Draft syllabus: 11th grade seminar: Seeing the World Through American Eyes (Overview) Team-taught by English

Department Chair Craig Carpentieri and Chief Academic Officer Gary Weisserman, this course is taught in a seminar style setting intended to transition students into college-level modalities of learning. The course will also serve as a "demonstration classroom," where Hillel teachers may come observe unique and outstanding "best practice" teaching from two experienced, master educators. Students will earn honors credit for this class. Students will be engaged as partners in determining which American Literature will be selected, what genres and media of writing will be emphasized, what emerging technologies will be employed, and how the course may be used as preparation for next year's implementation of our Capstone Years Program. Areas of emphasis may include: • Americans abroad: Literary perspectives on a global society; • Creative and multi-disciplinary writing about contemporary issues; • Investigations into the relationships between technology, aesthetics and literacy; and • Other themes as they arise. Essential Learnings Students in this class will: (Bloom’s Taxonomy level: Application) select and interpret global themes as they arise in American Literature that will guide at least four book talks on separate novels (of their own selection), and by authoring at least one formal critical response based on those novels. Each student will collaborate with instructors to select four novels, to be read on a schedule negotiated in class. They will partner with at

least two other students reading that same novel to conduct a book talk connecting each novel to a global theme, and will independently author at least one formal critical response (between 5-7 pages). They will also participate in classmate’s book talk, drawing connections between and across novels. (30%) (Bloom’s Taxonomy level: Evaluation) debate contemporary issues, as seen through the eyes of key figures in American Literature chosen from their four books or novels, by creating a media-based project bringing the characters together. Each student will create a media-based project, preferably web- or video-based, that shows a rich and complex understanding of different characters’ perspectives as they would relate to modern world issues, and present it to the class and other faculty or members of the community (including families) in a meaningful and engaging way. (25%) (Bloom’s Taxonomy level: Synthesis) create a substantial written product in the form of creative writing, non-fiction writing, blended media or critical analysis, to be published digitally or in print, and provide feedback on others’ works throughout the writing process. Each student will plan, workshop, and self-publish a serious work of literary or scholarly merit. They will give and receive feedback to other members of the class, and will thoughtfully incorporate this feedback in a meaningful way. (25%) (Bloom’s Taxonomy level: Knowledge) construct a technology-centered mechanism for teaching and learning vocabulary, using a given text as a starting point. Each student will work independently or collaboratively, as appropriate, an interesting and effective technology-based mechanism for teaching vocabulary using a given text as a starting point. Each student must also demonstrate mastery of this vocabulary themselves. (15%)

(Bloom’s Taxonomy level: Knowledge) construct a technology-centered mechanism for teaching and learning vocabulary, using a given text as a starting point. Each student will work independently or collaboratively, as appropriate, an interesting and effective technology-based mechanism for teaching vocabulary using a given text as a starting point. Each student must also demonstrate mastery of this vocabulary themselves. (15%) (Bloom’s Taxonomy level: Evaluation) respond briefly and thoughtfully to significant philosophical prompts drawn from contemporary issues and American literature. Each student will respond regularly, via Twitter or other technological mechanism, to prompts, with those responses used to facilitate discussion on critical issues. (5%) Areas of consideration for themes: • Engineering (the mastery of tools); • Knowledge building (making useful intellectual contributions to a learning community); • Artistic expression (the cultivation of aesthetic sensibilities); • Civic engagement (addressing important social issues and engaging in meaningful public and private discourse); • Spiritual development. Grades

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