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John DEau FBA/BIP 2011

Behavior Intervention Plan


Student: John DEau Date of Plan: May 3, 2011

Summary of Informant Data and Records Review To gather information from people who know John well and who are familiar with problem situations, Johns mother and father were given FAIT forms. Additional staff forms were completed by (his classroom teachers), (his Theater and Movement teacher), (his principal) and (his social worker). In addition, John was interviewed by using the student version of the FAIT. John reported that he had been in a fight last year at his old school. Although John has not used any sort of extreme physical aggression against another person at our school, Mom and Dad both report that generally aggressive and angry behaviors have increased in frequency and intensity this year. Consistent across reports is that John has a tendency to display disruptive behaviors such as talking back to adults, making growing/aggressive noises, getting out of his seat, kicking the wall and/or throwing/pushing classroom items, and refusing to follow directions. These behaviors were reported to particularly occur when John is given an ultimatum, when he is told no or stop or when he is asked to do something that is not pleasing to him. The on-task data collected by the FBA team indicated that during a 30 minute interval, John can stay on-task between 20-25 minutes. Positive Things About John Friendly/Sociable* Helpful* Liked by peers Has lots of friends Good sense of humor* Self-starter+ Socially aware+ Kind to adults+ Kind to other students+ Johns Preferences or Interests Superheroes* Games Singing/Music* Physical Activities* Demonstrating abilities Having jobs Talking to friends Reading Slinky Successful Learning Conditions When receiving frequent positive attention or support When he can engage in hands on activity When the expectations are clear When scaffolds are in place

John DEau FBA/BIP 2011


Operational Definition of Behaviors:
Off Task Talking to self or peers Lying on the floor Gets out of seat Walks around room Frustration Walking away from teacher Shouts or mutters demands/provocative statements (e.g. call my mother! I hate this school) Whiney Voice Crying Aggressive Pushing chairs/tables Bumping peers Plows through crowd Throwing personal objects Turning back aggressively Growling Contorts face in a threatening way Control/Defiance/Non Compliance Refusal to follow directions Talking back Constant Talking to self or peers (e.g. After give me 5)

Summary of Behavior: Talking back (instead of listening the first time), not following directives and/or rules (e.g. skipping steps on the stairs, talking during silent 5), throwing personal items on seat/table, growling, getting out of seat, consistent talking Setting Events Difficulty getting ready for school quickly and is frequently late A lot of transition/crises in his life this past year. Adjusting to a different custody schedule. Antecedent Triggers Direct demand is given Corrected publicly or privately When told to do something nonpreferred Transitions When he is given an ultimatum When he is told no or stop When he cant have something he wants Adults and Peers Respond By Loss of privilege Sent to principals office Verbal redirection Try to explain and discuss the issue Provide verbal reminder of what is and isnt appropriate Letting him have what he is asking for

The function is: Based on the data collected and reports from teachers, family members and John himself, we hypothesize that because of a history of loss and unpredictable changes in his personal/home life, Johns difficult behaviors serve as an attempt to gain control over a situation, to gain the attention of adults and to escape situations or tasks that might make him feel unsuccessful, embarrassed or a sense of disapproval.

John DEau FBA/BIP 2011


Behavior Intervention Plan
Strategies to Prevent Behavior:
For Transitions: Remove him from line whenever possible to give him a separate transition (breakfast, bathroom, movement, movement-lunch, lunchrecess, recess-classroom, downstairs) o Breakfasthe has talk time if he arrives on time. He will walk up with the rest of the class. If he needs an incentive, one can be offered like beatboxing, demonstrating talent, etc. o Bathroom--send him to the bathroom by himself 5 minutes before everyone else goes and then he goes into room for 10 minutes. One teacher stays with the class, one teacher walks with John to take something important down to Mr. (e.g. tell Mr. . how many students are here today/attendance chart). o Movement to lunchJohn goes over 2 minutes early to wipe down the students lunch table. Someone will be in the caf setting up lunch so he will be supervised. o Lunch to Recesstakes the balls upstairs o Recess to NapHe is the nap coordinator. Comes upstairs when the students line up with a teacher to get water, turn off the lights and turn on the music, and then lies down. o End of the day dismissalHe lines up with the rest of the class and walks down. Make sure he packs up quickly and on time. If he needs an incentive, one can be offered. For Classroom Disruption/Off Task: Change seat on the rug so that he is surrounded by positive models (i.e. ) and making sure that he is not near . Provide attention and specific praise to John during class (e.g. checking in on progress, providing feedback on positive behaviors and academic work) particularly at the start of independent work time. Provide opportunities for John to be a helper in the classroom. For Defiant/Aggressive behavior: Provide choices to John when available and appropriate. Provide separate transitions for John when possible. Use general corrections and precorrective strategies to remind class of expected behaviors. Continue individual meetings with to explore feelings of anger, to provide a place for emotional release and to develop social appropriate coping strategies. Explore the possibility of having John meet with possibly for some physical/sports activity, to build a positive, consistent male connection.

Strategies to Teach Replacement Behaviors:

John DEau FBA/BIP 2011


To help John recognize the physical signals of frustration/anger To help John develop a peaceful, non-disruptive signal for when he needs to take a break for release. To teach John appropriate and socially acceptable ways to release anger To teach and practice socially appropriate ways to self-soothe Teach John to transition smoothly into class with a 3-step self-instruction sequence. Teach John to transition smoothly to independent work with a 3-step self-instruction sequence.

Strategies to Strengthen Appropriate Behavior:


For on-task/compliant behavior: 1. Intersperse specific social praise and validation throughout the period where John is on-task/compliant. 2. John will have an incentive system where he can earn a superhero toy time. John receives a sticker from a teacher when he is: o Sitting silently on the rug o When hands and feet are folded o When he raises his hand o When he is following directions When he gets 5 stickers, he has independent toy time for 3-5 minutes. He sets the timer and independently returns to the class activity. 3. John will engage in self-monitoring and evaluation at the end of each day by filling out his Daily Reflection Sheet. He will answer the questions Was I working hard? Was I being safe? and Was I being nice. The teacher will help John write his reflections in first person. When John receives all three smiley faces for a given day, he will earn 1 minute of performance time in front of the class where he can select to do breakdancing, cartwheels, backbends, etc.

Strategies for Responding to Occurrences of Unwanted Behavior:


When we observe John begin to engage in precursor behaviors or smaller off-task/disruptive behaviors (including calling out, talking in a small group, playing with things on the rug, and general low-grade attention seeking , we will follow these steps: 1. Do not engage John directly by not giving eye-contact, but provide a general non-verbal reminder to the class and then talk around him in praise. Talking in small group- teacher whispers in ear first time and then gets a choice of a new seat youre not in trouble, just come work over here If John continues to display problem behaviors that are defiant/non-compliant (including growling to himself out of frustration, turning his back on a teacher in class, continuing to ignore directions) we will: 1. Speak in a calm, soothing voice to name the emotion, validate the emotion and give him two choices of how he can handle the situation. (e.g. I see that youre frustrated, would you like to take some deep breaths or go get a drink of water? or Its hard when someone tells you no. Would you like to go take a one-minute stretch break in the hall or try counting to 10?) 2. If John turns his back on the teacher during this interaction, the teacher will say, take a minute, Ill come back when you are facing me and your body is

John DEau FBA/BIP 2011


calm. The teacher should then walk away and not give him attention until he is calm and compliant. 3. Avoid engaging in power struggles with John and keep the wording of corrective interactions to a minimum. If Johns behaviors continue and become unmanageable in the classroom (including aggressive outbursts, banging the chair or desk, growling towards a teacher or another student, kicking the wall, or any behavior that endangers or threatens himself or others) we will follow these steps: 1. Tell John privately and in a calm voice, you need to come with me. John will then be escorted to the office. The teacher will not talk to John along the way, as it seems to trigger an aggressive response. Other adults will leave the situation so that there is no other person from which to seek attention.