ACADEMIC CATALOG

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SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY ACADEMIC CATALOG 2011/2012

Undergraduate and Graduate Programs

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SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY

TAbLE Of CONTENTS
Legal Studies ............................ 140 Political Science ....................... 141 Pre-Law.................................... 146 Psychology................................ 146 Social Justice............................. 152 Sociology/Cultural Anthropology ....................... 152 Women’s Studies ....................... 155 College of Education and Professional Psychology ............. 157 Elementary Education ................ 166 Secondary Education .................. 167 Physical Education...................... 179 Special Education ....................... 181 Technology in Education ............ 185 School of business............................ ... 187 Accounting .................................. 187 business Administration ............ 191 Economics ................................... 196 School of Engineering ...................... 198 Civil Engineering ........................ 202 Mechanical Engineering ............. 211 English as a Second Language (ESL) ........................... 221

About this Catalog ............................. 4 Accreditation...................................... 4 Mission Statement.............................. 5 Calendar ............................................. 6 History................................................ 8 Saint Martin of Tours......................... 9 Academic Values ................................ 9 Location ........................................... 10 Campus facilities ............................. 11 Student Life ...................................... 15 Residence Life .................................. 21 Student Conduct .............................. 21 Admission ........................................ 22 financial Aid .................................... 31 Expenses ........................................... 40 Extension Programs......................... 47

GENERAL INfORMATION ...... 3

Undergraduate Majors and Areas of Study ...................... 52 Graduate Programs ......................... 54 Degree Requirements ...................... 54 Saint Martin’s University General Education Program ...... 54 Academic Information .................... 60

ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ............ 51

GRADUATE PROGRAMS ....... 227
Master’s Program in business.......... 231 Master of business Administration (MbA).......................................... 231 Master’s Programs in Education and Professional Psychology ...... 240 Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC) ...................... 240 Master of Education (MED) ....... 247 Master in Teaching (MIT) .......... 254 Post-baccalaureate Certification-Only ...................... 262 Master’s Programs in Engineering .. 274 Master of Civil Engineering (MCE) .......................................... 274 Master of Engineering Management (MEM) ........................................ 284 Deans ................................................ 292 faculty .............................................. 292 faculty and Staff Emeriti ................. 298 board of Trustees ............................. 299 Saint Martin’s Abbey ........................ 300 University Administration............... 300 Administrative Offices ..................... 301 Academic Offices.............................. 303 Campus Map .................................... 304 Directions to Saint Martin’s ............. 306 Index................................................. 307

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS ......................... 77

Undergraduate Programs ................ 78 All-University Courses .................... 78 College of Arts and Sciences ............ 78 Programs in Humanities ............ 78 Art ............................................ 78 English ..................................... 79 Interdisciplinary Studies.......... 86 Music ........................................ 88 Philosophy................................ 93 Religious Studies ...................... 95 Speech....................................... 98 Theatre Arts.............................. 99 World Languages...................... 102 Programs in Science and Mathematics ...................... 104 biology ..................................... 104 Chemistry ................................. 111 Computer Science .................... 118 Mathematics ............................. 122 Physics ...................................... 127 Programs in Social Sciences ....... 128 Community Services ............... 128 Criminal Justice ....................... 129 Geography ................................ 133 History...................................... 133

DIRECTORY ............................. 291

ACADEMIC CATALOG

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GENERAL INfORMATION

GENERAL INFORMATION

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ABOUT THIS CATALOG / ACCREDITATION

AbOUT THIS CATALOG
The 2010/2011 edition of the Saint Martin’s University Academic Catalog is divided into sections to assist you in planning your undergraduate or graduate education at the University. Please refer to the table of contents to find main section headings. The course listings, appearing under each program area heading, provide the following information: • Course number • Course title followed, in parentheses, by the number of semester hours of credit earned for completing the class • Synopsis of the course offering • Prerequisites required for admission to the class, if applicable

ACCREDITATION
Saint Martin’s University is a comprehensive institution offering undergraduate- and graduate-level programs. Established in 1895, Saint Martin’s is a Catholic university and is the educational apostolate of St. Martin’s Abbey, a Benedictine monastery of the Roman Catholic Church. Members of the Abbey pray, work and live together on the University campus. Saint Martin’s University is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, the Washington State Board of Education and the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. Its undergraduate civil engineering and mechanical engineering programs are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology Inc. (ABET). The programs of the College of Education and Professional Psychology are accredited by the Washington Professional Educator Standards Board (PESB). The residency teacher education program, which is designed to prepare teacher candidates to become outstanding P-12 professionals, was granted initial accreditation by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) for a period of five years from June 2008 to June 2013. This accreditation certifies that the forenamed professional education program has provided evidence that the program adheres to TEAC’s quality principles. The University is a member of the American Association of Colleges; Council for Independent Colleges; Council for the Advancement and Support of Education; Independent Colleges of Washington; National Catholic Education Association; Northwest Association of Private Colleges and Universities; Washington Friends of Higher Education; Service Members Opportunity Colleges; American Association of Benedictine Colleges and Universities; and the Carnegie Association for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Saint Martin’s University’s programs of study are approved by the Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board’s State Approving Agency (HECB/SAA) for enrollment of people eligible to receive educational benefits under Title 38 and Title 10.

MISSION STATEMENT

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MISSION STATEMENT
Saint Martin’s University is a Catholic Benedictine institution of higher education that empowers students to pursue a lifetime of learning and accomplishment in all arenas of human endeavor. Saint Martin’s students learn to make a positive difference in their own lives and in the lives of others through the interaction of faith, reason and service. The University honors both the sacredness of the individual and the significance of community in the ongoing journey of becoming.

Context
Established in 1895, Saint Martin’s University is the educational mission of Saint Martin’s Abbey, a Catholic Benedictine monastery, whose members pray, work and live together on the University campus. The physical beauty of Saint Martin’s 300-acre campus reflects the rich intellectual and spiritual nature of its presence in the Pacific Northwest. Essential features of university life are animated by its Benedictine identity and its participation in the centuries-old traditions of Catholic intellectual thought and the search for truth. Thus, the University honors students and guides them toward achieving academic excellence. Superior teaching is the expected norm. Rooted in the long tradition of the liberal arts, the University curriculum cultivates: creativity and the ability to communicate and pursue ideas; critical thinking and independent inquiry; academic proficiency; the formation of sound ethical judgments; and service to humanity. Reflecting the Benedictine virtue of hospitality, the University welcomes and, indeed, seeks students not only from the Pacific Northwest, but also from other parts of the nation and the world at its main and extension campuses. Saint Martin’s treasures persons of all ages, religions and nationalities as it encourages cognizance of diverse viewpoints and an appreciation of all cultures. Saint Martin’s University Copyright 2011

Saint Martin’s is an equal opportunity institution.
Saint Martin’s University does not discriminate in employment or the delivery or administration of its educational programs, policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic or other University programs on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, race, color, religion, marital status, national or ethnic origin, military or veteran status, age or disability. Students are entitled to all rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Saint Martin’s University reserves the right to make changes as it deems necessary in procedures, policies, calendar, curriculum, overall academic programs or majors and costs.

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2011–12
fALL 2011
Advising and registration for new students: Session 1 Advising and registration for new students: Session 2 Advising and registration for new students: Session 3 Extension term I begins Faculty Convocation and Student Welcome Residence halls open Classes begin Mass of the Holy Spirit Labor Day (Holiday) Last Day to change or add a class Extension term I ends Midterm break Midterm grades due in Records Office Extension term II begins Last day to withdraw from a class Advising and preregistration begins Saint Martin’s Day (Holiday) Thanksgiving recess Last day of classes Saint Thomas Aquinas Study Day (no classes) Semester examinations Extension term II ends December graduate recognition ceremony Grades due in Records Office July 7-8 July 14-15 July 21-22 August 8 August 26 August 28 August 30 September 1 September 5 September 9 October 3 October 13-14 October 17 October 17 October 28 October 31 November 11 November 24-25 December 7 December 8 December 12-15 December 13 December 16 December 19

SPRING 2012
Extension term III begins Residence halls open Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Holiday) Classes begin Last day to change or add a class January 9 January 15 January 16 January 17 January 27

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 7 Presidents Day (Holiday) Extension term III ends Spring vacation begins after last class Midterm grades due in Records Office Extension term IV begins Saint Benedict Day (holiday) Classes resume after spring vacation Advising and preregistration begin Good Friday (Holiday) Easter Easter Monday (Holiday) Honors Convocation and Scholars Day (no classes) Last day of classes Saint Thomas Aquinas Study Day Senior Commencement Fair Semester examinations Bachelor baccalaureate and hooding Master baccalaureate and hooding Commencement Extension term IV ends Grades due in Records Office February 20 March 7 March 16 March 19 March 19 March 21 March 26 April 2 April 6 April 8 April 9 April 24 May 3 May 4 May 4 May 7-10 May 11 May 12 May 12 May 12 May 14 SUMMER SESSIONS 2012 Extension term V begins Summer session 1 begins Memorial Day (Holiday) Summer session 1 ends Summer session 2 begins Independence Day (Holiday) Extension term V ends Summer session 2 ends Grades due in Records Office May 21 May 21 May 28 June 29 July 2 July 4 July 18 August 10 August 13 GENERAL INFORMATION .

plus classical and commercial college courses. in the past century.B. The Order.8 HISTORY HISTORY Saint Martin’s University was established in 1895 by monks of the Roman Catholic Order of Saint Benedict. Both boarders and “day scholars” were accepted and taught from a curriculum of preparatory and high school classes. In 1920. Saint Martin’s is one of 18 Benedictine colleges and universities in the United States and Canada and the only one west of the Rockies. Monk scholars helped write the cultural and educational history of Europe and. From that early time to the present. From there. The site of Saint Martin’s University and Abbey. 11. . Saint Martin’s University also has a long history of building global relationships.. Benedictines have worked in education. colleges and universities throughout the country. baccalaureate-granting institution in 1940. established the first American abbey school. The new school admitted its first student. Benedictine history in the United States began in 1845 when Abbot Boniface Wimmer. Saint Martin’s motherhouse. the oldest in Western civilization. College-level courses were added in 1900 to provide the necessary education for candidates planning to enter the Benedictine priesthood.. Father Placidus Houtmeyers was one of the first monks to take Catholic education principles to Beijing. Benedictines founded high schools. near Latrobe. O. Saint Vincent College. Washington.B. It changed its name from Saint Martin’s College to Saint Martin’s University in August 2005 to more clearly define its existing nature and programs. was founded by Saint Benedict of Nursia in about 528.S. was selected in 1893 by Abbot Bernard Locnikar. accredited. on Sept. Their abbey schools nurtured and protected the legacy of the classics of Western civilization. By 1897. 29 students were attending Saint Martin’s. strengthen the University’s outreach ability and better fulfill its global mission. Angus McDonald. that of the United States. on a wooded hillside in rural Lacey. The University became coeducational in 1965. Pennsylvania. Saint Martin’s became a four-year.S. of Minnesota’s Saint John’s Abbey. The University’s collaboration with Mukogawa Women’s University is more than 25 years old and its partnership with Pudong Business School of the Shanghai Maritime University is almost a decade old. O. Saint Martin’s strong relationships with China and Japan continue today. Saint Martin’s first enrolled boys and young men between the approximate ages of 10 to 20. 1895.

Martin had a vision in which that beggar revealed himself to be the Lord Jesus Christ. cultural and linguistic plurality and scientific and aesthetic understanding. figures prominently in the development of Christianity in fourth-century Europe. he began his commitment to Christianity in earnest. Although he was sought as a bishop. He horrified his father. During his lifetime. when the people of Tours. chanced upon a shivering beggar clutching his rags about him in the bitter cold. studying under famous scholars and teachers of the era. As a free man.500 churches. a tribune in the army. the patron saint of the University. he longed for something more. prevailed upon him to become bishop. by studying to become a Christian. Martin established about 3. ACADEMIC VALUES Knowledge: We emphasize broad geographic and historical perspectives. Soon he was considered the holiest man in France. Although his youth was spent as a cavalryman in the Roman army. while still a soldier. GENERAL INFORMATION SAINT MARTIN Of TOURS . Legend has it that Martin. Some time thereafter. Saint Martin’s Abbey and University take their name from this illustrious patron.SAINT MARTIN OF TOURS / ACADEMIC VALUES 9 Saint Martin of Tours. Spirituality: We provide and encourage the development of personal recognition of spiritual values beyond the intellectual and physical. Martin cut his flowing cavalry cloak in two and gave half to warm the beggar. France. Martin obtained a discharge from the army. he chose to remain a missionary until 371. Soon after.

10 ACADEMIC VALUES / LOCATON Hospitality: We welcome and include in our community people from diverse backgrounds and locations.000. serving and valuing the worth of others. Holistic Education: We believe that intellect alone cannot sustain a meaningful life. The University’s proximity to the state capital gives students an opportunity to watch and take part in legislative and government-related activities. The wooded areas of campus are threaded with pleasant walking trails. artists and musicians. the state capital. Valuable student internships and work experiences can be obtained through positions in government offices and agencies. LOCATION Saint Martin’s University is located in Lacey. concerts and theater to professional sports. adjacent to Olympia. We encourage diverse viewpoints and the appreciation of different cultures. Saint Martin’s is conveniently located near Interstate-5. providing cultural opportunities to complement the University’s educational experience. . Oregon. including self-discovery. Service: We expect that our students will live exceptional lives dedicated to serving others in the local and global community. Washington. and that of Thurston County — which includes the greater Olympia area of Lacey. Olympia and Tumwater — is about 250. With its proximity to metropolitan areas. Located near the shores of South Puget Sound. and 30 minutes from Tacoma. Discovery: We believe that discovery. Many species of wildlife roam the undeveloped acres on campus and the meadows below the main University buildings.000. and who are prepared to address the complex nature of our society. students can take advantage of events ranging from top-flight art shows. Inquiry: We work to develop thoughtful graduates who are able to engage in honest and thorough analysis and critical and independent thinking. We expect such service to mirror the Catholic Benedictine life and to nurture the family spirit among all who participate in the University. is developed in the context of learning. and thus we work to unfold the potential of the whole person. The population of the Lacey area is about 41. In nearby cities. less than an hour from Seattle. Communication: We provide opportunities for students to pursue ideas and communicate them in varied forms. The beauty of the 300-acre Saint Martin’s campus reflects the rich intellectual and spiritual nature of its presence in the Pacific Northwest. the Greater Olympia area also attracts nationally recognized entertainers. Creativity: We expect our students to find joy in acts of creation and recognize artistic expression as the bridge between interior and exterior spaces. two hours from Portland.

Curriculum Resource Center. Saint Benedict of Nursia. four seminar rooms. . books. A bronze statue of the Benedictine Order’s patron saint. The library features the Information Commons. weather permitting. opened in January 2001. St. modern structure adjacent to the Abbey. videos. explore resources in the library catalog or one of the library’s web-based databases. a small computer lab. offer opportunities for clamming. recently was renovated and expanded to accommodate seating for 250. Old Main: Old Main. and the student and monastic dining rooms. write papers and get help publishing finished projects to a class website. students can confer with a librarian on a research strategy. skiers. the Computer Resource and Copy Center. many classrooms and laboratories. A beautiful. the University bookstore. search the Internet. The building has 550 network ports as well as wireless access throughout. Gertrude Dining Hall. O’Grady Library: O’Grady Library. streams and ocean inlets. Old Main’s south wing. Harned Hall is shared by students and faculty in every division. computers and multimedia equipment are available for use by the entire Saint Martin’s community. deep-sea fishing and sailing. Here. home of the Benedictine monks. the University’s oldest structure. It was seismically updated in 2000. Reference materials. journals. Students can dine outside. Less than an hour away. is across from Old Main. stands near the church entrance. an electrical lab. Mount St. the University’s primary academic building. a computer classroom. contains most faculty and administrative offices. designed by internationally acclaimed architect Michael Graves. The student dining area. and the west wing in 1923. or remain inside and enjoy the view from the hill onto the lower campus. Harned Hall: Opened in 2008. Abbey Church: The Abbey Church is the spiritual center of Saint Martin’s. kiteflying. its surrounding gardens and serene atmosphere draw many people from on campus and the nearby community. a faculty room and a tiered lecture hall. consult reference books.LOCATION / CAMPUS FACILITIES 11 CAMPUS fACILITIES Saint Martin’s Abbey: The Abbey. two technology classrooms and the spacious Benedictine Reading Room. was completed in 1913. hikers. eight group study rooms. the Olympic Peninsula and the San Juan Islands. Multimedia Center. This technology-rich building features eight general classrooms. This remarkable building enhances students’ access to both research materials and technology by integrating library and computer services under one roof. the area is exceptional. just 50 miles west. music CDs. The Information Commons blends traditional reference services with technology support. Swimming and other water activities are as close as five minutes from campus on a wealth of nearby lakes. Wireless access is available throughout the building. three media rooms. Helens. The church is used for daily services as well as for small concerts and other activities. Pacific Ocean beaches. GENERAL INFORMATION For nature lovers. the University’s oldest building. backpackers and other outdoor enthusiasts can pursue their favorite pastimes in the mountains or enjoy such spectacular Northwest attractions as Mount Rainier National Park.

These include: 1. The Center also features computer workstations with scanners. and individualized research or technology consultations. Internet and research tools. In addition. Group study rooms can be reserved in advance for team projects or study sessions. O’Grady Library. digital cameras.25 for color copies. and students have easy access to laser printers. library reference materials. houses an extensive collection of children’s literature. Trautman Student Union Building. Per-page print and copy charges are modest and are partially subsidized by the University. The Curriculum Resource Center. 3. These computers are licensed with a variety of up-to-date software. statistical software and engineering applications. Email. The O’Grady Library staff provides professional. The library extends its resources through participation in various consortia. Several locations are available for students to scan materials to data formats. classroom sets and other teaching-related materials. Librarians are committed to developing students’ information literacy skills. Computers are available in the Computer Resource Center in Old Main. students are given a $10 credit toward their printing each semester. digital voice recorders. the catalog of the Orbis Cascade Alliance. developed to support education students. Harned Hall. Print. technology troubleshooting. personal service. Traditional interlibrary loan services also are available. offering immediate reference assistance. Summit. specialized computer graphics software and video-editing tools. programming languages. see the staff for assistance.05 for black and white copies and $.12 CAMPUS FACILITIES The Multimedia Center holds the library’s audio and video collections and has equipment and viewing rooms for using these resources. Parsons Hall and Cebula Hall. The residence halls . copy and scanning. offers Saint Martin’s students access to more than 9 million titles from over 30 academic libraries in the Pacific Northwest. General-purpose computers. with two-business-day courier delivery to the O’Grady Library. students have easy access to the University’s network and to the Internet. Black and white or color copies can also be made at the O’Grady Library and Harned Hall utilizing a card or coin vending unit attached to the copiers. and the entire staff is dedicated to addressing students’ information needs. The Cooperating Libraries in Olympia (CLIO) project provides Saint Martin’s students with borrowing privileges at The Evergreen State College Library and the Washington State Library. Copies can be made in the Computer Resource and Copy Center at $. digital camcorders and other multimedia equipment are available for student checkout at the library’s circulation desk. young adult books. Email accounts and library database information also can be accessed off-campus via the Internet. 2. Laptops. The networked technology classrooms support multimedia presentations and offer a setting conducive to hands-on classroom projects. including Microsoft Office Professional. Computer Resource and Copy Center: A wide variety of computer resources are available to Saint Martin’s students. While on campus.

CAMPUS FACILITIES 13 To access University computer resources. a student must first complete a one-time computer/email account application. the Student Union Building is a center for student activities. alumni and community activities. Kreielsheimer Hall: Kreielsheimer Hall. Marcus Pavilion: The Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion. features an all-weather running track. offices and a kitchen. contains classroom. who served as the engineering division chairman for many years. Inappropriate uses such as pornography. which houses Abbey offices and the Integrated Technology Services offices. rehearsal and shop space. The facility also is the site for numerous sporting events.B. St. Its name honors Father Richard Cebula. . GENERAL INFORMATION provide wired Ethernet connections for each resident. originally dedicated as “Saint Martin’s Pavilion” in 1968.S. a multi-purpose classroom and an aerobics-dance studio. cardio equipment. Raphael Hall: Built in 1924. a game room. a four-lane running track. Trautman Student Union building (TUb): Dedicated in 1965. an engineering computer center and engineering laboratories. This includes the student agreeing to comply with the University’s Acceptable Use Policy. it is sometimes used for the performing arts. is the site for many University. an irrigated infield and soccer field.000-square-foot facility houses three multi-purpose courts. Students who violate that policy will quickly lose all access to University systems. conferences and social events. Charneski Recreation Center: Opened in the fall of 2009. Cebula Hall: Cebula Hall houses most engineering classrooms and offices. The University’s primary location for meetings. copyright violations or piracy will result in immediate loss of privileges. In addition to housing a large conference room that can be divided into smaller areas. and a relaxing environment for connecting with the community. Student activities there range from physical education classes and intramurals to team practices and weight-lifting. conferences and exhibitions. St. student government and clubs. this 36. the Norman Worthington Conference Center features a skylighted lobby. Wireless Internet access is also provided in common areas and in many classrooms. Norman Worthington Conference Center: Completed in 1992. On the ground floor is the Lynch Center. The 5.000-square-foot building opened in 1998. Track and field facility: Saint Martin’s track and field. concerts. as well as commencement ceremonies for Saint Martin’s and area high schools. a batting cage and a fitness center equipped with weights. (1916-2004). O. dedicated in 2009. Raphael Hall contains the Abbey guest quarters on its upper story. It offers meeting and activity space for students. as well as practice rooms for Saint Martin’s music and theatre arts programs. the University’s beautiful conference center adjoins the Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion and is a popular venue for area events. the University’s arts education building.

includes a large community room for activities and gatherings. Halls are smoke-free and furnished. Centralia College. The hall is comprised of furnished four-bedroom apartments housing approximately 90 students. contains mechanical engineering labs and maintenance and storage facilities. Saint Martin’s newest residence hall. computer lab. and all rooms and apartments house same-gender roommates. game room. Everett Community College (for mechanical engineering students) and Tacoma Community College (for civil engineering students). built in 2006. and all have laundry facilities. a conference room. was renovated in 2011 and houses primarily second-year students.14 CAMPUS FACILITIES Zaverl Hall: Zaverl Hall. a prayer room. Baran Hall also includes a community kitchen for student use and card-key security locks on the outer doors. Burton Hall. The Great Room provides an ideal setting for social activities. Spangler Hall has Housing and Residence Life offices where students can check out games. a fitness room. fitness room. and suite-style housing for sophomores. Spangler. and includes two computer labs. . juniors and seniors. vacuum cleaners. community kitchen. and is also home to the University Health Center on the first floor. Parsons Hall. Built in 2008. All halls are coeducational. a game room. Lambert Lodge: Lambert Lodge. Baran and Burton Halls are also equipped for phone access. Furnished suites are primarily for sophomores. a prayer room. It is the site for occasional University activities and retreats. provides on-campus apartment-style living for juniors and seniors. and find professional staff members to assist them as needed. Extension campuses: Saint Martin’s University operates extension campus programs at nearby Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Rooms/apartments in all four residence halls are equipped for Internet and cable TV access. pool sticks. The four halls have a variety of amenities that foster the sense of community for which Saint Martin’s is noted. convenience store. fireplace. located in a forested setting. and card-key security locks on exterior doors. belongs to the Saint Martin’s monastic community and is used as a recreational retreat. Spangler Hall provides on-campus residential space for 142 students. etc. conference room. Residence halls: Saint Martin’s has four residence halls offering a variety of housing arrangements to students living on campus. and study lounges on each floor. mail room. and is the most frequently used site for Residence Life-sponsored events. on the shores of Puget Sound. provides traditional-style housing for first-year students with double rooms and community bathrooms. and Housing and Residence Life offices. It offers spacious single and double rooms. Hall amenities include a student lounge on each floor. and apartments are primarily for juniors and seniors. the hall features an espresso stand. Baran Hall. The hall also houses a mailroom and a kitchen/patio area for social gatherings.

respect for the individual. area residents. regardless of religious persuasion. on a spaceavailable basis. retreats. embrace diversity. service and development of the whole person. The department also works to meet the needs of a diverse student population. Collaboration among students. Structured experiences help students develop and refine leadership skills. GENERAL INFORMATION The extension programs at the military installations provide educational access at the undergraduate and graduate level to military personnel. are assured respect and freedom to pursue personal spiritual growth. respect the rights of others. make responsible choices. educational and social justice programs. These programs are intended to assist students in blending their faith into their daily lives.STUDENT LIFE 15 STUDENT LIfE The Office of Student Affairs works to retain students by maintaining and improving the overall quality of campus life through programming based on Catholic Benedictine tradition. Campus Ministry is greatly influenced by the centuries-old traditions. celebrate common values. prayer groups. their families and. activities and services. and local. national and international trips. explore and define personal goals. and the services provided by the University. customs and spirit of Benedictine monasticism. While the extension campuses operate on different schedules from the University’s main campus. and activities such as volunteerism. resolve conflicts. faculty and staff enhance each student’s overall growth and development through coordinated programs. . regardless of where they are enrolled. Saint Martin’s facilities and resources are open to all students. hallmarks of which are hospitality. discussions. They are key factors in preparing students to pursue their career choices and become educated citizens. and develop other characteristics expected of University graduates. involved community members and future leaders. These experiences. recognize civil and social responsibilities. The Office of Campus Ministry supports all students and reinforces their integration into their spiritual community through liturgies. enrich Saint Martin’s learning environment. One of those traditions is hospitality. CAMPUS MINISTRY The Office of Campus Ministry provides a Christian environment in the Catholic Benedictine tradition in which all students and employees.

knowledge and opportunities for personal growth not always available in the classroom. scholarships and alumni mentors • Resume. the Associated Students of Saint Martin’s University (ASSMU). All currently enrolled undergraduate students are members of ASSMU and can participate in the election of representatives and executive officers. All students are urged to participate in out-of-class and community activities as part of their University education. social issues or personal development activities. lectures. ASSMU represents the needs of the students to the faculty. These organizations are typically formed around recreational interests. enrichment. sporting events. negotiating and other skill-building workshops • Graduate school testing information • Major and career exploration sessions for undecided students • On-campus interviewing and recruiting • Career guidance testing • Career fairs • Internet access • A career resource library • Assistance finding scholarship opportunities • Peer advisors • Facebook page . CAREER SERVICES The Career Center helps students define their career goals and objectives as they relate to future employment or graduate school opportunities. academic majors. Activities include social and educational excursions. Saint Martin’s believes co-curricular activities provide experience. dances and traditional activities such as Homecoming. interviewing. Individual student clubs and organizations are officially recognized through ASSMU. They also contribute to the well-being of the University community and its neighbors. Career planning begins when the student enters Saint Martin’s and continues through graduation. cultural events.16 STUDENT LIFE STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES Various campus organizations and activities contribute to the intellectual. leadership workshops. cover letter. moral and social development of students. Those services and programs include: • Online database (Saints4Hire) for jobs. administration and board of trustees. The University recognizes and supports the vital contributions made possible by students’ participation in student government. The Center’s services are available to all students and alumni at the University’s main campus and extension campuses. Student activities are coordinated through the Office of Campus Life.

extensive math drop-in tutoring. GENERAL INFORMATION LEARNING AND WRITING CENTER . personalized learning consultations. the Student Health Center assists students in developing a commitment to healthy lifestyles and becoming advocates for their own health care. adjustments. students meet with trained peer readers to discuss their academic. email or stop by the Counseling and Wellness Center. training.STUDENT LIFE 17 The Learning and Writing Center (LWC) offers free academic support services to all Saint Martin’s students. outreach and education on substance abuse prevention and awareness. located in room 102 of Burton Hall. To make an appointment. and relationship issues. The Learning Center provides subject area tutoring. The staff at the center also works closely with the University’s academic early warning system — a referral system that supports student success. personal and professional writing. Our professional staff of counselors is available to assist students with a wide range of issues to promote a successful college experience. diabetes and high blood pressure • Referrals for services that extend beyond the scope of the center All enrolled main campus undergraduate students are assessed a Student Health Center fee and may use the services of the center at no additional charge. COUNSELING AND WELLNESS CENTER The Counseling and Wellness Center provides free and confidential counseling services to all enrolled students. emotional. L such as asthma. students can call. STUDENT HEALTH CENTER Saint Martin’s Student Health Center. educational programs. depression. Wednesday and Friday. nurse practitioner and physician’s assistant. Our substance abuse prevention program coordinator is available to provide assessments. Services include: • Acute care for colds. Graduate students may utilize the Student Health Center for a fee paid at the time of visit. Hours of operation are announced at the beginning of each semester. is dedicated to the wellness of Saint Martin’s students. including: academic stress. flu and other medical concerns • riting of prescriptions (no prescription medications are kept W on the premises) • imited disease management for chronic health problems. The Student Health Center is open Monday. educational or vocational issues. referrals. stress. staff are available on Tuesday and Thursday to schedule appointments. Staffed by a physician. At the LWC. anxiety. Other services that we provide to the campus community include: consultation. Students can receive help for any social. and academic success workshops.

Beyond developing new friendships and taking in new sights. and credits may count toward a student’s degree. Costs are often similar to those accrued at Saint Martin’s. OIPD also offers student-led cultural activities that provide international students with a better understanding of American culture and an opportunity to explore the Pacific Northwest. or study tours. Short-term faculty-led programs. services and the assistance necessary to successfully pursue their higher education. summer cultural exchange programs. more focused time abroad. and have a specific study focus. Study tours typically last from one to six weeks. Students who need special housing accommodations on campus due to a disability also find assistance through the Office of Disability Support Services. and are selected to ensure students receive a quality of education comparable to Saint Martin’s. home-stay opportunities. International Education Week. academic year or summer break abroad through an approved program or sister university. These programs are available in more than 20 countries. International Taste of Culture. and various volunteer opportunities. The office supports this mission through numerous programs designed to integrate our international and domestic communities. OffICE Of INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS AND DEVELOPMENT The Office of International Programs and Development (OIPD) serves the Saint Martin’s community through a variety of international programs and services related to language. Students wishing to request appropriate accommodations are responsible for initiating contact with the office. student cultural ambassador program. culture and academic exchange. Specifically. The Office of Disability Support Services handles coordination of services and academic accommodations for students with disabilities. are also available to students who wish to have a shorter. conversation partners. Participating in a study abroad experience is a memorable and possibly life-changing event for a student. assist him or her in communicating those needs to faculty and staff and help the student obtain materials. many other benefits exist: . the annual Saint Martin’s University Dragon Boat Festival.18 STUDENT LIFE DISAbILITY SUPPORT SERVICES Saint Martin’s University is committed to providing a campus environment that is accessible to all students. representing nearly all continents. programs offered by OIPD are: study abroad and study tour opportunities. Study Abroad Students have opportunities to spend a semester. are comprised of several Saint Martin’s students. The goal of OIPD is to enhance and support international and cross-cultural education. Procedures for course substitutions and waivers for students with documented disabilities are available in the Office of Disability Support Services. The office will assess the individual needs of each student.

helps our students develop leadership skills. friends and families of students.000-square-foot Charneski Recreation Center. features an all-weather running track and an irrigated infield for field-event competition. Students are encouraged to participate in individual and group recreation. lakes.STUDENT LIFE • verseas experience strengthens an undergraduate degree and aids O students in standing out in a competitive job market. cardio equipment. Saint Martin’s opened the new 36. which in turn. Saint Martin’s is a member of NCAA Division II Great Northwest Athletic Conference. www.stmartin. a multi-purpose classroom and an aerobics-dance studio. and outdoor and indoor track and field. faculty and staff news and views on campus issues. and men’s baseball. women’s volleyball and softball. Students use the infield for soccer practice and intramural games. a periodic publication of the Office of Marketing and Communications. • tudy abroad enhances a student’s overall academic experience by S providing an alternative perspective to learning subject matter. GENERAL INFORMATION . a four-lane running track. offer opportunities for many sports and activities. The Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion is the University’s indoor athletic facility. Other communications concerning the University and its students include periodic newsletters for parents and a variety of news and information that is carried on the University’s website. In the fall of 2009. This facility includes three multi-purpose courts. Saint Martin’s outdoor track and field facility. shores and mountains. • Studying abroad helps build a greater sense of self-confidence. golf.edu. University teams participate in men’s and women’s basketball. Insights. 19 PUbLICATIONS The Belltower is a periodic newspaper written and edited by Saint Martin’s students. cross country. Abbey and alumni to alumni. Its purpose is to serve the communication needs of the student community and provide a vehicle for communicating student. independence and direction.000-square-foot fitness center equipped with weights. which was dedicated in the spring of 2009. a batting cage and a 9. The University’s athletic fields and courts. as well as nearby public golf courses. ATHLETIC AND RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS Athletic and recreational activities are planned and supervised as an integral part of educating the whole student. provides news about the University. soccer. • any study abroad programs offer unique and special opportunities M such as internships and volunteering in a field of interest.

. badminton. These two facilities are available for use by students and staff for a variety of internal campus events.S. CAMPUS DINING SERVICES Saint Martin’s food service. For athletic events.300 guests. The hall is open for breakfast. the Norman Worthington Conference Center and Marcus Pavilion are also available to the public for community meetings. The versatility of both facilities offers several options for equipment. STUDENTS AND MILITARY SERVICE The U. and for brunch and dinner on weekends. Bon Appétit. Air Force ROTC is available in cooperation with the University of Washington. banquets. Gertrude Dining Hall. basketball. On-campus catering services are provided exclusively by Bon Appétit. lunch and dinner Monday through Friday. provides a variety of services to the campus community and its guests. technology and room layout.stmartin. Note: The Art Acuff Fitness Room is no longer in use as a weight/fitness room. Sports and camping equipment is available for individual student use at no charge. basketball and volleyball courts.S. Bon Appétit also provides catering to student organizations and University departments. The University community dines in the St. As rental space. Activities vary from year to year. The dining hall is open to the public. the U. Conference Services manages the scheduling of these facilities and offers a one-stop-shop conferencing experience that meets the needs of those using the space. the University’s food service provider. receptions. but often include volleyball. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Program is available in cooperation with Pacific Lutheran University and other area colleges. soccer and softball. tennis. the Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion can provide seating for 4. table tennis. www. and locker rooms. Contact the ROTC offices at the respective universities for more information.20 STUDENT LIFE Students also can take part in intramurals at the team or individual level.edu. trade shows and other activities. graduations. Our friendly and knowledgeable conferencing staff will work closely with you to make your event a success and your experience memorable. conferences. playing fields. CONfERENCE SERVICES AND fACILITIES Saint Martin’s University Conference Services operates and manages the Norman Worthington Conference Center and the Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion. Spaces include classrooms. Catering information is available online at the Saint Martin’s website. and to outside events at the University.

except in those instances listed in the University’s Student Handbook. For returning Saint Martin’s students. For new students. The University reserves the right to suspend. University conduct system policies and guidelines are outlined in the Saint Martin’s University Student Handbook. a student not following the rules can expect University officials to initiate appropriate disciplinary action as outlined in the Student Handbook. The halls are maintained by professional and paraprofessional staff members specifically employed to assist students.RESIDENCE LIFE / STUDENT CONDUCT 21 The residence halls are an integral part of the University community and complement its educational programs. The damage deposit may be refunded only if no damage has been done to the room and the student has no outstanding balance on his/her account. Damage deposits may be refunded if requested in writing within 30 days of checking out of the residence halls. Procedures and policies for the residence halls are outlined in the Student Handbook and the housing contract. STUDENT CONDUCT Students at Saint Martin’s are expected to conduct themselves in a responsible manner that reflects favorably on themselves and the Saint Martin’s community. Additional information about the University’s residence halls is available from the Office of Admission or the Office of Housing and Residence Life. expel or otherwise discipline a student whose conduct is disruptive or dangerous to the University or members of the Saint Martin’s community. While the University is not responsible for student actions. The Office of Housing and Residence Life provides an environment that helps students learn and grow. Damage deposits are kept on file if the resident continues to live in the residence hall in future semesters. GENERAL INFORMATION RESIDENCE LIfE . Proof of payment must be made before early room reservations are accepted. Policies and regulations may be amended from time to time. All single undergraduate students younger than 21 and who have fewer than 60 semester hours are required to live in the residence halls. a housing contract and a $200 damage deposit/new student room reservation (taken from the enrollment deposit or charged to your account if your enrollment deposit is waived) are required. an additional $175 room reservation deposit must be on file with the Office of Student Accounts prior to early housing registration each year. and for complying with terms and conditions of each document. Residents are responsible for familiarizing themselves with this handbook and contract.

personalized education provided by the University. please contact: Office of Admissions. Old Main 256. WA 98503-7500. Lacey. Saint Martin’s University practices rolling admission. Saint Martin’s University. meaning there is no formal application deadline and applicants receive an admission decision approximately three weeks after submitting a complete application. Applicants are encouraged to thoroughly investigate Saint Martin’s University before submitting an application or committing to enroll.edu. stmartin. Applicants are encouraged to visit campus. For more information about admission to Saint Martin’s University. contains a wealth of information. email: admissions@stmartin. and commitment to serve the needs of the community. website: www. Applications are accepted for both the fall and spring semester. Admission to Saint Martin’s University is not based on any single criterion. The University website. Applicants are accepted up until the first day of class. eagerness to participate in the educational process. 5300 Pacific Avenue SE. Traditional indicators of a potential student’s academic ability are considered important and are carefully weighed in all admission decisions. level of motivation. all levels • Graduate admission • Education and teacher certification program admission • Extension campus admission • Readmission of former Saint Martin’s students • A description of the application procedure for each one of these follows.edu. . The Office of Admissions can answer most questions or direct you to the person or office that can best assist you. including contact information for University officials and offices. UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION The Office of Admissions welcomes applications for first-year admission. whether Saint Martin’s main campus in Lacey or one of the University’s extension campuses. and returning student admission. There are different applications for admission depending on which program you are applying to: • Undergraduate admission (first-year and transfer) • International student admission. Consideration also is given to an applicant’s life experiences. Telephone: 360-438-4596 / toll-free: 800-368-8803.22 ADMISSION ADMISSION Saint Martin’s University seeks to enroll students of all ages and backgrounds who will benefit from the distinctive. college and university transfer admission. Applicants applying for the spring term are advised to apply no less than 30 days prior to the start of the term to ensure sufficient time to process the application.stmartin.edu. www.

but the Office of Admissions may request additional information. or the test of General Education Development (GED) prior to enrollment. CAP is designed to help students succeed in college-level courses through special ad- GENERAL INFORMATION Applicants for the fall term are welcome to apply at any time. After review. Candidates for admission will be evaluated upon the high school transcript submitted at the time of their application. High school transcripts.ADMISSION 23 Upon an individual’s submission of a complete Application for Admission. financial aid resources may be limited. The best SAT or ACT scores submitted with the application will be used in the review process. For the SAT individual scores from different exams will be combined to form the highest possible combined score. Individual circumstances are always considered. The average high school GPA of admitted students is between 3. Applicants should take the time to complete the relevant sections of the Application for Admission so the Admission Committee is fully aware of their activities in and out of high school.3 each year. and applicants are encouraged to submit any and all additional information in writing or through an interview to fully explain their educational background. letter of recommendation and a personal essay are the primary vehicles through which the University evaluates academic achievement. Please contact the University’s Office of Admissions with questions or concerns about application guidelines or the availability of financial aid.edu. The application is available through the Office of Admissions or online at www. Character and community involvement are also important in the University’s effort to form a well-rounded and active student body. The Admission Committee will carefully review applications from students with a cumulative high school GPA below 2. However.80. One letter of recommendation is required. a student may be offered regular admission or admission through Saint Martin’s Conditional Admit Program (CAP). stmartin. Some decisions may be deferred until 7th or 8th term grades are available. All applicants should complete the Saint Martin’s University Application for Admission. but are strongly encouraged to apply by Saint Martin’s Priority Application Deadline of March 1. successfully completed a home school program. Applications arriving after the recommended March 1 guideline will receive full consideration on a space-available basis. additional letters (up to three) are always welcome. It is suggested that supplemental information be provided by those students who will be applying for Saint Martin’s University financial aid or scholarship programs.2 and 3. only students accepted before March 1 will receive priority consideration for institutional financial aid. After March 1. first-year Admission Saint Martin’s University welcomes applications from students who have earned a high school diploma. . the Office of Admissions will review the application and notify the applicant of an admission decision usually within three weeks. Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Testing (ACT) exam scores. The Catholic College Admission Application also is accepted. as well as state and federal financial aid. The most important criterion in the selection process is demonstrated academic achievement.

Application for first-Year Admission To apply for first-year admission. More information about CAP is available from the Office of Admissions or the Learning and Writing Center. psychology. debate or journalism. GED certificate or home school documentation . sociology and cultural anthropology. political science.0 GPA their first year at the University. mathematics. laboratory science and world language will strengthen the student’s Application for Admission.) • Mathematics – 3 years College preparatory algebra and geometry. • World Language – 2 years Students completing two years of a single world language in high school with a B average will have met the University’s world language requirement. in either paper or online format • Personal essay. as instructed on the Application • Official high school transcript. It is strongly recommended that high school applicants to Saint Martin’s complete an academic program that includes the following: • English – 4 years At least three years of study should be from college preparatory composition and English literature.) • Social Science – 2 years History. (One year may be satisfied by courses in drama. • Academic Electives – 3 years Academic electives and advanced study beyond the recommended course pattern.24 ADMISSION vising and tutoring from the Learning and Writing Center. economics. (Three years of science with two years of laboratory science are recommended for students majoring in engineering or the sciences. including one year of a laboratory science.) Students who do not meet these academic requirements or fulfill recommended course patterns may be offered admission on a conditional status. engineering or business. (Additional courses in English. students must submit: • The Application for Admission. (One additional year in advanced mathematics is recommended for students majoring in the sciences. public speaking. High school students are encouraged to submit their application materials during the first semester of their senior year. CAP students are required to maintain a 2.) • Science – 3 years College preparatory science.

College-level credit will be evaluated in a manner consistent with standard transfer equivalency programs. including completion of high school course requirements. transcripts must be submitted. Students must submit official college transcripts to receive credit for college courses completed while in high school. Students participating in the College Board’s examinations may receive credit for exam scores of 3. Saint Martin’s institutional codes. or 7 in selected higher level IB examinations. transcripts. To receive credit for IB exams students should submit their final high school transcript with IB exam scores to the Office of Admissions for review by the University’s registrar. but not ENG 102 or the literature requirement. University Credit for High School Students/Running Start/AP/Ib High school students earning college credit will be considered freshmen for University admission purposes. Saint Martin’s recognizes the International Baccalaureate Program. At minimum. Transcripts will be reviewed on an individual basis. Credit may be given for scores of 5. To receive academic credit for AP exams students should have official copies of their exam results sent to the Office of Admissions by the College Board or have them printed on their final high school transcript. If courses have been taken at a local high school or college.ADMISSION • Official transcripts from all colleges or universities attended (if applicable) • A $35 nonrefundable application fee or fee waiver • Test scores from the College Board’s SAT exam or American College Testing Program (ACT). GENERAL INFORMATION . Applicants should supply as much information as possible about their home school experience. Students with Advanced Placement scores of 4 or 5 may receive elective credits in writing and literature. descriptions of all courses. Exceptions to this policy are General Education requirements in writing and literature. applicants may send up to three) 25 Home School Applicants Home-schooled applicants will be evaluated on an individual basis. 4 or 5. which applicants need to have their exam scores reported to the Office of Admission. are 4674 for the SAT and 4474 for the ACT. • School Report Form • A letter of recommendation from a counselor or teacher (one letter is required. should be submitted to the Office of Admissions. Running Start students must follow freshman application procedures and meet freshman admission standards. with reading lists. A maximum of 32 semester credits may be granted for IB or AP examinations. 6. or any other type of advance credit for high school applicants. International Baccalaureate credits can be used to satisfy appropriate general education requirements and can be applied to major or minor programs of study with the approval of the academic department. An Advanced Placement exam score of 4 or 5 may exempt students from taking ENG 101.

Applicants are encouraged to provide as much information as possible about their previous education. No more than 30 semester hours (45 quarter hours) earned by extension or correspondence will be accepted. professional objectives and community involvement.26 ADMISSION Transfer Admission Students transferring from other colleges or universities are considered for admission on the basis of academic achievement. if applicable . as instructed on the Application • Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended • A $35 nonrefundable application fee or fee waiver • Official high school transcript. Applications for Admission are evaluated on an individual basis to determine admissibility and transcripts are evaluated on an individual basis to determine transferability of credit. GED certificate or home school documentation) and SAT or ACT scores. Community college graduates who have a Direct Transfer Associate Degree completed after 1990 are admitted to Saint Martin’s with junior standing. Application for Transfer Admission To apply for transfer admission students must submit: • The Application for Admission. life experience and educational/ professional objectives to assist the Admission Committee in making its decision. life experience. Transfer credits not included in a Direct Transfer Associate Degree will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. in either paper or online format • Personal essays. Transfer credits from a twoyear accredited college may not exceed 64 semester hours (96 quarter hours). Of these. A maximum of 96 semester hours (144 quarter hours) will be accepted toward fulfillment of requirements for a baccalaureate degree. and credits will be applied to academic major requirements according to established guidelines and policies. Saint Martin’s University participates in transfer agreements with 28 community colleges in the state of Washington. GED certificate or home school documentation. They will have satisfied Saint Martin’s General University Requirements with the exception of one course in religion and one course in philosophy. Applications are welcome from students attending two-year and four-year accredited colleges and universities worldwide. no more than six semester hours (nine quarter hours) may be taken by correspondence. Credits earned more than nine years ago will be reviewed to determine transferability. If an applicant has completed less than 30 semester credits or 45 quarter credits (generally one year) of college or university study they are asked to submit high school academic records (transcript.

DD Form 295. if applicable • For those who have prior military credits: All scores from U. 1 for spring semester. AARTS transcripts.S. $200 of the student’s enrollment deposit will be used as the required housing deposit. Residence hall assignments and pre-registration appointments are assigned after the enrollment confirmation deposit is received. International students seeking admission to the University must submit: • completed Saint Martin’s University International Student A Application for Admission and a non-refundable $35 (U. currency) application fee. • Personal essay as instructed on the Application. Students who will be living on campus also are required to submit a housing contract. International students must submit all application materials at least three months before their expected date of enrollment. Armed Forces Institution Examinations (USAFI) and/or (DANTES) and/or College Examination Program (CLEP).S. Saint Martin’s maintains an active International Club that promotes interaction between U. CCAF transcripts. The deposit is nonrefundable after these dates. The enrollment deposit may be submitted at any time. GENERAL INFORMATION .S. Other documentation such as DD Form 214. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION Saint Martin’s University welcomes applications from international students and provides support services for them through the Office of International Programs and Development. 27 Acceptance of an Undergraduate Offer of Admission Students will be notified of a decision regarding admission usually within three weeks after an application is complete. college A or university previously attended. • n official translated transcript from each secondary school. and international students and fosters a supportive environment on campus. Students who plan to enroll at Saint Martin’s must return the Enrollment Confirmation card with the Enrollment Deposit of $325. This deposit is credited to the student’s account for the first semester of enrollment. DLI transcripts and SMART transcripts. The housing deposit is refundable.ADMISSION • Test scores from the College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Testing Program (ACT). but the University recommends that the deposit be submitted by May 1 for fall semester and by Dec. provided the terms and conditions of the housing contract are met.

which complements that of the regular academic year. Those not matriculated at Saint Martin’s University should contact their home institution about transferability of the credits. Those P international students who lack valid U. please contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology office. GRADUATE ADMISSION Information concerning admission to the University’s individual graduate programs is contained in the graduate section of this catalog: • • • • • • Master of Business Administration (MBA) Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC) Master of Civil Engineering (MCE) Master of Engineering Management (MEM) Master of Education (MED) Master in Teaching (MIT) EDUCATION PROGRAM ADMISSION Students who seek to enroll in any of the University’s education programs must make separate Application for Admission to the University’s College of Education and Professional Psychology. provides opportunities to make up academic deficiencies.S. The curriculum. • roof of health insurance coverage that is valid in the U.S. health insurance coverage will be required to enroll in the University’s health plan. A letter of full guarantee or support submitted by any sponsoring agency will meet the requirement for proof of finances. 360-438-4333.28 ADMISSION • est scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) T are required if their native language is not English. . For specific requirements. Students from any institution may apply. accelerate progress toward graduation. • n official statement of financial support attesting to the student’s A ability to finance his or her education at Saint Martin’s. Admission to Saint Martin’s University does not secure admission into an education program. for admission information or to schedule an interview. Students who do not have a TOEFL score or who score 525 or below on the paper-based TOEFL (or the equivalent) will be enrolled in the English as a Second Language (ESL) Program until they are able to meet this requirement. SUMMER SESSION ADMISSION Summer session courses are offered at the Lacey campus by all of the University’s colleges and schools in terms of varying length from the first week after graduation through the first week of August. provided they meet the prerequisite and program participation requirements for the courses in which they wish to enroll. and undertake a variety of personally enriching learning experiences.

members of Saint Martin’s Abbey and the University faculty to discuss theological questions. contemporary issues and their deeper meanings in our lives. ExTENSION CAMPUS ADMISSION Applicants should submit the Saint Martin’s University Extension Campus Application either by paper or online format to be considered for admission to the extension programs at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Civilians should first consider our degree programs Saint Martin’s main campus in Lacey or the other extension campuses. Olympic Community College or Tacoma Community College. Centralia College. An attractive array of Summer. in either paper or Th online format • fficial transcripts from all colleges. In addition. and if admitted. The Institute may be taken for credit as RLS 494. if requested • ll scores from U. Saint Martin’s students may use it to fulfill the General Education Requirement in religious studies. . Only main campus offers the full range of support services often necessary for timely and successful degree completion. an Army/American Council on Education Registry D Transcript (AARTS) . GED certificate or home school O documentation.) • fficial high school transcript. Armed Forces Institution Examinations (USAFI) A and/or (DANTES) and/or College Examination Program (CLEP). Recent high school graduates are required to apply to. Term V and Term I courses also are offered online during the summer months and at the University’s extension campuses. complete their degree program at main campus unless there are highly exceptional circumstances. The extension campuses at Joint Base Lewis-McChord are for the benefit primarily of active-duty service members and their families. universities and military services O schools attended • $35 nonrefundable application fee or fee waiver (The undergraduate A application fee of $35 is automatically waived for active-duty members. Questions about which campus is the right campus for you to apply to should be directed to an admission counselor in the Office of Admissions.a Community College of the Air Force GENERAL INFORMATION A weeklong Spiritual Life Institute is sponsored by the Religious Studies Department each June. Everett Community College.or . extending the hospitality and warm welcome for which Saint Martin’s University and the Pacific Northwest are known. Visiting theologians join professionals from the local community. Participation is open to all. The Office of International Programs and Development offers language instruction and cultural enrichment programs for students from many parts of the world. active duty personnel must submit the following forms or transcripts: • D Form 295.S. A complete Extension Campus Application consists of: • e Extension Campus Application for Admission.ADMISSION 29 Summer is a busy time for international education at Saint Martin’s University.

Yellow Ribbon Program Saint Martin’s University is a participant in the Yellow Ribbon Program. Institutional members of the SOC DNS agree to special requirements and obligations that provide military students.a Sailor/Marine American Council on Education Registry (SMART) transcript • etired or completed-service personnel must submit a completed R DD Form 214. also known as the Post 9/11 GI Bill. and veterans.and four-year Degree Network System for the Army (SOCAD).30 ADMISSION (CCAF) transcript . their spouses and college-age children with opportunities to complete college degrees without suffering loss of academic credit due to changes of duty station. SOC Consortium institutional members subscribe to criteria to ensure that quality academic programs are available to military students.or . Applicants to the University should allow a minimum of two weeks from the time of their advising appointment for completion of transcript evaluation. SOC operates the two. The SOC Degree Network System (DNS) consists of a subset of SOC Consortium member institutions selected by the military services to deliver specific associate and bachelor’s degree programs to servicemembers and their families. .700 institutional members. established in 1972. financing documentation and additional information. • DLI transcripts Applicants with Military Experience Saint Martin’s University operates extension campuses at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. their family members. Eligibility for benefits is determined by the Veterans Administration. Navy (SOCNAV). Please see the catalog index for sections describing the extension campuses and their programs. Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Consortium Saint Martin’s University is a member of the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium and the SOC Degree Network System. SOC. academic degree program. veterans and their dependents will receive the maximum tuition assistance allowed by the program. is a consortium of national higher education associations and more than 1. Yellow Ribbon benefits replace other forms of Saint Martin’s financial assistance such as merit scholarships and grants. Veterans Administration / Vocational Rehabilitation Applicants applying through Veterans Administration or vocational rehabilitation programs should schedule an appointment with an admission counselor through the Office of Admissions to complete all required academic degree plans and necessary paperwork. plus assistance with books and living expenses. Eligible service members. Marine Corps (SOCMAR) and Coast Guard (SOCCOAST). civilian employees of the Department of Defense (DoD) and Coast Guard.

We work hard to provide the highest quality experience possible inside and outside the classroom. GENERAL INFORMATION APPLICATION fOR READMISSION . In all cases listed here. Eligibility for aid varies just as widely. should submit an Application for Re-Admission to the Office of Admissions if they have been away two or more semesters. productive members of society..FINANCIAL AID 31 Students who have attended Saint Martin’s previously and left voluntarily (i. Old Main 206. Admission normally will be granted if the applicant’s cumulative grade point average is 2. employment and loans to assist its students in financing a university education. and on pages 71-72 of this catalog. guided by our Benedictine values. students are strongly advised to contact the Office of Financial Aid at the same time and ask specifically what they need to do to reinstate or reapply for financial aid. The University provides a comprehensive financial aid program that includes scholarships. academic merit. We understand students and families undertake a significant financial commitment and make real sacrifices to attend Saint Martin’s. Details regarding the procedure to be followed are available in the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. we strive to make Saint Martin’s accessible through a combination of reasonable tuition rates and generous financial aid.e. grants. In exchange. Students who have been dismissed from Saint Martin’s University for conduct or behavior may seek reinstatement from the Office of the Dean of Students. Saint Martin’s University serves a wide variety of students in many programs. to engage deeply in the academic and social fabric of campus. fINANCIAL AID Guided by the Benedictine values of hospitality and stewardship. at many locations. Students who have been away only one semester should contact the Office of the Registrar directly to register for classes. Students who have attended another college or university during their absence must submit official transcripts from each institution. Saint Martin’s University will partner with you every step of the way.25 or better. Our role in this partnership. were not suspended). we ask our students to take their education seriously. Awards take into account a variety of circumstances: financial need. Old Main 269. and to fill in where family resources are not enough. Students who have been suspended from Saint Martin’s University for poor academic performance may appeal or seek reinstatement from the University’s Academic Standards Committee. goes well beyond the scholarships and grants that will be part of your financial aid package. Financial aid exists to supplement the student’s and family’s efforts. Students and families have the primary responsibility for paying the cost of education. and to take to heart our mission to create graduates who are active. Details regarding the procedure to appeal for reinstatement after conduct-related dismissal are available in the Office of the Dean of Students. Students are encouraged to speak to someone in the Office of Financial Aid to understand clearly what is available to them. talent or a combination of these elements.

• 16 – 45 days late (5/1 – 5/30): Institutional aid is reduced 25 percent. • 6 days to day before class starts (5/31 – to day before class starts): 4 Institutional aid is aid reduced 35 percent. Appeals for missing the FAFSA/FAFSA Non-Filer Form deadline will not be accepted.gov. and apply to both the FAFSA and the FAFSA Non-Filer Form. Deadlines • Newly admitted students – March 1 • Continuing Saint Martin’s students – April 15 These deadlines apply to all students in all programs. The Saint Martin’s University FAFSA code is 003794.ed. Students who submit financial aid materials after March 1 will receive awards on a first-come. Alternatively. Each year the University dedicates more than $7 million toward financial aid. In F addition. they can mail their completed FAFSA to the federal processor no later than mid-February to meet the March 1 deadline for new students and mid-March to meet the April 15 deadline for continuing students.ed. Penalties for Missing Deadlines New students who have been admitted and submitted the FAFSA form to the federal processor by March 1 receive priority consideration for financial aid at the University.gov as soon as possible after January 1 of each year. . Exceptions may be made only in the case of circumstances beyond the student’s control such as illness or death in the family. APPLYING fOR fINANCIAL AID The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is required to apply for financial aid at Saint Martin’s University.fafsa. Students can obtain a paper copy of the FAFSA by calling 1-800-4FEDAID or file online at www. Penalties for filing after this date are: • 1 – 15 days late (4/16 – 4/30): Institutional aid is reduced 10 percent.fafsa. Students not wishing to apply for state or federal aid (including Stafford and Perkins Loans) must file the Saint Martin’s University FAFSA Non-Filer Form in order to receive their merit or other non-need based scholarships. Failure to do so will result in forfeiture of those scholarship awards. • irst day of class or later: Institutional aid is reduced 50 percent. Continuing students must submit a renewal FAFSA or the FAFSA Non-Filer Form by April 15. first-served basis. As the most affordable Catholic university in the Pacific Northwest. we strive to make a Saint Martin’s education as accessible as possible. Students are encouraged to complete the FAFSA online at www. some state and federal funds you would normally be eligible for may not be available after the start of the semester. We strive to assist as broad a group of students as possible.32 FINANCIAL AID We take with equal importance our role as stewards of the tuition and costs paid to us each year. but it is not possible for us to meet 100 percent of every student’s need.

Please see page 35 for details and what actions the student or family must take. depending upon the following: • cademic Level: Undergraduate. graduate. Awards are made for the academic year. The formula takes into account such things as student and/or family income. and the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is calculated. All those who are admitted by the priority deadline of March 1 and submit their FAFSA by that date will receive 100 percent of the aid for which they are eligible. they are truly “financial aid packages” and may contain up to a dozen different sources of funding. This information is forwarded to the applicant (on the Student Aid Report or SAR) and to Saint Martin’s University if listed as one of the schools to receive the data. income. Saint Martin’s has several different Costs of Attendance. Awards to continuing students are not created until the student has pre-registered for the upcoming semester! This is to insure each award is based upon the correct COA. subject to change and to be made final upon completion of verification. Those selected for verification will not receive an award until verification is completed. Some students will be selected for verification. Based upon this. grants and federal for which they are eligible. New students selected for verification will receive an estimated or tentative award. number in college. ranging from scholarships to work-study. family size. Those who are admitted and who submitted their FAFSA in January will receive their awards first. Awards to new students begin mailing at the end of February or the beginning of March each year and continue through the spring.FINANCIAL AID 33 The amount of need-based financial aid a student receives is calculated using a formula established by the U.S. The EFC is compared to the student’s Cost of Attendance (COA). and financial need is determined. Students who file their FAFSA on-time (April 15) and are pre-registered should receive their award in early June. Special Circumstances If your family should experience one or more of the following situations. STAR A or post-baccalaureate study • Location: Main campus or extension campus • ousing (for main campus undergraduates): H On-campus. FAFSA data is processed by the central processor. Department of Education. At Saint Martin’s. assets and certain types of expenses. at home with parents. off-campus/not with parents Rarely does a financial aid award contain one source of funds. each applicant is awarded the scholarships. you may file a special/unusual circumstance letter to update your information (those families who are appealing will be selected for verification): • Loss of wages • Death of a parent or spouse • Divorce or separation GENERAL INFORMATION fINANCIAL AID AWARDS .

For continued eligibility.S. Full-time enrollment is defined as the following for the purposes of financial aid: • Main campus undergraduate students – 12 credits • Graduate Students – 6 credits • xtension campus students (those on the Term Schedule. e. Eligibility for aid.. especially federal loans and grants.g. freshmen. etc.34 FINANCIAL AID • Retirement of a parent or spouse • Medical/dental that are exceptional or unexpected • K-12 private school tuition costs • Loss of child support • Support paid to extended family members • National or natural disaster Situations we cannot consider: • Inability to liquidate assets • Consumer debt • Mortgage payment • Having employment to return to school • Property taxes ELIGIbILITY fOR fINANCIAL AID Only students who have been officially admitted to Saint Martin’s University and are enrolled in a degree-seeking program are eligible for financial aid from the University. sophomore. For federal and state aid. Eligibility for aid varies depending upon whether or not a student is enrolled fulltime. a student must meet the requirements established by the U. and Terms 3 and 4 comprise spring semester) or 12 credits for each semester. Department of Education and/or the State of Washington’s Higher Education Coordinating Board to be an eligible recipient of financial aid. also varies depending upon an undergraduate student’s class standing. Failure to do so may result in the student being placed on financial aid probation or termination of the student’s eligibility to receive financial aid. each student is expected to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward his or her degree and meet any other conditions of the award. such as at JBLM) E – 6 credits per eight-week term (Terms 1 and 2 comprise fall semester. Class standing is based strictly upon the number of credits earned (“earned” is defined as having passed the course): . Students considering enrolling at a level below this should contact the Office of Financial Aid and understand how their financial aid will be affected.

regardless of change of major. This process is separate from the Academic Progress that is monitored by the Academic Standards Committee.00 or higher. which will be reviewed at the beginning of each semester prior to disbursement. When calculating the percentage of courses attempted. 2. all financial aid recipients must meet two requirements: a quantitative measure or number of credits earned. Washington State Need Grant recipients must have completed no more than 125 percent of the maximum length of their program credits (160 credits) in order to remain eligible for the state need grant. 3. The college assumes the student has ceased participation in academic activities at the midpoint in the semester. To remain eligible to receive financial aid. Satisfactory Academic Progress is reviewed for all students at the conclusion of spring semester each year. Extension campus students will be reviewed on the same schedule. Students placed upon probationary status for financial aid will have their progress reviewed at the end of fall semester. I (incomplete) or V (vanished). I (incomplete) and V (vanished) during a semester are subject to the return of 50 percent of their federal aid. An undergraduate student may not exceed 192 attempted credits. state and/or institutional) from the University. Undergraduate Students 1. Students must complete. 1. The calculation is as follows: Earned Credits divided by Attempted Credits. W (withdrawn). at least 66 percent of all courses attempted. GENERAL INFORMATION . students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2. After the completion of two semesters. Please be advised that the Washington State Need Grant has its own Satisfactory Academic Progress policy. Students wishing to calculate their percentage of courses attempted may review their transcript through Self-Service (transcripts). W (withdrawn). all credit-bearing courses taken at Saint Martin’s University are considered.FINANCIAL AID First year/freshman: 0–29 semester credit hours earned Second year/sophomore: 30–59 credits earned Third year/junior: 60–89 credits earned Fourth year/senior: 90 or more credits earned 35 Zero Credits Earned: Students who earned zero credits (all grades of F or a combination of F. Terms 1 and 2 comprising fall semester and Terms 3 and 4 comprising spring semester. and a qualitative measure or cumulative grade point average (GPA) each measurement period. The student will be responsible for any balance from the loss of funding. Satisfactory Academic Progress: The Office of Financial Aid must monitor Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for all students receiving financial aid (federal. Attempted Credits included classes which a student may receive an F. with a passing grade.

2. W (withdrawn). Department of Education randomly selects some FAFSAs for verification. with a passing grade. Not all students selected for verification have to submit the same documents. Attempted Credits include classes which a student may receive an F. each year a minimum 30 percent of all Saint Martin’s University financial aid applicants must have the information submitted on the FAFSA verified. telephone. After the completion of two semesters. Students subject to verification should pay close attention to correspondence (mail. at least 66 percent of all courses attempted. and is fully subject to change. The normal expectation is that documents requested for verification be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid within 10 working days. regardless of change of major. Verification is a process to confirm that the information provided on the FAFSA is accurate. The U. Students have the right to appeal this decision in writing. Department of Education or Saint Martin’s due to discrepancies in their data. Students must complete. Verification: By law. Students wishing to calculate their percentage of courses attempted may review their transcript through Self Service (transcripts). The calculation is as follows: Earned Credits divided by Attempted Credits. all credit-bearing courses taken at Saint Martin’s University are considered. students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3. Appeals will be reviewed by the Financial Aid Appeals Committee for reconsideration based on extenuating circumstances presented by the student. or V (vanished). Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeals: Students who fail to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress will be denied financial aid by Saint Martin’s University.S. that award becomes an Estimated or Tentative Award.S. You may obtain a complete outline of the SAP policy and appeal process in the Office of Financial Aid. If any student or family feels they cannot meet this 10-day deadline.00 or higher. Decisions by this committee will be considered final. they should inform the Office of Financial Aid immediately. I (incomplete). and especially email) from the Office of Financial Aid. Failure to do so by the start of the semester will result in the student being deemed ineligible to receive financial aid and all aid will be cancelled. Those selected for verification will be asked to provide specific documentation. Typically both parent and student tax returns for the last one or two years are required. Graduate Students 1. Verification can result in a student’s financial aid award changing. To meet minimum satisfactory progress standards. respond quickly to any requests for information. Washington State Need Grant recipients must complete at least one-half of the original amount of credits for which the aid was calculated and disbursed. Others are selected by the U. If you receive a financial aid award prior to being informed that you have been selected for verification. When calculating the percentage of courses attempted.36 FINANCIAL AID 2. It is the student and family’s responsibility to complete the Verification process. . and understand at all times the status of their financial aid award.

FINANCIAL AID 37 LIMITS ON fINANCIAL AID If a student is attending Saint Martin’s and has exceeded one or more of the maximum timeframes or limits to receive financial aid. benefactors Scholarships (previously Scholarship-to-be-Named): This form of institutional gift aid is given to students with a GPA above 3. Those needing two semesters can appeal. the total amount of aid from all sources cannot under any circumstances exceed your Cost of Attendance. we will first reduce your loans. Some scholarships and grants have very specific criteria. students should consult with the Office of Financial Aid if they have questions about the specific grants they are receiving. Maximum Timeframe to Receive Aid — Institutional: Undergraduate students at Saint Martin’s University are eligible to receive institutional financial aid for eight fulltime semesters (prorated for transfers students based on number of credits transferred into the institution).5 who may receive one of GENERAL INFORMATION Verification ensures that the information students and parents report is accurate. Annual Limit: In any single academic year. Maximum Timeframe to Receive Aid — State: Per state regulations. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for complete details. then if necessary any Saint Martin’s funds. Your award may have a combination of the following: Athletic award: Top student-athletes may be offered these scholarships at the discretion of Saint Martin’s University athletic coaches. . state and federal programs. Maximum Timeframe to Receive Aid — federal: Per federal regulations. undergraduate students who qualify for federal financial aid can only receive federal aid for 160 semester credits (this includes credits earned at other institutions). In the rare case that you reach this limit. TYPES Of fINANCIAL AID Eligibility is determined by academic merit. or a combination of the two. your EFC. There are exceptions to this policy as dictated by federal law for veterans and active-duty military personnel. Some federal grants have different limitations. the pertinent type of aid will be automatically terminated. and private or “outside” scholarships. Students are strongly encouraged to work closely with their advisor to develop course schedules that allow for on-time graduation. but exceptional circumstances must be demonstrated. This includes Saint Martin’s. Verification prevents ineligible students from receiving aid by reporting false information and ensures that eligible students receive all of the aid for which they are qualified. Students who need an extra semester to complete their academic program can appeal to the Office of Financial Aid for an additional semester of aid. as described below. undergraduate students who qualify for federal financial aid can only receive federal aid for 180 semester credits (this includes credits earned at other institutions).

Merit Scholarships: This form of institutional gift aid is given to newly admitted students who demonstrate outstanding academic achievement. Those who qualify receive one of the following scholarships: Chancellor’s Academic Merit Scholarship. or grandparent(s) graduated from Saint Martin’s University. All names and graduation dates are verified. If the four-year service requirement is not met. family Discount: This form of institutional gift aid is given to students who have another family member attending Saint Martin’s University as a full-time. The award amount decreases if the recipient is not enrolled full-time. Students are notified at the beginning of the school year on how to apply for positions. Parish Youth Leadership Scholarship: This scholarship is for students who did not graduate from Catholic schools but were leaders in Catholic parish youth groups and were recommended by parish pastors or youth group advisors. you will receive this award if you reported the names of your family members on your Application for Admission. This grant does not need to be repaid. students will be awarded a specific scholarship that matches such things as their intended major. Dean’s Academic Merit Scholarship. Students are paid directly for their work. federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG): This need-based grant does not need to be repaid. which has a fixed interest rate of 5 percent. or leadership. This form of gift aid does not have to be repaid. A minimum enrollment of half-time (at least six . commitment to community service. College or High School. Perkins Loan: This is a need-based loan borrowed under the student’s name. it is not deducted from their tuition bill. eligibility is determined by criteria set by the federal government. spouse.38 FINANCIAL AID our donor scholarships. the funds must be repaid by the student as an unsubsidized Stafford Loan. President’s Academic Merit Scholarship. or the Faculty Merit Scholarship. contact your admission counselor immediately. Priority is given to Pell Grant recipients who are enrolled full-time. The award amount will decrease if a student is not enrolled full-time. extracurricular interests. federal TEACH Grant: This federal grant/loan is awarded to students who agree to teach for four years as a highly-qualified teacher in a high-need field at a low-income school after completing their degree. federal Work-Study: This federal need-based program allows students to work on campus to earn an income to help meet educational costs. degreeseeking. Saint Martin’s cannot replace this award with scholarship or grant aid if a student does not wish to work. Pell Grant: For this federal need-based grant. main campus student. Many jobs are available and it is the student’s responsibility to secure employment if they wish to work. Legacy Scholarship: If your parent(s). sibling(s). Students should manage these funds carefully and use them to meet educational expenses. If you did not.

First-time borrowers are required to complete an entrance counseling session. Unsubsidized Stafford Loan: This is a non-need-based loan borrowed under the student’s name. Students may choose either to pay the interest while they are in school or defer it until they begin repayment. and no interest will accrue while the student is in school. The two principal types are: • arent PLUS Loan. which details the borrower’s rights and responsibilities. foundations and philanthropic organizations. Outside Scholarships: There are many types of scholarships offered by businesses. such as a bank. which details the borrower’s rights and responsibilities. Students must be enrolled in at least six credits each semester to be eligible. OTHER MEANS fOR PAYING EDUCATIONAL COSTS Other Loans: There are other types of educational loans beyond the Stafford and Perkins Loans. Saint Martin’s will not reduce Saint Martin’s aid unless the amount falls under our Limit on Total Aid policy. Subsidized Stafford Loan: This is a need-based loan borrowed under the student’s name. we encourage all students to apply for any scholarship that might apply to them. there is a six-month grace period when no payments are required and no interest accrues. No payments are required while the student is enrolled at least half-time (at least six credits per semester). No payments are required while the student is enrolled at least half-time (at least six credits per semester). Students not receiving an academic merit scholarship may receive this award. GENERAL INFORMATION credits per semester) is required. Washington State Need Grant: This is a need-based state grant that does not need to be repaid. a non-need-based loan parents can take out to help P pay for their child’s education. but interest will accrue. Students are required to report any outside scholarships received. . First-time borrowers are required to complete an entrance counseling session. Students must be enrolled in at least six credits each semester to be eligible. a non-need-based loan borrowed P from a private lender. After the student leaves school.FINANCIAL AID 39 Saint Martin’s University Grants or University Scholarship: This form of institutional gift aid is given as part of our Benedictine commitment to making the Saint Martin’s experience accessible to many. there is a six-month grace period when no payments are required. After the student leaves school. which details the borrower’s rights and responsibilities. there is a nine-month grace period during which there are no payments and no interest accrues. No payments are required and no interest will accrue while the student is enrolled at least half-time. After the student leaves school. • rivate Loan or Alternative Loan. First-time borrowers are required to complete an entrance counseling session. The award amount decreases if the recipient is not enrolled full-time. Every little bit helps.

Payment plans at Saint Martin’s are administered by tuition management systems (TMS).730/$2. or by emailing finaid@stmartin.m. ExPENSES All fees are subject to change on 30 days’ notice.300 per academic year. business.40 EXPENSES Tuition payment plans: A frequently overlooked method of managing college costs is a monthly payment plan. Spangler Hall Suites  Double room charges Single room charges Super single charges Year/Semester $3.365 $5. Baran Hall  Double room charges Single room charges 2. TUITION RATES • full-time Student (12-18 semester hours): $27. The University may assess additional fees for testing. Information is available from the Student Financial Service Center or online at www.930 $4. and Engineering classes (Undergraduate and Graduate): $30 per semester hour surcharge. Saint Martin’s University.120 $4. $130 per semester hour awarded Final tuition charges are based on the student’s class schedule as recorded on the last day for adding or changing classes.edu. • Audit (no credit): $455 per semester hour.com/stmartin. RESIDENCE CHARGES 1.m. Lacey WA 98503-7500.860/$1. Be sure to set up your plan early. as the first payment is often due in July or August before classes start.afford. labs and other services. an official date listed in the academic calendar of this catalog. 5300 Pacific Avenue SE.100/$2.050 $4. • Accounting. The office is open from 8 a.240/$2. but do not charge interest.300/$2. Plans have a small set-up fee. fOR MORE INfORMATION Individuals seeking more information about financial aid at Saint Martin’s may contact the Office of Financial Aid by calling 360-438-4397 or 800-368-8803. • Part-time and Overload Rate: $910 per semester hour for one to 11 credits and for each credit above 18 credits. • Graduate-Level Credits: Please see the graduate program portion of this catalog • fOCUS Program: $75 application fee.650 . Monday through Friday except holidays. Students also can write the office at: Office of Financial Aid. to 5 p. Economics.

Burton Hall Apartments Single room charges Double room charges 5.128 $1. please contact the Office of Student Accounts.880/$2. main campus H undergraduates only GENERAL INFORMATION . New Student Damage Deposit/Room Reservation: $200.995 $5.725 $5. shared bath.990/$2. main F campus only • Transfer Student Orientation.460/$2. fall semester (non-refundable): $275.870 $5. this $200 fee is included in the $325 Enrollment Deposit. If student is residing on campus. Board Charges Gold Plan Silver Plan Bronze Plan Commuter 41 $5.740/$2. room charges Super single charges 6.795 $4. please contact the Office of Housing and Residence Life. 360-438-4389. 360-412-6163.230 $5. room charges Single. Parsons Hall Double room charges Single. located in the Student Financial Service Center. Please see the Refund Policy elsewhere in this section of the catalog for a description of refund policies for room and board deposits as well as room damage deposits.250 $4. S campus undergraduates only main • ealth Center Fee (non-refundable): $51 per semester.010/$2.650/$825 For other housing options. fEE SCHEDULE All fees listed are 2011/2012 rates. main campus only • ew Student Orientation.505 $5.380 $4.590/$2. Student Services fees • reshman Orientation. Session Room and board: For information.500/$2. Spangler Hall Apartments Single room charges Single room charges (studio) 4.300/$2.650 $4.450/$2.760/$2. spring semester: $30 spring semester.EXPENSES 3. fall semester: $85.440 $4. N main campus only • tudent Activity Fee (non-refundable): $110 per semester.255/$2. private bath.

NOTE: Please see the Refund Policy later in this section of the catalog for a description of tuition deposit refund policies.42 EXPENSES • ealth Insurance (non-refundable): Estimated $1. Registration fees • Application Fee (may be waived): $35 • nrollment Deposit: $325 E If student is residing on campus.380 per year for H student premium (family coverage is available). A convenience fee of 2. The following methods of payment are accepted online only: MasterCard. (For those non-enrolled tudents C s who have finished their coursework but not their degree requirements or for those who are on leave. NOTE: Fees may be charged for specific laboratories. If not residing on campus. if a student has not submitted the form by the deadline. Computer Resource and Copy Center and other University resources): $50 per semester. Credit card payments cannot be accepted in the Student Accounts Office in person. or traveler’s check. Special fees • ontinuing. Details about completing the online waiver can be found on the “Health Insurance” webpage of the Office of Student Accounts. For further information regarding payment .5 percent will be assessed for this service. money order. (Visa cannot be accepted). the entire $325 will be applied to tuition charges. non-enrolled student fee. Discover and American Express. by email or by fax. check. Free electronic check (e-Check) is also available online. he or she will be responsible for the insurance charge. International students must contact the Office of International Programs and Development (360-438-4504) for information regarding insurance requirements. $200 of this deposit will be applied to the Damage Deposit. this fee enables the student to use the University library. by phone. • OCUS program credits and credit by examination non-refundable): F ( $75 application fee. • ate Validation fee (non-refundable): $50 (charge effective on first day L of class) • Laboratory and Special Class fees (non-refundable): Fee information is included on each semester’s schedule. by mail. Students who have sufficient personal coverage may waive this fee by submitting a completed online waiver form to the University’s insurance provider by the first day of the semester. $130 per credit hour • Applied lessons in music: $195 per credit hour Payment Saint Martin’s University accepts the following methods of payment in person or by mail: cash. Waivers cannot be accepted after the deadline.

Payment Plans: Contact the Office of Student Accounts. Students are encouraged to maintain any personal coverage they have. Contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology office (360-438-4333) for information regarding the Alternative Route to Teacher Certification schedule/refund. if a student has not submitted the form by the deadline.edu/Student_accounts/Insurance. At Saint Martin’s extension campuses at Joint Base Lewis-McChord.and eight-week sessions. securities or personal property held by students. . located in the Student Financial Service Center.aspx). International students are required to have coverage while attending school in the U. Everett Community College and Tacoma Community College extension campuses is divided into two semesters of 16 weeks each. PROPERTY LOSS OR DAMAGE Saint Martin’s University does not assume responsibility for loss of money. located in the Student Financial Service Center. contact the Office of Student Accounts.stmartin. Those who do not have personal coverage through a private insurer must purchase health insurance through the University’s provider. depending on the program.EXPENSES 43 Regular Payment: All fees are due and payable in full on or before the first day of the semester or session. The academic year on the main campus and at Centralia College. Two six-week summer sessions also are offered. for information on the University’s annual and semester payment plans. Damage of school property is charged to the responsible student or repaired at his or her expense. the University offers five eight-week sessions. 360-438-4389. Students having satisfactory personal coverage may waive the fee by submitting a completed online waiver form to the University’s insurance provider by the first day of the semester. REfUND POLICY General Information Saint Martin’s University measures its classes in semester credit hours. Refund procedures and calculations vary by campus and by the session in which the student is enrolled. and must contact the Office of International Programs and Development (360-4384504) for further information. as are 12. STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE Saint Martin’s University requires main campus students to have health insurance coverage. he or she will be responsible for the insurance charge.S. 360-438-4389. Waivers cannot be accepted after the deadline. Details about completing the online waiver can be found on the “Health Insurance” webpage of the Office of Student Accounts (www. GENERAL INFORMATION options or wire transfer information. if possible.

Students who think their refund amount is incorrect should contact the director of student accounts. the Office of Financial Aid will determine whether eligibility for financial aid requires an adjustment. laboratory fees. In most cases. Tuition Refunds 16-Week Regular Session (GoArmyEd students: Please see 8-12 week refund schedule. since the policy continues to provide coverage even though the student is no longer enrolled at the University. technology fees and new student orientation fees. This is determined by the Office of Financial Aid in conjunction with the Federal Return of Title IV Funds Policy. student activity fees. the date written notification is received by the director of extension programs. these include application fees. not on amounts already paid by the student. Non-Refundable Payments Certain payments to the University are non-refundable. Official Withdrawal Date Determination Date of withdrawal is determined by the date the written notification is received by the Office of the Registrar or.) Date of Withdrawal Prior to first day of session and from 1 to 10 calendar days From 11 to 17 calendar days From 18 to 24 calendar days Percent of Charges Dropped 100 75 50 . if enrolled at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord extension campuses. The fee section of this catalog specifies those non-refundable fees. Refund Calculations and Appeals Refunds are based on total charges. Centralia College or Tacoma Community College extensions must notify the director of extension programs. Students enrolled at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Student health insurance is also non-refundable if the student withdraws after 45 days. Students should be aware that federal and state awards may have to be repaid before the student is eligible for a refund. Please see sections on room and board for descriptions of applicable refund policy. Failure to attend class does not constitute an official withdrawal. Please note that if the student is receiving financial aid.44 EXPENSES SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY Action Required by Student Students enrolled at the main campus in Lacey who wish to withdraw from a class or from the University must notify the Office of the Registrar in writing. below.

regardless of course location. this policy includes all extension sites and the Lacey campus for students enrolled in GoArmyEd. The refund schedule is as follows: Date of Withdrawal Prior to first day of session and from 1 to 8 calendar days From 9 to 12 calendar days From 13 to 16 calendar days After 16 calendar days Percent of Charges Dropped 100 50 25 0 Six-Week Session Date of Withdrawal Prior to and through the first class session Through 7 calendar days From 8 to 14 calendar days After 14 calendar days Percent of Charges Dropped 100 50 25 0 Refunds are paid within 30 days following the student’s official date of withdrawal. or after Dec. Saint Martin’s University has elected to use the eight-week refund schedule for all students enrolling through GoArmyEd. regardless of the date signed. or if requested more than 30 days after officially checking out of the halls.to 12-Week Session (Includes enrollment in GoArmyEd 16 week session) In compliance with the one refund policy of GoArmyEd. A resident who does not check out in accordance with the procedures described in the Student Handbook will be subject to fines and/or forfeiture of all or part of his/her deposit. as documented by the University. 15 for spring semester.ACADEMIC EXPENSES CATALOG From 25 to 31 calendar days After 31 calendar days 25 0 45 Eight. expulsion or grant of a leave of absence.) No portion of the $200 deposit will be refunded if: the application is cancelled more than 30 days from the date it is signed. Room and Damage Deposit Damage Deposit and Cancellation fee A refundable $200 damage deposit must be on file with the Office of Student Accounts prior to the issuance of keys to the room. Reservations not claimed by noon of the fourth day of classes may be terminated by the University. Thus. Tuition Deposit Tuition deposits are not refundable after May 1 for the summer sessions or fall semester. GENERAL INFORMATION . or after August 1. (A $100 cleaning service fee is nonrefundable for apartments.

Room damage deposits may be refunded only after written application is made to the Office of Housing and Residence Life. Please refer to the Saint Martin’s University dining services brochure or visit www. board charges are prorated at a daily rate based on the ratio of full days used (to and including the official withdrawal date) to total days covered by the student’s board contract. d.com/saintmartin for additional meal plan policy information. c. board Refund Meal plans may be selected and changed by written request anytime before the add/ drop date. if the applicant stays the entire contract period and applies to return to the residence halls the following academic year. Room Refund Room charges are prorated if a student officially withdraws from the University and checks out according to contract by the 30th day of the semester. a $300 cancellation fee will be assessed if this contract is terminated after the University’s fall semester add/drop deadline. but no changes will be made thereafter. b. A $100 cleaning service fee is non-refundable for apartments.46 EXPENSES SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY After taking occupancy. The resident follows the check-out policy outlined in the Student Handbook. Fall meal plan balances carry over to spring with the purchase of a traditional (Bronze. Cancellation Fee: A $300 cancellation fee will be assessed if this contract is terminated after the University’s fall semester add/drop deadline. Additionally. At the end of the spring semester. his/her damage deposit will automatically be carried over to the following academic year.cafebonappetit. Room keys are properly checked in with the Office of Housing and Residence Life. Room charges are not refundable if a student is not leaving the University or if the student withdraws after the 30th day of the semester. all balances expire. They may be refunded only when the application is received no later than 30 days after a student officially stops living in the residence hall. e. The deposit is refundable if: a. The student fulfills the housing contract Terms of Residence and does not cancel his/her reservation more than 30 days from the date it is signed or after August 1. The resident does not have an outstanding balance on his/her  account with the University. . No damages or excess cleaning charges are associated with the resident’s room upon check-out. Silver or Gold) meal plan. If a student leaves Housing or the University before the end of the semester.

as well as a mechanical engineering two-plus-two program at its Everett Community College extension campus and a civil engineering two-plus-two program at Tacoma Community College. and Centralia College (for Education programs) extension campuses operate on the same semester academic schedule as the Lacey campus. Tacoma Community College.EXTENSION PROGRAMS ACADEMIC CATALOG 47 Saint Martin’s University operates accelerated eight-week term extension campuses at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and Centralia College. The Everett Community College. professional certification — see graduate program section) • Master of Business Administration (see graduate program section) • Master of Engineering Management (see graduate program section) GENERAL INFORMATION ExTENSION PROGRAMS . Management and Marketing • Criminal Justice • Political Science • Psychology • Special Education bachelor of Science Degree • Computer Science Elementary or Secondary Teacher Residency Certification Professional Certification Master’s Degree (a bachelor’s degree is required prior to enrolling in this program) (a Residency Certification is required prior to enrolling in this program) • Master in Teaching (elementary. graduate and teacher certification courses are taught at both military extension campuses and are primarily for the benefit of armed forces personnel and the military community. special education — see graduate program section) • Master of Education (special education. secondary. Finance. Please see the Lacey campus schedule for academic start dates. Undergraduate. DEGREE OPTIONS The following degree options are offered at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord extension campuses: bachelor of Arts Degree • Accounting • Business Administration with concentrations in Accounting.

prior military personnel and civilian students. LACEY CAMPUS STUDENTS Students enrolled in a degree program at the University’s main campus in Lacey will be permitted to take undergraduate courses at the extension campuses at Joint Base LewisMcChord only with the approval of their respective student advisor. as well as courses in endorsement areas.48 SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY EXTENSION PROGRAMS The Centralia College extension campus offers courses that lead to bachelor’s degrees in criminal justice and elementary education. five-term academic year (semester hours) schedule. 22 – Dec. The second and third weeks are open to all students. 9 – March 7 M arch 19 – May 12 M ay 21 – July 18 A ug. and the vice president for academic affairs. Existing students may register online as soon as registration is open to students. 13 – Oct. the department chair of the course in question. Applications are accepted from military personnel. Graduate-level coursework is also available toward a Master in Teaching or Master of Education. REGISTRATION The Saint Martin’s University extension campus at Joint Base Lewis-McChord offers courses on an accelerated. The University’s registrar. as well as courses necessary to complete degree requirements. TERM DATES 2011 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 1 Term 2 J an. Enrollment is on a space-available basis only. For further information please contact the Centralia College extension campus at 360-736-9391 ext. 3 O ct. through extension campus academic advisors. . 18 2012 Registration begins three weeks before the start of the term. 13 J an. Students may register as soon as they are authorized to do so by their respective academic advisor. the dean of the academic unit which offers the course. 8 O ct. New students may register at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord extension offices for classes at either location. Terms are eight weeks in length. 17 – Dec. 8 – Oct. 414. Military identification cardholders and their family members may register the first week. will inform students of the total number of credits accepted. 10 – March 9 M arch 21 – May 14 M ay 23 – July 20 A ug. See the Admission section of this catalog for a list of materials applicants must submit. or at the Centralia extension offices for classes at the Centralia campus.

regardless of course location. No exceptions are made to this policy without prior approval from the University’s vice president for academic affairs and the director of extension campuses. six semester hours per term is considered to be full-time. There are no tuition refunds for distance learning courses after the start of classes. Eight-Week Term Date of withdrawal 1 to 8 calendar days 9 to 12 calendar days 13 to 16 calendar days After 16 calendar days Percent of charges dropped 100 50 25 0 GoARMYEd STUDENT REfUND POLICY The following refund schedule for GoArmyEd students was implemented following GoArmyEd regulations which do not allow universities to follow more than one refund schedule. For graduate program students using Veterans Administration benefits. enrollment in three semester hours per term is considered full-time. a student must be enrolled for a combined total of 12 semester hours in terms one and two. Saint Martin’s University is using the eight-week refund schedule for all students enrolling through GoArmyEd. as indicated below. The last day to withdraw from a course is the last day of the term’s fifth week. TUITION REfUND POLICY fOR ExTENSION CAMPUSES A percentage of tuition will be dropped if a student withdraws from a class. A “W” will be sent to the University registrar to be recorded on the student’s transcript. GoArmyEd students at all extension sites and the Lacey campus will follow the following refund schedule: GENERAL INFORMATION CLASS LOADS . The refund amount depends on when the withdrawal occurs.EXTENSION PROGRAMS ACADEMIC CATALOG 49 The maximum student load at Joint Base Lewis-McChord extensions is nine semester hours per term. The course instructor will determine whether the student is passing or failing. Thus. To be considered a full-time student for financial aid purposes. and a combined total of 12 semester hours in terms three and four. WITHDRAWAL POLICY A student may withdraw from a course by completing a withdrawal form at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord extension office. For undergraduate students using Veterans Administration benefits.

Please see the Academic Policies and Procedures section of this catalog for complete information. see previous tuition refund schedule. The request must be in writing and must bear the student’s original signature. Unofficial transcripts can be obtained online for no fee once a student has established an academic account with the University.50 SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY EXTENSION PROGRAMS Percent of charges dropped 100 50 25 0 Date of withdrawal 1 to 8 calendar days 9 to 12 calendar days 13 to 16 calendar days After 16 calendar days Sixteen-Week Term: Same as 16-week session on main campus. . TRANSCRIPTS Official and unofficial transcripts can be obtained only from the Office of the Registrar on the main Saint Martin’s University campus in Lacey.

ACADEMIC CATALOG 51 ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ACADEMIC POLICIES .

Finance. Economics.52 UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS AND AREAS OF STUDY UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS AND AREAS Of STUDY business and Economics Majors Accounting Business Administration (Concentrations in Accounting. Management and Marketing) Business Administration Economics Minors Education Majors Minors Elementary Education Special Education Physical Education Technology in Education Education Reading Special Education Engineering Majors Civil Engineering Mechanical Engineering Humanities Majors English Interdisciplinary Studies Music Religious Studies Theatre Arts English Japanese Studies Music Philosophy Religious Studies Theatre Arts Writing Minors Science and Mathematics Majors Biology Chemistry Computer Science Mathematics . Information Systems Management.

UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS AND AREAS OF STUDY Minors Biology Chemistry Mathematics 53 Social Sciences Majors Community Services Criminal Justice History Political Science Psychology Sociology and Cultural Anthropology Criminal Justice History International Relations Legal Studies Political Science Psychology Sociology and Cultural Anthropology Women’s Studies Minors Other Areas of Study Art Chinese French Geography Physics Spanish Speech Pre-professional Programs Dentistry Law Medicine Pharmacy Veterinary Medicine Optometry Residency Teaching Certificate Elementary Education Secondary Education Special Education Professional Teaching Certificate ACADEMIC POLICIES .

00 in all upper-academic unit courses in the major.00 and a Saint Martin’s grade point average of at least 2. • All University General Education Requirements (please see the next catalog section) • Support courses required for the major SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The faculty of Saint Martin’s University believes that a sound education for all academic degree programs rests on a foundation of general education.00. The purpose of the University’s General Education Program is to: • Provide students with a broad knowledge of human experience and the natural world. .54 GRADUATE PROGRAMS / DEGREE REQUIREMENTS GRADUATE PROGRAMS Master of Business Administration (MBA) Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC) Master of Civil Engineering (MCE) Master of Engineering Management (MEM) Master of Education (MED) Master in Teaching (MIT) DEGREE REqUIREMENTS bACHELOR’S DEGREES The University confers the following bachelor’s degrees: Bachelor of Arts. designed to expose students to diverse ways of thinking and to provide the intellectual. spiritual and ethical base for meaningful. satisfying and productive lives. General Requirements for bachelor’s Degrees Students must successfully complete 128–136 semester hours with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2. these degree programs can be completed within eight academic semesters. In most cases. Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in Civil or Mechanical Engineering. • A major sequence with a minimum of 20 upper-academic unit semester hours and a cumulative grade point average of 2. including passing: • 40 semester hours of upper-academic unit coursework.

• Use technology to solve problems and to find and communicate information. • Develop proficiency in writing. • Utilize skills. synthesize and evaluate ideas and information. social sciences and humanities with emphases upon broad geographic and historical perspectives. 55 GOAL 1: Provide students with a broad knowledge of human experience and the natural world. • Analyze. • Approach intellectual challenges with a spirit of creativity. • Develop an understanding of the role of the individual within the larger community. and scientific and aesthetic understanding. GOAL 3: Encourage students to understand. GOAL 2: Teach students to think critically and creatively. • Develop an understanding of the role and application of quantitative reasoning and methods to problem solving. • Challenge students to explore academic ideas and concepts within a spiritual and ethical framework. speaking and listening. ACADEMIC POLICIES GOALS AND ObJECTIVES fOR GENERAL EDUCATION . • Develop a holistic understanding of the interaction of the various fields of human endeavor. ideas and methods D of the natural sciences. integrate. and communicate the results. and to communicate effectively. and to communicate effectively.GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM • Teach students to think critically and creatively. reading. • Explore diverse approaches to understanding human societies and cultures and the natural world. • Use methods and approaches from several disciplines to understand complex issues and solve problems. cultural and linguistic plurality. • Design and conduct research. values and methods that can be applied across disciplines. and utilize knowledge across disciplines. • Encourage students to understand. integrate and utilize knowledge across disciplines. • Think critically and logically. • evelop an understanding of the basic concepts.

• Philosophy (3 credits) Students must complete three semester hours of philosophy from the courses listed below.56 GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM GOAL 4: Challenge students to explore academic ideas and concepts within a spiritual and ethical framework. 201. sciences and professions. It is recommended that the student wait until his or her sophomore year before taking philosophy courses selected from PHL 201. • Value hospitality and service to others. • Religion (3 credits) Students must complete three semester hours in religious studies selected from RLS 111. • Undertake a commitment to preserve and protect the natural environment. • Develop a commitment to seek the common good as a citizen of both the local and global community. • Clarify personal values and beliefs GOAL 5: Lead students to understand the role of the individual within the larger community. 302. 314. and appreciation for the value of cooperation. 301. 333. • Understand the moral and ethical questions facing students in the arts. • College Writing (6 credits) Six semester hours of college writing (ENG 101 and 102) should be taken during the first year of the student’s attendance at Saint Martin’s. 305 or 320. ethical and religious concepts and principles. 131 or 151. 341 or 346. GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM REqUIREMENTS I. • Develop an understanding of philosophical. 313. . 202. 303. students older than 24 years of age and those exempted for medical reasons) must complete two semester hours of physical education selected from any PE course numbered between PE 101 through 113. 301. • Physical Education (2 credits) Students (except military veterans. • Demonstrate respect for persons and ideas. General foundations (17 semester hours) • first-Year Seminar (3 credits) Entering freshmen must take First-year Seminar (UNI 101) during fall semester.

152. 211. CHM 105. 211. Select from: BIO 105. 122. • Natural Sciences (4 credits) Students must complete four semester hours of a natural science course that includes a laboratory component. 344. 347. 356. of a modern world language in high school. 307. Scientific and Technological foundations (7 semester hours) • Mathematics (3 credits) Students must complete three semester hours of mathematics in any course numbered MTH 110 or above. WS 200. 359. particularly those planning to attend graduate school. 351. 357. 142. 322. 205. • Literature (3 credits) Students must complete three semester hours of literature selected from ENG 201. 385 • fine Arts (3 credits) Students must complete three semester hours of fine arts. • World Language (6 credits) Study of a world language is required for all students completing the Bachelor of Arts degree at Saint Martin’s University. This requirement can be satisfied by two years of successful study. PLS 150. PHY 141. 361. 367. 142. 396. 142. 385. PSY 101. 151. 321. 305. World language study is highly recommended for all students. SOC 101. It is strongly advised that these six credits be in two different areas. THR 101. IV. 141. 217. 158. 102. Select from FRN 101. 171. Note: ASL does not satisfy the world language requirement. GPH 210. 172. grade of “B” or better. 215. ACADEMIC POLICIES . 415. Select from: CJ 101. ECN 101. 202. Select one course in American history from HIS 141. Historical and Cultural foundation (13-18 semester hours) • History (6 credits) Students must complete three semester hours of American history and three semester hours of European or non-Western history. SPN 101. 102. JPN 101. 121. 141. 142. 363. 311. MUS 108. 213. 325. 373. 103. Select one course in European or non-Western history from HIS 101. 203. Social and behavioral foundations (6 semester hours) • Six Credits: Students must complete six semester hours outside his or her major field. 357. 102. III. Select one course from: ART 157. 110. 205.GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 57 II. 102. 358. 331. Residency Requirements The student’s senior year (final 32 semester hours) must be completed in residence. 302. 341. At least one-half of the upper-academic unit semester hours in each major sequence must be included in the 32-hour minimum. 102.

due to circumstances beyond his or her control. The credit is not for the experience. No credit overlap is allowed in upper-academic unit requirements for each major. A second baccalaureate degree must differ from the first in title.” To be considered. • Fulfilled half the upper-academic unit requirements of his or her major at Saint Martin’s University Double Major Degree Program A student may choose to complete a second major within the 128 semester-hour minimum required for the bachelor’s degree. The University does not award two Bachelor of Arts degrees. Prior to selecting a second major. 2. but for learning that is equivalent to the knowledge and skills of a particular course offered at Saint Martin’s University. it may be used to satisfy both requirements. CREDIT fOR LIfE ExPERIENCE: THE fOCUS PROGRAM General facts about the FOCUS program at Saint Martin’s University: 1.58 GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM Degree Completion • Any student who. For example. this will require more than the minimum 128 semester hours. the student should consult with an advisor to determine if his or her choice is feasible and practical. • Completed 32 semester hours at Saint Martin’s University. Through the FOCUS program. FOCUS credit can be awarded for undergraduate-level work only. to both majors. This is covered by the double major. the student must have satisfied the following conditions: • Completed a minimum of 96 semester hours. if a specific course is required by both programs. a student may qualify for a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in psychology and for a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering by completing requirements in each program. A double major does not necessarily mean two degrees. The student is required to have his or her advisor’s approval in both majors. all departments participate. where applicable. The student may apply lower-academic unit credits. 3. Generally. . may petition the vice president for academic affairs for a “degree-completion program. Saint Martin’s University may grant academic credit for documented university-level learning students acquired through non-university experience. is unable to continue attending Saint Martin’s University. FOCUS is a university-wide program. However.

10. For credit to be awarded. Students who are interested in receiving FOCUS credits will meet with the registrar for preliminary inquiries. Students should begin the procedure as soon after matriculation as possible. university-level achievement. students must develop a FOCUS portfolio documenting their learning and submit that portfolio for approval by the evaluators. (c) physical education activity courses. If credits are awarded. 8. 14. One portfolio must be submitted for each course for which credit is requested. 13. FOCUS credit may not be used to fulfill the Saint Martin’s University requirement that a student complete 32 Saint Martin’s University credits for graduation. All the dates correspond to the Lacey campus calendar. approval must be obtained through the process outlined in this packet. 9.GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 4. FOCUS credit is not awarded for: (a) learning obtained after matriculation at Saint Martin’s University. (b) courses or subjects not offered at the University. To obtain guidelines for preparing a portfolio. the student can be recommended for credit for a Directed Study. 5. Students should use the Saint Martin’s University Catalog to identify courses for which FOCUS credit may be an option. 12. The student’s learning must reflect significant. 7. formal review of their request. Matriculated students who have registered as FOCUS candidates will be given a full. ACADEMIC POLICIES . 59 6. payment for the credits must be made prior to posting the credits to the student’s transcript. Students pay a one-time. FOCUS credit must be fully approved at least one semester before graduation. or Special Topics. starting on the following page. and must begin the procedure at least one academic year before graduation. nonrefundable $75 registration fee to become a FOCUS candidate. 11. visit the Office of the Registrar. For credit to be awarded. Learning which falls outside of the existing University courses should be designated on the transcript as “395 Special Topics” or “397 Directed Study.” Learning that is equivalent to courses listed in the catalog will be designated on the transcript as fulfilling the requirements of those courses. Insofar as the learning meets university-wide and departmental or program standards and requirements. No more than 15 cumulative semester credits (approximately one semester) can be granted through FOCUS.

They are intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores. Work missed because of late registration. STUDENT CLASSIfICATION • freshman: Has completed less than 30 semester hours. Courses at the 300-400 level frequently assume prior knowledge of the field and a higher level of analysis and difficulty. semester hours. critical discussion of issues and oral presentations. whether students completed graduation requirements in December or May or will complete them in August. . but less than 90. illness or any other reason must be completed. Decisions regarding absences from class are left to the individual instructor. The duration of a lecture class period is 50 minutes. They are intended primarily for juniors or seniors. Courses at the 500-600 level are considered graduate courses. Responsibility for fulfilling requirements for graduation rests with the individual student.60 ACADEMIC INFORMATION ACADEMIC INfORMATION SEMESTER SYSTEM A semester hour of credit is given for attending one class period a week for at least 15 weeks or the equivalent in other time blocks. Two to three hours of outside preparation is expected of the student for each lecture class period. Courses at the 100-200 level generally provide a foundation or overview of a discipline. COURSE NUMbER CLASSIfICATIONS The University gives credit for all courses numbered 100 through 699 in each academic department. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor to make arrangements COMMENCEMENT Official commencement ceremonies occur once a year at the close of spring semester. ATTENDANCE Students are expected to attend all classes for which they are registered. • Senior: Has completed at least 90 semester hours. The student must initiate withdrawal from a course. but less than 60 semester hours. • Sophomore: Has completed at least 30. • Junior: Has completed at least 60. They generally involve individual research projects.

After a student has registered for classes. They also are expected to truthfully complete all documents pertaining to their University studies and activities. policy revisions. programs and courses. changes in his or her courses or class sections must be properly approved and recorded by the registrar. ACADEMIC POLICIES . This includes students who are receiving financial aid or sponsored assistance. STUDENT RESPONSIbILITY Students are responsible for meeting academic regulations.ACADEMIC INFORMATION 61 Extension campus commencement ceremonies take place in December and May. Late Validation All students. Change of Registration Adding or dropping classes may be done only from the first through the eighth calendar day of a semester. Faculty members are prepared to help students explore various academic majors. explain University requirements and provide guidance in selecting classes. Advisors are expected to provide accurate information to students and help them make informed choices about majors. academic and graduation requirements and for seeking help from their advisor. Students wishing to attend both the extension campus and Lacey campus ceremonies may choose to do so. however. ADVISING Academic advising is the responsibility of both faculty members and the student. Failure to do so may constitute grounds for disciplinary action. make appropriate career choices. Students. must pay in full or have financial arrangements completed by the first day of the semester/term. Failure to complete this financial obligation will result in a late validation fee of $50. ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Registration No student will receive credit for any course in which he or she is not registered. Official withdrawal from courses without academic penalty is permitted until one week after mid-semester. are responsible for keeping themselves informed about policies. no matter which campus they are enrolled at or if their classes are online.

they must meet all prerequisites for the classes taken. No exceptions are made to this policy without prior approval from the University’s vice president for academic affairs and the director of extension programs. the class load may be increased to a maximum of 20 semester hours. A full-time student is one carrying a minimum of 12 semester hours of academic credits. They may enroll for as many terms as desired for the purpose of educational enrichment or transfer of courses to another institution. a student must be enrolled for 12 semester hours of credit.62 ACADEMIC INFORMATION Enrollment All students are expected to report to campus on the date officially listed in the Saint Martin’s University Academic Catalog. but the maximum course load permitted in any one semester is 11 semester hours. Schedule Limitations To be considered a full-time student for financial aid purposes. No special admission procedure is required for occasional workshops or shortterm courses. It will be considered only for those students who demonstrate a record of exemplary academic performance at Saint Martin’s University CLASS LOADS AT ExTENSION CAMPUSES The maximum course load at Saint Martin’s extension campuses at Joint Base LewisMcChord is nine semester hours per term. For undergraduate program students using Veterans Administration benefits. a non-degree student must have a cumulative grade point average of 2. . Non-degree Students “Non-degree students” are those who enroll in 11 semester hours of coursework or less per semester and who are not seeking an academic degree from Saint Martin’s. However. Under exceptional circumstances. enrollment in six semester hours per term is considered full-time. with at least 30 semester hours of officially approved coursework. A non-degree student may become a degree student by applying for and being granted formal admission to Saint Martin’s University. Any increase beyond 18 credits requires approval of the student’s advisor and the vice president for academic affairs. Individuals can be registered as either full-time or part-time students. New students will not be admitted unless they have received official notice of acceptance from the Office of Admissions.0 (C) or higher. They may enroll without formal admission to the University. Application for regular admission must be made prior to the student’s completion of the last 32 semester hours required for a degree at Saint Martin’s. although students may elect to carry 18 credits some semesters. A normal class load is 15 to 16 hours. For admission as a degree student.

grades are issued at the end of the designated term. ACADEMIC POLICIES Statute of Limitations Students working toward a degree at Saint Martin’s University are expected to meet the graduation requirements contained in the undergraduate section of the University’s academic catalog in effect for the year in which they are admitted. Grades Grades are issued at the end of the semester and at the end of summer session. At the Joint Base Lewis-McChord extension campuses. COURSES AT ExTENSION CAMPUSES Undergraduate courses taught at Saint Martin’s extension campuses at Joint Base Lewis-McChord are offered primarily for the benefit of armed forces personnel and the military community.00 1.67 .67 3. The cost of courses taken at those extensions is not included in the undergraduate block tuition arrangement.33 3. enrollment in three semester hours per term is considered full-time. a student must be enrolled for a combined total of 12 semester hours in terms one and two. and a combined total of 12 semester hours in terms three and four. the department chair of the course in question and the vice president for academic affairs. university or institution of higher learning while attending Saint Martin’s. students enrolled in a degree program at the University’s main campus in Lacey may be permitted to take undergraduate courses at the extension campuses. Grades are awarded on the following basis: Grade A AB+ B BC+ C CValue per Credit 4. Under exceptional circumstances. additional tuition will be assessed for courses taken at these extension centers.33 2. No student may use requirements in a catalog older than seven years prior to the date of his or her graduation.67 2. Therefore.00 3.ACADEMIC INFORMATION 63 For graduate program students using Veterans Administration benefits.00 2. To be considered a full-time student for financial aid purposes at the Joint Base LewisMcChord extension campuses. Enrollment at Other Colleges Students enrolled full-time at Saint Martin’s may not enroll at another college. This may be done only with the approval of the student’s advisor.

64 ACADEMIC INFORMATION D+ D DF W (withdrawal) AU (audit) I (incomplete) P (pass) 1. .67 0. these will be workshops. • No General Education Program requirement may be taken pass/fail.00 0. Request for an Incomplete Grade A student must request an incomplete grade in writing prior to the last week of the semester if half the course requirements have been completed and the student is prevented by serious illness or another justifiable cause from completing the entire course. instructor. independent studies.33 1. advisor and department chair — a course may be taken pass/fail.00 not computed in grade point average (GPA) not computed in GPA not computed in GPA not computed in GPA Grade Point Average Grade point average (GPA) is computed by dividing the total number of grade points by the total number of semester hours attempted. Grades from other institutions are computed into the cumulative grade point for academic honors. • A grade of “C” or better is required for a pass grade. Transfer “D” Grades Transfer “D” grades are not accepted for credit or to satisfy Saint Martin’s University graduation requirements. • Under special circumstances — and with approval of the student. directed studies and internships/student teaching. Normally. The cumulative grade point average represents the student’s performance for all courses completed at Saint Martin’s. • Pass/fail courses may be taken only with prior knowledge and agreement of the student and instructor. Pass/fail Grades The pass/fail grade option may be allowed within the limits of the following guidelines: • A grade of “P” (pass) may be given for specific courses. • A student wishing to take a course for graded credit when the course is designated pass/fail must request the change of grade status at the time of registration and obtain the instructor’s permission prior to the second class session. The Saint Martin’s University transcript reflects Saint Martin’s University grade point only and is so labeled.

then the following steps may be taken. he or she should ask the faculty member for clarification about grading criteria and his or her evaluation of coursework immediately after receiving the grade in question. an amended grade report may be filed with the Office of the Registrar. For example. if the student is given a grade that he or she thinks is unwarranted. The approved “I” grade request must include the specific work required to remove the incomplete. the respective academic unit dean and the vice president for academic affairs must approve a “change of grade request. All coursework must be completed by the end of the semester following the semester in which the incomplete was granted. . In all other cases.” Process for filing a Grievance about a Course Procedure or a Grade Academic problems related to a course. It is the intent of the procedure that a student be given a fair hearing and provided with a resolution process that protects the rights and recognizes the responsibilities of both the affected student and the faculty member(s). the student will be assigned the grade as earned in the course. and stays on the student’s permanent record. for Students at the Main Campus: 1. ACADEMIC POLICIES Removal of an Incomplete Grade The removal of an “Incomplete” is the student’s responsibility. Change of Grade If a teacher discovers an error in the recording or calculation of a student’s final grade. a professor or a grade should be solved at the lowest level possible. An unremoved incomplete grade cannot be changed after one calendar year.ACADEMIC INFORMATION 65 The request must be submitted in writing on the University form to the course instructor and must specify the reason for the request. the Office of the Registrar must be notified in writing by the faculty member that an incomplete grade will be issued. NOTE: For complaints or problems that include possible harassment and/or discrimination. The instructor must submit approved “I” grade requests on the University form with final grade sheets. If a student does not complete appropriate procedures and paperwork. If the problem cannot be resolved directly between the student and the faculty member involved or if the student is unable to confront the faculty member involved. please refer to the Student Conduct and Policies section of the current Student Handbook. If the instructor approves. The student should address the issue directly with the faculty member or members involved in a timely manner.

the instructor and the department chair of the course in question. If the complaint remains unresolved. Procedure for Students at Extension Campuses: 1. For example. Joint Base Lewis-McChord. the student should take a written explanation of the situation and copies of relevant documents to the University’s director of extension programs (David L. telephone 360-438-4310). Stone Education Center. Decisions of the vice president for academic affairs are final. telephone 253-964-4688). The vice president will provide the student with a written response and explanation regarding the findings in a timely manner. The vice president for academic affairs will read the student’s written explanation and related documentation. 360-438-4310). if the student is given a grade that he or she believes is unwarranted. The vice president for academic affairs will investigate the details of the complaint as necessary and appropriate. Copies of that response will be filed with the academic unit dean. Copies of that response will be filed with the academic unit dean. the instructor and the department chair of the course in question. . 3. 2. director or department chair of the course in question. The student should address the issue directly and in a timely manner with the faculty member involved. the student should ask the faculty member for clarification about grading criteria and his/her evaluation of the assignment immediately after receiving the grade in question. then the student should take the complaint to the vice president for academic affairs at the main campus in Lacey (Old Main 269. The dean or chair will investigate the details of the complaint as necessary and appropriate. The dean or director will read the written explanation and related documentation and consult with the dean.66 ACADEMIC INFORMATION 2. the student should take a written explanation of the situation and copies of relevant documents to the dean of the faculty member’s academic unit or the director of the graduate program. director or chair will then provide the student with a written response and explanation regarding the findings in a timely manner. The dean. A student can obtain the name and location of the dean directly from the Office of Academic Affairs at the University’s main campus in Lacey (Old Main 269. If the academic unit dean or graduate program director is the faculty member involved in the complaint or if the complaint cannot be resolved with the dean or graduate program director. If the complaint remains unresolved.

edu. 3. For more information. Notification of Rights Under family Educational Rights and Privacy Act for Postsecondary Institutions The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) provides students certain rights with respect to their Saint Martin’s University records.html. A written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect can be submitted to the registrar. head of the academic department or other appropriate official. Copies of that response will be filed with the director of extension programs. athletic program participation rates and financial support data is available on the University website. www. For questions or additional information. Information on the institution. family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Saint Martin’s University is in compliance with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. dean. visit http://www2. These rights include: 1. institutional security policies and crime statistics.ACADEMIC INFORMATION The director will read the student’s written explanation and related documentation and will consult with the academic unit dean of the course in question. The director or dean then will give the student a written response and explanation regarding the findings in a timely manner.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index. please contact the Office of Admission. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records can be inspected. academics. . financial assistance. The right to inspect and review his or her education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a written request for access. Decisions of the vice president for academic affairs are final. telephone 360-438-4310). 67 Student Right-to-Know Act Saint Martin’s University adheres to the requirements of the Federal Student Rightto-Know Act in providing certain information about the University. 360-438-4485. that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. the instructor and the academic unit dean of the course in question. ACADEMIC POLICIES Decisions can be appealed using the same process to the vice president for academic affairs at the main campus (Old Main 269. The University guarantees each student the right to inspect and review his or her personal educational records. graduation rates.ed.stmartin. The director or dean will investigate the details of the complaint as necessary and appropriate. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted.

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Saint Martin’s University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. Additional information regarding hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of their right to a hearing.68 ACADEMIC INFORMATION 2. the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.S. One exception. 3. U.” Withdrawal from Courses at Extension Campuses A student may withdraw from a course by completing a withdrawal form at an extension office. a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney. academic or research role or a support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff members). If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student..S. Withdrawals Withdrawal from Courses at Main Campus A student may withdraw from a course by securing a withdrawal form from the Office of the Registrar. a person serving on the University’s board of trustees. except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. auditor or collection agent). obtaining the signatures of his or her advisor and the instructor and returning the completed form to the Office of the Registrar. The course instructor will determine whether the student is passing or failing. Washington. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records. supervisory. The right to request amendment to education records the student believes to be inaccurate.C. D. 400 Maryland Avenue SW. which permits disclosure without consent. A “W” will be sent to the University’s registrar to be recorded on the student’s transcript. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office. . 4. The last day to withdraw from a course is the last day of the term’s fifth week. or a student serving on an official committee such as a disciplinary or grievance committee or a student who is assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. 20202-4605. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative. Withdrawal from a course will be reflected on the student’s transcript as a “W. Department of Education. The right to file a complaint with the U.

Directed studies are not recommended for regular catalog courses and will be accepted to satisfy General Education Requirements only under special circumstances. The highest grade received will be used in computing cumulative grade point average. The student. obtain the signatures of his or her advisor. Students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2. Respective academic departments define how many hours of directed study will be assigned and will approve topics and content. and credit will be allowed only once toward fulfilling graduation requirements. textbook and study materials. suggesting resource material and evaluating student achievement. Students taking a directed study must schedule regular meetings with the faculty supervisor at the outset of the study. The instructor’s role is to aid the student in defining the topic. Undergraduate transfer students must successfully complete at least one semester at Saint Martin’s before applying.” before the student registers for the directed study.0 to be eligible to apply for directed study. The department chair of the course in question and the vice president for academic affairs also must approve. and then return the completed form to the Office of Student Accounts. in consultation with an advisor and course instructor. “A Proposal of Directed Study. ACADEMIC POLICIES Repeating Courses Only a course in which a grade of “D” or “F” is received may be repeated. Students wishing to take correspondence courses for transfer to Saint Martin’s University must have prior written approval of their advisor following review of the course syllabus. initiates a directed study. A student withdraws in good standing if he or she is not dismissed for scholarship deficiencies and/or is not on academic probation at the time of withdrawal Correspondence Courses The use of correspondence courses (an educational course offered by a correspondence school) by enrolled students will be accepted only in exceptional cases. the student must have successfully completed his or her freshman year. Directed Study Directed study is designed for students who wish to research and study a topic not covered in a course offering or to explore a topic in greater depth. No more than six semester hours (nine quarter hours) of correspondence courses will be accepted.ACADEMIC INFORMATION 69 Withdrawal from the University A student wishing to withdraw from the University must obtain a withdrawal form from the Office of the Registrar. Together. To be eligible for directed study. they must complete a detailed outline. instructors and other officials listed on the form. .

number of copies requested .70 ACADEMIC INFORMATION Independent Study In unusual circumstances. please include this information: • Name (first. an independent study enables a student to take a course listed in the catalog on an individualized basis. An unofficial transcript bears no seal. Current or former students may request transcripts of their work at the University in person or by mail. middle and last. Transcripts A transcript is a copy of the student’s permanent record. An official transcript is one bearing the University seal and the signature of the University’s registrar. A transcript or diploma may not be released until the student’s account is paid in full. current address. When requesting transcripts. as well as any other names used during enrollment at Saint Martin’s University) • Date of birth or social security number. Transcripts will not be issued during periods of registration and commencement. is not a genuine copy and is not acceptable to other colleges or universities. A fee of $5 is charged for each transcript.

All applications must be filed at the Office of the Registrar. Test results considered are: • Advanced Placement testing • College-level Examination Program (CLEP. of the student’s withdrawal or non-attendance in courses that would result in a change of certification. Veterans The Veterans Affairs representative counsels and advises students about regulations and rules set forth by the U. or of the student’s complete withdrawal from the University. Once a student has achieved 32 semester hours of credit. Veterans Administration and Saint Martin’s University.ACADEMIC INFORMATION • Addresses where the University should send your transcripts • Type of transcript desired (official or unofficial) • $5 fee per transcript copy 71 Application for Degrees Candidates for degrees must file an application for a degree at the beginning of the student’s last academic year. ACADEMIC POLICIES .S. The University’s policies for credit secured through nontraditional means are available from the admissions director or the registrar. no additional credit for CLEP general examinations will be applied toward degree requirements and graduation. general and subject examination) • United States Armed Forces Institution examinations • Approved credit for educational experiences in the armed forces • Military DANTES and SST programs • International Baccalaureate (IB) examinations and diploma Official results of testing must be submitted to the Office of Admissions for evaluation and granting of credit. The TT Minimum Standards of Progress are as follows: • A student’s progress will be monitored by midterm and final grades. Credit granted cannot exceed 96 semester hours. • The administration’s regional office will be notified within 30 days of less-than-satisfactory progress or dismissal from the University. Applications will be available during registration and at all other times in the Office of the Registrar. Credit through Testing Saint Martin’s University may grant credit based on the results of various kinds of testing. It is the veteran’s responsibility to be fully informed of all academic regulations affecting his or her satisfactory progress.

’s American University or Washington Center. Washington. Internships Internships. • A minimum grade point average of 3. and engage in research projects on political and economic topics. • In the case of illness or other extenuating circumstances. Students should consult their advisor and department chair concerning requirements. these standards will be applied on an individual basis. In these programs. . Students can choose from one of the following Washington Semester programs: • American Politics • Foreign Policy • Justice • International Business and Trade • Economic Policy • International Environment and Development • Public Law • Peace and Conflict Resolution • World Capitals Academic Honors All students who meet the following requirements at the end of a semester qualify for the academic honors list published at the close of the semester: • Completion of a minimum of 12 graded semester hours during the semester.72 ACADEMIC INFORMATION • Attendance will be reported monthly to the Veterans Affairs representative. • A veteran whose benefits have been terminated will not be certified for reenrollment unless a federal Veteran’s Administration counseing psychologist approves. program-related work experience that primarily provides learning and personal growth. • No incomplete grades during the semester. are available for students in several disciplines.C. procedures and availability. Programs Saint Martin’s University gives students the opportunity to participate in the Washington Semester Program through Washington.C. D. students work as interns in government agencies or private associations. attend seminars in which prominent officials participate. D.50 during the semester.

50 to 3.0. Failure to meet the conditions of academic probation may result in suspension from the University. • Cum laude: A cumulative grade point average of 3. at least 32 hours of which were earned in residence. grades earned in courses completed at Saint Martin’s University and at other colleges and universities will count in the calculation of graduation honors. he or she will be placed on academic probation or suspended. The Academic Standards Committee notifies students of other restrictions and requirements. • Summa cum laude: A cumulative grade point average of 3.70 to 3.89. 73 Academic Probation A student will be placed on academic probation or suspended when his or her cumulative grade point average falls below 2.90 to 4. If placed on probation. exclusive of physical education activity courses. the student may continue on probation for a second semester if their overall grade point does not meet minimum standards. If a student falls below these minimum standards. A student may be permanently dismissed from the University for consistently failing to maintain its academic standards. the student will be placed on an academic contract with specific nonoptional actions designed to ensure student success through a letter of warning from the University. No student may remain on academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters without specific action of the Academic Standards Committee. Thus. Probation limits a student to a maximum course load of 12 semester hours.69. Academic Suspension Students academically suspended from the University may appeal their suspension if they wish to re-enroll the semester immediately following suspension.ACADEMIC INFORMATION Any student with a minimum of 64 semester hours of completed coursework. is eligible for graduation with honors. At semester’s end. To appeal. The cumulative grade point average for all completed coursework that appears as part of the student’s official transcript will be used to determine the appropriate academic honor according to the following standards.0. • Magna cum laude: A cumulative grade point average of 3. ACADEMIC POLICIES . Even if academic progress was made. the student’s record will be reviewed to determine whether progress toward meeting the minimum standards has been met.

by Oct. • Plagiarism. A letter of support from the student’s advisor and the Learning Center director acknowledging that they have met with the student and that they are aware of the student’s petition and approve of the student’s future academic plan. This plan must be developed in consultation with the student’s academic advisor and the Learning Center director. • Directly quoting material without using quotation marks or proper indentation. . • Not giving credit for another person’s original ideas and organization. by March 15 for reinstatement consideration for fall semester. Plagiarism is the act of using the words and ideas of others without giving proper credit. the reinstatement procedure should be followed. 2. • Using unauthorized materials for assistance during examinations. she or he may petition the Academic Standards Committee.74 ACADEMIC INFORMATION the student should contact the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs (Old Main 269) immediately upon receiving notice of suspension. The petition must consist of the following: 1. quizzes or other assignments. If a student wishes to petition for reinstatement to the University. This procedure is used after the student has been away from the University for one or more semesters after academic suspension. If no appeal is made. and 3. or the appeal is denied. or receiving assistance from a student without permission of the instructor. The student must submit the petition complete with an explanation and a plan to the Academic Standards Committee. The University has a defined procedure for any student who wishes to exercise his or her right to petition for reinstatement. The student will be notified of her or his status within three weeks of each of the above dates. Common varieties of plagiarism include: • Having another individual write a paper or take an examination for a student. A written explanation that demonstrates the student’s understanding of the reasons for her or his academic difficulties. tests. Academic Dishonesty Academic dishonesty includes but is not limited to: • Assisting another student on examinations. in care of the vice president for academic affairs. A realistic plan for addressing these difficulties. quizzes or other assignments. 15 for reinstatement consideration for summer or spring semester. tests.

If the professor chooses not to modify the penalty or if the student is not satisfied with the modification of the penalty. The dean will chair the appeals committee. and/or the severity of the penalty prescribed. an ad hoc appeals committee is constituted to hear the case. g) If multiple cases of cheating or plagiarism are reported. If the professor chooses to modify the penalty and this is acceptable to the student. c) If the student files an appeal. In these cases. e) The appeals committee has the authority to recommend reconsideration of a penalty to the professor. . f) In serious cases. The professor files an incident report with the vice president of academic affairs within seven days of notifying the student of the penalty. d) The appeals committee hears the case. The vice president of academic affairs constitutes the final appeal in these cases. The appeal must specify the grounds or reasons for the appeal. investigates the circumstances surrounding it and reaches a decision based on the facts of the case. whether the student is appealing the charge of cheating/plagiarism. This committee consists of the division dean of the course in question and a professor selected by the student. The student will be given the opportunity to present information to the committee prior to consideration of expulsion or suspension. the case is settled. the student will be provided with an opportunity to comment on the recommendation before the vice president of academic affairs makes a final decision to suspend or expel the student. A copy of the incident report is provided to the student. ACADEMIC POLICIES b) The student either accepts the penalty or files a written appeal with the vice president of academic affairs within seven days. The student must formally acknowledge his or her acceptance of the penalty in writing. The professor prescribes a penalty in keeping with the seriousness of the offense. the student has the right to appeal this decision to the vice president of academic affairs. the vice president of academic affairs can ask the Admissions and Academic Standards Committee to consider the issue of expulsion or suspension.ACADEMIC INFORMATION 75 Incidents of Cheating and Plagiarism and Their Appeal The following steps are followed for incidents of cheating and plagiarism and their appeal: a) The professor encounters an incident that he or she judges to be cheating or plagiarism. the vice president of academic affairs will select another division dean to hear the appeal. whose decision is final. the appeals committee may choose to recommend suspension or expulsion from the University. These two faculty members select a third member who is an upper-division student in undergraduate cases or a graduate student in graduate cases. If the division dean is the instructor of the course.

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77 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS .

ART faculty Thomas Deming Art Courses ART 157/158 fine Arts Survey (3) Study of painting. education and engineering. and by an interdisciplinary studies major. Courses are also available in Spanish. practicums. music. cultural activities. At Saint Martin’s. French. English. psychology and other disciplines and professions when those advances are understood as part of our culture. UNI 101 first-year Seminar (3) A seminar for first-year students that provides orientation to university life and study. speech and art. students will increase their knowledge and awareness of the relationship between motivation and the effective use of study skills and self management practices needed for college success. Dean PROGRAMS IN HUMANITIES The humanities deal with what is distinctively human: with the contributions of human beings to advances in artistic or literary expression and philosophical thought. sculpture and architecture from its beginning to the present. . theatre arts. internships and study abroad programs. The humanities can also be concerned with advances in science. students have opportunities to work with professors in smaller classes and to participate in research projects. business. as well as experiences contributing to student growth. and the application of values to all human enterprises. development and academic achievement. philosophy. At Saint Martin’s University. and music. Through guided instructional activities. engineering. math. or Japanese. the use and study of language. A student can also choose a minor in religious studies. Our 22 undergraduate majors span the liberal arts. COLLEGE Of ARTS AND SCIENCES Eric Apfelstadt. ALL-UNIVERSITY COURSES UNI 100 Study Skills (1) This course is designed for first-year students admitted to the University on a conditional basis.78 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS / ALL-UNIVERSITY COURSES UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Saint Martin’s University prepares students for successful lives. theatre arts. English. the humanities are represented by majors in religious studies. Required for all first-year students.

wheel work and coloring. students who major or minor in English and/or minor in Writing prepare themselves for careers in law. and advancing the University’s overarching mission of knowledge. Asia. The student will solve problems in drawing. techniques of painting. Using the medium of clay.B. as well as recognize and interpret larger patterns. social services.S. glazing and firing. The major requires students to take 36 semester hours of English (12 courses).COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – ART / ENGLISH 79 ART 205/305 Two-Dimensional Art Survey (3) A studio survey of two-dimensional design. honing analytical. a survey of historical traditions of ceramics is included. symbolism. Students also will participate in supporting activities. In a seminar format. service and sound value judgment. ENGLISH faculty Olivia Archibald Jeff Birkenstein Julia McCord Chavez Father Kilian Malvey. Although major emphasis is on contemporary developments in clay sculpture. diplomacy. fantasy in design. vitality of line. Nathalie Kuroiwa-Lewis Gloria Martin Stephen X. printmaking. the student is introduced to techniques of creating sculptural form. health services and global communications. simplification (its part in history and contemporary art). By learning to identify and analyze details. advocacy. O. Mead Jamie Olson The English Department serves students by leading them to discover the practical importance of our cultural inheritance. and communication skills. Students are UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Oceania and the Americas. professional writing. Instruction includes techniques of hand-building. ART 357 fine Art Survey: Art of the Non-Western World (3) Study of the visual arts among the traditional people of Africa. and the search for artistic ideas. mold-making. marketing. ART 295/395/495 Special Topics (3) To be arranged with department advisor. art ideas from other cultures. as well as explore the development of two-dimensional design in Western culture and the art styles of other cultures. painting and printmaking. fundraising. students will view art reproductions and read and discuss supporting texts and writings. media. ART 212/312 Three-Dimensional Art Survey/Clay (3) A studio survey of three-dimensional design in clay. Students also can prepare for the traditional fields of secondary and higher education. Course covers decorating flat surfaces. the power of distortion. critical. perspective drawing. human resources. nine hours — three classes — of which are General Education Requirements.

and not more than two courses between ENG 391 and ENG 399 E NG 499 Senior Thesis Seminar Upper-Division Courses • • • Minor in English Lower-Division Courses • • • ENG 101 ollege Writing C ENG 102 College Writing II Two of the following (six semester hours): ENG 201 Introduction to Fiction. The Department of English has prepared essay topics on which students will write a theme. philosophy and history. they can then enroll in ENG 101 to fulfill the University graduation requirements. Students are especially encouraged to pursue elective courses in language. ENG 202 Introduction to Poetry.80 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – ENGLISH encouraged to augment their English classes with outside studies in language. ENG 341 Shakespeare (3). Students who score below a department-established grade are required to enroll in ENG 100 English Skills. ENG 203 Introduction to Drama 2 1 upper-division semester hours including: ENG 321 A merican Literature to 1870 -or- ENG 322 American Literature After 1870. social science. On successful completion of that course. the fine arts and philosophy. bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in English Lower-Division Courses • • • ENG 101 ollege Writing C ENG 102 College Writing II Two of the following (six semester hours): ENG 201 Introduction to Fiction. . technology. A minor in English requires 12 semester hours (four courses) outside of General Education Requirements. history. Evaluations by all members of the English staff are based on content and technical competence. ENG 203 Introduction to Drama 12 upper-division semester hours in literature courses Upper Division English Courses • Entering freshmen are required to take an examination in composition skills. The theme is submitted to the department for reading and grading. ENG 202 Introduction to Poetry.

The writing minor will require students to take a total of 18 credit hours. one course from each of 3 categories below (of which 3 credit hours must be lower division) 3) 6 upper division credit hours. Writing Minor Mission The writing minor will help students develop the key communication.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – ENGLISH 81 Revised Washington State Education Endorsements For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in English language arts. audiences and contexts applicable to all majors. The minor will give students a well-rounded education in creative. Because our objective is to help develop students’ creative and unique qualities while preparing them to meet their career goals. the Writing Minor offers students an enriching and practical academic and spiritual experience that meets the needs of the whole person. critical and creative thinking and research skills necessary to prepare them for entry to academic. academic and professional and journalistic writing. Students will be required to take a total of 18 credits from the following: 1) 3 credit hours of literature (outside of General Education upper-division credit hours) 2) 9 credit hours. In keeping with the Benedictine philosophy of education. At the same time. the minor will allow students to specialize and develop an area of expertise. please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog. professional and career oriented fields that are writing intensive. the Writing Minor will deepen students’ understanding and proficiency with specific conventions. any two courses from the 3 categories below A) Creative Writing WRT 292 Creative Writing WRT 405 Advanced Creative Writing THR 302 Play Writing THR 402 Play Writing II b) Professional and Academic Writing WRT 306 Professional and Academic Writing Skills WRT 433 Teaching Composition WRT 320 Ethics in Writing WRT 390 English Internship C) Journalism WRT 299 Introduction to Journalism WRT 302 Advanced Journalism WRT 303 Digital Journalism (3 credits) (3 credits) (3 credits) (3 credits) (3 credits) (3 credits) (3 credits) (3 credits) (3 credits) (3 credits) (3 credits) UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS .

Prerequisite: Placement by the Department of English. ENG 292 Creative Writing (3) Introduction to the processes by which writers produce creative work. Prerequisites: ENG 101. correspondence and other writing tasks that support writing in school and the working world. ENG 102. ENG 195/295/395/495 Special Topics (1-3) To be arranged with department advisor. research projects. ENG 102. ENG 102. ENG 102. media law. stressing fundamentals of and critical approaches to this genre. Course primarily intended for those students not placed into English 101. including basic news story and feature writing. ENG 302 Advanced Journalism (3) Aspects of media law. Emphasis on structure of the essay and steps common to the writing process. interviewing. Prerequisites: ENG 101. Prerequisites: ENG 101. ethics and writing from speeches and interviews. ENG 101 College Writing I (3) Introduces students to fundamental forms of expository writing. Prerequisite: ENG 299. Topics include technical reading and writing. ENG 102. Prerequisite: A grade of “C-” or better in ENG 101. ENG 201 Introduction to fiction (3) A survey of the novel. ENG 203 Introduction to Drama (3) A survey of Western drama from the ancient Greek theatre to the 21st century.82 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – ENGLISH English Courses ENG 100 English Skills (3) Instruction and practice in sentence structure. reports. . as well as in larger units of composition. stressing fundamentals of and critical approaches to this genre. Prerequisites: ENG 101. including English grammar and punctuation. style and format used in writing inside and outside academia. First Amendment rights and and various modes of reporting. ENG 306 Professional and Academic Writing Skills (3) Emphasis on structure of language. ENG 299 Introduction to Journalism (3) Fundamentals of journalistic writing. copyediting. Students will study writers of poetry and fiction as a means of producing original work. ENG 202 Introduction to Poetry (3) Introduction to poetic forms. ENG 102 College Writing II (3) Integrates the research process with writing persuasive or argumentative essays. Prerequisites: ENG 101.

or ENG 203. May be repeated with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 201. ENG 202. ENG 321 American Literature to 1870 (3) Major writers through the Transcendentalists. ENG 317 Language and Culture (3) Course examines the nature of language and its various functions. or permission of instructor. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Prerequisites: ENG 201. ENG 203. or permission of instructor. drama and poetry from England and the Continent. power and history. and historical forces) that circulate through written texts and that influence our interpretation of them. ethnicity. with an emphasis upon English and its cultural and historical contexts. drama and poetry of the 16th and 17th centuries. ENG 202. Prerequisite: ENG 201. Prerequisite: ENG 202 or ENG 203. or permission of instructor. Prerequisites: ENG 201. discuss and write about several Shakespearean works in the context of other dramatic and non-dramatic Renaissance works.or permission of instructor. psychology. Examination of many contemporary theories that underpin how we read and interpret a piece of writing. Content varies. ENG 202 or ENG 203. ENG 322 American Literature After 1870 (3) Major writers from Walt Whitman to the present. or permission of instructor. May be repeated with permission of instructor. including but not limited to African American. or permission of instructor. ENG 326 Ethnic Literature (3) Representative works from one of a variety of ethnic American perspectives. ENG 202. Students explore the structure of language and its role in identity. English 312 does not satisfy the University General Education Requirements or upper-division literature requirements for English majors. Asian and Native American literature. May be repeated once with permission of instructor. Hispanic. although it is strongly recommended as an elective for students in English and women’s studies. ENG 351 Renaissance Studies (3) Studies in major and historically significant texts of prose.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – ENGLISH 83 ENG 312 Literary Criticism (3) Advanced study in textual interpretation and assumptions about literature for English majors and women’s studies minors. May be repeated once with permission of instructor. ENG 331 Medieval Studies (3) An exploration of enduring human questions by studying selected prose. Content changes. Course content varies. Prerequisite: ENG 202 or ENG 203. or permission of instructor. ENG 341 Shakespeare (3) Students will study. ENG 202. Prerequisite: ENG 202 or permission of instructor. gender. including systems (social class. Changing content. May be repeated once with permission of instructor. circa 500-1500. Prerequisites: ENG 201. Changing content.

Eliot. Forster. 3) Prerequisite: ENG 202 or ENG 203. Prerequisites: ENG 101. or permission of instructor. or permission of instructor. Lowell. ENG 299 or equivalents. 3) Prerequisite: ENG 202 or permission of instructor. 1789-1830. Waugh. Frost. and movements. Huxley. Joyce. Changing content. Prerequisite: ENG 201. ENG 202. and movements. ENG 371 Modern Poetry (3) Emphasis on Hopkins. thought. or permission of instructor. Heaney and Northwest poets. Yeats. or permission of instructor. ENG 390 Internship (1-3) Aspects of communication. ENG 363 The Victorian Age (3) Major British literary works within a context of contemporary historical and cultural conditions. thought.84 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – ENGLISH ENG 356 Eighteenth Century british Literature (3) A survey of key works of poetry. ENG 102. ENG 202 or ENG 203. Lawrence. ENG 381 Women’s Literature (3) Representative works of literature by and about women in their historical contexts with attention to the exploration of feminist issues in literature and the literary traditions in writings by women. ENG 396/398 Studies in british and Continental Literature (3. ENG 361 The Romantic Period (3) Major British literary works within the context of contemporary historical and cultural conditions. Prerequisites: ENG 201. and non-fiction from the Restoration through the end of the Enlightenment. drama. . Woolf. Auden. ENG 102. ENG 373 Twentieth Century fiction (3) Emphasis on Bennett. Prerequisites: ENG 201. ENG 392/394 Studies of American Literature (3. 1830-1900. ENG 202. Prerequisite: ENG 201. or permission of instructor. ENG 380 Literature on film (3) The study of important examples of literature adapted to the medium of film. Prerequisite: ENG 202. ENG 385 World Literature (3) Analytical and cultural study of major literary works from around the world and across the millennia. Larkin. May be repeated with permission of instructor. Bishop. Prerequisites: ENG 101. Equivalent to THR 380. fiction. ENG 202. or ENG 203. Prerequisite: ENG 201.

ethics and writing from speeches and interviews. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor. 85 ENG 404 Concentrated Author Studies (3) Intensive reading and criticism of works by one or two authors. Prerequisite: Senior standing and completion of Senior Thesis Proposal Form with advisor’s signature. Prerequisites: ENG 101. copyediting. research projects. WRT 303 Digital Journalism (3) Introduces students to the theory and practice needed to write stories for the digital news room. Prerequisite: WRT 299 or permission of the instructor. modern composition and teaching methods with a three-hour-per-week practicum in the University’s Learning and Writing Center. correspondence and other writing tasks that support writing in school and the working world. May be repeated for credit. Students explore tools of RSS. WRT 306 Professional and Academic Writing Skills (3) Emphasis on structure of language. Prerequisite: ENG 102. ENG 102. WRT 320 Ethics in Writing (3) Advanced study on the relationship between ethics. audio and slide production.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – ENGLISH / WRITING ENG 397 Directed Studies (1-2) Composition or readings in literature. WRT 302 Advanced Journalism (3) Aspects of media law. argumentation and writing. Prerequisite: ENG 299. style and format used in writing inside and outside academia. Topics include technical reading and writing. First Amendment rights and various modes of reporting. photography. ENG 433 Teaching Composition (3) Exploration of linguistics principles. media law. interviewing. ENG 499 Senior Thesis Seminar (3) Seminar for English majors to support research and composition of major paper on approved topic. Recommended for education majors. WRITING COURSES UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS WRT 292 Creative Writing (3) Introduction to the processes by which writers produce creative work. Prerequisites: ENG 101. Focus is Writing about ethical issues and the moral context that informs these issues. including basic news story and feature writing. Students will study writers of poetry and fiction as a means of producing original work. mapping. ENG 102. reports. blogging. . WRT 299 Introduction to Journalism (3) Fundamentals of journalistic writing.

Kilian Malvey. our students learn the approaches. This major is designed for students who seek to engage in rigorous intellectual training in understanding how varying methodologies and modes of inquiry raise different questions and serve different purposes. English David Hlavsa. By studying multiple approaches to enduring and topical human concerns. contractors. Students bring together knowledge of discrete disciplines to define and analyze problems or issues. This major requires independence of thought and a strong work ethic. The plan must include the following: . Students interested in domestic or international careers in fundraising.86 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES WRT 390 English Internship (3) Aspects of communication. modern composition and teaching methods with a three-hour-per-week practicum in the University’s Learning and Writing Center. envision solutions or responses. INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES board of Study Stephen X. at the same time. Anthropology The Interdisciplinary Studies major at Saint Martin’s University exists to further the school’s mission of integrative learning in the Benedictine tradition.” bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Course of Study must follow a plan submitted to and approved by the Interdisciplinary Studies Board of Study. O.. designers. and thereby bridge disparate communities. ENG102.B. Library Sciences David Suter. education. Religious Studies Fr. Prerequisites: ENG 101. It is particularly useful for students who wish to engage in occupations that touch on multiple areas of human interest and/or activity. architecture. will profit from the major’s emphasis on “ways of knowing. such comparative and interdisciplinary exploration encourages awareness of where different disciplines share assumptions and where they construct distinct heuristic processes. English Kirsti Thomas. Theatre Arts David Price. mediation.S. Mead. ENG 299 or equivalents. Religious Studies Jeff Birkenstein. Designed to deepen students’ creative writing skills. Recommended for education majors. WRT 433 Teaching Composition (3) Exploration of linguistics principles. Prerequisite: WRT 292. WRT 405 Advanced Creative Writing (3) Advanced study of creative writing. grant writing. management or administration. for example. and methodologies of discrete disciplines. lexicons.

At least two IDS301 seminars are required of IDS majors. students gather substantial bibliographies and produce drafts of their senior theses. and occurrences that students are required to interpret with two distinct sets of disciplinary methods. 3. Interdisciplinary Studies majors are expected to work with their advisors and the IDS Board of Study to choose a course of electives that will not only deepen their major but also broaden their university degrees so that they might graduate with an appreciation of myriad modes of inquiry and a flexibility of method that will enrich not only the skills they will bring to future employers. Understanding of some multi-cultural and transnational issues 2. Students revise and present their senior theses before Board of Study.0 minimum) of two junior seminars in Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS301) • Successful completion of IDS498 (Senior Thesis I) and IDS499 (Senior Thesis II) 87 In addition. Interdisciplinary Studies courses: • DS 301 Junior Seminar. twelve credits in each discipline • First-year competency in two world languages or second-year competency in one world language • Successful completion (2. texts. 2. After submitting a plan to the Board of I Study and receiving its approval. speaking. Familiarity with fundamental professional terminology of at least two disciplines Competency in writing. These seminars study significant ideas.* *Students will choose a senior thesis director. Board of Study will share its evaluation of the thesis with the director. and listening Ability to gather information via appropriate sources and to evaluate information critically Ability to identify discrete methodologies in their shared assumptions and distinct heuristic processes and to use these methodologies productively to define questions and explore responses. reading. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . director will determine its final grade. but also long lives of inquiry and civic engagement. Skills: 1. After presentation of senior thesis (IDS 499). Knowledge: 1. subject to the approval of the Board of Study.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES • Twenty-four (24) upper-division semester hours in two distinct disciplines. Team-taught classes with changing subject I matter.* • IDS 499 Senior Thesis II. • DS 498 Senior Thesis I.

Keyboard Proficiency All music students are required to take courses in basic piano and pass a functional keyboard proficiency examination. Courses in music integrate the study of music literature. Details regarding this examination are available in the Department of Music office. but is not limited to. Students are required to enroll in the appropriate level of applied instruction for the semester in which they perform their respective recital.88 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MUSIC MUSIC faculty Darrell Born The Department of Music offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in music. The senior recital is a full recital consisting of approximately one hour of music. or MUS 387 Orchestra. familiarity with a variety of cultures. For curricular purposes. Various ensemble requirements are contained in specific curricula and may vary depending on scholarship award requirements. The junior recital is a half recital consisting of approximately 30 minutes of music. Music minors are required to perform a junior recital and are encouraged to perform a senior recital. interpersonal relationships and poise. . Students who study music at Saint Martin’s University have the advantage of a strong music program within a liberal arts setting. This jury examination requires the demonstration of. Ensemble Participation An undergraduate music major must earn a minimum of eight credits in large ensemble participation during eight different semesters to be eligible for graduation and must be enrolled in a large ensemble during each semester of full-time study. A music minor must earn a minimum of four credits in large ensemble participation during four different semesters. a student must pass the requirements of the major area upper-division jury. Recital Music majors must complete junior (MUS 327) and senior (MUS 427) recitals. the fundamentals of the student’s major area of performance. Ensembles are open. Upper-Division Standing Before enrolling in 300-level applied lessons. some through audition. instrumental and general. MUS 286/386 Band. Students with prior piano training can waive basic piano coursework by challenging and passing the piano proficiency examination. Vocal majors are required to participate in MUS 285/385. The study of music encourages students to explore the value of music in their lives. a large ensemble is defined to mean MUS 285/385 Chorale. history and theory with musical performance to develop intellect. to all students regardless of major. Instrumental majors are required to participate in MUS 286/386 or MUS 387. a minor in music and three subject endorsements: choral. The student must show potential to continue improving in a manner that will lead to the successful completion of the performance requirements in the degree and major emphasis.

The program also provides preparation for advanced study in performance. Convocation provides a formal forum for student performance. students registered for the course are required to attend weekly Thursday noon workshops and convocation. Recital Attendance MUS 100 Recital Attendance. A panel of at least three music faculty members will serve as the jury to hear the audition.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MUSIC 89 Recital Audition Students who have registered to perform either the junior recital (MUS 327) or the senior recital (MUS 427) must perform and pass a recital audition at least two weeks prior to the recital date. teaching music in grades K-12. Convocation and Studio Workshop As a component of the course. music theory and literature. Lower-Division Courses (22 semester hours) • • • • • • • M US 100 Recital Attendance (6 semesters) M US 105 Music Theory I (3) M US 106 Music Theory II (3) M US 110 Applied Lessons: Piano (2) M US 112 Applied Lessons: Major instrument (8) M US 220 Basic Conducting (2) L arge Ensemble (4)* Upper-Division Courses (28 semester hours) • • • • M US 305 Music Theory III (3) M US 306 Music Theory IV (3) M US 312 Applied Lessons: Major Instrument (8)** M US 321 Choral Methods and Materials (3) UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Studio Workshop builds student technical skills and solidifies repertoire through performance within a nurturing workshop setting. required of music majors for six semesters and of music minors for two semesters. Applied Lessons. bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in Music (50 semester hours) The music major prepares students to be involved in a variety of musical pursuits. including teaching in a studio setting. participating in a variety of performance organizations and serving as a music conductor. provides the student musician an opportunity to gain insight into performance practices and concert etiquette in addition to hearing a variety of styles and genres.

instrumental students must enroll in MUS 286/386 or MUS 387. Core Requirements • • • • • • • • M US 100 Recital Attendance (2 semesters) M US 105 Music Theory I (3) M US 106 Music Theory II (3) M US 108 Music in Western Culture (3) M US 110 Applied Lessons – Piano (2) M US 110 Applied Lessons – Instrument or Voice (4) M US 327 Junior Recital (0) L arge Ensemble* (4) • M US electives (4) * Vocal students must enroll in MUS 285/385. as well as hearing a variety of styles and genres of music. cultural and performance perspectives. Minor in Music (23 semester hours) The course of study for a music minor provides opportunities for students to study music from technical. instrumental students must enroll in MUS 286/386 or MUS 387.90 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MUSIC • • • • • M US 327 Junior Recital (0) M US 330 Music History I (3) M US 331 Music History II (3) M US 427 Senior Recital (1) L arge Ensemble (4)* * Vocal students must enroll in MUS 285/385. Music Courses MUS 100 Recital Attendance (0) Through attending approved concerts and recitals. student musicians gain insight into performance practices and etiquette. Revised Washington State Education Endorsements For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in choral music. Required of music majors for six semesters and music minors for two semesters. with a minimum of five recitals per semester. please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog. . May be repeated for transcript inclusion. instrumental music or general music. ** Students must have passed the upper-division jury exam before enrolling in 300-level applied lessons.

trombone. One hour of private instruction per week plus convocation/area recital/ studio class. Prerequisite: Audition or instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: Audition by committee. tuba. Emphasis on selected composers and representative masterworks. violin. voice. MUS 106 Music Theory II (3) A continuation of MUS 105. notating music. may not be taken for audit. analysis and ear training. key signatures and clefs. organ. trumpet. bassoon. May be repeated for credit. horn. MUS 105 Music Theory I (3) An introduction to the rudiments of music. One hour of private instruction per week plus convocation/area recital/studio class. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . flute. One-half hour lesson per week plus convocation. oboe. See MUS 110 for instructional areas. euphonium. contrabass. MUS 108 Music in Western Culture (3) A study of music as a cultural phenomenon in the life of Western mankind. MUS 220 basic Conducting (2) A study of basic conducting techniques and score-reading skills applicable to instrumental and choral ensembles. MUS 110 Applied Lessons (1) For music minors. major and minor scales. MUS 111 Applied Lessons (2) For music majors who need to correct deficiencies in major instrument area. Emphasis on individual vocal and musical development during rehearsals. including common practice harmony. Prerequisite: placement audition by committee.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MUSIC 91 MUS 104 Music fundamentals (3) Study of the basic elements of music including note reading. viola. harpsichord. Final exam conducted by jury in some sections. clarinet. harp or guitar. MUS 285 Saint Martin’s Chorale (1-3) A study of sacred and secular choral literature for the large ensemble. Final exam conducted by jury. MUS 112 Applied Lessons (2) For music majors. Instruction offered in piano. secondary instruments and non-majors. Prerequisite: placement audition by committee. See MUS 110 for instruction areas. may not be taken for audit. percussion. Prerequisite: MUS 105 or instructor’s consent. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. rehearse and perform music from the extensive wind band repertoire. cello. saxophone. MUS 286 College band (1-3) The band provides students who perform on wind or percussion instruments an opportunity to study. may not be taken for audit. Final exam conducted by jury. Culminates in a group performance.

Prerequisite: Upper-division jury examination. MUS 310 Applied Lessons (1) For music minors. rehearsal techniques.92 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MUSIC MUS 295/395/495 Special Topics (1-3) To be arranged with department advisor. Specific ensembles will be offered based on student interest. Prerequisite: MUS 106 or instructor’s consent. See MUS 110 for instruction areas. with additional emphasis on contrapuntal techniques and 20th century harmony and composition. choral methods and pedagogy. MUS 330 Music History I (3) A study of major composers and compositions in Western culture prior to 1750. MUS 375 Instrumental Chamber Ensemble (1-3) These ensembles provide students with advanced instrumental background an opportunity to study challenging instrumental chamber music in which his/her instrument is commonly found. Students may audition for up to three different ensembles. MUS 321 Choral Methods and Materials (3) Continuation of basic conducting with emphasis on development of advanced choral conducting skills. Prerequisite: upper-division jury examination. Corequisite: MUS 310 for music minors. Each ensemble will be expected to perform for a variety of functions both on and off campus. each performing approximately one half-hour of music. Includes an overview of important historical events in related fields and their influence on the development of music. MUS 305 Music Theory III (3) Continuation of MUS 106 and beginning studies in counterpoint. MUS 312 for music majors. Includes an overview of important historical events in related fields and their influence on the development of music. secondary instruments and non-majors at the upper-division level. MUS 327 Junior Recital (0) A recital given by a music major or minor in which the student performs with another student. including complex patterns. MUS 312 Applied Lessons (2) For upper-division music majors. See MUS 110 for instruction areas. MUS 331 Music History II (3) A study of the major composers and compositions in Western culture from 1750 to the present. score reading and preparation. Prerequisite: MUS 305 or instructor consent. . MUS 306 Music Theory IV (3) A continuation of MUS 305.

Prerequisite: Audition or instructor’s consent. Prerequisite: MUS 285 or instructor’s consent. Selected interdisciplinary resources will be explored.e. MUS 430 Music in the Classroom (3) Introduction to teaching music in the elementary classroom designed for elementary education classroom teachers. bass) and/or in the chorale in general. It examines the intellectual heritage of the West in its historical roots and developments. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS .S. MUS 389 Jazz Ensemble (1-3) A study of the basic styles of jazz and of improvisation through rehearsal and performance. Prerequisite: MUS 286 or instructor’s consent. PHILOSOPHY faculty Father George Seidel. MUS 397 Directed Study (1-3) An opportunity for students to pursue research-based or scholarly projects on their own initiative. tenor. MUS 387 College Orchestra (1-3) This ensemble provides students with advanced instrumental backgrounds an opportunity to study a variety of challenging orchestral music with Student Orchestras of Greater Olympia (SOGO). MUS 427 Senior Recital (1) A recital given by a music major in which the student performs a music program approximately one hour in length. Students who take MUS 385 will assume a leadership role in the chorale in their respective sections (i. Corequisite: MUS 312. soprano. Philosophy surveys the history of human thought and studies the deepest concerns of human existence. thereby giving the student a deeper insight into a significant aspect of his or her cultural heritage. Course includes the study of music fundamentals and methods of teaching music in the elementary classroom. Prerequisite: Audition or instructor’s consent. No prior musical training is required. Students who enroll in MUS 386 will assume a leadership role in their respective section and/or in the ensemble in general. Culminates in group performance. Emphasis on individual vocal and musical development during rehearsal.. Offered on demand.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MUSIC / PHILOSOPHY 93 MUS 385 Saint Martin’s Chorale (1-3) A study of sacred and secular choral literature for the large ensemble. rehearse and perform music selected from the extensive wind band repertoire. Prerequisite: Instructor’s consent. MUS 386 College band (1-3) The band provides students who perform on wind or percussion instruments opportunity to study. alto.B. O. but also addresses the central problems of the tradition in a systematic fashion.

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Minor in Philosophy Lower-Division Courses
• • P HL 201 Introduction to Philosophy 1 5 semester hours chosen from: PHL 301 Ethics; PHL 313 Philosophy of Being; PHL 314 Philosophy of Nature and Science; PHL 333 Social Philosophy; PHL 341 Philosophy of the Self; PHL 346 Contemporary Philosophy; or PHL 397 Directed Study

Upper-Division Courses

Philosophy Courses
PHL 201 Introduction to Philosophy (3) An introduction into the nature and problems of philosophy. PHL 295/395 Special Topics (3) Topics to be arranged with department advisor. PHL 301 Ethics (3) A critical inquiry of moral behavior as proposed by various ethical systems PHL 313 Philosophy of being (3) A systematic study of the meaning of being and its properties, namely, the one, the true, the good and the beautiful. PHL 314 Philosophy of Nature and Science (3) A study of the physical world, presuppositions and methods of the natural sciences studying that world from a philosophical stance. PHL 333 Social Philosophy (3) A study of the philosophical models of social groups, concentrating especially on the 19th century. PHL 341 Philosophy of the Self (3) The structure of man/woman as a knowing and choosing being. PHL 346 Contemporary Philosophy (3) Early 20th-century philosophy, especially emphasizing the thought of Kierkegaard, Husserl and Heidegger. PHL 397 Directed Study (1-3) To be arranged with departmental advisor

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – RELIGIOUS STUDIES

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES
faculty Brother Luke Devine, O.S.B. Father Kilian Malvey, O.S.B. David Suter Ian Werrett Brother Aelred Woodard, O.S.B.

Religious Studies is an interdisciplinary department offering a major, a minor and electives, enabling students with a variety of interests to explore religious traditions, practices and values. The Judeo-Christian heritage is emphasized, yet we foster respect for and understanding of other religious traditions in our approach to education. Religious Studies faculty members focus on a wide range of topics, including Scripture, sacramentality and the moral dimension in human behavior. As representatives of the Catholic, Benedictine tradition, we are committed to an ecumenical and interfaith spirit that promotes the concepts of peace, justice and social transformation.

bachelor of Arts
General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Lower-Division Courses (6 semester hours)
• T wo courses chosen from: RLS 111 Introduction to Religious Studies; RLS 201 Introduction to Hebrew Scriptures; RLS 202 Introduction to the New Testament; or RLS 203 Introduction to Catholicism RLS 302 omparative Religion C RLS 304 oral Choices M RLS 305 e Peaceable Kingdom Th RLS 318 e Church in Christian History Th RLS 499 enior Thesis S Th ree courses chosen from: RLS 301 Christianity and the Arts; RLS 303 Religious Thought Patterns; RLS 306 The Spiritual Quest; RLS 319 Contemporary Catholic Theology; RLS 321 Religion in America; RLS 397 Directed Study; RLS 494 Spiritual Life Institute; PSY 315 Psychology of Religion I nternship (three semester hours), approved by the department

Upper-Division Courses (27 semester hours)
• • • • • •

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Major in Religious Studies (33 semester hours)

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Minor in Religious Studies (18 semester hours) Lower Division Courses (6 semester hours)
• T wo courses chosen from: RLS 111 Introduction to Religious Studies; RLS 201 Introduction to Hebrew Scriptures; RLS 202 Introduction to the New Testament; or RLS 203 Introduction to Catholicism

Upper Division Courses (12 semester hours)
• • • • RLS 302 omparative Religion C RLS 304 oral Choices M RLS 305 e Peaceable Kingdom Th O ne course chosen from: RLS 301 Christianity and the Arts; RLS 303 Religious Thought Patterns; RLS 306 The Spiritual Quest; RLS 318 The Church in Christian History; RLS 494 Spiritual Life Institute; PSY 315 Psychology of Religion

Religious Studies Courses
RLS 111 Introduction to Religious Studies (3) Exploration of contemporary religious issues and themes; emphasis on Christianity. RLS 201 Introduction to Hebrew Scriptures (3) Introduction to the literature and thought of the Hebrew scriptures or the Old Testament including scriptures in their original context and as presupposition of subsequent Jewish and Christian life. Study includes the emergence of the Pentateuch from ancient oral and written traditions and its central place in the Hebrew Scriptures. Study includes creation, the covenant, the prophets and the wisdom literature. RLS 202 Introduction to the New Testament (3) A survey of the New Testament with particular emphasis on the Gospels as the faith expression of the early Christian community. An introduction to modern Biblical interpretation, with a study of the dominant themes in the Gospels, Epistles, Acts and the Book of Revelation. RLS 203 Introduction to Catholicism (3) This course introduces the Roman Catholic Church and its teachings including doctrine, sacramental practices, ethics, and spirituality. The Catholic tradition will be examined, described, and evaluated as a historically-rooted, intercultural, global and local religious faith community. RLS 295/395/495 Special Topics (3) Topics to be arranged with department advisor. RLS 301 Christianity and the Arts (3) Expression of the Christian faith through classical and modern art forms.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – RELIGIOUS STUDIES RLS 302 Comparative Religion (3) A study of major religions with emphasis on history, doctrine and ethics.

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RLS 303 Religious Thought Patterns (3) Questions confronting modern believers about issues such as death and dying, symbols and sacraments, faith and justice, human suffering and the existence of evil. A changing subject-matter course. RLS 304 Moral Choices (3) An extensive interdisciplinary discussion of ethical theories and applied ethics relevant to fields such as business, government, religion, engineering and medicine. Does not fulfill General Education Requirement for religious studies course. RLS 305 The Peaceable Kingdom (3) Biblical perspectives on peace and justice, including an examination of a range of contemporary interpreters of the Bible, both Catholic and Protestant, who are concerned with the application of the Biblical ideal of shalom to contemporary peace and justice issues. Includes the American Catholic bishops’ pastoral letters on peace and on the economy. RLS 306 The Spiritual quest (3) Introduction to the basic history, theories and practices of Christian spiritual life. Concentration on Lawrence of the Resurrection, Teresa of Avila and Therese of Lisieux. Focus on contemporary application of spiritual practice in daily life. RLS 307 Topics in biblical Studies (3) Exploration of areas or issues in the study of the scripture, including specific parts of the Bible (Hebrew scriptures and New Testament, the gospels, the letters of Paul, the prophets) or issues (the life and teachings of Jesus, the formation of the Canon). RLS 318 The Church in Christian History (3) Development of the Church from its foundation to the present, stressing its role in the development of culture. RLS 319 Contemporary Catholic Theology (3) A reading of recent Catholic theologians in light of issues raised by the Second Vatican Council, with a view toward their foundations in classical theology. Topics include tradition, inculturation, doctrinal development and the emergence of liberation theology. RLS 320 Literature and Theology (3) Significant literature from various ages and cultures, and that literature’s theological content and relevance for the contemporary student. RLS 321 Religion in America (3) Historical survey of religion in America from the earliest settlements to the present. RLS 322 American Catholicism (3) A chronological look at the development of American Catholicism in the context of U.S. and international secular and religious developments, including an examination

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – RELIGIOUS STUDIES / SPEECH

of American Catholic life and thought and appraisal of the current state of American Catholicism. RLS 390/490 Internship (3) Approved by the department and carried out under the direction of department members and internship coordinators. RLS 397 Directed Study (1-3) Special studies for students prepared to do individual research. RLS 494 Spiritual Life Institute (3) One-week summer institute featuring major theologians, scholars, and public intellectuals. The goals of the institute are to encourage dialogue with individuals who are active in theological reflection, spiritual formation and peace and justice service throughout the world. The institute also works to foster and deepen the ecumenical spirit. This course fulfills University’s General Education religion requirement. RLS 499 Senior Thesis (3) Research essay prepared under direction of department members.

SPEECH
Speech Courses
SPH 103 Interpersonal Communication (3) EExploration of principles of interpersonal communication through a combination of lecture, discussion, text readings, journals and class exercises, with the goals of recognizing and understanding how and why the student communicates as he or she does. Development of skills needed to make students more comfortable and more effective communicators. Students learn to say what they mean so that others will understand and so that they will understand what others say, to respond effectively, and to understand and evaluate communication in a variety of contexts. SPH 106 Public Address (3) Course helps students learn to speak publicly. Students are taught to prepare and deliver a variety of speeches: informative, stimulating, convincing, entertaining and action-getting. Objectives include providing students with courage to express their ideas publicly and giving a heightened sense of confidence with the ability to think on their feet and with the ability to express themselves in correct English.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – THEATRE ARTS

99

THEATRE ARTS
faculty David Hlavsa The Theatre Arts Program seeks to integrate the study of dramatic literature and theatre history with theatrical practice as a means of developing intellectual, physical and spiritual adventurousness, openness of mind and increased understanding of the range of human experience. Courses prepare students for graduate studies, secondary school teaching certificates and professional lives in which written and interpersonal communication, aesthetic judgment, emotional understanding and organizational ability are of primary concern.

bachelor of Arts
General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in Theatre Arts (36 semester hours, at least 21 of which are upper-division) • THR 201 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design and Technology • THR 211 Acting I • THR 302 Play Writing • THR 305 Styles, Periods and Practices in Theatre • THR 311 Acting II • THR 450 Directing Practicum (must have three semester hours credit) • ENG 203 Introduction to Drama • ENG 341 Shakespeare • 12 semester hours chosen from: THR 250/360 Acting Practicum; THR 290/390 Internship; THR 320 Scene Design; THR 330 Costume Design; THR 340 Lighting Design; THR 260/350 Design/Tech Practicum NOTE: All students majoring in theatre arts are expected to work on each production each semester. THR 250, 256, 290, 350, 360, 390 and 450 are offered on a variable-credit basis. The number of semester hours of credit, 1 to 4, earned will be based on the size and/or complexity of the role to be played or the production support tasks being undertaken. Proficiency in a foreign language is strongly recommended for those intending to apply for graduate studies leading to a master’s and/or doctoral degree. Minor in Theatre Arts (18 semester hours) • THR 201 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design and Technology • THR 211 Acting I • THR 250/360 Acting Practicum (must have three semester hours credit) • THR 311 Acting II
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

THR 450 Directing Practicum NOTE: Education students seeking an endorsement in drama must take two additional elective semester hours of credit for a total of 20. No performing experience necessary. lighting. THR 260/350 Design/Tech Practicum • Three semester hours credit chosen from: THR 302 Play Writing. directors. designers. THR 211 Acting I (3) Survey of basic acting theory and technique. THR 330 Costume Design. THR 290/390 Internship (1-3) Internship with a professional or community theatre involving exposure to one or more of the following technical aspects: acting. Prerequisites: Audition/interview and instructor’s permission. Course fulfills the University’s General Education fine arts core requirement. stage and production management. Improvisation. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.100 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – THEATRE ARTS • One course chosen from: ENG 203 Introduction to Drama. THR 250/350 Acting Practicum (1-4) Students who act a substantial role in a theatrical production at Saint Martin’s may obtain credit for their work. Theatre Arts Courses THR 101 Introduction to the Theatre (3) Actors. stage management. Course does not fulfill the University’s General Education fine arts core requirement. stage management. No prerequisites. THR 260/360 Design/Tech Practicum (1-4) Students may obtain credit for a substantial technical or design contribution to a theatrical production at Saint Martin’s in the areas of costume. THR 340 Lighting Design. Fulfills the University’s General Education fine arts requirement. costume and scene design and construction. ENG 341 Shakespeare • Three semester hours chosen from: THR 290/390 Internship. No theater experience necessary. scene study and ensemble awareness. or technical direction. THR 201 fundamentals of Theatrical Design and Technology (3) Survey of basic principles and techniques of lighting. directing. relaxation. including vocal and physical warm-ups. No prerequisites. sound or makeup design. How do they do what they do? Find out by doing it yourself: exercises. playwrights. Revised Washington State Education Endorsements For information on the Washington state teacher education endorsement in drama. and technical direction. THR 320 Scene Design. costume . set. please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog. discussions and demonstrations give students hands-on experience with what it is like to work in professional theatre.

Prerequisite: junior standing or Instructor’s permission. THR 302 Play Writing (3) The fundamentals of writing for the stage: conflict. Does not fulfill the University’s General Education fine arts requirement. periods and genres with an emphasis on the practical challenges of production in a contemporary context. directing. Exploration of techniques and styles of costume rendering and construction. properties management. Course fulfills the University’s General Education fine arts requirement. dialogue. popular culture and socio-political commentary. set design and construction. plot. screenwriting and other related topics — as a means of developing tools for analyzing films as art. THR 320 Scene Design (3) A general overview of the history of architecture and interior design as applied to the collaborative process of creating environments for the stage. setting and structure. Prerequisite: THR 201 or instructor’s permission. with intensive focus on scene study. Methods of research and play analysis. THR 330 Costume Design (3) General overview of the history of clothing design and construction as applied to the collaborative process of creating costumes for the stage. Does not fulfill the University’s General Education fine arts requirement. Course may be repeated once with permission of department chair. lighting design and operation. sound design and operation. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. action. Periods and Practices in Theatre (3) A seminar of historical and/or modern theatre styles. Prerequisites: Junior standing or THR 101 or instructor’s permission. THR 295/395/495 Special Topics (3) To be arranged with department advisor. THR 307 Studies in film (3) How do films work? Critical survey of several narrative films in their historical context and exploration of filmmaking techniques — acting. No performing experience necessary. Does not fulfill UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . character. Methods of research and play analysis. Students work in collaboration with each other and with instructor to develop their ideas into original scripts. Prerequisite: THR 201 or instructor’s permission THR 340 Lighting Design (3) Stage lighting from the fundamentals of electricity and the development of lighting instruments to collaborative process of lighting theatrical productions. Course may be repeated once with permission of department chair. THR 305 Styles.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – THEATRE ARTS 101 design and construction. Exploration of techniques and styles of rendering and model construction. THR 311 Acting II (3) Survey of basic acting theory and technique. Fulfills the University’s General Education fine arts requirement. editing.

cont.102 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – WORLD LANGUAGES the University’s General Education fine arts requirement.B. Prerequisites: THR 401 or instructor’s permission. Knowledge of a world language offers students additional opportunities in an increasingly international market. the department offers a minor in Japanese Studies. but also can afford a better comprehension of the student’s own language and of how languages work in general. Students will complete a working draft of an original play. THR 380 Literature on film (3) The study of important examples of literature adapted to the medium of film. In addition. THR 397 Directed Study (1-3) An opportunity for students to pursue research-based or scholarly projects on their own initiative. Prerequisite: THR 201 or instructor’s permission. Equivalent to ENG 380. Spanish and Japanese. O. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. The Department of World Languages offers beginning through advanced courses in French. please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog. The study of a world language not only opens the door to knowledge and understanding of another culture rich in literature and history. . Kathleen McKain Learning a world language is an integral part of any liberal arts education.S. Further exploration of basic concepts of writing for the stage. Lazzari. including:) • • J PN 101 Introduction to Japanese J PN 102 Introduction to Japanese. WORLD LANGUAGES faculty Brother Boniface V. French and Spanish. Minor in Japanese Lower-Division Courses (12 semester hours of Japanese language. knowledge of a world language is a marketable skill. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. THR 450 Directing Practicum (1-4) Advanced students may arrange to direct a theatrical production at Saint Martin’s. Revised Washington State Education Endorsements For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in Japanese. THR 402 Play Writing II (3) Continuation of THR 401. In addition.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – WORLD LANGUAGES 103
• • J PN 201 Intermediate Japanese J PN 202 Intermediate Japanese, cont.

Upper-Division Courses
• S ix semester hours in courses numbered 300 or above in Japanese studies or selected from the following (must include one non-language course): JPN 301 Advanced Japanese; JPN 302 Advanced Japanese, cont.; JPN 395 Special Topics; JPN 495 Special Topics; PLS 352 Government and Politics of Asia or other courses numbered 300 or above that relate to Asian history and culture, subject to approval of the Department of World Languages.

World Languages Courses Japanese
JPN 101/102 Introduction to Japanese (3, 3) Introduction to Japanese language and culture. Students begin to acquire knowledge of Japanese and the fundamentals of Japanese grammar. Cultural aspects of Japanese life will also be presented. JPN 201/202 Intermediate Japanese (3, 3) Continuation of JPN 101 and 102. Building basic vocabulary and developing writing and speaking skills. JPN 301/302 Advanced Japanese (3, 3) Students will study speech, composition, complex kanji characters and advanced grammar. Focus continues to be on building the student’s aural and oral capabilities. Thus, a large amount of vocabulary will be introduced. Japanese culture and current events also are discussed to create better understanding of Japanese culture as well as language. JPN 295/395/495 To be arranged. Special Topics, Japanese (1-3)

French
fRN 101/102 Introduction to french (3, 3) Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammatical forms and syntax. Language skills (speaking, understanding, reading and writing) developed through contrasting analysis of French and English. fRN 201/202 Intermediate french (3, 3) Advances the four language skills: speaking, understanding, reading and writing. Readings in French are introduced. Emphasis on communication. Prerequisites: FRN 101, FRN 102 or equivalents.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

104 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – BIOLOGY fRN 295/395/495 To be arranged. Special Topics, french (1-3)

Spanish
SPN 101/102 Introduction to Spanish (3, 3) Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammatical forms and syntax. Language skills (speaking, understanding, reading and writing) are developed through a contrasting analysis of Spanish and English. SPN 201/202 Intermediate Spanish (3, 3) Advances the four language skills. Prerequisites: SPN 101, SPN 102 or equivalents. SPN 295/395/495 To be arranged. Special Topics, Spanish (1-3)

PROGRAMS IN SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
The science and mathematics programs of Saint Martin’s University will prepare students well for a career in any of our four major programs: biology, chemistry, computer science or mathematics. Limited coursework in physics is also offered. The division emphasizes critical analysis skills, logical problem solving, and collaborative work skills.

bIOLOGY
faculty Aaron Coby Stephen M. Fulton Mary Jo Hartman Margaret Olney

Biology plays an important role in education and human life. The goal of the department of biology is to enable students to gain an understanding of the phenomena of living organisms. Courses are designed to demonstrate the natural interrelationships among living organisms and also between them and their environments. Students will be prepared for more specialized investigations.

General biology Programs
The Department of Biology offers courses that prepare students for careers in teaching, research, government and industry, and for entry into graduate and professional schools. Areas of concentration include environmental science, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, human biology and botany. Opportunities for internships are available in these and many other areas. Under the direction of its faculty, the department also offers students the opportunity to pursue research.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – BIOLOGY 105

Pre-health Programs
Saint Martin’s University has a long and successful history of placing students into professional programs. Saint Martin’s offers pre-health programs that prepare students for admission into professional healthcare graduate schools including medical schools, osteopathic medical schools, dental schools, physical therapy schools, pharmacy schools and chiropractic colleges. The necessary preparatory pre-health curriculum varies from one field of study to another and from one graduate school to another. Programs usually include: • Completion of a four-year undergraduate degree. • Completion of a standardized preadmission examination, usually taken during a student’s junior year. (The exam required depends on the intended field of graduate study.) • Completion of relevant undergraduate pre-health classes, typically including:
• wo semesters of general biology. T • wo semesters of inorganic chemistry. Several upper-division T biology electives. • ne or two semesters of organic chemistry. O • wo or more semesters of mathematics. T

Some schools require additional coursework in biochemistry, calculus and the social sciences. Clinical work during a student’s undergraduate career is often preferred — and sometimes required — prior to acceptance into a professional healthcare school. These experiences are available through the department of biology’s internship program. Students enrolled in pre-health programs will be assigned a pre-health advisor. The advisor will design and individualize the coursework that best fits individual needs and goals. Pre-health advising is given through the biology department at Saint Martin’s. However, pre-health students may select any major field of study in pursuit of their degree, assuming that the relevant pre-health requirements are met as outlined above.

bachelor of Science
General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in biology Lower-Division Courses (39 semester hours) • BIO 141 General Biology I with Laboratory and BIO 142 General Biology II with Laboratory • CHM 141/142 General Chemistry with Laboratory • Two mathematics courses

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

• wo semesters of introductory physics. T

106 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – BIOLOGY • PHY 141/142 General Physics with Laboratory • CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory or equivalent Upper-Division Courses (30 semester hours) • BIO 400 Senior Seminar (2 semester hours) • BIO 401 Senior Seminar Research (4 semester hours) 24 semester hours, including at least one course from each of the following three categories: Molecular/cellular biology: • BIO 352 Advanced Microbiology, • BIO 370 Cell Biology, or • BIO 375 Genetics with Laboratory. Organismal biology: • BIO 305 Botany with Laboratory, • BIO 314 Invertebrate Zoology with Laboratory, • BIO 328 Anatomy and Physiology I, • BIO 351 Microbiology with Laboratory, or • BIO 382 Vertebrate Embryology. Ecology: • BIO 310 Marine Biology with Laboratory, • BIO 350 Microbial Ecology, • BIO 358 Ecology, • BIO 359 Field Ecology • Remaining semester hours chosen from: BIO 305 Botany with Laboratory; 310 Marine Biology with Laboratory; BIO 314 Invertebrate Zoology with Laboratory; BIO 328 Human Anatomy and Physiology I; BIO 329 Human Anatomy and Physiology II; BIO 330 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology, Bio350 Microbial Ecology; BIO 351 Microbiology with Laboratory; Bio352 Advanced Microbiology; 358 Ecology; BIO 359 Field Ecology; 360 Advanced Ecology; BIO 370 Cell Biology; BIO 382 Vertebrate Embryology; BIO 390 Internship; BIO 395 Special Topics; BIO 397 Directed Study; BIO 399 Biological Research and Data Presentation; Biochemistry CHM 362 The following courses are recommended for students planning to pursue graduate studies in biology: • MTH 171 Calculus I and MTH 172 Calculus II • CHM 362 Biochemistry • MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics • CHM 202/202L Organic Chemistry II/Laboratory

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – BIOLOGY 107 Minor in biology This program is a 22-semester-hour course of study for students interested in the biological sciences but do not plan to major in biology. The biology minor consists of the following: Lower-Division Courses (8 semester hours) • BIO 141 General Biology I with Laboratory • BIO 142 General Biology II with Laboratory Upper-Division Courses (14 semester hours) • BIO 375 Genetics with Laboratory • 10 additional semester hours in biology courses numbered 300 or above, excluding BIO 390, BIO 401, BIO 402 Upper-division elective classes include the following: • BIO 305 Botany with Laboratory • BIO 310 Marine Biology with Laboratory • BIO 314 Invertebrate Zoology with Laboratory • BIO 326 Anatomy/Physiology I • BIO 329 Anatomy/Physiology II • BIO 351 Microbiology with Laboratory • BIO 352 Advanced Microbiology • BIO 358 Ecology • BIO 359 Field Ecology • BIO 360 Advanced Ecology • BIO 370 Cell Biology • BIO 382 Vertebrate Embryology • BIO 395 Special Topics • BIO 397 Directed Study • BIO 399 Research Revised Washington State Education Endorsements For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in biology, please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

• BIO 350 Microbial Ecology

biology Courses
bIO 105 biology (3) An integrated treatment of biological concepts and their relationship to basic human and social concerns. Lecture course. bIO 105L biology Lab (1) A series of laboratory experiences to support the non-major biology course. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 105.

108 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – BIOLOGY bIO 110 Environmental Science with Laboratory (4) Course encompasses broad topics in environmental science; including species diversity, population dynamics, human population growth concerns, energy use and water quality. Includes laboratory and field experiences. Designed for non-majors. bIO 141 General biology I with Laboratory (4) Introduction to biological concepts common to all living organisms. This survey course is intended for prospective biology and science majors at Saint Martin’s University. Topics include biochemistry, cell structure and function, energy, photosynthesis, respiration, cell division, genetics, chromosomes, DNA structure and replication, transcription, translation, and evolution. This course is a prerequisite for all other biology courses at Saint Martin’s. One laboratory period per week. bIO 142 General biology II with Laboratory (4) Continuation of BIO 141. Topics include biodiversity, ecology and the evolution of early life, prokaryotes, viruses, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. BIO 141 and BIO 142 are prerequisites for all upper-division biology courses at Saint Martin’s University. One laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BIO 141 bIO 199 Introduction to biological Research (1) Introduction to basic biological research intended for students with no previous research experience. Students will collaborate with a faculty member or senior research student to learn basic skills necessary to design and implement an original research project. Coursework includes background reading to familiarize the student with techniques and the current state of the literature, as well as a three-hour-per-week commitment to working and observing in the laboratory learning the assays to be used in the research project. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. bIO 299 biological Research (1-2) Students will design and carry out an original research project under supervision of a faculty member. The course includes a three-hour or six-hour time commitment (depending on the number of credits) working in the laboratory. Students are encouraged to present their findings at a scientific conference. Prerequisites: BIO 199 and/or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. bIO 305 botany with Laboratory (4) The biology of plants with an emphasis on their evolution, biochemistry, cell biology, anatomy, and physiology. Labs will introduce plant diversity and physiology and will include small group research projects. One laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 or permission of the instructor. bIO 310 Marine biology with Laboratory (4) An overview of marine biology. Topics include basic oceanography, plankton and nekton communities, deep-sea biology, benthic communities, intertidal ecology, estuaries, tropical communities and human impacts on the sea. Lecture and laboratory course with laboratory and filed experiences in marine biology. Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142

and quantification of microorganisms and their growth responses. digestive and urinary. and the use of microorganisms in industrial and biotechnology settings. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS bIO 330 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology (3) Lecture includes advanced material for physiology and patho-physiology of human systems including the cardiovascular system. cardiovascular. skeletal system. and reproductive systems. identification. BIO 142. CHM 141 and CHM 142. Lab includes advanced dissections using a human cadaver. Prerequisites: BIO 141. Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142 bIO 328 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3) The first of a two-semester elective in human structure. BIO 328/328L. BIO 329/329L. renal system.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – BIOLOGY 109 bIO 314 Invertebrate Zoology with Laboratory (4) Taxonomy and interrelationships of invertebrates. Prerequisite: BIO 141 or BIO 142 or permission of instructor. immune system. PNS and autonomic functions. . CNS. Systems covered include: endocrine. Prerequisites: BIO 141/141L. respiratory. integument. Prerequisites: BIO 141. the diversity of microorganisms and the methods used to identify and quantify them in their habitats. muscle. Emphasis on marine animals. bIO 328L Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I (1) Laboratory experience to accompany BIO 328. bIO 329 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3) Continuation of BIO 328. Laboratory exercises include the isolation. BIO 142/142L. bIO 350 Microbial Ecology (3) Examination of how microorganisms interact with each other and with their environment. Topics covered include tissues.BIO 351 Microbiology with Laboratory (5) Structure and function of microorganisms that illustrate biological phenomena at the cellular level. cultivation. BIO 142. articulations. Field trips and inclass demonstrations supplement lecture. BIO 142. reproductive. bIO 329L Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory (1) Laboratory experiences to accompany BIO 329. function and pathophysiology. Includes laboratory and field experiences with invertebrate organisms. lymphatic. Prerequisites: BIO 141.

bIO 360 Advanced Ecology (3) Focuses on one major ecosystem — such as wetlands. One laboratory period per week. virology. BIO 142. . Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142. Lecture class only. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 382. either in a work-related or research environment. macromolecular biochemistry. Lecture course. bIO 390 Internship (1-4) Off-campus experience in the biological sciences. Lecture course. bIO 358L Ecology Laboratory (1) Laboratory and field experiences to study basic interactions in the environment. cell structure and energy conversion. Fieldwork on local populations and the environmental factors influencing them. or permission of the instructor. bIO 370 Cell biology (3) A detailed survey of the molecular biology of eucaryotic cells. fertilization. Prerequisites: BIO 141 and BIO 142. Laboratory exercises will investigate patterns of gene transmission and use modern molecular techniques for genetic analyses. immunology. and epidemiology. forests or riparian zones — and the interrelationships of the communities involved in such a system. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 358. and population genetics. Extensive fieldwork required. Prerequisites: BIO 141. bIO 358 Ecology (3) Analysis of the physical and biotic factors involved in the distribution and relationships of plants and animals in their native environments. BIO 142. genetic mechanisms. bIO 382L Vertebrate Embryology Laboratory (1) Laboratory exercises exploring developmental processes. Current topics in microbiology will be covered as well as discussion of current research. BIO 142. Topics include cellular evolution. molecular. BIO 358. cleavage and differentiation of representative animals. Prerequisites: BIO 141. supervised and evaluated by an intern supervisor and faculty member. Prerequisite: BIO 351 or permission of instructor. BIO 358.110 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – BIOLOGY bIO 352 Advanced Microbiology (4) Topics covered include microbial genetics. diagnostic microbiology. Monitored. CHM 141/142. Prerequisites: BIO 141. bIO 359 field Ecology (4) Most of the course is spent in the field conducting experimental studies of organisms and characteristics of the local terrestrial and aquatic environments of Washington. bIO 375 Genetics with Laboratory (4) The study of transmission. bIO 382 Vertebrate Embryology (4) Developmental biology of vertebrates including maturation. Prerequisites: BIO 141/142. or permission of instructor.

In advanced courses. Offered on approval by the chair of the department. BIO 401E (ecology/marine biology). bIO 397 Directed Study (1-3) A student/faculty-selected project that allows the student to do research in a specialized area of biology. bIO 401 Senior Seminar Research (4) Literature review. medicine and dentistry. Prerequisites: for BIO 401M: BIO 351 or permission of instructor. physiology. Saint Martin’s offers both a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry. Prerequisites: BIO 299 and/or permission of the instructor. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . for BIO 401E: BIO 310. CHEMISTRY faculty Darrell Axtell Gregory Milligan Arwyn Smalley Society is influenced by the field of chemistry in essentially all phases of life. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit. geology. environmental science. An understanding of chemistry is necessary for those who wish to study such subjects as biology. Discipline-specific research focus designated by the following course numbers: BIO 401M (microbiology). law. BIO 358. All courses contain a strong emphasis on classroom instruction and development of competent laboratory technique. A knowledge of chemistry and its effects. BIO 401D (molecular biology). for BIO 401D: BIO 375 or permission of instructor. as related to the foods we eat.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CHEMISTRY 111 bIO 395 Special Topics (1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. BIO 359. hands-on training in operation and use of all department instruments is received. for example. the air we breathe and medications we use. bIO 400 Senior Seminar (2) Presentation and discussion of results of literature and laboratory investigations of biological topics. will enhance the lives of students from all disciplines. bIO 399 biological Research and Data Presentation (1-3) Students design and carry out an original research project under supervision of a faculty member and are expected to present their findings at a scientific conference in the form of a poster or oral presentation. psychology. or permission of instructor. Students can use course time to collect and analyze data as well as to prepare for the presentation. engineering. Culminates in a written paper and oral presentation. development and implementation of a research project focused in an area of study determined by the instructor.

and either Research (CHM 450) or an internship (CHM 390). An internship program is available to all chemistry majors. although it is not a requirement for Bachelor of Science candidates. 8 of mathematics. bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in Chemistry (64-70 semester hours) Lower-Division Courses (20 semester hours of chemistry. and 475). Many students opt for the bachelor of arts program and complete the requirements for a second degree with a major in biology while in the University’s pre-medicine program. and Thesis (CHM 375. Degree requirements are based on American Chemical Society standards. Professional and Academic Writing Skills. 450. Students working toward a Bachelor of Science degree will complete Elements of Research. The curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry is designed to prepare students for positions in industry and government or for further graduate education. All chemistry majors are advised to take ENG 306. Students working toward a Bachelor of Arts degree are expected to complete both Elements of Research (CHM 375) and Thesis (CHM 475). as specified) • CHM 331/331L Quantitative Analysis/Laboratory • CHM 345/345L Molecular Structure Analysis/Laboratory • CHM 362/362L Biochemistry/Laboratory • CHM 371/371L Physical Chemistry/Laboratory • CHM 372/372L Physical Chemistry/Laboratory • CHM 375 Elements of Research • CHM 390 or CHM 450 Student Internship or Research • CHM 475 Thesis . 172 Calculus I.112 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CHEMISTRY The curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry serves the needs of those seeking a broader education. as specified) • CHM 141/141L. II Upper-Division Courses (26-32 semester hours. 142/142L General Chemistry/Laboratory • CHM 201/201L Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory • CHM 202/202L Organic Chemistry II/Laboratory • PHY 141/141L General Physics/Laboratory • PHY 142/142L General Physics/Laboratory • MTH 171. as an elective. 10 of physics. This curriculum is recommended for students entering the allied health fields and for those who desire to teach science at the secondary school level. Research.

142/142L General Chemistry/Laboratory • CHM 201/201L Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory • CHM 202/202L Organic Chemistry II/Laboratory • PHY 171/171 L Introductory Physics/Laboratory • PHY 172/172L Introductory Physics/Laboratory • MTH 171.II Upper-Division Courses (30-31 hours in chemistry. CHM 475 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS • CHM 371/371L. 372/372L Physical Chemistry/Laboratory Minor in Chemistry (30 semester hours. CHM 362/362L Biochemistry/Laboratory. CHM 395 Special Topics. 8 of mathematics. 10 of physics. . as specified below) Revised Washington State Education Endorsements For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in chemistry. 142/142L General Chemistry/Laboratory • CHM 201/201L Organic Chemistry I/Laboratory • CHM 202/202L Organic Chemistry II/Laboratory Upper-Division Courses • CHM 331/331L Quantitative Analysis/Laboratory • Six semester hours in chemistry courses numbered 300 or above.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CHEMISTRY 113 bachelor of Science General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in Chemistry (68-69 semester hours) Lower-Division Courses (20 semester hours of chemistry. please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog. MTH 322 Differential Equations Lower-Division Courses • CHM 141/141L. 172 Calculus I. as specified below) • CHM 331/33L Quantitative Analysis/Laboratory • CHM 345/345L Molecular Structure Analysis • CHM 355 Inorganic Chemistry • CHM 375 Elements of Research • CHM 450 Research • CHM 475 Thesis • lus at least one of the following: CHM 351 Organic P Chemistry III. CHM 450. CHM 390. as specified) • CHM 141/141L. exclusive of CHM 375.

. Four hours of lecture per week. 142. Prerequisite: CHM 201 or concurrent enrollment. Emphasis on microscale techniques. Must be taken concurrently with CHM 105. spectroscopy. but is not a prerequisite for other chemistry courses.114 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CHEMISTRY Chemistry Courses CHM 105 Chemistry in the Community (3) Student attention is directed to selected problems facing society and how chemistry must play a role in solving those problems. Prerequisite for CHM 142L: CHM 141L or permission of instructor. Two unique features make this course of interest to non-science students: a focus on decision-making and the interplay between science and society. One three laboratory per week. periodicity. 142. CHM 201L Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1) Introduction to basic techniques for physical separation. 4) Principles of chemistry. verification of principles learned in CHM 201. CHM 105L Chemistry in the Community Laboratory (1) A series of laboratory experiences to supplement and support the development of a basic understanding and appreciation of chemistry and its place in the global community. CHM 141/142 General Chemistry (4. Students will be expected to integrate large amounts of information into a coherent framework of knowledge. CHM 141L/142L General Chemistry Laboratory (1. May be repeated for credit. Qualitative and quantitative exercises to illustrate complement and extend the material presented in lecture. solutions. introduction to organic chemistry. fundamentals of resonance and aromaticity and the concept of functional groups of principle classes of organic compounds. One hour lecture per week. Three hours of lecture per week. CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I (4) Structure and bonding. equilibrium. nomenclature. Prerequisite for CHM 142: CHM 141 or permission of instructor. Three hours of lecture and one hour discussion per week. stereochemistry. purification and identification of organic compounds. gases. atomic-molecular structure and bonding. Satisfies core requirement. Prerequisite for CHM 141: Passing score on the American Chemical Society Placement Test or concurrent enrollment in CHM 140. CHM 140 Problem-solving in General Chemistry (1) Students learn techniques for analyzing problems and develop a formalized approach to solving problems in general chemistry that may be applied to any type of problem. descriptive chemistry. Strongly recommended to be taken concurrently with CHM 141. Introduction to laboratory techniques and manipulations. Prerequisite: CHM 142 or equivalent. 1) Laboratory experience for General Chemistry 141. liquids and solids. spectroscopy. One three-hour lab per week. thermochemistry. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment CHM 141 or 142. kinetics. including stoichiometry.

use of instrumentation and detailed interpretation of results will be investigated. This course is not a part of the research track of the chemistry major. GC HPLC. Students are expected to integrate large amounts of information into a coherent framework of knowledge. CHM 299 Laboratory Projects (1-2) Students assist in a research project under the supervision of the instructor. One three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: CHM 142/142L or permission of instructor. acidimetry. One three-hour lab per week. students learn how chemical reactions occur through a reaction mechanism approach. Open to all disciplines. complement and supplement lecture material. and focuses on selected topics in organic chemistry. Common approaches to all reactions are stressed. Prerequisites: CHM 345 or concurrent enrollment. MS Polarimetry. IR UV-Vis. CHM 202L Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1) Introduction to basic techniques for synthesis of organic compounds. May be repeated for credit. Methods studied will include NMR. gravimetric analysis. includ- UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS .COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CHEMISTRY 115 CHM 202 Organic Chemistry II (4) Building on concepts from CHM 201. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. organometallic. Determination of composition of simple and complex mixtures. CHM 345 Molecular Structure Analysis (3) Theory of operation. Theory and hands-on instruction in the operation of chemical instrumentation. but which are important to an understanding of organic chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM 331 or concurrent enrollment. to illustrate. Research progress will be monitored by the chemistry faculty on a regular basis. Prerequisite: CHM 201. Instrumental methods will be applied to the separation. and Polarimetry. CHM 331L quantitative Analysis Laboratory (1) Laboratory component of CHM 331. Introduction to methods and techniques of quantitative analysis. Prerequisite: CHM 202 or concurrent enrollment. and inorganic systems. oxidation-reduction analysis. analytical separations. introduction to instrumental techniques. Cyclic Voltammetry. with emphasis on multi-step synthesis and spectroscopic analysis. CHM 345L Molecular Structure Analysis Laboratory (1) Laboratory component of CHM 345. Practical applications of concepts from CHM 202. One three-hour lab per week. characterization and identification of unknown or uncharacterized organic. sample preparation. Four hours of lecture per week. CHM 351 Organic Chemistry III (3) Course is a continuation of CHM 202. spectroscopic methods for structural determination. Designed to present those advanced areas of study not covered in CHM 201 or CHM 202. separation and purification. precipitation analysis. Prerequisites: CHM 331 and CHM 202 (or concurrent) or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Three hours lecture per week. CHM 331 quantitative Analysis (3) Principles and practice of analytical chemistry.

Emphasis on lipids. UV-Vis. One three-hour laboratory per week. PHY 172 or concurrent. Prerequisites: CHM 142. 3) Introduction to statistical mechanics and kinetic molecular theory of gases.116 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CHEMISTRY ing reaction mechanisms. the student will prepare an original research proposal and research plan. reactions. and evaluate the chemical literature using traditional and online methods. 1) Laboratory experience for CHM 371/CHM 372. organometallic and bioinorganic. to illustrate. Prerequisites: For CHM 371L: CHM 142. CHM 142. lipids and proteins. PHY 171 or concurrent. carbohydrates. Periodicity. PHY 171. electrochemistry. Once the topic is chosen. kinetics. analytical methods such as electrophoresis. acids. functional group transformations and modern synthetic methods. MTH 172. MTH 322 recommended. and NMR spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHM 202 or equivalent. thermodynamics and phase equilibrium. Three lectures per week. read. CHM 371/372 Physical Chemistry (3. structure. mechanisms of inorganic compounds: main group. hormones. The stu- . coordination. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHM 362. Prerequisite: CHM 202. enzymes. Three hours of lecture per week. MTH 172. chemical kinetics and quantum mechanics with application to chemical bonding and molecular spectroscopy. CHM 362L biochemistry Laboratory (1) Laboratory methods will be introduced to investigate the properties and metabolism of carbohydrates. proteins. CHM 380 Techniques in Laboratory Instruction (1) Students will gain experience in laboratory instruction by participating in one of the lower division laboratory classes as an assistant to the laboratory instructor. CHM 371L/372L Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1. Four lectures per week. vitamins and coenzymes. research methods. CHM 362 biochemistry (3) Lecture course covering principle topics of biochemistry. CHM 375 Elements of Research (2) First course in the capstone research track. complement and supplement the lecture material. acid-base chemistry and physical techniques in inorganic chemistry will be discussed according to current theories. CHM 355 Inorganic Chemistry (3) Bonding. Students will learn to search. CHM 202/202L. Must be taken concurrently with CHM 371/CHM 372. Prerequisites: CHM 331/331L. Prerequisite: CHM 141. MTH 322 recommended. for CHM 372L: Successful completion of CHM 371L or permission of instructor. techniques of enzyme catalysis and isolation. Students will then pick a research topic or subtopic in consultation with a chemistry faculty member. with discussions of the applicable metabolic pathways.

and other duties as assigned by the instructor. The results of these experiments will be used to further the course of the students’ research project or subproject. read abstracts. CHM 385 Conference Preparation (1) This course is designed to prepare students to attend a scientific conference. or for those who intend to pursue an academic career. Once the research is completed. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. This course will offer students some teaching experience through a safe. and learn to do literature research. such as the national meeting of the American Chemical Society students will learn how to read scientific journal articles. and some grading. assist in teaching laboratory techniques to lab students. They will investigate the session offerings at the conference. All students who participate in the class will be able to attend the conference. since many conferences offer undergraduate programming designed to supply information about graduatea study and to encourage interest in graduate school attendance. write about what they read. May be repeated for credit. answer students’ questions. CHM 475 Thesis (2) Third and final course in the three-course capstone research track. Academic credit is earned while working at a part-time job in local industry that uses students in chemistry. May be repeated for credit. but only 1 credit may be used toward the Chemistry minor. and decide on a schedule of seminar sessions that they will attend at the conference. the student will produce a thesis describing all aspects of the project and its contribution to the body of chemical knowledge. CHM 390 Student Internship (3) Students receive professional training in an actual employment setting. This schedule may include specific programming for undergraduate students.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CHEMISTRY 117 dent will help supervise the laboratory class. writing or testing new experiments. Students may have the opportunity to assist in revising laboratory experiments. This course is repeatable for credit. Students who have done research in a scientific field will be encouraged to present their research in either a poster or presentation. CHM 450 Research (4) Second course in the capstone research track. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. which will be valuable for those enter graduate school. writing lab “lectures” or pre-lab quizzes. Under close supervision by a chemistry faculty member. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . CHM 395 Special Topics (1-4) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The thesis will be presented and defended to members of the chemistry faculty and student body. mentorship experience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. students will follow their previously developed research plan to conduct laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: CHM 375. Students will complete literature and laboratory research in support of their research project. Prerequisite: CHM 450.

118 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – COMPUTER SCIENCE COMPUTER SCIENCE faculty Kyu Lee The Bachelor of Science degree program in computer science provides students with the education and training needed for careers in software development. as specified) Lower-Division Courses • CSC 180 Introduction to Programming with C# • CSC 200 Intermediate Programming • CSC 220 Computer Organization and Assembly Language • MTH 171 Calculus I • MTH 172 Calculus II • MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics . • Small classes. systems analysis and database applications development. software testing. The in-class portion of the program is supplemented by hands-on experience in the University’s computer labs and an optional internship. enabling students to receive individual attention from faculty members. • Necessary class. testing. it continuously reshapes itself with the advancement of information technology. As such. Major in Computer Science (56 semester hours. In the midst of a rich liberal arts curriculum. computer and study environments to support the program. The program provides: • A rigorous educational environment in which faculty members work closely with their students. e-commerce and C# programming. library. The program offers a firm foundation in the fundamentals of computer science plus a balanced treatment of the key topics mentioned above. The program also provides a solid base for those graduates who plan to seek an advanced degree in the field. Areas of focus include software engineering. the computer science program is designed to meet the needs of industry. • Quality computer facilities. All students are required in his or her senior year to apply what they have learned by creating a significant software product under the supervision of a computer science faculty member. • A strong liberal arts component that broadens career options and the possibility of professional advancement. Students must receive a minimum grade of “C-” in all degree requirements listed below to graduate with a computer science major or minor.

will be used throughout. including Microsoft Access. Prerequisite: CSC 160. configuration and maintenance. Pre. Internet concepts and tools are included in this course. Excel and Power Point.or corequisite: CSC 160 or equivalent knowledge. CSC 162 Systems and Advanced Applications (3) This course adds depth and breadth to the material of CSC 160. Includes an overview of various computer systems and introductory Windows applications including Word. Students will become more familiar with computer hardware troubleshooting.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – COMPUTER SCIENCE 119 Upper-Division Courses • CSC 310 An Introduction to Database Design • CSC 340 Data Structures and Algorithms • CSC 345 Data Communications and Networking • CSC 370 Principles of Programming Languages (3) • CSC 385 Operating System Theory • CSC 430 Introduction to Computer Theory (3) • CSC 446 Software Engineering: Analysis and Design • CSC 450 Software Testing - or - CSC 460 E-Commerce Development • CSC 480 Senior Project • MTH 353 Linear Algebra • MTH 357 Probability and Statistics • ENG 306 Professional and Academic Writing Skills • CSC 160 Introduction to Computing Technology • CSC 200 Intermediate Programming • CSC 220 Computer Organization and Assembly Language • CSC 310 An Introduction to Database Design • CSC 340 Data Structures and Algorithms • CSC elective (three upper-division semester hours credit) UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Minor in Computer Science (21 semester credits. Introduction to Computing Technology. . A contemporary programming language. as specified) • CSC 180 Introduction to Programming with C# Computer Science Courses CSC 160 Introduction to Computing Technology (3) Provides an overview of computer concepts and vocabulary for business and science students. C#. Students will work on advanced Office Suite tutorials and software projects. CSC 180 Introduction to Programming with C# (3) Introduction to object-oriented programming through systematic problem definition and design of appropriate solutions.

Course assumes that student has no prior knowledge of computer programming. CSC 320 Project Management (3) Students will receive a solid grounding in all aspects of project management and a comprehensive introduction to the roles. Prerequisite or concurrently: CSC 160 or equivalent. CSC 295/395/495 Special Topics (1-3) To be arranged with department advisor. Includes processor theory and concentrates on the Intel 80X86 series. Information modeling techniques will be covered with an emphasis on the Relational Model and the Semantic Object Model. Several short programs will be written in assembly language. trees and graphs will be studied. Prerequisite: CSC 180. construct and publish web pages. CSC 220 Computer Organization and Assembly Language (3) Overview of elementary computer architecture and assembly language. CSC 240 Introduction to Visual basic Programming for Microsoft Office (3) Introductory programming course using Visual BASIC. Prerequisite: CSC 200. The class project will use Visual BASIC as an interface to an Access database as it might be used in an office environment. Emphasis on advanced features of C# language. programming techniques. Prerequisite: CSC 200.or corequisite: CSC 160 or equivalent. will be studied. Database languages. Practical experience will be obtained through individual projects. visual interfaces and VBASIC projects. data structures and associated algorithms.120 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – COMPUTER SCIENCE CSC 200 Intermediate Programming (3) The course will advance the student’s knowledge of programming and skills in program design and construction. Exploration of data representation and digital logic to gain insight into the electronic environment of computers. decision logic structures and various methods and techniques of data management. website design and website management techniques. style conventions and elementary data structures. Use of lists. including SQL and QBE. Programs will be written using loops. Students will learn to design. Emphasis will be placed on structured programming. CSC 340 Data Structures and Algorithms (3) A study of data types. Pre. Students will learn to use appropriate project management software tools such as MS Project and Primavera SureTrak. CSC 250 Web Programming and Management (3) This course introduces students to webpage construction. responsibilities and techniques used by today’s successful project managers. CSC 310 An Introduction to Database Design (3) A study of the variety of common information management requirements. Prerequisite or concurrently: CSC 200. . Different searching and sorting algorithms will be examined. Prerequisite: CSC 200. abstract data types.

pushdown automata and how these theories led to development of computers. Course covers a study of information and its use throughout modern organizations. Turing machines and Finite Automata provide major content. CSC 397/497 Directed Study (1-3) To be arranged with department faculty. Includes programming projects that demonstrate knowledge and skill necessary for entry-level programming at a professional level. Prerequisites: CSC 310. and how these factors contribute to the success or failure of an organization. interacting systems. their concepts and constructs will be taught. will be covered. Also covers Chomsky’s theories of languages. Prerequisite: CSC 340. Includes batchprocessing systems. multiprogramming systems and basic file systems. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Formal languages. resource allocation.or corequisite: CSC 340. auxiliary storage management. CSC 385 Operating System Theory (3) Principles of operating systems. in-depth examination of human and ethical issues surrounding information systems. Process management. Prerequisite: CSC 340. such as Visual Basic. (Offered only at Joint Base Lewis-McChord extensions) CSC 370 Principles of Programming Languages (3) Principles of programming languages. Laboratory exercises will consist of building a simple Local Area Network. (Offered only at Joint Base Lewis-McChord extensions) CSC 430 Introduction to Computer Theory (3) Provides an overview of computer theory. Prerequisites: CSC 310. Pre. CSC 365 Programming for Informational System Managers (3) Course will expose students to common programming practices in COBOL and a high-level database front-end language.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – COMPUTER SCIENCE 121 CSC 345 Data Communications and Networking (3) The course will introduce the basics of data communications and networking. CSC 420 Information Systems for Managers (3) Exploration of contemporary issues and practices related to the management of information systems. Comparison with other GUI environments. Prerequisite: CSC 340. context-free grammars. scheduling algorithms. A language based on the Windows paradigm. such as NATURAL or SQL. Some content in computer graphics will be included in the course. BA 360. Students will learn the terminology and concepts of contemporary data communications and networking. Prerequisite or concurrent: CSC 340. BA 365. Students will learn features of various contemporary programming languages and scripting languages. CSC 350 GUI Programming (3) Introduction to programming in the Windows GUI environment. memory management.

122 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MATHEMATICS CSC 446 Software Engineering: Analysis and Design (4) Introduction to software engineering. projects are done in a team environment. CSC 460 E-Commerce Development (3) Students will learn how to develop E-Commerce sites. white box testing and generation of text plans and test cases. In most cases. The essence of software quality assurance also will be covered. testing and quality assurance is playing a critical role in software development. Prerequisite: CSC 446. In this course. as opposed to marketing-oriented. CSC 490 Industry Internship (1-3) Application of concepts and techniques in an off-campus work environment. As such. the students will write a system specification and design document of a non-trivial software system. CSC 310. MATHEMATICS faculty Bonnie Amende Joe Mailhot Carol Overdeep Katherine Porter Mathematics contributes in a unique way to the development of the disciplined. Prerequisite: Permission of department. Principles of E-Commerce and components that make successful E-Commerce and some marketing aspects will be discussed. Some projects may be sponsored by outside agents. Students will configure a server and develop websites to support electronic commerce. students will learn the fundamentals of software testing. Class is software engineering-oriented. CSC 480 Senior Project (4) A capstone course where students will apply what they have learned to create a significant software product under supervision of the instructor. CSC 310. . Prerequisite: CSC 200. Prerequisites: CSC 200. This is a hands-on class where students will actually build and experiment with sites. with emphasis on object-oriented methodology such as OMT (Object Modeling Technique) or UML (Unified Modeling Language) to specify and design software systems. the output of which will be carried over to CSC 480 as the foundation for their senior project (CSC 480). CSC 450 Software Testing (3) The quality of a software product is often said to be the result of good testing. Prerequisites: CSC 340. The course will introduce various analysis and design methodologies. It improves one’s ability to fit new concepts into a framework of existing knowledge. Students graduating with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics frequently find employment in secondary schools. black box testing. insurance firms and the financial or computing divisions of large companies. As an exercise. rational person.

computer science. supports other majors in the University and offers courses of general interest. ECN 371 Econometrics. MTH 461 Abstract Algebra MTH 471 Real Analysis I.33 to graduate with a mathematics degree or minor. 2 including: MTH 353 Linear Algebra. or physics. engineering. economics. NOTE: The upper-division support area courses must be in the same area. NOTE: These courses do not count toward the upper-division major requirements when taken to satisfy lower-division requirements. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS • Any two sequences chosen from: . education. bachelor of Science General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in Mathematics Lower-Division Courses (29-35 semester hours) • One computer science course other than CSC 160 • MTH 171 Calculus I • MTH 172 Calculus II • MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics • MTH 271 Vector Calculus • PHY 171/172 Introductory Physics • CHM 141/142 General Chemistry • BIO 141/142 General Biology • CSC 180/200 Programming with C# • ECN 101 Principles of Economics - and - one of: ECN 325 The Evolution of Economic Thought. chemistry. MTH 400 Senior Paper • ine approved upper-division semester hours in an approved N supportive area such as biology. or BA 302 Applied Quantitative Management Techniques NOTE: CSC courses cannot be counted to satisfy the “one computer science course” requirement above when taken to satisfy the twosequence requirement. Students must receive a minimum grade of “C-” in all degree requirements listed below with the GPA for these courses no lower than 2.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MATHEMATICS 123 The mathematics program at Saint Martin’s University provides a basic undergraduate program for mathematics majors. Upper-Division Courses (33 semester hours) • 4 semester hours in mathematics courses numbered 300 or above. MTH 357 Probability and Statistics.

computer science. engineering. MTH 471 Real Analysis I • ine approved upper-division semester hours in a supportive area N such as biology. or physics NOTE: The upper-division support area courses must be in the same area. Minor in Mathematics Lower-Division Courses (23-24 semester credits) • MTH 171 Calculus I • MTH 172 Calculus II • MTH 220 Discrete Mathematic -or- MTH 271 Vector Calculus Upper-Division Courses • Four 300-level math courses. please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog. education. . including MTH 366. Prerequisite: One year high school algebra with grade “B” or better. chemistry. systems of equations and inequalities and graphing. economics. MTH 461 Abstract Algebra.124 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MATHEMATICS bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Mathematics Major Lower-Division Courses (17 semester credits) • One computer science course • MTH 171 Calculus I • MTH 172 Calculus II • MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics • MTH 271 Vector Calculus Upper-Division Courses (29 semester hours) • 20 semester hours in mathematics courses numbered 300 or above. including three of the following four courses: MTH 353 Linear Algebra. MTH 357 Probability and Statistics. functions. Mathematics Courses MTH 101 Intermediate Algebra (3) Sets. not including MTH 375 Revised Washington State Education Endorsements For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in mathematics. To be recommended by the Department of Mathematics for teaching at the secondary level. and the requirements of Education Programs. a student must fulfill requirements for a bachelor of arts degree as outlined.

Prerequisite: MTH 101 or equivalent. Prerequisite: MTH 101 or two years high school algebra with grade “B” orbetter. including mathematical reasoning. graphs. . Prerequisite: MTH 121 or equivalent with grade “C-” or better. and calculus. Topics typically include voting theory. linear programming. MTH 121 Precalculus Mathematics (3) Preparation for the study of calculus. Topics include linear algebra. Prerequisite: MTH 171 with grade “C-” or better or permission of the instructor. applications of integration. multiple integration and partial differentiation. Students will be exposed to several coordinate systems that enable the universe to be viewed from a different perspective. Prerequisite: MTH 172. applications and modeling. conic sections. estimation and hypothesis testing. analytic trigonometry. measures of central tendency and variability. Prerequisite: MTH 122 or equivalent with grade “C-” or better or permission of the instructor. sampling distributions. Trigonometric functions. study of algorithms. Course is a transition from the study of algebraic functions to the study of transcendental functions with a greater emphasis on analytic geometry. probability. Prerequisite: MTH 171 or equivalent with grade “C-” or better. MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics (3) Introduction to descriptive statistics. MTH 271 Vector Calculus (3) Expansion of the study of the integral and derivative to higher dimensions. Prerequisite: MTH 121 or equivalent with grade “C-” or better. trees and other discrete structures. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS MTH 171 Calculus I (4) A first course in calculus. Topics include vector functions. differentiation applications of the derivative. Course proceeds at a relaxed pace and is aimed at students with little technical mathematical background. MTH 161 Mathematical Methods for business and Social Sciences (3) Introduction to calculus in a business and social sciences setting. Integration. sequences and series. and infinite series. systems of equations and inequalities. MTH 172 Calculus II (4) A second course in calculus. complex numbers. graphing in higher dimensions. and antiderivatives. MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics (3) Introduction to abstract mathematical concepts prefacing topics basic to the study of computer science. MTH 122 Precalculus II (3) Trigonometry and analytical geometry. fair division and apportionment techniques and graph theory. Limits.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MATHEMATICS 125 MTH 110 Mathematics and Modern Culture (3) Selected topics in 20th-century mathematics.

and Europe 1500 A.–1200 A.C. vector spaces. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Prerequisite: MTH 172. MTH 461 Abstract Algebra (4) Course will study properties of generalized algebraic systems. and regression. Prerequisite: MTH 220..D. common distribution and density functions. Course is writing-intensive.D. systems of linear equations. Course required to be certified to teach secondary mathematics. MTH 400 Senior Paper (2-3) Students write a detailed.–600 A. Course is proof-based. Analytic and numerical (computer-generated) solutions will be studied. MTH 357 Probability and Statistics (3) Probability expectation. confidence intervals..D.D. Prerequisite: MTH 172. Open only to senior math majors. May be repeated once for credit.–1900 A. hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: MTH 172. thesis-style report describing the results of research or independent study. Topics include groups and rings (generalization of integers) and fields (generalization of real numbers). linear transformations. Prerequisites: MTH 220 and MTH 353. matrices. MTH 375 Math Seminar (1) Seminar for math majors.D. MTH 395 Special Topics (3) Selected topics in math. Course will consider both technical mathematical achievement and historical and social contexts in which these accomplishments took place. Topics vary and typically will be chosen from subject areas beyond those regularly covered in other courses. MTH 397 Directed Study (1-3) A reading or research project in an area of interest to the student. applications. projective geometry and non-Euclidean geometry. Estimation.126 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – MATHEMATICS MTH 314 History of Mathematics (3) Selected topics from the three great mathematical cultures that fed contemporary world mathematical culture: Greece 600 B. the Muslim Near East 800 A. Euclidean geometry. MTH 366 Geometry (3) Course will study several types of geometries by considering their sets of axioms and proving theorems. Prerequisite: MTH 161 or MTH 171 or consent of instructor. linear models. Geometries covered are finite geometries. . MTH 353 Linear Algebra (3) Vectors. This could be advanced study on the subject of a regularly taught upper-division course or study of a topic not covered in the regular curriculum. Prerequisite: MTH 172. MTH 322 Differential Equations (3) Course will examine ordinary differential equations and systems of differential equations. May be repeated for credit.

light. optics. MTH 472 Real Analysis II (3) Theory of the derivative and the (Riemann) integral. Mechanics. PHY 171L/172L Introductory Physics Laboratory (1. Prerequisite: MTH 471. MTH 353. Prerequisite: MTH 171. biology. limits of sequences and functions. Corequisite: MTH 172. forces. plus one of the following: MTH 322. kinematics.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – PHYSICS 127 MTH 471 Real Analysis I (4) A proof-based course in the theory of the real numbers and the foundations of calculus. PHY 171. Taylor series. light. Prerequisites: MTH 172 and MTH 220. Topics include waves. PHY 172 Introductory Physics (4) A continuation of PHY 171. 1) To be taken concurrently with PHY 171 and 172. MTH 357. PHY 141L/142L General Physics Laboratory (1. PHY 142 General Physics (4) A continuation of PHY 141. Topics include development of the real number system. properties of materials and thermodynamics are covered. fluids and thermodynamics. astronomy and engineering to provide a background for study in these areas. sound. PHY 195 Special Topics (1-4) Lower-division lecture and lab topics. Corequisite: MTH 171. rotational motion. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Physics Courses . electricity and magnetism. 1) To be taken concurrently with PHY 141 and 142. PHY 141 General Physics (4) An algebra-based introduction to classical physics. PHY 171 Introductory Physics (4) A general introduction to physics for science and engineering students. Sequences and series of functions. Topics covered include vectors. PHY 395 Special Topics (1-4) Upper-division lecture. respectively. Physics interacts with fields such as chemistry. electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: MTH 122. PHYSICS faculty Stephen Parker Physics seeks to explain the workings of the physical world encompassing a vast scale from elementary particles to the cosmos. or MTH 366. Prerequisite: PHY 141. optics. lab and seminar topics. continuosity and uniform continuity of functions and differentiation. Topics include waves sound.

Objectives are to: • Increase student knowledge of the social work approach to solving human problems. international relations. criminal justice. Minors are available in criminal justice. sociology and cultural anthropology and women’s studies. psychology. foreign service and a variety of other human service professions.128 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – COMMUNITY SERVICES PROGRAMS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES The social sciences are concerned with the development of human society. the social sciences are represented by majors in community services. social studies and sociology and cultural anthropology. • Prepare students desiring professional work as a human service practitioner. the nature of social institutions and roles. history. bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Community Services Major (51 semester hours) Lower-Division Courses • SOC 240 Research Methods • ne lower-division course in O economics • One lower-division course in history or political science • One lower-division course in psychology • One additional lower-division course in sociology . moral insight and humanistic concepts. • Encourage students to develop ethical and analytical thinking essential for professional life in social work. psychology. history. political science. Limited coursework in geography is also offered within the social science programs. COMMUNITY SERVICES faculty Katya Shkurkin The community services program is an interdisciplinary social work major that combines classroom study with practical application through extensive internship. psychology. At Saint Martin’s University. human behavior and the ideas that have shaped human life. political science. social studies. The community services major is offered only at the University’s main campus. • Help students gain intellectual skills.

5. chosen from psychology. • Completion of SOC 339: Introduction to Social Work: Methods and Ethics. Prerequisite: CSP 390 must be completed before starting internship. with a grade of “C” or better. A major in criminal justice may be complemented by minors in sociology. Prerequisite: Completion of SOC 339 with a grade of “C” or higher before starting internship. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS • Have an overall grade point average of at least 2. Consult with your academic advisor. . Seminar must be attended before starting this internship. CSP 490 Advanced Internship (6) Experience with and application of social service principles in a selected community agency. Before enrolling in an internship (CSP 390). political science.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CRIMINAL JUSTICE 129 Upper-Division Courses • One upper-division course in economics • One upper-division course in history or political science • SOC 339 Introduction to Social Work: Methods and Ethics • PSY 340 Interviewing (a prerequisite for SOC 339) • Three additional upper-division courses concentrating in one field. Student selects a senior seminar from a Social Science discipline. CSP 390 Internship (3) Experience with and application of social service principles in a selected community agency. history or economics • 12-27 semester hours of internship • Senior seminar. CRIMINAL JUSTICE faculty Robert Hauhart Victor Kogan The criminal justice major is an interdisciplinary social science program preparing candidates for positions in the criminal justice field and providing a solid background for further education in graduate school or law school. psychology or political science. students must meet the following requirements: • Completion of 12 semester hours of required major courses on the main campus. Community Services Courses CSP 290 Introduction to Internship (3) Observation and application of social service principles and concepts in a selected community agency. or instructor permission. sociology.

courts. methods and techniques of the modern crime laboratory and legal considerations surrounding the scientific investigation of crime. probation and parole — and their impact and involvement with the individual and community. including selected social institutional factors as related to their influence on police systems. corrections. and application of laws to law enforcement field problems. crime scene investigation. . prosecution. including CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice) Criminal Justice Courses CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) An examination of the organization and jurisdiction of various agencies in the criminal justice field — role of police. CJ 304 Law and Evidence (3) Theory. Prerequisite: CJ 101 and CJ 215. physical evidence. analysis of case decisions and laws on the production and presentation of evidence in criminal trials. including: ) • CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice • CJ 215 Police and Society • SOC/PSY 240 Research Methods • PLS 150 Survey of American Government and Politics Upper-Division Courses (24-27 upper-division semester hours in criminal justice.130 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CRIMINAL JUSTICE bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in Criminal Justice (39 semester hours) Lower-Division Courses (12-15 semester hours in criminal justice. concepts and philosophy of criminal law. CJ 215 Police and Society (3) Review of research on the police. Prerequisite: CJ 101. Prerequisite: CJ 101. including: ) • CJ 308 Impact of Correctional Methods • CJ/SOC 325 Criminology and Juvenile Delinquency • CJ/PLS 379 Judicial Process • CJ/PLS 430 Constitutional Safeguards and Individual Liberties • CJ 410 Law and Society • CJ 499 Senior Seminar Minor in Criminal Justice (21 semester hours. CJ 240 forensic Science (3) An introductory forensic science class encompassing historical development of forensic science.

approaches and current research related to the study of complex organizations and administration practices of criminal justice agencies. repeatable for up to six semester hours. philosophical. Current information derived from empirical research reports and other academic sources is emphasized. Equivalent to PLS 379. functional and legal aspects. roots of Anglo-American jurisprudence. Prerequisite: CJ 101. CJ 450. CJ 308 Impact of Correctional Methods (3) Examination of confinement and rehabilitation philosophies. CJ 353 Drugs and Society (3) In this class we will examine psychoactive substances. the victim and administration of justice and social reaction to victimization. May be taken for elective credit only. structural. CJ 310 Community Corrections (3) An examination of community corrections as viable alternatives to incarceration. efforts to control them. CJ 325 Criminology and Juvenile Delinquency (3) Nature and causes of crime and delinquency. Prerequisite: CJ 101. CJ 390/490 Internship (1-6) Job experience in a criminal justice field. Equivalent to SOC 325. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or PLS 150. Prerequisite: CJ 101. structure of American court system. Equivalent to PSY 353. CJ 379 Judicial Process (3) Course covers role of the American court system. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Historical background and modern concepts will be analyzed. including the origin and scope of victimology. CJ 315 Organization and behavior (3) A comprehensive and critical evaluation of the important theories. We will place special emphasis on the biological elements of drug use and abuse. political aspects of legal institutions. Examines conceptual. Prerequisite: CJ 101. and therapeutic drugs. illegal. as well as examine the issues of drug dependence and treatment for dependence. historical. Equivalent to SOC 305. including legal. We will consider the history and social implications of drug use. CJ 395 Special Topics (3) Courses offered periodically on topics announced by faculty. analysis of local. Students who take internship credit cannot participate in a practicum. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . CJ 312 Victimology (3) A survey of victim-offender relationships.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CRIMINAL JUSTICE 131 CJ 305 Juvenile Justice (3) An examination of the legal history of the juvenile court: analysis of the problems and processes of the juvenile justice system. state and federal correctional systems. Prerequisite: department permission and junior standing.

theories and philosophical basis of western law. Equivalent to PLS 430. physical pattern analysis. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. Students can take course only once.132 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – CRIMINAL JUSTICE CJ 397 Directed Study (1-3) Opportunity for students with advanced standing to pursue topics of special interest. nature. Final course of student’s program in criminal justice. Prerequisite: CJ 101. and 6th Amendments regarding police conduct and the lawful procedures police may employ. 5th. detention. principles. Prerequisite: Permission of advisor. questionable documents examination and firearm and toolmark examination. Consequently. CJ 410 Law and Society (3) Study of law and its relationship to society. drug analysis. . search. Elective credit only. Emphasis on studying and clarifying effects of U. Constitution and its amendments from standpoints of criminal justice and law enforcement.S. I will assume you have a general knowledge of the history. CJ 440 Advanced forensic Science (3) Advanced forensic science laboratory teaching trace evidence examination. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Prerequisite: CJ 240. full-time observation and/or research with a criminal justice agency or related agency. we will examine the role of the police in our criminal justice system in light of Supreme Court cases that bear on police investigation. Supreme Court decisions and how they relate to society.S. CJ 499 Senior Seminar (3) Major research paper on approved topic under direction of department chair. forensic serology. The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with the history of ideas that constitutes the foundation for western legal reasoning. interrogation and arrest practices. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or PLS 150. Prerequisite: CJ 101 and/or LS 101. CJ 450 Practicum (1-15) Semester-long. CJ 420 Philosophy of Law (3) This course provides an overview of the nature. CJ 390/490. and are not permitted to take an internship. CJ 430 Constitutional Safeguards and Individual Liberties (3) Investigation of the origins of the U. purpose and scope of the criminal justice system. Equivalent to PLS 420. arson analysis. CJ 460 Criminal Law/Criminal Procedure (3) The purpose of the course is to acquaint you with the constitutional requirements of the 4th. A substantial research project is required. Instructor may focus on specific issues as they relate to law and society.

Emeritus Roger Snider UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS History is the critical examination of peoples. in both written and oral forms.. • To assist the student in developing the skills for critical thinking. They will understand how to think critically and how to communicate. • To teach students the diversity of human experience within and across nations and cultures.S. the department’s curriculum is designed to achieve the following objectives: • To acquaint the students with major issues in world history.B. Our department seeks to educate future leaders to be thoughtful. and objective participants in the global society. Our graduates will attain a solid base of historical knowledge. physical features. climate.B. their historical backgrounds. bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) . political dynamics and economic resources. places. and of global historical development. • To prepare students who seek to enter the profession of history. To fulfill this mission. lessons and insights from the past. informed. Casillas Father Gerard Kirsch. HISTORY faculty Brian Barnes Rex J. The Department of History devotes itself to teaching within the tradition of liberal arts and professional education to produce responsible and informed persons. across the globe. • To develop the student’s oral and written communication. O. • To teach the student how to conduct independent research and critically evaluate sources. and cultures in the past.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – GEOGRAPHY / HISTORY 133 GEOGRAPHY faculty Richard Langill Geography courses GPH 210 World Regional Geography (3) Study of major world regions. O. Richard Langill William Marcy Father John Scott.S. Our students will use their knowledge and skills to reach outside the university in service to the larger community.

equivalents .134 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – HISTORY Major in History (36 semester hours) Upper Division Courses (24 upper-division semester hours in history) European Emphasis: History majors with a European emphasis must take HIS 344 Nineteenth Century European History and HIS 347 Twentieth Century Europe and: • Three semester hours in American history • Three semester hours in history of non-Western cultures • 12 semester hours in political science. American Constitutional Development.S. nine of which must be in upper-division work • HIS 499 Senior Seminar/Paper United States Emphasis: History majors with a United States emphasis must take: • Three semester hours from: HIS 356 Colonial American History to 1763 -or. History majors are advised to pursue supporting coursework in foreign languages. Political Ideologies. History of Capitalism.S.equivalents European Emphasis: HIS 101 Development of Western Civilization -or. computer science and philosophy.HIS 357 United States History 1763-1877 • Three semester hours from: HIS 358 United States History 1877-1945 -or. History Since 1877 -or. Minor in History (18 semester hours) Lower-Division Courses Lower division supportive coursework including: American Emphasis: HIS 141 U.HIS 142 U. and the Cold War. statistics. History of the Vietnam War.HIS 102 Survey of Modern Europe Since 1648 -or. The following departmental courses may be applied to either (but not both) the history or political science degree requirements: American Foreign Policy. History to 1877 -or. nine of which must be in upperdivision work • HIS 499 Senior Seminar/Paper No more than six semester hours of internship credit may be applied toward requirements for a history major.HIS 359 United States History Since 1945 • Three semester hours in European history • ree semester hours in non-Western culture Th • 12 semester hours in political science.

HIS 122 World History Since 1500 (3) The course is a general examination of different civilizations in many parts of the world from the Renaissance to World War I. Consequently. please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog. the course explains how global interaction through trade. Specifically. including: • Either HIS 344 Nineteenth Century European History -or- HIS 347 Twentieth Century Europe • Either HIS 356 Colonial American History to 1763 -or- HIS 357 United States History 1763-1877 -or. . warfare. the course looks at the political. At the end of the course students should be able to broadly explain the chronological events that shaped the world at the beginning of the 20th century. migration. social. Specifically. political development and military struggles of various cultures across the globe. cultural and economic forces in the development of present civilization. Through this course students will be able to explain basic concepts such as civilization and the effects of market economies.HIS 358 United States History 1877-1945 -or. and religion on the formation and maintenance of cultures. the course looks at the origin. intellectual. History Courses HIS 101 Development of Western Civilization (3) An introductory course showing the interplay of political. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS HIS 102 Survey of Modern Europe Since 1648 (3) A survey of modern European history from the Renaissance to the present. The students will also be able identify important historical figures as well as the geographical regions of various civilizations.HIS 359 United States History Since 1945 • Six upper-division semester hours in political science Revised Washington State Education Endorsements For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in history. HIS 121 World History to 1500 (3) The course is an examination of different civilizations in many parts of the world from the beginning of man’s origins to 1500 AD. art. religious. Finally. religion and war contributed to the growing interconnectivity of the modern world.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – HISTORY 135 Upper-Division Courses 12 upper-division semester hours in history. religion. The course also studies the technological and philosophical revolutions as well as historical figures that shaped the world into what it is today. students should have the competency to broadly explain the chronological events that have occurred throughout the history of the world. economic and military struggles of various cultures across the globe and will provide explanations to understand the relationship between the Western and nonWestern worlds.

development. colonial socio-political organization. history from the Industrial Revolution to the present. the course examines indigenous societies in Mesoamerica and the Andes.S. and the build-up to the independence in Latin America. economic. HIS 215 History of Islamic Civilization (3) Introductory survey of Middle East history. development and implementation of United States foreign policy. social and economic factors. HIS 217 History of Chinese and Japanese Civilizations (3) General survey of the history of China and Japan. Equivalent to PLS 310. while also considering their relationships with Europe. The course focuses on the political. It will examine various African societies in their own right. Specifically.S. the growth and abolition of the slave trade. Examines key political. Course will examine key social. HIS 305 History of American Women (3) Survey of the history of American women from the colonial era to the present. and the Americas through the exchange of Christianity and Islam. HIS 310 United States Diplomatic History (3) A study of the origins. economic and political factors that shaped and were shaped by women in the United States. and cultural forces that shaped Spanish and Portuguese Colonial America. the conquest of Latin America. the late colonial crises. cultural and economic developments from the time of Muhammad to the present. political. militarism. Emphasis on the important aspects of Chinese and Japanese civilizations. History to 1877 (3) General survey of U. history through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Focus is on cultural. HIS 213 History of African Civilization to 1880 (3) This class will examine African history. History Since 1877 (3) General survey of U.S. the impact of the West. HIS 295/395/495 Special Topics (1-3) To be arranged with department advisor. . HIS 142 U. HIS 211 History of Latin American Civilization (3) This course studies Latin American history from the origins of pre-Columbian civilization to the independence movement from Spain in 1810. war and revolution.S. Asia. including examination of key social. focusing on Sub-Saharan Africa from the period 1000 to 1880AD.136 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – HISTORY HIS 141 U. and the emergence of colonialism. economic and political developments in the United States during this period. modernization. economic and political developments in the United States during this period.

HIS 331 England to 1688 (3) Development of the period from prehistoric Britain to the “Glorious Revolution. military and diplomatic aspects. Nazi Germany. and the Holocaust. The course will focus on the origins of anti-Semitism. the road to war and the relationship between total war and genocide. the impact of World War I on German society. Also examines overall significance of the contemporary women’s sports revolution. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . the abortive experiment in democracy in the 1920s. HIS 344 Nineteenth Century European History (3) The European experience from 1815 to World War I. HIS 336 Early Modern European History (3) A survey of all aspects of European history from 1450 to the French Revolution. HIS 326 Pacific Northwest History (3) Discovery. political and cultural variables that influenced and shaped women’s athletics. which that regime perpetrated.S. HIS 347 Twentieth Century Europe (3) Critical study of European problems and developments since 1914. Equivalent to PLS 325. its impact on the foreign and domestic policies of the United States and Soviet Union. It will consider the social. settlement and development of the greater Pacific Northwest (Education Program requirement in many cases). HIS 325 History of the Vietnam War (3) History of the Vietnam War from 1945 to 1975. Emphasis on religious. Focus on U. HIS 334 Medieval European History (3) Germanic migrations to the fall of Constantinople. the emergence of Adolf Hitler and the rise of the Nazi movement to power. HIS 330 Cold War (3) The course traces the origins of the Cold War. Equivalent to PLS 330. and the role of perceptions and misperceptions on the part of United States and Soviet decision-makers.” HIS 332 England Since 1688 (3) Examines the period from the “Glorious Revolution” to the present. HIS 320 The History of Nazi Germany (3) This course will examine one of the most radical and destructive regimes in history. also examines the French role in Indochina and regional developments since the war’s end.-Vietnam relations. 1453. The course will also examine Hitler’s regime.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – HISTORY 137 HIS 315 Women’s Sports History (3) A critical survey of the origins and historical evolution of women’s sports. political.

and with primary sources produced by enslaved people. political. HIS 359 United States History Since 1945 (3) An in-depth analysis of the history of the post-World War II United States. Course spans period from earliest European contact through the maturation of the colonies. political and economic developments that consolidated the nation. Supreme Court. and whether the war and Northern victory was inevitable. HIS 385 Political Ideologies — Their Origin and Impact (3) Development of Western political and social theory since the 17th century. protection of property. HIS 357 United States History 1763-1877 (3) Intensive overview of the United States from the Revolutionary period through the Civil War and Reconstruction era. and examine the relationship between slavery and racism. and others. economic and diplomatic developments that moved the United States from the periphery of international power to world leadership during World War II. and civilians. It will examine the experiences of enslaved people. national politics. and the degree to which Northern and Southern society and politics were altered by the war and Reconstruction.S. the causes of the successes and failures of Reconstruction. slaves. Democratic. civil liberties and separation and delegation of government powers. the economy. including 20th-century developments. the Civil War. HIS 358 United States History 1877-1945 (3) Comprehensive analysis of the emergence of the United States as a great power. Socialist.138 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – HISTORY HIS 356 Colonial American History to 1763 (3) A comprehensive analysis of the ideas. Emphasis on questions of federalism. the role enslaved people and Abraham Lincoln played in the outcome of the war and emancipation. military developments. Equivalent to PLS 385. and its relation to slavery. political. Marxist and Fascist perspectives. and society more broadly. expansion. Equivalent to PLS 378. slaveholders. events and institutions that shaped the colonial experience and development of the future United States. economic and diplomatic developments of the postwar period. and abolition of slavery in colonial and 19th century America. including working with secondary sources produced by historians of slavery. Constitution by the U. HIS 360 History of American Slavery (3) This course will explore the origins. Among other topics. the wartime experiences of soldiers. slaveholders. HIS 378 American Constitutional Development (3) Interpretation of U. HIS 365 History of the Civil War and Reconstruction (3) This is a specialized course in the history of the Civil War and Reconstruction. . Examines social. Emergence of the United States as a modern superpower will be traced through examination of key social.S. and non-slaveholders in different contexts. Examines crucial social. The course will also explore different approaches to studying slavery. this course will explore the causes of the war.

HIS 435 History of Capitalism (3) Origins of private property. the influence of the West and critically evaluate contemporary Egypt within the context of the modern Middle East. HIS 410 The History of Modern Egypt (3) This course analyzes the modern history of Egypt within an extended time span between the early 19th century and the present. The class studies Bolivar’s war for independence and the subsequent effect of independence on Latin America’s socioeconomic and political environment. HIS 499 Senior Seminar/Paper (3) To be arranged with department advisor.S. HIS 415 History of the Modern Middle East (3) Intensive overview of 19th. The course will continually explore how Africans have defined themselves. their relations with other Africans. The course focuses on the economic. modernization. Equivalent to PLS 435. HIS 413 History of Modern Africa (3) This course will survey African History since 1880. African resistance to this colonization from the 19th century until independence.and 20th-century history of the Middle East. It will examine the political. political. Alternative explanations for the rise and fall of capitalism. with a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa. In particular.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – HISTORY 139 HIS 390/490 History Internship (3-9) Departmental permission and junior standing required. economic and socio-cultural foundations of modern Egypt. HIS 397 Directed Study (1-3) Permission of department required. HIS 411 Modern Latin America (3) The course is designed to examine the historical development of Latin America from its age of independence in the nineteenth century to the modern day nation states of the twenty-first century. and the challenges and successes of the post-colonial period to the present day.-Latin American relations. The class then studies Latin America’s political and economic development in the twentieth century as it fluctuated between nationalism. It will examine the European colonization of Africa. economic and cultural developments of the region from the age of European imperialism to the present will be considered. profit-taking and possessive individualism. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . the course presents two major theories (the cultural historical legacy argument and the external dependency argument) that influence modern Latin America today. and cultural forces that have shaped Latin America. and the relationship between Africa and the rest of the world. Extensive reference to the experience of the North Atlantic community. Key political. communist upheavals and dictatorship while also examining U.

Students interested in pursuing law school and a career in law are especially encouraged to fulfill a minor concentration in Legal Studies. Students interested in acquainting themselves with the genesis. Minor in Legal Studies A student may complete a minor concentration in Legal Studies by completing 21 credit hours in approved law related courses. Required Courses (9 semester hours) A student electing to pursue a minor in Legal Studies must complete: • LS 101 The Legal Environment and Ethics • CJ/PLS 430 Constitutional Safeguards and Individual Liberties • CJ 304 Law and Evidence Elective Courses (12 semester hours chosen from the following) In addition to the nine (9) hours of required courses. and Engineering. Law. Legal Studies is administered under the direction of the Pre-Law Advisor and the Department of Criminal Justice. Political Science. Philosophy. Education. History. development. & Economics in Engineering Practice • LS 395 Special Topics in Legal Studies • LS 397 Directed Readings in Legal Studies . and the schools of Business. Sociology. a student wishing to complete a minor in Legal Studies must complete twelve (12) credit hours from the following: • HIS/PLS 378 American Constitutional Development • BUS 225 Business Law I • BUS 226 Business Law II • CJ/PLS 420 Philosophy of Law • CJ/PLS 379 Judicial Process • CJ/SOC 410 Law and Society • CJ 460 Criminal Law/Criminal Procedure • ED 371 Educational Law • SED 467 Legal Issues and IFSP/IEP • GE 359 Ethics.140 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – LEGAL STUDIES LEGAL STUDIES faculty Robert Hauhart Victor Kogan Shawn Newman Roger Snider The Legal Studies concentration is an interdisciplinary field of study composed of law courses from the departments of Criminal Justice. Nine (9) hours of required legal studies courses may be supplemented by twelve (12) hours of electives from the courses listed below. impact and contemporary status of American law may minor in Legal Studies in support of their major field of study.

LS 397 Directed Readings in Legal Studies (3) A semester of directed readings under the supervision of the Pre-Law Advisor. Likewise. Objectives of the major are to: • Acquaint the student with the great issues of politics. law libraries. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. Prerequisite: LS 101. topical areas within the law. The course features a broad range of guest speakers as well as a number of field trips to courts. journalism and business). movements and institutions are incomprehensible without adequate understanding of their history. the foreign service. Casillas Richard Langill Roger Snider Political scientists seek to understand the basis of power in society. institutions and concerns. the study of history profits from awareness of political and social philosophies. 3. • Analyze alternative approaches to those issues.0 GPA. processes. • Prepare students for graduate study with a view toward teaching and/or research. • Serve practical needs of students planning a career involving the law. and ethical issues. Permission of the Pre-Law Advisor. others. • Develop the student’s intelligent and lasting interest in society and politics and provide him or her with an environment for learning active self-governance. LS 395 Special Topics (3) Courses relevant to the Legal Studies curriculum offered periodically on topics announced by the faculty. POLITICAL SCIENCE faculty Rex J. institutions. techniques and social and economic environment of modern governments (areas stressed are law. It is the initial. basic legal research methods. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . environmental law/environmental crime. Courses may include topics such as: white collar crime.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – POLITICAL SCIENCE 141 Legal Studies Courses Course descriptions for additional Legal Studies courses offered other than those listed below may be found under the department from which the courses originate. legal process. and law offices. introductory course in Legal Studies and is required for completion of a minor in Legal Studies. public administration. how that power is organized and exercised and its impact on people’s lives. Topic to be chosen by student in consultation with Pre-Law Advisor. Political and social ideas. LS 101 The Legal Environment and Ethics (3) This course introduces the student to the American legal system. including sources of law.

and the Cold War. American Constitutional Development. PLS 350 Government and Politics of Europe. PLS 499 Senior Seminar Paper • One course chosen from: PLS 364 Political Behavior and Public Opinion. PLS 366 The Legislative Process. PLS 385 Political Ideologies: Their Origin and Impact. Political science majors are advised to pursue supporting coursework in philosophy.142 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – POLITICAL SCIENCE The major provides students with a mature understanding of politics and history. • Six upper-division semester hours in history . The following departmental courses may be applied to either (but not both) the political science or the history degree requirements: American Foreign Policy. Minor in Political Science (21 semester hours) Upper-Division Courses • 12 upper-division semester hours in political science including: PLS 300 International Relations. PLS 381 Political Parties • 12 semester hours of history. While students can elect either a history or political science degree. statistics and computer studies. The department offers coursework in a program integrating history and political science. History of the Vietnam War. bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in Political Science (36 semester hours) Upper-Division Courses • 24 upper-division semester hours in political science. PLS 381 Political Parties. research methods. including: PLS 300 International Relations. History of Capitalism. PLS 350 Government and Politics of Europe or PLS 352 Government Politics of Asia. Political Ideologies. substantial coursework is required in both disciplines for departmental majors. PLS 385 Political Ideologies: Their Origin and Impact. • One course chosen from: PLS 364 Political Behavior and Public Opinion. PLS 366 Congress and the Presidency. at least nine of which must be upper-division NOTE: No more than six semester hours of credit in internships may be applied toward requirements for a political science major. or PLS 352 Government Politics of Asia.

The minor recognizes the fact that we live in an interdependent world where globalization has had a tremendous impact on foreign and domestic policy. the social sciences or humanities and who want an international dimension to their education. functions and processes of American political system. sociology and cultural anthropology. such as comparative politics.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – POLITICAL SCIENCE 143 Minor in International Relations (21 semester hours) The minor in international relations seeks to provide students with an understanding of the political economic. PLS 151 Introduction to American Public Policies and Issues (3) Examination of American public policy processes. Emphasis on impact of government and society on the lives of Americans. economics. PLS/HIS 310 American Foreign Policy or PLS/HIS 330 Cold War. social and cultural relations between nations. Political Science Courses PLS 150 Survey of American Government and Politics (3) Structure. FRN 201/202 Intermediate French. PLS 352 Asian Politics. nuclear proliferation and globalization. • Credit through the Defense Language Institute at the intermediate proficiency level may be used to fulfill this requirement. history and languages. population and global environmental issues. PLS 152 Global Issues (3) Critical analysis of a wide range of global issues. The minor requires coursework in political science. including terrorism. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS • Six semester hours or its equivalent chosen from: SPN 201/202 Intermediate Spanish. with focus on selected policy ideas and issues. Requirements: • Nine semester hours consisting of: GPH 210 World Regional Geography. HIS 215 History of Islamic Civilization. SOC 396 Intercultural Communication. and World Affairs. PLS 300 International Relations. arms control. international relations. PLS 152 U.S. PLS 325 History of the Vietnam War. • One elective (three semester hours) chosen from: ECN 420 International Business. . SOC 103 Cultural Anthropology. with additional electives in related fields. • One course (three semester hours) chosen from: HIS 211 History of Latin American Civilization. geography. human rights. HIS 217 History of Chinese and Japanese Civilization. PLS 350 European Politics. JPN 201/202 Intermediate Japanese. The minor may be of special interest to students majoring in business. structures and outcomes.

and Soviet decision-makers. Selected historic social and political struggles of women. Equivalent to HIS 310. development and implementation of U. political culture. Japan and selected Southeast Asian states. Although course focuses on U. PLS 352 Government and Politics of Asia (3) Study of the government and politics of China.144 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – POLITICAL SCIENCE PLS 220 State and Local Politics and Administration (3) Structures. PLS 310 American foreign Policy (3) A study of the origins.Vietnam relations. Techniques of public administration. and the contemporary role of women in conventional and non-conventional political action.S. values and beliefs. the emergence and impact of “second wave” feminism. Emphasis on contemporary political and economic problems in the region. PLS 360 Women and Politics (3) Explores the role of women in American politics.S.S. political structures. interest groups and contemporary political and economic problems. Case studies on war. PLS 350 Government and Politics of Europe (3) A study of the government and politics of Britain. Germany. PLS 300 International Relations (3) Study of major concepts and practices of international politics.S. Relationship between public administrative agencies and other government entities. functions and processes of state and local governments. Equivalent to HIS 325. PLS 330 Cold War (3) The course traces the origins of the Cold War. voting. Equivalent to HIS 330. PLS 364 Political behavior and Public Opinion (3) The political socialization process and development of political attitudes. development of the modern state system. foreign policy. foreign policy. political participation and selected studies in political linkage. and Soviet Union. Opinion. class and race as they apply to the theory and practice of feminism. PLS 325 History of the Vietnam War (3) A history of the Vietnam War from 1945 to 1975. Particular attention given to the concepts of gender. . France. it also examines the French role in Indochina and regional developments since the war’s end. PLS 295/395/495 Special Topics (1-3) To be arranged with department advisor. and the role of perceptions and misperceptions on the part of U. political parties. approaches to the study of peace. Russia and selected other European political systems.S. Emphasis on comparative political methodology. its impact on the foreign and domestic policies of the U. and the formulation and implementation of U.

S. PLS 379 Judicial Process (3) Role of the American court system. Supreme Court. Constitution and its amendments. roles and performance of Congress and the Presidency. composition. PLS 420 Philosophy of Law (3) This course provides an overview of the nature. Equivalent to CJ 430. Equivalent to CJ 379. their history. Emphasis on questions of federalism. functions. PLS 390/490 Legislative and Administrative Internships (3-12) Department permission and junior standing required. Roots of Anglo-American jurisprudence. profit-taking and possessive individualism. political aspects of legal institutions. PLS 397 Directed Study (1-3) Departmental permission required. PLS 385 Political Ideologies — Their Origin and Impact (3) Development of post-17th-century Western political and social theory. Equivalent to CJ 420. leadership and influence on the formation and execution of public policy. PLS 499 Senior Seminar Paper (3) UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . PLS 435 History of Capitalism (3) Origins of private property. Constitution by the U. Equivalent to HIS 435.S. theories and philosophical basis of western law. Supreme Court decisions and how they relate to society.S. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. civil liberties. Equivalent to HIS 385. Liberal. evolution. structure of American court system.S. and separation and delegation of government powers.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – POLITICAL SCIENCE 145 PLS 366 Congress and the Presidency (3) Examines the constitutional foundation. PLS 430 Civil Liberties (3) Investigation of the origins of the U. principles. Equivalent to HIS 378. including 20th century developments. Democratic. attempting to develop a greater understanding of the most important relationship in American government. Extensive reference to the experience of the North Atlantic community. PLS 378 American Constitutional Development (3) Interpretation of the U. Emphasis on studying and clarifying effects of U. PLS 381 Political Parties (3) Political parties in the United States and abroad. Conservative. Socialist. protection of property. Alternative explanations of the rise and fall of capitalism. Marxist and Fascist perspectives. The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with the history of ideas that constitutes the foundation for western legal reasoning. organization.

Since the goals and background of students vary. rigorous nature of his or her academic program. Admission to law school is heavily influenced by the applicant’s University grade point average. critical thinking. The department structures coursework and field placements to integrate experiential learning with rigorous study of psychology as the scientific study of human beings. PSYCHOLOGY faculty Michael Butler Jeanette Munn Jeremy Newton Sheila Steiner The Department of Psychology has three interrelated objectives: • To provide students with knowledge through classroom work and field experience that will prepare them for entry-level positions in human services professions. • To help prepare interested students for graduate study in psychology and related fields. As a consequence. maintain above average academic standing. criminal justice and business. and situation. and develop strong relationships with faculty who challenge and develop their intellectual skills. students interested in pursuing a legal education are encouraged to select a rigorous course of study. • To provide students with opportunities to examine and interpret human lives and relationships through psychological perspectives. each student is advised according to his or her individual educational plan. history. and supporting documentation. . it provides a broad-based education in psychology that gives students completing the program the skills and self-confidence to use a variety of perspectives in their work with people. Instead. and broad exposure to a challenging array of courses that reflects our American intellectual heritage.146 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – PRE-LAW / PSYCHOLOGY PRE-LAW faculty Robert Hauhart The pre-law curriculum at Saint Martin’s University consists of courses offered by a number of departments including political science. The department’s curriculum does not emphasize any single school of thought. Many majors offer strong preparation for legal study. Pre-law students are encouraged to select courses that stress writing skills. score on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). interest.

emotion. Application of principles to an understanding of one’s own behavior and the behavior of others is stressed. learning. . dysfunctional behavior and treatment. perception. and Behavior • PSY 499 Senior Seminar • 12 additional upper division electives in psychology Lower-Division Courses (6 semester hours) • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology • PSY 240 Research Methods Upper-Division Courses (15 semester hours) • PSY 320 Social Psychology • PSY 335 Abnormal Psychology.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – PSYCHOLOGY 147 bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in Psychology (42 semester hours) Lower-Division Courses • MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology • PSY 205 Child and Adolescent Development • PSY 240 Research Methods Upper-Division Courses (30 semester hours) • PSY 320 Social Psychology • PSY 335 Abnormal Psychology • PSY 390 Psychology Internship • PSY 420 Personality Theories • PSY 430 Learning. • PSY 420 Personality Theories • 6 additional upper-division electives in psychology UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Minor in Psychology (21 semester hours) Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology Please see graduate program section of this catalog. personality. Psychology Courses PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (3) A general survey of the psychological aspects of human behavior: cognition. Cognitiion. motivation.

Topics will include: historically significant psychological theories of religion. cognitive systems of belief. intimacy. PSY 315 Psychology of Religion and Spirituality (3) This course will familiarize students with a wide variety of psychological topics related to the study of religion and spirituality. and time periods). social and emotional influences on belief and practice. Equivalent to SOC 320.148 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – PSYCHOLOGY PSY 205 Child and Adolescent Development (3) Survey of human development and functioning from infancy through adolescence. motivations. human sexual response. PSY 330 Psychology of the family (3) Survey of major systems theories used by psychologists to examine family life. the related but distinct psychological variables of religiosity and spirituality. Topics include sexual anatomy. sexual behaviors and intimacy. intimacy and the development of sexual identity. PSY 305 Adulthood and Aging (3) The study of predictable life challenges and changing capacities in adulthood and old age. violence. PSY 240 Research Methods (3) The practice of social scientific research. perceptions and communicative processes. social and cultural settings that give an individual support and direction. prominent psychological theories and models contained within the world’s major religious systems. Equivalent to SOC 240. attitude formations. methods of data collection and analysis. sexual health and illness. PSY 310 Psychology of Human Sexuality (3) Focuses on physiological. cultures. sexuality and attitudes toward women and men. Emphasis on practical mastery of research skills and knowledge of data sources. Topics include: work. . psychological and cultural influences on human sexuality. parental relationships. and empirical research on specific spiritual disciplines and psychological orientations toward religion (that exist across religions. Emphasis on placing development within the interpersonal. PSY 295/395/495 Special Topics (3) To be arranged with department advisor. prejudices. PSY 320 Social Psychology (3) Overview of group formation and interaction in relation to environment. PSY 325 Psychology of Men (3) Study of major issues having impact on development of male gender identity. Also covers ways in which family experiences can affect family members and how psychologists work with dysfunctional families. How they influence the individual’s needs. pregnancy and childbirth. the paraphillias.

illegal. specific mental health conditions and their treatments. The main focus is on the ways in which psychologists are involved in working alongside medical professionals to promote health and wellness. This includes the examination of the relationship between stress and illness. coping with illness and lifestyle changes. based on the biopsychosocial model. research. stress. as well as examine the issues of drug dependence and treatment for dependence. stress management. consciousness. Readings are in the contexts of development of psychology in particular and the social sciences in general. Current information derived from empirical research reports and other academic sources is emphasized. motivation. PSY 240. They are also heavily involved in research on the important connections between health. and illness. prevention of illness.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – PSYCHOLOGY 149 PSY 333 biological Psychology (3) In this class we will examine the structure and function of the nervous system. PSY 355 Great books in Psychology (3) Study of seminal texts that have shaped modern psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 101. the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (the primary diagnostic classification system in the United States). and the influence of personality and relationships on health and illness. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Equivalent to CJ 353. and therapeutic drugs. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Current information derived from empirical research reports and other academic sources is emphasized. PSY 353 Drugs and Society (3) In this class we will examine psychoactive substances. Prerequisites: PSY 101. stress. and psychological disorders. and ethical principles related to the treatment of individuals with mental illnesses. including sensation and perception. students will receive a thorough introduction to the study.e. cognition. Prerequisite: PSY 101. PSY 345 Counseling Theories (3) Survey of major theories of counseling. including legal. Also sometimes known as Behavioral Medicine. Major topics of lecture and discussion will include: the concept of “abnormality” in contemporary scientific psychology. We will also consider how the nervous system is involved in various behavioral and psychological phenomena. coping styles and techniques. psychologists use cognitivebehavioral knowledge and techniques in directly providing patient care. PSY 343 Health Psychology (3) Health Psychology is a rapidly growing field of study and practice. We will place special emphasis on the biological elements of drug use and abuse. PSY 340 Interviewing (3) Interviewing as a practical skill in social service and social science. PSY 335 Abnormal Psychology (3) In this course. diagnostic procedures and criteria. the common ways in which human beings suffer from distress and impairment). coping. stigma. and treatment of mental illnesses (i. We will consider the history and social implications of drug use.

and bingeeating disorders and look at research-based methods of assessment and treatment. Jung and Hall are explored. eating disorders. Emphasis on developments since 1900. Cognition. Adler. We will review the professional literature on anorexia.150 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – PSYCHOLOGY PSY 360 History and Systems of Psychology (3) Development of the major schools of thought in psychology. arbitration. conflict resolution and effective communication. PSY 387 body Image and Eating Disorders (3) This course focuses on cultural and psychological issues related to gender. The dangers of dieting are examined along with research on effective weight loss programs. Skill training in consensus. PSY 380 Psychology of Group Processes (3) Study of major group therapy methods. Cultural and media messages about ideal body size are explored. Application of group methods. body image. May be repeated with consent of instructor. Theories of interpretation by Freud. the biological . PSY 365 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3) Learning experiences in participatory management. Students are expected to arrange internship sites prior to the beginning of the semester. PSY 420 Personality Theories (3) A survey of major theories of personality development. Focus on understanding the value of different styles of leadership and treatment results. PSY 397 Directed Study (3) An examination of selected issues or research projects in psychology. Women’s identity as “self in relation” will be examined as well as the clinical application of these theories. negotiation. The history of experimental psychology is also emphasized in this course. Perls. Topics include classical and operant conditioning. PSY 390/490 Psychology Internship (1-6) Experience with and application of psychological principles in a selected community agency or organization. PSY 430 Learning. PSY 370 Psychology of Dreams (3) Study of physiological. PSY 385 Psychology of Women (3) In this class students will study the development of female gender identity and theories related to the psychology of women. historical. Research on girls’ and women’s development will be explored and contrasted to previous psychological models based on male development. including behavioristic and cognitivistic theories. theoretical and functional aspects of dreaming. and obesity. and behavior (3) This course covers major theories of human and animal learning. bulimia.

analyzing data. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . helping children cope with death. PSY 440 Grief and Loss (3) The objective of this course is to provide current and timely information on a variety of grief. and the application of learning and cognitive theories to bring about positive behavioral changes. and death related topics. PSY 240.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – PSYCHOLOGY 151 basis of learning and memory. near death experience. Prerequisites: PSY 101. Prerequisites: MTH 201. models of human memory. We will review experimental and non-experimental methods of research. PSY 498 Advanced Research Design (3) In this class students gain experience designing and conducting research. the rise of cognitive science. and chronic sorrow. survivors. students will develop a research proposal for an empirical study to be completed in the spring as their thesis projects. psychological theories regarding grief. Prerequisite: PSY/SOC 240. and other topics of interest to students. and writing research reports. but will not be the focus of this course. childhood bereavement. suicide. the grief process. the funeral. working in teams. senior status. Such topics may include but will not be limited to: cultural variables in the death process. loss. students will conduct an empirical study of a research topic chosen by the instructor. PSY 499 Senior Seminar (3) Preparation and presentation of a senior paper that demonstrates competency in a selected psychology topic. Individually. spiritual aspects of death and dying. HIV/AIDS. Bereavement counseling will be addressed. death ritual and custom. death with dignity. loss. Then. senior status or with instructor permission. cultural grief.

The sociology and cultural anthropology major also serves the professional requirements of other departments by examining the impact of culture. race and stratification in contemporary society. Criminal Justice. Detailed information about the curricula and course offerings for these programs can be found in their respective sections of this catalog. and Sociology and Cultural Anthropology. including:) • SOC 318 History of Sociology and Anthropology • SOC 320 Social Psychology . including sociological consulting. Students in the program gain a broad-based education in critical reasoning and writing skills through the study of culture and society. as well as minor concentrations in each of those disciplines and in Legal Studies. bachelor of Arts General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) Major in Sociology/Cultural Anthropology (39 semester hours) Lower-Division Courses • SOC 101 Modern Society and Culture • SOC 102 American Social Problems • SOC 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology • SOC 240 Research Methods Upper-Division Courses (27 upper-division semester hours in sociology and cultural anthropology. museum studies and a variety of service careers in both the public and private sector.152 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – SOCIAL JUSTICE / SOCIOLOGY SOCIAL JUSTICE faculty Robert Hauhart Victor Kogan David Price Katya Shkurkin The Department of Social Justice is an administrative unit that incorporates the intellectual orientations and curricula of several distinct but complementary programs. SOCIOLOGY AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY faculty Robert Hauhart Victor Kogan David Price Katya Shkurkin The Sociology and Cultural Anthropology Program is an interdisciplinary major designed to prepare students for work in a variety of fields. It offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in Community Services. The department is also home to the University’s pre-law program. applied anthropology consulting. ethnicity.

SOC 302 Sex. Comparison of biological facts with common stereotypes and discriminatory practices. Race and Disability (3) Social meanings of sex. leading to an acquaintance with the concept of culture and its importance to an understanding of human behavior. Emphasis on developing a foundation for understanding. programs. role adjustments associated with retirement. Examination of the basic forms and processes that characterize modern society and culture.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – SOCIOLOGY & CULTURAL ANTHRO 153 • SOC 350 Social Theory • SOC 450 Advanced Research for the Social Sciences • SOC 499 Sociology Seminar Lower-Division Courses • SOC 101 Modern Society and Culture • SOC 102 American Social Problems • SOC 240 Research Methods Upper-Division Courses (12 semester hours of electives in sociology and cultural anthropology) Minor in Sociology/Cultural Anthropology (21 semester hours) Sociology and Cultural Anthropology Courses SOC 101 Modern Society and Culture (3) A survey of sociology and sociological theory. age discrimination. Social meaning and demography of aging. SOC 303 Sociology of Aging (3) Examination of aging from social-psychological and macro-psychological perspectives. SOC 103 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) Studies of societies that contrast with Western civilization. individual rights and community responsibilities. Emphasis on practical mastery of research skills and knowledge of data sources. problems and potentials. current social policies. economic and interpersonal problems and issues. Perspectives and answers of different sociologists are examined. health care and social service needs. race and disability. physical and psychological aging. SOC 240 Research Methods (3) The nature of social scientific research. researching and analyzing social problems. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Impact of stress on life. political. SOC 102 American Social Problems (3) A survey of major social problems in American society. Equivalent to PSY 240. death and bereavement. methods of data collection and analysis.

Equivalent to WS 316. economic gender inequality. SOC 318 History of Sociology and Anthropology (3) Examination of the early sociology and anthropology masters. psychological and feminist theories of the time. Examination of how they influence the individual in terms of needs. social order and institutional change. including theories of group action. SOC 333 Women. the politics of reproduction and models of engendered sexuality. SOC 340 Child Welfare (3) Rights and needs of children. Special focus on the Settlement House movement. the sociological. and the progressive era. SOC 325 Criminology and Juvenile Delinquency (3) Nature and causes of crime and delinquency and efforts to control them. attitude formation. SOC 316 The History of Women in North American Social Work: 1848-1945 (3) Focusing on the historical context. essentialism. domestic organization. families and groups. the Women’s Clubs.154 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – SOCIOLOGY & CULTURAL ANTHRO SOC 305 Juvenile Justice (3) An examination of the legal history of the juvenile court. probable future development. marital and familial processes and conflicts in American society. prejudice. perceptions and communicative processes. SOC 339 Introduction to Community Services: Methods and Ethics (3) Introduction to methodology of community service work with individuals. SOC 395 Special Topics (1-3) To be arranged with department advisor. emergence of sociology and anthropology as sciences. Equivalent to CJ 305. history of sociology and anthropology in a social context. analysis of the problems and processes of the juvenile justice system. cross-cultural considerations of gender. . Topics covered include social construction of gender. Prerequisite: junior standing. SOC 380 Marriage and the family (3) Sexual. Course also explores ethical principles of social service work. Equivalent to PSY 320. Culture and Society (3) Examination of anthropological and sociological models of gender theory. SOC 350 Social Theory (3) In-depth survey of the major conceptual framework of sociology. measures to secure them. motivation. and specific leaders in many communities who began to address social ills of our young nation. Equivalent to CJ 325. Prerequisite: PSY 340. Open to non-majors. SOC 320 Social Psychology (3) Overview of group formation and interaction in relation to environment. cross-cultural examination of the family. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

measurement. and the construction and representation of gender. WOMEN’S STUDIES UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Faculty Olivia Archibald Rex J. science. questionnaire construction and analysis. experimentation. history. Coursework intended for anyone whose work or lifestyle may involve encounters of the intercultural kind. SOC 499 Sociology Seminar (3) A major research paper on an approved topic under the direction of the department. The minor gives students information about women’s experiences. SOC 397 Directed Study (1-3) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. observation.COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – WOMEN’S STUDIES 155 SOC 396 Intercultural Communication (3) Cross-cultural examination of international. Minor in Women’s Studies (18 semester credits) Required Courses (six credits) • WS 200 Introduction to Women’s Studies • WS 400 Feminist Theory and Practice Electives (12 credits chosen from the following) • BIO 395 Women and Science • ENG 381 Women’s Literature . the arts. Prerequisite: SOC/PSY 240. thus offering a valuable background for most professions and an important complement to any major. psychological. cultural and biological factors. Prerequisite: senior standing. domestic and personal communication. politics and other relevant fields of study. sampling. It also analyzes the experiences of women with respect to social. history and changing roles. SOC 450 Advanced Research for the Social Sciences (3) Course studies sociological research methods. Coursework includes scholarship by and/or about women in literature. survey methods. Casillas Gloria Martin Jeanette Munn David Price Katya Shkurkin Roger Snider Women’s studies offers a comprehensive program that provides students with a multidisciplinary body of theoretical and factual knowledge about women.

Equivalent to SOC 316. Examination of feminist approaches to explaining women’s experiences. Open to non-majors.156 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES – WOMEN’S STUDIES • ENG 395 Literature Criticism • HIS 305 History of American Women • HIS 315 Women’s Sports History • PSY 310 Human Sexuality • PSY 385 Psychology of Women • PSY 387 Body Image and Eating Disorders • SOC 333 Women. culture. focusing on a multi-disciplinary understanding of women’s lives. Special focus on the Settlement House movement. social sciences and science. WS 400 feminist Theory and Practice (3) Capstone experience for students with women’s studies minors. WS 397 Directed Studies (3) An examination of selected issues or research projects in women’s studies. sexuality and physical ability intersect to impact our lives. . Also explores women’s contributions to the arts. Will examine how gender. WS 316 The History of Women in North American Social Work: 1848-1945 (3) Focusing on the historical context. the Women’s Clubs. WS 295/395/495 Special Topics in Women’s Studies (3) Elective courses offered periodically on topics related to women’s studies. announced by faculty. Culture and Society • WS 295/395/495 Special Topics • WS 316 History of Women in North American Social Work • WS 397 Directed Studies Women’s Studies Courses WS 200 Introduction to Women’s Studies (3) Introduction to research and methods of women’s studies. and the progressive era. class. Program permission required. Prerequisite: WS 200 and senior status. humanities. their representations and their relative positions in societies. psychological and feminist theories of the time. the sociological. age. and specific leaders in many communities who began to address social ills of our young nation.

counselor. as well as local school district teachers. our mission is to prepare a community of reflective practitioners who use their knowledge. students gain essential knowledge and skills and participate in varied field experiences in P-12 schools. which is designed to prepare teacher candidates to become outstanding P-12 professionals. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . University faculty. secondary or special education options are eligible for certification by the state of Washington. This accreditation certifies that the forenamed professional education program has provided evidence that the program adheres to TEAC’s quality principles. Through pre-program requirements. skills. and dispositions to transform the lives of those they serve. Certification requirements are subject to changes enacted by the state’s Professional Educator Standards Board. candidates in the alternate route program typically participate in a yearlong full-time supervised internship. which take precedence over requirements outlined in the University’s catalog. and administrator candidates to become outstanding P-12 professionals. reason. 50 traditional program and 24 alternate route program candidates were enrolled in supervised internships during the 2009-2010 academic year. Complete Title II Reports are available on the University website. To the general University emphasis on basic strength in academic areas of study for all graduates. TEAC Accreditation: Saint Martin’s University’s Residency Teacher Education Program.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 157 COLLEGE Of EDUCATION AND PROfESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Joyce Westgard. Dean Mission Statement In a culture inspired by the interaction of faith. A total of 183 candidates were enrolled during 2009-2010. Title II 2009-2010 Institutional Report Card Information: The pass rates of traditional and alternative route program completers for the WEST-E is 100 percent. counselors and administrators. the University’s education programs ensure that all students have knowledge in the liberal arts. Students completing the elementary. participate in the program and contribute to its quality and relevance. the College of Education and Professional Psychology adds strong professional teacher. counselor and administrator programs that comply with specific state requirements. Candidates in the traditional program typically participate in 16 weeks of full-time supervised internship (560 hours). Saint Martin’s University’s education programs are approved by the Washington Professional Educator Standards Board. and service. The goal of Saint Martin’s University education programs is to select and prepare teacher. is granted accreditation by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) for a period of five years from June 2008 to June 2013. During the professional sequence.

scholarship. and education within the community of the school. compassion. spiritual. The pluralistic and ever-changing world of diverse students and knowledge will always be welcomed by our graduates. We value our heritage and our mission continues. Such is our mission. flexibility. an educational philosophy centered on meeting the needs of the individual child. and democratic values. .158 CEPP The programs also are shaped by practitioners who serve on professional education advisory boards (PEABs). They are ready to promote hospitality. True to its Roman Catholic Benedictine heritage. A teacher/counselor/administrator education candidate at Saint Martin’s will enter his or her first school prepared not only with knowledge. or as part of theMaster in Teaching degree. The Residency School Counselor Program: The program can be completed as a certification-only (education staff associate) or as part of a Master of Education strand. Education and Professional Psychology Programs: The education programs include bachelor’s and master’s degree options as well as non-degree certification-only options: The Residency Teacher Certification Program (first-level certification): The program can be completed as part of a bachelor’s degree. they will take with them a core set of human. The Professional Teacher Certification Program (second-level certification): The program can be completed as certification-only or as part of a Master of Education degree strand. and a base of practical experience on which to build. Saint Martin’s University makes no guarantees for students to be recommended for Washington State teacher/counselor/administrator certification based on course and field experience completion alone. Students may be withdrawn from education programs at the discretion of the College of Education and Professional Psychology as a result of the Staffing Level II/Intervention Level II process. We see it in ourselves as we mutually support each other with personal encouragement and academic integrity. and camaraderie reflected in our commitment to bridging and connecting the classrooms at Saint Martin’s with the schools of the community. As a community of educators. but also with strong values. The Residency School Administrator Program: The program can be completed as certification-only for principal and/or programadministrator as part of a Master of Education degree strand. the education programs share the University’s strong emphasis on moral and ethical values. we see the values of hard work. College of Education and Professional Psychology Conceptual framework Mission Statement: When an education professional leaves the Saint Martin’s Education Programs. independently after the baccalaureate is completed (certification-only).

and who value the dynamics of pluralism. and critical thinking and problem solving tasks. think critically. relevant and realistic. Purpose Statement: The purpose of the Saint Martin’s University Programs is to provide a distinctive professional educational experience in our education programs. change. and grow in spiritual and ethical character with the goal of promoting the better education and welfare of children. Philosophy Statement: The Education Programs at Saint Martin’s University have been constructed to allow for the confluence of 1. we strive to realize potential. skills. and administrative skills. Candidates are intentionally guided.500 years of Benedictine traditions of scholarship. and dispositions within their chosen field. Commitment to Excellence We are committed to assuring that candidates will be provided an intellectual and professional learning environment that is rigorous. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . and community with current thoughts and practices of today. involve the recognition of change. therefore. education. Our programs are developed and conducted with high expectations that candidates will be personally engaged in their learning. technological utilization. subscribe to a progressive spirit. reflective practitioners meeting the needs of an evolving world. counseling. stimulated in their thinking and genuinely challenged to expand the knowledge. and individuality. Therefore. the constructivist approach to knowledge and skills formulation. We feel that the blending of tradition and modernity allows us to develop education professionals with curiosity. and significant themes of inquiry integrating both the practical and the theoretical aspects of knowledge. and concurrently. who promote stimulating environments for increasingly diverse students. Core Values: Our programs. reach further and to encourage creative and resourceful exploration of alternative pathways to address presented issues and tasks. multi-age grouping practices. Candidates are held accountable to demonstrate professional dispositions and organize and simultaneously manage multiple projects within established timelines. hospitality. Our learning community instills excellence in thought and service while nurturing a candidate’s sense of personal and professional development. love learning.CEPP 159 Vision Statement: Saint Martin’s University strives to focus our education programs upon the development of professionals who value tradition. In partnership with our students and P-12 professional educators. completion of realistic analysis. Academic courses and program experiences are purposefully designed for candidates to probe deeper. coached and supported in their enhancement of relevant and meaningful teaching. candidates completing our academic and certification programs will be agents of change and educational leaders who are resilient. Candidates will demonstrate their abilities to meet professional standards through effective oral and written communications.

P-12 students and staff. performance and reflective assessment. Goals: The following three goals.edu/education. and problem-solve and construct/discover new learning opportunities for themselves. critical. the College of Education and Professional Psychology adds strong professional training programs which comply with specific state requirements. a strong background in academic content areas. but also with strong values. practiced. creative. lead us to the core of the College of Education and Professional Psychology Conceptual Framework: 1. stmartin. consensual. Education Programs will provide a community for P-12 and SMU collaboration. and mastered as students proceed through the program from the introductory courses/ opportunities to the core foundation courses/opportunities. the College of Education and Professional Psychology shares the University’s strong emphasis on moral and ethical values and development of the whole person — intellectually. Our programs support the use of case studies. Full program design statements are available in the Education Student Handbook and on the website. and. and the need for students to be active agents in their education. to the student teaching/internship. creatively participate in free and open inquiry. developed. Guiding Principles: The goal of Saint Martin’s University College of Education and Professional Psychology is to select and prepare candidates to become outstanding P-12 professionals. True to its Catholic Benedictine heritage. and imaginative thinking. A teacher/counselor/administrator educated at Saint Martin’s will enter his/her first school prepared not only with knowledge. Students who complete our program(s) are able to function as future educators in a pluralistic. . field experiences. to methods courses/opportunities. and a base of experience upon which to build. an educational philosophy centered on meeting the needs of the individual child. www. thus enriching pre-service through the pro- 2. Individuals completing our programs will utilize/communicate with technology as it relates to teaching. Knowledge/skills are introduced. and spiritually. The programs are also shaped by practitioners who serve on its Professional Education Advisory Boards (PEAB). and ethical decision making. Pedagogy (Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills): Individuals will develop and utilize pedagogical strategies and skills necessary to their program. therefore. To the general University emphasis on basic strength in academic areas of study for all graduates. democratic society and recognize the need for instruction in both social (group) and personal (individual) realms. Program Design: Spiral/Integrated Program Design: Programs have been designed to integrate knowledge/skills throughout courses and various learning and field experience opportunities. physically. finally.160 CEPP Our curriculum engages students in basic skills development through inquiry-oriented. Curriculum (Subject Matter Knowledge): The College of Education and Professional Psychology is dedicated to developing competent professional educators who have strong knowledge in subject matter. reflective.

professional leadership. Caring Community (Professional Dispositions): The Education Programs are dedicated to developing a caring community of teacher/ counselor administrator colleagues with strong ethical character.0 (a “B” average). 3. Individuals completing our programs will have participated in a variety of leadership and service opportunities and multiple P-12 field experiences. the ability to apply that theory and knowledge in practical. confidence and sensitivity in classroom leadership. collaborative skill. Students who receive two grades of “C-” or lower in any program or endorsement course. and personal integrity. technological and teaching techniques for successfully transmitting that knowledge and application skill. nurturing attitude toward children and colleagues. and. Individuals completing our programs will reflect democratic traditions — including acceptance (hospitality) of all individuals and sensitivity for cultural diversity. a caring. the College of Education and Professional Psychology’s programs were designed to supply its students with: an excellent background in academic and pedagogical theory and knowledge. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . With these goals in mind. not those in effect when they were admitted to the University. All Education Programs: Academic Policy Students should review prerequisites for all courses required for their teacher certification program. Students who receive a “C-” in any course required by their program are required to retake the course. including placements with school districts with diverse student populations. or whose overall grade point average falls below 3. will be automatically withdrawn from the teacher certification program. openness to innovation. skill. courses in basic certification and/or endorsements completed more than seven years before admission or readmission to the teacher certification program do not meet professional requirements. daily situations. Students may reapply to the program when grade discrepancies have been rectified.CEPP 161 fessional performance continuum. Students must earn a grade of “C” (2. Contact the Education office (360-4384333) for additional details. Students may need to repeat all or part of those courses before student teaching as per advisor recommendation. Students who preregister will be processed on the assumption that they will satisfactorily complete all coursework presently being taken. All Education Programs: Waiver and Substitution Options Waiver and substitution options are available for courses based on approved documentation of equivalent knowledge and skills. Ordinarily. Education students must meet the professional education requirements in effect when they are accepted to an education program within the College.00) or better in each program course. the ability to gain employment.

Residency Teacher: Competency-based Endorsements All teacher certification candidates are required to complete two competency-based endorsements of 30 or more semester credits each or equivalent. and/or successful passing of the appropriate WEST-E exams. 5300 Pacific Avenue SE. approved waiver documentation for previous life and/or work experience. one and one-half pages) describing shortand long-term goals as a professional educator • Fingerprint receipt (WSP & FBI) within last two years • Current first aid and CPR cards (Adult. test scores and the application fee should be mailed to: College of Education and Professional Psychology. middle-level or special education. mathematics and writing tests • An on-site essay (handwritten. and Child) • A color Photograph Applications accepted on a rolling basis. priority dates for consideration are: Lacey and Centralia Campuses Alternative Route (STAR) option Joint base LewisMcChord Campuses June 1 for fall November 1 for spring March 1 for summer April 1 for summer academy Term 1 July 1 Term 2 September 1 Term 3 December 1 Term 4 February 1 Term 5 April 1 All application forms. State-approved college/university with a grade of “C” or better.162 CEPP Residency Teacher: Application Applicants must submit the following materials to be considered for admission: • Acceptance to Saint Martin’s University (degree-seeking students only) • College of Education and Professional Psychology application packet. Infant. with $35 processing fee • Forms contained within the application packet • Three letters of recommendation • Copies of official transcripts from all schools. Course requirements may be satisfied by coursework completed at a regionally accredited. WA 98503-7500. To receive an endorsement in elementary education. a student must complete all the required courses and be recommended for a . letters of recommendation. Saint Martin’s University. colleges and universities attended (in addition to transcripts required by the Registrar’s Office) • Passing scores on the WEST-B: reading. Lacey.

middle-level humanities. additional coursework may be required. history. middle-level science. Japanese. or special education (kindergarten-12). Saint Martin’s University makes no guarantees for students to be recommended for Washington State teacher/counselor/administrator certification based on course and field experience completion alone. Requirements for acceptance are: UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Residency Teacher: Procedures for Admission Students must apply for admission before or during the semester in which they complete the pre-professional sequence of courses. middle-level (grades 4-9). mathematics. basic courses and courses to complete two endorsements. instrumental music. Requirements for each of the revised Washington State endorsements offered by Saint Martin’s University are listed later in this section. middle-level math. science. drama.CEPP 163 residency teaching certificate with an endorsement in elementary education (kindergarten-8). elementary education. chemistry. each student is required to have at least one additional endorsement earned either at Saint Martin’s or elsewhere. While this requirement is usually satisfied with the student’s baccalaureate major. bilingual education. students planning to enter the Saint Martin’s teacher education program must consult an advisor from the College of Education and Professional Psychology prior to taking courses. general music. Residency Teacher: Program Requirements The residency teacher education program requires pre-professional courses. To insure proper sequencing of courses. English language arts. Saint Martin’s has been authorized by the Washington Professional Educator Standards Board to offer teacher certificate competency-based endorsements in the following fields: biology. Spanish and special education. early childhood special education. Candidates for secondary education (grades 5-12) are required to have an academic major or equivalent (30 semester-hour minimum) in the area in which they intend to be endorsed. choral music. Students seeking a Master in Teaching certification can be recommended only in the field of their major and in fields for which they meet state requirements for added endorsements. middle-level and/or special education. English language learners. social studies. Veterans Administration students must contact the veteran services representative regarding VA benefits. early childhood education. health/fitness. Students must apply for acceptance to the program before or during the pre-professional sequence. French. In addition to an endorsement in elementary. All coursework must be completed before student teaching. reading. Students may be withdrawn from Education Programs at the discretion of the College of Education and Professional Psychology as a result of the Staffing Level II/Intervention Level II process.

Education programs staff will work diligently to obtain a placement for student teaching.0. he or she must have demonstrated academic ability. with a particular cooperating teacher or University supervisor. Saint Martin’s College of Education and Professional Psychology placement offices make no guarantees for student teaching placement in a particular school district or school building. Students may not register for academic coursework other than the student teaching seminar during the semester in which they student teach. University supervisors will discuss individual placement problems with students. mathematics). a ma- . Residency Teacher: Student Teaching/Internship The teacher certification program requires supervised student teaching (also known as an internship). A student is expected to complete all required courses and at least 12 semester hours at Saint Martin’s University before student teaching. To be accepted to this option. or during a particular semester. Students may not be placed in the same school in which a spouse or family member is employed. • Scores that meet state requirements on standardized tests. All student teaching assignments are considered full-time work. To do so may jeopardize placement at that school and/or district and may result in termination of any/all field experience placements in that district for the student. Residency Teacher: Post-baccalaureate Certification-Only Option An individual with a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree from an accredited institution may be admitted to a certification-only option leading to program verification for a Residency Teaching Certificate. normally requiring seven hours a day in the school.164 CEPP • An overall grade point average of at least 3. broad liberal arts preparation. Concurrent enrollment in the student teaching/internship seminar is required of student teachers. Students may be withdrawn from student teaching at the discretion of the College of Education and Professional Psychology faculty or of the administrators of the P-12 school. plus additional time for class preparation and seminars. • Demonstrated competency in basic skill areas (oral and written expression. Students are asked to convey special placement requests at that time. application for a supervised internship must be made by the deadline for the internship. Students should contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology office for specific deadline dates. Completion of an application for intern teaching and assignment to a school or classroom are tentative and are based on successful completion of coursework in progress. Students may not make special arrangements on their own. Students should contact the education office to obtain a teacher education certificate candidate application packet. but final acceptance of a student teacher is the prerogative of the school district. but the University ultimately makes the internship assignments in cooperation with school district personnel. To facilitate placement.

The “equal work but less credit” split-level courses therefore adjust for graduate credit earned. Graduate students are also often required to analyze or perform research or accept greater leadership in the course content.CEPP 165 jor field acceptable for public school teaching and realistic career plans. Requirements can be met by a combination of coursework. Non-degree students seeking certification can only be verified in an area that meets state endorsement requirements and in fields for which they meet state requirements for added endorsements. graduate students will be expected to complete additional requirements. WEST-E tests and/or Performance-based Pedagogy Assessment evaluation. Program information is available from the Office of Admissions or the College of Education and Professional Psychology. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Graduate Degree Options The University’s College of Education and Professional Psychology offers programs leading to a master of education or a master in teaching degree. except that: • Candidates who are not to be recommended for a bachelor’s degree at Saint Martin’s need not meet the University’s general education requirements. appropriate methods knowledge/skills. (See the “Graduate Programs” section of this catalog for a description of the Master of Education and Master in Teaching degree programs. . Individuals interested in the University’s certification-only option should contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology office. Graduate degrees can be earned in conjunction with residency certification. life and/or work experience.) Added Endorsement Options Added endorsement options for current teachers are available for all endorsements authorized for Saint Martin’s University (refer to the list under “Endorsements” in this section). Contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology office for further information or application materials. Requirements for the certification-only option are the same as those described for elementary and secondary degree certification options. Graduate core split level courses (e.) Residency Teacher: Split-Level Course Requirements Many courses offered in the master of education and master in teaching programs have an undergraduate level offered concurrently with the graduate level course.g. Requirements vary depending on the current endorsement and the desired endorsement. ED 306/MED 506) are typically one credit less than the undergraduate section. observation. In split-level courses for which undergraduate and graduate students earn the same credit. These can be earned at Saint Martin’s or in earlier college or university experience. (Please see the graduate programs section of this catalog for complete program descriptions. • Graduate-level courses may be substituted for some courses leading to certification..

history course One world history course One natural science course with laboratory PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology ENG 101 College Writing I ENG 102 College Writing II SPH 106 Public Address -or.166 CEPP – ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ELEMENTARY EDUCATION faculty Kathleen Allen Huabin Chen Mark Haddock Fumie Hashimoto Belinda Hill Paul Nelson Maureen Siera Lou Therrell Dan Windisch bachelor of Arts Grades Preschool–8 General Education Core (42-48 semester hours) General University degree requirements are listed in the “Academic Programs and Policies” section of this catalog. Pre-Professional Courses (30-31 semester hours) May include General Education and/or academic field/added endorsement courses: • • • • • • • • • • • One mathematics course above MTH 101 One U. S.THR 211 Acting I ED 204 Introduction to Education ED 205 Child and Adolescent Development SOC 396 Intercultural Communications basic Courses (57 semester hours) Includes an endorsement in elementary education • • • • • • ED 306 Curriculum and Instruction TED 312 Classroom Technology SED 359 Introduction to Exceptionality ED 360 Classroom Management ED 370 Classroom Assessment ED 371 Education Law .

Elementary Teachers ED 494 Student Teaching in the Elementary School ED 498 Student Teaching Seminar: Elementary Elementary Education Endorsement To receive an endorsement in “elementary education. P-8. SECONDARY EDUCATION faculty Ann Gentle Mark Haddock Eileen Reilich Maureen Siera Steve Siera Dan Windisch bachelor of Arts Grades 4–12 General Education Core (45-51 semester hours) General University degree requirements are listed in the “Academic Programs and Policies” section of this catalog. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Second/Additional Endorsement (14-40 semester hours) In addition to the endorsement in “elementary education. . and with careful planning. Depending on the endorsement area. this second endorsement may require only 14 or 15 semester hours. Some credits may double as credits for a second or additional endorsement or for general education requirements. Certificate Endorsement / Academic Major (30-60 semester hours) Academic majors typically range between 30 and 60 semester hours. P-8.” a student must complete all required courses and be verified for program completion for a residency teaching certificate with an endorsement in elementary education (P-8). The additional endorsement may be earned either at Saint Martin’s University or elsewhere.” students are required to complete at least one additional endorsement in a second endorsable area.CEPP – SECONDARY EDUCATION 167 • • • • • • • • • • • • ED 383 Issues of Abuse/ Teacher as Counselor ED 411 Methods of Teaching Mathematics ED 415 Methods of Teaching Science ED 418 Methods of Teaching Social Studies ED 419 Methods of Teaching Language Arts ED 426 Methods of Teaching Language Acquisition ED 429 Arts and Movement ED 438 Literature for Children and Young Adults ED 474 Primary Reading/Writing ED 476 Elementary Content-area Reading .

general). basic Courses (42 semester hours) Required before student teaching: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ED 306 Curriculum and Instruction TED 312 Classroom Technology SED 359 Introduction to Exceptionality ED 360 Classroom Management ED 370 Classroom Assessment ED 371 Education Law ED 383 Issues of Abuse/Teacher as Counselor ED 426 Methods of Teaching Language Acquisition ED 482 Reading Assessment and Intervention for Secondary Teachers ED 484 General Methods for Secondary Teachers ED 485 Content-area Reading for Secondary Teachers ED 487 Secondary Methods Seminar/Practicum ED 496 Student Teaching in Secondary Schools ED 499 Student Teaching Seminar: Secondary . Candidates must have advisors in both the College of Education and Professional Psychology and their academic major. English. Required Pre-Professional Courses * (24-25 semester hours) • One mathematics course above MTH 101 • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology • ENG 101 College Writing I • ENG 102 College Writing II • SPH 106 Public Address -or. Students completing the Secondary Education Program meet the requirements for a minor in education. Saint Martin’s University is authorized to verify its graduates for teaching endorsements in secondary schools (grades 4-12) in the following academic majors: biology. music (choral. chemistry. history and mathematics.168 CEPP – SECONDARY EDUCATION Candidates for secondary program verification are required to have an academic major in the area in which they intend to be endorsed. instrumental. drama.THR 211 Acting I • ED 204 Introduction to Education • ED 205 Child and Adolescent Development • SOC 396 Intercultural Communication * Some credits may be included in the University’s General Education and/or academic major requirements.

ED 485 Content-area Reading for Secondary Teachers • ED 477 Reading Diagnosis -or. Students can earn the additional endorsement either at Saint Martin’s University or elsewhere. Minor in Education (19-20 semester hours) Please see general information on education degree programs earlier in this catalog. For a minor in education.CEPP – SECONDARY EDUCATION 169 Second/Additional Endorsements (0-40 semester hours) In addition to endorsement in the student’s major. Lower-Division Courses (6 semester hours) • ED 204 Introduction to Education • ED 205 Child and Adolescent Development Upper-Division Courses (13-14 semester hours) • SED 359 Introduction to Exceptionality • ED 306 Curriculum and Instruction • ED 383 Issues of Abuse/Teacher as Counselor Plus Two Courses Chosen From: • ED 360 Classroom Management • ED 371 Education Law • TED 312 Classroom Technology UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS • ED 370 Classroom Assessment NOTE: Completion of the education minor does not satisfy requirements for teacher certification.ED 482 Reading Assessment/Intervention Secondary • ED 479 Reading Practicum • ED 481 Issues and Trends in Literacy Instruction . Minor in Reading (21-24 semester hours. at least one additional endorsement is required.) Upper-Division Courses • ED 419 Method of Teaching Language Arts • ED 438 Literature for Children and Young Adults • ED 474 Primary Reading/Writing • ED 475 Reader-Writer Workshop • ED 476 Content-area Reading for Elementary Teachers -or. students must apply for acceptance before enrolling in any upper-division coursework. Students must meet the same requirements as those applying to major in education. does not include a complete endorsement in reading.

or JPN.) For a competency-based endorsement. MTH 357 or MTH 201 Chemistry Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: MTH 171. MUS 331.170 CEPP – ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS WASHINGTON STATE COMPETENCY-bASED ENDORSEMENT REqUIREMENTS (Graduate-level courses may be substituted for lower-level requirements. CHM 362. MTH 101. ED 428/MED 528 Biology Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: BIO elective: choose from cell biology. CHM 299/399/401 or CHM 402 Choral Music Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: MUS 105. MUS 385 (8 credits minimum). ED 426/MED 526. ENG 101 or ENG 102.e. or English advanced writing course. the student must have completed each of the following requirements: • College of Education and Professional Psychology requirements for Washington State Residency Teacher Certification in elementary education. BIO 358 and lab. CHM 355. MTH 201 or MTH 357. 30-45+ semester credits) in the endorsement area and related areas and/or approved waiver documentation. secondary education. BIO 375 and lab. PHY 141. CHM 142. SPN. MUS 321. CHM 105. Endorsements Offered Bilingual Education Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: Endorsement in FRN. SED 461/MED 561. CHM 141. SED 359/MED 559.. CHM 201 and lab. MUS 306. ED 476/MED 576 or ED 485/MED 585. Complete information about endorsement requirements is available at the College of Education and Professional Psychology office. ED 427/ MED 527. BIO 351 and lab. 6 credits minimum voice and 2 credits minimum piano). MUS 106. BIO 305 and lab. CHM 331. BIO 328 and lab. CHM 371 and lab. ENG 433. ENG 306. MUS 305. Endorsements may require additional methods courses specified on the endorsement forms available in the College of Education and Professional Psychology office and on the website. • Appropriate methods courses The student also must have: • Passed the WEST-E test in the appropriate endorsement areas. ED 425/MED 525. CHM 202 and lab. molecular biology. • The knowledge/skills equivalent to a “major” (i. MUS 110 or MUS 310 (applied lessons. BIO 310 and lab or BIO 314 and lab. ED 438/MED 538 or ED 482/MED 582 or ED 466/MED 566. SOC 396 or MED 605. BIO 142 and lab. and/or special education. MUS 330. • Been observed teaching. MUS 220. BIO 141 and lab. • Met all areas on the Washington State Teacher Assessment Evaluation. MUS 495 . MUS 395A. environmental biology.

MUS 305.history of a French-speaking region General Music Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: MUS 105. 1 credit woodwinds. PE 401. ED 419/MED 519. MUS 395B (3 credits minimum – 1 credit brass. THR 401. PE 310. THR 350. MUS 305. ED 205/MED 607. THR 330. ENG 306. ENG 433. FRN 395. MUS 331. PE 345 or PE 430. FRN 101. MUS 495 Health/Fitness Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ED 205/MED 607. SOC 396/MED 605. ED425/MED525. ENG 201 or ENG 202. 5 credits minimum piano). ED428/MED528. ENG 341/356/358/361/363 or 367. ED 476/MED 576. ED 411/MED 511. ED 426/MED 526. THR 211 or THR 305. SOC 396/MED 605. MUS 395A. PLS 151.CEPP – ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS 171 Drama Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: THR 101. ED 472/ MED 572. 6 credits minimum major instrument). ED 476/MED 576 English Language Arts Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ED 485/MED 585. ED 438/MED 538. PE 202/203 or PE 204. HIS 141. FRN 202. MUS 220. MUS 106. ED 424/MED 524. ED427/MED527. ENG 102. FRN 201. THR 307 or THR 380. MUS 330. ENG 385. SOC396 or MED605. ENG 299 or ENG 302. SED 359/MED 559. 2 credits minimum piano.HIS 102 and two other world/ regional history courses. PE 301. ENG 203. MUS 220. MUS 110 or MUS 310 (applied lessons. ED426/MED526. MUS 385 (6 credits minimum). MUS 306. ED 438/MED 538. ED 474/MED 574. ED 418/MED 518. ED417/MED517. SPH course. MUS 386 (8 credits minimum band). ED 474/MED 574. MUS 331. ED 429/MED 529. ED 419/MED 519. MUS 395A. SOC 396/MED 605. THR 450 Early Childhood Coursework or approved waiver documentation for a complete endorsement in elementary or special education and the following courses: ED 205/ MED 607. MUS 110 or MUS 310 (applied lessons. ENG 321 or ENG 322. THR 305. MUS 306.S. THR 320. THR 201. FRN 295. ED477/MED577 or SED461/ MED561 or approved Community College ECE course. ED 474/MED 574. HIS 142 and two other U. 8 credits minimum vocal. ED 497/MED 597 French Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ED 205/MED 607. MUS 330. ED 370/MED 570. FRN 102. PE 302. HIS 101. SOC396 or MED605. THR 211. history courses. SED 359/MED 559. SED469/MED569 or ED479/MED579 or approved Community College ECE supervised practicum Early Childhood Special Education Coursework completed for early childhood (with or without the WEST-E exam) and a complete endorsement in special education Elementary Education Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ED 204/MED 607. TED 312/MED 512. GPH 210. ED 438/MED 538. SED 359/ MED 559. FRN 495A. FRN 495C -or. ED 306/MED 506. ED 472/MED 572. THR 250. PE 400. 1 credit percussion). SED 359/MED559. ED383/MED583 History Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: HIS 326. ECN 101 Instrumental Music Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: MUS 105. MUS 106. ED 415/ MED 515. FRN 495B. ENG 326 English Language Learner Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ENG 433 or ENG 306 or English advanced writing course. MUS 395C UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS .

BIO 110 and lab or BIO 358 and lab or BIO 359 and lab. SOC 396/MED 605. ED 476/MED 576 or ED 485/MED 585. ED 475/MED475. MTH 314. JPN 495A. BIO 141 and lab. ENG 101. JPN 302. MTH 353 or MTH 361. world history course. MTH 171. ED 426/MED526. one geography course. JPN 102. MTH 172. ED 419/MED519.S. MTH 172. BIO 141 and lab. MTH 101 (or two years high school algebra with “B” or better grade or Math Department placement test passing score). JPN 202. history course. MTH 171. ED 481/MED581. PHY 142 and lab or PHY 172 and lab. SED 359/MED 559 or SED 461/MED 561. PHY 141 . MTH 220. CHM 142 and lab. TED 312/MED 512. ED426/ MED526. MTH 314. JPN 495B or history of Japan Mathematics Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: MTH 101. ED 474/MED474. U. PHY 141 and lab or PHY 171 and lab. ED 411/MED 511 (elementary focus) –or- ED 484 and ED 487 or MED 584 (secondary focus) Middle Level – Humanities Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ED 486/MED 586. ED 485/MED 585 or ED 476/MED 576. MTH 121. Choose two: ED 472/MED572. BIO 110 and lab or BIO 358 and lab or BIO 359 with lab. SOC 396/MED 605. MTH 201 or MTH 357. or ED428/MED528 Science Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: MTH 171. ED 418/MED 518 or ED 419/MED 519 or ED 484 and ED 487 or MED 584. English literature course. MTH 201 or MTH 357. BIO 328 with lab Reading/Literacy Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ENG 102. ED 485/MED 585 or ED 476/MED 576. CHEM 141 and lab. MTH 172. ED 479/MED579. MTH 122. SED 359/MED 559 or SED 461/MED 561. ENG 102. SED 359/MED 559 or SED 461/MED 561. MTH 366. MTH 121 (or one year high school precalculus with “B” or better grade or Math Department placement test passing score or grade of “C” or better in MTH 171 or MTH 220). SED 359/MED559. ED 476/MED576 or ED 485/ MED585. JPN 395. SCI 105 with lab. and one economics course Middle Level – Math Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ED 486/ MED 586.172 CEPP – ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS Japanese Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ED 205/MED 607. MTH 357. SOC 396/MED 605. ED 477/MED577. BIO 142 and lab. BIO 142 and lab. ED 411/MED 511 or ED 484 and ED 487 or MED 584. SOC 396/MED 605. MTH 366 Middle Level – Science Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ED 486/ MED 586. CHM 141 and lab. ED 484 and ED 487 or MED 584 or ED 415/MED 515. ED 438/MED538. JPN 301. JPN 101. MTH 220. SED461/MED561. TED 312/MED 512. one political science course.

May be repeated for credit. SED 466/ MED 566. SOC 396/MED 605. other U. Students will be encouraged to apply ideas and theories to education and to investigate a variety of resources for future reference. PSY 101 or SOC 101.HIS 141. May be repeated for credit. PLS 151. PHY 142 and lab or PHY 172 and lab. ED 297/397/497 Directed Practicum (1-3) Student/faculty-selected internship in a specialized area. SPN 102. PLS 300. ECN 101 Spanish Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: ED 205/MED 607. SPN 202.CEPP – EDUCATION COURSES 173 and lab or PHY 171 and lab. especially in the United States. Provides a foundation to be expanded on in other education classes. ED 477/MED 577. Considerable attention given to preschool-12 curriculum. SPN 395. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. history course. SOC 396/MED 605. SPN 495C or history of a Spanish-speaking region Special Education Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: SED 359/ MED 559. SED 461/MED 561. HIS 102. Education Courses ED 204 Introduction to Education (3) Introduction to education as a profession.S. The waiver in this case does not indicate waiver of knowledge/skills. ED 295/395/495 Directed Study (1-3) Courses offered periodically on education topics announced by the faculty. and governance. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Please contact the University’s Department of Special Education for additional information. SPN 295. curriculum. SED 469/MED 569. The waiver involves allowing the teacher an additional three years after certification to complete the remaining nine semester hours in ED 424/MED 524 or ED426/MED526. funding. particularly the social forces that shape it. A survey of educational history. but a three-year approval to teach in special education while completing the remaining requirements for the endorsement. Offered on approval by faculty and dean of education. another world /regional history course. ED 415/MED 515 (elementary focus) or ED 484 and ED 487 or MED 584 (secondary focus) Social Studies Coursework or approved waiver documentation for: HIS 326. HIS 142. SPN 201. SED 465/MED 565. SED 445/MED 545 NOTE: A candidate may be eligible for a pre-endorsement waiver from the Washington State Special Education Office if he or she is hired to teach a special education classroom and has completed the first seven courses (21 special education credits) listed above. ED 477/MED 577 and SED 445/MED 545. HIS 101. ED 205 Child and Adolescent Development (3) The emphasis of this class will be on gaining a basic understanding of research and theories of child and adolescent development. SED 467/MED 467. SED 463/MED 563. SPN 495B. ED 426/MED 526. SPN 495A. one astronomy course. SPN 101. ED 424/MED 524 or ED 426/ MED 526. GPH 210. SCI 105 with lab.

standardized tests. Prerequisite: Acceptance as a teacher certification candidate. assessment management technology and conferencing skills. Includes a 10-hour observation and instruction practicum in primary-grade 8 mathematics. observe and critique student teacher’s lessons. Covers state agencies and local school boards. strengths and weaknesses. but is not limited to. reporting and working with children who have been victims of child abuse. tenure. Also includes the role of the classroom teacher as counselor. sequencing. delivering. Prerequisite: ED 306 or concurrent enrollment. Also covered are state and national trends in assessment and testing. ED 411 Methods of Teaching Math (4) Objectives. evaluating instruction. confer with student teacher on progress. No prerequisite required.174 CEPP – EDUCATION COURSES ED 300 Competency Seminar (1-2) A seminar/independent study to assess a student’s competency in state-required generic competency areas. instruction developed through systematic application of specific models. Exploration of teaching methods such as cooperative learning. strategies for individual and group behavior. concept development and inquiry learning. ED 370 Classroom Assessment (3) Students learn how to construct and evaluate classroom assessments to assess student learning. Principles of organizing. methods and curriculum for teaching preschool-grade 8 mathematics. academic freedom and student issues of compulsory education. educational statistics. teaching strategies and integrated knowledge and skills of mathematics for elementary teachers. grading. ED 360 Classroom Management (3) Through an understanding of current theories and practices in classroom management. Prerequisite: ED 306 . ED 400 Training for Mentor Teachers (1) Training to plan and structure the student teaching experience. Includes. Prerequisite: ED 306 or concurrent enrollment. ED 383 Issues of Abuse/Teacher as Counselor (2) Course addresses the teacher’s role in identifying. Emphasis on development of a thematic unit with lesson design based on state and national standards. alternative assessments. ED 306 Curriculum and Instruction (3) Multiple approaches to curriculum and instruction emphasizing becoming a reflective teacher. ED 371 Educational Law (2) Fulfills new Washington State requirements for understanding educational law and its relationship to contemporary school issues and problems. university issues and law. Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements and Grade Level Expectations. students will begin to create their own philosophy of management. materials. Emphasis on theory. teachers’ employment. No prerequisite required. norm and criterion referenced tests. and write student-teaching evaluations and recommendations.

assessment. This course presents issues pertaining to educating English Language Learners. Prerequisite: ED 306. Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements. Emphasis on theory. Involvement of parents. Prerequisite: ED 306. curriculum and assessment specific to early childhood education will be reviewed. Methods. Additionally. teaching strategies and integrated knowledge and skills of science for elementary teachers. classroom environment. and linguistic issues involved in meeting the needs of students who are speakers of languages other than English. and promotion of social competence. Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements and Grade Level Expectations. materials. Emphasis of theory. and politics involving ELL and Bilingual Education. SED 359 or concurrent enrollment. speaking. including program models. ED 425 Issues and Trends in English Language Learners and bilingual Education (3) Examination of the educational theories. writing and reading in grades kindergarten-8. Includes a 10-hour observation and instruction practicum in primarygrade 8 science. practice and research related to the education of English Language Learners (ELL) and Bilingual Education. map-globe interpretation and content specified in the Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements for grades P-8 will be emphasized. ED 418 Methods of Teaching Social Studies (3) Introduces education students preparing to teach preschool-grade 12 to specific methods used to teach social studies. methods and curriculum for teaching listening. Offered on demand. ED 426. Prerequisite: ED 306. mainstream teachers and others who do not have ESOL or bilingual training in educating English Language Learners will be included. Prerequisite: ED 306. Resources for continuing professional development in the fields of second language instruction and bilingual education will be provided. methods and curriculum for teaching preschool-grade 8 science. school community. as will relationship of family and community to the student. teaching strategies and integrated knowledge/skills for health and physical education.CEPP – EDUCATION COURSES 175 ED 415 Methods of Teaching Science (4) Objectives. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS ED 419 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (3) Objectives. Course requires a 10-hour observation and instruction practicum in preschool-grade 12 social studies. ED 424 Early Childhood Education (3) Important issues related to teaching primary-grade 3 emphasized. ED 417 Methods of Teaching Health and Physical Education (2) Introduction of specific instructional methods unique to health/physical education for preschool-grade 8 education students. Includes a 10-hour instructional practicum in primary-grade 8 language arts. . Prerequisites: ED 306. Prerequisite: ED 306. Integrated thematic unit planning. social/cultural. Emphasis on theory. political. materials. teaching strategies and integrated knowledge and skills of language arts for elementary teachers. discussions will include evaluating the historical.

Prerequisites: ED 306. Prerequisite: ED 306. learning styles. The impact of social context factors such as race. what the study of language tells us about the human mind and the relation of language to its cultural and educational context. Electronic sources of information for teachers and students will be reviewed. Examination of the educational theories. special education. anthropology and artificial intelligence. ED 436 Library Media in the Instructional Program (3) Issues and skills related to integration of the library media center and its resources into the school’s instructional program. history and sources of children’s books. Prerequisite: ED 306/MED 506. ED 429 Arts and Movement (4) This course explores the elements. principles. socialization patterns and educational opportunity will be studied. Uses English-as-a-second-language. Prerequisite: ED 306/MED 506. Prerequisite: ED 306.176 CEPP – EDUCATION COURSES ED 426 Methods of Teaching Language Acquisition (3) Course focuses on developing student’s proficiency-oriented teaching style. ethnicity. bilingual education and foreign language strategies. ED 427 Social Linguistics and People: Theory and Practice (3) The course concerns the nature of human language. ED 438 Literature for Children and Young Adults (3) Nature. English and English/Language Arts endorsements. Prerequisite: ED 306. ED 435 Information Sources and Retrieval (2) Presentation and evaluation of print and non-print references for kindergarten-12 materials. drama. philosophy of language and the mind. reading and writing. . and pedagogy of visual art. Students will create and participate in arts experiences for the class and others. theories and history of language acquisition. ED 428 Reading Instruction of English Language Learners (3) The course provides knowledge of various methods of instruction for ELL/bilingual education students with emphasis on techniques for effective instruction and assessment of oral language development. Students develop multicultural curriculum to support language learning. Theory of selection and methods of incorporating materials into specific courses of instruction will be covered. A ten (10) hour practicum is required. The scope of the course is interdisciplinary and the topics explored reach beyond the boundaries of linguistics to other scientific disciplines that constitute the field of cognitive science: psycholinguistics. knowledge bases. Students will be able to apply language acquisition theories and develop personal teaching styles. English language learner. Required for elementary certification. music and creative movement for the elementary classroom. exploring various methodologies. ED 426. Prerequisite: ED 306. ED 426. practice and research related to the education of diverse populations. gender and economic status on social linguistics. culture. Development of appropriate and diverse classrooms and curriculum will be emphasized. using ELL/bilingual education strategies. reading.

Prerequisites: ED 419. ED 474 and ED 476. ED 474 Primary Reading/Writing Instruction (2) This course explores the reading and writing process as it pertains to teaching beginning reading. ED 474. miscue analysis and other assessment tools. ED 476. ED 475 Reader-Writer Workshop (3) The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the reader-writer workshop approach to teaching reading and writing as an integrated process for K-8 students. ED 474 and ED 476. as they are integrated into the reading program in elementary school. fluency vocabulary. vocabulary and comprehension) are used in planning strategy lessons for use with students. planning and implementing instruction. ED 438. Students will acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to support secondary students in read- UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . ED 481 Issues and Trends in Literacy Instruction (3) This course is designed as a student-centered forum in which students take a leadership role in the study and discussion of current reading topics and current research in literacy education. Prerequisites: ED 419. ED 474. phonics and spelling. using research-based best practices to develop a personal classroom reading philosophy. Students learn when and how to use various assessments and instructional strategies to help struggling readers. Prerequisites: ED 419. Prerequisites: ED 419. ED 474 and ED 476 ED 473 Philosophy of Reading Instruction (3) This course is designed to explore the theoretical base for teaching of reading in grades kindergarten-8. ED 479 Reading Practicum (3) The purpose of this course is to apply theoretical knowledge learned in the reading program. This practicum serves as an opportunity to observe and practice instructional activities in reading in an extended field experience. ED 477 Reading Diagnosis (4) Explores the area of reading disabilities. ED 474 and ED 476. content and strategies of phonemic awareness. Major components of reading (fluency. Analysis of reading behavior using informal reading inventories. ED 476 Content-Area Reading for Elementary Teachers (2) This course is planned to facilitate the application of specific reading and writing strategies to assist comprehension of printed materials in all subject areas by students at all levels of reading. ED 482 Reading Assessment and Intervention for Secondary Teachers (2) This course focuses on the reading behaviors of secondary students. Prerequisite: ED 419. Prerequisites: ED 419. Prerequisites: ED 419.CEPP – EDUCATION COURSES 177 ED 472 Integrated Approach to Phonics and Spelling (2) An in-depth exploration of the theoretical rationale and research base for the learning and teaching of reading skills. Prerequisite: ED 419. ED 476. Students participate in a weekly tutoring experience. The five components of reading (phonemic awareness. and comprehension) are applied to the teaching of beginning reading. phonics. diagnosing children.

either working in a reading program and/or tutoring a struggling student. ED 486 Living and Learning in the Middle School (3) Course intertwines specific needs of pre-adolescents (ages 10-14) with middle school philosophy. Also covered are advanced instructional planning and forming more effective relationships with students. Prerequisite: ED 484 or concurrent enrollment. teaching preparation. Includes 15-hour seminar. Field experiences and assignments will relate to the student’s added endorsement area. Prerequisite: ED 306. teaching experience. and ED 485 or concurrent enrollment. Includes a minimum of two observations by a university supervisor using the Washington State Performance-based Pedagogy Assessment. . vocabulary and comprehension) are used in planning strategy lessons for use with students. ED 484 Secondary Methods (3) Students learn varied instructional methods via performance and observation of peer teaching. Prerequisites: ED 306. permission of instructor. Special education students seeking elementary endorsements will have a split student teaching assignment. Assessment strategies are studied and applied to the content areas taught in secondary schools. Major components of reading (fluency. Prerequisite: Acceptance to Added Endorsement Program. Includes a 30-hour practicum integrating observation and teaching at the middle-school level. ED 494 Student Teaching/Internship in the Elementary School (6-12) Supervised full-time student teaching in an elementary school for one semester. Required concurrent enrollment with ED 487. Students will explore the reading process and examine their own reading behaviors. ED 485 Content Area Reading for Secondary Teachers (2) This course explores the reading process as it is applied to the content areas taught in the secondary school. This course facilitates the application of specific reading and writing strategies to assist comprehension of expository materials in all subject areas by students at all levels of reading. Students are required to participate in a secondary school. and reflection in a P-12 setting in the added endorsement field.178 CEPP – EDUCATION COURSES ing complex materials. Specific research-based professional development models are emphasized. Prerequisite: ED 306. ED 491 Added Endorsement Practicum (2-3) Includes 60-90 hours of structured observation. organization and specific teaching methods. Field experiences and assignments will relate to the student’s major teaching area. Prerequisite: completion of all required coursework leading to recommendation for certification and endorsements. Prerequisites: ED 306. ED 487 Secondary Methods Practicum/Seminar (3) Forty-five hours of structured observation and teaching experience in a high school.

PE 195a. ED 499 Student Teaching/Internship Seminar: Secondary (1) Seminar for student teachers. including PE 301. at least one from each category above. Enrollment in physical education activities is required of all freshmen who are not veterans of military service or are not excused for age or on a physician’s order. • Individual sport (PE 101. PE 111). Must be taken concurrently with ED 494 or SED 493. PE 195c) • Small group/partner sport (PE 106. will be offered. exercise. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . posture and athletic skills. Prerequisites: Completion of all required courses in major and secondary education sequence and endorsements. Please contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology or the Department of Physical Education for current semester offerings.CEPP – PHYSICAL EDUCATION 179 ED 496 Student Teaching/Internship in the Secondary School (6-12) Supervised student teaching in either a junior high school or senior high school fulltime for one semester. does not include a complete health/fitness endorsement) Lower-Division Courses • Two semester hours selected from: PE 202. Minor in Physical Education (19 semester hours. PE 107. PE 113) • Large group sport (PE 102. PE 109. three to five activity courses. PE 310. Must be taken concurrently with ED 496. Courses vary year-to-year. PE 108. PE 110. please refer to the requirements as outlined in the education section of the Academic Catalog. PE 345. seasonal participation in intercollegiate athletics may be accepted as a substitute for these required courses. PE 203 or PE 204 Upper-Division Courses • 17 semester hours. PE 104. PE 401 and PE 430 Revised Washington State Education Endorsements For information on the Washington State teacher education endorsement in health/ fitness. PE 112. With consent of the department. PHYSICAL EDUCATION faculty Tim Healy Courses in physical education promote the well-being of students by providing instruction in health. PE 195b. PE 103. PE 400. ED 498 Student Teaching/Internship Seminar: Elementary/Special Education (1) Seminar for student and intern teachers. NOTE for PE 101 through PE 113: Each fall and spring semester.

including theories of offense and defense. PE 203 baseball Theory (2) Fundamentals of baseball.180 CEPP – PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education Courses PE 101 PE 102 PE 103 PE 104 PE 106 PE 107 PE 108 PE 109 PE 110 PE 111 PE 112 PE 113 body Conditioning (1) basketball (1) Volleyball (1) Aerobics (1) Golf (1) Tennis (1) Softball (1) Contemporary Dance (1) badminton (1) Soccer (1) Self-defense Karate (1) Pickleball (1) PE 131 Intercollegiate Athletics (1) May repeat for a maximum of eight semester hours of credit. PE 301 foundations of Physical Education (3) A thorough investigation of modern physical education based on past history and current trends and practices in the field. including strategy and basic skills. procedures and lesson planning. PE 204 Methods of Coaching Track and field (2) Techniques. Offered every third semester. Offered every third semester. Rotates with PE 302. Rotates with PE 202 and PE 204. Offered every fourth semester. Offered every third semester. PE 195a PE 195b PE 195c Yoga (1) Walk/Jog fitness (1) Tai Chi (1) PE 202 basketball Theory (2) Fundamentals of basketball. PE 430. Prerequisite: Permission of coach. PE 345. PE 195 Activity Course (1) Special topic activity course as determined by student interests. Rotates with PE 202 and PE 204. PE 302 School Health Education (3) Study of multiple factors contributing to conduct and maintenance of school health . Rotates with PE 203 and PE 204.

coach. PE 302. principally by directed study. a resource room or a self-contained special education class. facilities. advisor and department chair. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . intramural and interscholastic and sports programs. Offered every fourth semester. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. The waiver in this case does not indicate waiver of knowledge/skills. PE 430. but a three-year approval to teach in Special Education while completing the remaining requirements for the endorsement. personnel. Rotates with PE 301. Rotates with PE 301. Intramurals and Intercollegiate Sports (3) Administrative policies as they relate to program development budget. PE 302. PE 345 Psychology and Philosophy of Coaching (3) Techniques and current practices. SPECIAL EDUCATION faculty Cindy Petersen The Special Education major and endorsement prepares teachers to work with mildly or moderately disabled students in settings such as an inclusionary classroom. PE 400 Kinesiology (3) Exploration of anatomical and mechanical fundamentals of human motion. Students may qualify for Red Cross certificates. PE 430. equipment. PE 401 Exercise Physiology (3) Course promotes understanding of theoretical and practical aspects of exercise physiology as they relate to the teacher.” If the student selects this option. discussion and research. PE 345.CEPP – SPECIAL EDUCATION 181 conditions and their relationship to the home and other community institutions. PE 395 Directed Study (1-3) Open only to seniors and graduate students who have shown both the ability and need to work independently. PE 345. Offered every fourth semester. Completion of the required 30 semester-hour endorsement will lead to an institutional recommendation that the student be verified for completion of an endorsement in special education for all levels (P-12). trainer and/or exercise specialist. to complete the additional nine credits to receive the full endorsement. granted by the state Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. he or she has three years following issuance of the waiver. The University offers the option of supporting the student’s request for a “waiver” to teach in special education after completion of the “core of 21. Offered every fourth semester. PE 430 Organizational Administration of PE. management and public relations in directing physical education. Rotates with PE 301. PE 310 first Aid and Athletic Injuries (3) Study of emergency methods used in common accidents. Please contact the University’s Department of Special Education for additional information.

Therefore. Pre-Professional Courses (24-25 semester hours) Required before admission to the Special Education major as a certificate candidate: • One mathematics course above MTH 101 • One U. (37-60 semester hours) bachelor of Arts Grades Preschool-12 (123-148 semester hours) General Education Core (45-51 semester hours) General University degree requirements are listed in the “Academic Programs and Policies” section of this catalog. history course (elementary and SED dual endorsements only) • ne world history course (elementary and SED dual endorsements O only) • ne natural science course with laboratory (elementary and SED dual O endorsements only) • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology • ENG 101 College Writing I • ENG 102 College Writing II • SPH 106 Public Address -or- THR 211 Acting I • ED 204 Introduction to Education • ED 205 Child and Adolescent Development • SOC 396 Intercultural Communications basic Courses (59-60 semester hours) Includes an endorsement in special education. • ED 300 Competency Seminar (may be required for some students) • ED 306 Curriculum and Instruction • TED 312 Technology in the Classroom • ED 360 Classroom Management • ED 370 Classroom Assessment • ED 371 Education Law • ED 383 Issues of Abuse/ Teacher as Counselor .182 CEPP – SPECIAL EDUCATION NOTE: Completion of the special education major and endorsement program does not allow the certificate-holder to teach in a regular elementary or secondary classroom.S. The statement concerning “second/additional certificate endorsements” in the Elementary Education Program section of this catalog applies to special education as well as to elementary education. students also must complete the required elementary or secondary sequence. including at least eight weeks of student teaching in a regular classroom.

) .CEPP – SPECIAL EDUCATION 183 • ED 424 Issues and Trends - Early Childhood Education.ED 426 Methods of Teaching Language Acquisition (ELL) • ED 477 Reading Diagnosis • SED 445 School Drug Prevention and Counseling • SED 359 Introduction to Exceptionality • SED 461 Instructional Methods of Exceptional Learners • SED 463 Management Strategies for Exceptional Learners • SED 465 Transition to Adulthood for Exceptional Learners • SED 466 Assessment of Exceptional Learners • SED 467 Legal Issues and the IFSP/IEP • SED 469 Seminar and Practicum in Special Education • SED 493 Student Teaching: Special Education • ED 498 Student Teaching Seminar: Special Education Upper-Division Courses (21 semester hours) • SED 359 Introduction to Exceptionality • SED 461 Instructional Methods of Exceptional Learners • SED 463 Management Strategies for Exceptional Learners • SED 465 Transition to Adulthood for Exceptional Learners • SED 466 Assessment in Exceptional Learners • SED 467 Legal Issues and the IFSP/IEP • SED 469 Seminar and Practicum in Special Education UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Minor in Special Education Please see general information on the Special Education Program earlier in this catalog. -or. (The minor in SED does not include a complete endorsement in special education.

for example). including ecological. Prerequisite: SED 359. SED 359 Introduction to Exceptionality (3) Introduction to philosophical. onsite visits and other appropriate formats. Offered on approval by special education faculty and dean of education. Prerequisites: SED 359. counseling and referral of students with drug and alcohol problems.and criterion-referenced testing. Prerequisites: ED 306 or concurrent enrollment. May be repeated for credit. Effective methods for teaching content-area material (reading. ED 360. Strategies for organization. . SED 463 Management Strategies for Exceptional Learners (3) Strategies for individual and group behavior/instruction management. historical. SED 445 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3) Examines pharmacology. strategy-based pedagogical perspective. ED 370. diagnostic instruments and procedures. classroom and curriculum-based assessment. Selecting and adapting curriculum. counseling approaches and school programs related to the school counselors’ role in prevention. math. field-based participatory research. SED 466 Assessment of Exceptional Learners (3) Study of professional practice in special education assessment.184 CEPP – SPECIAL EDUCATION Special Education Courses SED 295/395/495 Directed Study (1-3) Courses offered periodically on special education topics announced by the faculty. Prerequisites: SED 359. ED 306. Various competencies developed in systematic application of specific models for exceptional learners. administration and participation with families and other significant parties are included. norm. SED 465 Transitions to Adulthood for Exceptional Learners (3) Examines the educational transition of differently abled people from school-based special education programs to independent living or agency-supported living through presentation and discussion of current literature. Prerequisites: SED 359. May be repeated for credit. SED 297/397/497 Directed Practicum (1-3) A student/ faculty-selected internship in a specialized area for special education. science. Observation of school-based assessment techniques and practical application of learned techniques is required. SED 461 Instructional Methods of Exceptional Learners (3) Principles of organizing. sequencing. delivering and evaluating instruction for exceptional learners. Ten hours of classroom experience required as part of the course. legal and social implications of the exceptional student from an integrated. and alternative assessment strategies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Supervised training and experience in all phases of classroom instruction of the mildly and moderately handicapped.33 grade point average in three prior SED courses. Prerequisite: SED 359. implementation and evaluation of Individualized Family Service Plans/Individualized Education Plans for all settings involving exceptional populations.CEPP – TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION 185 SED 467 Legal Issues and the IfSP/IEP (3) Comprehensive study of federal and state regulations on development. see specific course descriptions in the ED/TED/MED sections of the catalog. Minor in Technology in Education Lower-Division Courses (3 semester hours) • CSC 160 Introduction to Computer Technology Upper-Division Courses (15 semester hours) • TED 312/MED 512 Technology for the Classroom • TED 413 Multimedia Productions for Educators • TED 414 Network Systems for Educators • TED 490 Internship in K-12 Schools • lectives: Courses as approved from the department of computer science E . SED 493 Student Teaching: Special Education (6-12) Competency-based extension of systematic instructional skills. For ED/TED/MED courses. SED 469 Practicum in Special Education (3) Observation. school personnel and outside agencies are emphasized. small group instruction and assessment of exceptional learners in public and private sectors. Primary focus is on technology application in the P-12 environment. Communicative ethics and collaborative strategies joining families. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION faculty Huabin Chen Belinda Hill The technology in education minor is an interdisciplinary program that prepares students to teach instructional technology in P-12 classroom settings or to prepare individuals for positions in instructional design outside the P-12 education system. Prerequisites: Minimum of 3.

rather than computer skills themselves. TED 413 Multimedia Production for Educators (3) Classroom applications of multimedia hardware and peripherals such as CD-ROMs. Students will create an advanced integrated multimedia project. TED 490 Directed Practicum/Seminar in K-12 Schools (3) Directed instructional project in which students spend 20-60 hours with a classroom teacher and 15 hours in seminar. space use. May be repeated for credit.186 CEPP – TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION Technology in Education Courses TED 295/395/495 Directed Study (1-3) Courses offered periodically on technology in education topics announced by the faculty. selection and organization of materials and equipment. TED 312 Technology for the Classroom (3) Class explores ways to integrate computers and other technologies into classroom teaching. are used to creatively express a view of the world. Technology in education applications used in the classroom/school are assessed. laserdiscs. cartoons. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prerequisite: TED 312 or equivalent. Emphasis on development of electronic portfolio. issues and trends in an information age. photography and posters. along with other multimedia models/techniques. digital cameras and video cameras. Prerequisite: TED 312. Offered on approval of technology in education faculty and the dean of education. Students will create home pages for themselves and participate in the creation of pages for the Saint Martin’s website. TED 297/397/497 Directed Practicum (1-3) A student/faculty-selected internship in a specialized area of technology in education. Prerequisite: TED 414. TED 499 Thesis (1-2) . Discussions focus on teaching philosophies. animation. techniques and administrative procedures. models. A summary paper is required. including budget preparation. (Offered on demand) TED 480 Readings in Technology in Education (1-2) An independent reading course for students with special needs. Book production. Course content will incorporate objectives and functions of a school’s technology center. Reading list to be developed by students and advisor. scanners. Students will develop curriculum and classroom materials using e-mail. (Offered on demand) TED 414 Network Systems for Educators (3) Exploration of management information systems development and network systems as they pertain to the preschool-grade 12 school environment. internet and selected software. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Ways to incorporate these techniques into the classroom will be explored.

. students are trained to be well-rounded professionals rather than technicians. Chair. The School of Business offers the following degree programs and options. Because of the University’s liberal arts heritage. MBA program Riley Moore Don Stout Hal Wilson. Director. • Accounting • Economics • Finance • Management • Minor in Economics • Master of Arts In Business Administration (MBA) faculty Denis DuBois Michael Gideon. Chair. Customer satisfaction and the competitive need for continuous quality improvement provide the major focus for this integration. Emphasis also is placed on the multicultural setting of business competition. both in national and international markets. • Bachelor of Arts in Accounting • Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration with concentrations in. corporate accounting and government service. Accounting Department Paul Patterson Heather Grob. and on the political economy in which it operates.SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – ACCOUNTING 187 SCHOOL Of bUSINESS Richard beer. A variety of courses are offered to prepare graduates for responsible positions in private practice. Dean The School of Business offers a unified business program that integrates the separate functional areas of business. Business Department UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS • Marketing ACCOUNTING faculty Michael Gideon Diane Bingaman Accounting is a descriptive/analytical discipline that provides quantitative information critical to management decision-making.

. which is 128.MTH 171 Calculus I • MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics • ECN 101 Principles of Economics • ECN 325 The Evolution of Economic Thoughts • BA 305 Business Communications Common Professional Component (33 semester hours) • ACC 201 Financial Accounting • ACC 202 Financial Accounting • BA 225 Business Law I • BA 300 Principles of Finance • BA 311 Money. The semester hours for these courses only pertain to the business administration major and do not reflect the total number of semester hours necessary for graduation. ACC 395 and ACC 397 may be applied toward the 9 semester hours of electives.188 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – ACCOUNTING bachelor of Arts General Education Core (45-51 semester hours) Major in Accounting Foundation Courses (15 semester hours) • MTH 161 Mathematical Methods for Business and Social Sciences -or. Banking and Financial Institutions • BA 320 Operations Management • BA 330 Principles of Marketing • BA 335 Organizational Management • BA 350 Business and Society • BA 499 Business Policy • ECN 420 International Business and Global Economics Major Requirements (21 semester hours) • ACC 301 Intermediate Accounting • ACC 302 Intermediate Accounting • ACC 401 Advanced Accounting • ACC 499 Contemporary Issues in Accounting • 9 semester hours in upper-division accounting electives NOTE: No more than three semester hours from ACC 390/490.

along with related revenues and expenses. including study of accounting theories related to pensions. ACC 202 financial Accounting (3) Continuation of ACC 201. Prerequisite: ACC 201. Prerequisite: ACC 202. Prerequisites: ACC 201 and ACC 202. emphasis on liabilities and equity. leases and earnings per share. • An accounting concentration or equivalent. including management reports. preparation of tax returns. credit and other decisions. Intensive study of the equity side of a balance sheet. Emphasis on presentation of financial data for investment.SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – ACCOUNTING 189 Preparation for the CPA Examination An applicant for a CPA certificate must have completed at least 150 semester hours of college/university education. satisfactorily fulfilling the requirement for a concentration in accounting. analysis and presentation of data for managerial decision-making. adjustments to gross income and deductible expenses. ACC 302 Intermediate Accounting (3) Continuation of ACC 301. Fundamentals of measuring and communicating financial aspects of business transactions. Course includes accounting concepts and standards related to the determination of net income and financial position. Prerequisite: ACC 301. as defined by the Washington State Board of Accountancy. Introduction of additional topics. ACC 351 federal Taxation I (3) Basic federal law provisions affecting individual income tax returns. ACC 301 Intermediate Accounting (3) Review and intensive study of the concepts and standards used in determining net income and financial position. Students seeking more information about CPA education requirements and exam preparation should contact their accounting faculty advisor. Emphasis is on the asset side of the balance sheet and related revenues and expenses. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Accounting Courses ACC 201 financial Accounting (3) Fundamentals of measuring and communicating financial aspects of business transactions to decision-makers. The University’s current major in accounting conforms with the board of accountancy’s standards. including corporations and partnerships. including: • A baccalaureate or higher degree. Introduction of additional topics. Researching tax problems and tax planning. Includes determination of gross income.

Emphasis on providing more sophisticated financial data for managerial decisions.190 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – ACCOUNTING ACC 352 federal Taxation II (3) Basic provisions of federal law affecting returns of partnerships. Introduction to theory of fund accounting. Tax planning and preparation of tax returns are covered. including professional ethics. Prerequisite: ACC 302. ACC 202. Prerequisite: ACC 351. estates and trusts. ACC 395 Special Topics in Accounting (1-3) Courses that cover topics as announced by faculty. Prerequisite: ACC 202. ACC 201. ACC 353 Managerial Cost Accounting (3) Determination and control of cost of materials. multinational-national accounting. BA 225. including state and local governments. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of advisor. ACC 358 Governmental and Non-profit Accounting (3) Accounting methods and reporting practices of non-profit entities. budgets. standards and variance analysis. labor and overhead. scope. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Issues discussed in relation to the current political. legal and economic environment. Students are required to develop and present their own Excel applications. adjustment to gross income and deductible expenses. corporations. ACC 401 Advanced Accounting (3) Specialized fields of accounting such as partnerships. forecasting. coupled with training in the use of contemporary. consolidated statements. ACC 450 Auditing (3) Techniques of auditing. . Prerequisites: CSC 160. business combinations. objectives and nature of the audit. Prerequisite: ACC 202. segment reporting. social. ACC 499 Contemporary Issues in Accounting (3) Senior capstone course reviewing current literature on major issues affecting the accounting and auditing profession. statistical sampling and auditing with computer systems. commercial accounting software. Includes determination of gross income. MTH 201. ACC 425 Microcomputer Applications in Accounting (3) Advanced skills and techniques in Microsoft Excel. ACC 390/490 Internship (1-6) An opportunity to apply accounting theory and practice in a work environment under the supervision of University faculty and an intern supervisor. legal responsibilities. reporting standards for audit findings. ACC 397 Directed Study (1-3) A student/ faculty-selected project that enables the student to research a specialized area of accounting. Prerequisites: ACC 302. responsibility accounting.

ever-changing global marketplace and challenged ecosystems currently shaping the world. Saint Martin’s graduates have the ability to work across business functions. Through practice and active learning. and become enthusiastic lifelong learners. Business and Economics offers a unified business program that integrates the separate functional areas of business. the Business Administration Program offers students an opportunity to learn and practice general management skills. discover the need for ethical decision-making and acquire functional business area expertise. Benedictine heritage and values. bachelor of Arts General Education Core (45-51 semester hours) Major in business Administration Foundation Courses (15 semester hours) • TH 161 Mathematical Methods for Business M and Social Sciences -or. accept change and ambiguity as a natural part of life.SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 191 bUSINESS ADMINISTRATION faculty Denis DuBois Paul Patterson Don Stout Hal Wilson Built on the General Education foundation informed by Saint Martin’s Catholic.MTH 171 Calculus I • MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics • ECN 101 Principles of Economics • ECN 325 The Evolution of Economic Thought • BA 305 Business Communications Common Professional Component (33 semester hours) • ACC 201 Financial Accounting • ACC 202 Financial Accounting • BA 225 Business Law • BA 300 Principles of Finance • BA 311 Money. and they demonstrate sharpened critical thinking skills and professional judgment. Acknowledging the technologic innovation. adjust quickly to new situations. students also gain the ability to work cooperatively in diverse teams. Students graduate with a broad perspective on the business world and its place in our culture. Banking and Financial Institutions • BA 320 Operations Management UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . They become effective writers and speakers.

MTH 171 Calculus I • MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics • ECN 101 Principles of Economics • ECN 325 The Evolution of Economic Thought • BA 305 Business Communications Professional Component (15 semester hours) • ACC 201 Financial Accounting • BA 311 Money. must select one with a maximum of two concentrations permitted) • Accounting: ACC 301 Intermediate Accounting ACC 302 Intermediate Accounting ACC 353 Managerial Cost Accounting • Economics: ECN 371 Econometrics ECN 375 Cost-Benefit Analysis ECN 410 Public Finance • Finance: BA 315 Investment Analysis ECN 410 Public Finance BA 435 Corporate Finance • Management : BA 302 Applied Quantitative Management Techniques BA 303 Labor/Management Relations BA 340 Human Relations in Management • Marketing: BA 344 BA 355 BA 431 Promotion. Banking and Financial Institutions • BA 320 • BA 330 • BA 335 Operations Management Principles of Marketing Organizational Management . Advertising and Branding Management of the Sales Force Market Research and Consumer Behavior Minor in business Administration Foundation Courses (15 semester hours) • MTH 161 Mathematical Methods for Business and Social Sciences -or.192 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION • BA 330 Principles of Marketing • BA 335 Organizational Management • BA 350 Business and Society • BA 499 Business Policy • ECN 420 International Business and Global Economics Concentration (9-18 semester hours.

structure and processes constituting the collective bargaining process in the United States today. and world economies. Topics include mathematical modeling. Students will utilize telecommunications. agency. labor-management relations and on negotiating and implementing a collective bargaining agreement. MTH 201. business writing (letters. short-term and long-term financing. research proposals. texting). Emphasis is placed on using communication skills and technology to communicate complex data and relationships to individuals and large groups. Prerequisite: BA 300. Prerequisites: none bA 311 Money. forms of business (sole proprietorships. critical listening skills and quantitative reasoning). torts. Prerequisites: MTH 161. bA 305 business Communications (3) BA 305 Business Communications: Fundamentals of effective business communication form and style. LLCs and Corporations). business Administration Courses bA 225 business Law I (3) Introduction to the American legal system (sources of law and legal process). security markets. network analysis. partnerships. business ethics. Prerequisites: none. bA 303 Labor/Management Relations (3) A conceptual framework for the study of labor-management relations in the private and public sectors.S. reports. bA 315 Investment Analysis (3) Characteristics of securities. which is 128. linear and nonlinear programming. banking and financial markets in the contemporary U. e-video and internet and intranet enabled communication systems and relevant application software. markets and central banking. cost of capital and capital budgeting. products liability. Examines role of monetary theory and policy with an emphasis on financial institutions. simulation and other topics at the instructor’s discretion. bA 302 Applied quantitative Management Techniques (3) Exposure to and practice in the use of mathematical tools for aiding managerial decision-making in the corporate and public sectors. capital structure. MTH 201. employment law. Concentrates on development.SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 193 The semester hours for these courses only pertain to the business administration major and do not reflect the total number of semester hours necessary for graduation. memos.and effective business speaking (interviews.S. property law. Prerequisites: ACC 201 and ACC 202. banking and financial Institutions (3) An exploration of money. securities and portfolio selection. investment strategies. contract law. management. bA 300 Principles of finance (3) Asset management. Prerequisite: BA 300. meetings and presentations. wills & trusts. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Emphasis will be on the history and legal framework of U.

consumer demand and behavior. professional and legal responsibilities. Prerequisites: BA 225 bA 330 Principles of Marketing (3) Analysis of marketing concepts. Marketing failures and successes are reviewed for decision guidelines. Marketing is shown as interrelated decision-making based on environmental assumptions that allocate organizational resources to product development. sales law [Uniform Commercial Code Art. Organization. Prerequisite: BA 330. scheduling. Organizational theory and interpersonal relationships. 2 and 2A]. such as mass advertising and sales promotion by themselves no longer work. distribution. Such topics as layout. marketing functions of the firm. 9]. Promotional success demands marketers focus on their core assettheir customers. product. bankruptcy. debtor-creditor relations. Negotiable Instruments & Documents of Title [Uniform Commercial Code Art.194 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION bA 320 Operations Management (3) Relationship of factor inputs to the final output of the firm. bA 335 Organizational Management (3) Study of the evolution of management. administration and internal working relationships of industrial and service firms. institutions in the marketing channel. bA 344 Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) (3) Traditional media. bA 341 Marketing Management (3) Case course integrating the student’s previous marketing study. advertising and personal selling. their jobs and the organization. securities regulations. including differences between mechanistic and organic models. Emphasis on how management of human resources insures that people work together more productively. MTH 201. Secured Transactions [Uniform Commercial Code Art. inventory management and location analysis are covered. within an increasingly fragmented marketplace that maximizes consistent message Impact at minimal cost. BA 330 . Prerequisites: MTH 161. 3 and 4]. Survey course highlights the interrelationships of the entrepreneurial venture. bA 340 Human Relations in Management (3) The study of workers’ relationships with their leaders. meeting the needs of the individual and the goals of the organization. government and special interest groups. pricing ploys. Prerequiste. price and promotion strategies. Prerequisite: Junior standing. bA 326 business Law II (3) Property law. bA 325 fundamentals of Entrepreneurship (3) Examination of fundamental business concepts of the independently owned venture. Today’s marketers integrate and coordinate a diverse set of marketing tools (IMC) from media advertising to social marketing. people.

processing and interpretation. BA 335. Course covers preliminary research design. bA 435 Corporate finance (3) Develops analytical and decision-making skills in analyzing and solving complex financial problems facing organizations. bA 397 Directed Study (3) A student/faculty-selected project that enables the student to research a specialized area of management. Prerequisites: MTH 201. motivation and evaluation are key areas covered. BA 311. implementation and evaluation of computerized systems. case studies and presentations will be reviewed. sampling. Cases will deal with such current social issues as pollution. bA 425 Small business Institute (1-3) Provides students with hands-on experience in the context of serving as a consultant to local businesses. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS bA 395 Special Topics (1-3) Course covers topics announced by faculty. Planning. Course will stress problem analysis and decisions based on all environmental factors affecting the orga- . bA 431 Market Research and Consumer behavior (3) Models of consumer behavior and techniques. design. A team approach to problem-solving is emphasized and practiced via a group-prepared report of findings and recommendations. Emphasis on financing of resources needed to attain organizational goals and on effective management of those resources. instrument development. cost analysis. bA 360 Systems Analysis and Design (3) Planning. discrimination. energy. deployment. Prerequisite: BA 300. uses of marketing research in making business decisions. and presentation of data. Prerequisites: CSC 200. recruiting. BA 330. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of advisor. bA 390/490 Internship (1-6) Opportunity for students to apply knowledge of management theory and practice in a work environment while under supervision and guidance of management faculty and an intern supervisor. Prerequisites: BA 330.SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 195 bA 350 business and Society (3) A case course covering interrelationship of business decisions and society’s goals. bA 499 business Policy (3) Emphasis on policy formulation at upper levels of management. poverty and corporate social responsibility. bA 355 Management of the Sales force (3) Course familiarizes students with management responsibilities unique to personal sales. data sources. MTH 161. BA 315 or permission of instructor. Text. Course considers the business and social aspects of problems under consideration.

completion of.MTH 171 Calculus I • MTH 201 Introduction to Statistics • ECN 101 Principles of Economics • ECN 325 The Evolution of Economic Thought • BA 305 Business Communications Requirements (12 semester hours) • ECN 371 Econometrics • ECN 375 Cost-Benefit Analysis • ECN 410 Public Finance • ECN 420 International Business and Global Economics Economics Courses ECN 101 Principles of Economics (3) An integrated introduction to the analysis of individual firms and markets. problems and values are used to reconsider basic disputes and major contributions of the past. Economics also looks at alternative strategies for allocating scarce resources. all courses in the common professional component. science and philosophy and its impact on contemporary economic theory and practice. evidence. ECN 325 The Evolution of Economic Thought (3) A historical survey of economic thought from religion. It provides the student with a broader understanding of the social role of business in a market economy. or concurrent enrollment in. . The philosophies that drive the economic way of thinking. Prerequisites: Senior standing. as well as aggregate economic variables. Minor in Economics Foundation Courses (15 semester hours) • MTH 161 Mathematic Methods for Business and Social Sciences -or.196 SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – ECONOMICS nization. the ideas of the great economic thinkers and their logical connections to the world will be analyzed. New economic ideas. These include inflation. unemployment and economic growth. economics underlies all business activity. with a focus on the state’s role in attempts to regulate the economy outside the market. ECONOMICS faculty Heather Grob Riley Moore As the social science that explains competitive behavior in the marketplace. This is an integrating course designed to draw on student’s total University course experience.

Prerequisite: Senior standing. ECN 499 Senior Project (3) Prerequisite: Senior standing. Prerequisites: ECN 101. regulation and democracy. ECN 375 Cost-benefit Analysis (3) Survey cost-benefit analysis topics. sources of protectionism. Requires a strong grounding in mathematics. Apply economic theories using statistical software. MTH161 or 171. economic interdependence among modern nations. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS ECN 395 Special Topics in Economics (1-3) Courses offered periodically. Debate topics in sustainable economics. including proper discounting. with topics announced by faculty. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of advisor. especially use of natural resources. Examine best practices in empirical and survey methods. valuation of life and human activities. Prerequisites: BA 300. policies and practices relating to government revenues. Analysis of risks and opportunities of international marketing and finance. including principles of social welfare. Budgeting procedure and public financial administration. Conduct and critically evaluate cost-benefit studies. . BA 311 and BA 315 or permission of instructor. ECN 420 International business and Global Economics (3) Classical and modern theories of trade. with supervision by economics faculty and an intern supervisor. MTH 201. but will focus on practical issues and theoretical problems of obtaining and using data to conduct economic analysis. deepen knowledge of economics. ECN 410 Public finance (3) Theories. uncertainty and acceptable levels of risk. Prerequisites: ECN 101. and BA300 or GE359. regression analysis and forecasting. ECN 390/490 Internship (1-6) Application of economics theory and practice in an actual work environment.SCHOOL OF BUSINESS – ECONOMICS 197 ECN 371 Econometrics (3) Foundation for economic analysis and forecasting that includes hypothesis testing. expenditures and debts.

. social sciences and general education topics. The goal is to provide a living and learning environment that prepares students for active. We nurture the student-engineer’s spirit of inquiry and discovery. and design-oriented activities are integrated throughout the curriculum. recognizing. Additionally. supporting and developing the unique strengths and capabilities of each individual. Benedictine tradition as the guiding principle.198 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING SCHOOL Of ENGINEERING Zella Kahn-Jetter. with a similar number devoted to the humanities. responsible. written and oral communications. the community and the world. and productive lives in their professions and as members of the local and global community. critical thinking and analysis. to educate” is the commitment of Saint Martin’s University to the student. in the company and in society is a common thread that lends cohesion to the programs. The professional portion of the program is student-engineer centered. ethics. we provide an environment where spirituality. With the Catholic. hospitality. Dean The mission of the School of Engineering and its programs dovetails with the mission of the University and reinforces it. the University accomplishes its mission by recognizing the spiritual and ethical dimensions of all human activity and by celebrating the uniqueness and worth of each human being. and creativity can flourish. The Engineering Advisory Board is a voluntary group of practicing professionals who help guide Saint Martin’s School of Engineering. Approximately one quarter of the total number of credits required to graduate are devoted to the basic sciences and mathematics. including self-discovery. Laboratory work. “To know. The liberal arts portion of the program emphasizes ethical values. Our guiding philosophy is to provide both a strong fundamental liberal education and a strong engineering education. and provide opportunities for them to develop their skills in varied forms of communication. to serve. In keeping with our Benedictine heritage. Roughly half of the curriculum addresses engineering topics. problem-solving skills and service to society and is administered in a supportive environment. These practicing engineers help us in setting program goals and in evaluating graduates. Undergraduate Curriculum The undergraduate curriculum has been designed to meet the challenging objectives stated above. the engineer’s role in the team. The mission of the School of Engineering is to provide our graduates with an education that will prepare them for successful careers in engineering practice and serve as preparation for advanced graduate studies and for lifelong learning. service. to care.

They also seek to provide professional services. For this reason. government and local industry. The expected outcomes of the undergraduate curriculum are given on the school’s website: www. chemistry and physics. In addition. During the sophomore year. religion and philosophy. Courses are taken in advanced mathematics. Our faculty strives to be sensitive to the needs of non-traditional students and students who seek an education in a more personalized. students complete a total of 30 credit hours in the liberal arts. short courses. there is a listing of a “normal” four year program for CE and ME listed with the graduation requirements on the School of Engineering’s website. ethical and moral issues that accompany engineering professional practice.stmartin. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS bachelor of Science While most of the classes taken in the first two years of the ME and CE programs are the same. including English and literature. students build on their foundation in the sciences and mathematics. Professional practice matters are included in courses introduced throughout the curriculum by participating practicing professional engineers. humanities and social studies. Hence. supportive small-college atmosphere. art. These courses are not taken at random but with the specific intent of developing skills necessary for graduates to function effectively in a diverse work environment.edu/engineering. a voluntary group of practicing professionals. An important component of engineering education is the development of an appreciation of societal. natural science and engineering mechanics. It is provided by the school’s Advisory Committee.SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 199 A common engineering core builds a foundation in fundamental mathematics and science. Introductions are provided to engineering problem-solving and design and computer competency. there are some minor differences. Continued involvement of practicing professional engineers in setting goals and evaluating program results is essential. review courses and a professional forum for members of business. in addition to scientific and engineering subjects. the graduation requirements for the CE and ME program are listed under those programs. seminars. including calculus. during the student’s first two years. .

• Fulfill Saint Martin’s University’s general requirements for graduation including the General Education requirements.200 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING Transfer Credits A significant number of Saint Martin’s students elect to transfer some courses into the University from other accredited institutions. The course is designed to ensure that students have the . check with your school for the correct nomenclature. Minimum Graduation Requirements All students must: • Complete not less than 128 semester hours of credit. • Complete not less than 32 semester hours at Saint Martin’s University. General Engineering Courses GE 103 Graphics and Computer-aided Drafting (3) Basic graphics techniques and representations (orthographic. If you have any questions regarding your program. No previous computer experience required. including the senior design course. A course grade of a “C” or better is required for transfer of credits. Use of drafting technology in engineering design and plans preparation. Courses taken in technical college programs generally are not acceptable for transfer. Commonly. This name may vary. All students must complete certain background or prerequisite classes either at Saint Martin’s or at another institution of higher learning in addition to all other requirements. perspective) with traditional drawing and with CAD graphics for mechanical engineering applications. Each request from a transfer student for advanced standing is considered individually. GE 104 Mechanical Engineering Introduction to CAD (3) This course introduces the student to basic graphic techniques (orthographic. perspective) with traditional drawing and with computer-aided graphics for engineering applications. isometric. and a detailed program is designed to the applicant’s needs. Students transferring from a community college must complete no less than 64 credits at Saint Martin’s University. most students transferring from Washington State Community Colleges will find that their best option is to take the Associate of Science (Engineering Track) degree from their community college. While there are variations in their programs. isometric. These classes are commonly the lower division (100 and 200 level) General Engineering Classes. Course designed to build basic competency in interpreting and constructing technical drawings in AutoCAD for use in future design classes. students will need 136 semester hours of credit to complete an engineering degree at Saint Martin’s. contact the head of your major at Saint Martin’s or the dean of the School of Engineering. Students who have completed a background or prerequisite class at another institution will not be required to repeat this class at Saint Martin’s.

GE 206 Mechanics of Materials (3) A study of the fundamentals of mechanics that deal with the relationships between applied loads. shear and combined loads. Emphasis is on stimulating interest and creativity within the framework of an open-ended repetitive. students will be introduced to graphing calculators. to applied science. The equilibrium of a particle when acted upon by a system of forces and the equilibrium of bodies in two and three dimensions are studied. Student teams create practical solutions to simple engineering design projects. Students learn to solve problems requiring the application of combinations of dynamics principles and to relate “real world” conditions to theoretical dynamic models and their results. safety and reliability are included. ultimate strength and safety factor. impulse and momentum. Also covers equilibrium considerations for the design of trusses and machines. flexure. economics. In addition. It will also introduce the students to analysis techniques for geometry and meshing. stress analysis for axial force. ethics. Topics covered include development and application of the conservation of energy. Prerequisites: MTH 171 and PHY 171. Course is designed to supplement mechanics of materials classroom work with experimental verification and visualization. fluid mechanics. machine design. and deflections in beams and shafts. GE 207 Materials Laboratory (1) Experimental techniques for measuring the stresses. Prerequisite: GE 204. work and energy. strains and deflections associated with tension. and impulse and momentum. internal stresses and deformations in deformable bodies. column stability. as studied in physics. force. GE 105 Introduction to Engineering Design (1) Introduction to engineering problem-solving and the engineering design process. Newton’s second law is applied to the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Discussions and guest lectures on professionalism. comparing potential solutions to project criteria and selecting the optimum solution to achieve objectives. legal issues. torsion. GE 205 Dynamics (3) Covers kinematics. GE 204 Statics (3) Course represents the transition from theoretical studies of forces and equilibrium. laboratory tech- UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Prerequisites: MTH 171 and PHY 171. Emphasis is on practical application. Course is required for all freshman engineering students. motions of particles and rigid bodies and kinetics. mass and acceleration.SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 201 required skills to create and interpret drawings in 3-D and solid models using SolidWorks or current software available in the field. advanced stress analysis and structural analysis and design. effects of friction on equilibrium and calculations of centroids and center of gravity. bending and torsion in structural members. Transfer students register for GE 305. Course represents the transition from statics to upper-division courses in geotechnical engineering. Topics include relationships between stress and strain. compression. and the conservation of momentum forms of the second law. systematic process for generating alternatives.

The basic scientific . with application to economic feasibility studies of engineering projects. government or private consulting firms. As the first of the engineering laboratory classes. either as individuals or as a team to schedule a guest speaker. GE 359 Ethics. Discussion of relevant concepts in contract law. space structures and wastewater collection and treatment facilities. professional and product liability as they relate to engineering practice.202 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – CIVIL ENGINEERING nique. Civil engineering is a creative. capital recovery. manage and construct buildings. including benefit/cost ratio. design. highways. engineering sciences. bridges. Transfer students register for GE 305. GE 305 Engineering Seminar (1) Seminar students are given presentations from visiting speakers and professors providing them with a better understanding of what engineers do in industry. power plants. torts. practical and satisfying profession in high demand worldwide. tunnels. Ethical codes of conduct are presented and case studies discussed with an emphasis on safety and public welfare. pay-back period and rate-of-return methods. Most of these students will enter professional practice in the South Sound area following their undergraduate studies. data-handling and report-writing. water supply systems. CIVIL ENGINEERING faculty Dintie Mahamah. Chair Pius Igharo Chun Kyung Seong John Sladek The Department of Civil Engineering provides its students with an outstanding educational opportunity to enter a challenging and fulfilling professional career. physical and natural sciences. offshore structures. design and laboratory experience. Law and Economics in Engineering Practice (2) Introduction to professional and socioeconomic concepts essential to successful engineering practice and in preparation for senior design courses. this course provides an important introduction to hands-on engineering experimentation. and submit a written biography on their chosen guest speaker. ports. dams. A professional engineering license is mandatory for career success as a civil engineer. Prerequisites: GE 206 or concurrent registration. Students will be responsible. Professional competence is built on a foundation of mathematics. conduct an interview. airports. Prerequisite: Junior standing in civil or mechanical engineering. Students have the ability to make valuable contacts and invite presenters from engineering specialties of interest. Most civil engineers work in industry. Civil engineers plan. safety. Introduction of economic analysis in decision-making. The majority of students seeking a civil engineering degree at Saint Martin’s come from community colleges in the South Puget Sound area. Many of our graduates attend the Master of Civil Engineering Program or the Master of Engineering Management at Saint Martin’s as part-time students while working regionally in the profession. Freshmen register for GE 105.

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – CIVIL ENGINEERING 203 principles learned in these areas are then applied to practical problems in structures, foundations, transportation systems and environmental problems. The role of the engineer as problem-solver and designer is the common thread throughout the engineer’s career, both during preparation and in practice. During their junior and senior years, students are required to take a core program that includes structural, transportation, environmental and geotechnical engineering. They also take a minimum of eight credits of electives to begin specializing in a selected discipline area. All upper-division courses incorporate design problems in the curriculum. The program culminates with a major, year-long teamwork-based capstone design experience in the senior year. Goals and expected outcomes of the Department of Civil Engineering can be found on the University website, www.stmartin.edu/engineering.

Department of Civil Engineering Goals
The goal of the Department of Civil Engineering is to provide graduates with an education that prepares them for entry into the civil engineering profession and for successful careers as registered (licensed) Professional Engineers. Because the first essential step toward a professional license is a degree from an ABET-accredited program, the school’s goal is to maintain the program’s ABET/EAC accreditation.

Civil Engineering Major
Listed below are the classes required for graduation. These classes fall into four general categories: General Education; Mathematics, Science and Computer Science; General Engineering; plus, Civil Engineering. The classes listed under General Education will not match the University’s general education requirements, as some of the mathematics, science and computer science requirements fulfill the University’s general requirements. The following lists the current requirements (136 total semester hours) for the BSCE degree: General Education Requirements (35 semester hours) Some General Education Requirements are included in the Engineering Graduation Requirements (below) and are shown there. • ART Approved Art Elective (3) • UNI 101 Freshman Seminar (3) • ENG 101 College Writing I (3) • ENG 102 College Writing II (3) • ENG • HIS • HIS • PE • PE Literature (3) American History (3) World, European, Asian, etc. (must not be U.S. History) (3) Physical Education (1) Physical Education (1)

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

204 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – CIVIL ENGINEERING • PHL • RLS • SOC • SOC Philosophy (3) Religious Studies (3) Social Sciences Elective I (3) Social Sciences Elective II (3)

Math and Science Requirements (32 Semester hours) • CHEM 141 General Chemistry with Laboratory (5) • CSC 180 • MTH 171 • MTH 172 • MTH 322 • MTH 357 • PHY 171 • PHY 172 Introduction to Programming (3) Calculus I (4) Calculus II (4) Differential Equations (3) Probability and Statistics (3) (or approved upper-level math class) Introduction to Physics I with Laboratory (5) Introduction to Physics II with Laboratory (5)

Science elective from a third area (3) (Geology, Biology, as approved)

General Engineering Requirements (16 semester hours) • GE 103 Graphics and Computer-Aided Drafting (3) • GE 105 or 305 Engineering Problem Solving and Design (1) Freshman take GE 105; transfers take GE 305. • GE 204 • GE 205 • GE 359 Statics (3) Dynamics (3) Ethics, Law and Economics in Engineering Practice (2)

• GE 206/207 Mechanics of Materials with Laboratory (4) Civil Engineering Requirements (50 semester hours) • CE 304 Surveying with Laboratory (3) • CE 308/309 Fluid Mechanics with Laboratory (4) • CE 310 Civil Engineering Materials, with Laboratory (3) • CE 321/322 Soil Mechanics with Laboratory (4) • CE 323/324 Transportation Engineering with Laboratory (4) • CE 330 • CE 350 • CE 360 • CE 370 • CE 385 • CE 498 • CE 499 Hydrology (3) Structural Analysis (4) Reinforced Concrete (4) Hydraulic Engineering (3) Environmental Engineering (3) Senior Design (3) Senior Design (3)

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – CIVIL ENGINEERING 205 • CE Elective (3) • CE Elective (3) • CE Elective (3)

Civil Engineering Courses
CE 220 Physical Geology (3) Introductory study of basic concepts of physical geology. Topics include geologic time, plate tectonics, rocks and minerals, weathering and erosion, soils, structural geology, earthquakes, geomorphology, mass wasting, fluvial processes, coastal processes, glacial processes and groundwater. A basic science elective is recommended for civil engineers prior to upper-division courses in soil mechanics and foundations. Laboratory included. CE 304 / CE 304L Surveying (3) Fundamentals of plane measurement survey, including field use of instruments for distance measurement, traverse, differential levels, horizontal curve layout and the use of electronic and computer adjustment of errors. Introduction to technology in surveying practice (GPS, GIS). Understanding of key applications of surveying in civil engineering and construction practices. Lab taken included. CE 308 fluid Mechanics (3) Course develops a fundamental understanding of fluid behavior essential to the study of technologically important situations encountered in courses to follow in hydraulics, hydrology and environmental engineering. Covers fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid flow, viscous effects, fluid resistance, dimensional analysis, dynamic similitude, frictionless compressible flow and two-dimensional ideal fluid flow. Applications to flow measurement and flow in closed conduits and open channels. Lab taken concurrently. Prerequisites: GE 205, GE 206, MTH 322. Corequisite: CE 309. CE 309 fluids Laboratory (1) Laboratory experiments designed to provide physical demonstration of the fundamental principles covered in CE 308, Fluid Mechanics (taken concurrently). Experimental measurement and laboratory exercises in fluid behavior, including dynamic forces, flow rates and velocity distribution in closed and open systems. Emphasis is placed on experimental procedures, observation and recording of data, class teamwork, reportwriting, and relating results to theory. Prerequisite: CE 308 or concurrent registration. CE 310 Civil Engineering Materials (3) Classroom and laboratory study of the principal materials used in civil engineering, emphasizing the physical characteristics and mechanical properties that impact their application to civil engineering projects. Included are soils, aggregates, asphalt, cement, concrete, wood, steel and plastic. Code-based laboratory testing procedures to determine material properties and quality are introduced. General mechanics of materials theory is related to the behavior of the specific materials used in upper-division design courses in foundations, pavements, steel, concrete and wood. Lab taken concurrently. Prerequisites: GE 206 and GE 207.
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

206 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – CIVIL ENGINEERING CE 321 Soil Mechanics (3) Identification and classification of soils, determination and interpretation of mechanical properties for civil engineering purposes, and introductory applications in the mechanics of foundations and earth structures. Topics include site investigation, index properties, hydraulics of soils, soil stresses, compressibility, shear strength, slope stability, lateral earth pressures, bearing capacity and settlement. Course extends engineering mechanics to the use of soil as a structural material, introduces foundation design. Laboratory must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: GE 206; CE 308, CE 309 taken concurrently. CE 322 Soil Mechanics Laboratory (1) Field and laboratory testing procedures used to classify soils and measure their mechanical properties are conducted. Importance of testing in geotechnical engineering is emphasized; appreciation fostered for the limitations, approximations and risks inherent in applying test results to foundation design. ASTM and AASHTO standards are introduced and followed. A subsurface soils investigation and formal geotechnical reconnaissance report of the proposed site for the senior design project is made. Take concurrently with CE 321. CE 323 Transportation Engineering (3) Planning and design of urban and intercity transportation, emphasizing a systems approach to problem definition and feasible solutions. Introduces volume analysis, geometric design, signalization, parking studies and development of models for establishing design criteria for transportation structures. A formal report of a traffic reconnaissance study of the selected site for the senior design project is made by student teams. Prerequisite: GE 103 and junior standing. CE 324 Transportation Engineering Laboratory (1) Field and laboratory techniques for observation and measurement of traffic data collected under operational conditions; analysis of data using software packages. Traffic studies include speed volume, travel time, delay, turning movements, peak-hour factor, gap, and parking. Prerequisite: CE 323 concurrently. CE 330 Hydrology (3) Development of models for hydrologic analysis and design, with application to systems such as canals, roadway drainage, sewers and dams. Analysis of rainfall intensity, runoff, unit hydrographs, storm water detention, river flow prediction, flood-routing and probability analysis. Course applies theoretical knowledge gained in fluid mechanics to the solution of practical design problems. Prerequisites: Junior standing, CE 308. CE 350 Structural Analysis (4) Methods of analysis of statically determinate coplanar and space structures; introduction to indeterminate structural analysis. Topics include loads, reactions, shear and moment diagrams, influence lines, trusses, frames, deflections by the conjugate beam and virtual work methods, the method of consistent distortions, slope-deflection, moment distribution, and the stiffness method, with an introduction to computer techniques. Course links basic knowledge gained in statics and mechanics of materials to upper-division structural design courses. Prerequisite: GE 206.

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – CIVIL ENGINEERING 207 CE 360 Reinforced Concrete Design (4) Analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures in accordance with the current ACI Building Code. Topics include basic concrete and reinforcing steel properties, introduction to fundamental reinforced concrete behavior and design philosophy, development of simple loads and load paths, load combinations, construction specifications and introduction to structural design/analysis software. Design/analysis elements include simple and continuous beams, one-way slabs, footings, retaining walls and introduction to columns. Students consider elements over full range of construction and behavior including ultimate strength, serviceability and basic detailing. Students learn to apply mechanics of materials and structural analysis principles to the design of reinforced concrete components. Prerequisite: CE 321 and CE 350. CE 370 Hydraulic Engineering (3) Application of hydraulic principles to the analysis and design of selected hydraulic facilities including reservoirs, dams, spillways, outlet works, open channels, closed conduit flow, water hammer, pipe networks analysis and hydraulic machinery. Course provides the practical extension of fluid mechanics theory to the design of hydraulic structures. Prerequisite: CE 308. CE 385 Environmental Engineering (3) Introduction to the effects of pollutants on the environment, and to the processes and design procedures for water and wastewater treatment plants. Topics include conceptual design of unit processes and operations, pretreatment, sedimentation, filtration, aeration, disinfection, sludge treatment and disposal, and advanced treatment. The basic knowledge gained in chemistry and fluid mechanics is combined and extended to the analysis of pollution effects and design of treatment facilities. Prerequisites: CHM 141, CE 308. CE 403 Engineering Construction Management (2) Covers engineering project management from concept through design, procurement, construction and closeout. Topics include project delivery, contractual arrangements, construction documents, project phases, cost-estimating, work-planning, scheduling, tracking and cost control, trend analysis and forecasting, administration of group process and leadership and economic feasibility analysis. Engineering economics reviewed, and use of the critical-path method included. Many topics are applicable to the concurrently offered senior design course. Prerequisite: GE 359. CE 405 Insitu Soil Testing (2) Introduction to site investigation procedures and insitu testing techniques to characterize field behavior of soils related to engineering properties. Field exercises in principles of mechanics of materials and structural analysis to the design of steel structures in conformance with current codes. Prerequisite: CE 350. CE 415 Earthquake Engineering (3) Structural design for earthquake forces in accordance with the 1997 Uniform Building Code and the 2000 International Building Code. Fundamentals of earthquake ground motion: tectonics, seismic waves, intensity, magnitude, seismic maps, soil effects,

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

208 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – CIVIL ENGINEERING structural dynamics and response spectra. A detailed study of the IBC-2000 static force provisions, including seismic use groups, spectral maps, site coefficients, base shear, force distribution, torsion and reliability factor; comparison to the UBC-97 provisions. Detailed analysis and design of diaphragm and shear wall systems in wood, masonry and concrete. Analysis of steel moment frames, braced frames and eccentrically braced frames. Overview of foundation design considerations, seismic isolation and seismic retrofit. Prerequisites: CE 321, CE 350, CE 450. CE 418 Seismic Evaluation (3) Fundamentals of seismology and geotechnical earthquake engineering, in accordance with the NEHRP and USGS procedures, with correlation to the UBC and IBC building codes. Topics include plate tectonics, earthquake faults, seismic magnitude and intensity, ground motion, seismic wave attenuation, development of response spectra, seismic hazard analysis, ground motion amplification, liquefaction analysis, dynamic slope stability, seismic design of retaining walls and mitigation of hazardous sites. Prerequisites: CE 321, CE 350, CE 450. CE 420 Engineering Geology (3) Introduction to engineering geology. Major topics include three-dimensional portrayal of subsurface conditions, endogenic and exogenic geological conditions applicable to civil engineering, land use planning, applied geomorphology and geophysics, hydrology and field methods for site-specific analysis of engineering geology problems. Prerequisite: CE 321. CE 425 Advanced Transportation Engineering (3) Selected topics in advanced transportation planning techniques, signalization design, airport planning and design and transportation economics. Course is designed to equip students with practical design-oriented knowledge of land use impacts on transportation, travel demand forecasting, models of trip distribution and traffic assignment on the road network. Prerequisites: CE 323, GE 359. CE 430 foundation Design (3) Geotechnical design of foundations and retaining structures. Structural requirements are combined with subsurface behavior to select and design the most suitable foundation type, focusing on safety, serviceability and economy of design. Topics include subsurface exploration methods, bearing capacity and settlement analysis for shallow and deep foundations, retaining walls and abutments, sheet piles, problem soils, ground improvement, slope stability and construction excavation and bracing. Basic soil mechanics theory is extended and applied to analytic and semi-empirical approaches in the geotechnical design of foundation systems for civil engineering structures. Prerequisites CE 321, CE 322, CE 350 and CE 360. CE 435 Pavement Design (2) Asphalt and concrete pavement design for highways and airfields. Covers wheel loads and design factors, stresses in flexible and rigid pavements, vehicle and traffic considerations, soil classification and characteristics, subgrade, design methods and bases and subbases. Combines soil mechanics theory and traffic requirements for an under-

Economical arrangements of components to achieve material compatibility. Topics include steel properties. with design of material and thickness to satisfy strength and serviceability performance objectives. response to harmonic. columns.SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – CIVIL ENGINEERING 209 standing of the fundamental behavior of pavements under traffic loads. CE 445 Timber Design (3) Analysis and design of wood structures by the allowable stress method. finite element method (FEM) and simple examples of FEM application will be introduced. beams and frames. bolted and nailed connections. beams. strength. beam-columns. arbitrary or step excitations. CE 453 Matrix Structural Analysis (3) Senior civil engineering students who have completed CE350 Structural Analysis course will extend their classical structural analysis knowledge from CE350 to the advanced computer aided structural analysis theory and techniques currently used in professional practice. wind and earthquake loads in accordance with Uniform Building Code criteria. Topics covered include brief summary of matrix algebra. Senior civil engineering students learn to apply the principles of mechanics of materials and structural analysis to the design of wood buildings in conformance with current codes. In addition. bolted connections and structural systems to resist vertical and lateral loads. basic concepts of the force and displacement methods of structural analysis. Topics include wood properties and specifications. Prerequisite: CE350. CE 440 Steel Design (3) Analysis and design of structural steel members. live. connections and systems in accordance with current AISC Specification. forming member and structure stiffness matrices. Prerequisite: CE 360. The impacts of different professional disciplines’ responsibilities comprising a typical project team are examined. Senior civil engineering students learn to apply the principles of mechanics of materials and structural analysis to the design of steel structures in conformance with current codes. Multiple material types are used in creating structural systems designed to resist dead. CE 463 Dynamics of Structure (3) Introduction of free and forced vibration structures. welds. serviceability and constructability are emphasized. application of principle of minimum potential energy. beams. tension members. and examples of solving indeterminate trusses. and plywood diaphragms and shear walls to resist lateral loads. trusses. linear UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Students will learn commercial software currently used by practicing structural engineers. design of solid and glued-laminated members. Prerequisite: CE 321. the Gaussian elimination and Cholesky triangular inverse matrix algorithm. in accordance with the National Design Specification for Wood Construction. virtual work displacement calculation. Prerequisite: CE 350. CE 460 Structural Systems Design (3) Current professional practice in the design of structural systems for buildings. equations of motion for single and multi degree of freedom structural system. CE 360. load combinations. design of tension members. Prerequisites: CE 350. beam-columns. columns. analytical and numerical methods of natural frequency of vibration. specifications.

flexural analysis and design. un-damped. Class integrates the various design/ analysis methods presented in previous courses and equips students to be successful. coliform counts. Structural design and analysis against earthquake loading will be introduced. transport. modified compression field theory in shear and torsion design. coordination and quality control. Prerequisites. students will design and prepare structural drawings of a bridge. effective verbal. During the course. BOD and microbial examinations. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. productive design team members. Prerequisites: CE 350 and three of the following design classes: CE 321. an strut and tie analysis and design for disturbed region. These general concepts on the dynamic behavior of buildings and bridges are related to the structural response under earthquake induced motion. CE 370. Topics include: Local. case studies illustrating the integration of various civil engineering disciplines into successful projects.CE 360 and CE 440 CE 480 Environmental Laboratory Processes (2) Laboratory analysis techniques for water and wastewater evaluation. Design of steel girder bridge also will be introduced. Focus will be on the reinforced concrete deck and pre-stressed girder composite bridge structures. Topics on new load resistant factors and parameters. global and historic perspectives of civil engineering. Students who are currently employed in civil engineering-related jobs are given the opportunity to discover relationships between academic topics and professional practice. including solids. Prerequisite: CE 385.210 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – CIVIL ENGINEERING and nonlinear system. CE 453. case studies illustrating design/construction failures. CE 490 Internship (1-3) Coordinated through the University’s Career Center and the School of Engineering. CE 323. CE 498 Senior Design I (3) First of a two-semester capstone design sequence. CE 360. including report and construction document/plan preparation. the Department of Civil Engineering grants approval of credits for work. . engineering ethics. dissolved oxygen. damped and resonant behavior of structures. Emphasis on municipal wastes. CE 470 Solid Waste Management (2) Engineering management and principles as applied to the collection. CE 475 bridge Engineering and Design (3) Analysis and design of bridge structure based on Load Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) in accordance with the 2002 AASHTO and WADOT Bridge Design Specifications. fatigue and fracture problems in steel bridge and substructure design. re-use and disposal of solid wastes. CE 495 Special Topics (1-3) Selected topics in engineering approved by the School of Engineering. Prerequisites: CE 350. importance of and preparation for professional registration. and initial conceptual design/team organization for the design project. new live load system and application. CE 385. written and technical communication. Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of department chair. design project planning. Prerequisite: CE 385. One design class may be taken as a corequisite. awareness of public policy and related legal issues.

Practicing mechanical engineers are generally required to take a product from concept to prototype and beyond. however. physical and natural sciences. Multi-discipline student teams take the conceptual study done in Senior Design I through design development and contract documents. bioengineering. detailed drawings. a balanced program encompassing strong communication skills and an appreciation for the arts. Most mechanical engineering graduates take positions in industry. CE 498 and CE 499 must be completed in two successive semesters. synthetical and evolutional skills through engineering topics equally divided between the department’s focuses in energy and in structures and motion. Seniors may tailor their curricula by choosing nine to 12 semester hours of UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . energy-related issues and fluid mechanics. Some. Due to the versatility. state government or business. A major goal of the junior year is to develop the student’s analytical. it is necessary to develop the whole person. engineering sciences. continue their formal education in a graduate program. The role of the engineer as problem-solver and designer is the common thread throughout the curriculum. energy systems. including computations. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING faculty Amanie Abdelmessih. The principles learned in such disciplines are applied to mechanical design and systems. James Witsmeer bachelor of Science Mechanical engineers design products and systems used by the public for a variety of applications. Sandford Jr. Computers are used when appropriate to aid in reaching and interpreting solutions to engineering problems. Prerequisite: CE 498. automated manufacturing and heating. a wide spectrum of career opportunities is open to them. Professional competence is built on a foundation of mathematics. They work in areas as diverse as aerospace. Mechanical. Students participate in five laboratory courses that emphasize the statistical nature of systems and their behavior. and systems design activities are continued in three junior-year courses. cost estimates. ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC). thermal. In preparing for lifelong learning. Chair Isaac Jung Roy D. flexibility and ability of mechanical engineers to work in a team. Written. specifications and bidding material. graphic and oral presentations are made. design and laboratory experience. propulsion and transportation systems.SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 211 ACADEMIC CATALOG CE 499 Senior Design II (3) Second of a two-semester capstone design sequence. The main goal in the senior year is to integrate knowledge in science with engineering topics. humanities and social sciences is required. thereby developing a degree of maturity in the student’s engineering capabilities. In addition to professional competency. Practicing engineers from the community are involved in reviewing the students’ work.

These objectives were developed after extensive consultation and in collaboration with the constituents of the Department of Mechanical Engineering faculty. Program outcomes were formulated using the same constituents and are available on the department’s website: www. • Know the importance and be capable of lifelong learning for enhancing their personal and professional growth. The final design course is a capstone that requires integration of knowledge gained in preceding analysis and design courses with generation of a concept-to-prototype schema.htm. alumni and the Engineering Advisory Board. Design Integration Objective: To insure insure that mechanical engineering students obtain knowledge of design and demonstrate skills to solve progressively more challenging design problems.212 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING technical electives. As such. as well as written and oral communication of the design solution. • Have the skills and abilities needed for successful employment in the mechanical engineering and related professions. • Be broadly educated consistent with the Benedictine tradition. This experience should grow from initial introductory exposure during the freshman year and terminate in a capstone design course synthesizing all or most of their design knowledge. The objectives of the program dovetail with the objectives of the School of Engineering and the mission of the University. . Some students choose to pursue an independent research project under faculty direction. Each of these technical electives includes design as an important component. The engineering faculty and staff are committed to excellence in engineering education. students may decide to develop depth in a certain area or to develop breadth in several areas. • Possess the necessary communication and interpersonal skills to enable them to be successful in mechanical engineering. students.stmartin. program outcomes have been matched with objectives. The first emphasizes design considerations and methods required to solve open-ended problems.edu/engineering/ mechanical/program_outcomes. keeping in mind the requirements of the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology ABET/EAC. We recognize the need for continuous improvement and change necessitated by advancement in technology and changes in the requirements of the profession. The senior year culminates in a two-semester sequence in engineering design. Accordingly. Educational Objectives Our graduates will: • Understand the fundamental scientific principles that govern the mechanical engineering profession.

Mechanical Engineering Major The following is a list of courses required for graduation. Mathematics. History) (3) Physical Education (1) Physical Education (1) Philosophy (3) Religious Studies (3) Social Sciences Elective I (3) Social Sciences Elective II (3) UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS • ENG Literature (3) Math and Science Requirements (32 semester hours) • CHEM 141 General Chemistry with Laboratory (5) • MTH 171 • MTH 172 • MTH 271 • MTH 322 • MTH 357 • PHY 171 • PHY 172 Calculus I (4) Calculus II (4) Vector Calculus (3) Differential Equations (3) Statistics (3) . The following lists the current requirements (136 total semester hours) for the BSME degree: General Education Requirements (35 semester hours) Some General Education Requirements are included in the Engineering Graduation Requirements (below) and are shown there. as some of the mathematics. The courses listed under General Education will not match the University’s general education requirements. • ART Approved Art Elective (3) • UNI 101 Freshman Seminar (3) • ENG 101 College Writing I (3) • ENG 102 College Writing II (3) • HIS • HIS • PE • PE • PHL • RLS • SOC • SOC American History (3) World. General Engineering.S.MTH 353 Algebra (3) Introduction to Physics I with Laboratory (5) Introduction to Physics II with Laboratory (5) Graphics and Computer-Aided Drafting (3) General Engineering Requirements (16 semester hours) • GE or GE104 .SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 213 The following design sequence represents the integration of design into the program. These courses fall into four general categories: General Education. and Mechanical Engineering. Science. etc. (must not be U. Asian. science requirements fulfill the University’s general requirements. European.or .

welding and sheet metal working. Concurrent lab enrollment required. Design and manufacture of simple artifacts. Also covers material selection and the production process for an application. Introduction of various processes available for producing engineering artifacts from raw material. quality control. Students will be required to plan the production process and to design tooling for work-holding and sheet metal work. ME 300L Manufacturing Processes Laboratory (1) Design of work-holding devices for measurement and manufacturing. transfers take GE 305. . Reinforces theoretical knowledge obtained in ME 300. Law and Economics in Engineering Practice (2) Manufacturing Processes with Laboratory (4) Theory of Machines (3) Thermodynamics I (3) Thermodynamics II (3) Elements of Electrical Engineering with Laboratory (4) Heat Transfer with Laboratory (4) Material Science (2) Systems Analysis and Design (2) Machine Design (3) Instruments and Experimental Design (3) Senior Design I (3) Senior Design II (3) • GE 206/207 Mechanics of Materials with Laboratory (4) Mechanical Engineering Requirements (50 semester hours) • ME 308/309 Fluid Mechanics I with Laboratory (4) • Approved ME Elective (3) • Approved ME Elective (3) • Approved ME Elective (3) Mechanical Engineering Courses ME 300 Manufacturing Processes (3) Study of commonly used industrial processes. along with the fundamentals of statistical quality control. metal-cutting. Prerequisite: GE 206. • GE 204 • GE 205 • GE 359 • ME 300 /L • ME 301 • ME 340 • ME 341 • ME 345/L • ME 347 /L • ME 360 • ME 370 • ME 401 • ME 415 • ME 498 • ME 499 Statics (3) Dynamics (3) Ethics.214 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING • GE 105 or 305 Engineering Problem Solving and Design (1) Freshman take GE 105. Corequisite: ME 300. manufacturing materials and numerical control.

flow rates. literature and patents on fluid mechanics of heterogeneous fluids in steadystate and transient flow. GE 206. as well as statistical analysis of experimental data. GE 205. fluid statics and flows. experimental techniques. Corequisite: ME 308. automated data acquisition and recording. energy method. beyond that introduced in elementary physics and chemistry courses. Introduces numerical solutions. behavior of fluids. Application of thermodynamic laws to UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . Prerequisites: MTH 172. Prime goal is cultivating student’s capability of modeling complex real-world problems into analytical models and solving them numerically or analytically. ME 340 Thermodynamics I (3) The first and second laws of thermodynamics. GE 207. boundary layer theory. This course introduces the design process as it applies to the solution of reallife. unstructured engineering design problems and improves students’ ability to communicate their understanding of the subject through professional quality technical reports and oral presentations. heterogeneous. Course also acquaints student with current problems. ME 308. Developing a team approach to the experiments is a part of the learning exercise. dimensional analysis. observation and written reports that discuss the related theory and results. Introduction of viscous. These topics are fundamental to the broader subject of machine design. Emphasis is on conducting specific experiments. two-dimensional ideal flow. GE 206. ME 308 fluid Mechanics (3) First course in fluid mechanics covers fluid properties. buckling problems and computational structural mechanics.SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 215 ACADEMIC CATALOG ME 301 Theory of Machines (3) This course introduces fundamental topics of kinematics and dynamics of machinery in respect to the synthesis of mechanisms in order to accomplish desired motions of tasks. nozzles and diffusers. Experimentation on fluids (liquid and gas). flow measurement for both liquid and gas and compressible flow of gases. incompressible and compressible fluid flows. static and dynamic characteristics of physical signals and experimental methods. Also covers viscous flow in pipes. research methods and data analysis. and also the analysis of mechanisms in order to determine their rigid-body dynamic behavior. velocity distributions and tow-tank experiments. including static and dynamic forces. will be covered. Application of design problems to simple flows. with emphasis on fundamental phenomena. measurement systems. velocities. viscous effect. MTH 322. Prerequisite: ME 308. Structural design and analysis of the senior design project is conducted during course. ME 306 Intermediate Mechanics of Materials (3) Advanced course in strength of material and structural design. Prerequisites GE 205. ME 312 fluid Mechanics II (3) Continued coverage of fluid mechanics with more advanced mathematical treatment and with emphasis on external incompressible flow and internal compressible flow. Prerequisites: MTH 322. Emphasis on indeterminate structural analysis. jets. ME 309 fluid Mechanics Laboratory (1) Lab experiments are organized and scheduled to support the academic course.

ME 341 Thermodynamics II (3) Emphasis is placed on the practical applications of the principles of thermodynamics developed in ME 340 and extended to cycle analysis. ME 345 Elements of Electrical Engineering (3) Study of and applications of linear circuit theorems including maximum power transfer theorem. controls and instrumentation. An electrical project may be pursued in place of some or all of the experiments depending on the scope of the project. Prerequisite: ME 340. A student may choose to design and build a project of interest with the approval of the instructor. internal combustion engines and heat pumps. Primary emphasis is given to heat engines. characteristics of electrical elements including their transient’s properties and applied frequency responses. including internal and external combustion engines. The course is calculus based. one three-hour lab per week. Emphasis is on the concept and practical problems of power generation. Open-ended design projects provide an introduction to design in thermal sciences/engineering and foster teamwork.216 SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING practical engineering problems such as turbines. ME 360 Material Science (2) Course provides the necessary background of material science and engineering that can be applies to manufacturing processes. steady and transient states with emphasis on classical solutions. compressors. ME 347/347L Heat Transfer (4) Application of the principles of conduction. gas mixtures. the thermodynamics of high speed gas flows and combustion also are covered. house-hold wiring. Corequisite: ME 345 or instructor’s permission. as well as boiling and condensation. ME 308 and MTH 322 or instructor’s consent. CHEM 141. Radiation properties and exchange between surfaces also covered. refrigerators and heat pumps. electri- . Prerequisites: PHY 172. Electrical circuits are studied along with their protective measures and their applications in automotive ignition circuits. throttles. delta and Y transformations. and various control devices. The lab manual includes problems to reinforce the experimenter’s ability to solve circuit problems. Primary emphasis is given to steam power plants. and industrial applications. refrigeration. machine design. chemical and phase equilibrium. Introduce basic calculations for heat exchangers. A. Study of conduction in one and two dimensions. The application of psychometric principles. Thevenin’s and Norton’s circuit reductions. Topics include magnetic circuits related to transformers. convection and radiation heat transfer to practical problems. corequisite: MTH 322. Forced and natural convection in external and internal flows. circuit analyses are expressed in both the time and phasor domains. Example projects have included designing and building an electric amplifier for musicians. thermodynamics property relations. Prerequisites: MTH 172 and PHY 172 ME 345L Elements of Electrical Engineering Laboratory (1) The laboratory work consists in verifying the electrical theorems and provides handson experience working with electrical components and electrical instruments. heat exchangers and mixing chambers.C. nozzles. Prerequisites: ME 340. strength of materials. Three hours lecture.

Prerequisites GE 205. steady and variable loading. protection of delicate and sensitive instruments from environmental vibrations. free and forced vibrations. Introduction to modern composite materials. Emphasis on heat treatments. ME 401 Machine Design (3) Course covers theoretical and practical design of machine parts and simple systems. design concepts in seismometers and accelerometers. material properties and processes and understanding of the relationship between material structures.SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 217 ACADEMIC CATALOG cal and electronics engineering. Students are introduced to the mechanics of the human body’s physical movements and are given an overview of physiology and anatomy as applicable to mechanics and kinematics of joints. students design measurement techniques for assessing the performance of sensory organs. MTH 322. springs. Also covers formulation of the dynamic system using constitutive equations. mechanical. ME 415 Instrumentation and Experimental Design (3) Course introduces students to the subject of engineering measurements. ME 385 biomechanical Engineering (3) Course makes students aware of the various ways in which engineers can contribute in the field of medicine. corrosion and wear prevention techniques. Course covers single and multiple degrees of freedom systems. spectral analysis of forcing functions and system response. including screws. dynamics of human motion and the causes and effects of the failures of joints. Prerequisites CHM 141. Introduction to techniques in identifying basic system elements and analogy among electrical. mechanics of load-bearing. compatibility equations and continuity equations. materials. vehicle suspension system design. experimen- UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . steady state analysis and application to design of engineering systems. Phase diagrams and corrosion mechanics are introduced. synthesis and design of structures. Includes the integration of the basic engineering disciplines necessary for proper analysis. Modern engineering materials and their properties are considered in terms of microstructure. Group design project will be conducted to reinforce theory. Students conduct a paper design of an instrument employing the principles of vibration theory or resolve an actual vibration problem in a machine or equipment. processing and properties of materials. bearings and gearing. A major component is the design of engineering artifacts to assist in motion and/or replace limbs. Focus is on sensory organs. wheel and rotor balancing. feedback system and stability criteria will be introduced. torsional. In addition. A design project will be conducted. placing special emphasis on the fundamental aspects of engineering measurements. vibration resonance and damping. thermal and fluid elements. Laplace transform method. ME 410 Vibration Theory (3) Course deals with some limitations imposed on the design of dynamic systems due to vibrations. GE 205. Prerequisite: ME 370. ME 370 Systems Analysis and Design I (2) Covers modeling of mechanical and electrical lumped parameter elements and systems. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Establishment of design criteria based on stress and fatigue analysis and on experimental results. GE 206. simple machines or processes. Prerequisites: MTH 322. statistical considerations. Analytical and numerical solution methods are emphasized.

volume-control analysis for flow continuity. space heating and cooling loads. Prerequisites: ME 347/347L or instructor’s consent. ME 425 Heating. energy calculations and pumping. shell-andtube heat exchangers. Students will develop an understanding of basic energy economics. plate heat exchangers. ME 422 Numerical Methods in Engineering (3) Selected topics in numerical methods are developed to solve problems in fluid mechanics. geothermal.218 SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING tal techniques. Prerequisites: ME 308. fouling of heat exchangers. Prerequisites: ME 341 and ME 347/347L or instructor’s permission. experimental testing. condensers and evaporators. sensors and measurement systems. Introduce the theoretical basis for the design of air conditioning systems. Prerequisite: MTH 322. heat transmission in buildings. spherical and cylindrical coordinates. nuclear. Behavior and design of compressors. for engineering graduate school preparation and for general professional development. ME 420 Turbo Machinery (3) Course deals with fundamentals of the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of turbo-machinery with emphasis on gas turbines. Lagrangian interpolation and the Newton-Raphson method to solve systems of equations. Course includes open-ended design project of mechanical parameter measurement systems. vibrations and acoustics. including cycles. heat transfer. environmental impact and industrial risks. compact heat exchangers. momentum and energy in rectangular. Study of various types of heat exchangers: double-pipe heat exchangers. design methods. single phase convection correlations and two-phase correlations. applications of Fourier series. Prerequisites: ME 341. report-writing and final presentations. ME 347/347L or instructor’s permission. ME 435 Energy Systems (3) Focus is on energy systems associated with electric power-generation. Ventilating and Air Conditioning (3) Specific course goals are to demonstrate the basic application of the principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer to air conditioning systems. data analysis. Prerequisite: ME 345. ME 436 Thermal Design of Heat Exchangers (3) Classification of heat exchangers. students will be able to evaluate the performance of turbo-machinery and design and optimize component and system performance. pressure drop calculations. components and component-matching. Topics include indoor air quality. research methods and design of experiments and measurement systems. biomass and fuel cells. Examples include. . ME 341. Relate the principals of thermodynamics and heat transfer to the application of available energy resources and promote the concept of energy conservation through proper system design. Taylor series. solar radiation. computer-aided measurement systems. Topics will change to reflect demands in undergraduate engineering courses. Specific goals are to expose the student to the various sources of energy including renewable energy sources (solar and wind). A design project will be performed. Laplace transforms. Upon successful completion of course. uncertainty analysis and error propagation. turbines and pumps.

ME 440 Internal Combustion Engines (3) Study of engine types including hybrid systems and operation. analysis and optimization. Course deals with tooling required for mass production. These include but are not limited to mathematical and computer modeling. viewing. Failures in electronics due to thermal reasons. Sensitivity to the production aspects of tool design is emphasized. Learn to build finite element models: geometric modeling. simulations. thermochemistry of fuel-air mixtures. welding fixtures and tools will be developed. groups. ME 447 Heat Transfer in Electronic Packaging (3) Background on materials used in electronics manufacturing and their thermal properties.and three-dimensional graphics and presentations. animation and two. finite element analysis. Prerequisite: Senior standing in ME program. In addition. thermal/fluid boundary conditions. contact resistance. Design projects will be assigned. as well UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . display. Machining. Prerequisite: ME 340. Prerequisites: ME 347/L. Design projects involving the application of CAD (computer-aided design) constitute a significant portion of the course. Applications to thermal engineering problems.SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 219 ME 437 Computational Heat Transfer and Thermal Modeling (3) Application of finite difference numerical methods to heat transfer from steady two dimensional heat transfer to transient three dimensional (explicit and implicit methods). ME 450 Advanced CAD (3) Covers interactive computer programming and graphics and their applications in the mechanical design of engineering systems. and miniature heat pipes will be covered. Emphasis on use of hard and programmable automation in the design of systems for manufacture. Prerequisite: ME 347. elements and meshing. engine design parameters. Course design project consists of an optimization study among selected engine design parameters and/or the design of an engine mechanical system or an engine system involving the solution of a gas dynamic and/or heat transfer problem. ME 454 Robotics and Automation (3) Course focuses on the application of kinematics and dynamics in automated machinery. pollutant formation and control and engine operating characteristics. gas exchange processes. analysis set up. Presents various ways in which computers can help the designer solve problems and make decisions. sheet-metal working. materials and element properties. Prerequisites: Senior standing in ME program. students are required to design fixtures and gripping devices for automated manufacturing. Thermal engineering design projects assigned will be modeled thermally using commercial thermal software. properties of working fluids. results and plots. Computations and characterization for designs of thermal systems using commercial thermal software. Design projects represent a primary portion of course. ME 452 Automated Manufacturing and Tool Design (3) Introduction to numerical and empirical calculations for the design of work-holding devices. ideal and actual engine cycles. Learn to evaluate the models. combustion in spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines. Actuators and control systems in automation are introduced. fields.

Also covered are two-dimensional flow. analytical tools and graphic methods such as the Bode diagram. as well as compensation methods. Prerequisite: ME 450. PID control. Prerequisites: ME 312. ME 464 flight Mechanics (3) Application of fluid mechanics and dynamics to flight. Nichols plot. stability and control are studied. rate of climb. Students learn to apply principles of dynamics and fluid mechanics to traditional flight problems of aircraft. ME 490 Internship (1-3) Coordinated through the University’s Career Center and the School of Engineering. isentropic. plasma-working lasers and manufacturing systems. propulsion. Safety of the flight is emphasized. and regulatory agencies and product liability are covered. if necessary. The performance and control design portion of the senior design project will be conducted through this course. take-off. analog simulation of hydraulic. Prerequisite: ME 370. ME 456 Design for Manufacturing (3) Examination of design considerations for the production of parts using traditional metal-cutting and forming. ME 340. s domain or z domain. as are applications to design of mechanical systems. Prerequisite: Senior standing in ME program. Students will design a control system using computer software. landing. Introduction of control laws such as PI. root locus method. Students will demonstrate their ability to use these methods through team design problems. rate of climb. endurance. including a trade-off study involving system cost and maintenance and system reliability. ME 460 Gas Dynamics (3) Course extends student’s knowledge of compressible fluid flow beyond that introduced in elementary fluid mechanics courses. Extensive hands-on experience in the lab is a major course component. Three studies are conducted. Prerequisites: ME 308. ME 458 Safety and Reliability in Systems Design (3) Introduction to the methods of failure mode and effects analysis and the application of Boolean algebra and probability theory to fault tree and event tree analyses and Markov modeling. shock waves. method of characteristics. pneumatic and electrical systems are covered. Emphasis will be on developing methods for use in design. One-dimensional flow. supersonic airfoils.220 SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING – MECHANICAL ENGINEERING as use of sensors and interrupts in small design tasks. reliability and maintainability. ME 470 Systems Analysis and Design II (3) Senior-level course in control system design and analysis. stability and controllability. small perturbation theory. such as its range. System designed for safety. Transfer functions. Introduction to digital control systems. Also provides background and tools sufficient for solution of engineering design problems involving gas flow. sweepback. ME 340. EDM. Prandtl-Meyer expansion. Gothert’s rule. drag. Aircraft lift. frequency domain. Students will be able to analyze their design in time domain. Application to aircraft design. . constant-area flow with friction and with heating or cooling are covered. range. Prerequisite: MTH 357. Nyquist plot or root locus technique. Design projects constitute a significant portion of this course. and oblique shock waves.

Culmination of design experience and synthesis of all theoretical and practical knowledge into the production of an engineering artifact/system. Students will design a significant engineering project requiring engineering practice and development of alternatives and evaluation based on technical. synthesis. graphic and oral communication. International Programs and Development Marco Tulluck. ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) faculty Josephine Yung. Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of department chair. as well as technical content. A secondary purpose is to provide exchange students with an educational experience. with students working independently. Prerequisites: ME 345. ME 498 Senior Design I (3) First of a two-course sequence providing a culminating experience to seniors. ME 370. team-building.ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 221 ACADEMIC CATALOG the Department of Mechanical Engineering grants approval of credits for work. Emphasis on written. while enhancing the university community by bringing an international presence to campus through students that come to study ESL. conceptualization. Prerequisites: ME 401. ME 347. financial and social considerations. safety. projects normally will be conducted through preliminary design. with students working in design teams. Vice President. ME 495 Directed Study (1-3) A student/faculty-selected project allows the student to do research in a specialized area. Students who are currently employed in civil engineering-related jobs are given the opportunity to discover relationships between academic topics and professional practice. In the first course. Course will stress design methods. ME 498. Offered on approval by the chair of the department. creativity. component and system development. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS ME 499 Senior Design II (3) Continuation of ME 498. open-ended design. The ESL curriculum is divided into two course subtypes: • English language skills • Culture-based content ESL classes are sectioned according to four levels of communicative competence: Level 1 (courses ESL 020 – ESL 039) . Corequisite: ME 401. ESL Program Manager Ellin Beer Michael Shohan Blaine Snow Ryan Wachter Saint Martin’s English as a Second Language (ESL) courses are designed primarily for international and immigrant students to improve English language skills for the purpose of matriculating into Saint Martin’s University. economics. Project is taken through final design. construction and testing.

social and political context. summarizing and anticipating the topic using level-appropriate stories. history for the purpose of understanding American attitudes. ESL 025/035 Grammar Intensive practice in mastering basic grammar through grammar exercises and contextualized writing assignments. economic. is generally as follows for the institutional paper-based exam: Level 1 = 375 – 415 Level 2 = 415 – 445 Level 3 = 445 – 475 Level 4 = 475 – 524 Matriculating ESL students in Level 4 may take a combination of ESL and regular undergraduate courses. poems and biographies. skimming. English as a Second Language (ESL) Program Courses ESL 020/030/040/050/060/070/080/090 Grammar/Writing Covers the full sequence of English grammar structures and parts of speech through specific writing assignments and interactive exercises. The number of levels and courses offered each semester are necessarily based on enrollment numbers.222 GRADUATE PROGRAMSLANGUAGE ENGLISH AS A SECOND Level 2 (courses ESL 040 – ESL 059) Level 3 (courses ESL 060 – ESL 079) Level 4 (courses ESL 080 – ESL 099) The levels offered each semester are dependent on enrollment. ESL 028/048/068/088 American History Overview and survey of North American and U. 2 and 3 will generally be offered both fall and spring semesters. Students with TOEFL scores of 525 on the institutional paperbased TOEFL and above are eligible for full-time undergraduate study at Saint Martin’s. No required TOEFL score is necessary for entry into the program. ESL 038/058/078/098 History of the Americas Overview and survey of North. politics and people. essays. values.S. if it is available. Level placement according to TOEFL score. . Levels 1. ESL 021/041 Reading Skills Focuses on foundational reading skills such as reading for the main idea. Central and/or South American history for the purpose of understanding the United States in its geographical.

ESL 024/044/064/084 American Culture General survey of the broad diversity of American mainstream and minority cultures through the study of American personalities. intonation and paces of speech so that students can develop their ability to better understand spoken English. ESL 034/054/074/094 Cultures of America General survey of the diverse cultures present in the United States. ESL 061/081 Literature and Poetry Focuses on skills to understand and analyze a variety of literature and poetry. including different accents. marriage. including cultures based on nationality. ESL 022/042 Listening/Speaking through Drama Focuses on developing students’ comfort with using the spoken English language through scenes and plays designed to increase familiarity with American culture and common social contexts in the United States. lifestyles and customs. ESL 032/052 Listening/Speaking Focuses on developing listening and speaking skills by exposing students to a variety of spoken English. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS . The class will study the ways these cultures influence and affect U. ethnicity. relationships. society and the ways that these cultures have developed over time. feelings and cultural assumptions. geography. focusing on a step-by-step approach to literary analysis. business.S. Explores the diversity of American values. Emphasis is on building speaking confidence/listening comprehension and on skills that fit various American conversational contexts. intonation and their ability to orally present information and ideas to large and small groups.ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 223 ACADEMIC CATALOG ESL 031/051/071/091 Understanding Literature Offers a general understanding of literature. music. Students will also learn and practice ways to improve their speech in English. families. environmental and political issues. art. ESL 062/082 Conversation Skills Focuses on the practice of spoken English and conversational skills in a relaxed and open context. politics. ESL 027/037 Pronunciation Focuses on listening and speech challenges that are particular to the students’ native languages through a variety of intensive speech exercises and pronunciation games. sexuality. social and economic classes. beliefs. ESL 072/092 Contemporary Issues Focuses on the practice of spoken English and conversational skills in the study of current domestic and international social. including work on pronunciation. race. discussion and literary writing. sport. science. film. economic.

journals. social and environmental issues. poetry display. punctuation. group work. reading and writing. age and sexual orientation. Through readings. social class. gender. in-class discussions and written essays. writing. but also between subcultures such as race. they learn to work around or avoid such miscommunications to become more mindful and skillful c ommunicators in their globally interconnected world. ESL 023/043 Writing Skills Focuses on building foundational writing skills in English such as paragraph forms. Students focus on the broad outlines of cultural differences to gain awareness of the many ways in which misunderstandings occur due to unconscious cultural assumptions. speeches and research papers. speaking. designing and producing a writing project. ESL 047/077 English in Music and film Explores the American vernacular and popular culture through the study of American music styles and lyrics and film. profiling and exposition. Japanese. ESL 057/067 American Music History Explores American history as it relates to music and American music as it has both reflected and influenced history. ESL 033/053/073/093 Writing Workshop A class where international students put their creative energy together into creating.224 GRADUATE PROGRAMSLANGUAGE ENGLISH AS A SECOND ESL 026/046/066/086 International Studies Introductory comparison of international cultures through a general survey of current global and international economic. ESL 069/089 Intercultural Communication This course is designed specifically for international students studying abroad in North America. class activities. short story exhibition or other related projects. ESL 036/056/076/096 World Cultures Covers intercultural communication in an international context by exploring differences not only between national cultures such as Korean. description. Focuses on writing reports. observing and reporting. such as a newspaper. essays. political. religion. ESL 045/055/065/075/085/095 TOEfL Skills and Strategy Covers successful test-taking strategies and strengthens skills through intensive work in all four sections of the Next Generation TOEFL test: listening. guest speakers. language. French and Mexican. ESL 063/083 College Writing Designed for international students who are planning to matriculate or immigrant students needing writing improvement. . spelling and grammar. as well as on using narration.

discussion and critical thinking. Courses are selected from the course offerings above. The following ESL foreign language courses are offered to ESL students from Reitaku University: ESL 016a ESL 017a ESL Chinese I ESL Chinese II ESL 016b ESL Spanish I ESL 016c ESL French I ESL 016d ESL Korean I ESL 016e ESL German I ESL 017b ESL Spanish II ESL 017c ESL French II ESL 017d ESL Korean II ESL 017e ESL German II UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Three four-week summer sessions are available for students to enroll in. university-level courses effectively by emphasizing the importance of class participation. The SummerSession ESL Program provides an excellent opportunity for English language students to continue their English studies from spring semester or to prepare for the upcoming fall semester. .ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 225 ACADEMIC CATALOG ESL 079/099 University Preparation This course focuses on preparing advanced English language students to enter U.S. balanced student. The course will cover note-taking skills as well as strategies for being a successful.

226 GRADUATE PROGRAMS .

ACADEMIC CATALOG 227 GRADUATE PROGRAMS 227 GRADUATE PROGRAMS GRADUATE PROGRAMS .

write an essay specific to the field of interest and/or be interviewed. www. three decisions can be made about the candidate’s application: • The student may be admitted unequivocally -or• The student may be admitted provisionally. Admissions procedures for each program are listed on the University website. For instance. counseling and engineering and are designed to help students explore the academic field that inspires their passion.stmartin. Highly experienced professors include students in a tightly knit community of scholars that both challenges and supports personal and professional growth. The decision to admit a student rests with criteria established by the respective department or program. with additional requirements specified -or• The student may be denied admission. education. take standardized tests. Saint Martin’s University offers the following programs leading to a graduate degree in the following fields of study: • Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC) • Master of Business Administration (MBA) • Master of Education (MED) • Master in Teaching (MIT) • Master of Civil Engineering (MCE) • Master of Engineering Management (MEM) APPLICATION Specific requirements and procedures are set forth under the respective master’s degree programs. The department acts as an agent of Saint Martin’s University. the student may be required to complete a programspecific application and secure letters of recommendation. COMMON POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Students Students apply to and are admitted to the graduate department or program of their choice. Regardless of the department.228 GRADUATE PROGRAMS GRADUATE PROGRAMS Saint Martin’s six graduate programs span business. The number of semester hours required to complete a master’s degree varies among programs. . Each department/degree has specific requirements and procedures unique to it.edu.

Classes are offered at the University’s main campus in Lacey. Graduate faculty advisors work with students to develop a program that will enable them to complete their graduate degree in a reasonable time frame. www. Students may transfer no more than nine semester hours of credit from another institution into the respective graduate program. Teacher certification/ endorsement programs also are available at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord extensions. . GRADUATE PROGRAMS • Connected. In general. bringing valuable insights into their subject areas. On completion of all specific program and degree requirements as established by the University and graduate program. Students have a maximum of seven calendar years from formal program admission to complete their degree.GRADUATE PROGRAMS 229 The admission of a student to graduate study does not imply admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. The major department in which the student intends to become a candidate for a master’s degree must be satisfied as to the student’s sound basic training and the ability to pursue studies at the graduate level. students complete a minimum of 12 to 18 semester hours of coursework before review or application for admission to candidacy. The University’s graduate programs provide excellent opportunities to build and expand a professional network. • Professional. They must maintain a “B” average in graduate coursework. weekends and summers to meet the needs of the working professional. regardless of the graduate program in which they are enrolled.stmartin. • flexible. Students seeking their master’s degree in either business administration (MBA) or engineering management (MEM) also can complete their degrees in evening/weekend study through Saint Martin’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord extension campuses. Please click on the “Graduate Studies” link to learn more about the program of interest in or to contact the program director. Each program determines the particular format for the admission to candidacy and/or the particular time frame in which it is to occur. Faculty in the University’s graduate programs have excellent academic credentials and real-world experience in the subjects they teach.edu. Each program is described in more detail on the academics portion of the University’s website. Washington. the student will be awarded the appropriate master’s degree. Most or all classes are offered evenings. The University’s graduate degree programs are designed to be: • Accessible.

financial Aid for Graduate Students: While most financial aid is limited to undergraduate study. (Visa is not accepted). A convenience fee of 2. 360-438-4389. or by fax. Regular Payment: All fees are due and payable in full on or before registration day. Please contact the director of the program of interest. contact the Office of Student Accounts. Discover and American Express. The following methods of payment are accepted online only: MasterCard.5% will be assessed for this service. Free Electronic check (e-Check) is also available on line. the federal processor must receive a signed FAFSA by March 1. To meet the priority funding deadline. Payments Saint Martin’s University accepts the following methods of payment in person or by mail: Cash. for information on the University’s annual and semester payment plans. Applications received after that date will be processed but may not be eligible for all funding for which they would otherwise be eligible. located in the Student Financial Service Center. fees • Application fee: $35 (non-refundable) • Other fees: Each graduate program differs in administration. by phone. Students may be charged a technology fee or be required to purchase student health insurance. or traveler’s check. Payment Plans: Contact Saint Martin’s Office of Student Accounts. graduate students at Saint Martin’s are eligible to apply for student loans by completing and submitting a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). money order. length and requirements. Credit card payments cannot be accepted in the Student Accounts Office in person. by mail. by email. located in the Student Financial Service Center. The .230 GRADUATE PROGRAMS ExPENSES Tuition Tuition rates vary by program length and location. For further information regarding payment options or wire transfer information. check. 360-438-4389. Please check with the director of each program for specific and current information.

5300 Pacific Avenue SE. telephone: 360-438-4363. For further information about financial aid.MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 231 GRADUATE PROGRAMS FAFSA can be most quickly processed by completing it online at www. finance. Lacey. the administrative office of the School of Business. economics. GRADUATE PROGRAMS Admission Admission Admission to the program is open to all college graduates with a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution who have completed the Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT). All classes are offered at night and some on Saturdays to accommodate working professionals. Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT) Information for the Graduate Management Aptitude Test is available from the Saint Martin’s University Office of Career Services. Saint Martin’s University. . rather than a minimum requirement on either criterion. for MBA/Accounting: 85F-Q1-19. WA 98503-7500. Director Denis DuBois Michael Gideon Riley Moore Paul Patterson Don Stout Hal Wilson Saint Martin’s Master of Business Administration program provides students with decision-making tools and an understanding of the total administrative system. MASTER’S PROGRAM IN bUSINESS MASTER Of bUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MbA) faculty Heather Grob. please contact: Office of Financial Aid.gov. You may apply for the GMAT at www. Saint Martin’s test codes are: for MBA/Full Time: 85F-Q1-26. Students lacking specific coursework in accounting. The school code for Saint Martin’s University is 003794. The program operates year-round.com. The program develops a capacity for understanding managerial relationships and provides specialized training and personal research in a functional field of management.ed.mba. most students are encouraged to progress at a more measured pace.fafsa. or either of the University’s extension campus offices at Joint Base LewisMcChord. While the program can be completed in a single calendar year. marketing and management may have to complete prerequisite work. Acceptance is based on a combined grade point average/GMAT score.

Students enrolled in the program may enroll in courses at any location and can expect to take courses at all three locations. Application Application for admission to the program can be made at any time prior to the beginning of a new term. WA 98503-7500. official score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The application materials and fee should be sent directly to: Director. A letter of full guarantee or support submitted by any sponsoring private party or institution will satisfy the need for a financial responsibility statement. MBA Program. A minimum score of 525 is required for acceptance to the program (computer-based [CBT] score of 197 or Internet-based [IBT] score of 71 are considered equivalent to the paper-based score of 525). • If required. college or university. However.232 MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS Test of English as foreign Language (TOEfL) The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required for all students whose native language is not English. International students also must submit a declaration of finances statement indicating their financial status. colleges and universities attended. S. Class Locations Classes are offered on the main campus in Lacey and at the extension campuses at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. . Saint Martin’s University. • Official Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) score. Calendar The MBA program is offered in five eight-week terms per year. Lacey. The TOEFL is not required for foreign students who received their bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U. Applications can be obtained from the Office of International Programs and Development. • Copies of official transcripts from all schools. enabling students to complete the required coursework (minus the research component and assuming no prerequisites are required) in one year if they are taking two classes per term. This statement must attest to the student’s ability to finance his or her education at Saint Martin’s for the two years needed to complete the degree. most students complete the degree in 18 to 24 months. Applicants must submit the following materials to be considered to admission: • Saint Martin’s University graduate application form and $35 application fee (check made out to Saint Martin’s University). 5300 Pacific Avenue SE.

All MBA students must complete the program within seven years. Limited transfer of graduate work from other institutions is permitted. contact: Director. A student receiving a grade of “C” will be placed on academic probation. • MBA 611 Research Project (three credit hours). . Degree Requirements Candidates must complete 33 semester hours to be awarded an MBA degree.edu. Comprehensive examinations are not required. MBA Program. A grade point average of 3. WA 98503-7500.0 (“B”) is required in all work taken after admission to the University. Email: mba@stmartin. No more than seven years may elapse between time of registration for the earliest core course listed on the program plan and completion of all requirements for the degree. Lacey. A student who receives a grade lower than “C” or two grades of “C” will be required to withdraw from the program. Candidates may elect to complete either of the two options below: • 21 semester hours (seven courses) of core work.MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 233 GRADUATE PROGRAMS The terms are as follows: Fall I Fall II Spring I Spring II Summer August–October October–December January–March March–May May–July Registration Registration must be completed by the second class meeting of the term. Saint Martin’s University.or • Six semester hours (two courses) of elective work • MBA 612 Master’s Thesis (six credit hours). • 21 hours (seven courses) of core work Candidates may choose any member of the graduate faculty as their research project or thesis advisor/evaluator. but will be counted when calculating grade point average. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . Telephone: 360438-4512/4511. the candidate’s concluding course. • Nine semester hours (three courses) of elective work. Additional information For further information and applications. Grades of “C” or below are not considered acceptable graduate-level work. 5300 Pacific Avenue SE. Foreign students must complete nine credit hours during 16 weeks (two eight-week terms) to be considered full-time. Students enrolled for three credit hours per eight-week term are classified as full-time students. the candidate’s concluding course.

(See the core course descriptions for prerequisite requirements. . They do not count toward the MBA degree. choice of three courses — nine semester hours — with research project option) • MBA 620 Financial Institutions and Markets • MBA 621 Microcomputer Applications for Management • MBA 622 Marketing Management • MBA 623 Management Information and Control Systems • MBA 624 Human Resource Management • MBA 625 International Management • MBA 626 Consumer Behavior • MBA 627 Managerial Communications • MBA 628 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management • MBA 630 Entrepreneurship • MBA 631 Operations Management Research Project / Thesis • MBA 611 Research Project (three semester hours) plus three electives -orMBA 612 Graduate Thesis (six semester hours) plus two electives. prospective MBA students must have completed either these courses or their equivalent undergraduate courses prior to taking the core courses for which these courses are prerequisites.234 MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS MBA 500 courses listed below are provided for applicants without an undergraduate background in these areas. However.) Prerequisite Courses • MBA 500 Survey of Economics • MBA 501 Survey of Accounting Systems • MBA 502 Survey of Finance • MBA 503 Survey of Management and Marketing • MBA 504 Quantitative Methods for Management Core Courses (21 semester hours) • MBA 601 Organization Theory and Behavior • MBA 602 Financial Planning and Control • MBA 603 Accounting for Managerial Decision-making • MBA 605 Advanced Quantitative Methods for Management • MBA 606 Marketing Concepts and Theory • MBA 610 Seminar in Research Methods • MBA 650 Strategy and Policy Analysis Elective Courses (Choice of two courses — six semester hours — with thesis option.

including inflation and unemployment. Course content duplicates ECN 101 or its equivalent. The accounting strand is composed of 33 semester hours. Applicants must meet the existing MBA entry requirements and must have an undergraduate accounting degree. Candidates may elect to complete either: • 24 semester hours (eight courses) of core work • Six semester hours (two courses) of elective work • MBA 611 Research or MBA 613 Accounting Internship — three credit hours . as well as analysis of key aggregate variables. management or related majors. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . individual firms and their market interaction.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 235 Master of business Administration / Accounting This program enables accounting students with an undergraduate accounting degree to receive an MBA with an accounting focus.or • 24 semester hours (eight courses) of core work • Three semester hours (one course) of elective work • MBA 612 Master’s Thesis — six credit hours Core Courses (24 semester hours) • MBA 601 Organizational Theory and Behavior • MBA 602 Financial Planning and Control • MBA 605 Advanced Quantitative Methods for Management • MBA 610 Seminar in Research Methods • MBA 661 Commercial Law • MBA 662 Tax Research • MBA 663 Accounting Measurement and Disclosure • MBA 664 Financial Statement Analysis for Decision Making and Valuation Elective Courses (number of electives required based on selection of thesis or internship option) • MBA 620 Financial Institutions and Markets • MBA 621 Micro-computer Applications for Management • MBA 627 Managerial Communications • MBA 631 Operations Management Thesis/Internship Master of business Administration Courses MbA 500 Survey of Economics (3) Introduction Introduction to the economic analysis of consumers. Credit not applicable toward graduation requirement in fields of economics. so that they have sufficient academic credit to sit for the Certified Public Account (CPA) examination.

Course content duplicates BA 300 and BA 311 or equivalent. linear programming and other stochastic and deterministic models applied to managerial problems. sets. Prerequisite: MBA 503 or equivalent. MbA 603 Accounting for Managerial Decision Making (3) Study and application of accounting concepts and techniques used by management for planning and controlling organizational activities. Organizational marketing activities also are covered. MBA 502 and MBA 504 or equivalents. MbA 502 Survey of finance (3) Development and use of basic financial information for management analysis. MbA 605 Advanced quantitative Methods for Management (3) Concepts of statistical decision theory. statistics and linear programming used in management and related fields. as well as of mutual interaction of people and organizations. critical investigation of evaluation process and resulting impact on firm investment. forecasting. management or related majors. Course duplicates MTH 201. principles and techniques that form the basis for contemporary accounting practices. MbA 601 Organization Theory and behavior (3) An analysis of historical and contemporary organizations and an examination of models for understanding human behavior within a complex social environment. Credit not applicable toward any graduation requirement in accounting. Course content duplicates ACC 201 and ACC 202 or equivalent. Prerequisite: MBA 504 or equivalent. Equivalent to MEM 603. BA 302 or equivalent. . monetary system. Prerequisites: MBA 500. Contemporary theory and controversies of financial policy and structure. along with exploration of contemporary financial institutions and U. management or related majors. production and control. Credit not applicable toward any graduation requirement in management or related fields. decision-making. economics. Course content duplicates BA 335 and BA 330 or equivalent.S. Prerequisites: MBA 500. Intensive. planning and control. MbA 504 quantitative Methods for Management (3) Introduction to applied topics in algebraic functions. Credit not applicable toward any graduation requirement in fields of economics. MbA 503 Survey of Management and Marketing (3) Analysis of the organizational activities of planning. financing and dividend policies. Credit not applicable toward graduation requirement in management. sampling. MBA 501. MbA 602 financial Planning and Control (3) Analysis of operational financial policies.236 MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS MbA 501 Survey of Accounting Systems (3) Introduction to the basic assumptions. mathematics or related fields. MBA 502 and MBA 504 or equivalents.

MbA 620 financial Institutions and Markets (3) Analysis of central role of money. central banking and financial sophistication. The student is required to give oral presentations and written reports on the internship and have prior approval from faculty and the internship director. MbA 612 Graduate Thesis (6) Student will develop a proposition to be maintained against argument. presentation graphics and telecommunications. develop a hypothesis. text editing. Prerequisite: MBA 605. Employer performance evaluations are required. Seminar will culminate in the design of a research proposal. . modeling. The result will be a monograph embodying original research. observation methods. The project is designed not as original research. managerial and strategic underpinning of marketing theory and practice. Advanced work with higher-level business software packages is included. including information systems. A student selecting the research project alternative will be required to take one additional elective course. The student will begin with an idea. analyze data. create a survey instrument if necessary. A study of the basic concepts and tools necessary in analysis of markets and marketing opportunities. design of experimental procedures. Candidate may select MBA 612 upon completion of MBA 610 during any term. decision-support systems. but not required. Prerequisite: MBA 503 or equivalent. Approval of the proposal leads to initiation of a research project or thesis that will be completed in MBA 611 or MBA 612. MbA 611 Research Project (3) Student will research a topic of interest approved by his or her faculty sponsor.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 237 MbA 606 Marketing Concepts and Theory (3) Provides an understanding of societal. analysis of data and reporting of findings. but instead as a survey of literature with respect to the topic selected. MbA 621 Microcomputer Applications for Management (3) Analysis of microcomputer use in business. state a conclusion and document the process and conclusions. The relationship between financial institutions and economic growth and instability are covered through study of the development of the banking industry. create a research design. Prerequisite: MBA 602. carry out research design. finance and financial institutions in capitalistic economic systems. Candidate may select MBA 611 upon completion of MBA 610 during any term. Quantitative analysis will be encouraged. as well as designing tactical marketing strategies. faculty and employer. GRADUATE PROGRAMS MbA 613 Accounting Internship (3) The internship is designed to be a cooperative learning experience between student. MbA 610 Seminar in Research Methods (3) Selection of research projects.

Coverage includes retention. Emphasis is on identification. Prerequisite: MBA 601. MbA 626 Consumer behavior (3) Course studies purchase decisions for individual consumers and industrial buyers. MbA 625 International Management (3) Discussion and analysis of the scope of international business within a framework that identifies the specific role of the multinational corporation and provides an orientation into every aspect of the functional intricacies of these firms. Prerequisites: MBA 601 and MBA 602.238 MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS MbA 622 Marketing Management (3) Examination of the marketing system. MbA 623 Management Information and Control Systems (3) Evaluation of organizational information needs and the ability of computer technology to meet those needs in an economical way. advertising and consumer psychology to assist marketing managers in major marketing decisions will be explored. Market research. MbA 624 Human Resources Management (3) Analysis and discussion of problems/opportunities administering personnel systems and policies. influences. specification and installation of appropriate computer technology and the subsequent need for direction. appraisal. MbA 628 . MBA 605. training and compensation. recruitment. Prerequisite: MBA 606. control and overall management of the information function. examines various models of purchasing behavior while exploring motivations. Special emphasis is placed on identifying barriers to effective communication and developing a prescription to solve those problems. Prerequisite: MBA 601. employment. Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management (3) Comprehensive coverage of descriptive and quantitative areas of portfolio analysis design / management. Emphasis on development of integrated marketing program. roles played and situational factors influencing the purchase of products and services. MBA 603. its operations and mechanism for coordinating these operations. Equivalent to MEM 624. MbA 627 Managerial Communications (3) An examination of current theories of interpersonal and organizational communications. Prerequisites: MBA 602.

Course will utilize current electronic research techniques. cash flow statement. MbA 695 Special Topics (3) Course covers topics announced by faculty. Undergraduate accounting degree required. Prerequisite: Undergraduate accounting and auditing. Emphasis on management decisionmaking and business valuation techniques. MbA 662 Tax Research (3) Course provides students with working knowledge of tax research methods to derive solutions to routine. Major topics covered include managing creativity.MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 239 GRADUATE PROGRAMS MbA 630 Entrepreneurship (3) Course provides framework for understanding human and organizational issues underlying creative and entrepreneurial success. property. customer order fulfillment. Emphases on electronic research techniques and the theoretical structure of accounting and auditing. including recent pronouncements concerning generally accepted accounting principles and generally accepted auditing standards. and note disclosures for foreign and domestic companies. Case studies and projects related to actual company financial statements will be used. using secondary sources as research tools and independently researching and communicating tax Issues within the business environment. MbA 664 financial Statement Analysis for Decision Making and Valuation (3) Course includes analysis of the balance sheet. and complex tax problems. business organizations and government regulations. job design. scheduling. income statement. inventory and quality management. MbA 650 Strategy and Policy Analysis (3) Integrative course in business policy and strategy analysis. Undergraduate accounting degree required. Quantitative decision-modeling techniques also are explored for planning. the entrepreneur. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . measuring and controlling organizational activities. Undergraduate accounting degree required. control and analysis of operations. bankruptcy. Since operations management spans almost all the real value-added activities of an organization. production scheduling. MbA 631 Operations Management (3) This course is an intensive study of strategies employed in the design and operation of all processes required for the production of goods and delivery of services. MbA 663 Accounting Measurement and Disclosure (3) Comprehensive accounting and auditing research course. uniform commercial code. this course looks at a breadth of topics including product and process design. Prerequisite: Completion of undergraduate business law course. MbA 661 Commercial Law (3) Advanced law course including topics in contracts. developing objectives and plans for achievement. facility layout. material requirements planning and supply chain. managing the evolving organization and entrepreneurship and creativity in the established firm. Topic areas include: primary sources of federal tax law.

a series of electives provides students with an opportunity to study specialized modalities and/or the psychological issues and therapy needs of special populations.240 MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER’S PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION AND PROfESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Saint Martin’s University offers a graduate degree in counseling psychology. intellectual hunger. fundamental respect. In addition. liberating and enriching. Internship classes are on Saturdays. and therapy. intellect. and wisdom. assessment. psychodrama and introspective exercises. The MIT and the MED Special Education Strand are offered at the University’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord extension campuses Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC) MASTER Of ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY faculty Godfrey J. and a focus on the person of the therapist. A minor in psychology is usually expected as minimum academic background. it strives to be personally and professionally transformative. All courses are offered once a week in the afternoons or evenings. The 48-credit MAC program provides students with opportunities to acquire or increase competence in the areas of diagnosis. Most required courses are offered at least once a year during evenings. Director Leticia Nieto Peggy Zorn Mission Statement The Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology program trains students in the theoretical foundations and clinical skills necessary for advanced positions in the counseling profession. the Master of Education (MED) degree and the Master in Teaching (MIT) degree. in-depth opportunity to work in a variety of community-based counseling programs. Teaching methods include lecture and discussion formats as well as supervised roleplaying. Ellis. An undergraduate major in psychology is highly desirable but not essential. At the same time that the program provides students with opportunities to acquire and increase excellence in the areas of diagnosis. . the MAC program strives to embody spirit. and two graduate degrees in the field of education. Built on a philosophy of therapeutic service. A required 600-hour internship complements coursework by providing students with a supervised. the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC). assessment and therapy. This is accomplished through completion of a common core of courses. Admission A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university is required of all candidates seeking admission to the MAC program. All options are offered at the Lacey campus.

and desire for. Application Procedure To receive priority consideration for financial aid. enthusiastic and nurturing. application to the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology program should be made by the deadline of the desired semester. • Ability (or potential) to move fluidly between theory and practice. Other experiences may be considered. generally is expected as a requirement for admission into the program.” • Clarity of purpose and ability to be self-directed and self-motivated. These could include: 1) an undergraduate internship. or faculty. • Acceptance of others. late application date Spring Application deadline April 5 June 15 Nov. Note that exceptions to the following deadline dates may be made at the discretion of the program director. either voluntary or in a paid position. • Ability to resolve personal issues rather than projecting those issues onto clients. 5 NOTE: The financial aid application deadlines are different. More information is available in the MAC Admission Handbook on the University’s MAC program webpage. • Psychological self-awareness and emotional “groundedness. Those interested in financial aid should consult the appropriate section of the handbook.stmartin.MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY 241 GRADUATE PROGRAMS Some clinical experience in a reputable counseling facility.edu/social_science/mac. • Capacity for compassion and ability to be warm. A final expectation is what might be called the “person of the therapist. • Emotional maturity and readiness (this is not the same as “age”). appropriate social skills and excellent “people skills. Prospective students should carefully review the information posted there. students. 2) counseling experience connected to commercial services or products and/ or 3) personal therapy. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . personal growth and enrichment.” including the student’s suitability for the field of counseling and such characteristics as: • Ability to work with abstractions and applications of theory. • Non-discriminatory and non-ethnocentric attitudes and behavior. Students are expected to have professional goals that match the orientation of the program and to have adequate professional preparation for graduate study in counseling psychology.” • A tendency toward. www. Semester Desired Summer or Fall Fall.

WA 98503-7500. Degree candidate status is necessary to begin an internship. 5300 Pacific Avenue SE. Candidacy Status On completion of initial coursework. 512. After all materials are received. Students whose backgrounds closely match program objectives will be called for a prospective student interview. students may apply for degree candidate status. Grades lower than “B” cannot be considered for transfer credit. Admission to the graduate program does not guarantee admission to degree candidate status. MAC Program. Saint Martin’s University. Lacey. Possible outcomes include unequivocal admission.242 MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAMS Applicants must submit: • Completed graduate application form • Completed supplemental application questions • $35 application fee (non-refundable) • Two or three letters of recommendation. Program format Transfer Credit Generally. The courses must be taken in the last six years and prior to admission to the program. • Completion of an essay of 200-300 words. . 514. reasons for desiring entrance into the program. All application materials should be sent directly to: Administrative Assistant. 521 and 522 before applying for degree candidate status. Requests for transfer credit normally must be made no later than the end of the second semester in the program. a maximum of nine semester hours of graduate work may be considered for transfer credit. provisional admission. Courses considered for transfer credit must be graduate-level courses consistent with the educational goals of the MAC Program and must have been completed at another accredited college or university. preferably one from a previous teacher and another from a clinical supervisor • Copies of official transcripts from all colleges/universities attended • A written statement of four-to-six pages (typed/double spaced) in which the applicant describes his or her preparation for the program. 503. and career objectives. Initial Coursework All students must successfully complete a minimum of 18 semester hours of graduate coursework consisting of MAC 502. the applicant’s file will be reviewed. Degree candidacy status is not automatic. or non-acceptance. Admission to candidacy will be based on: • Grade point average in graduate courses.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY 243 • A letter of recommendation from a current student or alumnus/a who has been in the MAC program at least as long as the applicant. or who receive a grade of “C” in any single class. The candidate’s course of study is planned in consultation with program advisors. GRADUATE PROGRAMS The statute of limitations for completing degree requirements is seven years.0. Additional Information Further information and application forms may be obtained by contacting: Administrative Assistant. Lacey. will be placed on immediate academic probation and their candidacy reviewed by the core MAC faculty. 2) receives two grades of “C.” or 3) receives any grade lower than “C” in any class. WA 98503-7500. Saint Martin’s University. 5300 Pacific Avenue SE. www. who evaluate academic preparation and personal suitability of the student for a career in counseling. MAC students are expected to maintain a grade point average of 3. MAC Program.edu. telephone: 360-438-4560. Degree Requirements Degree candidates must complete the approved course of graduate study listed in the program requirements. A total of 48 credits is required for completion of the MAC program. normally will be withdrawn from the MAC program and from Saint Martin’s University.stmartin. Students whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 (“B” or better) in their coursework and to receive a grade of at least a “C+” in any MAC course.0 by the end of the next semester. • Recommendation of graduate instructors. Program Requirements Core Requirements (27 semester hours) • MAC 502 Group Therapy • MAC 503 Individual Therapy • MAC 512 Family Systems Therapy • MAC 514 Developmental Theory and Psychotherapy • MAC 521 Gender and Ethnicity • MAC 522 Treatment of Abusive Relationships • MAC 601 Psychopathology . Information on the MAC program also is available under the graduate academic programs section of the University website. Students who fail to take courses for more than three consecutive semesters may be asked to reapply to the program and re-enter under requirements current at the time the new application is submitted. A student who: 1) fails to return the GPA to a 3.

or a mental health therapist of equivalent status. a licensed clinical social worker. an M.244 MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAMS • MAC 602 Assessment and Treatment Planning • MAC 620 Ethical Practice in Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy Electives (15 semester hours from the courses listed below) • MAC 560 Therapy with Children • MAC 570 Counseling for Career Development • MAC 595/695 Special Topics • MAC 651 Treatment of Substance Abuse • MAC 661 Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum • MAC 670 Statistics and Research for Counselors • MAC 671 Expressive Therapies in Family Therapy • MAC 681 Sex Therapy • MAC 675 Advanced Clinical Skills Internship* (6 semester hours) • MAC 691 Counseling Internship I • MAC 692 Counseling Internship II * Only degree candidates are eligible for internships. students are required to have completed MAC 601 and MAC 602 (for a total of 24 hours of coursework) prior to beginning an internship. Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology Courses MAC 502 Group Therapy (3) Experiential course that provides both group membership and co-leadership roles. a licensed clinical psychologist. The therapist must be approved prior to beginning therapy. psychiatrist. stages of group development and change factors in group therapy. . Forms are available in the “current students” portion of the University’s MAC web page. Personal Therapy Requirement All MAC students are required to complete a minimum of 10 sessions of individual. a licensed marriage and family therapist.D. group or family therapy while in the program. for more detailed information). In addition. Therapy must be conducted by a licensed mental health counselor. This is true even for those students who have received some kind of therapy before entering Saint Martin’s University or those who intend to seek counseling after they have finished the MAC program. Focus on group theory and practice. This therapy is expected to take place during the first two semesters of the program. It must definitely take place before application for degree candidate status (see the University’s MAC web page.

MAC 514 Developmental Theory and Psychotherapy (3) Review of selected theories and models of human development. MAC 570 Counseling for Career Development (3) Provides in-depth inquiry into the process of career development. paradoxical. and the impact of ethnocultural roots on both therapist and client. test interpretation. MAC 602 Assessment and Treatment Planning (3) Conducting mental status exams. MAC 522 Treatment of Abusive Relationships (3) Psychosocial explanations for physical and sexual abuse.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY 245 MAC 503 Individual Therapy (3) Study of major techniques and theories of individual counseling. Personality and relationship issues in individual and family treatment. Includes student’s family of origin work. MAC 595/695 Special Topics (3) Course devoted to selected topics relevant to counseling psychology. solution-oriented. MAC 601 Psychopathology (3) Overview of the range of mental and personality disorders. narrative. Covers clinical techniques such as play therapy. art therapy and sandtray therapy. Includes mythopoetic approaches. strategic. and marital). Prerequisite: Psychopathology. multigenerational. Emphasis on developing counseling skills through role-playing. MAC 512 family Systems Therapy (3) Introduction to systemic perspective and major schools of family therapy (structural. Prerequisite: MAC 514. MAC 521 Gender and Ethnicity in Psychotherapy (3) Exploration of the mental health issues of men and women. Includes treatment considerations. Prerequisite: MAC 601. exam preparation and intensive career self-exploration. Includes practice in the diagnosis and differentiation of various psychopathologies using case examples. with emphasis on how developmental issues impact the counseling of clients. MAC 620 Ethical Practice in Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and family Therapy (3) Presents the knowledge necessary to provide counseling in an ethical and responsible manner and to operate within the ethical standards that guide practitioners in GRADUATE PROGRAMS . career counseling theories and tools. contracting for treatment and treatment planning. Familiarization with current diagnostic conventions and constructs (DSM). Prerequisite: MAC 503. experiential. MAC 560 Therapy with Children (3) Discusses developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

.246 MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE PROGRAMS the fields of mental health counseling and marriage and family therapy. Prerequisite: MAC 503. Prerequisite: MAC 512. 512. eating disorders and transference. Emphasis placed on counseling ethics and facilitating transition from structured classroom to the unsupervised world of the professional workplace. Explores common therapeutic issues such as bereavement. MAC 691 Counseling Internship I (3) Provides academic and clinical structure and supervision of an off-campus internship experience. Emphasis also placed on values and ethical issues of counseling. Prerequisite: MAC 512. Emphasizes the consumption of research and an overview of statistics for counselors and clinicians. Prerequisite: MAC 503. Includes psychopharmacology of alcohol and drugs. MAC 512. Therapist Interventions and the therapist as a person are considered. MAC 512 and MAC 522. Prerequisites: MAC 503. MAC 671 Expressive Therapies in family Therapy (3) Considers various innovative theories and expressive arts techniques. MAC 681 Sex Therapy (3) Major theoretical perspectives on sexual dynamics and dysfunctions. MAC 675 Advanced Clinical Skills (3) Course offers techniques in advanced clinical skills. MAC 692 Counseling Internship II (3) Continues the academic and clinical structure and supervision of an off-campus internship experience. MAC 651 Treatment of Substance Abuse (3) Advanced treatment planning and counseling methods in working with substance abuse clients. MAC 661 Marriage and family Therapy Practicum (3) In-depth coverage of advanced systems theories and supervised practice with clinical marriage and family therapy techniques. MAC 670 Statistics and Research for Counselors (3) Reviews both qualitative and quantitative methods. as well as standard clinical approaches to the treatment of sexual disorders.

guidance and counseling.” In addition to the core requirement. strands and electives. The Master in Teaching (MIT) degree is a post-baccalaureate option for individuals seeking residency teacher certification leading to a master’s degree. The number of semester hours varies with the strand a student chooses to follow (please see description below). special education. The program has three components: core. Director Kathleen Allen Huabin Chen Ann Gentle Mark Haddock Belinda Hill Cynthia Petersen Eileen Reilich Mina Ringenbach Maureen Siera Steve Siera Lou Therrell Dan Windisch The Master of Education degree provides teachers and future school counselors or administrators the opportunity to gain advanced professional skills in the areas of advanced teaching and learning. reading literacy. the graduate-level credits apply toward the MED degree. This option does not result in a master’s degree. and technology in education. The College of Education and Professional Psychology also offers the Post-baccalaureate Certification-only option for those who already have a baccalaureate degree. See the Professional Certification section for more information. and on subsequent application and successful admission to the Master of Education program. it is possible to combine a professional certification program with an MED.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF EDUCATION 247 MASTER Of EDUCATION (MED) faculty Fumie Hashimoto. For students wishing to earn professional certification. All MED and MIT degree candidates are required to take 11 semester hours of general courses called a “core. The MED is a 32-41 semester-hour degree offered during summers. English as a second language. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . students choose from either a thesis option or a non-thesis option. the latter requiring 1-2 additional graduate-level courses (3-6 credits) beyond the requirements for the thesis option. On satisfactory completion of residency certification. principal or program administrator. Once these courses start. evenings and weekends. although an individual can apply some coursework to either the MED or MIT degree. Post-baccalaureate Certification-only candidates may choose to register for graduate credit for several select courses rather than enroll in the courses’ undergraduate equivalents. candidates will not be permitted to change registration.

• A completed teacher certification program acceptable to the State of Washington. NOTE: Rules. These courses must be acceptable for graduate credit and typically are taken from courses offered in education. .248 MASTER OF EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS Elective courses are selected to complete required credit hours. they may include undergraduate (with prior approval only) or graduate courses from other departments. policies and procedures determined by state and national policymakers may take precedence over the contents of this catalog for certification/ endorsements. or an intention to complete the school counselor ESA certificate. NOTE: The ESA school counseling certificate does not require teacher certification in the State of Washington. • Advanced Teaching and Learning • English as a Second Language (includes partial endorsement) • Guidance and Counseling (includes Educational Staff Associate – ESA – certification) • Principal/Program Administrator (includes Administration-Principal or Program Administrator certification) • Reading Literacy (includes partial endorsement) • Special Education (includes partial endorsement) • Technology in Education Admission Applicants. usually under contract in a state-accredited school. and/or certification). normally have had at least one year of relevant work experience in the field of education. A strand requires between four and nine courses (16 to 29 semester hours).0 GPA on undergraduate work and either a score of 850 on the verbal plus quantitative sections of the GRE or 386 on the MAT (35 if taken prior to October 2004). Strand Areas The Master of Education degree has seven strand options (areas of emphasis. regulations. applicants must have at least a 3. except for those applying to the guidance and counseling strand. For regular admission. Those not meeting these criteria may be admitted provisionally. All applicants for admission must meet the following requirements: • A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. Other work experience involving students is considered on an individual basis. partial endorsements. However.

0. • Have completed MED 601 (or be enrolled in MED 601 during the semester in which the application is submitted). GRADUATE PROGRAMS All application forms. 5300 Pacific Avenue SE. colleges and universities attended • Score on either the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test. Lacey. test scores and the fees should be mailed to: College of Education and Professional Psychology. • Have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3. letters of recommendation. Infant and Child) • Two copies of official transcripts from all schools. taken within the last five years • An on-site essay of approximately 400 words describing how your master’s program will contribute to your professional development and aid in achieving your professional goals • A professional or work experience vitae Submission dates for priority consideration are June 1 for fall semester. • Formed a Supervisory Committee. • Be in good standing. 1 for spring and March 1 for summer. Saint Martin’s University. . To be a degree candidate. Master of Education Degree Requirements A candidate working toward a Master of Education degree must be accepted as a degree candidate. WA 98503-7500.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF EDUCATION 249 Application Applicants must submit the following materials to be considered for admission: • Saint Martin’s University graduate application form • College of Education and Professional Psychology application packet and $35 processing fee • Forms contained within the application packet • A color photograph • Three letters of recommendation from professionals who have knowledge of your potential to do graduate-level work. the student must: • Have completed 15 semester hours of graduate study. Degree candidates must complete an approved course of 32-41 semester hours to secure their degree. including a recommendation from an immediate supervisor • Current fingerprints (within the last two years) • Valid first aid and CPR card (Adult. Nov.

The student may apply for reinstatement. MED Requirements Core Requirements (11 hours required) • MED 601 Educational Research Methods I (3) • MED 607 Foundations for Educational Practice (3) • MED 605 Diversity and Social Context (3) • MED 559 Introduction to Exceptionality (2) -or• MED 561 Instructional Strategies for the Exceptional Learner (2) Exit Options • Thesis Option: • MED 699 Final Project/Thesis (3) -or• Non-Thesis Option: • MED 690 Integrating Seminar (1) • One or two additional graduate-level elective courses in education (3-6) • Satisfactory completion of Comprehensive Examinations . and carries a grade of “B” or better. provided the work fits the program plan. Candidates who receive a grade of “C” will be placed on academic probation and their candidacy reviewed by the Graduate Program Advisory Committee. Courses of study are planned in consultation with a program advisor and may not be changed without prior approval. The time limit for completion of degree requirements is seven years. Candidates having an initial or residency certificate may coordinate the MED degree with requirements for continuing certification. in addition to selected master’s degree courses. A candidate who receives a grade lower than “C” or two grades of “C” will be withdrawn from the program.250 MASTER OF EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS A student working toward a Master of Education degree leading to additional certification must complete all certification and endorsement requirements. Degree candidates are expected to receive a grade of at least a “B” in all courses. Nine semester hours of graduate work may be taken at another institution and transferred. is recommended by the program advisor. is approved by the director of master’s programs in education. Graduate students pursuing the professional teacher certificate should discuss their program with their advisor. Students already enrolled in the masters program must receive the appropriate approvals for transfer credit prior to enrolling in the courses to be transferred. Students applying for program admission must request to have prior graduate study considered for transfer into the program prior to admission.

Principal/Program Administrator Strand (36-39 total semester hours. including 18 hours in the strand) • MED 506 Curriculum and Instruction (2) -or • MED 635 Inquiry Development (2) • MED 630 Creative Thinking and Problem-solving (3) • MED 631 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) • MED 633 Models of Teaching (3) • MED 538 Literature for Children and Young Adults (2) • Approved Electives (5) b. Advanced Teaching and Learning Strand (32-36 total semester hours.MASTER OF EDUCATION 251 GRADUATE PROGRAMS Specialization Strands (one strand required) A. English as a Second Language/ English Language Learner Strand (32-36 total semester hours. Guidance and Counseling Strand (40-41 total semester hours. including 18 hours in the strand) • MED 525 Issues & Trends in ELL & BE (3) • MED 526 Language Acquisition Methods (3) • MED 527 Social Linguistics and People: Theory and Practice (3) • MED 528 Reading Instruction for English Language Learners (3) • MED 566 Assessment in Special Education (3) • MED 597 Directed Practicum: ESL/BE Internship (3) C. including 26 semester hours in the strand) • MED 642 Group Processes (3) • MAC 503 Individual Counseling (3) -or- • MED 641 Individual Counseling (3) • MED 640 Guidance and Counseling (3) • MED 644 High School and Career Counseling (3) • MED 545 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3) • MED 646 Assessment and Current Issues in School Counseling (3) • MED 648 Elementary and Middle School Counseling (3) • MED 649 Internship in School Counseling (5) D. including 22 hours in the strand) • MED 631 Curriculum Development (3) GRADUATE PROGRAMS • MAC 502 Group Counseling (3) -or- .

252 MASTER OF EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS • MED 650 Professional Development Evaluation and Supervision (3) • MED 653 Principles of Leadership (3) • MED 654 Principal as Leader of Learning Community (3) • MED 655 School and Community Relations (2) • MED 656 Educational Finance (2) • MED 657 School Law for Educational Administrators (2) • MED 659 Principal/Administrative Leadership Internship (2. including 12 semester hours in the strand and seven semester hours of electives) • MED 512 Technology for the Classroom (2) • MED 513 Multimedia and Production for Educators (3) . Reading Literacy Strand (32-36 total semester hours. and Phonics Instruction: From Theory to Practice (3) • MED 673 Strategies for Reading Improvement K-12 (3) • MED 674 Literature Across the Curriculum (3) • MED 675 Literacy Assessment and Evaluation (3) • MED 678 Literacy Leadership (2) • Elective (2) f. 2) E. Special Education Strand (36 total semester hours. including 12 semester hours in strand and six hours of electives approved by the director of special education • MED 563 Management Strategies for Exceptional Learners (3) • MED 565 Transitions to Adulthood for Special Populations (3) • MED 566 Assessment in Special Education (3) • MED 567 Legal Issues and the IEP (3) • Approved electives noted below (6) G. • • • • • MED 569 Practicum in Special Education (3) MED 577 Reading Diagnosis (4) MED 526 Lang Acquisition Methods (3) MED 524 Early Childhood Education (3) (for Elementary) MED 545 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3) (for Secondary) Technology in Education Strand (32-36 total semester hours. Spelling. 18 semester hours in the strand) • MED 671 Philosophy of Reading (2) • MED 672 Writing.

a case study) and will be accompanied by a quality research study and thesis. GRADUATE PROGRAMS Thesis Option: MED and MIT Programs . • The thesis/project should make a significant contribution to the candidate and/or his or her immediate professional position.MASTER OF EDUCATION 253 GRADUATE PROGRAMS • MED 514 Network Systems for Educators (3) • MED 590 Internship in K-12 Schools (3) • Approved electives (7) Electives (Select from choices below. A 400 hour internship and comprehensive examination are required for the guidance and counseling strand/ESA certificate. with permission of advisor and instructor) • ED courses listed in any strand. The thesis/field project must be developed in consultation with the candidate’s advisor. a curriculum guide.. • The thesis/project cannot be approved on an ex-post-facto basis. well-researched product (e. A 540 hour internship over 2 semesters is required for the principal and program administrator strand/certificate. It will be characterized in the following way: • The nature of the thesis/project will demonstrate advanced competency related to the area of specialization. • The development of the thesis/project will show significant effort above and beyond normal employment expectations of an employer. or M • ED 511 Methods of Teaching Math (may not duplicate ED 411) M • ED 515 Methods of Teaching Science (may not duplicate ED 415) M • ED 518 Methods of Teaching Social Studies (may not duplicate ED 418 M • ED 519 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (may not duplicate ED 419 M • ED 571 Educational Law (may not duplicate ED 371) M • ED 580 Readings in Education M • ED 584 Secondary Methods (may not duplicate ED 484) M • ED 586 Living and Learning – Middle School (may not duplicate ED 486) M • ED 595 Directed Study M • ED 597 Directed Practicum M • ED 623 The Gifted Child M • ED 643 Assessment and Appraisal M The MED and MIT thesis options require a thesis or field project as part of the degree. • The thesis/project will result in a usable. a movie.g. as well as a more general contribution to the field. a written document.

The comprehensive exam required for the guidance and counseling/ ESA certification substitutes for three specialty hours of the non-thesis written exam. Professional Certification Washington has a two-tier certification system. The courses must be acceptable for graduate credit and typically are taken from courses offered in education. materials and/or procedures having potential usefulness to the educational community as well as to answer questions related to the thesis. In Washington.254 MASTER IN TEACHING GRADUATE PROGRAMS Once the final thesis/project is completed and approved. MED 597. Non-Thesis Option: MED and MIT The MED and MIT non-thesis options require 1-2 additional graduate-level courses (3-6 credits) beyond the requirements for the thesis option. teachers are required to earn a professional certificate within five years of gaining continuing employment as a teacher with a residency certificate. MASTER IN TEACHING (MIT) faculty Steve Siera. the candidate will present the thesis/project at a public seminar. MED 595. they may include undergraduate (with prior approval only) or graduate courses from other departments. This oral defense is a sharing of information. MED 590. Director Kathleen Allen Huabin Chen Ann Gentle Mark Haddock Fumie Hashimoto Belinda Hill Cynthia Petersen Eileen Reilich Mina Ringenbach Maureen Siera Lou Therrell Dan Windisch . The non-thesis option also requires six hours of written comprehensive exams (three hours for the core and three hours for the specialty area) and two hours of an oral comprehensive exam. However. These elective courses may be from any strand area but may not include MED 580. Saint Martin’s provides some support for master’s degree students pursuing ProTeach assessment as an option. The professional certificate is a second level of teaching certificate earned after the residency (first level) certificate. Individuals desiring additional information about the Professional Certification program should contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology office.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 255 MASTER IN TEACHING The Master in Teaching (MIT) degree is approved by the Washington State Professional Educator Standards Board. The residency teacher education program (including the MIT), which is designed to prepare teacher candidates to become outstanding P-12 professionals, was granted initial accreditation by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) for a period of five years from June 2008 to June 2013. This accreditation certifies that the forenamed professional education program has provided evidence that the program adheres to TEAC’s quality principles. Students completing the elementary, secondary or special education programs are eligible for state certification. To ensure eligibility, it is sometimes necessary to make program revisions if the Washington State Board of Education makes changes in certificate requirements. Any changed state requirements take precedence over requirements outlined in this catalog. The Master in Teaching degree provides the opportunity for simultaneously earning residency teacher certification and a master’s degree. Residency certification can be obtained in the areas of:
• Elementary Education • Secondary Education -and/or• Special Education

During the professional sequence, students gain knowledge and skills essential to effective teaching and participate in varied field experiences in school classrooms. University faculty and local school district teachers and administrators participate in the program and contribute to its quality and relevance. The Master in Teaching option is a 45-73 semester hour degree offered during days, evenings, summers and weekends. The number of semester hours varies with the specific endorsement: elementary education is 63-65 semester hours in length; secondary education is 45-51 semester hours; and special education, 67-73 semester hours. In addition to these total required hours, the student may need to complete pre-requirements and/ or endorsement courses.

Competency-based Endorsements
All candidates are required to complete two competency-based endorsements of 30 or more semester hours each. Course requirements may be satisfied by coursework completed at a regionally accredited, state-approved college or university with a grade of “C” or better; approved waiver documentation for previous life and/or work experience; and/or successfully passing the appropriate WEST-E exams. Candidates for a secondary endorsement (grades 5-12) are required to have an academic major or equivalent (30 semester-hour minimum) in the area in which they intend to be endorsed. Students seeking MIT certification can be recommended only in the field of their major and in fields for which they meet state requirements for added endorsements.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

256 MASTER IN TEACHING GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Authorized Endorsements
Saint Martin’s has been authorized by the Washington State Board of Education to offer teacher certificate competency-based endorsements in the following fields: biology, bilingual education, chemistry, drama, early childhood education, early childhood special education, elementary education, English language arts, English Language Learner, French, health/fitness, history, Japanese, mathematics, middle-level humanities, middle-level math, middle-level science, choral music, instrumental music, general music, reading, science, social studies, Spanish and special education. Contact an education advisor for assistance in developing an approved endorsement program.

Endorsement Requirements
For Washington State teacher education endorsements, please refer to the requirements as outlined in the undergraduate College of Education and Professional Psychology section of this catalog.

Admission
All applicants for admission to the MIT degree must meet the following requirements: • Possession of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. • Submission of the following materials: • Saint Martin’s graduate application form • College of Education and Professional Psychology application packet and $35 application fee • Forms contained within the application packet • Current fingerprints (within last two years) • A color photograph • Three letters of recommendation from professionals, including a recommendation from an immediate supervisor, who have knowledge of your potential to do graduate level work • Two copies of official transcripts from all schools, colleges and universities attended • Score on either the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test, taken within the last five years • An on-site essay of approximately 400 words describing how your master’s program will contribute to your professional development and aid in achieving your professional goals • A professional or work experience vitae • Valid first aid and CPR card • West-B Tests (passing scores on all three tests) All application forms, letters of recommendation, test scores and fees should be delivered to: College of Education and Professional Psychology, Saint Martin’s University, 5300 Pacific Avenue SE, Lacey, WA 98503-7500.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 257 MASTER IN TEACHING For regular admission, applicants must have at least a 3.0 GPA on undergraduate work and a score of 850 on the verbal plus quantitative sections of the GRE or 386 on the MAT (or 35 if taken prior to October 2004). Applicants who do not meet these criteria may be admitted provisionally.

Application Procedures
Candidates must apply for formal admission to the MIT before or during the semester in which they complete the pre-professional sequence of courses required for admission. Submission dates for priority consideration are June 1 for fall semester, November 1 for spring and March 1 for summer. Admission requires a grade of at least “C” (2.00) in each of the required pre-professional courses, an overall grade point average of 3.0 (“B”), demonstrated competency in basic skill areas (oral and written expression, mathematics) and scores that meet state requirements on standardized tests. Students should contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology office to obtain application packets. Students should review prerequisites of all courses required for admission to the MIT. Students who pre-register will be processed on the assumption that they will satisfactorily complete all coursework currently being taken.

Master in Teaching Degree Requirements
A student working toward a master in teaching degree must be accepted as a degree candidate. To be a degree candidate, the student must have:
• Completed 15 semester hours of graduate study. • Be in good standing. • Earned a cumulative GPA of 3.0. • Completed MED 601 (or be enrolled in MED 601 during the semester in which the application is submitted). • Formed a supervisory committee.

Degree Degree candidates must complete an approved course of 45-73 graduate-level semester hours to secure their degree. Courses of study are planned in consultation with a program advisor and may not be changed without prior approval. Degree candidates are expected to receive a grade of at least a “B” in all courses. Candidates who receive a grade of “C” will be placed on academic probation and their candidacy reviewed by the graduate program advisory committee. A student who receives a grade lower than “C” or two grades of “C” or whose overall grade point average falls below 3.0 will be automatically withdrawn from the MIT degree option. The student may apply for reinstatement. The time limit for completion of degree requirements is seven years. Nine semester hours of graduate work may be taken at another institution and transferred, provided the work fits the program plan; is recommended by the program advisor; is approved by the director of master’s programs in education; and carries a grade of “B” or better. Students applying for program admission must request to have

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

258 MASTER IN TEACHING GRADUATE PROGRAMS prior graduate study considered for transfer into the program prior to admission. Students already enrolled in the masters program must receive the appropriate approvals for transfer credit prior to enrolling in the courses to be transferred. Ordinarily, courses in professional education completed more than seven years before admission or readmission do not meet professional requirements. Students may need to repeat all or part of these courses or document current knowledge/skills before student teaching.

MIT Requirements
Pre-Professional Courses (required before formal admission) • ENG 101 College Writing I
• ENG 102 College Writing II • SPH 106 Public Address -or- THR 211 Acting I • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology • Mathematics course above MTH 101 • CSC 160 Computer Applications and Issue • Natural science, with laboratory (elementary) • U.S. History (elementary) • World History (elementary)

Core Courses for Elementary, Secondary or Special Education Options (11 semester hours; must be taken at the graduate level) • MED 601 Educational Research Methods I (3)
• MED 607 Foundations for Educational Practice (3) • MED 605 Diversity and Social Context (3) • MED 559 Introduction to Exceptionality (2) -or• MED 561 Instructional Strategies for the Exceptional Learner (2)

Exit Options • Thesis Option: • MED 699 Final Project/Thesis (3) -or• Non-Thesis Option: • MED 690 Integrating Seminar (1) • One or two graduate-level elective courses in education* (3-6) • Satisfactory completion of Comprehensive Examinations

basic Certification Core Courses for Elementary, Secondary or Special Education Options (35 semester hours; must be taken at the graduate level) • MED 506 Curriculum and Instruction (2)

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 259 MASTER IN TEACHING
• MED 512 Technology for the Classroom (2) • MED 560 Classroom Management (2) • MED 561 Instructional Strategies for the Exceptional Learner (2) (if not taken as part of graduate core) • MED 570 Classroom Assessment (2) • MED 571 Educational Law (1) • MED 583 Issues of Abuse/Teacher as Counselor (1) • MED 593 and/or 594 and/or 596 Internship (12) • MED 598 Internship Seminar (1)

Elementary Methods Courses (18 semester hours — required in addition to the basic and core courses listed above; courses previously taken at the undergraduate level may apply) • MED 511 Methods of Teaching Math (3)
• MED 515 Methods of Teaching Science (3) • MED 518 Methods of Teaching Social Studies (2) • MED 519 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (2) • MED 529 Arts and Movement (4) • MED 538 Child and Adolescent Literature (2) • MED 574 Primary Reading/Writing (1) • MED 576 Reading Content Area for Elementary Teachers (1)

• MED 584 General Secondary Methods with Practicum (4) • MED 585 Content Area Reading for Secondary Teachers (1) • MED XXX Content-specific Methods Courses

Special Education Methods Courses (25 semester hours — required in addition to the basic and core courses listed above; courses previously taken at the undergraduate level may apply)
• MED 563 Management Strategies for Exceptional Learners (3) • MED 565 Transitions to Adulthood for Special Populations (3) • MED 566 Assessment in Special Education (3) • MED 567 Legal Issues and the IEP (3) • MED 524 Issues and Trends in ECE (3) -or- MED 526 Methods of Language Acquisition (ESL) (3) • MED 577 Reading Diagnosis (4)

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Secondary Methods Courses (6 semester hours — required in addition to the basic and core courses listed above; courses previously taken at the undergraduate level may apply; additional methods may be required for individual endorsements) • MED 582 Reading Assessment and Intervention for Secondary Teachers (1)

260 MASTER IN TEACHING GRADUATE PROGRAMS
• MED 545 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3) • MED 569 Practicum in Special Education (3)

Special Education Endorsement (Grades Preschool-12)
The University’s Special Education endorsement prepares teachers to work with mildly or moderately handicapped students in an inclusionary classroom, a resource room or a self-contained special education class. Completion of the required courses for the endorsement will lead to an institutional recommendation that the student be endorsed in special education. NOTE: Completion of the special education MIT and/or endorsement leads to a special education endorsement. That endorsement does not allow the certificate holder to teach in a regular elementary or secondary classroom. Therefore, students also must complete the required elementary or secondary sequence, including at least eight weeks of internship in a regular classroom. The section concerning endorsements applies to the special education program as well as the elementary program. To ensure proper sequencing of courses, students planning to enter the Master in Teaching program must consult an advisor from the College of Education and Professional Psychology prior to taking courses at the University.

Thesis Option: MED and MIT
The MED and MIT thesis option requires a thesis or field project as part of the degree. A practicum and comprehensive examination is required for the guidance and counseling strand/educational staff associate (ESA) certificate (thesis and non-thesis options). The thesis/field project must be developed in consultation with the student’s advisor. It will be characterized in the following way:
• The nature of the thesis/project will demonstrate advanced competency related to the area of specialization. • The development of the thesis/project will show significant effort above and beyond the normal workload of the candidate • The thesis/project will result in a usable, well-researched product (such as a written document, a curriculum guide, a movie, a case study) and be accompanied by a quality research study and thesis. • The thesis/project should make a significant contribution to the candidate and/or his or her immediate professional position, and a more general contribution to the field. • The thesis/project cannot be approved on an ex-post-facto basis.

Once the final thesis/project is completed and approved, the student will present the thesis/project at a public seminar. This oral defense is a sharing of information, materials and/or procedures having potential usefulness to the educational community as well as to answer questions related to the thesis.

Candidates are asked to convey special placement requests at that time. Education programs staff will work diligently to obtain a placement for student teaching.GRADUATE PROGRAMS 261 MASTER IN TEACHING Non-Thesis Option: MED and MIT The MED and MIT non-thesis option requires 1-2 additional graduate-level courses (three to six credits) beyond the requirements for the thesis option. 590. The non-thesis option also requires six hours of written comprehensive exams (three hours for the core and three hours for the specialty area) and two hours of an oral comprehensive exam. 597. However. or during a particular semester. Saint Martin’s College of Education and Professional Psychology placement offices make no guarantees for student teaching placement in a particular school district or school building. but the University ultimately makes the internship assignments in cooperation with school district personnel. University supervisors will discuss individual placement problems with students. These elective courses can be from any strand area but may not include MED 580. To do so may jeopardize placement at that school and/or district and may result in termination of any/all field experience placements in that district for the student. Students may not be placed in the same school in which a spouse or family member is employed. with a particular cooperating teacher or University supervisor. normally requiring seven hours a day in the school plus additional time for class preparation and seminars. they may include undergraduate (with prior approval only) or graduate courses from other departments. application for supervised internship must be made by the deadline for the internship (contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology office for specific deadline dates). but final acceptance of a student teacher is the prerogative of the school district. The course must be acceptable for graduate credit and typically are taken from courses offered in education. Internship All teacher certification programs require supervised student teaching/internship. Students may not make special arrangements on their own. To facilitate placement. GRADUATE PROGRAMS Completion of an application for intern teaching and assignment to a school or classroom are tentative and are based on successful completion of coursework in progress. A student is expected to complete all required professional courses and be accepted into candidacy before applying for the internship. All internship assignments are considered full-time work. 595. Students may be withdrawn from intern teaching at the discretion of the College of Education and Professional Psychology faculty or of the administrators of the P-12 school. .

the Post-baccalaureate certification-only option at Saint Martin’s University provides the opportunity to earn Washington State residency teacher certification without earning a master’s degree. students are not permitted to change registration between the undergraduate and graduate course levels. The “equal work but less credit” split-level courses therefore adjust for graduate credit earned. Master’s Degrees in Education Courses Split-Level Course Requirements Many courses offered in the master of education and master in teaching programs have an undergraduate level offered concurrently with the graduate level course. On satisfactory completion of the certification sequence and subsequent application and successful admission to the Master of Education program.g.. Graduate core split level courses (e. Graduate students will also be required to analyze or perform research or accept greater leadership in the course content. . Courses at the 600 level are designed to be offered for graduate credit only. ED 306/MED 506) are typically one credit less than the undergraduate section. graduate students will be expected to complete additional requirements. In split-level courses for which undergraduate and graduate students earn the same credit. summers and weekends.262 MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES GRADUATE PROGRAMS POST-bACCALAUREATE CERTIfICATIONONLY OPTION For those who already have a baccalaureate degree. Once these courses start. Those interested in the program should consult the catalog’s undergraduate section for application and certification requirements. evenings. the graduate-level credits will apply toward the MED degree. The option is a 48-67 semester-hour non-degree sequence offered during days. The total number of semester hours varies with the endorsement: Elementary Education • 58-59 semester hours (includes certification and an elementary endorsement Secondary Education • 48-49 semester hours (includes certification and a secondary content area endorsement) Special Education • 65-66 semester hours (includes certification and a SED endorsement) NOTE: Pre-requirements and/or endorsement courses may be in addition to these totals. Split-level courses are numbered at the 500 level. Students in this option can register for graduate credit for several select courses rather than for their undergraduate equivalents.

Students will create home pages for themselves and participate in the creation of pages for the Saint Martin’s website. MED 512 Technology for the Classroom (2) Emphasis on how to integrate computers and other technologies into classroom teaching. photography and posters. digital cameras and video cameras. materials. MED 515 Methods of Teaching Science (3) Objectives. Prerequisite: MED 512. teaching strategies and integrated knowledge and skills of mathematics for elementary teachers. Prerequisite: MED 512 or equivalent. along with other multimedia models/techniques. Emphasis on theory.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES 263 MED 506 Curriculum and Instruction (2) Multiple approaches to curriculum and instruction emphasizing becoming a reflective teacher. issues and trends in an information age. Prerequisite: Acceptance as a teacher certification candidate. Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements. Prerequisite: MED 506. methods and curriculum for teaching preschool-grade 8 mathematics. animation. models. Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements and Grade Level Expectations. Emphasis on development of a thematic unit with lesson design based on state and national standards. methods and curriculum for teaching preschool-grade 8 science. Class discussions will focus on teaching philosophies. MED 514 Network Systems for Educators (3) Exploration of management information systems development. sequencing. Emphasis on development of electronic portfolio. and network systems as they pertain to the preschool-grade 12 school environment. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . materials. Principles of organizing. delivering. selection and organization of materials and equipment. techniques and administrative procedures. scanner. Emphasis on theory. laserdiscs. are used to creatively express a view of the world. evaluating instruction. space use. Ways to incorporate these techniques into the classroom will be explored. Includes a 10-hour observation and instruction practicum in primary-grade 8 mathematics. Course content will incorporate the objectives and functions of a school’s technology center. cartoons. Exploration of teaching methods such as cooperative learning. Students will create an advanced integrated multimedia project. MED 513 Multimedia Production for Educators (3) Classroom applications of multimedia hardware and peripherals such as CD-ROMs. concept development and inquiry learning. Students will develop curriculum and classroom materials using e-mail. internet and selected software. teaching strategies and integrated knowledge and skills of science for elementary teachers. MED 511 Methods of Teaching Math (3) Objectives. Book production. Includes a 10-hour observation and instruction practicum in primarygrade 8 science. Prerequisite: MED 506. rather than computer skills themselves. including budget preparation.

classroom environment and promotion of social competence. as will the relationship of family and community to the student. Prerequisite: MED 506. including program models. assessment. MED 519 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (2) Objectives. and politics involving ELL and Bilingual Education. map-globe interpretation and content specified in the Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements for grades primary-12.264 MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES GRADUATE PROGRAMS MED 518 Methods of Teaching Social Studies (2) Introduces specific methods used in preschool-grade 8 to teach social studies. Includes a 10-hour instructional practicum in primary-grade 8 language arts. what the study of language tells us about the human mind and the relation of language to its cultural and educational context. Emphasis on integrated thematic unit planning. Uses English-as-a-Second-Language. curriculum and assessment specific to early childhood education will be reviewed. Involvement of parents. bilingual education and foreign language strategies. Methods. Prerequisite: MED 506. Prerequisite: MED 506. Course requires a 10-hour observation and instruction practicum in primary-grade 12 social studies. methods and curriculum for teaching listening. speaking. MED 527 Social Linguistics and People: Theory and Practice (3) The course concerns the nature of human language. mainstream teachers and others who do not have ESOL or bilingual training in educating English Language Learners will be included. materials. theories and history of language acquisition. discussions will include evaluating the historical. political. MED 559 or concurrent enrollment. Additionally. Students will be able to apply language acquisition theories and develop personal teaching styles. Emphasis on theory. The scope of the course is interdisciplinary and the topics explored reach . MED 525 Issues and Trends in English Language Learners and bilingual Education (3) Examination of the educational theories. practice and research related to the education of English Language Learners (ELL) and Bilingual Education. MED 524 Early Childhood Education (3) Important issues related to teaching preschool-3 will be emphasized. MED 526 Language Acquisition Methods (3) Course focuses on developing student’s proficiency-oriented teaching style. Prerequisites: MED 506. Resources for continuing professional development in the fields of second language instruction and bilingual education will be provided. teaching strategies and integrated knowledge and skills of language arts for elementary teachers. social/cultural. school community. This course presents issues pertaining to educating English Language Learners. Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements and Grade Level Expectations. Prerequisite: MED 506. exploring various methodologies. and linguistic issues involved in meeting the needs of students who are speakers of languages other than English. English language learner. writing and reading in grades kindergarten-8. MED 526.

MED 545 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3) Examines pharmacology. legal and social implications of the exceptional student from an integrated. reading and writing. MED 538 Literature for Children and Young Adults (2) Nature. Students will create and participate in arts experiences for the class and others. history and sources of children’s books. MED 528 Reading Instruction of English Language Learners (3) The course provides knowledge of various methods of instruction for ELL/bilingual education students with emphasis on techniques for effective instruction and assessment of oral language development. students begin to create personal philosophy of management. socialization patterns and educational opportunity will be studied. delivering and evaluating instruction for exceptional learners. MED 529 Arts and Movement (4) This course explores the elements.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES 265 beyond the boundaries of linguistics to other scientific disciplines that constitute the field of cognitive science: psycholinguistics. using ELL/bilingual education strategies. music and creative movement for the elementary classroom. The impact of social context factors such as race. anthropology and artificial intelligence. learning styles. Examination of the educational theories. Prerequisite: MED 506. reading. knowledge bases. strategy-based pedagogical perspective. counseling and referral of students with drug and alcohol problems. sequencing. MED 561 Instructional Methods of Exceptional Learners (2) Principles of organizing. principles and pedagogy of visual art. gender and economic status on social linguistics. philosophy of language and the mind. Ten hours of classroom experience are required as a part of the course. drama. Includes. Effective methods for teaching content-area material such as reading. Prerequisite: MED 506 or concurrent enrollment. Development of appropriate and diverse classrooms and curriculum will be emphasized. MED 560 Classroom Management (2) Through an understanding of current theories and practices in classroom management. Required for elementary certification. but is not limited to. English and English/language arts endorsements. Prerequisite: MED 506. strategies for individual and group behavior and instruction developed through systematic application of specific models. Students develop multicultural curriculum to support language learning. practice and research related to the education of diverse populations. Prerequisites: MED 506. Prerequisite: MED 506. counseling approaches and school programs related to the school counselors’ role in prevention. MED 526. culture. ethnicity. special education. MED 559 Introduction to Exceptionality (2) Introduction to philosophical. A 10-hour practicum is required. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . historical.

Also covered are state and national trends in assessment and testing. Strategies for organization. Observation of school-based assessment techniques and practical application of learned techniques is required. alternative assessments. or concurrent enrollment. Prerequisite: MED 559. MED 563 Management Strategies for Exceptional Learners (3) Strategies for individual and group behavior/ instructional management. MED 569 Practicum in Special Education (3) Observation.266 MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES GRADUATE PROGRAMS math or science. Various competencies developed in systematic application of specific models for exceptional learners. small group instruction and assessment of exceptional learners in public and private sectors. Prerequisite: MED 566 and MED 559. MED 566 Assessment in Special Education (3) Study of professional practice in special education assessment. assessment management technology and conferencing skills. including ecological. MED 565 Transitions to Adulthood for Special Populations (3) Examines the educational transition from school-based special education programs to independent living or agency-supported living for differently abled people through presentation and discussion of current literature. . norm-and criterion-referenced testing. Prerequisites: MED 506. Prerequisites: MED 506. grading. administration and participation with families and other significant parties are included. classroom and curriculum-based assessment. Selecting and adapting curriculum. school personnel and outside agencies are emphasized. Prerequisite: Minimum of 3. educational statistics. norm. MED 559.33 grade point average in three prior Special Education courses. MED 570 Classroom Assessment (2) Students learn how to construct and evaluate classroom assessments to assess student learning. Prerequisite: MED 570. field-based participatory research. standardized tests. MED 567 Legal Issues and the IEP (3) Comprehensive study of federal and state regulations on populations.and criterion-referenced tests. Communicative ethics and collaborative strategies joining families. MED 559. on-site visits and other appropriate formats. and alternative assessment strategies. Prerequisite: MED 506. diagnostic instruments and procedures. MED 559.

miscue analysis and other assessment tools. The five components of reading (phonemic awareness. MED 574. MED 576 Content-area Reading for Elementary Teachers (1) This course is planned to facilitate the application of specific reading and writing strategies to assist comprehension of printed materials in all subject areas by students at all levels of reading. tenure. MED 575 Reader-Writer Workshop (3) The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the reader-writer workshop approach to teaching reading and writing as an integrated process for K-8 students. MED 574 and MED 576. MED 576. Prerequisites: MED 519. MED 580 Readings in Education (1-2) An independent readings course for students with special needs. Prerequisite: MED 519. Prerequisites: MED 519. Reading list to be developed by student and advisor. This practicum serves as an opportunity to observe and practice instructional activities in reading in an extended field experience. Students learn when and how to use various assessments and instructional strategies to help struggling readers. academic freedom and student issues of compulsory education. Prerequisite: MED 519. MED 574 and MED 576. planning and implementing instruction. MED 577 Reading Diagnosis (4) Explores the area of reading disabilities. and comprehension) are applied to the teaching of beginning reading. MED 574 Primary Reading/Writing Instruction (1) This course explores the reading and writing process as it pertains to the teaching of beginning reading. content and strategies of phonemic awareness. vocabulary and comprehension) are used in planning strategy lessons for use with students. Reading behavior is analyzed using informal reading inventories. MED 579 Reading Practicum (3) The purpose of this course is to apply theoretical knowledge learned in the reading program. Prerequisites: MED 519 or permission of instructor. MED 572 Integrated Approach to Phonics and Spelling (2) An in-depth exploration of the theoretical rationale and research base for the learning and teaching of the reading skills. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . vocabulary. teachers’ employment. State agencies and local school boards. diagnosing children. Prerequisites: MED 519. Restricted enrollment. phonics. Prerequisite: Graduate status. university issues and law. Major components of reading (fluency. MED 574 and MED 576. Students participate in a weekly tutoring experience.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES 267 MED 571 Educational Law (1) Fulfills new Washington State requirements for understanding educational law and its relationship to contemporary school issues and problems. phonics and spelling as they are integrated into the reading program in elementary school. fluency.

Prerequisite: MED 506. Includes 45 hours structured observation and teaching experience in a high school and concurrent seminar. MED 582 Reading Assessment and Intervention for Secondary Teachers (1) This course focuses on the reading behaviors of secondary students. Prerequisite: Acceptance to Added Endorsement Program. teaching experience. Prerequisites: MED 506. either working in a reading program and/or tutoring a struggling student. MED 574. Includes a minimum of two observations by a University supervisor using the Washington State Performancebased Pedagogy Assessment.268 MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES GRADUATE PROGRAMS MED 581 Issues and Trends in Literacy Instruction (3) This course is designed as a student-centered forum in which students take a leadership role in the study and discussion of current reading topics and current research in literacy education. and MED 585 or concurrent enrollment. organization and specific middle school teaching methods. and reflection in a P-12 setting in the added endorsement field. . vocabulary and comprehension) are used in planning strategy lessons for use with students. This course facilitates the application of specific reading and writing strategies to assist comprehension of expository materials in all subject areas by students at all levels of reading. Students will explore the reading process and examine their own reading behaviors. Includes a 30-hour practicum designed to integrate observation and teaching at the middle-school level. Students are required to participate in a secondary school. and MED 576. MED 584 Secondary Methods/Practica (4) Students learn varied instructional methods via performance and observation of peer teaching. MED 591 Added Endorsement Practicum (2-3) Includes 60-90 hours of structured observation. Field experiences and assignments will relate to the student’s added endorsement area. Prerequisites: MED 506. permission of instructor. Prerequisites: MED 502 and MED 506. Prerequisite: MED 506. Also covered are advanced instructional planning and forming more effective relationships with students. MED 586 Living and Learning in the Middle School (3) Intertwines specific needs of preadolescents (ages 10-14 years old) with middle school philosophy. reporting and working with children who have been victims of child abuse. MED 583 Issues of Abuse/Teacher as Counselor (1) Course addresses the teacher’s role in identifying. Major components of reading (fluency. Assessment strategies are studied and applied to the content areas taught in secondary schools. Students will acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to support secondary students in reading complex materials. Prerequisites: MED 519. MED 585 Content-area Reading for Secondary Teachers (1) This course explores the reading process as it is applied to content areas taught in the secondary school. teaching preparation. Also includes the role of the classroom teacher as a counselor.

gender and economic status on knowledge bases. Restricted enrollment. Special Education (6-12) Sixteen-week internship in special education in a kindergarten-12 school setting. Prerequisite: Application approval. including library research. MED 594 Internship. The impact of social context factors such as race. culture. MED 607 foundations for Educational Practice (3) This is a course designed to provide a graduate student the basic knowledge and skills in educational philosophy and educational psychology. MED 595 Directed Study (1-3) Independent study on topics of special interest. MED 609. A variety of techniques related to understanding and writing. socialization patterns and educational opportunity will be studied. Prerequisite: Application approval. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . narrative. Graduate students will be asked to think critically and creatively about concepts involved with the control of education. ethnicity. educational philosophy and psychology. Restricted enrollment. This course is a prerequisite for the research course. Must be taken concurrently with internship. Prerequisite: Application approval. and the thesis course. Prerequisites: Admission to graduate program. Focus will be on those basic concepts central to the certification requirements as well as refinement and extension of those concepts. metaphoric and personal reflection will be studied. practice and research related to the education of diverse populations.MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES 269 GRADUATE PROGRAMS MED 593 Internship. learning styles. MED 601 Educational Research Methods I (3) An introduction to traditional and alternative forms of understanding and communicating about the teaching profession. MED 699. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MED 590. MED 598 Internship Teaching Seminar (1) Weekly seminar for student or intern teachers. The course will include how these philosophies or theories affect best practice. Elementary Education (6-12) Sixteen-week internship in elementary education in a kindergarten-12 school setting. and how best practice affects these theories. MED 605 Diversity and Social Context in the Classroom: Theory and Practice (3) Examination of the educational theories. relevant professional experience. MED 597 Directed Practicum (1-3) Independent practicum related to strand/endorsement/area of interest. Prerequisite: Graduate status. Secondary Education (6-12) Sixteen-week internship in secondary education (7-12) in a kindergarten-12 school setting. MED 596 Internship. To be taken prior to admission to candidacy. field research. Development of appropriate and diverse classrooms and curriculums will be emphasized.

MED 636 Individualized Instruction (2) Rationale and principles of individualized instruction. Prerequisite: MED 506.270 MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES GRADUATE PROGRAMS MED 630 Creative Thinking and Problem-solving (3) Examination of basic theoretical concepts involved with creativity and problem-solving. Emphasis on strategies amenable to analytical review and evaluation. productive learners. MED 640 Guidance and Counseling (3) Consideration of major principles and practices of guidance and counseling. emphasizing definition. Development of ideas and design of activities aimed at enhancing the capabilities of others. as well as development of new programs. teaching procedures and assessment are discussed. methods and materials now available. MED 631 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) Design. MED 635 Inquiry Development (2) Development of questioning techniques that enable teachers to increase the verbal skills of students and make students more autonomous. MED 641 Individual Counseling (3) Consideration of major principles and practices of individual counseling for school counselors. sequencing. Selection. development and evaluation of instructional material. psychological and social domains. with special attention to programs. Either MED 641 or MAC 501 can be taken to meet the Individual Counseling Requirement for the Guidance and Counseling Strand. Either MED 642 or MAC 502 can be taken to meet the Group Counseling Requirement for the Guidance and Counseling Strand. MED 644 High School and Career Counseling (3) The course combines two topics: 1) topics and skills needed for high school counselors. Roles of the teacher and school counselor in the guidance and counseling process. MED 643 Assessment and Appraisal (3) Introduction to major techniques of assessing strengths and weaknesses of individuals in academic. . MED 637 The Gifted Child (2) Investigation of the gifted student. MED 633 Models of Teaching (3) Comprehensive review of various instructional strategies frequently used in classroom settings. Attention to development of creative thinking and problem-solving abilities. Prerequisite: MED 506. Emphasis on construction of educational sequences for various types of learning tasks. MED 642 Group Processes (3) Consideration of major principles and practices of group counseling for school counselors. attributes. identification and implications for the educator. and 2) career counseling topics and skills needed for K-12 school counselors.

Special attention will be given to how principals lead. human growth development. testing and measurement. operations and resources for a safe. MED 654 Principal as Leader of Learning Community (3) An introduction to the information and competencies necessary to prepare administrators capable of facilitating the development. and testing and assessment competencies needed by school counselors. visitations to kindergarten-8 schools. theory from education and the social sciences. design of relevant didactic and practicum staff development experiences. working with parents. and education as a “profession. and knowledge based on effective practices. Each student must take a total of five credits. who are advocating. articulation. the characteristics of effective schools. . MED 650 Professional Development Evaluation and Supervision (3) The study and development of knowledge/skills and techniques/strategies essential to personnel evaluation. learning and American school law for ESA school counseling candidates without prior coursework in the above topics. concepts. who are capable of ensuring management of the organization. nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth. Emphasis on pragmatic. and effective learning environment. and the value of leading school change and improvement. MED 648 Elementary and Middle School Counseling (3) Covers topics and skills needed for elementary and middle school counselors. counseling skills for working with kindergarten-grade 8 students. MED 647 Education foundations for ESA Certification (1) Focuses on problems of school and society.MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES 271 GRADUATE PROGRAMS MED 646 Assessment and Current Issues in School Counseling (3) Covers research on current issues of interest to school counselors. Topics include community resources. and models will be applied to the realities of successful. efficient. consulting and training design roles of school counselors. Using research. implementation and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community. Must be repeated each semester that a student is working on the internship.” GRADUATE PROGRAMS MED 653 Principles of Leadership (3) This course examines the basic principles of school leadership. productive leadership. MED 649 Internship in School Counseling (1-5) An accumulation of 400 hours of supervised and school based internship in a P-grade 12 school setting and a one-hour weekly seminar. developmentally appropriate. manage programs and shape school culture. prevention programs and the role of school counselor as staff trainer and consultant. Theories. Focus will be on three related areas: assessment of person’s competency and performance. the varying roles of kindergarten-8 school counselors. students will examine various aspects of the daily work of principals. and who will act with integrity. fairness and in an ethical manner. supervision and development.

This course focuses on those cognitive strategies needed for the instruction of reading comprehension and effective study methods. MED 656 Educational finance (2) An overview of financial support for schools including legal and historical basis of school funding. in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements. (A minimum of 360 of the hours must be accumulated during the regular school day. sources of funding for schools. MED 672 Writing. The overall goal is to produce leaders who can take action to promote organizational growth and productivity. Emphasis will be placed on legal foundations and requirements for practice. MED 657 School Law for Educational Administrators (2) Provides an overview of federal and state law that principals and school administrators are responsible to know and administer. including student rights and protections under special education and privacy requirements. MED 659 Principal/Program Administrator Internship (1-4) An accumulation of 720 hours of school-based. and Phonics Instruction: from Theory to Practice (3) This course is designed for the serious student of literacy education to study and evaluate the trends and issues in the field of education that have lead to the professionally accepted best practices in the areas of writing. Also offers an overview of the body of knowledge associated with the field of reading instruction. Prerequisite: Admission to the school administration program or permission of instructor. Each student must take a total of 4 units. Prerequisites: Admission to the MED graduate program. Prerequisites: MED 519. including the role of communications in school-community relations. Spelling. Internal and external communities and the relationship between and among these entities and the school will be examined. budgeting procedures. This course satisfies the following requirements of WAC 181-27-(2): Principal and program administrator candidates. MED 671 Philosophy of Reading Instruction (2) Explores theoretical and historical base of teaching of reading and writing in grades kindergarten-8. will complete a well-planned sequence of courses and/or experiences in an approved preparation program which shall include: (B) Information Collection… (C) Problem analysis… (D) Judgment… (P) Oral expression… (Q) Written expression… (R) Philosophical and cultural values… (S) Legal and regulatory applications. Students assess the effectiveness . MED 673 Strategies for Reading Improvement K-12 (3) Students learn how to create a learning environment that fosters reading improvement at the K-12 level.) Repeated each semester that a student is working on the internship. and building level financial management. basics of funding mechanisms.272 MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES GRADUATE PROGRAMS MED 655 School and Community Relations (2) A course designed to provide a thorough examination of the school and its interaction with the community. and phonics instruction in America’s schools. MED 574 and MED 576. spelling. internship in a kindergartengrade 12 school setting and a weekly one hour seminar. supervised.

Prerequisites: Admission to the MED graduate program. Prerequisites: Admission to the MED graduate program. It is further planned to facilitate the preparation of teachers to be effective reading coaches in their schools. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . in which the residency teacher’s/counselor’s ability to demonstrate the standards and criteria will be evaluated. MED 675 Literacy Assessment and Evaluation (3) The study of reading development and the analysis of reading behavior using a variety of assessment tools. and implement effective instruction. development of the individualized growth plan based on a pre-assessment of the candidate’s ability to demonstrate successfully the professional growth standards and criteria with the coordination of the professional growth team that is required by Washington Administrative Code (WAC). In this course. This work will be documented via electronic portfolio. students will explore ways to effectively use literature to supplement. Using a literacy curriculum framework. Prerequisite: Successful completion of development of the Growth Plan from MED 680 and written permission of the candidate’s professional growth team. and enhance student learning. Prerequisite: Acceptance to Professional Certification program. MED 685 School Counselor Peer Review (1) This is a Washington state required OSPI course for continued School Counselor Certification (WAC 181-79A-221). where appropriate. and receive and provide peerreview on their approaches for having a positive impact on their student’s academic learning and lives. Prerequisites: Must be taken in the last 12 hours of the graduate program.MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES 273 GRADUATE PROGRAMS of the school/class reading curriculum and learn how to supplement that curriculum for diverse learners. Prerequisite: previously earned ESA School Counselor Certificate. extend. Students work with children individually and in small groups to diagnose. Prerequisites: Admission to the MED graduate program. MED 688 Professional Growth Plan — Culminating Seminar (2) Final component of the Professional Growth Plan. Students will share. examine. The residency teacher/counselor will produce assignments that include multiple forms of data collected over time. students will build their knowledge of quality children’s and young adult literature and develop practical teaching methods using literature. plan. MED 678 Literacy Leadership (2) This course is designed to aid the master teacher in the development of leadership skills in preparation for filling the role of reading specialist in schools. MED 674 Literature Across the Curriculum (3) Literature is part of a balanced-literacy program. including Running Records. including evidence of positive impact on student learning. MED 680 Professional Growth Plan — Pre-assessment Seminar (2) An overview of the Professional Certification program including the legal frameworks for the program. Informal Reading Inventories and Miscue Analysis.

MED 699 final Project/Thesis Research Component (3) Designed for the student to complete the thesis/final project (thesis option). The program includes advanced courses in structural engineering. environmental engineering. Prerequisites: All Graduate Core courses completed and Graduate Committee formed. The curriculum is adaptable to both recent graduates and engineers with professional experience.274 MASTER’S-LEVEL EDUCATION COURSES GRADUATE PROGRAMS MED 690 Integrating Seminar (1) Required for non-thesis option students. A Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering with: • A cumulative grade point average of at least 2. MASTER Of CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE) faculty Chun Kyung Seong. Designed to be taken during the last semester of the candidate’s program.80 for all undergraduate work . The student will emerge with enhanced engineering analysis and design skills tailored to his or her professional objectives. MASTER’S PROGRAMS IN ENGINEERING Saint Martin’s University School of Engineering offers graduate studies leading to Master of Civil Engineering and Master of Engineering Management degrees. Admission The MCE program is open to students who meet one of the following lists of criteria: 1. geotechnical engineering and construction management. Director Pius Igharo Bijan Khaleghi Dintie Mahamah John Sladek Don Stout The Master of Civil Engineering program is designed to provide engineering and science graduates with specialized technical knowledge oriented toward professional engineering practice in their field of interest within civil engineering. Provides practice in integrative writing similar to that required for comprehensive examinations and practice in questions comparable to oral examinations. All courses are offered in the late afternoon or evening to accommodate working students who are professionals. transportation engineering. Classes are generally scheduled to allow a student to complete the program in a two to three year period by taking two classes per semester.

registered engineers or supervisors GRADUATE PROGRAMS . chemistry (one-half year).00 for all upper-division engineering courses -or. Applicants must submit: • Graduate application form • $35 application fee (non-refundable) • Three letters of recommendation.a 3. physics (one year). statics. A Bachelor of Science degree in any field. Application Process Application to the program can be made at any time prior to the beginning of a new semester. 3. plus current registration as a Professional Engineer (PE). mechanics of materials and dynamics. 2.MASTERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 275 OF CIVIL ENGINEERING -or. differential equations. preferably from professors. • Completion of calculus (one year). A Bachelor of Science degree in another engineering field or the sciences and: • A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.80 for all undergraduate work.a passing score on the nationally conducted Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Examination.

WA 98503-7500. prepare a program of study and research to present to the program director for approval. A maximum of nine semester hours of equivalent coursework from other institutions may be transferred into the program if approved by the program director. Students must meet the prerequisites listed for all program courses taken. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3. 5300 Pacific Avenue SE. in consultation with his/her advisor. Saint Martin’s University. bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering / Master of Civil Engineering Combined Degree Program Application Process A student enters the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (BSCE)/Master of Civil Engineering (MCE) combined degree program by applying for admission during his or her senior year at Saint Martin’s. If accepted. A minimum of 18 semester hours must be in courses numbered 500 or 600 and taken after completion of BSCE degree. School of Engineering. Degree Requirements Candidates for the Master of Civil Engineering degree must satisfactorily complete 30 semester hours of approved coursework. The maximum course load per semester is 12 semester hours unless approval for a larger course load is obtained from the MCE program director. Program Preparation and Continuation Within the first semester following admission. including three semester hours of Advanced Design Project (MCE 502) or six semester hours of Thesis (MCE 503). A maximum of four hours of independent study (MCE 501) is allowed.00 must be maintained in graduate work.00 (“B”) or better for all graduate work undertaken and must complete all work within seven years of starting the program. the student shall.276 MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS • Official copies of college/university transcripts • International students also must submit a declaration of finance and TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores International students original transcript should be validated by the World Education Services in Seattle. In some cases. Lacey. Washington All application materials should be sent directly to: Director. this may require the student to take additional preparatory undergraduate courses that may not count toward the MCE degree. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3. up to six hours of approved MCE . All courses must be from the approved MCE courses list or must be preapproved by the program director. Master of Civil Engineering Program.

Approved MCE Courses All courses applied toward the MCE degree must be taken from the following list unless specifically pre-approved by the program director. provided the student enrolls in the MCE program the year following graduation.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 277 courses may be applied toward both the bachelor’s and master’s degrees. both the undergraduate and graduate degrees in civil engineering could be earned in five academic years. A minimum of 18 semester hours must be taken from the following: • MCE 501 Independent Study (1-4) • MCE 502 Advanced Design Project (3) • MCE 503 Thesis (1-3) • MCE 505 Insitu Soil Testing (3) • MCE 518 Seismic Evaluation (3) • MCE 525 Advanced Transportation Engineering (4) • MCE 531 Advanced Steel Design (3) • MCE 533 Prestressed Concrete Design (3) • MCE 535 Pavement Design (3) • MCE 552 Masonry Design (3) • MCE 553 Matrix Structural Analysis (3) • MCE 555 Advanced Foundation Design (3) • MCE 563 Dynamics of Structures (3) • MCE 565 Traffic Capacity Analysis (3) • MCE 570 Solid Waste Management (3) • MCE 571 Transportation Planning Applications (3) • MCE 573 Earthquake Engineering (3) • MCE 575 Bridge Engineering and Design (3) • MCE 580 Environmental Laboratory Processes (3) • MCE 583 Water Resources Design (3) • MCE 585 Wastewater Systems Design (3) • MCE 595 Special Topics (2-3) • MCE 596 Industrial Waste Pollution and Management (3) • MCE/MEM 612 Project Management (3) • MCE/MEM 660 Construction Estimating (3) • MCE 560 Structural Systems Design (3) GRADUATE PROGRAMS . The number of semester hours earned by the student for each course is listed after the course name. Thus. Additional MCE program coursework may be taken as an undergraduate and reserved for application to the master’s degree.

278 MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS • MCE/MEM 680 Environmental Management (3) A maximum of 12 semester hours may be taken from the following: • CE 403 Engineering Construction Management (2) • CE 405 Insitu Soil Testing (2) • CE 425 Advanced Transportation Engineering (3) • CE 430 Foundation Design (3) • CE 435 Pavement Design (2) • CE 440 Steel Design (3) • CE 445 Wood Design (3) • CE 453 Matrix Structural Analysis (2) • CE 460 Structural Systems Design (3) • CE 470 Solid Waste Management (2) • CE 473 Earthquake Engineering (3) • CE 480 Environmental Laboratory Processes (2) • CE 495 Special Topics (2-3) Suggested Programs of Study Many program arrangements meeting the requirements for the Master of Civil Engineering degree are possible. The following are three examples of non-thesis programs with disciplinary emphases. Note: The courses cross-listed in both CE and MCE programs will require MCE students to complete advanced level study. such as term paper(s) and/or term project(s) which are related to the course subject matter in addition to the course description of this catalog. Structures and foundations Emphasis • CE 403 Engineering Construction Management (2) • CE 430 Foundation Design (2) • CE 440 Steel Design (3) • CE 445 Wood Design (2) • MCE 502 Advanced Design Project (3) • MCE 505 Insitu Soil Testing (3) • MCE 518 Seismic Evaluation (3) • MCE 531 Advanced Steel Design (3) • MCE 533 Prestressed Concrete Design (3) • MCE 552 Masonry Design (3) . Students are free to take any of the approved courses for which they meet the prerequisites.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 279 • MCE 553 Matrix Structural Analysis (3) • MCE 555 Advanced Foundation Design (3) • MCE 560 Structural Systems Design (3) • MCE 563 Dynamics of Structures (3) • MCE 565 Traffic Capacity Analysis (3) • MCE 573 Earthquake Engineering (3) • MCE 575 Bridge Engineering and Design (3) • MCE 660 Construction Estimating (3) Transportation and Project Management Emphasis • CE 403 Engineering Construction Management (2) • CE 405 Insitu Soil Testing (2) • CE 430 Foundation Design (2) • CE 470 Solid Waste Management (2) • MCE 502 Advanced Design Project (3) • MCE 525 Advanced Transportation Engineering (4) • MCE 535 Pavement Design (3) • MCE 565 Traffic Capacity Analysis (3) • MCE 571 Transportation Planning Applications (3) • MCE/MEM 612 Project Management (3) • MCE/MEM 660 Construction Estimating (3) • MCE/MEM 680 Environmental Management (3) • CE 403 Engineering Construction Management (2) • CE 425 Advanced Transportation Engineering (3) • CE 435 Pavement Design (2) • CE 480 Environmental Laboratory Processes (2) • MCE 501 Independent Study (3) • MCE 502 Advanced Design Project (3) • MCE 570 Solid Waste Management (3) • MCE 580 Environmental Laboratory Processes (3) • MCE 583 Water Resources Design (3) • MCE 585 Wastewater Systems Design (3) • MCE/MEM 612 Project Management (3) • MCE/MEM 660 Construction Estimating (3) • MCE/MEM 680 Environmental Management (3) GRADUATE PROGRAMS Environmental Engineering Emphasis .

liquefaction analysis. travel demand forecasting. CE 322. Credit not allowed for students who have taken CE 405. development of response spectra. Prerequisites: CE 321. MCE 503 Thesis (1-3) Independent research in the student’s area of interest. MCE 502 Advanced Design Project (3) Course is required of all students not writing a thesis. signalization design. seismic hazard analysis. Exercises in reducing field data and deriving soil properties for application to foundation design problems. Course provides a connection between introductory soil mechanics and foundation design and introduces both current practice as well as state-of-art site investigation techniques. airport planning and design and transportation economics. seismic wave attenuation. models of trip distribution and traffic assignment on the road network. MCE 525 Advanced Transportation Engineering (4) Selected topics in advanced transportation planning techniques. Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit. seismic design of retaining walls and mitigation of hazardous sites. MCE 518 Seismic Evaluation (3) Fundamentals of seismology and geotechnical earthquake engineering. graphical and oral presentation of the completed project is required. Students may register for a maximum of three hours per semester. ground motion amplification. Students may not take both the undergraduate and graduate versions of a class for credit. CE 360. cone penetration test and pressure meter test. under supervision of faculty. in consultation with faculty. MCE 505 Insitu Soil Testing (3) Introduction to site investigation procedures and institute testing techniques to characterize field behavior of soils related to engineering properties. with correlation to the Uniform Building Code and International Building Code. Prerequisites: Completion of 18 semester hours in the MCE program and consent of instructor. CE 350. Successful completion of a final oral examination and successful defense of the thesis before a faculty panel is required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Course is designed to equip students with practical design-oriented knowledge of land-use impacts on transportation. Independent research report or design project re- . For example. A formal written. ground motion. Field exercises in the use and interpretation of the standard penetration test. MCE 501 Independent Study (1-4) Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval of program director. An independent or small teambased comprehensive graduate-level design project in the student’s discipline interest area. CE 480 and MCE 580 may not both be taken for credit. earthquake faults. in accordance with the NEHRP and USGS procedures. seismic magnitude and intensity.280 MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS Master of Civil Engineering Courses Courses in the MCE program are scheduled in accord with enrollment numbers and demand. Topics covered include plate tectonics. Prerequisites: CE 321. dynamic slope stability.

Course credit cannot be given to students who have taken CE 435. member and structure stiffness matrices. introduction to fundamental unreinforced and reinforced masonry behavior and design philosophy. Design/analysis elements include wall. diaphragm action. fire safety. MCE 552 Masonry Design (3) Analysis and design of masonry structures per current building code requirements with focus on reinforced masonry. Prerequisites CE 350. lintel and beam sections over a full range of behavior. Students learn to extend classical structural analysis to the advanced analytical GRADUATE PROGRAMS . Introduces basic concepts of lateral bracing. Covers wheel loads and design factors. MCE 535 Pavement Design (3) Asphalt and concrete pavement design for highways and airfields. soil classification and characteristics. Coursework based on load and resistance factor design methods. Combines soil mechanics theory and traffic requirements for an understanding of the fundamental behavior of pavements under traffic loads. subgrade. including special connections. load combinations. beams and frames. stresses in flexible and rigid pavements. Students apply mechanics of materials. Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit. CE 359. in accordance with applicable national and international building code requirements. the gaussian elimination algorithm. Prerequisite: CE 360. Prerequisites: CE 323. Prerequisite: CE 321. architectural features and rehabilitation of older masonry buildings. and exercises in solving indeterminate trusses. CE 360. structural analysis principles and methods first developed in reinforced concrete to the design of masonry components. and design methods. plate girders. serviceability and basic detailing. with design of material and thickness to satisfy strength and serviceability performance objectives. basic masonry and reinforcing steel properties. basic concepts of the force and flexibility methods. Topics include general types and applications of masonry construction systems. construction specifications and basic building applications. MCE 533 Prestressed Concrete Design (3) Analysis and design of components of prestressed concrete structures. composite steel-concrete members. vehicle and traffic considerations. MCE 553 Matrix Structural Analysis (3) Development and application of matrix methods as the basis for modern computerbased structural analysis. Course credit cannot be given to students who have taken CE 425. in accordance with applicable national and international building code requirements. bases and subbases. development of simple loads and load paths. MCE 531 Advanced Steel Design (3) Analysis and design of steel structures. Prerequisites: CE 440.MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 281 GRADUATE PROGRAMS quired for graduate credit. Topics covered include matrix algebra. integration of masonry components into simple building systems. structural systems and bracing for lateral load resistance. including ultimate strength.

MCE 563 Dynamics of Structures (3) Introduction of free and forced vibration of structures. testing and application of traffic estimation models. The impacts of different professional disciplines’ responsibilities comprising a typical project team are examined. MCE 571 Transportation Planning Applications (3) Techniques of transportation planning applied in urban areas and for resource transportation. Prerequisite: CE 385. Covers operational. MCE 565 Traffic Capacity Analysis (3) Analyzes and evaluates capacity and level of service of highway facilities using methodology of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM). Prerequisite: CE 350. Introduction of commercial software currently used by structural engineers. transport. live. .282 MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS techniques used in professional practice. Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit. These general concepts on the dynamic behavior of buildings and bridges are related to the structural response under earthquake-induced motion. Prerequisite: CE 435. reuse and disposal of solid waste. Specific focus on the application of the HCM methodology to two-lane rural highways. calibration. un-damped. strength. MCE 560 Structural Systems Design (3) Current professional practice in the design of structural systems for buildings. Prerequisite: CE 430. ramps and weaving segments. response to harmonic. Course credit cannot be given to students who have taken CE 453. urban streets and signalized intersections. Use of HCS software emphasized. damped and resonant behavior of structures. linear and nonlinear system. Emphasis is on municipal wastes. freeways and multilane highways. MCE 570 Solid Waste Management (3) Engineering management and principles as applied to the collection. Multiple material types are used in creating structural systems designed to resist dead. equations of motion for single and multi degree-of-freedom structural system. Course credit cannot be given to students who have taken CE 470. serviceability and constructability are emphasized. design and planning applications. Structural design and analysis against earthquake-loading will be introduced. evaluation of alternate plans. wind and earthquake loads in accordance with Uniform Building Code criteria. Economical arrangements of components to achieve material compatibility. Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit. arbitrary or step excitations. MCE 555 Advanced foundation Design (3) Advanced topics in settlement and bearing capacity analysis of shallow and deep foundations. analytical and numerical methods of natural frequency of vibration. including application of insitu testing and numerical schemes to foundation design.

MCE 585 Wastewater Systems Design (3) Advanced wastewater systems design. biosolids management. site coefficients. Prerequisites: CE 321. and strut and tie analysis and design for disturbed region. including treatment plant design. fatigue and fracture problems in steel bridge and substructure design. Modern methods of management including treatment. treatment plant design. Prerequisite: CE 385. Students will design and prepare structural drawings of a bridge. Collection and distribution. Detailed analysis and design of diaphragm and shear-wall systems in wood.GRADUATE PROGRAMS MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 283 MCE 573 Earthquake Engineering (3) Structural design for earthquake forces in accordance with the 1997 UBC and the 2000 IBC. pump stations. water quality and economic considerations. seismic isolation and seismic retrofit. cannery. coliform counts. intensity. CE 440. Overview of foundation design considerations. MCE 596 Industrial Waste Pollution and Management (3) Problems of waste pollution from industries such as pulp and paper. pump station and collection system design. beverage. chemical. including solids. seismic maps. GRADUATE PROGRAMS MCE 583 Water Resources Design (3) Application of principles of hydrology and hydraulic engineering to water supply systems design. torsion and reliability factor. recovery. BOD and microbial examinations. recycling and reuse are . Focus on reinforced concrete deck and pre-stressed girder composite bridge structures. CE 350. Prerequisites: CE 330. MCE 575 bridge Engineering and Design (3) Analysis and design of bridge structure based on load resistance factor design in accordance with 2002 AASHTO and WADOT bridge design specifications. Graduate credit not allowed for students who have taken CE 480. modified compression field theory in shear and torsion design. Analysis of steel moment frames. structural dynamics and response spectra. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. CE 360. waste minimization. comparison to the UBC-97 provisions. A detailed study of the IBC-2000 static force provisions. MCE 595 Special Topics (2-3) Selected topics in civil engineering. soil effects. base shear. reduction. masonry and concrete. including seismic use groups. metal plating. storage sizing. Topics on new load-resistant factors and parameters. new live-load system and application. CE 385. Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit. braced frames and eccentrically braced frames. seismic waves. Offered on demand. Design of steel girder bridge also introduced. etc. CE 370. petroleum. magnitude. MCE 580 Environmental Laboratory Processes (3) Laboratory analysis for water and wastewater evaluation. tannery. Prerequisites: CE 370. force distribution. dissolved oxygen. Fundamentals of earthquake ground motion: tectonics. Prerequisites CE 360. flexural analysis and design. spectral maps.

Focuses on the challenges of managing engineering approaches. Course credit cannot be given to students who have taken MEM 680. scheduling. Estimation techniques to evaluate professional technological costs of research and development. economic analysis. with emphasis on materials. MCE/MEM 612 Project Management — A Holistic Approach (3) Intensive coverage of management in industrial applications from concept through operations. The program stresses the interrelationship of these phases and focuses on the role of the project manager in managing and controlling all aspects of the project. MCE 660 Construction and Consultant Estimating (3) Cost estimation for construction projects. environmental impact statements and other legal requirements. design and construction. such as meeting environmental assessment.284 MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT GRADUATE PROGRAMS covered. . Planning. Prerequisite: CE 385. Course credit cannot be given to students who have taken MEM 660. Course credit cannot be given to students who have taken MEM 612. planning. administration and associated costs. financing. MASTER Of ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (MEM) faculty Bill Phillips. MCE/MEM 680 Environmental Management (3) Engineering and administrative function in the control of environmental factors affecting human health and survival. controlling. The students will emerge with management and business skills to allow effective performance in directing engineering organizations and in assessing client needs from a business and engineering standpoint. Graduate credit not allowed for students who have taken CE 496. The program emphasizes the continuity of management and engineering-related efforts from planning through design to execution. quality control and customer satisfaction are stressed. Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit. Director Stephen Bao Bob Berquist David Jensen Robert Raymond Don Stout The Master of Engineering Management (MEM) program prepares engineering and science graduates for management careers in the field of engineering and engineering project management. labor.

Application Process Application to the program can be made at any time prior to the beginning of a new semester or term. Applicants must submit: • A completed University graduate application for admission form • $35 application fee (nonrefundable) • Three letters of recommendation. preferably from professors. if the student’s native language is not English. mathematics or related field and: • A cumulative grade point average of at least 2. or • In special cases.MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT 285 GRADUATE PROGRAMS Admission The MEM program is open to graduates who have at least a bachelor’s degree in science or engineering from an accredited college program. who have a background in engineering. with a minimum score of 525. initial acceptance by the program director. Applications can be obtained from the University’s Office of International Programs and Development.80 and/or acceptance by the program director. or • Successful completion of the engineering license examination and acceptance by the program director. The TOEFL is not required for foreign students who received their bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U. with final acceptance into the program by the admissions committee • The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). college or university. registered engineers and supervisors • Copies of official transcripts from all colleges/universities attended GRADUATE PROGRAMS . S.

5300 Pacific Avenue SE.286 MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT GRADUATE PROGRAMS All international applicants. Additional Information The graduate application form. Thesis * (6 semester hours) • MEM 690 Thesis .stmartin. Degree Requirements Degree candidates must satisfactorily complete 33 semester hours of designated coursework and a comprehensive examination. letters of recommendation and application fee should be sent directly to: Director. Once the student starts a thesis. Lacey. official transcripts. continuous enrollment is required. Further information about the program can be obtained at the above address. by telephoning 360-438-4320 or 360-438-4587 or by e-mailing smcmemprogram@ stmartin. All work must be completed by the candidate within seven years of starting the program. Each student’s performance record is reviewed upon completion of 12 semester hours to ensure that satisfactory progress is being made.edu. Saint Martin’s University. on being accepted to the MEM program. The department has set a maximum course load of 12 semester hours per semester unless approval for a larger course load is obtained from the program director. MCE or MBA program. must submit a declaration of finance. Elective classes must be numbered at the 500 level and above.edu. A cumulative grade point average of 3. www. or 24 semester hours of designated coursework plus a six semester-hour thesis. Further information also is available in the academic section of the University website. WA 98503-7500. Program Requirements Core Requirements (18 semester hours) • MBA 502 Survey of Finance • MEM 603 Accounting for Managerial Decision-making • MEM 610 Systems Engineering Management — Planning • MEM 611 Systems Engineering Management — Design • MEM 612 Project Management • MEM 620 Engineering Law Electives Students must take 15 semester hours of approved electives in the MEM.00 must be maintained in graduate work. Master of Engineering Management Program.

public meetings and workshops. forecasting and modeling. Students’ design projects will vary from year to year and the course involves mainly outside-the-classroom applied work. Offered alternate fall semesters. personal protection equipment. trades integration and computer software applications for design management. economic analysis. MEM 610 Systems Engineering Management — Planning (3) Covers approaches to planning. including strategies. costestimating and design of engineering projects. MEM 582 Industrial Engineering (3) Topics in the field of safety engineering and their associated laws. regulations and standards are covered. MEM 582 and 583 MEM. etc. usability. applied biomechanics. conversion of client needs to engineering specifications. value engineering. Topics include criteria development. Prerequisite: Acceptance into MEM program or instructor’s permission. Topics include hazards and their control. MEM 585 Applied Ergonomics (3) Following the Engineering Design Method students undertake a major design challenge focusing on a product’s or system’s ergonomics parameters such as safety. industrial hygiene and hazard detection instrumentation. efficiency. GRADUATE PROGRAMS . controlling. quality control and assurance. MEM 581. Equivalent to MBA 603. MEM 603 Accounting for Managerial Decision-making (3) Study and application of accounting concepts and techniques used by management for planning and controlling organizational activities. EA/EIS. MEM/MCE 612 Project Management — A Holistic Approach (3) Intensive coverage of management in a wide range of project applications from concept through operations. incident investigation. Planning. city planning. MEM 611 Systems Engineering Management — Design (3) Stresses development of management skills to be applied in scope definition. MEM 615 Managerial and Engineering Economy (3) Economic evaluation of engineering alternatives geared to maximize investment potentials. zoning ordinances. Also covered are human behavior approaches to problem-solving and scheduling. concept analysis. managing feasibility studies. management of industrial safety and health. The Ergonomics and Biomechanics lab may be used for various projects including bicycle design and associated components. Prerequisites: MEM 580. Emphasizes techniques useful in scope planning. Includes study of various methods of decision analysis. quality control and customer satisfaction are stressed in this course.MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT 287 GRADUATE PROGRAMS Master of Engineering Management Courses Courses in the MEM program are scheduled in accord with enrollment numbers and demand. scheduling.

labor relations and training. use of visual aids. specification and installation of appropriate computer technology and subsequent need for direction. MEM 640 Marketing for Engineers (3) Market information.) . MEM/MCE 660 Construction and Consultant Estimating (3) Cost estimation for construction projects. Quality in design and planning is stressed as equally important to quality in the completed project and quality in production of goods and services. scope of work. methodology portrayal. MEM 690 Thesis (1-3) Independent research project in the student’s area of interest involving investigation and analysis of an engineering management related problem or study. job analysis/evaluation and compensation. including engineering ethics. Emphasis on identification. job cost determinations. copyrights. contract law and practice. control and overall management of the information function. MEM 623 Seminar in Management Information and Control Systems (3) Evaluation of organizational information needs and the ability of computer technology to meet those needs in an economical fashion. MEM/MCE 680 Environmental Management (3) Engineering and administrative functions in the control of environmental factors affecting human health and survival. six sigma. joint venture strategy. design and construction. environmental impact statements and other legal requirements. Equivalent to MBA 624. human resource planning and recruitment. formal presentations. forecasts. customer relations. Marketing methods. proposal preparation. patents. organizational design and structure. MEM 624 Human Resource Management (3) The management of human resources informal organizations. general and special considerations. MEM 650 quality Control (3) Use of various methods and recent developments of quality control (such as QA/ QC. labor.288 MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT GRADUATE PROGRAMS MEM 620 Engineering Law (3) Practical legal considerations. (A total of six semester hours are required. ISO 9000 and TQM) are covered in detail. property rights and a focus on contract administration. Focuses on challenges of managing engineering approaches such as meeting environmental assessments. financing. with emphasis on materials. Equivalent to MBA 623. liabilities. specifications. management development. Estimation techniques to evaluate professional technological costs of research and development. administration and associated costs. phase selection and marketing cost factors. labor law. Course uses case studies. planning. performance evaluation. qualitative and quantitative analysis and trends.

MEM 695A Construction Management GRADUATE PROGRAMS .MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT 289 GRADUATE PROGRAMS MEM 695 Special Topics (3) Course devoted to selected topics relevant to engineering management studies.

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DIRECTORY .

A.S. English (1996). (2000). brian barnes (2008) Assistant professor. University of Washington. Los Angeles. Ph. (1994). Egypt. Marshall University. M. M. Montana State University. Ed.E.D.A.S.D. University of Oregon Olivia Archibald (2000) Professor. M. (2008).S. College of Education and Professional Psychology. (1988).A. Kathleen Allen (2004) Associate professor. (1973). B. (1967).S. Oregon State University. Portland State University. B.D. University of Kentucky. University of Washington. (1987). (1993). B. Montana State University. education. University of Minnesota. California State University Long Beach. The Cooper Union. University of Wyoming. Richard beer (2010) Dean.M. (1971). (2001). (2005).S. College of Arts and Sciences. M. Apfelstadt (2010) Dean. (1973). (2003). (1981). Technical University of Berlin. School of Engineering. Ph. (1998). M. (1983). Ed. Ph. University of California. Montana State University fACULTY Year following name indicates when faculty member joined Saint Martin’s University Amanie Abdelmessih (1997) Professor. (1985). (1979). University of California.A. University of Iowa. M. Joyce V.D.S. Wake Forest University. (1987) Princeton University. M. English.F. M. (1980).. Darrell D. (1972). School of Business. mathematics. B. M.D.M.A.E. M. Westgard (1988) Dean. (1996). Indiana State University. English. Polytechnic University. mechanical engineering. (1987).A.D. B.D. Santa Barbara. chemistry.S. Princeton University. (1983).D. history. Egypt. S. Teaching English as a Second Language (2002). Ph. Ph.S. Ph. George Fox University. B.D. University of California.A. (1988). (1997). (1972). B. Ph. B. bonnie Amende (2007) Associate professor. Oregon State University.A. B. Zella Kahn-Jetter (2011) Dean. Santa Barbara.A. University of Utah. (1981). Alexandria University. Dr. (1973). (2004). Linfield College. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.S. Ph. Oklahoma State University.-Eng. Marshall University. English. M. M.S. (1976).A. Alexandria University.D.292 SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY 292 DEANS / FACULTY DEANS Eric C. . Jeff birkenstein (2003) Associate professor.Ed.A. (2003). B.B.S. University of Kentucky. (1979). Axtell (1988) Associate professor. M. Technische Fachhochschule Berlin.

B. Stanford University. Whitworth College.P.S. music. Fordham University.A.A. Indiana University School of LawBloomington. Oregon Health Sciences University School of Medicine.A. Irina Gendelman (2007) Assistant professor. University of Southern California.T. Biola University.B. University of Washington. Coby (2007) Assistant professor. counseling psychology. (1979).S. butler (2008) Assistant professor. Biological Science. University of Notre Dame. Ann Gentle (2002) Associate professor. University of Washington. B.A.A.S. B. Ph. Michael P. Julia McCord Chavez (2011) Associate professor. O. DePauw University.D. (2001). (1976). (2000). Ph.D. Brigham Young University.A. (2001). Columbia Pacific University. (1977). (1973).S. B. Aaron J.D. Ph. education. (1989). Pacific Lutheran University.E. Ellis (1988) Professor.S. (1998). (1961). Rex J. B. Indiana University. M. Ph.S. Ph. M. (2005). (1974). M.Ed. University of Michigan. M. (1979). (1981). Michael Gideon (1990) Associate professor.A. (1991).Ed. (1999). (1975). C. vocal performance (1999). (1990). M. (2008). Fordham University.D. University of Washington.S. Certificate in Museum Studies (2004).A. University of Illinois– Champaign Urbana. B. Shanghai Teachers’ University. education. business. M.D. M. (1992). finance.FACULTY 293 Darrell born (2003) Associate professor. religious studies. (1968). M. California State University. Ph.D. B. M. (1959). Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ph.D.D. Wichita State University. M.A. Mark Haddock (1979-1986. Indiana University. Ph. M. M. (2008).b. B.S. accounting. M. (2006).A. University of Washington. University of Denver.D. Saint Xavier University. Denis Dubois (2009) Assistant professor. biology.D. Long Beach.D. B. (2002). Casillas (1987) Associate professor. Pacific Lutheran University.M. (1981). B. history. M. DIRECTORY / INDEX . 2008) Associate professor. University of Washington. (2000).A. Ph. (1995).A. (1972). (1974). library. Ph.P. English. B. B. Western Washington University. (1987) Associate professor. (1989).Ed.D. B. Western Washington University. (1995). Heather Grob (2005) Associate professor. Naval Post Graduate School.E. (1997). Indiana University. (1977). Saint Martin’s University. Washington State University.S. (1996). University of Utah. (1983). (1967). (1975).M. Western Washington University. (1994).A.A. Huabin Chen (1994) Professor. University of Wisconsin-Madison.S. Stephen M.A. brother Luke Devine. M. biology. Indiana University. B. Weston Jesuit School of Theology.A. American University. (1981). University of Wisconsin-Madison. Brigham Young University. education. J. (2008) Instructor.S. (2008). psychology.B.E.A. Godfrey J. (1995). M. M. M.A.D. B. Idaho State University. fulton.

David A. Universidad Pontificia Comillas.D. M. M. University of Florida. M.D.A. Eastern Oregon State College. Washington State University. (1992). Lazzari. (1981). California State University.F. (1960). (1999). Seoul National University. father Gerard Kirsch. (1998).S. Long Beach.b. library. mechanical engineering.. education. Cloud State University. B. Hlavsa (1989) Professor. (1986).S. University of Washington. Richard L. M.S. St. Kazakh State University. A. Swarthmore College. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Pius Igharo (1996) Associate professor. M. library. M. B. Saint Martin’s College.S.D. Robert Hauhart (2006) Associate professor.A. J. State University of New York at Albany. Institute of State and Law of the USSR Academy of Sciences.S. (1984). University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Ph. religious studies. sociology. (1978). M. theatre arts. S.A. University of Arizona. O. (1991).S. The American University.Ed. (2001). (1970) Assistant professor.A. (1959). criminal justice. Clemson University.L.S.D. (1971). Ph. M. Ph.A.D. University of Virginia. O. (1984). (1987). physical education. (1967). B. University of Washington.A. (1992).A. California State University.D.294 FACULTY SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY Scot Harrison (2001) Associate professor. M. (1985). University of Washington. Princeton University. Mount Angel Seminary. University of Iowa. University of Washington. B.S. B. (1991). M. B. Victor M. B.A. Western Washington University. Long Beach.b. Saint Martin’s College.A.A. B. education. Southern Illinois University. Ph. (1997). Heritage College.D. Kogan (1990) Professor. Washington State University. (1982). Ph. (1966-70). (1995). Smith College. Ph. belinda Hill (1996) Associate professor. B. political science. brother boniface V. fumie Hashimoto (2000) Professor. history. University of Illinois. civil engineering. journalism.B.A.S. Ph. Han Soo Jung (1991) Associate professor. M.I. English. Mary Jo Hartman (2005) Associate professor. .D. M.M.S. (2007).D. (1970). (1976). (1966) Associate professor. Tim Healy (1996) Assistant professor.S. (1965). B.T. University of Pittsburgh. (1973). (1974). Columbia University. B.A. Spanish.A. B.D.A. (1982). University of Baltimore School of Law. (2007).I.A. Saint Martin’s College. (1994). (1986). (1992). education. Ph.L. University of Florida. University of South Carolina.A.A. Kazakh State University. B.A. Washington University.Ed. M. University of Texas at Austin. (1963). Washington State University. College of St. (1963). M. M. FACULTY Karen Jaskar (2007) Assistant professor. (1986). M. biology. M. (2003). (1972). criminal justice. Nathalie Kuroiwa-Lewis (2007) Assistant professor. Scholastica. (1965).S. Langill (1986) Professor. (1993). (1973).A. Ph. B. (1965).

Western Washington University. Ph. Washington State University. B.B. Ph.S. (1982).A. psychology. (1964). M.ACADEMIC CATALOG 295 FACULTY Kyu Lee (2003) Professor.D. (1960). Carol Overdeep (2005) Associate professor. University of California. Lawrence University. DIRECTORY / INDEX . Newton (2011) Assistant professor. Davis. George Fox College. (1984).A. English.B. Psy. B.A. Gregory Milligan (2002) Associate professor. Dintie S.A. (2004). Kathleen McKain (1993) Associate professor. (197174) Heythrop College.D.T. Madison.S.Y. Ryokan College. (1964). Mailhot (1986) Associate professor.S. (1980). B. Purchase. Mississippi State University.A. (1990). Ph. Stephen Parker (2009) Assistant professor. B. University of Washington. Middlebury College. religious studies. Boston Theological Institute. M.D.A. Ph. (2002). Mississippi State University. (1981). California State UniversityFullerton.D. physics. Edinboro State College. Joseph M. Seoul National University. (1986). University of Rhode Island.N. University of Michigan. (1977). M.D. O.S. University of Wisconsin. (1980). Ph.A. (1999). Stephen x.S.A. Mead (1986) Professor. (1983). Western Washington University. Pacific Lutheran University. economics.A. (1978).S. biology. Swarthmore College. University of Puget Sound. University of Georgia. B. Jamie Olson (2008) Assistant professor. Indiana University. B. M. (1987). English. Margaret A.S.D. B. (1983). M. University of Washington. (1984). Ph. (2010).D.A. (2003). B.D.U. Stanford University. M. M. (1993). (1966).S. Washington State University.A. The College of Saint Scholastica. Ph. (1961) Professor. University of Science and Technology. English. M. M. Olney (2005) Associate professor. (1983).A. (1985). (1987). (1999). (1991).S. Ph. French. (1981).D.D.A. (2008). mathematics. Saint Martin’s College.D. (1989).. Malvey. D. University of California. Ph.A. Riley Moore (2001) Associate professor.S. Indiana University.A. Azuza Pacific University. (1984).A. M. University of London. Ph. Ph. father Kilian J. B. Berkeley. Jeremy W.Min. Point Loma College.A. Gloria Martin (1991) Professor. Central Michigan University.b. B. University of Washington. Marquette University. Indiana University. M. B. (1988). (1993). (1981).S.S. Indiana University. (1987). chemistry. Leticia Nieto (1992) Professor. University of Michigan. Washington State University. computer science. (2000). civil engineering. (1992). psychology. M. Jeanette Munn (1994) Associate professor. counseling psychology.D.D. B. B. English. B. (1986). (1984).A. (2001). (1970). Purdue University. M. M. S. University of Oregon. Mahamah (1984) Professor. M. (1989). (1970). University of Rhode Island.S. mathematics. (1978).A. B. B. Ph. University of Washington.

Ph. (1960). (1984). Certification (1991). (2005). University of Florida.S.S./STD (candidate). (1963). (1974). (1992) Associate professor. Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology. Ph.A.B. library.A. father George J. Oklahoma State University. The Evergreen State College. M. Chun Kyung Seong (1995) Professor. University of Alabama in Huntsville. philosophy.A. B. (1983). Knoxville. M. (2001). Maryville College.Ed. University of Toronto. education. M. Jr. College of Education and Professional Psychology. (1983). University of Alabama in Huntsville. Eileen Reilich (1997) Associate professor. David Price (1994) Professor. E. University of Delaware.A. (1970).D. (1977). education. St.D. (2004). Ph. Ph. Saint Martin’s College.A. Washington State University. B.D. (1990). (1970). philosophy. University of Washington. B. Washington State University. community services/sociology. Ph. STL (2002). B.D. Ekaterina “Katya” Shkurkin (1999) Associate professor.S. (1989). Lehigh University. Montana College of Mineral Science and Technology.D. M. (1980). Rutgers – The State University (1973-78). Cynthia Petersen (1993) Professor. University of Washington.A. (1972). Rome. education.D. civil engineering. B.A. B. (1961) Professor. father David E. Pontificium Athenaeum Anselmianum (1955-58). University of Chicago. education.296 FACULTY SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY Paul Patterson (2000) Associate professor. Seoul National University.I. M. (1987). M. Alita Pierson (2007) Assistant professor. mechanical engineering.b. Stillwater.S. M.A.Div. Associate dean. Katherine Porter (2000) Associate professor.S. The University of Tennessee. M.W. (1990). sociology and cultural anthropology. (1959).S.A. . The Evergreen State College. M.S. (1975). M. (1985).A. University of Idaho.A. B. Pacific Lutheran University.D. Jesuit School of Theology. (1965). Seoul National University. Roy D. Ed. marketing. University of California. (1999). (1989).S. New Jersey Institute of Technology. Maryville College. (1962). Ed. M.A. M.A. (1998). B. (1983). Belgium. University of Washington. (1955).S. B. education. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven. Maureen Siera (2000) Associate professor. M. (1993). Ph. Knoxville. Pratt (2008) Assistant professor. University of San Francisco. Saint Martin’s College. College of Arts and Sciences. New Mexico State University. Mina Ringenbach (2004) Assistant professor. (1986). Associate dean. Pacific Lutheran University. Steve Siera (2003) Associate professor.S. B. Ph. B. California Coast University.S. Columbia University.A. (1999). B.D. mathematics. (1987). (1995). Phil. (1984). M. B. New Jersey Institute of Technology. O. M. (1974).S.D. Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology. M. Ph. Sandford. University of Toronto.A.L. (1971).A. University of Tennessee. (1977). Oberlin College. (1979). Seidel. B.S. (1983).S. Vladimir’s Orthodox Seminary.D.S.

M. (1967). B. civil engineering. University of Georgia. (1976). Ph.D.Sc.A. M. DIRECTORY / INDEX . political science. Ph.A.E. (1988). (1999). Auburn University. (1998). Director. business. (1975). University of Chicago. University of Idaho. University of Oregon.D.S.D. M. (1967). Sheila M. M.S. San Diego State University. psychology. Stout. Appalachian State University.S. Wilson Jr. (1998). counseling psychology. Ed. Davidson College. Ph. University of Puget Sound. Davis.A. The Citadel. Ph. Central Washington University. (1978).A. University of Puget Sound. British Columbia. University of Chicago.b. University of Oregon. Ed.M. M. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.D. religious studies.S. B. education. (1971). (1989) Associate professor. (1993). (1979). M. (1977). (1966). Saint Martin’s College. (1970). (2001). Florida State University. Andrews. (1993). (1964). University of California. B. (1999) Associate professor. Roger Snider (1988) Associate professor. M. (1960). (1983). (1996). Scotland. B.A.A. (1974). (2005). Kirsti Thomas (2000) Assistant professor. Western Washington University. Northeastern University. Saint Martin’s College. B. M. M.A.S. Boston. (1978). Suter (1984) Professor. (1992). Spiritual Life Institute.S. education. B. (1969). chemistry. Trinity Western University. Gonzaga University. Lou Therrell (1989) Associate professor.L. library. University of Chicago. Old Dominion University. Washington State University.C. brother Peter Tynan. (2001). Davis. O. history. B. B.I. Human Relations Institute.A. The College of Idaho.A. M. (1969). B. (1970).S. religious studies. B. B. University of Texas at Austin. University of California.D.A. St.A. Jr. business.A. B. University of Texas at Austin.A. M.ACADEMIC CATALOG 297 FACULTY John Sladek (2001) Associate professor. University of St. (1985).I. David W. (1997). M.A. (2000). Donald E.L. M.A. University of Delaware. Western Washington University. University of Nebraska-Lincoln.E. Arwyn Smalley (2008) Assistant professor. University of Idaho.S.A. M. (1990). Langley. Ph. M. Ian Werrett (2006) Associate professor.D. B. (1991).B.D. Peggy Zorn (1995) Assistant professor. Central Washington University.S.A.A.Sc. Andrews. Haldon D. (2006).P. Dan Windisch (1989) Professor. B. (1976). (1980). M. Steiner (2008) Professor. (2005) Library archivist.

Meinrad School of Theology.b. M. drama.. father Richard Cebula.D. B. University of Illinois. State of Washington. Ishii † President emeritus. University of Illinois. B. University of Washington. engineering. M. Texas A & M University.S. (196871) St. civil engineering. father Michael feeney.A. (1962). University of Moscow. Carl A. (1970). B. (1937). Georgetown University. P. O. M.D.A.S.A. Immaculate Heart College. M. Ph.A. † Professor emeritus.S. B. † Deceased .  Mary Lou Peltier Professor emeritus.A. (1942). Robert Harvie Professor emeritus. Saint Martin’s College. University of Michigan.D. University of Illinois. U.S. Scott. Military Academy. (1942). B.S. Georgetown University. Military Academy.  B.S.A. Ellen M. O. O. M. (1956). M. (1969). (1953). University of Washington.S. Ph. Saint Martin’s College. University of Idaho.  B. Saint Martin’s College. (1941). M.S.S.W. William H.D. (1965).A. Saint Martin’s College. University of Illinois. B. M.b. John D.E. civil engineering. (1973). (1961). Los Angeles. (1950). Ph. (1950). University of Wales.A.Sc.A. Mount Angel College.S. M. Indiana University. Arthur Acuff † Professor emeritus. United Kingdom. (1967). (1961).S. Anthony de Sam Lazaro Professor emeritus. Cardiff. (1972). Immaculate Heart College. Central Washington State College. M. University of Madras. Norma Shelan Professor emeritus. history/religious studies.S. biology.S. Saint Martin’s College. (1980). criminal justice. civil engineering. † President emeritus. Ph. physical education and education. M. (1960). University of New Mexico. Los Angeles. B.b. M. B. (1947).. father John C.S. Kernander † Professor emeritus. B.b. James Harmon Associate professor emeritus. Russia.A. M.S.S. (1989). B. (1948). (1978). (1973).D. Military Academy.A. Princeton University. B. (1978). father Placidus Reischman. U. U.A. University of Madras. Esser † Professor emeritus. (1966). M. (1964). India. B. (1966). † Professor emeritus. Army War College (1973). J. Catholic University of America. M. Iowa State College. (1963). Catholic University of America. O.S.S. (1962).298 FACULTY AND STAFF EMERITI SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY fACULTY AND STAff EMERITI Chris Allaire Associate professor emeritus.S. Washington State University. (1971) Professor. University of Washington. civil engineering. University of Texas. Manning Professor emeritus. (1957). (1942). biology. David R. University of Oregon. (1969).S. University of Washington. B. (1971).S. (1977). (1968).A. Ph.D. B.A. Spangler President emeritus.S. physics/mathematics.S. community services/sociology. (1962).S. M.S.

CPA.. President President. Washington brother boniface V. Olympia Federal Savings Olympia. ‘64 Alongi Contracting Olympia. O. Illinois Patrick W. California   father bede Classick.b. Washington father Kilian Malvey. Hecker. Armandino’s Salumi Restaurant & Salumi Artisan Cured Meats Seattle. Washington Phillip Hall. St. Washington Roy f.. ‘65 CEO. Partner STAR Anesthesia PA San Antonio. Washington Daniel Dugaw. Ph.S. Washington Mary E. HS‘68 Physician Olympia. Purchasing Solutions. St. Washington Lori G.S. Martin’s Abbey Lacey. Martin’s Abbey Lacey. ‘91 Strader Hallett & Co. Drummond CEO. ‘65.b. Chancellor Abbot. Olympia. Washington father Justin McCreedy. Northrop Grumman Corporation (Ret) Los Angeles. Richard Panowicz. Michael Cronk HS‘61. Martin’s Abbey Lacey. Martin’s Abbey Lacey. LLC Oak Brook.. Washington G.S..S. Martin’s Abbey Lacey. Anthem Grant and Advocacy Seattle. Parametrix (Retired) Sumner. Monaghan.S. Roth. CEng. Martin’s Abbey Lacey. California/Olympia. HS‘55. Inc. batali ‘59   President/Owner. ‘64 St.ACADEMIC TRUSTEES 299 BOARD OF CATALOG bOARD Of TRUSTEES 2011/2012 A. Texas father Alfred J.b. Heynderickx. ‘64 Chairman and CEO. Contracts and Real Estate. Washington Joseph Alongi HS‘62. berchtold ‘59 Vice President. Chair Enhanced Technology (Retired) Olympia. O. PE. Vice-chair President L & E Bottling Company.b. CMA. DIRECTV Sports Network Seattle. Charneski. Crumb ‘85 Executive Vice President. Washington brian S. VECO Engineering Group (Ret) Palm Desert. O. ‘62 President. Washington Abbot Neal G. Washington Waite Dalrymple. Lacey. O. Business Affairs and General Counsel. fAOCA. ‘51 St. Washington Chris fidler ‘82 President/CEO. Washington Richard b. Hulscher. Washington Armandino A. ’67 St.S.D. Washington Kenneth J.S.b.. St. Lazzari. Washington Terence R. Washington DIRECTORY / INDEX . ‘81 Founding Physician. DO. PE. O. DO. Saint Martin’s University Lacey. Gentry ‘73 Attorney (Retired) Olympia. O.b.. P.

LLC Yelm. Subprior UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION Abbot Neal Roth. Williams Williams Group. O. President Joseph D.D.S. Worth Attorney at Law. Col.S. USMC (Ret) Olympia. Ph. O’Grady President. O.b. bessie. O. LL. flores.S. Washington SAINT MARTIN’S AbbEY Right Reverend Neal Roth.b. The O’Grady Foundation New York. O.D. Tumwater. treasurer and director of fiscal affairs father Clement Pangratz. Washington Cynthia S. O. Secretary Melanie R. Weigand Realtor (Retired) / Lt.. Provost and vice president for academic affairs father bede Classick.b.b.S. Ph. Abbot father Alfred Hulscher.M.S. Dean of admission and financial aid Jennifer fellinger Vice president for marketing and communications Lee Golden Interim vice president for institutional advancement Susan Heltsley Vice president of finance father Alfred Hulscher. Chancellor Roy f. Richardson Dean of students Josephine Yung Vice president for international programs and development .D.S. Prior. The Rants Group Olympia. Heynderickx. Treasurer Juan P.300 SAINT MARTIN’S ABBEY / UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY Kathleen C. O. Washington Philip S. Washington Joseph S. New York Pat Rants President / Co-CEO.b.b. Ph.

edu Extension Programs (Joint base Lewis-McChord.D. Ph. Centralia College.D. Office of Susan Leyster..D. Ed. director 360-438-4577 gjoiner@stmartin.edu Extension Campuses Mercedes Garrido.. Olympic Community College.edu Engineering. Westgard. athletic director 360-438-4305 bgrisham@stmartin. director 360-438-4581 leysters@stmartin. S.edu Alumni Relations. Bessie. College of Eric C. Office of Jan Berney.. Office of Juan Flores. dean 360-438-4333 westgard@stmartin. P. director 360-486-8133 rshahanriehl@stmartin. Everett Community College.D.edu Campus Ministry.edu Career Center Ann Adams...edu Campus Life. School of Zella Kahn-Jetter.edu financial Aid. School of Richard Beer. program specialist 253-584-3533 mgarrido@stmartin. dean 360-438-4564 eapfelstadt@stmartin. Office of Shelle Riehl. vice president 360-438-4390 .edu Centralia College Extension Campus Cruz Arroyo. Office of 800-220-7722 / 360-486-8885 Arts and Sciences.edu Athletics Department Bob Grisham.. College of Joyce V.D. Ph.edu business. Ph.D.edu DIRECTORY / INDEX finance Office Susan Heltsley.. Office of Joseph D. director 360-438-4371 jberney@stmartin. dean of admissions and student financial services 800-368-8803 / 360-438-4311 jflores@stmartin. Ph.edu Disability Support Services. vice president for academic affairs 360-438-4310 Admissions. 414 carroyo@stmartin. Office of 360-438-4580 TTY: 360-438-4556 Education and Professional Psychology.ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 301 ACADEMIC CATALOG ADMINISTRATIVE OffICES University General Information 360-491-4700 FAX: 360-459-4124 Academic Affairs. Ph. Apfelstadt. director 360-736-9391 ext. Tacoma Community College) Cruz Arroyo. director 253-964-4688 carroyo@stmartin. dean 360-438-4320 zkahnjetter@stmartin.edu Counseling and Wellness. Office of Ginny-Beth Joiner. director 360-486-8842 aadams@stmartin.E. dean 360-438-4512 jrbeer@stmartin.

Office of Melanie Richardson. director 253-964-4688 carroyo@stmartin. dean of students 360-438-4367 mrichardson@stmartin. Office of the Mary Conley Law. vice president 360-438-4375 jyung@stmartin.302 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY Housing and Residence Life.edu Joint base Lewis-McChord (JbLM) Main Cruz Arroyo. Office of John Hopkins. Ph. director 360-412-6163 tmcclain@stmartin.edu Intercultural Initiatives.edu Joint base Lewis-McChord (JbLM) McChord field Kim Van Vleet.edu .stmartin.edu President. interim vice president 360-438-4586 lgolden@stmartin.edu Registrar. vice president 360-438-4332 jfellinger@stmartin. director 360-438-4389 dlong@stmartin. Office of Jennifer Fellinger. Heynderickx Ph. Office of Lee Golden. director 360-486-8800 / 360-486-8800 sharrison@stmartin.edu Carl Lew. president 360-438-4307 president@stmartin. Office of Cynthia Johnson. web manager 360-438-4461 clew@stmartin. Office of Ronda Vandergriff.. Office of Howard Thronson.edu Student Accounts. Office of the Roy F.edu ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES O’Grady Library Scot Harrison. director 360-486-8805 ptaylor@stmartin.edu Human Resources.edu Institutional Advancement.edu Student Affairs. registrar 360-438-4356 marylaw@stmartin.. Office of Patrick Taylor. administrative assistant 360-438-4356 rvandergriff@stmartin. director 253-584-3533 kvanvleet@stmartin. director 360-438-8880 ddebow@stmartin. Office of Josephine Yung.edu Learning and Writing Center Deborah Debow.edu Public Safety.D.edu Veteran Services.edu International Programs and Development. Office of Timothy McClain. director 360-486-8847 jhopkins@stmartin. Office of Debbie Long.D. director 360-486-8876 hthronson@stmartin.edu Marketing and Communications. director 360-486-8131 cjohnson@stmartin.edu Integrated Technology Services.edu Website / www.

please visit the University website at www.ACADEMIC OFFICES ACADEMIC CATALOG 303 ACADEMIC OffICES Arts and Sciences 360-438-4564 business and Economics 360-438-4512 Education and Professional Psychology 360-438-4333 Engineering 360-438-4320 International Education 360-438-4375 Master of business Administration Program 360-438-4512 Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology Program 360-438-4560 Master of Civil Engineering Program 360-438-4320 Master of Engineering Management Program 360-438-4320 Master of Education/Master in Teaching Programs 360-438-4333 Spiritual Life Institute 360-438-4564 Summer Session 360-438-4596 For additional information about Saint Martin’s University programs and policies.stmartin.edu. DIRECTORY / INDEX .

O S. O 2. L 5. S R. U D.edu 6th AVENUE SE 6TH AVENUE FIELD  14 10 BUILD 1. B K. O G. S L. A B. G . Z 6. C 8. R 18. L E. R H. A 4.304 CAMPUS MAP SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY CAMPUS MAP SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY AND ABBEY CAMPUS MAP 5300 PACIFIC AVE. H N 10. C N. P I. J  15 11   13 6 16 17 SOFTBALL FIELD JAN HALLIDAY ’89 MEMORIAL PLAZA TRACK AND SOCCER FIELD BARAN DRIVE    BASEBALL FIELD  PAVILION WAY PARK A.stmartin. S 16. N M. SE LACEY. S P. P 17. B 11. L F. B J. N O. B 13. H 7. K 14. S Q. O 15. WASHINGTON 98503-7500 www. C C. T 9. M 3.

Trautman Student Union Building (TUB) 9. Parsons Hall (resident student lot) I. Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion/Norman Worthington Conference Center 10. Baran Hall (Residence) 11. Baran/Spangler Hall (resident student lot) J. Abbey Church 4. Parsons Hall (Residence) 17. University and Abbey visitor lot D. Reserved employee lot H. South Pavilion lot R. Jan Halliday ’89 Memorial Plaza Parking A. Lynch visitor lot F. SW Pavilion employee lot Q. CE employee lot N. Recreation Center 18. O’Grady Library lot G. NW Pavilion employee lot M. Lynch Center (Abbey Guest House) 5. Overflow lot S. Burton Hall (resident student lot) K. Grand Staircase student lot DIRECTORY / INDEX .ACADEMIC CATALOG CAMPUS MAP – LEGEND 305 LEGEND buildings 1. Monastery 3. Abbey private guest lot B. Kreielsheimer Hall (Arts Education) 14. Courtyard lot C. SE Pavilion lot P. Burton Hall (Residence) 13. Softball (resident student/student lot) L. O’Grady Library 15. Lynch employee lot E. Harned Hall (Academic Building) 7. Old Main (Bookstore on 2nd floor) 2. Cebula Hall (Engineering) 8. Zaverl Hall (Maintenance Building) 6. NE Pavilion lot O. Spangler Hall (Residence) 16.

Turn right onto College Street. Proceed to Pacific Avenue. Turn left on 6th Avenue. Follow signs to Pavilion and Conference Center.306 DIRECTIONS TO SAINT MARTIN’S DIRECTIONS TO SAINT MARTIN’S from Interstate-5 Northbound: Take College St. . turn left. from Interstate-5 Southbound: Take Martin Way exit #109. Proceed to Franz Street. from College Street to Old Main Classroom and Administration building: Proceed to 6th Avenue. exit #108. from College Street to the Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion and Norman Worthington Conference Center: Proceed to Lacey Boulevard. turn left. cross to the University entrance at Father Meinrad Gaul Drive. Turn right onto Martin Way. Turn left onto College Street. Follow signs to Old Main and visitor parking.

4-5 Admission. 26-27 Undergraduate. 27 Accounting.INDEX 307 INDEx -AAbbey Church. 10. 22-31 Acceptance of admission offer. 191 Business Administration major. 78-79 Art courses. 31. 104 Biology major. 74-75 Academic honors. 191-195. 73 Academic values. 196-197 Business Administration. 23-24 Graduate. 188 Accounting. 28. 9-10 Acceptance of admission offer. 5. 300 About this catalog. 24 Application for readmission. 187-197 Accounting. 27-28 Transfer. 4. 40 Burton Hall. School. 15. 187-190 Business Administration. 9. 191. 11. 4 Academic calendar. 231-239 Business Administration courses. 22-28 Administration. 14. 191-192 Business Administration minor. 299-300 Board refund. 52-53 Art. 212 Bachelor’s degrees. 160. 104-111 Biology courses. 231-239 DIRECTORY / INDEX . 192 Economics. University. 23-24 Application for degree. 26-27 Application for graduate programs. 11 Business. 41 Biology. 228-231 Home school applicants. The. 228-231 International students. 61 All-University courses. 187 Accounting major. 71 Application for transfer admission. 78-156 Athletic and recreational programs. 30 Application for first-year admission. 5. 6-7 Academic dishonesty. 14. 39. 29-30 First-year. 47 Baran Hall. 105-106 Biology minor. 25 Advising. 193-196 Business Administration faculty. 11 Abbey. 107-111 Biology faculty. 51. 187-190 Accounting courses. 303 Academic policies/procedures. 11. 301-302 Advanced Placement. preparation for CPA examination. 189 Accreditation. 73 Academic suspension. 61-75 Academic probation. 86. 17. 8. Saint Martin’s. 8 Benedictine. 22-31 Applicants with military experience. 191-196 Concentrations. requirements. 27 Application for. 95. 31 Education. 189-190 Accounting faculty. 28 Extension campus. 60 -bBelltower. 78 Arts and Sciences. 159. 25 Areas of study. 81. 46 Bon Appetit. 198. 78 Art faculty. 192-193 Master of Business Administration (MBA) program. 78 Application for admission. 60-75 Academic offices. 158. 20 Bookstore. 19 Benedict of Nursia. College of. 19-20 Attendance. 300 Administrative offices. 72 Academic information. 107 Board of trustees.

Master of Arts (MAC) program. 58 Degree. 196-197 Economics courses. 157-186. 61 Cheating. 113 Civil engineering. 202-210 Civil engineering courses. 111 Chemistry major (Bachelor of Arts). 162. 128 Community services major. 20 Career services. 48. 18 Double major degree program. 60 Courses at extension campuses. 130 Criminal justice. 306 Directory. 185. 205-211 Civil engineering faculty. 15 Campus dining services. 274-284 Conduct. 129-132 Criminal justice courses. 71 Criminal justice. application for. 130-132 Criminal justice faculty. minor. 196 Education and Professional Psychology. 65 Change of registration. 63 CPA exam. 202 Civil engineering major. 20 Correspondence courses. 255. 119 Community services. 299-300 Faculty. undergraduate. 128 Computer and Copy Resource Center. 64 Degree completion. 118 Computer science major. 300 Disability Support Services. 128-129 Community services courses. 58-59 -EEconomics. 240-246 Course number classifications. 196 Economics minor. 14. 20 Directed study. 47. 129 Community services faculty. 240-274 . 170. 12. 29. 292-297 Faculty and staff emeriti. 196-197 Economics faculty. Office. 44. 292-303 Academic offices. 118-122 Computer science courses. 71 Degree requirements. College of. 6-7 Campus facilities. 189 Credit for life experience (FOCUS program). 256 Computer science. 13 Centralia College extension campus. 17 Counseling Psychology. 119-122 Computer science faculty. 203-205 Master of Civil Engineering. 303 Administration. 114-117 Chemistry faculty. 28. 75 Chemistry. 16 Cebula Hall. 58-59 Credit through testing. preparation for. 12 -D“D” grades. 118 Computer science minor. 11-15 Campus map. 54 Dining hall. 69 Counseling and Wellness Center. 20 Dining services. 304-305 Campus ministry. 301-302 Board of trustees. 12 Conference services and facilities. 298 Saint Martin’s Abbey. 162 Change of grade. 300 Administrative offices. 111-117 Chemistry courses.308 INDEX MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY SAINT -CCalendars. transfer of. 113 Chemistry minor. 21 Commencement. 69 Directions to campus. 129 Criminal justice major. 130 Curriculum Resource Center. 43. 112 Chemistry major (Bachelor of Science). 60 Competency-based endorsements.

second/additional. faculty and staff. 198-202. 284-289 Master’s programs in engineering. 166-167 Endorsements. 199 Civil engineering. 157 Added endorsement options. 274-284 Master of Engineering Management (MEM). 163 Reading minor. 14. 247 Physical education. 274-289 Bachelor of Science. School of. 80 English as a Second Language (ESL). 49 Withdrawal policy. 165 Admission to. 50 Tuition refund policy. 262 Student teaching/internship. 29-30 Class loads. 103-104 Fee schedule. 49. 5 Everett Community College extension campus. 162. 48 Transcripts. 166-167 Elementary education faculty. 48 Registration. 221-225 ESL courses. 298 Engineering. 38 French. 41-42 Payment. 49 -fFacilities (campus). 169 Elementary education. 170-173 Elementary education. general courses. 62 Enrollment at other colleges. 200 Transfer credits. 63 Equal opportunity statement. 211-221 Minimum graduation requirements. 170-173. 292-297 Faculty and staff emeriti. 67-68 Notification of rights. 274-289 Mechanical engineering. 63 Degree options. 230-231 Expenses. 47 Expenses. Washington State competency-based requirements. 222-225 ESL faculty.ACADEMIC CATALOG 309 INDEX Academic Policy. 47-48 Lacey campus students. 11-15 Faculty. 198-199 English. 80 English minor. 164-165 Program requirements. 162 Competency-based endorsements. 167 Emeriti. 164 Technology in education. 181-185 Split-level course requirements. 42 Registration fees. graduate programs. 179-181 Post-baccalaureate Certification-only option. 166 Elementary education major/ endorsement. 166-167 Graduate programs. 29. 169 Secondary education. 48 Term dates. 67-68 Federal work study. 161 Endorsements. 170-173. 165. 14. 62-63 Courses. 79-85 English courses. 165. 163 Application to. 200 Undergraduate curriculum. 42 DIRECTORY / INDEX . 161 Accreditation. 40-46. 173-179 Education minor. 167-169 Special education. 43. 298 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). 185-186 Waiver and substitution option. 162. 202-211 Engineering. 230-231 Extension campus programs. 221 Enrollment. 158 Courses. 200-202 Master of Civil Engineering (MCE). 4. 255 Conceptual framework. 79 English major. 82-85 English faculty. 47-50 Application for admission. 255 Endorsements offered.

55-58 Degree completion. 254-261 Post-Baccalaureate CertificationOnly Option.310 INDEX MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY SAINT Special fees. 42 Student services fees. 93-94 Religious Studies. 88-93 Philosophy. 98 Theatre Arts. 78-79 English. 232 Common policies and procedures. 32 Award. 63-64 Graduate programs. 301 Financial aid. 240-246 Master of Business Administration (MBA). 231-232. 8 History. 95-98 Speech. 47-49. 133 Geography courses. 38-39 Grievance. 230-231 Fees. 58-59 Food service. 55-56 Mission statement. 42-44 History of Saint Martin’s. 65-67 -GGeneral education program. 33 Determining. 38-39 Other means. 284-289 Payments. 134 History minor. 37-39 Student loans. 133-139 History courses. 37-39 Undergraduate students. 36 Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC). 162. 41 Filing a grievance about a grade. 11. 62-63. 39-40 Satisfactory Academic Progress. 25 Humanities. 66. 54. 230 -HHal and Inge Marcus Pavilion. 44. 228. 35-36 FOCUS program. 58 Goals and objectives. procedure for filing. 14. 240. 41 Health insurance. 230-231 Tuition. 17. 247-254 Master in Teaching (MIT). 64 Grades. 36-37 Scholarships. 19. 229. 57 Geography. 49 Grade point average. 262 Master’s programs in engineering. 247-274 Master of Education (MED). 79-85 Interdisciplinary Studies. 40 Types of. 37-39 Timeframe to receive aid. 274-289 Master of Civil Engineering. 135-139 History faculty. 133 GoArmyEd. 13. 54 Residency requirements. 274-284 Master of Engineering Management. 28. 65-67 Financial aid. faculty. 133 Geography. 34-35 Graduate students. 231-239 Master’s degrees in education. 36 Grants (gift aid). 31-32 Eligibility requirements for. 31-40 Applying for. 99-102 . 43. 58 Double major degree program. 86-87 Music. Programs in. 20 Harned Hall. 78-104 Art. 37-39 Student employment. 228-229 Expenses. 14. 54-55 Program requirements. 228-289 Application to. 134-135 Home school applicants. 12 Health Center. 29. 20 Joint Base Lewis-McChord extension campus. 133 History major. 230 Grants (gift aid).

52-53 Marcus (Hal and Inge) Pavilion. 38-39 Location of Saint Martin’s. 61 Learning and Writing Center. Office of. 256-257 Application to. 262-274 Degree requirements. 249 Courses. 243 Faculty. 235 Admission to. 20 Martin of Tours. 10-11 -MMajors and areas of study. 232-233 Class locations. 240-241 Application to. 81. student. 257 Competency-based endorsements. 11 Interdisciplinary Studies. 86-87 International Baccalaureate. 27-28 Health insurance for. 70 Information Commons. 244-246. 64 Incomplete. 254 Internship. 231 Registration. 14 Late validation.ACADEMIC CATALOG 311 INDEX World Languages. 240-274 Courses. 42. 13 -LLacey campus students (extension students). 254-261 Admission to. 102-103 -KKreielsheimer Hall. 42. 233-234 Faculty. 233 Master of Education (MED). 255 Courses. 253-254 Master’s degrees in education and professional psychology. request for. 102-104 Writing. 65 Independent study. 254 Program requirements. 241-242 Courses. 235-239 Degree requirements. 19 -JJapanese minor. 232 Calendar. 18 Internships. 72 Insights. removal of. 25 International relations minor. 240 Program format. 247-254 Admission to. 64 Incomplete. 261 Non-thesis option. 143 International students. 240-246 Admission to. 243 Thesis option. 257-258 Faculty. 242-243 Program requirements. 140-141 Loans. 261 Professional certification. 17 Legal Studies. 248 Application to. 232 Courses. 261 -IIncomplete. 247 Non-thesis option. 249-250 Faculty. 43 Application. 231-239 Accounting. 250 Split-level course requirements. 85-86 Master of Arts in counseling psychology (MAC) program. undergraduate. 243-244 Master of Business Administration (MBA) program. 244-246 Degree requirements. 262 Strand areas. 9 DIRECTORY / INDEX . 43 International Programs and Development. 19. 48 Lambert Lodge. 13. 262-274 Master in Teaching (MIT). 231-232 Application to. 258-260 Degree requirements. 27-28.

127 Physics courses. 123 Mathematics minor. 162. 20 -OO’Grady Library. 94 Philosophy faculty. 274-284 Master of Civil Engineering (MCE) program. 20 Mission of the University. 212 Mechanical engineering courses. 232. 62. 14. 179 Physics. 9 Mission statement. 274-275 Application to. 276 Suggested programs of study. 301. 63. 260 Masters programs in engineering. 179-181 Physical education courses. 5 Music. 30 Military service (ROTC). 302 McDonald. 121. 14 Pass/fail grades. 212 Design Integration. 94 Physical education. 13. 8 Mechanical engineering. 29. 285 Application to. 274-284 Admission to. 34. 278-279 Master of Engineering Management (MEM) program. 61-62 Political science. 124 Joint Base Lewis-McChord extension campus. 214-221 Mechanical engineering faculty. 284-289 Master of civil engineering (MCE) program.312 INDEX MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY SAINT Thesis option. 286 Mathematics. 180-181 Physical education faculty. 284 Program requirements. 229. 62 Norman Worthington Conference Center. 274 Program preparation and continuation. 211-221 Educational objectives. 5. 8 Multimedia Center. 274-284 Master of Engineering Management (MEM) program. 284-289 Admission to. 41-42 Philosophy. 213-214 Military applicants. 280-284 Degree requirements. 89-90 Music minor. 276-277 Courses. 90-93 Music faculty. 285-286 Courses. 49. 93-94 Philosophy courses. 301 -PParsons Hall. 286 Faculty. 74-75 Policies and procedures. 122 Mathematics major (Bachelor of Arts). 11 Olympic College extension campus. 12 -NNon-degree students. 11 Old Main. 287-289 Degree requirements. 127 Plagiarism. 48. 64 Payment of fees. 211 Mechanical engineering major. 93 Philosophy minor. 122-127 Mathematics courses. 179 Physical education minor. 88 Music major. 240. 124-127 Mathematics faculty. 276 Faculty. 88-93 Music courses. 29. 43. 66. 231. 47. 90 Mukogawa Women’s University. 124 Mathematics major (Bachelor of Science). 275-276 Combined degree (BSCE/MCE) program. 47. 141-145 . 44. Angus.

142 Post 9/11 GI Bill. 30 Science and Mathematics. 96 Removal of incomplete grade. 142 Political science minor. 43 Psychology. 21 Residency requirements. 122-127 Physics. 111-117 Computer Science. Programs in. 167-169 Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium. 262 Pre-law. 95 Religious studies minor. 34-35 Graduate. 11. 143-145 Political science faculty. 147 Publications. 146 Psychology major. minor (education). 61 Registration fees. 44-45 Registration. 240-246 Psychology courses. 95-98 Religious studies courses. 46 Room and board. 44 Non-refundable payments. Recreation and fitness center. 146 Property loss or damage. 45-46 Room refund. 69 Request for an incomplete grade. 146-151 Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC). 13 Refund policy. 167 Secondary education. 42 Religious studies. 46 ROTC. 31 Charneski. 60 Secondary education. 129-132 Geography. 128-156 Community services. 118-122 Mathematics. 45-46 Room refund. 164. 40-41 Residence halls. 143 Political science courses. 96-98 Religious studies faculty.INDEX ACADEMIC CATALOG 313 International relations minor. 9 Saint Martin’s Abbey. 19 Residence charges. 133 History. 104-127 Biology. 43-46 Action required. 25 -SSaint Benedict of Nursia. Programs in. 127 Social Sciences. 45 Withdrawal dates. 44 Room and Damage Deposit. damage deposit. 30 Post-baccalaureate certification-only program. major/ endorsement. 62 Scholarships. 104-111 Chemistry. 95 Religious studies major. 140-141 Political science. 141 Political science major. 46 Calculations and appeals. 146 Pre-law faculty. 14 Residence life. 147 Psychology minor. 45-46 Board refund. 65 Repeating courses. 41. 141-145 -RReading. returning students. 128-129 Criminal justice. 167-169 Secondary education faculty. 147-151 Psychology faculty. 20 Running Start. 37-39 Semester system. 8 Saint Martin of Tours. 31 Application for. 44 Board refund. 36 Undergraduate 35 Schedule limitations. 169 Readmission. 133-139 Legal Studies. 57 Room and board. 64-65 DIRECTORY / INDEX . 300 Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). 46 Tuition deposit.

programs. 99-102 Theatre arts courses. 153-155 Sociology and cultural anthropology faculty. 44-45 -UUndergraduate majors and areas of study. 13 Statute of limitations. 153 Spangler Hall. 99-100 Track and field facility.C. 67-68 Student services fees. 63 Strand areas (MED program). major. 42 Speech. 47. 70-71 Transfer admission. 20 Summer Session. 146-151 Social Justice. vocational rehabilitation applicants. 185 Technology in education minor. 165 St. 50. 68 From University. 14. 16 Student responsibility. 152-155 Sociology and cultural anthropology courses. 29. 152-155 Women’s Studies. 30. 98. 2 Tacoma Community College extension campus. 99 Theatre arts major. 248. 155-156 . 17 Student health insurance. 146 Psychology. 185 Term dates for extension campuses. 64 Trautman Student Union Building.314 INDEX MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY SAINT Pre-Law. 40 Tuition refunds. 42-43 Student life. 164 Students and military service. 72 Withdrawal. 41-42 Student teaching. 99 Theatre arts minor. 98 Spiritual Life Institute. D. 98 Speech courses. 52-53 Undergraduate programs. 45 Tuition rates. 60 Student conduct. 181-185 Special education courses. 170-173 Washington. Gertrude Dining Hall. 28-29 Suspension. 69 Women’s studies. 68 From main campus courses. 26-27 Transfer “D” grades. 73-74 -TTable of contents. 20 St. 61 Student Right to Know Act. 43. 303 Split-level course requirements. 104 Special education. 183 Special fees. 11. 181 Special education minor. 186 Technology in education faculty. 15-20 Student organizations and activities. 185-186 Technology in education courses. 152-153 Sociology and cultural anthropology minor. 30 -WWashington State competency-based endorsement requirements. Raphael Hall. 21 Student Health Center. 48 Theatre arts. 184-185 Special education faculty. 155-156 Sociology and cultural anthropology. 100-102 Theatre arts faculty. 13 Tuition deposit. 301 Technology in education. 14 Spanish. 251-253 Student classification. 152 Sociology and cultural anthropology. 71-72 Veterans Administration. 44. 13 Transcripts. 78-225 -VVeterans. 152 Sociology and cultural anthropology. 29. 68-69 From extension campus courses.

INDEX ACADEMIC CATALOG 315 Women’s studies courses. 30 -ZZaverl Hall. 103-104 World languages faculty. 103-104 Japanese. 20 Writing Minor. 102-103 Spanish. 14 DIRECTORY / INDEX . 155 Women’s studies minor. 38 World languages. 155-156 Work study. 103 Japanese minor. 104 World language courses. 81 -YYellow Ribbon Program. 102-104 French. 13. 156 Women’s studies faculty. 102 Worthington (Norman) Conference Center.

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