Ph. Ohio State University Martin. B. B. Ph. Marla E.A. B.. Georgetown University McCoy.F. J.D. B. M.A. University of California-Berkeley LoPresti. M.... Hardin-Simmons University. Applied Associate Professor of Audiology.S.S.S.. B. M..B. J..S. B. State University of New York.. University of Texas McCormick.A. Applied Instructor of Physics.A. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Texas A&M University Lambert. M.S.A. B.. University of Florida Latham.D.D.. Princeton University Mansfield. Professor of Law.D..S.. M..S.. B.S. Theodore. Central ElectroChemical Research Institute. Texas Tech University. Professor of English..M. Yale University. B. M.. University Professor of Chemical Engineering.A. Professor of Psychology...A.. Ph. Oklahoma State University McColl.A....S.S. M... Anna.. B. Peter G.. B. B.. Lamont C. Francis S. A. Ph. M. University of Pittsburgh Manly.D.. Ph.A. Ph.. B. Applied Assistant Professor of Accounting. Southwestern University. Professor of Nursing. A. Princeton University. Michelle. Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing.D..A. Clinical Associate Professor of Law. Brenton.E. Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering. University of Tulsa.S.. Professor of Anthropology.N. Ph. B. Au. University of Massachusetts Manikas. University of Rhode Island Levit.. Christi Patton. M.D. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. Sean. Ph.. Jerome D. Assistant Professor of Computer Science. J.S. B.. University of Wyoming Martin.. Swarthmore College. Ph. Brown University Leonard.D. Lori N. Professor of Biological Science.S. Pennsylvania State University Limas.. M.. East Central University. B. M. A.A. Applied Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering.A.E.. Mary Dana.A. University of Minnesota .

F. Ph.D.A. Assistant Professor of Law.. Poland Misra. University of Oklahoma.S.Phil.B. George H...T. Montclair State University.A. M. Ph. B.. J. University of Mississippi. Donald Feagin Professor of Music. M. Oklahoma State University Nogueira. Associate Professor of Political Science.. Ph.A. Mauricio..Resident Faculty McMahon.A.. Yale University Odell..B. M.. Detwiler Chair in Petroleum Engineering. Kansas State University. A. New Zealand Miller.A.S. Cracow..S. University of California-Berkeley.A..D. University of Delhi. Professor of Petroleum Engineering. Professor of Physics. Jonathan B. University of Oklahoma. University of Mining and Metallurgy.. Florida International University. M. Ph. Michael. Arizona State University. Ph. University of Kerala..D. B... Stefan. Ph. B. B.. University of Oklahoma. Occidental College. Anupama...D.. B. David. Robert J.D. B. Universidad Central de Venezuela. M.D. Northern Arizona University Piety..A. Harvard University O’Neil. Elana. Assistant Professor of English. Professor of Mechanical Engineering... B. B. B. Ph. M.. McFarlin Professor of Psychology. McMan Chair in Geosciences.A.A. Associate Professor of Biological Science. Richard A. University of Toronto. Professor of Legal Writing. University of Michigan Mohan.S. Professor of Political Science.A. D. B. B.. M. Ph. Bryn Mawr College. Colgate University. A. B. Assistant Professor of Art. University of California-Berkeley.Sc..D.. Ph.. B.. M. Maureen. B... University of Tulsa.. Ph. B. Tamara R.. Applied Professor of Communication and Film Studies. M..S.M. Trustees Professor of Finance.A. Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences. Indiana University Mosher. Ph. Claudia.. Professor of Law. Cloud University... Oklahoma State University Monroe. Wright State University Newman.. Cleveland Institute of Music O’Boyle. Texas Woman’s University. University of Tulsa Parker.D. B. Ram S. University of Maryland Norberg... B.. M..D..A.A. Peter John.D..S. Columbia University Paschal. Applied Instructor in Music. George P..A.S.A. Mus. Florida State University Meunier.S. University of Arizona Michael. Associate Professor of Psychology. Avi. Ed... University Lyon II. M.A. M.A. B. Doctor of Technical Sciences. Professor of Anthropology. Pennsylvania State University. J.. University of Illinois Papa. M.. Associate Professor of Computer Science.. M. B. Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences. University of Miami. B. Ph. J.. University of Toronto. University of New Mexico.S..B. Ph.M. Kristie S.D.S. Duke University Nichols... Ph. M.A.. Ohio University McNulty. Michaela. M.. Assistant Professor of Education.D. Lydie.D.. M.. Mus. LL. Anna. Kenton S. Arizona State University.. B... LL. Iowa State University Mintz. expected 2008. St.. J.... Johnny C.. Associate Professor of French..... Professor of Geosciences. B. Ph. Harvard University 243 Narayan. B. Ph...A.D.A.. Ph.S. Instructor in Biological Science.B.S. Washington University. B...S.. A. Kevin A.S..D.A.D..D. Yale University... Karen A.. Harvard University .. D. M.N. Ph. John. University of Tulsa Merryday..A.Sc. Assistant Professor of Psychology.D. M.D..A.B. Princeton University.A. University of Arizona Nix.A.A.D..S.N..A. Maria Elena. Columbia University Miska. Columbia University Miller. University of Kentucky Moncrief.D. University of Waikato. Kalpana. M.N. Lee Anne. University of Vienna..M.A.D.S.. M. Associate Professor of Nursing. B.B. University of Delhi. Associate Professor of Psychology. M.S. Associate Professor of Nursing.S. University of Tulsa Pereyra. M. M.

University of New Hampshire. Robin.A.. William. B.. B.. B... John S. Professor of Mathematical Sciences. Ph.A. M. Indiana University Reeder. Shirley N..A.. M.D.. University of Utah.D. B. Indiana University Roberts. University of Washington Prado.. Professor of Petroleum Engineering.D.A.. University of Wisconsin-Madison Plasencia..J. M.S.. Western Kentucky University. Rita T.A.M. Oklahoma State University.244 Resident Faculty Rasher..E.M. M.. M. B. B. Instituto Militar de Engenharia. Associate Professor of Chemistry. Associate Professor of Law. J. Indian School of Mines.Sc..A. Mauricio. Applied Instructor in Spanish.. Visiting Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering.. Madeleine M. Oklahoma City University.. B. Ph..D. Ph. Professor of Law. M..S. Eastern Michigan University.. Shirley B. University of Kansas Purser.D.S. University of Pennsylvania Ploeger.S. Ch. Canada . University of California. Jamie. Michigan State University. Arthur A.D. Southwest Missouri State University.D.A. University of Arizona Reynolds.. McMan Chair in Petroleum Engineering..M.. Associate Professor of Accounting.B.D. Associate Professor of Law. Assistant Professor of Psychology. M. Ph. University of Colorado Ramachandran. Ph. B. India. Geoffrey L..S.. Ph....M. M. B. Professor of Biological Science. Associate Professor of Management. M. B.M.... Karl. Associate Professor of Chemistry. Havana Pollin. Case Institute of Technology. Stephen R. William Roger. Linda. Professor of Music.B.Sc.. B.S. M. Ph. Jr.A.D.. Michigan State University Redner.D. B.S.. B... D.A. Clinical Associate Professor of Athletic Training.. Middle Level Pedagogical Institute E. University of South Carolina.M.A. M.. Ph..A. Kentucky Wesleyan College.. Kumar...A. M.. University of Tulsa Price. Varona Pedagogical College... Colorado State University Powell.. M.D.S. Texas A&M University Rice.D. B...D.D. Ph. Albert C.A.D... Emory University Pomeranz.. Santa Barbara. B. Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences.D. B.... B.. M... Universidade Estadual de Campinas. Case Western Reserve University Rhodes.A. Valparaiso University.S.S. Ph. B.S. Kenneth P. Ph. J. Richard L... Ed.S. Higher Pedagogical Institute E.. Guilford College. B.. Austin College. Brigham Young University Plumlee. Joseph L.M. University of Tulsa Rhudy.. Professor of Music and Film Studies.. Gordon. Ph.. Ph. E.M.M. Rice University Price.S..D. Barnard College. M. A. Assistant Professor of French. Cornell University. M. M.... University of Tulsa Robards. University of Connecticut.D. Southeastern Oklahoma State University. New York University.. G. Professor of Chemical Engineering. Teresa L. D.Tech. University of Massachusetts Potter. University of Notre Dame.. Ohio University. Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Associate Professor of Music. Judith V. Professor of Music.S.S. Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees. Applied Associate Professor of Music..S.. Phillips University. University of Paris X-Nanterre and University of Lille III. Assistant Professor of Geosciences.D. Professor of Mathematical Sciences.J.S. Associate Professor of Education. William T. B.. Elsa Gomez. Iowa State University Rockwell.D. M.S. Ph.S. J.Sc. University of Oklahoma Rivers. B. University of Texas. Lamar University.... University of Victoria... Ph. Ph.Tech. B. B. Michigan State University Royster.E... Laboratory Instructor in Chemistry. Ph. University of Houston Reed. Richard A.. M. University of MissouriKansas City. University of Tulsa... University of Arizona Roark-Strummer.

D.B.S.. B.D. Steve B. M. Christine.. Iowa State University Sorem. Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. B. B. Princeton University. Ph.A. Ph. Ph.... University of Oklahoma Soltow. Curtis Institute of Music. B. Brigham Young University.. M.D. B.A.. Sujeet. Applied Instructor in Spanish..... Irma.D. M...D. M.A. Saeed.S.. Ph... Ph.A. University of Mississippi Smith. Stevenson Distinguished Presidential Professor of Petroleum Engineering. Tel Aviv University Shrestha. Vice President for Research.S. B. Professor of Law.A. M.S. Siamack A. Binghamton University. Ohio State University Sarica.. P.M in Theory. Washington State University.S. Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics. Jr. University of Alabama.D.. F.S. California State University..D. Miami University.S.F.. Ovadia. B. B. Amy Nicole. M. M. Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Harry Rogers Chair in Mechanical Engineering... Allen R..D. Lawrence University. B. B.M.S. Ph. Ph.S. Surendra. University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Assistant Professor of Psychology.S. Iowa State University ..S.A.Resident Faculty Ruane..D.. Binod.A..S.E. University of New Mexico Shoham.. Ph... Chad A.. Princeton University.A.. M. M... University of Michigan Senese..D. Robert.S. Kurukshetra University. Ph. University of Maryland Samiee. B. B..Tech.A.M. M...S. Sandip.C. B.D. University of San Francisco.A. M. M. Dale A.S.S. B.... Ph.D.A.. M. M. M..A. Francis J. University of Arizona. B... Robert A. Professor of Mechanical Engineering.. M.. expected 2008.. Bryant University. Ph. Ph. Ph.. University of Colorado-Boulder Shenoi. Vice President for Information Services and Chief Information Officer. Wichita State University. Case Institute of Technology... M. University of Kansas Spoo.A. M...A. Associate Professor of Economics.A. Professor of Mechanical Engineering.. B.. Luther College... M. Floyd M. Ph. Applied Assistant Professor of Management. B. M.. Professor of Computer Science. M.A.F. University of Houston.. B. Assistant Professor of Art/Foundation.L. Ph.A. Karen J. Ph.D. University of California-Berkeley Rubio. Edmund F.S. B... Assistant Professor of Law. M.A.A.D. Indian Institute of Technology. Collins Professor of Marketing. in Performance.S. B. University of Tulsa Saylor.Tech. Northeastern State University.D. Ph. B. Associate Professor of History.A. B. New Mexico State University. Robert J.B. Yale Law School Steib..S. Istanbul Technical University. Cem.L.D.D. Professor of Economics. Case Western Reserve University Salvaggio. University of Kansas Russell... Associate Professor of Music.S.... Walter Professor of Computer Science.. J.. Jadavpur University... Tribhuvan University. B..D. M... B.. Florida State University Rybicki. James R.. Ph. Ph. Ryan R. University of Texas Ryan. University of Missouri-Columbia Russell.D.. Ph. P.. Associate Professor of Economics. Professor of Marketing.A.D. Professor of Management. University of Texas. University of Oklahoma 245 Settle. M. Georgetown University.A. Bangalore University and Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Singh.. Assistant Professor of Political Science.D. Professor of Electrical Engineering.. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry.D. Professor of Petroleum Engineering. University of Iowa Sen. University of Wyoming Sheaff. B.. Ph. Wayne State College. Collins Professor of Operations Management. University of Virginia Schoenefeld. Ph. Pennsylvania State University.. M.S. J.A. B.A.D.. Kansas State University Shirazi.S...D. James. Indian Institute of Technology.

. Dean of the Collins College of Business. University of California-Berkeley Upham.D. B..S. University of Virginia. B. Jeffery.. University of Tulsa Sullenberger. Ph...D..D. B. B.S. M. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Geosciences. J. President of The University of Tulsa.D. Associate Professor of Geosciences. B.. University of Michigan... Chapman Chair in English. Deborah W. Simon Fraser University. B.... B.D. Oklahoma State University. Dale C. D.S. M.A. University of Michigan Taylor..D. Associate Professor of English.. Associate Professor of Accounting.. Arizona State University Urban. Keith.S.. LL..A. Applied Associate Professor of Art and Graphic Design..S.. Texas Tech University Takach.S.. Teresa. Ph. Laura..F. M.E. Ph... University of Arkansas.A.. University of Tulsa Tingey... M.. University of Kansas Van Hanken. Ph. Professor of Law. M. M. Gale. Harvard University. University of Alabama. M.. M.A.A. Victor M..A..A.I. B. B. University of Tulsa Stevens. University of Michigan Udwin. University of California-Berkeley Taylor. New York University Teeters..Engr.D. National Tsing-Hua University. Ph.. Professor of Management Information Systems and Operations Management.S. Ph. Melissa. Ph.. Michael. M.S. B.S. University of Michigan Stromberg. Assistant Professor of German. Gordon O.. Heng-Ming. B. University of Oklahoma Tai. University of Oklahoma. J. Winona M.. Professor of Chemistry. M. California State Polytechnic University. New York University Thompson..A. Ph.A.. Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering.A.. B. Assistant Professor of International Business. University of Redlands.A.. B..246 Resident Faculty Tett.D.... B.S.A.. Vice Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs.M. Robert.D. Purdue University.. B. University of Oklahoma .D.S. A. Professor of Electrical Engineering. J.A...A. Professor of Chemistry. Ph. Instructor in Chemistry.B. M. M. M. University of Nevada Tanaka.A. Stanford University Strunk. M.S.S.. Ph. B...D.A. B. James C. University of Texas-Austin Van Nostrand.D. Wellesley College. Professor of Anthropology. A.B. J.. B. University of Texas-Arlington Valero. Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing. Associate Professor of Law. Stanford University Tomlins. Nicholas E. City University of New York Sublette... University of Arkansas. B.A..... Associate Professor of German and Comparative Literature. Chuck B. Columbia University Tapp. Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Professor of English.S.A.D. Collins Professor of Operations Management..D. Professor of Anthropology. Leslie G..S.A... James Bryan. M. Diane K.. M.. M. M. M..S.E. Brigham Young University Tipton.. Oklahoma State University. Ph. B.. Ph. M. Varley (Sandy) H. Wellspring Assistant Professor of Film Studies... Professor of Law. Steve M.. B. Vanderbilt University Thomas. University of Oklahoma Tatum.S. University of Oklahoma Symcox. M..F. B. M... Villanova University.A. Centenary College of Louisiana. Kerry L. Ph. M... University of Western Ontario Thomas.S. College of William and Mary. Clinical Professor of Law.. Duke University.S. B.F.D.. J.. M. B. Fairfield University. Trinity University....A.Engr. Peter G. Associate Professor of Psychology. B.D.S.S..F.S. Steadman.S. B. LL. Central State University. Princeton University.D.A. B. B. Sarkeys Professor of Environmental Engineering.M.A.A. M..A.A.S. Timothy L.. Ph..B.. Kathleen....D.. Professor of Art.. B. Southwestern Oklahoma State University.D..S. Senior Instructor in Mathematical Sciences.. Kansas State University.A.D.B.. David L. Ph. Ohio State University Troilo.

Northwest University. Assistant Professor of Physics. Roger L.D.. Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. B..S... University of Tulsa Wang. B. B.. State University of New York-Binghamton Wilson.. University of Tulsa Yu.. Associate Professor of History.A. Eric E..D. Michael E. Distinguished Professor of English..S.S. B. M. Ph.S. University of Missouri Wright.. Ph. B.A.. M...D.. University of Tulsa.Ed. Catherine.. Clinical Assistant Professor of Athletic Training. University of Arkansas. Tulane University Wright.. Tianjin University. B.Ed. Ph. M. Sanwu. Instructor in Communication Disorders. Jinsong.A. University of Wisconsin-Madison Wisecarver. Tianjin University. Ph.Resident Faculty Wainwright. M.D.. University of Virginia Wilson.A. Occidental College. University of TexasAustin..S. University of Newcastle. Ohio State University 247 Wofford.. University of Rochester. Doctor of Fine Arts (honoris causa). Bruce Dean.. M. University of Texas-Austin Zboja. M. University of Kansas Yasser. Jan Doolittle.D. Frances W.A..... Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering... Ph. J.S... M.S. Kathleen. Professor of Law. University of Tulsa.. B.. Ph.S. B. Michigan State University.S.D.. Professor of Law. University of California-Santa Barbara West... Florida State University Zedalis. Sandra E. Ph.I..D.S.A.. B.M.. Associate Professor of Spanish. China.. M.A. Pepperdine University. Associate Professor of Marketing.B. J. M.F. Columbia University Zhang. Tsinghua University..D.A. Keith D. Iowa State University Willis. J. LL... Clinical Assistant Professor of Athletic Training. Ph.A. A. Laboratory Instructor in Geosciences. Professor of Anthropology. M. Assistant Professor of Athletic Training. Bowdoin College.. Applied Associate Professor of Creative Writing.. Ph. Harrington..D. Regent University. Middle Tennessee State University.S. Ron H. Ph. James J. Harvard University Walker.S..B. Professor of Theatre.. M. Larry.. Rex J. B.. Missouri Western State University. Iowa State University Waits.. China.S. M.L.A. M. B. University of Oklahoma Wood.D. Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering. California State University. University of California Wood. Hong-Quan (Holden). B. Theatre and Film Studies.A..S.S.A. Mengjiao.. B. Charles M. James G. Memphis State University. China. B.. Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering.S.D.D.A. Ph. Jason O.B.D. B. Ph. Duke University Yevtushenko. M. Anhui Laodong University. Ph.A. Oklahoma State University. M. J. College of William and Mary.A.D. Cornell University.S. B.B.. Ph. Indiana State University. Assistant Professor of Marketing. Professor of Computer Sciences....B.S.E. M. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Wickel. Michael... M. M. B. B. M. M.S. Ph.S. Raymond L. Yevgeny.. University of Pittsburgh Webster.. M. Australia Wang.A.. University of Miami . Beijing Institute of Technology. O’Hornett Professor of English..S. Professor of Law. M. M. B. Ph...F. M..B.D.S.A... B..D.A. Associate Professor of Biological Science.S.. expected 2009..S.D.A..A.. A..A.. University of Central Missouri Whalen. A... M.J.A. University of Tulsa Wells.B.D. University of Delaware.S. Tao. George Washington University. Lisa... China Zhang.B. B.D. Andrew. B. Assistant Professor of Education.S. University of Wyoming.D.. B.. Xian Jiaotong University. Ph. Bovaird Professor of Entrepreneurial Studies. Zhejiang University... Rollins College for Continuing Education.D..S. Wellspring Assistant Professor of History.F. East China Normal University Watson..

. University of California-Berkeley Hornbostel... John M.. Toronto Buck.D. University of Oklahoma Hansson.. A. Corinna del Greco. Sociology.. Huber. Ph. Richard W..D. Ph. John F. President Emeritus. Robert O. James P.D.D. Communication Disorders. Ph.D.. M.D. M. M.D..D. University of Washington Harris. Jane.....D. Ph. J. Ph. Music. Reginald L. University of Oklahoma Buthod. Foreign Languages and Comparative Literature. Ph. Colin. University of Tulsa Carmichael-Everitt. Communication.. Accounting... Paul. John K. University of Southern California Lobner.. University of Tulsa Eisenach.. Petroleum Engineering. Donald D. Purdue University Dailey. Oregon College Frey...D. McFarlin Chair in Psychology.. Ph. Victor O. Washburn University . Ph.D.. Paul L. Philosophy. Texas A&M College Hall. Syracuse University Henneke... Barry A. History. Music. University of Nebraska Foreman. Ph.D..S.. Law. Ph. Ph. Martin. Victoria University.. Ph. M. University of Illinois Lind. Biological Science.. McMan Chair in Petroleum Engineering.D. Kent.. University of Illinois Hogan. Political Science. Kenneth A.A. Kermit E. Geosciences.M. M.D. Ph..D. University of Texas Brown.. Philosophy.D... Eldon.M. J.. University of Illinois Kuenhold. Orley R. Edward C. Ph...M.D. Communication. Ph. William Jack... Ph.. Ben G. Ph. Oklahoma State University Bowen.D.. LL. University of Texas Brown. Dale M. Paul.S. Yale University Brill. Ph.. University of New Mexico Johnson.. Political Science. LL. Education.M. President Emeritus. Communication Disorders. University of North Carolina Dumit..S. Jr. Ohio State University Lampton. Ph.D. Richard Lee. Chemical Engineering.. University of Michigan Douze. Music.D.. University of Oklahoma Barker. Economics. University of Nebraska Kramer.. David. Derry Deane. University of Illinois Hicks. Ph. University of California-Berkeley Ellingsworth... Ed.D. Edward.. Law.. Trustees Professor Emeritus of Humanities.D.. Stanford University Dreyer..D. Manly. Ph.D. Art. Ph. McMan Chair in Geosciences... English. Robert T. T. French and Comparative Literature. Stevenson Endowed Presidential Chair in Petroleum Engineering. Psychology. Mathematical Sciences.. University of Arkansas Hayden. Floyd M. Law. John M. Robert W. George Washington University Frizzell. Texas A&M University Lilly. Education. Ph. Management. Petroleum Engineering. M.D. Virgil D...D. Th.. Donald E. Ph.D.. Pittsburg State University Lawless. University of Pennsylvania Johnson. Kistler Professor of Physics. Ph.. University of New Mexico Professors Emeriti Azar. Madison Christensen.. Law. Edward J. Education. E.D. D... Oxford University Bonham.D. Ph.. University of Tulsa Lomax. University of Wisconsin.. M. University of Wisconsin Hyatte. Ph.. Ph. Dwight M.D.D. Florida State University Epstein. University of Minnesota Kinsey..M.M. J. Ph.. Marvin M.. LL.248 Resident Faculty Guerrero. Modern Letters. History..

.. University of Southern California-Los Angeles Weston.. New York University 249 . University of Maryland McKay. Ph. Ohio State University McKee.D. North Texas State Teachers College Predl.. Ronald E.. Spanish. Barnard Chair in Western American History. Economics.. Joseph A. Cadwell L. Kenneth C. Rice University Wolfe. James P. Ph. Ph.... Ed.Resident Faculty Luce.. Ph...M. Richard E. Lyle R.... Art.A. Melvin C. Psychology.D.. Biological Science. University of Nebraska Shadley.D. Indiana University Vial.D.....D. Ph. Accounting. Lester A. M.S. Marketing.. James L.D.. John R. Mechanical Engineering. Ph.. Chemistry. William E. Electrical Engineering.. Oklahoma State University Tomasi. University of Texas Oliver. Music. H. Music. Chemical Engineering. Biological Sciences. University of Tulsa Place. Carl...D. Terrence S. Robert D.D. Ph. Bradley E. University of Houston Shirley. Management. Ph.D... University of Rochester Ronda.. University of Pennsylvania Nielsen.. G. Ph. Ph.D. Ph.D. Chemistry... Richard A. Barbara. Mechanical Engineering.. Iowa State University Trueblood.D.. D. University of Texas Resnick.D.D. Ph.D. Management. B. Education... North Texas State University Neidell. Ph.. Northwestern University Ray. B. Ph. Carnegie Mellon University Thompson.D. University of Oklahoma Strattan. Edward S.. Ph. Ph.D. Gordon L.B.

. . 144 Business Administration. . . . . 14 Graduate School memberships . . . . . 27 Computer Science . . . . . . . 59 Dismissal . . . . . . . . 8 Academic Honesty . . . . . . . 71 Assistantships. . 57 Accounting . 34. . . . . . . . . . doctoral degree . . courses in . . . . . 4 Activity Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Art . 83 Electrical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Athletic and Recreational Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Doctoral degree requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (see also individual programs) . . . . . . . . 33. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 English Language and Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Art History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . master’s degree (see also individual programs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250 Index Index About The University of Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . 113 Comprehensive examination. . . . . . . . Master of . . . . Henry Kendall College of. . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Comprehensive examination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Geology. . . . . Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Financial Assistance . . . . . . . . . . 28 Career Services . . . . . . . . . . . . general requirements (see also individual programs) . College of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Engineering and Natural Sciences. . . . . . . . . . . . 118 GMAT . . . . . . 56 Anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Graduate Student Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . School of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16. . . . . . 236 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) . . . . . . . 164 Conduct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . international applicants . 143 English Institute for International Students . . . 85 Employment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 . . . 20 Graduate residency. . . . . . . . . . . 23 Graduate courses for undergraduate credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Grades . . . . General Standards of . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Academic Deans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Air Force ROTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Financial Information and Services . payment of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Foundation courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Dissertation. . . . individual programs) . . . . . . . 44. . . . . 44 Accreditation . . general information . . 128 Accounts. . types of . . . . . . . . . 25 Degrees granted . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . programs in . . . . . 117 GRE . . . . . . 117 Combined Bachelor’s / Master’s Degree Programs (see also individual programs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . services for people with . . 43 Fellowships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Auditing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Chemistry and Biochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Finance . . . 34. . 16 Admission. . . . . . . . . . . General (see. . . . . . . 158 Clinical Psychology . . . . . . . . . general requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Communication Disorders . . Inside Front Cover Campus Map . Inside Back Cover Campus Organizations and Activities . 221 Commencement Policy . . 57 Course load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Fine Arts Programs . . . . . . Master’s degree . . . . . 175 Elementary Education . programs in . . . . . . . . 92 Enrollment and course load . . . . . . . . 8 Administrators . . 188 Geosciences . . . 69 Fees . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Food services . . . . also. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Academic . . . . . . . . courses in . . . . . . . 107 College of Law . courses in . . . . . . 41 Counseling and Psychological Services . . . . 57 Certificate Programs . . 39 Collins College of Business. . . 8 Degree Card . . . . 61 Fine Arts. . 122. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Deans. . . . . . . . . 60 Administration. . . . 70 Continuing Education . . . 6 Administrative Officers . . . . . . . . University . . . . . enrollment in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Candidacy. . . . . 79 Arts and Sciences. . . . . 21 Biological Science . . . . 186 Geophysics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . programs in . . . . . . doctoral degree (see also individual programs) . . . . . . . 229 Certification or licensure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Chemical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Education. . . 19 Equal Opportunity Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Academic and Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Final Enrollment . . . . . . . . . 71 Applied Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Graduate School. . . . . . . . 8 Admission. . . . . . . 15 Disabilities. . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Student Rights. . . . . . Office of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . transfer of . . admission . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Secondary Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Research and Evaluation (Educational) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Master of Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Index Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Musical Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Speech. . . . courses in . . . . . 84 Research and Teaching Assistantships . . . . . . . . 24 Professional Education . . 214 Master of Taxation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . doctoral program . . . . and Hearing Testing and Therapy . . . . 69 ROTC. . . . . 22 Refunds . . . . . . . General (see also individual programs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Mathematics. . . . . . . . . 193 Statute of Limitations . . . . . . . . 49 Student Government . . . . . Radio. 60 Pass/Fail . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Publications. . . . . . . 140 Payment of Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Leave of Absence . . . . . . . 227 Juris Doctor/Master of Science . . . . . . 37 Interdisciplinary Programs . . . . . . . . 60 IELTS . . . . . . 16 International Students. . . . . . . . . . . 222 Juris Doctor/Master of Arts . . . . 127 Master of Teaching Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Student Academic Support. Air Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Master’s degree requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Residence requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Master of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Life Skills Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Multicultural Student Programs . . . . . 66 Operations Management . . . . . . 30 Petroleum Engineering . . 113 Statistics. . . . . . 62 National Energy and Environmental Law Policy Institute (NELPI) . 24 Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Probation and Dismissal . . . . . . 88 Psychological Services . . . 44 Identification cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Residency. . . . . . . . . . 78 Master of Science in Finance . . . 58 Joint Degree Programs . . 83 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Renter’s Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . Center for . . . . . . . . 58 International Student Services . . 44 Parking Permits . . . TV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and Responsibilities . . . 85 Special Opportunities and Facilities . . . . . . . . . . 23 Industrial/Organizational Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . English Institute for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Research Grants and Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43. . . . . 25 Health Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 251 Organizations and Activities . 122 Master of Science in Math/Science Education . . . . . . . . . 59 Incompletes . . . . . . . 56 Scholarship requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . College of . . . . . . . . 23 Petitions to the Graduate Council . . . master’s program . . . . . . 224 Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration . . . . . . . . 127 Teacher Certification . . . . . . . . . 201 Petrophysics . . . 27. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Immunizations . . . . . 135 Management Information Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Housing and Dining services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Student Affairs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Office of Research and Sponsored Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Health Services . 227 Law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Residence requirement. . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Student Research Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . 190 Mechanical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Psychology . 57 TOEFL . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Student Financial Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Information Services . . 214 International applicants. 44 Religious Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Speech-Language Pathology . . . . . . . . . 139 Master of Business Administration . . . . . . . . Freedoms. . . . 16 Taxation. . . . . . . . 20 Rights and Responsibilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 History of the University . . . . . . . Applied . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Student Conduct . . . . . 32. Office of . . . . . . . . Graduate (enrollment in) . . . Language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Records. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Special Student Status . . . 226 Juris Doctor/Master of Taxation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Research. . . . 86. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Loan funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Mission of The University of Tulsa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Marketing . . 59 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . 20 University School. . . . . . . . Master of . . . . . . . . general requirements (see also individual programs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Board of . . . . . . . 42 Withdrawal . . . . . . . . . 34. . 26 Transfer Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Theatre . . The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Transfer of Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Undergraduate courses for graduate credit (see also individual programs) . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Trustees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252 Index Teaching and Research Assistantships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Teaching Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 . 61 Thesis. . 6 Tuition and Fees . . . . . .

University Square Apartments . House 5: Student Housing 43. FLORENCE 57 Twin Towers Lot Westby Lot 56 12 27 S. I-244 E.A. House 6: Delta Delta Delta Sorority 44. House 4: Kappa Delta Sorority 42. 81. Mary K. McFarlin Library 25. 19. 7 a. = Inner Campus Loop Route M-F. 17.m. 72. 79. 7. Mayo Village Apartments 54. 4TH STREET 6 John Rogers Lot Keplinger Lot E. 8TH STREET TUCKER DRIVE TUCKER DRIVE 62 GOLD ROUTE S. University Square Apartments . Sigma Chi Fraternity 56. 4TH PLACE 59 69 E. 4TH PLACE 60 E. 71. TU MAIN CAMPUS Allen Chapman Activity Center Alexander Health Center Annex East Annex West Bayless Plaza Boesche Legal Center Center for Global Education Central Plant Chapman Commons Chapman Hall Child Development Center Collins Hall/Shaw Alumni Center/ Whitney Hall Harwell Hall Helmerich Hall Holmes Student Center John Rogers Hall Kendall Hall Keplinger Hall Lorton Hall Roxana Rozsa & Robert Eugene Lorton Performance Center (under construction) 21. 3. 4. House 1: Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority 39. 70. 68. 66.m to 5:30 p.m to 5:30 p. McClure Hall 24. Kappa Alpha Fraternity 47. House 7: Chi Omega Sorority 45. Genave King Rogers Fountain 28. 77. 16. House 3: Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority 41. 63. 15. 7 a. COLUMBIA 53 72 S. 18. 62. Chapman Stadium Hardesty Sports & Recreation Complex Harwell Field Hurricane Athletic Building Hurricane Track/Soccer Stadium Mabee Gym/Athletics Multi-Purpose Field Reynolds Center Skelly Field Soccer Practice Field Softball Field Tennis Courts CAMPUS MINISTRIES Baptist Student Center Muslim Student Association Prayer House Newman Center United Ministries Center Wesley Foundation S. 5TH STREET 80 81 Holmes Lot 64 45 71 69 E. 73. Kappa Sigma Fraternity 48.m. Tyrrell Hall 32. 20. 6. 74. 4TH STREET 58 50 E. Twin Towers Hall 58. Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity 50. John Mabee Hall 46. Hillel House 37.m. 10.TU Map Key = Shuttle Stops = Emergency Phone/Strobe = Bicycle Racks = Parking Lots Hurricane Express Information = Blue Shuttle Route M-F. Sharp Plaza 30. Language House 51. 5TH PLACE 66 30 24 29 43 7 42 40 41 39 38 17 76 67 20 75 Delaware Lot 52 19 Lorton Lot 31 23 5 28 25 33 77 8 13 . 78. LaFortune House 49. HARVARD 51 73 61 Reynolds Center Lot . = Gold Shuttle Route M-F. 67. Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity 55. 75. Shuttle routes and times subject to change. Oliphant Hall 26. 12. GARY Mabee West Lot 70 68 Mabee East Lot 48 LaFortune Lot Harvard Lot 66 74 E. DELAWARE 9 65 E. Zink Hall STUDENT HOUSING 35. Twin South Hall 57.South 60. ATHLETIC FACILITIES Athletic Ticket Office Case Athletic Complex Case Tennis Center Collins Fitness Center H. 2. 80. 6TH STREET 22 14 10 Phillips Lot 2 McFarlin Lot 1 ACAC Lot 26 15 44 ACAC East Lot S. Lorton Village Apartments 52. 76. Westby Hall 34. Lottie Jane Mabee Hall 53. The U 31. GARY PLACE BLUE ROUTE 63 S.West 61. Brown Village Apartments 36.m to 10 p. University School 33. 13. Honors House 38. 11TH STREET 1. 14. Chapman Center 23. GARY UMC Lot M-F 4th & College South Lot 78 16 21 18 35 79 Keplinger South Lot 4 3 E. 3RD STREET 36 11 32 4th & College North Lot E. Sharp Chapel 29. 8 a. 64. University Square Apartments and Apartment Housing Office 59. 65. House 2: Delta Gamma Sorority 40. 11.Harwell Lot 34 54 47 46 49 37 55 S. Phillips Hall 27. 5. 8. 9. 8TH STREET E. Mabee Legal Information Center 22. 69.

or Toll Free: (800) 882-4723. u t u l s a . and exciting athletic teams that compete in Division 1A athletics.Forward Thinking Make a difference. Learning. contact the Graduate School at (918) 631-2336. 800 South Tucker Drive. 87% of recent TU graduates are employed soon after graduation. TU#8121 . Our graduates work. Jane Corso. 48 hours is recommended for all other accommodations. (918) 631-2616. aids. e d u / g r a d u a t e The University of Tulsa does not discriminate on the basis of personal status or group characteristics including but not limited to the classes protected under federal and state law in its programs. TU is the university of choice for students who want to make a difference in the world and are eager to get started. To ensure availability of an interpreter. Oklahoma 74104-9700.edu w w w . (918) 631-2315. while being mentored by faculty who are leaders in their fields. Whatever your interests. Our students engage in groundbreaking cross-disciplinary studies that allow them to tailor academic plans to meet specific interests. Our students enjoy a vibrant residential campus environment highlighted by more than 160 student organizations. Individual Attention. or benefits. Inquiries regarding implementation of this policy may be addressed to the Office of Human Resources. All graduate students have the opportunity to work individually with faculty members who are on the cutting edge in their fields. E-mail: grad@utulsa. Great facilities. Tulsa. For more information or to schedule a campus visit. New or updated amenities include: • Student fitness center • State-of-the-art classrooms • Premium apartments • Outstanding recreational options Living. extensive on-campus amenities. Big Impact. services. We have more than 660 graduate students in a variety of master’s and doctoral programs. five to seven days notice is needed. Dr. Requests for accommodation of disabilities may be addressed to the University’s 504 Coordinator. you’ll be able to find an activity that complements your studies and your personality.

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