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FAMILY SAVE-ALL.
SUPPLYING EXCELLENT DISHES FOR

BREAKFAST, DINNER AND TEA,
FROM
.COLD FRAGMENTS,
.

AS WELL AS A LARGE
SOUPS,

NUMBER OP NEW RECEIPTS FOR COOKING AND PREPARING ALL KINDS OF
t

1

/^/:
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, by
T.

B.

PETERSON & BROTHERS.
Court of the United States, in and for

In the Clerk's

Office of the District

the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

•*1

•«

PREFACE.
<«•

In the comiDilation of the following pages

we have done
dustry.

our utmost to

make our

title

applicable to every branch of household in-

We

are sure that all

will agree

with us that the time has come when even
our
fair

country-women must turn their

attention to economizing in the household

expenses.

"We

may

well learn of our neighbors, the

French, their art of concocting a savory
dinner, of several courses, fi\)m a piece of

meat which one of our uneducated cooks
would send
pyriamatic
pepsia.
to the table saturated
oil,

with em-

a sure provocative of dys-

The Save-All

will be found to contain a

carefully-prepared system of secondary cooking, comprising receipts for preparing
(15)

good

IG

PREFACE.

and tempting dishes from cold meats, vegetables,

and puddings, which may be served

with the warmth and appetizing appearance
of the original dish.

Every housekeeper

must be aware that no previous book upon
cooking has been given containing
tory information
this subject
is

satisfac-

upon

this

point.

That

important, will be recognized
that there are none but the

when we think
families

and houses of the wealthiest who
rule,

do not, as a general
well
as

have

roasts,

as

other

eatables,

sent to the table

twice and even thrice.

How much

more acceptable, then,

to our

luxurious American taste, would be a warm,

savory dinner, prepared from these materials,

than the everlasting '^cold shoulder."
give also to our readers numerous re-

We

ceipts for preparing for the table the sec-

ondary parts of animals
liver,
tripe,
feet,
etc.,

—such
and

as the heart,

compounding

from these usually cheap
dishes

portions

many
and

which

will rival the great joints,

PREFACE.

17

win the

suffrages of those

who

are tired of

the endless succession of beef, mutton, and
chicken.
It

hq^ been thought advisable, therefore,

to confine this

work

to a collection of plain

and useful

receipts,

selected
tried

from family
for

MSS., having been

and vouched

by those from
tained.
It
is

whom

they have been ob-

also enriched

by the

contri-

butions of

many

foreign friends,

who have

given us the opportunity of verifying the
saying that America has no national cuisine,

but assimilates to herself the experience of

every nation, to prepare the abundance of
riches that a kind Providence has

showered

upon

us.

We

recommend, particularly
a

to

young
of

housekeepers,

profound

study

our
are

Housewifery department.
not only invaluable,
tried

The

hints

but have been well
Indeed,

and

their

worth ascertained.

the contents of our whole book are almost
entirely new,

and some useful information

18
will be found

PREFACE.

upon each page, tending

to

simplify labor,
of home.

and

to increase the comforts

Though

it

is

not desirable, in this en-

lightened age, that ladies should, like their

great-grandmothers, devote themselves exclusively to household duties, yet a thorough

knowledge of domestic management

is

not

incompatible with the cultivation of the

mind, or the practice of those accomplish-

ments which adorn the
trary, this

sex.

On

the conto all

knowledge encourages them

the studies and pursuits which tend to

make
so
life

home happy.

The

useful

instruction

necessary to attain this great aim of
is

rarely supplied at school, or at home, to
at that early age

girls

when

the

mind

is

ductile,

and the frame active; and consemature years, the attempt to
habits
is

quently, in
acquire

new

frequently irksome

and mortifying.
Let every young wife or mother remember her serious responsibility, and take care

PREFACE.
that
their

19
children find

the husband

and

the

home

to be truly the

haven of refuge
resting

from temptation

from labor and care
cheerful

—the calm —and the

place

bright and
sense,

abode of comfort.

Good

good humor, and good principles, are the
female spells that diffuse cheerfulness and
peace around the hearth of the poor as well
as the rich

man.

Intellectual attainments,

and

brilliant accomplishments, are agreeable

fireside

companions

;

but a

woman

of

little

education, if she earnestly determine to do

her

duty faithfulty and pleasantly,
fireside as

may

make her humble
brilliant

happy

as the

drawing-room.

In the manageas in the regu-

ment of a household. Is well
lation of the

human mind,

it is

attention to

the smaller duties which forms the
usefulness and happiness.

sum

of

Domestic
tained by

comfort

may

be equally

at-

all classes

—provided, always, that

the expenditure does not exceed the means,

20

PREFACE.
to

and .that cheerful exertions are used
the best of the means.

make

The

mistress of a family should always

remember, that the welfare and good man-

agement of the house depend on the eye of
the superior
is

— and consequently that nothing
whereby waste
never been accustomed,

too trifling for her notice

may

be avoided.

If a lady has

while single, to think of family manage-

ment,

let

her not on that account fear that
art.

she cannot attain the

It is certainly desirable to proportion the

style of living as well to the fortune, as to

the position in society

;

but

if

the two can-

not be

made

to agree, justice

demands the

sacrifice of

such appendages to station as

are inconsistent with the means.

The expenditure must be
sidered,

carefully con-

and retrenchment made on such
comfort of
sets

articles as will least affect the
all.
it,

Every woman who earnestly
live Avithin

about
excel-

may

the means.

An

PREFACE.
lent

21
in

common-sense

maxim

household

management,
is,

as well as in important aiFairs,

" Begin nothing without steadily looking

to the end."

A

prudent housekeeper will always prois

vide in time every thing that

actually

wanted

;

but will never be tempted to buy

what

is

not wanted, and then try to find a
it.

use for

She should never allow hurry or bustle

to

be the practice of the household, or nothing
will be well done.
It is

unnecessary for any

woman

to say

she has not time to perform some important
duty.

A

due arrangement and economy
opportunity for
all

of time leaves
needful.

things

Economy
fore,

is

an arrangement of order of
Thereas the

things to produce a certain result.

no economy can be so important
time, the

economy of
sion of

most precious

posses-

man.
reflection

A

little

in

the

morning

will

on the contrary. afford them a On the mutual duties of servants and employers. so that not one moment shall be misspent —the important duties to be per- formed at regular and stated periods. But for these a well- regulated itors mind is ever prepared. moderate demands and judicious forbearance produce respectful obedience. we may say. Idle vis- must and will infest the homes of the industrious. and may. A piece of needlework. Ser- . or accidents.22 PREFACE. unavoidable interunforeseen domestic af- ruptions fairs . In the pursuits of the mistress of a family there may be. enable mistress or servant to make due ar- rangements for the emploj^ment of the day before her. however. knitting. or even some simple household occupation be carried on without offence to the may visitors. in general. but the time need not be wholly lost. useful lesson. the lesser occupations to be introduced to fill up the disengaged spaces. that. — visitors.

like the calm affection brings. 23 vants should always remember that their services are only the just payment for their wages and support. May And. visit some lone sick one's bed. We were just about to explain. and should scrupulously render them. has still the power rarest perfume to exhale That perfume. borne on zephyr's wings. PREFACE.. There's nothing lost. But the attachment of a serfor- vant can only be bought by mildness. The reader may possibly ask what is the use and application of the sentimental and humorous passages which follow. and kind words. but have come to the conclusion to allow each one the pleasure of making the discovery. The tiniest flower That grows within the darkest vale. . THERE'S NOTHING LOST. bearance. Though hid from The view. 'Twill scatter gladness round her head.

perchance. May touch a And cause heart alread}' stirred. The drop of dew- That trembles Will seek its in the rosebud's breast home of ether blue And To fall again as pure and blest spra^'.. Tliere's nothing lost. take root. And make a saddened breast rejoice And then. some pilgrim ma^^ Seek shelter from the heat of noon. The slightest tone Or whisper from a loved one's voice May melt a heart of hardest stone. the careless word Our thoughtless lips too ol'ten speak. lost. And song-birds sing their sweetest tune. A green and glorious tree be found its Beneath shade. that troubled heart to break . While in its boughs the breezes play. the fountain spray. in the To mingle in Or sparkle bow of God. . The seed that's cast By Will careless 3'et hand upon the ground. There's nothing lost. and may at last . 24 There's nothing PREFACE. Perchance to revel in the cool the dry and parching sod.

So guide our hands that w^e may say " There's nothing wasted. There's nothing lost. is wisely used bless'd ! and we're doubly And be our lot with rich or poor. The music of some happier hour. Though every mournful The string be mute . For Heaven's teachings are the best The blessing that Increases.." . or tempest toss'd. hai'p that swells with love's own wordsj May thrill the soul with deepest power When still the hand that swept its chords Then let us make the plan our own. PREFACE. By sunshine warm'd. nothing lost. 95 faintest strain The Of breathing from some dear In memor3^'s dream one's hite may come again.

.

.. No. «' " No. . Beef soup... 50 Cold rock fish. . 58 59 60 Another soup of green No. .. Croquettes of fish. 72 73 73 74 75 75 76 77 .. A cheap soup.. . . .. 60 Fish as food. Clam soup. . . Shad. 2.. 2.. . 58 Fish fritters... 54 .... Baked herrings. .. ..... ETC. .. 49 Boiled rock. Beau soup. 82 83 84 J-5 " " No..CONTENTS. No.. 2. Oyster omelet. French gumbo. .. White soup. Egg soup. A nice dish from fragments of cold fish. . Economical mode of 62 cooking salmon. 1. soup. 40 41 43 To cure shad. " No.. Halibut.. . Green pea soup without Broiled shad.. .. . Sago soup. 51 Boiled herrings. Mock turtle soup. Boiled shad. Bouillon. Salted cod fish. 45 Fried shad. . . Shad roasted on a board. 56 of serving A nice way 57 any kind of cold up 57 fish with stale bread.. 47 Fried rock. . Soup of beef's heart.. SOUPS. No.. . .. FISH. Veal soup. Fried oysters. No. . .. OYSTERS... .. . Green corn soup. . . 2 Cakes or balls made from cold cod fish.. .. 3.. 54 Fresh herrings. 66 67 68 68 69 69 70 71 . 1.. Soup without meat.. Pickled oysters. 52 Potted herrings.. . . . . Cold boiled rock fish. . 47 White potted shad. . . souce^. .. Summer meat. peas. Pepper pot.. . 1. ... 63 64 65 66 44 Soup from calf's feet. 78 79 79 80 81 . . 53 Herring fried.. White soup without meat.. 62 Fish. 55 . . Oyster soup. . . . .... No. 45 Potted shad.. . . No. 2. . 39 Cat-fish..souced. Bouillon.. . 1. 86 86 (27) .

Boiled meats. 95 96 97 99 " Rissoles" of cold beef.. .. Terrapins. 88 88 Cold beef with pota118 toes. . . . Beef baked in forms. . . and Yorkshire pudding. Corned beef.. POULTRY. A nice Stewed beefsteaks.. No. Beef.. recooked. or veal. bers. 122 . 112 112 113 114 115 115 .. Meats. Plain oyster patties. ribs.. Economical stew. Baked beef. beef. Beefsteak with cucum.. . 90 91 A dish from cold beef . like game. Beef. . . CONTENTS. . Stewed oysters with cream. Beef's kidney. ' No.. Roast beef. . Mutton chops with lemon. . or veal. . a 9aise. . Italian beefsteak. ETC. Under-done beef served . . of dressing cold sirloin of beef. breakfast. Cold potatoes and beef. 124 125 126 126 127 128 128 A fricassee from frag- ments of cold beef.. with mashed 123 or sirloin.. French stew. la Fran- 117 . Lobster salad. GAME. Hashes. . luncheon.28 Scalloped oysters. . 131 132 132 134 135 136 .. . Minced beef. 123 . Cold beef or mutton with poached eggs. potted from cold beef. Beefsteak with potatoes. .. Lunch from cold roast . . The only " cold shoulder" which can be shown to a friend without offence. or supper relish.. mutton. as steaks. No. Method potatoes. mutton.. . 92 93 and mashed potatoes. Beefsteak fried. . Beefsteak with oysters. 1. — . No. . . . . .. Oyster pie. 2. stuffed.. Fried beefsteak with wine. 129 of cold roast Pie made beef. 1. Beef cakes. 2. . Mutton chop. "Toad in the hole" from cold meat. . 119' 120 120 121 MEATS. 1 corned beef. Turnovers of cold meat.... ... Mutton cutlets with Portugese sauce. a-ia-mode. fried. . 2. Nice patties from underdone beef. 130 Cold beef hashed with vinegar. Beefs heart. To make a nice relisli out of fragments of cold lobster or crab.. S7 Beef hashed. A nice dish from cold beef. Beef. . . Broiled beef's heart. Roasted beef's tongue. 100 101 102 103 104 104 105 106 106 107 108 109 109 110 Ill Boiled No.. . No. Cold beef. ..

. . . . . Lamb stewed with 147 148 Pie or cold veal. of calf's . To cook cold veal. .. .77 crust. 183 184 184 Ragout of livers of . or veal. game 2 . French stew of veal. . .. . . or lamb. . veal.. 140 141 . Entree of cold chicken. Sweet-bread pie. 180 181 182 150 151 152 153 . . Boiled sweet-breads. Calves' brains fried. Calf's liver broiled. 29 .. . . Roast veal.. Cold mutton re-cooked with wine. . Sweet-bread fried. Broiled cold chicken. .. 179 179 A onions. mutton and mashed pototoes. Irish stew. Pie of cold veal and 143 143 144 145 146 ham.. . or spinach. . from cold Fricassee boiled chickens. Directions for selecting 136 137 Minced veal. Mutton pie with potato . Chicken pot pie.. poultry. Cold breast of mutton or veal. Roasted sweet-breads... . turkey.. . A nice ragout of cold ... .. Boiled leg of lamb. . . Method A of re-dressing cold roast beef.. Pie of cold roast veal. mutton. . An excellent hash from cold poultry.. Cutlets lamb of cold roast or mutton. Scotch kidney-collops. Cold mutton minced. . Curried boiled mutton. . . Fried veal with tomatoes.. .CONTENTS. . Fried sweet-breads. . Stewed sweet-breads. . A very nice dish of cold lamb and cucumbers. . head.. . Fillet of veal a-la-mode. .. 183 . nice ragout from cold 148 149 A lamb. . veal. To dress cold mutton or veal. 172 173 174 174 175 176 177 1. delicate dish from cold fowl or veal. Calf's head stewed with . slices of Potato sausage. . Broiled chickens. Sweet-bread cutlets. To fricassee sweetbreads. . A breast of veal in hodge-podge. Cold roast fowls fried. Veal sausage. A nice hash of mutton. . etc. Mutton hashed in the style^ of venison.. . . . . Veal pot pie. . . . . . Breast of veal stewed white. Very nice sausage balls from cold mutton. . . 141 .. . . Very nice scallops from cold chicken. . 154 155 156 156 157 . 138 139 139 Mock turtle. .. 158 159 160 162 163 163 164 165 165 166 167 168 169 169 170 171 oyster sauce. Spiced veal.. Fried chickens. .. . . Baked fillet of veal. Patties from cold turkey or chickens. very nice dish of . 142 .

30 To roast a turkey witli CONTEXTS. X .

.. Apples buttered. Peach pot Paste for pie. . ments of bread. PUDDINGS. 267 267 . Cold slaw. at . . Guernsey pudding. . 276 PIES. Carrots with flavor. No. Bakewell pudding. Paradise Pudding. 270 Egg plant. without Portuguese sweet rice. 31 A 246 247 248 248 249 249 250 250 251 252 delicious plum pudding without eggs. Swiss apple pudding. . . . Corn oysters. 2. To serve cold 271 pud272 An green vegetable. Rice balls. A nice way of warming cold . . . .. leaf as a .. . Bread and apples Rus. . . Dumplings paste. . Dumplings made with apples. small expense.. . 280 281 282 283 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 289 290 291 292 292 293 264 265 266 267 sian fashion. Pea tops used as an ordinary vegetable. where water- A pudding from 256 cresses are plentiful. or tart. . 262 263 dumplings 264 ''shortening." Cheap crust for dumplings. Rich plum pudding. '' " - No. . .. pie.. . . Rice pudding with fruit. A nice pie. . Apples with custard. .... French compote of apApple miroton. . 254 255 French bread pudding. Pastry. the table in the finest condition. Apple Charlotte.. .. . Browned egg . . stale from 275 frag. . .. — . Apple dumplings. .. No. .. without . . DESSERT. . The rhubarb . ples. Apple pot pie. .. . " No. and serving rice plum pudding. .. Mock oysters. way remains to serve the of an apple . 1.. Hot slaw. An excellent substitute plant.. . 273 274 274 A made very nice pudding.. muffins. Ground A rice puddings. . Apple tart with quince. . A very nice and novel dish 252 ding.. etc. . Puff paste. . Mock oyster fritters. . Endive may be cooked as a dinner vegetable. 1. 271 . . .. Rice fritters... To send boiled rice to .CONTENTS. excellent pudding of pieces of stale bread.. prepare apples for 257 258 259 260 261 262 Glazed rice. . Rhubarb To pies. Succotash. very nice and cheap 277 277 278 279 dish. . 2. . for plum pudding . . Boiled rice pudding. . . Bread pudding. . . and carrots without.. Asparagus. Apple pudding.

Buttermilk pudding. . Chocolate cream. . Mock cream. 303 Blancmange. . . 305 Lemon sponge. . No. Cocoanut balls. An excellent family «' 342 No. . 309 Black-cap pudding.... . 339 Quick waffles. . 3. English. . 296 297 297 ding. Potato pudding. . 316 *' *' No. Cocoanut pudding. . . . 314 Tottenham muffins. 304 Blanc mange. Cheshire pudding. . . CONTENTS. 2. 302 Blanc mange. Dutch. 346 . 337 310 Rice waffles. . . . .. Railway pudding. 296 Orange cream for pud. Tapioca pudding. . 306 Jam rolled pudding. No. Apple cream. 300 Whipped cream. " 345 No 2. . . . . . .. Indian pudding. . . . . . 341 313 Wafers. . . . . . Diplomatic pudding. .82 . . . . Cocoanut pudding. 301 Cream trifle.. . 338 311 Waffles. . 1. with eggs. Amsterdam pudding.. . 309 Jersey waflies. 348 322 Flannel cakes. Scotch. . . No. . 323 . or flannel 346 cakes. . . 1. . . pudding. .. .. . 337 . . 307 AND TEA CAKES. .. 343 Water muffins. . Cup custards. 335 Peach charlotte. . 324 324 325 326 . . 336 Lemon pudding. 320 Griddle cakes. . . . 300 Milanese cream. . 294 Snow balls. . .. .. . . Lemon cream. To ornament custards. . Boiled batter pudding. . 2. 349 out yeast. . pudding of cold pota342 . Baked cocoanut pud. . 317 Rice batter cakes. . 1. No. .with sugar. 1. College pudding. 2. . . pudding. . 300 Floating island. A savory or sweet drip314 Sally Lunn. 2. . toes. 317 Soda pudding. Victoria's pudding. . . 294 Orange cream. 334 . Pudding of calf's feet. 344 . . Arrow-root No. . ding. etc. 340 ding. Fruit pudding. .. . 327 327 328 329 329 330 330 331 332 . A very good old-fash348 ioned boiled custard. a-la-fran302 333 Pumpkin pudding 9aise. . . molasses pud312 Waffles without yeast. BREAKFAST ROLLS. *' " No.. 348 323 Buckwheat cakes withBurnt cream. 306 German pudding. Corn pudding. . 315 Sally Lunn. 343 ping pudding. Custard with rice. No. . . 295 Frothed orange cream. A pudding for a prince. CAKES. . 341 Muffins. 345 . . 1. . No. . 298 Another way to make 299 mock cream. 322 Wharton flannel cakes.. 319 Crumpets. .

.CONTENTS.

. MISCELLANEOUS. Isinglass blancmange.. 2. . Tomato sauce. Bread pudding infants.. . White sauce for fish. . . ' " No. . . 424 . • 429 430 431 431 432 433 434 435 Vnal teV fill ica. . Potato sauce. To pickle gherkins. . . . . . . . . . JELLIES. .. • 408 408 409 410 410 411 412 412 413 414 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 420 422 422 423 Horseradish sauce.. Calves' feet for jellies. . Preserved green gages. . . Peacli marmalade. ETC. . . Raspberry jelly. Preserved pears. . Preserved peaches. . .l.. Pi<. . Pickled cherries. . . Barley gruel. Jelly with gelatine. Irish moss or carrigan. . Marmalade jelly. . . . cake.. .. To preserve pears. 436 436 437 437 437 438 439 439 439 440 440 441 441 442 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 . 2. To preserve Nectarines 425 426 427 428 Balm I tea. Pine-apple marmalade. To make gruel. . Apple jelly.. . • To pickle lemons. .. Acorn coffee. To preserve a melon. Mangoes. Cucumbers. Cranberry sauce. .. No. No.kled onions. . To keep oranges or lemons for pastry. Onion sauce. . . I . Dried peach sauce. . 1. 453 453 453 454 454 455 456 457 457 457 458 458 459 Celery dressed as slaw. . 1. 1. ETC. . Mint sauce. . 451 452 452 Apple water. Brandy peaches. . Pickled tomatoes. . . Beef tea. Vegetable sauce. " " No. CONTENTS. . . Currant jelly. Barley water.34 Common plum Loaf cake. . . Economical use of nutmegs. No. . Wine sauce. Apricots in brandy. • Ale posset. . '« No. . Orange Grapes jelly. • • Calf's feet jelly. . . Piccalilli. . . . Slippery-elm tea. . . Raspberry jam. No. Cranberry water. . Apple sauce. Dried apple sauce. Pickled beats. Indian or pickle. . To pickle cauliflowers To pickle tomatoes. . . . . 2. . . . Arrowroot jelly... Strawberry jelly.. . . preserved in vinegar. . SAUCES. half quinces.. Chow chow. • • 406 407 PRESERVES. for . To preserve whole or . . Pepper sauce. • Punch jelly. . . . . PICKLES. . Liver sauce. Pickled red cabbage. . " No. 2.. Tomato catsup. . . .

To make Perry. game dressed poultry. . Home-made pepper. Elderberry wine. . Fried tripe. . 505 Use of bones in cook506 Coffee. . . . . Cayenne . .. Rhubarb wine. . Gooseberry champagne. . Water ices generally. Cherry bounce. Raspberry vinegar. A cheap summer drink. . Lemon 472 473 474 474 475 475 476 477 478 479 480 480 481 sherbert... .. Molasses candy. . Ginger beer. . . puddings.. 35 489 490 491 491' . . . .. . . Buttered eggs. . . . . Queen's toast. Breakf't dish. Samp. . To cure hams. Raisin wine. or fondu. Plain omelette. . Cheese sandwiches. Ham omelette. Blackberry cordial. . Cheese souffle. . . Mock Tea. Food for fants.. . Celery for flavoring. . . Cheese toasted. .. Mayonnaise. ... 460 460 461 462 463 464 464 465 466 466 467 468 469 469 471 471 To keep chestnuts. . To color butter. . 482 484 484 485 485 To obtain mint sauce at any season of the year.. . a constant 508 supply of pure vine- The best method making tea. . .. . Melted butter. . . 509 510 511 512 512 513 Boiled tripe. . The cost of eggs saved in the dearest season. . fritters. Milk porridge. . . of . . 506 507 To preserve milk... Spruce beer. . delicate in- The best ginger beer. Cold meat. Another mode of curing hams. . Beer. . Yeast. .. 488 Cheap omelette Green corn omelette. To preserve eggs Rice flummery. . Ham sandwiches. . . . . . .. Cherry ice. .. Snow pancakes .. — and . . Ginger wine. Essence of celery. . Portable lemonade. . 486 487 488 Another way yeast. Chicken jelly. Sandwiches.CONTENTS. An excellent substitute for pastry for the dyspeptic. or as Potato yeast. . . . . to make 514 514 514 515 516 Yeast powders. Toasted cheese. .. oysters. A cheap method of obtaining gar. . valids. To make cottage beer. . ing. Restorative jelly for in. To clarify dripping. . cold meat. Dressing for cold slaw. 492 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 503 504 Preserving eggs.. . . .. To freshen salt butter. . . . . . . ... . . Punch. Patties of fried bread. Savory macaroni. .. ..

. . To remove ink stains from silver. . . . . To clean candlesticks. .. cleanse mattresses.. 532 To clean paper hang. in ironing.. .. . A nice luncheon or supper cake from cold . clean marble. 524 To clean silver ware. To remove ink-spots from white clothes. . . Washing To wash pane. Chicken curry. . . 530 To clean matting. . . 576 577 . HOUSEWIFERY. Bottling wine.. To take stains out of silver. 525 Another mode of clean.. bread. . . . . To prepare common . . .... 541 To wash a book muslin dress. 525 526 ing silver. or cop- 560 561 562 563 New England brown . 556 557 558 559 Cakes made of cold meat or poultry. CONTENTS. . for stale Pancakes without eggs.. . 517 517 Stiffness to collars. etc. rice. . To 530 per kettle. 539 a To To To To To To To clean greasy carpets. or chicken and ham. .. 564 565 566 567 568 569 570 570 . To To To To To clean lamp shades. .. Caramels. clean floor-cloths.36 Baked egg omelette.. of jars. clean iron from rust. . .. . brittannia clean metal. Milk bread.. To clean block covers. . 531 To extract grease from 532 papered walls.. . A chartreuse of apple 533 534 535 536 537 ings. Bread fritters. . Mush bread. .. 571 572 572 573 573 575 To make washing fluid. . 2. take ink stains out . counter- 540 To wash colored dresses. clean decanters. Another way to use stale bread. . To clean Rules regard gold to orna- veal... Paste for cleaning plate. tin dish . To clean brass. Corn bread. . . 3. clean alabaster. 548 549 Minced meat.. No. ' " " " 527 528 To clean a brass 527 529 No. Another use bread. ... .. . Uses for stale bread. .. . .. . . 551 552 A nice pie of cold veal. To remove fresh ink from a carpet. whiten piano keys. . . 643 545 545 ritarch. 546 of mahogany. 519 520 520 521 522 ments.. Beverage from cherries. . . To prepare starch. German and puffs. cleanse the inside .. Soda bread. clean hair brushes. 1. . To roast coffee. No.. Potato puffs. Bread jelly. 552 553 553 555 Egg-nog. ..

. . . . Flour paste. . . . Method of washing the .. 612 Clieap soap. 613 To prevent rust. ticles. 588 chapped 588 Ointment for chapped 589 589 590 591 hands. Violet perfume. 606 To prepare feathers for beds. Rice glue. 603 Mastic cement. 611 To imitate alabaster. Various methods of mending broken ar. No. 579 . . 609 To remove grease spots. . ... . . . Bandoline. to . for alabaster . . . .. Paste for hands.. 610 To scour boards.. Receipt for making the hands white. 611 Uses of coal ashes. simple method of catching and destroy- Cement Cement for leather. mending . . Cement for The Turkish oath upon 584 584 586 586 587 587 a small scale. . Another way to mend broken china. etc. 604 Tincture of nutmeg. Cement for broken glass .. ornaments. nails. for the . 579 ... 616 To take out mildew from linen. 605 To prevent the breakage of lamp chimneys. 602 lights.. . 602 . Cheap lotion for chapped hands. 37 595 596 Pomatum for children's 578 hair. .. Wash to whiten the . . . To mend alabaster or. ..CONTENTS. . .. A receipt for oil Castor hair. . To make a scent jar. .. . . 613 To remove scorch marks. hands. . . . of 596 597 597 597 598 599 600 600 601 Another kind line. 610 To polish alabaster ornaments. cream for the 592 593 594 ing flies.. .. .... .. Whitewash that will not rub off. 1.. . stone. 614 Saving of fuel. hair. . Glue for uniting cardboard... Children's curls.. . 608 To remove the taste of new wood. Cleansing the hair. . A naments. . . 617 .. mend 582 582 583 584 Lip salve. 615 To wash blond lace. 606 Beds for the poor. To join glass that has been broken. Bouquet de la reine. Another method of removing ink spots. .. Another way to join broken glass. .. To cleanse and prevent the hair from falling off.. Essence of jessamine. Curling fluid. . . Another way china. .. pomade. etc. .. . bando- 580 581 581 or china. Honey soap. . . Ends of candles converted into night . .

To destroy bugs. To keep silk.. .. To improve gilding... To raise the crush pile . white. . Acorn trees. . of velvet The potato remedy for rheumatism. 'J'o take out wax. 2. .. To drive away musqui- To extinguish chimney.. Pea vines a winter or- The economy of dripping means of saving the consumption — How 631 nament. To 'i'o select floor oil cloths. Deafness in old persons.. Means of doubling a crop of potatoes with- 628 629 629 Johnson's receipt rheumatism. curl feathers. . to grow large potatoes for frozen po- . Re<l. .. 630 Coal ashes useful for making garden walks. 634 Potatoes slightly diseased preserved by peat charcoal. For toothache.. . 635 636 637 . . fire in a . Cheap simple cerate... . bottle corks. .. .. 620 621 621 622 622 523 623 Alum curd. . . .. 624 625 625 525 626 626 mice. To obtaiu herbs jf the . Red wasli for brick pavement. 632 Liquid glue. 647 648 out increased expenditure. To destroy vermin... . trees. .. 632 633 How leather boots waterproof that will resistthe severest weather. .. for .. To obliterate writing. . Tincture from scraps of lemon peel. . C42 643 644 644 645 A night-cap made finest Havor.. 627 moment. in a To remove glass stoppers.. 641 641 . .. . 654 . 617 (JlS Yeast cakes. To take out mildew from linen.. .. . . . To prevent moth. To cool a room. . or preserved yeast. To restore black crape. To wash thread lace... Remedy tatoes.. No.. To keep bread... or black varnish for baskets. Red c«ment. To avoid chilblains. to make . 624 To destroy rats and . To clean white feathers.CONTENTS. . . To kill moths in carpets. 637 638 639 . 639 6^ 640 Cement for toes. Use of soot. . . To prevent lamp smoke. . Dr. insects prevent To fruit climbing up . .. . 650 651 ... .. 648 649 650 of butter. Receipt for preserving and making leather waterproof. . . .

made of to is hold from one to seven pounds of meat provided. A kind of French soup or stew. which is then filled up with cold water five pints of —the proportion being water to a pound and a half of meat.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL SOUPS BOUILLON. 1. usually part of the leg or shoulder. three-quarters of (39) . pre: pared as follows An earthen pot. and generally on the hot ashes. A sufficient quantity lean meat. When is it begins to simmer. close The pot is then placed on the hearth to the wood fire. the is scum which thrown up carefully re- moved from time to time. is put into this vessel.

hot water being from time to time supplied in the place of that which has evaporated. What is odds but the contrary to even ? Therefore. fire. together with salt. in the proportion of one pound to one quart . an hour being allowed A in carrot. saith one. are then added. 2. but if it be fit. the pot remains covered at the and is kept there simmering for six hours more. because there is some unfitness between them which makes odds. — BOUILLON. little an onion. and spice. Put beef in an earthen stock-pot. Marrt vge-ring Symbolized. This is is the common soup almost of France. it neither pincheth nor slippeth. for this purpose. and there will be no odds. half a parsnip. Hence came the first use of the ring in weddings for if it be straighter than the finger it will pinch and if it be wider than the finger it will fall off. and in use in every French family. a celery. a turnip. pepper. and any other vegetables season. We see many times even the godly couples to jar when they are married.40 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. After these additions. make them even. : .

When the object is simply to make a good. or leg-of-mutton piece should be used. pure-flavored beef broth. Crack the bone of a shin of it beef. But the meat to be eateji. the dissolved. some and if letting it stew four or five is hours.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. adding vegetables. BEEF SOUP. and put to every on to boil. and the savorous parts of the meat are diffused through the broth. and a spoonful of salt to each quart of water. and let it become slowly is By so doing the fibre of the meat gelatine is enlarged. the rump. and forget not thine own weakso shalt thou pardon the failings of others. part of the shin or leg will answ^er the purpose. consider. and skim it well. fire 41 Place it at the side of the hot. pared and cut in . Let it boil two hours. But ness . 3. of cold water. in one quart of water large tea- pound of meat. Then add four turnips.

. and shows up our better qualities. may be substituted for the dumplings. quarters. — "Ah. man adversity tries us. Two SORTS OP Trials. eh?" cheer up. Drop . and he showed up — my worst qualities. Jem. yes. . but adversity didnH try me it was an Old Baile}^ j^dge. moist- ened with a little water or milk. and one bunch of sweet herbs (which should be washed and tied with a thread. Sam. to thicken it with a little flour and water . with more salt and pepper to the taste. strain off the soup and return the pot again ." " Well. take meat. four onions j^ared carrots scraped and cut in and sliced. When out the it tender." "Ah. made of a tear spoonful of butter to two of flour. and some dumplings. these dumplings into the boiling soup let them boil five minutes. one root of celery cut in small pieces. well." 42 THE FAMILY SAVE. in trouble. two slices. so you've been "Yes. as they are to be is taken out when the soup the vegetables are served) . then add some parsley finely chopped.ALL. and serve them Noodles with the soup in the tureen.

stirring fire well Set on the and stir till it then let it boil up. Take out the and set it meat with a the fire to slice. by degrees. Put the meat in a dish. skim Set it it well. put in a soup-pot with a shin or leg of beef of about ten pounds weight. cover it up. to by the simmer very gently about two hours. it Cover the well with cold water and set on fire. then skim and put in two heads of celery. all fat off. When it boils.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and skim the broth it well before you put into the tureen. by keep warm. and a large turnip cut into small squares. 43 A CHEAP 4-. SOUP. cut into four it pieces. boils. it it and pour it the broth into together. Put a quart of the soup into a basin put about an ounce of flour into a stew-pan. and let it boil an hour and a half longer. . Wash three-quarters of a little pound of it barley in a cold water . Season it with salt. and strain the sauce through a sieve . and fire put in two large onions.

some capers or minced gherkins or walnuts. and stir- then pour in the soup very gradually. 5. Strain broth one teacupful of sago. " youHl be sure to die if you recover itJ^ SAGO SOUP.44 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Boil two pounds of beef in rather sufficient to cover it. . bat do not too soft. etc. more water than the essence is until completely extracted from the the broth." said he. if liked. . barley." replied the doctor. off. Koast beef bones make pea-soup and should be boiled with the peas the day before eaten. in great alarm. for gently one hour. that the fat may fell be taken A GLUTTON sick. let the sago be- come eggs. by adding or peas. The water in which meat has been boiled makes an excellent soup vegetables. "T have lost my appetite. fine for the poor. and add to the Boil it meat. Beat the yolks of three pour them into your soup tureen. ring it gently. " It's not of the slightest consequence. over the meat. Add. and sent for a doctor.

. Parboil and cut it into small pieces. and a bunch of parsley. while those that have nothing in them stand upright." replied the farmer. and add a teaspoonful of salt to each quart. and little. pour in to thicken the soup a very " V^HY do you not hold up your head as I do V' inquired an aristocratic lawyer of a laboring farmer. Soak the heart several hours in to extract the blood. like yours 1" *•» » VEAL 7. "Squire. like mine. carrots nicely sliced. in large pieces. Pare and . 45 SOUP OF BEEF'S HEART. slices. ''look at that field of grain. a turnip cut in back into the liquor gait. till again the vegetables are tender mix a little flour and water smoothly. All the valuable heads hang down. which must be put which add pepper. veal. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. put it in a Take a knuckle of pot with four quarts of water. — to some celery cut some fine. an onion Let chopped it boil fine. salt it and water then cut it. SOUP. 6. lengthwise.

" rejoined the gentleman. or any other meat A GENTLEMAN. it When Put it they are in the pot was boiled in. said to him: "Sir. "as I yours. Dish the meat with the vegetables around it. They should be about as large a hickory-nut. then add the above vegetables. finding some swine amongst : his " He to whom they said to his servant belong is a fool. be served with it. Drop them into the boiling soup. strain the soup. I shall not contradict myself" vines.46 slice THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. may be put in and boiled ten minutes. when they are put they in. tender. four turnips. . ." One of his servants.to of a teaspoonful of two of flour. Let the veal boil one hour. If noodles are preferred. three onions. two carrots. who recognized these animals. Make some dumplings butter. and add a little parsley finely chopped. and milk or water soft enough to make a very as dough. thicken the soup with some little Hour mixed smoothly with a water." have said it. and a small portion of celery. Drawn butter may sauce. they are ''Well. a bunch of sweet herbs.

my good fellow. three turnips cut in quarters. Take four feet. " and what did you do to help us to gain this victory?" *' Do. the fine. may it please your honor. which cut into . Add to this three cnions sliced. A HERO." MOCK TURTLE 9. green top of a head of celery chopped with salt and pepper all to the taste.— THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. clean them nicely and put them on to boil with rather more water than to cover them. dry them with a and put them into a . that was off already. why I walked bouldly up to one of the inimy and cut off his foot. three carrots sliced. an' faith." " Cut off his foot Why didn't you cut off his head ?" ! "Ah. well. little water boils away too much add a roll a piece more. Just before serving of butter in some flour and stir it in. inch squares wash and clean them cloth." said a victorious general to a favorite soldier after a battle. your honor. " Well. Scald a calf's head. a bunch of parsley. 8. SOUP. While If the boiling remove the fat and scum. 47 SOUP FROM CALF'S FEET.

Madeira or sherry for four hours . have not been men who bent themselves to one single branch of business. stew-pan. keep these stirring put it in. scattered as the}' are over the wid(5 face of creation . with two gallons of stock gravy. when the sun is far distant. when ready throw in some forcemeat . but collect tliose beams to a focus. chopped fine. So the man that squanders his talents and his strength on many things. half a pint of . stirring it as for it is you put let all it is very apt to curdle . this in the soup. balls fire. savory. It must be so. and you can scarcely feel the influence of its beams. some parsley. accumulated property. and they kindle up a flame in an instant. reader. Go out in the spring. heat a little [one pint]. . over a gentle fire until near boiling. sweet tle basil. knotted marjoram. cloves and mace pounded. . some flour mixed smooth in the yolk of two eggs .48 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and see whether those among them who have got along smoothly.and gained a good name. then stew together for half an hour to send to table. will fail to make an impression with either: but let him . a all lit- thyme. and hard yolks of eggs when off the squeeze in the juice of half a lemon. stew all together gently butter and milk it. Step among j-our neighbors.

take out the white portion when well . tapioca. draw them to a point let him strike ject. Vermicelli may be added after the thickening. or three ounces of the in boiling water. it should be added soon enough to get perfectly tender. slices to the soup it may be pour^ with of French roll sent up in the tualso be varied White soup may the rice. stock.. rice. or thicken with ground root. If the stock has been made with fowl. with a little cayenne pepper. Take two quarts of the crumb of a roll in and a gill of milk beat the yolks of six hard-boiled eggs with three ounces of sweet almonds very well in a mortar. boil the m SOUP. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. bruised sago. and . add the whole over reen. as it requires less time to do. after soaking in cold water. Wash two it . best kind. 49 — at a single ob- WHITE 10. blanch and let it drain it add the it rice to the soup and it stew until swells. and it will yield before him. or arrowis If macaroni used.

it Strain the soup. set over the fire again. cut parts of into them them in the soup till quite smooth. the crumb of a small baker's a bunch of sweet herbs. boil Then take the white and lettuce. pound the meat in a mortar. salt. pieces. grated Parmesan cheese with white but it partly destroys that delicacy which all ought to be the distinctive property of white soups. Put two quarts of water into a clean loaf." WHITE SOUP WITHOUT MEAT. " Yes. . \Mtse so. then." said she. the fashion now send up soup." was the reply. and add it to the soup It is —which is a great improveto ment. I sup"Well. some whole grains of pepper.50 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. endive. two or three cloves. stewed. an onion it chopped fine and a little Let boil half an hour. " Is a man and his Mafe one ?" asked the wife of a man in a state of stupefaction. and I ought to be ashamed of mj'self. 11. " I came home veiy drunk last night. saucepan. as she was holding his aching head in both hands. celery.

12. a handful of chopped onion.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. she let the cook have the remainder of it if it was not she ga\e it to her lap-dog . put in a tablespoonful of butter. season high with Cayenne pepbeef-steak can per. poor little Bow. then put in fifty oysters . told us it was a long time before she could get them made uniformly good till she made the following rule " if the soup was good. a little thyme and parsley before serving. lump of a butter rolled in a let it boil few minutes more.Wow seldom got the — — — sweet treat after. their liquor. FRENCH GUMBO. Cut up one large fowl." but as soon as this resolution was known. An old gentlewoman who lived almost entirely on soups. cover close let it simmer two with just or three hours . 51 and when it begins to boil add a little flour . one of lard. dredge it well with have ready a soup-kettle. . Fry the fowl then to a good brown add to this four quarts of . season salt it with flour. and pepper . and serve. boiling water. stir in a tablespoonful of the filee powder . Turkey and make also .

The powder consists of nothing more than the leaves of the sassafras cured in the shade. it. and therefore. would OYSTER 13. both get and save. . then strain put it back in the stew-pan and add the oysters. some ful of crushed allspice. with one teaspoonmace. liquor. very good gumbo. As soon as the oysters are plump. gives The filee or felee is what a mucilaginous character and excel- lence to the soup. serve them.52 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. any family it in the coun- try can always have in their house. and then pounded sifted . Take one hundred oysters out of the To half of the liquor add an equal Boil it quantity of water. Let it boil twenty minutes. it If youth knew what age would crave. a little Cayenne pepper and salt. SOTTP. it As soon as begins to boil add a teacupful of cream little and a grated (jracker rubbed in one ounce of butter.

Boil fifty clams in two quarts of to it a little mix together. but beware how jou hazard your audear. she returned to her mistress and in(][uired." said the sershe was not at home. Just before it is taken eggs. CLAM 14. . and after she had done as she was bid.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. to see whether it is willing to be embraced for it is of no importance whether it salute a stranger or not. with a few and pepper. my est. SOUP. ma'' am. and then serve If preferred the parsley may be omitted. water. when the door was rung. ma'am. and add butter and flour. 53 clear- — " Kiss mamma.^^ . off the fire. Assist Children to Obey. simmer a few minutes. affairs. was requested by her mistress to say that "Yes. " When I go to the praste. stir in the yolks of two and some cream. or shall I say it was yours." is a command you may be sure will be obeyed with alacrity." Look thority by saying " Kiss that lady. vant. was engaged in domestic and the bell who was a Catholic. shall I confess that as my lie. after these sprigs of parsley are added. A LADY servant. but it is of immense importance that it should not disobey its mother in a sino:le instance. well at the countenance of the child before you issue the command. let it it.

MISERLY old lady. small butter. kept an inn.54 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and asked for something to eat." was the reply. were set before him. and . mother. "A shilling. an ounce of butter. "so / gave the soldier a shilling f07^ doing it. After A One day finishing his dinner." replied the boy. during the war. If the clams are small use more of them. Add to a pint of water the yolk of an egg well beaten. mother. a famished soldier called. " much was it worth. parsley and onions. and sent him awa}'. put some money in his hand as he stepped out of the door. the old lady expecting to receive the money. boll it Take a knuckle of veal and fifty three quarts of water salted to liking. with clams and their juice. of an to some and flour sufficient form a paste. to pick those bones ?" asked How the boy. CLAM 15. in SOUP. a little son of the landlady. that had been pi-ett}^ well picked. SOUP. together with seasoning of pepper." EGG 16. Some beef bones. dumplings Add made to the soup some egg. noticing that the soldier found it very difficult to make out much of a dinner. " I thought so.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and back frothed. devoured it. "3^ou wouldn't have me eat de vite? De yolk is de chicken . a foreigner the eggs. put four them in the pot with the tripe. he drew out the yolk. de vite de fedders. who had already been prejudiced against monsieur by his mustaches. again till it is smoothed and This is a pleasant and good resto- breakfast one morning at an inn. ^et it boil till quite tender. rative. you leave all the white How is the landlord to afford a breakfast at that rate?" *' Vy. then have ready two calf's feet. At made quick despatch with ! PEPPER POT. Yould 3'ou have me make von bolster of myself?" The farmer had never viewed the matter in that light before. and it Set over the stir it till it begins to simmer. When he had swallowed the seventh." replied the foreigner. Put your tripe on in water enough to cover it. then pour several times from the pan to a basin. sir. could brook the extra^ifagance no longer. Add . " Why. and speaking up. an old farmer. Thrusting a spoon into the middle. 17. and passed on to the next. said. the fire 55 it same quantity of sugar. allowing a teaspoonful of salt to each quart of water.

Put a piece of pickled pork in a pot with two quarts of water. put them in a colander to drain. BEAN SOUP. and to reject nothing that may do you good. for health is the basis of all social virtue we can be useful no longer than when we are well. In another pot put one quart of dried beans after being picked and washed. onions chopped herbs. " I ADVISE you. As soon as the beans begin to boil take them out. to do nothing that may hurt you. in with the pork and cover the whole with water.ithenr put them. Boil them till they are quite soft. . and a bunch of sweet it oft' Just before taking the fire add two ounces of butter rolled in flour. fine. 18.56 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." says Johnson. '' and I advise you with great earnestness. Whole grains of allspice or cloves may be added if liked." . To preserve health is a moral and religious duty. Season the soup very highly with Cayenne pepper and salt.

for thou his secret griefs. knowest not . 19. salt to the taste. a tablespoonful of rice or barley. a little more may be added. is When Then to tender the soup done. To one quart of water add three potatoes. and put the veal roll it on to boil with the veal. GREEN CORN 20. then add a little parsley chopped fine about it is ten minutes before taken off the fire. Put on of salt. SOUP. Envy not the happiness in any man. a knuckle of veal to boil in three quarts of water. two carrots. and Boil it down to one pint. 67 SOUP WITHOUT MEAT.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and three teaspoonsful Cut the corn it is off* of one dozen ears. an ounce of butter in it flour and add before is served. If the fire has been very hot and the water has boiled away too much. three turnips. three onions.

back into the water they were boiled in all stir well together. replied. SOUP. one lettuce. pan and mash them then put them . then pour water and set it by to make into a the soup with." — GREEN PEA SOUP WITHOUT MEAT. SUMMER 21. 22. Put them on in boiling water off the . and a pint of green peas. stew for two hours more sieve . stew them three . three potatoes. peas. Take a quart of young green and divide half a pint from them. let it parsley. in a Tiiompsonian style " Sir. press it through a and thicken it with flour and butter. it is nonsense to bolt a door with a boiled carrot. or four hours little three pints of stock add a green mint. one head of white cabbage . A GENTLEMAN beins^ asked to give a definition of nonsense. boil until tender. fry these together in in butter. Put the boiled peas . twelve or fourteen onions.58 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Two cucumbers. and rub it through a hair .

23. Add salt to the taste. by private contract. The following advertisement lately appeared in a Jersey print: "To be sold. that's uttered against you. calf's etc. word every angry put in one mild one. The same may be made with have been the liquor in which calf's or joints of veal. This will be found to be a Yery useful soup in families troubled with irritable tempers.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. roll When the peas are in flour two ounces of butter pepper and and stir in.. nearly soft. head. and a large dessert spoonful of sugar. a parrot. boiled. feet. mutton. two poodles. the property of a lady just ma?-ried. who has no further use for them. sieve. ANOTHER SOUP OF GKEEN PEAS. separated from the others. A Receipt for Peace Soup. — For . turn them into the soup and boil hot. and a tortoise-shell cat. a beautiful rooster monkey. and when done. To a pint of shelled peas add one quart of boiling water. 59' Boil the half pint of peas.

considering fish is is how. ANOTHER SOUP OF GREEN 24. black pepper. ETC. and a dust of caystir into enne pepper. from digested. and you will have a cheap and wholesome summer dish. Boil three quarts of shelled peas in two quarts of water. FISH. Mix three ounces of butter with flour until quite smooth.: 60 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. there exist in fish a substance which does not animals. 25. soft fibre. more easily Moreover. than in butcher's meat. and until the the boiling peas whole boils again. in the flesh of land iodine —a substance which may have a beneficial effect upon the health. for little less . weight and in may be more nourits ishing. and tend . add a little salt. weight There is much nourishment efiect it in fish. FISH AS FOOD. PEAS. OYSTERS. viz.

the latter. to prevent the production of scrofulous 61 and tubercular disease of . afflicted most cruel and which the are highly educated and refined with. game And if we give attention to classes of people. in the form pulmonary consumption. in the majority of the proportion of solid matter —that is. . and prolific. more robust and active men. handsome women. or the expulsion of the aqueous part — is little inferior to the several kinds of butcher's meat. no class than that of fishers do we see so large families. classed as to the quality of the food they principally subsist on. or greater exemptions from maladies. Comparative fish. the matter which remains after perfect desiccation.WW' THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. fatal one of the civilized. or poultry. trials prove that. healthy. find we In that the ichthyophagous classes are especially strong.

CLASS was reciting a lesson in metaphysics the chapter on motives operating on the human will when a mackerel vender went by shouting. ECONOMICAL MODE OF COOKING SALMON. is avoided. Cut some the width of the slices in fish. if always be perfectly when To select fresh ones life- observe the eyes. eyes are sunken and dark they and have lost their brilliancy. gills. . " Mackerel. the direction of in boiling Put them and let water with a ten little salt.— §2 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. fine fresh mackerel I" Suddenly. FISH. on the contrary. the colored. are certainly stale. By this method. they have a bright. fresh Fish should cooked. the waste usually resulting from preparing the whole fish at once. like appearance the fish is fresh if. 27. Some judge by the but they are sometimes redness of the colored to deceive customers. them boil minutes. dis- A — . 26.

be deaf as haddocks. and prices never were better. season your fish with Cayenne pepper and salt. turbed 63 bj'' tlie noise. he said they must noise. We have had a gloriotis — .THE FAMILY SAYE-^LL. Lay on a dish and butter A Model Christian. " Dear Brother. in slices about a quarter of an inch thick wash and dry them. grease the bars. and flat as flounders. HALIBUT. Cut it . and it broil it till of a fine it. and fry them.to perceive that it was a sell-fish motive. heat your gridiron. and fry your fish in till of a delicate brown on both sides. with Cayenne pepper and have ready it a pan of hot lard. I have got one of the handsomest farms in the State. Or. and have it nearly paid for. 28. the master inquired of the class what motive the man had for making snch a No answer being given. brown color. Crops are good. When done in this manner it should be cut rather first thinner than according to the method. not. season salt. Some dip the cutlets in beaten egg and then in bread crumbs.

blustering advocate.^" When a man has the headache. take out the upper part of the back bone next the head. wash and wipe them dry. they are bread are dipped beaten egg and crumbs.ach fish in two parts. and fried. "It's the salmon. 29. In a trial of a right of fishery." CAT-FISH. once got from a witness more than he gave.^^ you may safely conclude that he has been drinking like a fishy .64 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. aud last week we took him to the poor-house. " but / donna like cochle saiice with it . revival of religion in our church. season with Cayenne pepper and fry salt. he asked the witness. They very nice dipped in beaten egg. and says." replied the witness. down the back and stomach. Father got to be rather an incumbrance. " Don't j^ou love fish?" "Ay. Cut e. and both our children (the Lord be praised) are converted. and fried in hot lard. who was a rough. Serjeant Cockle. and dredge flour over them. Your affectionate brother. without the crumbs. Some then dress them in like oysters . them in hot Lard of a nice light brown.

. dry with clean napkins. 65 TO CURE SHAD. place them in layers with back down. and two pounds of brown sugar. Clean so the shad nicely. This draws out all the blood. and let them stand twenty-four all hours. abuse. 30.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Sprinkle each fish plentifully with ground salt. and laid open fish as the inside of the may be up. Wipe them Place them in layers in a clean tub. Strew plenty of rock salt over them with the saltpetre and sugar. Never go late to a friend's dinner for you may have observed that when a company is waiting for a guest. down For one hundred shad take half a pound of saltpetre. they fill up the time by loading him with . there salt is no danger of putting on too much they will only absorb a certain as quantity. with the backs as before.

Have . 32. split Have your shad with salt. washed. SHAD KOASTED ON A BOARD. almost charred. place the board before the with the head part down. it and season well with salt. indeed. in order to retain the juices. Split your shad down the back. to the and serve it hot.66 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. down the back. inches it thick and fire two till feet stand before the the board is verj hot. Take a three piece of clean oak board. on the board. it As soon with the as the juices begin to run turn tail down. ." BROILED SHAD. wiped dry. 31. cleaned. This the receipt '^fish baking shad of the Philadelphia house. It should be turned frequently. and seasoned Fasten it to the hot board with skin side should be a few small nails —the next the board fire. about square. wash it. butter table for it When Send is it done.

in which was an old shirt. ingham." said she." This is as bad as the old woman. Cut the fish in half. Being asked why he would wish to change his linen when he was so ill. wdth very sour cold vinegar poured over them . desired a friend who was present to reach him a drawer. fine black pepper. with her last breath. Watson.* If designed for the dinnerit table. *' Because. 33. and then in slices. that it may assume original form. Put them in a milk crock. Put a . slowly It should be of a fine brown on both sides. salt. finding himself at the point of death. who. and this is good enough for her. blew out an inch of — candle. and whole allspice.— THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. a Mr. that he might put it on. and broil quite done. and serve it. uncle to the late Marquis of Rockman of immense wealth. crosswise. he replied "Because I am told that the shirt I die in must be the nurse's perquisite. fold it over. the darkP^ "I can see to die in SHAD. SOUCED. after having basted well with but- ter on both its sides. then add Cayenne pepper. 67 bars till your gridiron heated —grease it the put on the shad.

in half. 35. The fish must be highly seasoned. When it done. The Oak. FRIED SHAD. wash it and and season with Caydredge flour over it. it. it and stand in an oven. that may assume the appearance of the whole fish. Clean your shad. crust over the top of the crock. it into a large vessel of boiling water with salt. put the two halves together. BOILED SHAD. that now spreadeth its branches toward the heavens. a great deal of It will require about it. and fry it in hot lard. . twenty minutes to cook Serve it with egg sauce or rich drawn butter. wrap it in a cloth. was once but an acorn in the bowels of the earth. wipe it Cut your shad dry.68 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. score it. 34. wash it and wipe and put flour it well. enne pepper and salt.

69 POTTED SHAD. but the fish dark-colored. his hours hang heavy on his head he loitereth about. . and knoweth not what he would do. 36. Mix to- gether two tablespoonfuls of whole allspice . and over this tie closely to several thicknesses of in the let it brown paper keep steam . set it in a moderate oven and This is remain twelve hours. Cut a shad in about half a dozen wash it and wipe it dry. pieces. Mix one dessert- spoonful of ground allspice. with a clean cloth. The Slothful Man is a burthen to himself. WHITE POTTED 37. Cut a shad in six or eight it pieces. and half a table- spoonful of salt —sprinkle a portion of this seasoning over each piece of shad. half a table- spoonful of black pepper. is very good. Put them into a stone jar. SHAD. with enough good cover the jar cider vinegar to cover them . wash and wipe dry.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

I think it don't. cover vinegar. . swear that this is not your handwriting ?" " Does it resemble " I reckon not. on your oath. and wipe them dry. " Now. wash. Let them stand at least one hour before they are cooked.70 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." said a fierce lawyer. and season well with Cayenne pepper and salt." do write. sir !" FRIED ROCK. salt it is to be the next morning sprinkle over per. "do you." was the reply. and one tablespoonful of whole black pep2}er . half a teaspoonful of Cayenne pep- Place the shad in a stone jar. 38. your writing ?" " Yes. with for and set it in a moderate oven twelve hours. and a portion of the it over each layer throw grains of pepper and allspice. how do you know ?" " 'Cause I can't sir. Clean and score your fish." " Do you swear that it don't resemble your writing ?" "I " You take your oath that tliis writing does !" not resemble yours in a single letter?" " Y-e-a-s. "Sir. put one tablespoonful and a half of over the shad the evening before potted it .

thy ear hath any pleasure in the voice of praise. that they done through. A com- mon-sized fish requires about half a large teacupful of salt. if If thy soul thirsteth for honor. BOILED EOCK. and boil it in plenty of water strongly salted. dredge flour over your put them in the pan and fry them slowly. may fish be They should be sides. wrap the fish in it. fish. it boil hard twenty Take out of the cloth carefully. raise thj'self from the dust whereof thou art made. and exalt thy aim to something that is praiseworthy. 39. that the seasoning trate them. and wash it well. fire. of a handare some brown on both fried in the All pan same way. cloth. take out the eyes and Flour a gills. Scale a rock.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. time to pene- Have ready a pan of hot lard. Place your fish-kettle over a strong and when the water Let it boils put in the minutes. . 71 may have fish. draw it.

Boil fish the vinegar and spice. Lay the fish in much vinegar as will mace and two a deep dish. If Garnish the dish with green any of the boiled it fish should be left from dinner. Season the salt. a little or three cloves. potatoes are an accompaniment to boiled fish. COLD BOILED ROCK FISH. it THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. " Gentlemen. highly with Cayenne pepper and Then pour the spiced vinegar over while boiling hot. at the MinisBlackwall dinner. he replied. and make an excellentr relish breakfast or tea. may be spiced as for shad. When ter's Canning's health was drunk.72 place table. Put as cover it into a kettle with some whole grains of allspice. on your fish dish. cold it makes a nice relish for break- Any boiled fish may be prepared in the same manner. and send it to the Have egg sauce in a sauce boat. When fast. this . 40. Mashed parsley.

salt. who drink a good deal. and a sprig of mace. "No. fit In twelve hours will be for the table. 41. SOUSED. Boil enough vinegar it to cover and pour it over boiling hot." Sam?" " Large one why you've had time enough to scale . but never speak. Put the fish into a deep dish. fish Extract the bones from the cold left which may have been fish from dinner. the fish. a few grains of allspice. 42. I do not see that we can do better than follow the example of the fishes.y THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.''^ COLD ROCK FISH. "Haven't you finished scaling that fish yet. Season the with Cayenne pepper. Put them into boiling water with a wineglassful of vinegar and a tablespoonful . master. ! a mountain BOILED HERRINGS. one or two cloves. is 73 a fish dinner: so after sincerely thanliing you for your good wislies. 'tis a very large one.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and so on are tie m . wash them place well and wipe them dry. alas are let on long leases. and in prudently cultivating an undergrowth of small pleasures since very few great ones. closely with several thick- up the jar nesses of paper. cover the herring with cold vinegar. then put in till all another layer of herring. Though sometimes machine. small evils like iiwisible in- and a single hair may stop a vast 3'et the chief secret of comfort lies in not suffeiing trifles to vex one. and set it in the oven let it after the bread has been drawn out. half a dozen cloves. and simmer ten minutes . for use. inflict pain. 43. and two or three blades of mace . with sauce in a tureen. in your jar a layer of herring. POTTED HERHING. remain there all night. Clean your herring.74 of salt. then rub each some one with salt and Cayenne pepper. will be As soon fit as they become cold they sects. ! . serve on a napkin. then grains of allspice.

and well clean gridiron the herrings place fire. according to serve very hot. and when your lard boiling hot. 45. dust the fish is with flour. — Knead a dessertspoonful of baked flour and a teaspoonful of flour of mustard with gill three ounces of butter.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. lay them separately on a board. and serve. and stir into a of boiling water . them on a and broil over a bright for size . 44-. with the following sauce in a tureen : MusTAED Sauce for Eed Herring. and fry them over a brisk fire. ten or twelve minutes. and to the fire to use them before you want them . Cut off the heads. . Scale. wash and dry your herrings two or three minutes well set . FRESH HERRINGS. a few at a time. boil ^ve minutes . add a teaspoonful of vinegar. 75 HERRING. put in the fish. FRIED. .

" BAKED HERRINGS. sir I" . a Made ginger. 46. Serve cold. Take off the heads of six herrings put them into a deep dish and season with a saltspoonful of pepper. and a teaspoonful of finely chopped chives added. gill of cold water and a a of vinegar. 76 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. with sauce strained. how did you " Boy. exclaimed. Bake in slow oven the for half an hour. half an inch of bruised and a teaspoonful of grated horseadd a good gill radish. this is the first time I ever saw red herrings alive. " Well. two four allspice. of mace. a quarter of a grain of Cayenne. An Irish footman.. six pepper-corns. manage to get such a big string of fish?" " I hooked them. cloves. a teaspoonful of salt. on entering a room where there was a vase of gold fish. who got a situation at the west end of London.

the bones. sepait from the bones. he concluded : b}' bidding the 5 3^0 ung satirist begone to his room. ." When. they say. Oxford. roll into balls. brush the outside with egg. fry them of a tails." An undergraduate having. you say. mince- with a seasoning. 77 CROaUETTES OF FISH. and it one of milk. stewed together. an anchovy. will make cro- the gravy. as the doctor was informed.thing he said with the words. I say. had a ridiculous manner of prefacing ever}'. I say.— THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 47. heads. Dr. in Lobsters make down delicate shell quettes. finding the ridiculous combination in which his speech was involved. with an onion. of Hart Hall. Take dressed rate little it fish of any kind. an eg^ beaten with a tea- spoonful of flour. which case the should be broken and boiled for the gravy. nice color. it and dredge well with bread crumbs . Sharp. and a pint of water. "I say. mimicked him in this peculiarit}^ he sent for him to give him a lecturing which he thus began " I say.

and it Cayenne pepper on — then a thick . A Frenchman other fish to fry. with a little melted butter poured over it. He determined to remember the phrase and its application. layer of stale bread. iie thought of the above expression. bones.78 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and divided into small pieces an- other layer of bread as before. picked from the . to preit vent cracking. — . grease with butter. Cold mutton may be served in the same way. sare. being otherwise engaged. sprinkle OF SERVING UP ANY KIND FISH WITH STALE BREAD. Repeat this process as often as required for the quantity of fish. "I've got uttered by a person who was in a hurry and did not wish to be detained. grated fine upon the bread place a layer of fish. One day a friend invited him to go and walk and. and gave it thus " Excuse me to-day. I must go and fry some fish!^^ . slightly with fine bread mixed for Place it in an oven twenty or thirty minutes. and sprinkle with pepper. OF COLD WAY Dip a flat dish in hot water." had heard the phrase. Smooth the surface with a spoon. A NICE 48.

49. ^ Season highly with Caj enne pepper and . sir. 79 FISH FRITTERS. " What was the cause of the saltness of the ocean?" Soon one little girl raised her head.THE FAMILY SAVE. it Take out all the bones." said the committeeman. remove the bones. Mix together half a teaeggs." a said the pupil. ''Salt fish. and fry them in boiling lard. and mash up with an equal quantity of potatoes.ALL. not many 3^ears ago. 50. CAKES/ OR BALLS MADE FROM COLD COD FISH. " You may tell. cut into small cakes. In one of our city schools. and anchovy Beat all sauce. up to a proper consistency. cupful of cream with two well-beaten some Cayenne pepper. and it in a mortar. member of the committee asked a member of a class which was under examination. flushed with the discovery which had flashed upon her mind. all Take the remains of any pound fish which has been served the preceding day. Add bread crumbs and mashed potatoes in equal quantities.

If order were observed for every one to mend his heart or house. he answered. and fry them to a cold fish brown. a Add as much beaten egg as will form Make it out into thin cakes. Any may be dressed in this manner. "To be sure I will what would your fish dinner be without the Great Seal ?" . but do not to pieces. being asked by the Secretary of the Treasury whether he woukl attend the grand ministerial fish dinner at the end of the session. How soon are those streets kingdom reformation made clean where every one swee2:)s before his own own ! door ! SALTED COD FISH. comes V^HEN Lord Erskine was Chancellor. city. produce family. 80 salt. and soak it it is all night. fine them. It should be It is served with mashed potatoes. how would personal amendment.. by degrees. to season with after it usual Cayenne pepper and mustard to the table. water until fall done. flour paste. country. Boil it Wash in fresh let it it. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 51.

separate it from Ob- the bones. Take the cold fish. melt as will and add as it much bread crumbs dry up . 52. 81 A NICE DISH FEOM FRAGMENTS OF COLD FISH. and give it a boil. into a basin. and drop bits of butter on the top of each. bit of but- ter into the stew-pan. Put the cold fish into scallop shells that have been previously buttered and strewed with bread crumbs . and cut into small pieces. cover with bread crumbs. own liquor for two or three minutes . in number proportioned Stew them slowly to the quantity of fish. The whole flat dish. tain oysters. then put the oyster liquor into the pan with the butter and crumbs. in their . take them out with a spoon and pour it skim the liquor. Then brown in a Dutch oven. may like be prepared at once in a large instead of the scallop shells. Put a it. add a couple of oysters to each . divide the oyster liquor between the different shells. a particularly Those who keen relish may add .THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.

000 eggs a cod. the physiologist. and to each egg add hal^ a tablespoonful of thick cream the oysters. and fry them in plenty of hot butter.000 in a sole. 36.568 in a flounder. 546. grated lemonpeel.355. to prolificacy of edible fish. first in Dip the egg then in the cracker crumbs.685. Have ready some grated cracker.400 in a plaice.000. catchup. and in a trench 300. Cayenne. 38.384. one at a time. 225. seasoned with Cayenne pepper and salt. counted 9. Take them out and endeavor of their liquor with a fork. or other condhnents. in doing so to rinse off all the particles of shell which may adhere to them. in a carp 3. mace.278 in a smelt.82 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.760. 1.681 Id in a mackerel. is taste. The for the a subject fitted. 53. or butter and lard . Beat the yolks only of some eggs. most evident reasons. to call forth our wonder and thankfulness toward a beneficent Providence. Dry them between napkins. FRIED OYSTERS. 100. Select the largest oysters for frying. Lewenhock.900 in a herring. anchovy.

two tablespoonfuls of and a tablespoonful of mace. fire. and a teaspoonful of cloves. PICKLED OYSTERS. To this quantity take one and a half pints salt. and liquor on to boil. Have ready two and a full half quarts of oysters. when the it comes to a boil. over a quick cold. They must be cooked They must be served A FOOL boasteth of attainments in things that are of no worth but where it is a shame to be ignorant. Put and the vinegar. Be careful they do not burn. it skim it then add up. salt.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. of vinegar. give another boil and after this put in the oysters. there he hath uo understandinor. 54. one tablespoonful of allspice. mixed. sides. with a pint of their liquor. spices. . the same quantity of white pepper. : . both till 83 they are of a light brown on Serve them hot.

and as soon as they boil take them Have ready in a pan one of gill of vinegar. dining at a fashionable hotel a few weeks since. their Take one hundred liquor. was requested by a gentleman to pass some article of food that was near him. one table- spoonful of pepper grains. " Do you mistake me for a waiter ?" said the ex" No. oysters out of and add to them as much water as there was liquor. was the reply.84 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. one tablespoonful allspice. them. should be pickled eaten. take out the oysters. the fire Put them over skim them. PICKLED OYSTERS. with salt to the taste. off. They hours. sir. the day before a few they are if After standing a scum should have risen on them. 55." quisite. a little gill Cayenne pepper and mace. I mistook you for a gentleman. . and half a of pepper. One of our young bloods. About six slice hours before they are a lemon and add to to be served. and strain the liquor.

1.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Season the eggs with pepper and salt to taste. Have ready one them in half. stir them and fry them under side is in hot When little the salt brown. turn an omelet. No. 85 OYSTER OMELET. 57. then gill add by degrees one of cream. sprinkle a top. and cut them up in small into the beaten egg butter. pieces. lest the pain of purchasing them exceed the pleasure thou hast in their enjoyment. Never heavy. 56. No. 2. OYSTER OMELET. cut the eggs in a pan of hot butter. Beat four eggs very light. and pepper over the half over as it and fold one the other. and drop . Cut the hard part out of eight or a dozen oysters. wipe them dry. Beat six eggs to a thick froth. according to their size. pour fine oysters. makes it Let not thy recreations be expensive. and beat them well dozen together.

with pepper and salt. comparative wafer. it. The above is of preparing oyster omelet. a bright-eyed little fellow. chopped fine.86 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 3. Beat the eggs very light. a little milk. An omelet should never be turned. but do not turn it is As mode soon as serve it done. daring the parsing lesson. add the oysters and the flour. Fry it a light brown. word waif occurred in the sentence. But the better way set is to put your oysters in a stew-pan. it the oysters over as equally as possible. 58. to a paste with a little Pepper and salt to the taste. superlative sealing- the — wax!" OYSTER OMELET. fire. which must be mixed milk. The youngest who was up. and serve hot. Eight oysters No. a wineglassful of flour. to the taste. and then " I can parse it. them over the and the moment . Fry in hot butter. puzzled over the word for a few minutes. six eggs. Posia bright idea struck him tive waif. In a certain School. slip it on a dish and the usual hot.

and dry them in a napkin. they begin to boil 87 out. and so on are in. then a layer of the oysters. strew in a layer of egg and crumbs. with Drain your oysters and season them salt and Cayenne pepper. SCALLOPED OYSTERS.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. with some lumps of butter on them. 59. and consequently will not dilute the beaten egg as much as the former mode. take them drain them. mince them and pro- ceed as above. they never get out of their beds till they are pullod We out. One of our writers asks what sort of animals are think it likely that oysters are. butter a deep dish. and season with the and pepper. chopped. . then more crumbs. When they are cold. are not so They this watery when prepared in manner. for the laziest. till all Put a cover of crumbs on the top. it crumb salt some stale bread. To each gill of bread finely crumbs add one hard boiled egg.

. Kinse one hundred oysters. or take small French rasps —make a hole in the top of each. 60. Put some oysters into a stew-pan . and a very mace. Lose no time thing useful : cut off be always employed in someall unnecessary actions. PLAIN OYSTER PATTIES. and put them in a stew pan with the water which adheres salt to them . STEWED OYSTERS WITH CREAM. and scrape out a portion of the crumb. Make little round loaves. As soon as they begin to boil pour in half a pint of cream. season them with little and Cayenne pepper. this it Bake serve in a tolerable quick oven and hot. grated Let them boil once and serve them hot.88 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 61. and stir little in half an ounce of butter rolled in a cracker.

rubbed or grated a fine. lamb. " Bring in the oysters I told you to open. and cover with the off. and lump or of butter. As he proceeds the oj^sters get interested one by one they gape with astonishment at the tremendous whoppers which are poured forth. He spreads 'em in a circle. and begins spinning a yarn.^^ " I KNOW a genius. Minced veal. loaves. game. Season with black pep- per and a sprinkle of Cayenne. poultry. seats himself in the centre. Sometimes it's a lionsla^ang adventure sometimes a legend of his love sometimes a descent into the crater of Vesuvius. proudly it "it took nie a long while to clean 'em. and then put in a Fill the rasps or bits spoonful of good cream. of crust previously cut Set them in an oven for a few minutes to crisp. but I've done at last. " There they are." observed Meister Karl. 89 with their own liquor.." said the liead of the household. . five Stew for six minutes. may be done in the same way as for paste patties. etc. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and add to them the crumbs of bread. growing impatient. " who has an howdacious plan of opening oysters.." replied the countr}^ cook. and thrown all the insides into the slop bucket. and as they gape my friend whips them out and swallows them !" — — .

chop as them up. salt order to Pour it off half the liquor to your taste. "That'll do. into a stew-pan. one at a time. and a Cayenne pepper. stir in one gill of cream. "I wish we had a bushel of 'em here now they'd open — easy I ''^ OYSTER 62. and strew the bread crumbs on the Cover the whole with a lid of paste. and mix them with many bread crumbs as will cover the top of your pie. Cut . Boil two eggs hard. one ounce and a half of little butter rolled in grated cracker. dry them perfectly. and place in them between clean napkins." said Starlight. pour the hot liquor over them. which Drain. so as to free of the shell them from any portions might adhere to them. put in the oysters. the sides of your pie dish. PIE.90 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Season the bread and egg with Caysalt. enne pepper and line Make a rich paste. top. with a long sigh. Take one hundred oysters out of their liquor.

" was the reply. " that the Lord has opened my mouth without any learning. in until the claws are perfectly The time the of boiling depends very terrapin . 91 an opening in the centre of the top crust. " I am thankful. loose." replied the latter." "A similar event. Put the terrapins on let in boiling water and them boil ten minutes. Then boil them it. and ornament it with flowers or leaves it made hot. LEARNED CLERGYMAN ill Maine was accosted manner by an illiterate preacher who despised education " Sir.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. take them out and with a also the thin coarse cloth rub all the skin oif the head." replied the former. much on age of the some . TERRAPINS. that may come water. neck. of the paste. in clean with a little salt soft. sir. 63. Bake it is and serve As soon as the crust done take the pie out of the oven. you have been to college I suppose?" "Yes." . "took place in in the following : A — Balaam's time but such things are of rare occurrence in the present day. shell and claws.

which you must not break. to the to each terrapin. mustard. put them in a stew pan. take out the sandbag. One fuls large lobster. and mustard. with a little Mix the whole together. salt. taste. hours. or two dessert- spoonfuls of gill common mixed oil.92 take three THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. butter. deira black. LOBSTEE SALAD. one the and a half of sweet yolks of five hard . the spongy part. open them carefully. also. Send them to the table hot. suit and red pepper. and to each large a quarter of terrapin butter. one gill and a half of vinegar. and stew minutes. and the gall. three tablespoon- of French mustard. take a pound of one wine glass of Sherry or Mawine. der of the Cut all the remain- terrapin in small pieces. When they are soft. 64. fifteen mashed to a paste. the yolks of two hard boiled eggs.

that legs and left and portions of the back are Collect all untouched. and a small of butter. that hath clothed himself with honor. the inside leaves of two heads of cabbage lettuce. a portion latter pepper and the salt. mash the yolks with a wooden or silver spoon. that is spoken of in the city with praise.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. a small teaspoonful of Cayenne pepper. Sloth. salt to taste. Cut the Boil the meat and lettuce in small pieces. the fragments of and put with them two blades of little mace. quantity of the to the must be proportioned 6 amount . is he that hath acquired wealth. that hath to power. or luncheons. and hath said. thou art mine enemy. fish. It OF FRAG- MENTS OF COLD LOBSTER OR CRAB. and that standeth liefore the king in his counsel? Even he that hath shut out idleness from his house. Who risen TO MAKE A NICE RELISH OUT 65. eggs hard. often happens after lobster or crab suppers claws. 93 boiled eggs.

YOUNG lady at a ball was asked by a lover of serious poetry." " I mean have. Put these all together. are nearly filled. may be cut into small pieces. If in- tended to be kept for some time. press When down the contents. sir. had tails nor any other. whether she had seen " Grabbers Tales ?" " Why.94 of lobster.'you read Crabbe's Tales ?" assure you. and set in the middle of the and the the jars paste poured over them. Take small and fill these with the prepared lob- If there are any solid parts of the to which cannot well be reduced they a j)aste. luncheon. " I didn't know tliat A said he " I crabs had tails. no. tie down with pieces of thick paper. clarified butter. pour over them a layer of or lard. and beat them jars ster." she answered. I was not aware that red crabs . THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. into a paste in a mortar. jars." "I beg your pardon. This will afford a nice relish for breakfast. miss. tail. or supper." .

may be known by the lower end of the breast bone if it yields readily to the pressure they are not old. MEATS. and the fat white the lean of veal should be of a light color. ETC. taking hold of the skin tears the wing and raising easily the if goose is tender. 66. the flesh The is finest grained beef is the best. POULTRY. 95 MEATS. GAME. and the fat a light cream is color. of a fine red. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. . the same remarks regard to will hold good with chickens ducks. but not yellow. young pressing . too. is the fat is should appear firm a tender goose known by it .. solid and firm the lean of mutton should be of a red color. or if you can readily insert the head of a pin into the flesh it is young. fat white . and if young it . the skin of pork should a light color. the . fat. and the be of tender .

a leg of veal of twelve pounds weight will require three hours and a half / ." " So was the beef we had yesterdaj^. The butcher forwarded it in due course but. meats should be boiled slowly fast is . and the meat. 67. Your copper All should be very clean and well tinned. presented themselves were unmistakable. animals the bones are cartilaginous ." was the reply. ]Sext day tlie same "Are you sure girl it is was sent sweet?" for a leg of lamb. on removing a portion of the suet.96 for in all THE FAMILY SATE-ALL. instance. when young and plump pliable. she inquired. to boil them For hardens the outside before the inside dissolves warm. "Per- lamb was alive yesterday." said the butcher. " the BOILED MEATS. fectly. for a piece of beef. the breast should be broad in all kinds of poultry. the feet easily and the toes broken when bent back. is A great deal of care and niceness requisite in boiling meats. the indications of life which A warm . SERVANT was Sent by her mistress during weather.

A of lamb of pounds. observe to dredge them well with flour before you put them into "the . 68. boiling 97 —the it slower will be. OR SIRLOIN. require half an hour A leg of pork will more of boiling than a leg of veal of the same weight. BEEF. You must allow an hour for every four pounds weight of beef or mutton. the joint with a clean cloth. kettle of cold water keep it covered. weight will require an hour and a half boiling. but veal. envelope Wipe it in .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. ]M)t Mutton and beef do boiling. RIBS. are not wholesome they are not boiled enough. if require so much or lamb. it boils the whiter and plumper When you boil. is The four best way is to put your meat in when the water leg cold. Beef should be kept a week or ten days when the weather will permit.-ROAST BEEF. mut- ton or beef. and take off the scum. pork.

. The time gravy as follows : To be . quarter of an hour near.98 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. half an hour off" before serving take the paper. two minutes to be added in each case. and baste it with two ounces of dissolved butter. pour it into the dish . pour the dripping off. and serve at once. dredge the beef slightly with baked flour. thickly spread with sweet beef- dripping . to . baste frequently commencement. thin paper. seventeen minutes weather. add a teacupful ofl)oiling water and half a saltspoonful of salt to the gravy dripped from the beef. done through. place the beef on a hot dish . eleven minutes to in. place the screen before the fire half an hour before putting down the beef. hang the joint before the fire for the first . baste then withit draw slowly the it to till a distance. and let roast frcmi done . the pound with the be well in frosty fourteen minutes. underdone. gar- nish with horseradish.

put on bars which should it your dripping pan. Who must be in good temper. 4. 5. 99 There are seven chances against even the most simple dish being presented to the mouth in absoFor instance. It must have been kept a good time. AND YORKSHIRE PUDDING. the whites in a broad stir in dish. which mu^ be whisked very dry. When the yolks are thick as a pint of milk. have good luck. — 6. and it for moment. It must be roasted at a good fire. By a good cook. the yolks in a pan. set in the oven. and when it is half done. with a gill of water in the pan. make a Then stir in the whites. Rub it salt on a nice piece of fit beef. do not . : make Beat the pudding in the following manner four eggs very light. BAKED BEEF. 3. but much flour as will not a thick one. and batter. With all this felicitous combination you must the meat the mouths ^ toGood appetite—be ready andaction at thewhicli ^re eat same must t. 1. a roast of beef lute perfection.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The meat must be good. 69. 2.

purpose." BEEF A-LA-MODE. him . in the No. round Tvith Silent Contempt. and cook is it into the the pudding batter enougj| done. the brown side up. according to the size . meat about an inch and within Season it one inch of the opposite with pepper and salt.100 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. skim put till the fat off the gravy. 1. Take out the meat." replied Hook. is beat the batter after the white stir in. " What do you mean to do K. "why I mean to let him alone — most severely. alhiding " Do with to a man who had grossly vilified him. lastly. in a teaspoonful of dissolved carbonate of all ammonia. oven again. A round of beef is the best for this With a sharp knife cut incisions apart. and place the dish. cut it the pudding in squares. ?" said a friend to Theodore Hook. You should make to cover your dripping pan about half an is inch deep. pour in the batter all and replace the meat. side. When the meat dished. 70.

and pepper. Let it simmer six or eight hours. is once. put the a pot with about a pint of water. then make a dressing of bread. parsley. com- BEEF A-LA-MODE. spice add it all- When the meat is done dish little up. Some stick in a few cloves. trifles. and bread crumbs. it. and those who are fond of spice. or at accidents. butter. and serve cold. Fill the incisions with ipaeat in the dressing. and stuff around the bone. This ex- cellent when Be not disturbed at mon or unavoidable. > 101 of the piece of meat. lard it with bacon ter. Make a dressing of in onion. 2. and thicken the gravy with a Let it boil flour. 71. the proportion of a pint of crumbs. one small onion finely chopped. with pepper and salt to the taste. a round of beef. onion. No. and an ounce of butter. Take . and in . butsalt sweet herbs.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. it and cover tightly.

and bind deep pot cover hours. it boils the better it will let it For every pound of meat. take care that Whosoever speaketh of not himself. as . be. having been flavored with Madeira wine. If the beef is boil three to be eaten cold. with force- meat gravy and carrots. halt Let him he BOILED CORNED BEEF. Thus. 72. The slower minutes. Put on the meat in cold water. Have ready it. tlie several places in lean part —skewer it. Baste it Stew it four or five constantly with the gravy. 1. and turn it in the pot. Pour the previously over it. When it done. a —put it the beef into and half with water.102 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. a boil fifteen piece of beef weighing twelve pounds. allow one quart of water to every pound of meat. No. parsley. it it close with tape. should hours. another's failings with pleasure. that scoffeth at the lame. shall hear of his own with bitterness of heart. place upon a dish and garnish balls.

cold No. 2. 'tis only a family dinner I'm asking you to. V . slowly. ." "And what for not. and from an enemy CORNED BEEF. Mr.— THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. that bates the world my favorite dinner we often have it at our table harrin^ the heef — . a familj^ dinner is a mighty pleasant thing. A MILD answer to an angry man. abateth his heat he shall become thy friend. ?" asked one Irishman of another. Corned beef should be put on in water. with all my heart. soon as it it is . What have you got ?" " Och." " By the powers. nothing uncommon an elegant piece of corned beef. in order to retain the juices. and potatoes." " Remember. im- merse a few minutes in cold water as soon as taken from the pot. serve it with turnips and pois to If the beef it for it is be eaten cold. and when done tatoes. *' Faith and I will. " Will you dine with me to-morrow. 73. Tongues are boiled in the same manner. like water cast upon the fire. 103 taken out of the pot immerse in cold water for a short time. allowing a quart of water to Boil it every pound of meat.

it. a party came into the public rooms Buxton. the cavities Then wipe it dry. loud enough for him to at One morning hear the observation. Boil it slowly for two hours. his lordship. " but before I ate the tongue I was assured you did not want it. Soak a fresh tongue for several hours in strong salt and water. ROASTED BEEF'S TONGUE. Trim and clean it. take off the skin and roast and while Serve with cooking baste currant jelly. and a little onion . They were told that Lord " I am very angry with Bja'on had eaten it all. draw out the The water should be changed two or three times. 74:.104 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. madam." said a lady." retorted Lord Bj-ron. somewhat later than usual. pepper. the let heart. STUFFED. and then drain it well. it with butter. of bread. and fill with a dressing made of crumbs salt. and requested some tongue. " I am sorry for it. it and sprinkle salt over and to stand for all two or three hours blood." BEEF'S HEART. 75.

76.THE FAMILY SAVE. bind each with twine. When brown. salt. a glassful of wine. allowing for each pound.ALL. If convenient. Stew till done. or skewer shape. and a little water. . 105 butter chopped as will fine. fire. but if they happen to go the wrong way they cause a deal of trouble. dredge flour over. two bay-leaves. Cut some slices of beef into square put on each a strip of bacon. a a slice of lemon-peel. Set it a moderate a quarter of oven and bake an hour it is it. Put to this as much make in the crumbs adhere together. spoonful of capers. — BEEF. pieces. spice. better roasted before the There are some members of the community that are like the crumb in the mouth if they go the right way they afford a little nourishment. more delicious . half a glassful of vinegar. add shalots. LIKE GAME. them into a rolled Fry them in butter. The piety of a child is sweeter than the incense of Persia oftered to the sun yea.

and in fort3'-eight hours use unslaked lime finely powdered. Put the steak with a lump of butter pan over a slow fire. to ruU until all the rust disappears.ALL. 77. salt. of Arabian spices by ITALIAN BEEFSTEAK. into a stew it and turn fine until the butter has it become a white gravy. fine. Score a steak transversely with a cutting it sharp knife without through. 78. When the steak . it and cook an onion chopped very in its Let own gravy for about three-quarters of an hour and serve. — STEWED BEEFSTEAKS. field than odors wafted from a the western gales. Cover the steel with sweet oil.106 THE FAMILY SAVE. season with pepper. and put more butter to the steak. then pour into a basin. To TAKE Rust out of Steel. well nibbed on it. Lay it in a stew-pan with a small piece of butter.

take it out. and a shalot finely sliced . that thy station on earth is Forget not. and who often in mercy denieth thy requests. stew it for ten minutes. Add let pint of water. . and it stew very slowly for one hour then add a glass . up very man. and serve hot. and fry the steak then add it to the gravy in the stew-pan. cover the pan close. it Cut the steak rather thick . an sliced. who seeth the vanity of thy wishes.. Or. . appointed by the wisdom of the Eternal who knoweth tliy heart. with a tablespoonful of wine. and serve first. pepper and cover thicken it it with flour and butter. an onion sliced. brown half a in a frying-pan with butter. pepper and salt. fry the steak slightly at it then put onion into half a pint of water. it up. return the gravy into the stew-pan. is 107 all nicely done. 79. a spoonful salt. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. ketchup. of it walnut close. BEEFSTEAK WITH OYSTERS.

and asked why. that the price was raised. made them dearer.108 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. beat dip and season them with pepper and into a little melted butter and broil When fire. Serve'with the following mix. done. pepper and Shortly after the commencement of the last war. " It's owin' to the wars. ture laid underneath parsley chopped fine. little of port wine. in Greenock. remarked to her chandler. Cut the steaks into thin slices. and a dozen or having been two of oysters. BEEFSTEAK. a tax was laid on candles. WITH POTATOES. put them into a dish to a fine before the and fry potatoes brown color. their liquor previously strained and put into the stewpan. salt. which. as a political economist would prove. a flour. salt. a small piece of butter. 80. them them. Paddy Macbeth. Scotch wife." said Paddy. " The war!" said the astonished matron. " gracious me are they gaun to fight by candle light f" A ! .

pepper. BEEFSTEAK FRIED. Some people. as many sunbeams as they. and with effort you can cull as many flowers and catch — . some pepper and boils. When fire. until they are of a fine When done. salt. 109 FRIED BEEFSTEAK WITH WINE. 82. place in a hot dish before the add to the gravy in the pan a wineglassful of port wine. to be sure. of a fine brown. place fire .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. brown. are born they are naturall}^ pleasant and lightlike sunshine hearted but these are few and far between. 81. done. As soon as it pour it over the steak and serve very hot. 7 . and always monopolized. Emulate them. Why may not you be as cheerful as they ? They have their trials and private annoyances as well as you. Happiness. like every dther precious good must be sought for. until it it Fry the steak over a quick is fire. them to in a hot dish before the add the gravy in the pan a wineglassful of port wine. Fry the steaks in butter for twelve or fifteen minutes.

add one ounce of butter rolled in flour. and slice put a layer of the meat and a layer of onions in a stew-pan. Cut up one pound of beef in small pieces about an inch square.110 salt. No. and serve very hot. the gravy seems too thin. with salt and pepper and a is little flour alternately. till all in. over the steaks. 1. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. it cover closely and set it on a slow if fire to stew. 83. and a minced onion. in season two tomatoes pieces and stewed with be cooked in the Cold beef may same manner. FRENCH STEW. but if it should be thick flour. and add half a teacupful of water. when about half done. pour it Give it a boil up. enough. Nothing serves more effectually to lighten the calamities of life than steady employment. pare six onions . add the butter without the When tomatoes are may be cut in small the meat. .

Mayor. If the gravy should not be thick enough. bowing. observing it. The queen. attempted several times to drink. Mr. and on her approaching the city of Coventry. being thirsty. 84. and to it a pint of sliced tomatoes. 2. the mayor. On their return the}" had to pass through a wide brook.'* FRENCH STEW. with a numerous cavalcade. It does not require any water. add No." The mayor. went out to meet her. Cover it is and let it simmer the beef tender. as the tomatoes are sufficiently juicy. and an flour. The in tomatoes must be peeled. said to him '* Pray. replied " Madam.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. till ounce of butter rolled in closely. very humbly. permit your horse to drink. Cut up two pounds of beef. till your majesty's royal steed has : : — satisfied his thirst. and the mayor's horse. it would be the height of presumption for my unworthy horse to drink. Queen Elizabeth was once making a journey in England. Ill Excessive Politeness. a stew-pan and season it Put the meat well with pepper and salt . then add your tomatoes. . but his cavalier prevented him. add a little flour mixed with cold water.

and the leaves of the trees in the autumn of the year. 85. lambs. 86. The cheeks of a lady in the autumn of life. with pepper and and put it into a hot dish with a bit of butter. Beef . BEEF'S KIDNEY. with pepper and salt. season salt. Pare and slice lengthwise two large cucumbers and a large onion. in proportion to their bulk.112 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. FRIED. often grow redder and redder but nature is not always in both cases the artist. Kidneys require a longer time to dress. and serve hot. more than those of sheep. BEEFSTEAK WITH CUCUMBERS. . it Broil a steak. Why is French cookery better than English? Because in the Revolution of 1688 the Stew-arts were driven out of England into France. and fry them. then pour the cucumbers over it. than any other parts of animals 5 and beef kidneys etc. Season them dredge flour over them.

re- move them from with a small ful of flour. salt. . dredge them well with and season with salt. or any sauce that will impart a good flavor. slices Fry on both sides and as the are done. Cut the beef into small pieces. and salt. at the last moment. the pan. 87. and Cayenne. Trim. Serve with small slices of fried bread. and roll it fill with meat.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and make a gravy slice of butter. . a of white wine. and bake a light brown. walnut pickle. season with pepper. lemon-juice. pepper. and a little chopit ped onion out thin . kidneys ner : 113 may be fried in the following manslices . . make it a plain paste. little and a little boiling water. Add a mushroom catchup. NICE PATTIES FROM UNDER-DONE BEEF. a dessert-spoon- pepper. Some add glass to the gravy. and cut the kidney into flour.

is the best " If it were done. lend wliose society j^ou don't like him some money if he is rich. fat. 88. As soon as brown.: 114 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. when 'tis done. Here is a recipe to get rid of an old acquaintance If he is poor. and joint. the one given in the words of Macbeth. fire . One of them observed. The steaks will be found excellently served with sliced fried potatoes round it. pour over some hot gravy of the the seasoning is If is added while the meat being boiled. securing a good proportion of Lay them on a gridiron over a good turn often. Both means are certain. when he deliberates on the intended death of the king. Cut the meat in slices an inch and a half thick. then 'twere well it were done quickly. of all receipts. but do not stick a fork into them." . the latter will be hardened and the pieces wasted. that. ask him to lend you some. and add and pepper. Two Gentlemen were talking in a coffee-house of the best method of dressing a beefsteak. lay them on a salt very hot dish. — : UNDER-DONE BEEF SERVED AS STEAKS.

and the meat . but without due attention is an indigestible preparation. 90. or will that the meat has been once cooked.THE PAMILY SAVE-ALL. Broil fire . Meat that has been a first underdone the . until all drawn out then wipe them dry. HASHES. unsuited for delicate little stomachs. them and be over or before a clear .when thoroughly done they should served with currant jelly. A hash is a very convenient mode of disposing of cold meat. son well with pepper and slowly. in slices not thicker than half an inch. in salt Cut the heart lengthwise. time is the best for this purpose first the gravy should be heated. 115 BROILED BEEF'S HEART. 89. Soak them the blood is and water . The cook must always remember be very lightly done. and seasalt. and must now it be tough and hard.

then strain off the gravy. merely simmered in it afterwards. little thyme and hash be and a single clove. and serve with toasted bread. gristle. to is allow garlic to be perceptible an offence against good taste. and make it it hot over the fire. put in the sliced meat. taking great care that does not boil. The meat should be cut pieces.116 THE FAMILY S AYE-ALL. a small piece of butter blended with a tablespoonful of flour. salt and pepper. The mushroom flavor is the most approved and delicate in what are called made dishes. or small then all the sinews. especially. a fried onion. and bone. a parsley. and even those of health. if the Let it boil down to three fourths of the quantity. the laws of cookery. in thin slices. must be put into a saucepan with a little water. that only the aroma . and flavor it with a little ketchup or Worcester sauce. beef. yet it should always be so sklfully used. skin. No flavor or condiment should unduly prekind of onions or dominate in this or any other cookery.

She requested her employer. 91. salt and nutmeg.. thicken the and when near boiling . if the cause of her dismissal should be mentioned. A LA FEANCAISE. " Anna B has 'ing certificate was given to her conducted herself well in service. add half a pint of water. MAID servant was dismissed on account of her lack of cleanliness. A The followto do it in as light terms as possible. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. cut let it into small but thick slices fire stand by the and heat gradually point. the main cause of her dismissal being a tendency to hydrO' phobia. a dessertspoonful of minced a when thoroughly browned. and onion parsley stir into them a finely chopped and . should be distinguished. and a tablespoonful of stew-pan. simmer flour. : my BEEF HASHED. into fire for them over the minute. and put to it Place in the beef. Put a piece of butter the size of a a a walnut. it seasoning of pepper. 117 This should be particularly attended to in all dishes com- posed of veal or fowls.

mixed with a tablespoonful of lemon juice. cut it Take the meat from the bones.118 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. COLD BEEF WITH POTATOES. with the gravy in the stew-pan. and add two or three raw potatoes pared and sliced. strain the bones from the gravy the stew-pan : pour the latter back into season the meat with pepper little and put salt. Man in his civilized state is supposed to eat more than a thousand times in every year of his life. them little into a saucepan with some and a more than cover them with cold water. and in small pieces. crack the bones small. and when the potatoes are done dish up. let is them stew until the water reduced to one half. it and a mace if preferred. . 92. put salt. . Small squares of toasted bread laid in the may be bottom of the dish. put the stew over the it fire. sauce with the yolk of three eggs.

about half an inch thick. After hunting for it in company with a bo}' until midnight. or it it stew a gravy from the bones. ''I know where he is. that I knew where I might find him !" The boy. cried out. mashed potatoes and Make it into small cakes. seasoned. one Saturday evening. when not large enough to be sliced. 93. and season bits of pepper and salt.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Or the meat. supposing the horse was still the burden of thought. The next day he took for his text the following passage from Job : " Oh. as above. he gave up in despair. Cut the cold meat into small Season the slices slices. who had just come in. and spread thinly over them some bread crumbs and some small lumps of butter. thicken with with buttqr rolled in flour. and fry them a nice brown. sir he's in Tom Smith's stable !" The following is who lost his horse — A DISH FROM COLD BEEF AND MASHED POTATOES. 119 a good story about a clergyman. Take the gravy left from the joint. may be minced. . and mixed with flour.

a married man (who should have known better) proposed " The Ladies Who divide our sorrows. do it quickly. Chop some cold roast beef as fine as possible. put over the it fire. Defer not till the evening what the morning may accomplish. but any other parts may be used) —cut into slices of equal thickness. 94-.: 120 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Take a piece of a sirloin of beef. double our joys. and as soon as it is hot serve with boiled or poached eggs. clear fire until and boil them quickly over a . COLD BEEF OR MUTTON WITH POACHED EGGS. pour over it some of the cold it gravy which was left. and treble our expenses /" — MINCED BEEF. or of a leg of mutton — (these parts are recommended. 95. At a recent festive meeting. Whatever thou resolvest to do.

and add to it also a few is potatoes. .^" . Charles the Second gave the name to the piece of beef called the " sirloin. he asked and being told that it was a loin of beef. its name said jocosely that it should be knighted for its merits then. or." Having dined from a loin.THE FAMILY SAVE. Put stew-pan with some of the cold gravy if .ALL. ECONOMICAL STEW. lay them upon a dish . Stew gently If there until the meat quite tender. add a little water. . fore the fire to keep hot then poach some eggs and lay around the meat —and serve with mashed potatoes. extending his sword over it. It is proper to ob- serve that the under-done parts of meat are only suitable for this purpose. salt. " Henceforth be Sir Loin . and being well pleased with the joint. it season the meat with pepper and it and in a dredge over a little flour. 96. he exclaimed. Slice an onion fine. there be none left. was no cold gravy. Slice some cold beef or mutton. slightly 121 be- brown .

H. he asked his patient if he was attending to that advice. cut adhering them apart.. me in my life !" LUNCH FROM COLD ROAST BEEF. rare." said the doctor " 'tis the only way to secure you length of da3^s. Grease the gridiron and broil them quickly. . " Right. Sheridan was once taken ill in consequence of a fortnight's continued dining-out and dissipation. "for these last three days. fried eggs Poached or and mashed potatoes are suitable accompaniments. 122 a little THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. taking care not to burn them." " I do not doubt it. have been the longest to . He sent for Dr. When to the beef has been cooked and the bones have considerable meat them. and crack or saw each one in pieces about four inches long. 97. who prescribed rigid abstinence calling again soon afterward." said Sheridan. The answer being in the affirmative.. butter rolled in flour must be added is a few minutes before the stew served. since I began.

of eggs. either in a plain way Qgg. WITH MASHED POTATOES. and then into some Fry them a Cold veal is nicely-seasoned bread crumbs. Slice . after going over a handsome mansion. MUTTON. A NICE DISH FROM COLD BEEF. dip Beat the yolks of a couple the meat into small cakes. it to the taste with pepper it and salt. 99.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. OR VEAL. Mash potatoes. 98. and moisten with some mushroom or walnut catsup. season Mince some cold beef or mutton. or with hot milk and the yolk of an and add some butter and salt. 123 "RISSOLES" OF COLD BEEF. but little nicer with cold ham grated and mixed with " What a small kitchen !" exclaimed Queen Elizabeth. nice light brown on both a it.''^ replied the owner. " It is by having so small a kitchen that I am enabled to keep so large a mansion. may be dressed in the same way. sides. make them into the egg.

An Irish housemaid. if possible. adding to it at the bottom of a salt. who was sent to call a gentleman to dinner. in squares of equal size. Cut the under-done parts of the in long narrow slices about an inch little leaving. tooth-brush. ma'am. a capital dinner for a small family. When This. 100. directly he's just sharpening his — teeth r' METHOD OF DRESSING COLD SIRLOIN OF BEEF. a fat salt at- tached to each piece. Season with flour. with an apple-tart or dumpling to follow. found him engaged in using a ** Well. it the cold beef. and lay pie dish. is browned serve immediately. dredge with and heat . some pepper. " Yes. it Put the dish in an on all oven and brown nicely sides. meat thick. and a little beef gravy. is he coming ?" said the lady. potato crust with the point of a knife. Cover the whole with Score the a thick paste of the potatoes.124 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and mixed spices.

dear. " I is to step into 8 tlie kitchen . with of toasted bread." replied the husbaud. COLD POTATOES AND BEEF. served with fried or mashed There can be no objection to broils in the house.'" . returning from a have learned one of the most difficult steps. so that they emanate only from the kitchen. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." "There is a step. ! "My ball. either from the joint. 125 to them little in gravy from the joint — which a slices vinegar may be added. you will never care to learn. Thicken slices gravy. pepper. Slice the beef and the potatoes put an onion to a good gravy. and serve hot." said a young wife." " Indeed what can that be ?" " It . I fear. 101. or stewed from the bones potatoes . The may be boiled. Add the vinegar. and salt. let the and beef simmer in the gravy.. "the most valuable of all but it is one. and potatoes.

COLD BEEF. RECOOKED. mix eggs well together. and fry them in butter or good one lard. off the shells mash the yolks fine and add them to the meat. and salt. every one leaves you to recover it as you can. When TURNOVERS OF COLD MEAT. onion if liked. and season well with pepper and add a little finely-chopped cold potatoes. Boil fresh twenty minutes and take very it lay them . is . Make into small cakes. 102. with salt all and pepper six . MUTTON OR VEAL. . 103.126 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Cut any kind of cold meat into small pieces. add a small meat and chop piece of butter. every ready to help you to look for it but when you have lost your character. Take a it pound or more of cold very fine. roll them in flour or fine bread crumbs. Take some grate them. beat an egg and put to them. in cold water. you have lost money in the streets. .

cold Take some rather thick of under-done beef. and lay the meat on the top. : and vinegar themes what Tnother always sea' sons with /" . " salt. slices 104. and stir in gradually the whites of the eggs. 127 form a and dust in as much dough. seasoning with salt and pepper. Pour the batter into a deep baking dish. fold the edges of the paste and pinch them together so as to hold the meat. mustard. and fry them on both sides a fine brown. Set it in the oven and bake it a nice brown. and tell me what the four seasons Yonng prodigy responds " Pepper. Lastly little salt." Come here. To a pint of milk add the yolks of the eggs. put on a portion of this paste some of the seasoned meat. flour to and enough put in a make a batter.— THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. flour as will Roll this out about the ordinary thickness for pies. are. *'TOAD IN THE HOLE" FROM COLD MEAT. Make a batter by beating the whites and yolks separately of four eggs.

Mix it well. according to the quantity of meat. Season well with pepper and salt. free Cut the meat into thin fat . slices.. and butter it put in the meat and press hard. 105. " M}'^ dear. Mince Very fine equal quantities of cold roast beef and tongue. and add the whole or a part of a well-beaten egg. as she turned up her rosy little mouth to be kissed. and them from it take some cold gravy and thicken with butter rolled in flour . love. a mould ." inquired a young wife of her husband. to acquire : down very the mould tin. which quite *'• ! satiffies me!" A FRICASSEE FROM FRAGMENTS OF COLD BEEF. the shape of then turn it it out on a baking and wash Set it over with some well-beaten egg. " have you seen the magnificent set of walnut furniture which the Jenkinses have just bought?" Hem No. BEEF BAKED IN FORMS. 128 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. but I've seen the bill. 106. in the oven to brown.

but . salt. but do not allow it Stir the fricassee. If something a better add a glass of port wine. Season with pepper. OR SUPPER RELISH FROM POTTED COLD BEEF. and chop it fine. young onions. GOOD housewife should not be a person of one should be familiar with the flower garden as well as the flour barrel and though her lesson should be to lessen expense. Put it in a stew-pan. the gravy. 107. and the juice of a lemon. She will prefer a yard of shrubbery to If her husband is a skilful sower a yard of satin. to boil.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. it and as soon it begins to boil little may is be served. A should not be less valuable than the order of her household. and spices to the . she is equally skilful as a sewer of garments. proceed following manner. cut it Drain the meat from in pieces. of grain. the yolk of an egg beaten. Having a joint of dressed beef in the which cannot be consumed. He keeps his hoes bright by use she keeps the hose of the family in order. the odor of a fine rose idea. LUNCHEON. 129 and and as for seasoning use salt. pepper. required. — A NICE BREAKFAST.

"I *' Why. Put it into small cans. or. onion." replied the applicant. Line a deep pie dish with paste. Pour in a little water. Over this strew some finely-minced onion. press down. . leaving a hole in the centre. the pie is full. 108. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. put in a layer of meat. add pepper and salt to the taste. Cut about half a pound of cold beef into under-done small pieces . layers of oysters may be substituted. and flour. Bake in it. Cover the top with paste. it. place of the onions. ma'am. and on the top layer lay some lumps of butter. see. you was too good-looking. and when I opened the door folks took me for the missus /" Why PIE MADE OF COLD ROAST BEEF. and cover with plenty of melted butter.130 taste. " did you leave _yoiir last place ?" Inquired a young housekeeper about to engage a new servant. and serve with oyster sauce . ^ . dredge flour over then add another layer till of meat.

This is a nice dish for supper or luncheon.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. but at the conclusion of the meal a person should always feel as though he could eat more. season with Cayenne pepper and salt to the taste. as much vinegar as would cover the meat boil in it a few grains of whole allspice and a couple of cloves . beef- steak. been boiled for cut it in pieces about half an inch square. is A is PRUDENT wife a treasure. . Quantity of Food. and an active one worth her weight in gold. 109. Take . a further reduction of a third should be made and so on until a proper standard is arrived at. and stand away to get cold. If we find that we dined too freel3' to-day. To satisfy the appetite it is not necessary to eat to repletion. Take some soup cold roast beef. or the meat from a shin which has . COLD BEEF HASHED WITH VINEGAR. . to-morrow we should reduce the quantity one-third and if that is not sufficient. 131 — The proper quantity of food — to be taken at a meal is best regulated by a person's own feelings. pour it over the meat while it boil- ing hot.

is Take some is cold beef —that which it under-done the best little —mince Season very into fine.132 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. proceed in the follow- ing manner. with the yolk of an egg. pepper and and rub with bread crumbs and Broil it sweet herbs. Score the shoulder in squares. and grate a to uncooked it. BEEF CAKES. 111. flour them. to which has been added an ounce of fresh butter rubbed into a table- . it. ham it enough flavor with pepper and salt. or a part of one. over a clear fire —or put it it in an oven until nicely browned. THE ONLY "COLD SHOULDER" WHICH CAN BE SHOWN TO A FRIEND WITHOUT OFFENCE. being left cold. Send to table with sauce made of a half a pint of gravy. it Mix the whole together and make out into small cakes. and fry them a nice brown on both sides. rub salt it it. A shoulder of lamb. 110.

Serve with caper sauce poured over or melted butter. "A wife should be like roasted — . having only a blade bone. in which should be mixed some mushroom catchup and lemon juice. and send up the rest in a tureen. one of black pepper. pour a of the sauce over the meat. a vinegar. Somebody lamb and nicely dressed. says. spoonful of flour^ the same of 133 or mushroom walnut catsup. or a few grains of Chili Cayenne — simlittle mer together for a few minutes." An impertinent fellow adds and " without sauce /" —tender. it. a quarter of a little rind of lemon grated very fine.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The sauce -may be sim- plified at discretion if the above ingredients cold shoulder of are not all at hand. little meat upon the may be dressed in the same way. A mutton. about a table-spoonful of each. two teaspoonsful of lemon juice.

a wine-glassful of . six Sultana raisins put them into a saucepan with a wine-glassful of vinegar. a tea-spoonful of moist sugar. Take five or six cutlets off the . and fry slowly in plenty of boiling of a pale fat till brown color. half a salt-spoonful of pepper. and a quarter of a grain of Cayenne. then into the crumbs. and beat the cutlets ounces of with fine a chopper. Dip the cutlets into beaten egg (one). fifteen or twenty minutes. mutton trim off the bare the bone. rub through a sieve round the and the sauce in the centre.134 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 112. Season two crumbs of bread with the eighth part of a nutmeg grated. best end of a neck of fat. Simmer place the twenty minutes. a table-spoonful of gravy. one clove. Serve immediately. Add dish. port wine cutlets . MUTTON CUTLETS WITH PORTUGUESE SAUCE. . a half . large Peel and chop fine an onion. a clove of garlic. a salt-spoonful of salt. apple. and four pepper-corns.

Be always more ready an injury. 113.THE FAMILY SAVE. Tomato likewise served with it. but does not keep a car- — — riage I" MUTTON I CHOP. great To cook a mutton chop well is a They should not be cut too thin. art. having sent round to the church wardens in his diocese a circular of in" Does your officiating quiries. take from the fat is eight to ten minutes. They will and should be done over a nice bright coal fire. a chop never stick a fork into sauce is In dressing it. and is the lean feels hard.ALL. and is his converThe sation and carriage consistent therewith ?" "He church wardens of Wallingford replied: preaches the gospel. It should be served on a very hot plate. and with a nice mealy potato. hot. the chop done. to forgive than to return . among which was clergyman preach the gospel. When transparent. 135 The Bishop of Oxford.

them on a dish and season salt. salt . of a neck of mutton cut into neat chops season pepper. Let it not quite cover the mutton. cold pour in but sufficient water to reach. When they are done. is Memory beautiful. 114. Wash the chops. grease the bars of your gridiron. but true. it is more and a thousand times as IRISH STEW. . 115.136 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. three place just with three saltspoonsful of bL-ick and the same of onions. and send them to the table. and broil them over hot lay coals. wipe them dry. This is the French method of serving them. the mutton closely over. About two pounds of the best end . MUTTON CHOPS WITH LEMON. not so brilliant as hope. them with on pepper and ter. peel and baste them with butlemons. lay a slice and slice each chop. slice thin put them in a stew-pan. boil up.

Sprinkle desserttablefine over it a teaspoonful of salt.ALL. 116. the same wash them. Wash half a pound and boil it in a quart of water for . 137 an hour Skim and simmer very gently and a quarter. and let simmer very gently for an hour and a half of rice. "Are you guilty or not guilty?" asked the clerk of arraigns to a prisoner the other day. and them on the mutton. Cut into neat slices three quarters of a pound of cold boiled mutton. longer. Simmer half on a an hour and serve very hot dish. and a spoonful of flour chop one onion quite and add that. it Shake the pan quently." said Pat. "what are you put there for but to find that out ?" — CURRIED BOILED MUTTON. water. . two spoonsful of curry powder. potatoes place (all for Peel two pounds of mealy size).THE FAMILY SAVE. "An' sure now. Put the mutton into a stewif pan with half a pint of gravy it. An Irishman's ]?lea. you have fre- and if not.

and with it a glass of mixed separate. OR SPINACH. methods of and pour a good gravy over them various when served. f The fool is not always man always successful . The redressing mutton are applicable generally to lamb. it twenty-five minutes. never was a wise man wholly unhappy. egg. chopped parsley. drain on a sieve. 117. nor the wise yet never had a fool a thorough enjoyment. grated lemon and and yolk of a little Some nutmeg may be added. Place the rice round the dish neatly. A LADY who made pretensions to refined feelings. Serve very pickles. A VERY NICE DISH OF COLD LAMB AND CUCUMBERS. and put it into the oven for five minutes to dry. hot. little Fry them. went to her butcher to remonstrate with him on . and put the curry in the centre. they are slightly browned in dip the slices bread crumbs.138 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. till Fry slices or chops of cold lamb . unfortunate.

when cold. his cruel practices. madam?" said the butcher. and sat in expectation of something better. little flour some mutton cut Thicken the gravy with a and butter. cold Boil the whole gently with in small pieces. it made may.— THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. *' can you be to put innocent little lambs to death?" "Why not. Add to some cold gravy some finely-chopped onion and half a pint mush- rooms. If any of the neck of mutton or veal should be left after having been into soup. FooTE." said she. John bring that back again I find it's neck or nothing /" ! TO DRESS COLD MUTTON OR VEAL. Foote called out to him. A neck of mutton being the last thing. 118. however. found nothing to his liking. As the servant was taking it away. 139 so barbarous " How. he refused it. dining at the house of Mrs. " Hello. as he had the other dishes. be cut into . 119. would you?" as A NICE HASH OF MUTTON. understanding that there was nothing more. Thrale. "you wouldn't eat 'em alive.

or the meat become Serve with currant jelly. will Don't let hard. and boil. it Cut the mutton into slices and put in. Then add some Cayenne pepper and some flour to thicken. gives in his account of his vo3"age up the an amusing instance of a singular opinion of the proper qfualities of meat entertained by the He sa3's " On arriving at Kench we gave sailors. and let it simmer for four or ^lyq minutes. Take three put it pints of mutton gravy. Then add a it gill of port wine. Nile. preferred by them to young mutton because it stood more chewing /" Warburton. and a little bit of butter. — MUTTON HASHED IN THE STYLE OF VENISON.140 small THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. the crew a feast. and whole grains of little Put all in a stew-pan with a vinegar. let it into a saucepan. allspice. . boil. pieces and seasoned highly with Cayenne pepper. consisting of an old ram. and as soon as it is boiling hot serve it. 120. salt. salt.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. your honesty. sir. sir T^ COLD BREAST OF MUTTON OR VEAL. sweeping out a bachelor's room. Trim the Put cold meat . you do with " Yes. and inquired of the girl if she had seen it. may be known to be good by being not too large. 9 — it is. spots. season with and pepper." was the reply. "And what did it?" ^^Kept it for my honesty. and chuckling her under the chin. it in a hot oven." said he. which " You may keep it for she carried to the owner. and of If the flesh white color. or soon will joints of unfit for eating. A short time after he missed his gold pencil-case. 141 A FEMALE servant. or discolored by green or yellow rejected the meat should be be. or Directions for Selecting Veal. 121. cover it with salt egg and bread crumbs. be flabby. smiling. serve It may be eaten with currant or guava jelly. when thoroughly browned caper sauce. and it. firm in the flesh. The prime . found a ten cent piece on the carpet. —Veal fat.

provided himself with some farthings. MUTTON. METHOD OF RE-DRESSING COLD ROAST BEEF. pay for it before you wear it. Fry them a nice brown. 122. on leaving the next party he attended. " I beg your pardon. and the breast for stewing. OR LAMB. If you would sleep soundly." "Oh. The head and valuable for the feet are especially qualities. ^^ I never give lessP^ A . season well with pepper and and dip each lightly in beaten egg and then in bread crumbs. "but you have made a mistake. labor for it.142 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. or some delicate made dish." said the gentleman. presented one to the footman as he stood at the door. If you would enjoy your raiment. Cut the meat into small thin salt. their nourishing If you would relish your food. take a clear conscience to bed with you." said Johnny. sir. no. veal. slices. are the loin and the leg for roasting. and. GENTLEMAN who greatly disliked the custom of giving fees to servants.

to a bookseller. Cut the meat little in small pieces. " Why. little Stew till Thicken with flour and butter mixed. a piece of bread toasted brown. and a dessert-spoonful of walnut catsup boiled in a pint of water. Take the remains of a leg it of boiled or roast mutton. some whole pepper. walnut a catsup. "No. and serve on a dish surrounded by mashed potatoes. may be made of a large onion. 143 A VERY NICE DISH OF MUTTON AND MASHED POTATOES. madam. gravy for all stews. and stew in a gravy. none. inexpensive etc.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 124. of to which add a or dessert-spoonful mushroom hot.." exclaimed the witty and beautiful lady. " Has that cookery book any pictures ?" said Miss C." was the answer. but not burned. " what is the use of telling us how make a good dinner if the}'' give us no plates ?" to COLD MUTTON RE-COOKED WITH WINE. 123. An hashes. stick into eight .

that — cold meat. and she is on no account to wait dinner for me. it's I may possibly be detained in the cit}^ on business. Master of the House. Tell your mistress. and Cover till it simmer tender. two onions. — Oh. H'm Mary. what I is there for dinner to-day ? Mary.144 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 125. thicken with some j)ieces of butter rolled in flour. fire Just before it taken from the pour in a glass of Madeira wine. some parsley chopped fine. two turnips. and season well with pepper and salt. when she comes in. of a boiled leg of mutton. or ten cloves. I think. it the vegetables are perfectly off all it Take out the meat. celery top. — sir. Take the most underdone it parts fine. chop very . and let it boil is a minute or two. sir. skim the the fat from gravy. Mary. of the House. VERY NICE SAUSAGE BALLS FROM COLD MUTTON. Put it into a stew-pan with two carrots. and some pieces of with cold water. Pour the gravy over the meat and Master serve.

a quarter of a pound whites of grated bread. Have ready some . 145 and season with pepper. Add six ounces of beef suet chopped some pounded sweet herbs. put into a moderate . where do you live "Please. Cover it it with a lid of mashed potatoes. / donH live now. and on the top lay some butter. ma'am. well. and spice. now?" married f^^ replied the girl. Boil some potatoes. salt. the yolks and of two eggs well beaten. 126. Mix as and press down Use sausages.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. or roll into and fry a nice brown. MUTTON PIE WITH POTATO CRUST. and a clove of garlic. into a pot. inquired — a girl " Well. season the fill meat with pepper and lumps of and the dish with the meat. who had lately left her Lucy. fine. mash them with some milk and butter. and season with pepper and salt. Line a deep dish with the mashed potatoes. Pm A LADY meeting service. small pieces of cold mutton or lamb salt. balls.

cut off it the shank. in.146 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Trim off all the loose fat. in order that the numer: — . dredge . it it with flour and tie it in a clean cloth to cover put in boiling water enough it. Serve in the dish it was baked BOILED LEG OF LAMB. with drawn butter rich parsley sauce. from two to three hours accordServe it ing to or its size. The water should be salted in the proportion of ^two teaspoonsful of Let it boil salt to a quart of water. it oven. w^hichever may be preferred. the lower surface of the leaf upon the blackened surface of the oiled paper. to render it pliable. the following process should be adopted: Hold oiled paper in the smoke of a lamp. and bake fine until the potatoes are a it brown. having previously -warmed Place it between your hands. wash and wipe dry . and vegetables of any kind which may be in season. or of pitch. 127. To take perfect impressions of the leaves of plants. Leaf Impressions. until it becomes coated with the smoke to this paper apply the leaf of which you wish the impression taken.

" said the man. a paper over the leaf. covered with woollen cloth. at an eating-house asked the person next to him if he would please to pass the mustard? "Sir. roller." was the repl}^. no. so that every part of the leaf may come in contact with the soap on the oiled paper a coating of smoke will thus adhere to the leaf.n white paper. Slice the cold meat of an under. with- out beins: overdone. and broil or fry them over a quick fire. and pressing upon it with the fingers on the roller as before. ^& A GENTLEMAN. showing its perfect outlines and veins.: CUTLETS OF COLD ROAST LAMB OR MUTTON." . Thus may be obtained the impression of a leaf. done joint of lamb or mutton dip them into egg and well-seasoned bread crumbs. more accurately than in the most careful drawing. with a small either with the fingers or. covering the leaf with a clean slip of paper. '' I mistook for a waiter ?" you for a gentleman. Then remove the leaf carefully. or some soft material.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and place the blackened surface on a sheet of clea. 147 ous veins which are so prominent on this side may Lay receive from the paper a portion of the smoke. "do you mistake me " Oh. that they may be browned and heated through. 128. better still. and then press it gently upon the smoked paper.

LAMB STEWED WITH 130. This is ONIONS. which term continues to this day in all legal proceedings. finely. in with salt. . and lay them onions and some pepper and as the Put in let much water as will cook them them stew slowly till they are tender. in slices. were consequently called spinsters. cut them and put them in your stew-pan . women were prohibited from marrying till they had spun a regular set of bed furniture. . season it it with pepper and little and in a pan with a of the gravy. 129. COLD MUTTON MINCED. put Mince some cold mutton very salt. pound them. or with a small piece of butter. till their marriages. off onions. and serve it with fried tomatoes. then add a piece of butter rolled in flour to thicken the gravy. Heat it up. and. Peel some a French dish. or with poached eggs. cut the ends of the chops.148 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. Formerly.

" " a live sheep or a dead one ?" answered B . season with sweet herbs. my lord. a dead one but two there are but two legs of mutton the others are . 131. and add to half a glass of port wine . the Chancellor asked him. . the juice . some oysters a few mushrooms. Mutton may be served same way. into convenient pieces. " legs has a sheep ?" "Does your Lordship mean. mutton gravy." A NICE RAGOUT FROM COLD LAMB. spice. 149 Technical Distinction.: . and stew very sufficient to. — shoulders. cover salt. How "Is it not the same thing?" said the Chancellor. pepper. "No. to be examined upon application for a statute of lunacy A — B many against him. lightly in it . When the Earl of was brought before Lord Loughborough." said Lord B "there is much difference a live sheep has four. . and a bit of butter rolled in flour. lard with and cut bacon fried of a light brown. Separate the lamb from the bones. of half a lemon boil together for a few min- utes in the gravy. THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. keeping it the meat hot. and Strain off the gravy. and pour the sauce over in the the lamb.

a little little beef suet. it When it. make a forcemeat as follows cut it Boil the sweetbread. put balls. the juice of a lemon. Do honor. and boil it in milk and water. milk^ some it nutmeg. some grated bread. flour. garnish with the and pour the sauce over Thy father hath watched for thy welfare. a salt. Cut a piece : off each end . BREAST OF VEAL STEWED WHITE. two eggs. to his age. is in the dish. and pepper. together. Why is a cricket on the hearth like a soldier in the Crimea ? Because he always advances under a brisk fire. very small. 132.150 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. therefore. he hath toiled for thy ease. ends that were cut with half a pint of oysters. and a piece the veal it of butter rolled in flour. and let not his gray hairs be treated with irreverence. thin Mix rest well and stuff the it part of the breast with some of —the make up a cloth in of the into little balls and fry. done. . Make some gravy off. close Skewer the skin down.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. it till to eat with the there is just as much season you would have with salt for sauce. a little whole pepper tied in a bundle of sweet herbs. or if it be boiled to your palate. 151 A BREAST OF VEAL IN HODGE-PODGE. it. and . sweet herbs and spice. muslin rag. two or three blades of mace. and then have ready a kettle of boiling water. into the veal. and to your palate. it . and every bone asunder. a little a small onion stuck with a few cloves. fill it up. Cover till it close and let it stew an hour. veal Gut the brisket of a breast of little into pieces. and it round. a whole Throw lettuce in a pint of green peas. washed clean. and a little salt. you would have soup made of you must stew as it but if you would have only sauce veal. 133. Take out the onion. then flour and put half a pound of butter is into a stew-pan. fry When it all it hot throw it over tea- a light brown. pour stir it into the stew-pan.

it pour altogether into your dish. If you have no peas. fire and for slowly before a moderate . have no lettuces. clean. and stew for the sauce. and cut thin pieces.152 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. the top close with a it till there be just enough Set the lettuce in the middle and the veal round. skewer the sweetbread flour place. then take four or five heads of celery the white part washed small. bread made ROAST VEAL. pepper firmly roast in it Season a breast of veal with and its salt. or the young If you would make a very fine dish of it. scoop out the pulp. pare three or four cucumbers. and thread. Pour the sauce all Garnish your dish with rasped into figures with your fingers. fill the inside of your lettuce tie with forcemeat. over it. take little the little of savoys. the meat. and cut When you hearts sprouts. 34.

135. man. Make a dressing of bread crumbs. without regretting the loss of that which is past. and those that are to come may not come to thee. or too much depending on that which is to come. pepper and salt to the taste. season the . as Make incisions all around the closely as possible so as not to touch each other. about four hours.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The gravy should be brown. to employ the present time. put the gravy in a stew-pan. bone. an onion finely chopped. a little sweet marjoram. with butter. with to the taste. Since the days that are past are gone forever. It 153 should be of a fine Baste it Drown. it behoveth thee. but not dry. BAKED FILLET OF VEAL. with enough butter to cause the bread crumbs to adhere together. add a piece of butter rolled in browned and if there should little not be quite enough gravy add a pepper and salt more water. Fill these incisions with the dressing. done. When flour.

Have ready some tomatoes which have been stewed very dry. As more cook the the gravy stews water. meat with pepper and strip and skewer the of fat around it. Pour them hot over the veal and . season it. and draweth down mischief on his own head. let it three or four hours. salt. pan in which the meat has been enough to and add" butter make gravy. FRIED VEAL WITH TOMATOES. Cut some veal it in thin nice slices. When make gravy with some flour rolled in butter. put in the rack. then put them a rich into the fried. and place the meat on it. He that watches for an opportunity of revenge. 136.154 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and add pepper and salt to the taste. and fry of a brown. away add a little Put it in a cool oven and done. pass them through a sieve to take out the seeds. Pour in enough water to cover the bottom of the pan. lieth in wait against himself.

and cover it Let it cook slowly two hours at Some prefer a little sweet marjoram to or thyme. finely powdered. dressing. 155' Beef is excellent. and he that increaseth his riches increaseth his cares. serve it.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. least. Make your loaf. and thicken the gravy with a flour. To be satisfied with a little is the greatest wisdom. added the it is Take out the veal when done. and trouble findeth it not. little . Cut deep incisions in the meat it about an inch apart. and an ounce of salt to with pepper and incisions the taste. FILLET OF VEAL A-LA-MODE. with this dressing. of water. and season with pepper and salt. Fill the chopped. put the veal in gills a pot with three tightly. 137. cooked in the same way. dressing with a four-cent baker's finely two small onions butter. but a contented mind is a hidden treasure.

Cut some of the thick part of a cold loin of veal into pieces about an inch Pour over it. square. and a sprig of mace. Cut up some is veal. 138. that I may know where to send when I want a thorough paced villian. The queen gave him a thousand crowns. who betrayed the Spaniards at Bergen-op-Zoom to Queen Elizabeth. VEAL POT 139. SPICED VEAL." 156 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. the best part of to preferable any other. a allspice. the neck PIE. " Get you home. wash . a teaspoonful of ground two cloves. —Graveston. Cold beef will answer A Traitor's Reward. It much may be . half a teaspoonful of Cayenne pepper. but said at the same time. instead of veal. spiced vine- eaten hot or To spice the vinegar To two gills of vinegar. it as gar as will cover cold. Boil the spices in the vinegar and pour over the veal boiling hot. little salt. afterwards came to England to give her majesty an account of his success and to claim his reward.

and add pour in as much water as will cover it. put the lid on the pot and put it it over a moderate the meat dish. place the soft crust on a it. put in the veal with some pieces of paste rolled out and cut in squares. and their utility to the public crowneth him with honor. SCOTCH KIDNEY-COLLOPS. brown side Serve the gravy in a boat. To have it the crust of a pot pie brown. cut rolled in flour up some pieces of butter to it. the improvement of arts is his delight. and lay a sheet of paste on the top. put the meat over and on the top lay the hard crust.ALL. with the up. leaving an opening in the centre. 140. let cook slowly till done . it Let the kidney be very fresh . set the pot on a few coals before the quently. then is fire. and turn fre- The wise man cultivates his mind with knowledge. and season sides of it with pepper and salt line the your pot with paste. 157 .THE FAMILY SAVE. cut in pieces the size of very small steaks. 10 . fire.

young onions minced. Rossini had accepted an invitation to dine with a certain lady whose dinners were known to be arranged on a severely economical scale. if you like. 141. This is one of the most agreeable. pour a pan. <' I hope you will soon do me the honor to dine " Oh. or onion-pickle close. shred and a little vinegar. and dry and fresh them brown butter. aiely. Dust them with in flour. slices in warm water. and every part may be used. yes. and he left the table rather hungry. The dinner offered to the maestro formed no exception to the general rule. and wholesome of made of veal is The meat from any joint available. with parsley. MINCED VEAL. immedi' with me again." was the reply." said the lady. Cover the stew-pan and let the collops simmer slowly for two hours or more. Cayenne. them a stew-pan with When into browned. inexpensive dishes. four little hot water the salt. well. pepper. simple.158 soak the THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. vinegar. some .

then strained and with the minced meat put into a stewpan with a teaspoonful of grated lemonpeel. The brown the and the bones (broken up). it a pan with to this the water it was boiled Add two . the same quantity of lemon-juice. salt. gristles. mace .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. enough water with a little salt. pour off the water it. As soon as perfectly hot through. When it the veal tender. and a piece of butter blended with flour. Boil a knuckle of veal in just to cover is it. lined with toast. the mince should be poured out upon the dish. and a blade of off. 142. nicely minced. must little be boiled into a gravy. 159 It must all be cut away from the bones and outside. a tablespoonful of cream. people not even objecting to a little fat. Cut the veal in in small pieces. FRENCH STEW OF VEAL. with a pepper. was boiled in and save and put in.

143. put it into a stew-pan.ALL. a sprig of thyme. a teacupful of vinegar in in Well wash it two or three waters . and serve pour in two glasses of wine. with two onions. and pour into fire. and fix not thy hopes beyond the bounds of probability so shall success attend thy undertakin(>s thy heart shall not be vexed with disappointments. a table- spoonful of allspice in grains (which should be crushed.— 160 THE FAMILY SAVE. a little mace. a quarter pound of and butter. . Set it over the let it boil for two or three minutes. it. with one hour in cold it. Tn all thy desires let reason go along with thee. a laurel leaf. it hot. two little tablespoonsful of flour smoothly in a water. CALF'S HEAD STEWED. hard-boiled eggs chopped very fine. a bay leaf. but not broken of a fine). a sprig of . WITH OYSTER SAUCE. Soak half of a small skin) for calf's head (without the water. and Stir pepper salt to the taste.

As a general rule. . 161 marjoram. It is no unusual thing for a merchant to breakfast at eight o'clock in the morning. and continue longer oysters. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. it lays the train for subsequent dyspepsia and all its attendant horrors. and a pint and a half of cold water. Boil up quickly skim . four sprigs of parsley. — . four allspice. it constantly. two sage leaves. half of a carrot. . and return to dine at six or seven o'clock in the evening. Intervals between Meals. and although thing all day. two cloves. put the head in again. six black peppercorns. boil up . vrithout having eaten any This is very injurious. but this of course varies according to circumstances. skimming . Take out to it three the head strain the liquor add tablespoonsful of baked flour and the strained liquor of three dozen oysters . ride several miles. add three dozen and then simmer for three-quarters of utes. an interval of five or six hours should elapse between each meal. Persons engaged in business frequently do themselves much mischief by disregarding these monitions amidst the bustle and excitement of business. then simmer gently for an hour and a half.. it may not be immediately felt. an hour and seven min- and then serve.

boil half an hour when liver done. Fry the and lay it round the dish with some nice balls. it much of the liquor as will cover and stew gently one hour. boil in as it is much water cut as will cover When done enough to take the meat off the bones. and some browned stew. and lay . red pepper. nutmeg. some sweet herbs. and let it butter. because the under line of the worst air in the room is on a level with the fire-place the lower. salt it to your liking. add a glass of wine. Take a fine large calf's head. Low — the body is immersed in the inferior air.162 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. split open. the meat into square pieces. it CALF'S HEAD. mix it with the . the deeper the upper portion of less . forcemeat much Mantel-pieces. OF 144. cloves. put it. this top is placed in a room. therefore. the heads of the occupiers are . In rooms nut well ventilated. and a large onion in as let it . Then take one quarter of a pound of butter rolled in flour. and put into a stewpan with them some mace. Low mantel-pieces are wholesome than high ones. it for two or three hours in it cold water then put on to it. MOCK TURTLE.

A a *' trial for assault. during the distance he was from the parties when the assault happened. take them up and dry them in . " Because I thought some fool or other would ask me. and small thin of toasted bacon. salt and water. over. it beat up the yolk of an egg. when done. salt. BROW-BEATING counscl asked a witness. Parboil them in. feather. 163 in the worst and the warmest air. and rub over them with a pepper." FRIED SWEET-BREADS. placed at different elevations in a warm room will A confirm these truths. Make a seasoning of this and grated bread. fellow ?" said the counsel. "How Just four feet five inches and a half. Garnish with slices crisped parsley.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. so I measured it. strew and fry them in butter. Cut sweet-breads into long slices. SWEET-BREAD FRIED. their feet are thermometer placed in the best and coldest. 146. 145. He answered." come you to be so exact.

BOILED SWEET-BREADS. Or they may be egg fried as oysters. cut them in half. then throw them them. Eat not to dulness . With a sharp knife. First parboil them. 147. drink not to elevation. flour them. They should be basted while broiling by putting them on a in it. into cold water to whiten and harden season Wipe them dry and salt. them with pepper and and broil them.164 a cloth. with and bread crumbs. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and fry them in hot lard. or grated crackers. season them with pepper and salt. of a light brown. . plate with a little melted butter A sumed CALF when fed for market is said to have conas much milk as would make one hundred pounds of cheese.

Parboil the sweet-breads in salt and water. to the fat they and a is little brown flour. This all is called hlanch- and should precede the other modes . as the gravy thick- ened. ROASTED SWEET-BREADS. The gifts of the understanding are the treasures of God. flour over them. 148. 165 TO FRICASSEE SWEET-BREADS. take it off" the pour it over the sweet- breads and serve hot. and then thrown into cold water. pour in some Lisbon or Maderia wine.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and dish them a fine brown. As soon fire. to make them white and ing^ firm. salt Season with and pepper. 149. Put them on a make a gravy by adding some water were fried in. Sweet-breads should be parboiled. but be careful not to break them. and when cool skim them. and he appointeth to every one his portion in what measure seemeth good unto himself. dust some fry .

Season the sweetbreads with pepsalt. leaving an opening in the centre. serve the pie . with paste. . Have ready some cracker salt. put in the sweetbreads pie with and some of the gravy. Bake the it in a tolerably hot oven. Put them a pan and bake or roast them. dip each one into some beaten egg.166 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. of cooking them. dust some flour over them. butter a pie dish. cover the a lid of paste. per and PIE. crumbs well seasoned with pepper and season your sweet-breads. but whose pride will cheapen nothing. line it them with a When done. then in into the bread crumbs. It is better to be laughed at than ruined better to have a wife who cheapens every thing and buys nothing. is When crust brown. SWEETBREAD 150. to stew and add enough water nice gravy. than to be impoverished by one whose vanity would purchase every thing.

"I little A — don't want to know !" . added: "Now. my dear?" "Very girl: The visitor then well. my dear. When cool. pepper. and a glass of white wine. STEWED SWEETBREADS. 1 thank you. salt. skin them and cut them pepper and light in half Season them with salt. 151. FORMAL. in salt Parboil three or four sweetbreads and water." The child simply and honestly replied. you should ask me how I am. 167 with the remainder of the gravy in a sauce tureen. fashionable visitor thus addressed a "How are you. Brown with a a piece of butter with flour little ." she replied. and fry them a brown then stew them in a portion of the liquor in which they were boiled. Lord Byron knew a dull man who lived on a bon mot of Moore's for a week and his lordship once offered a wager of a considerable sum that the reciter was guiltless of understanding its point. them.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. add it. but he could get no one to accept the bet. flour . .

and dress them with the sweetbreads after they have been egged and seasoned in the same way. When many can be done conveniently. and dip them with yolk Cayenne. light Fry them of a brown. placing them high them a in the centre. under gravy made in the little thickened with a glass of sherry or flour. SWEETBREAD CUTLETS.168 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. . Arrange them in a dish. and place each cutlet upon a slice of tongue when they are dished. to which a be added Madeira may just before it it is taken off the fire. brush of egg. sub- stitute fried bread cut the size of the cutlet. pare the skin from them. cut them into of equal thickness. and pour pan. crumbs seasoned with grated lemon-rind. and when slices they are perfectly cold. take as slices of a cold boiled tongue as there are sweetbread cutlets. Boil the sweetbreads for half an little hour in water with a salt. 152. For variety. trim them into good shape. and fine them into very fine bread salt.

parboil them. "how long can a person live without brains ?" "I dinna ken. and fry them a delicate brown. CALVES' BRAINS FRIED. remove the skin.THE FAMILY SAVE. pepper and salt dust flour over them. he met a well-known individual of weak intellect. Slice the liver. and season with . 169 The crumb is of a stale loaf very evenly sliced best for the purpose. "Pray." said the Professor. lay it in salt and w^ater for an hour or two to draw out the . As the late Professor was one day walking near Aberdeen. scratching his head. 153. Wash all the brains clean. and gratefully reciprocate kindness and attention." replied Jemmy. 154. ''how auld are ye yourself V^ CALF'S LIVER BROILED. A GOOD wife will always receive her husband with smiles. or bread crumbs. leave nothing undone to render home agreeable.ALL.

wash it it clean. of whose fame he was very jealous. it. but he is raw yet /" — PIE OF COLD ROAST VEAL. which he took up and carefully ." One day. he saw a farthing lying at his feet. and wound up with " He ought to know something of cookery. " he may have been forty years before the fire. full of half the meat. line a deep pie dish. " Get all you can. and parboil salt. for he has been forty years before the fire. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.170 blood. and broil it till sides. an ancestor of the Earl of Fife." said the Mirza. 155. fill Make it nice paste. with some lumps of butter. walking down the avenue from his house. and a season them with pepper and salt." " Well. it . was remarkable for practicing that miserable rule. put the liver over a clear fire. and on the top lay some oysters. Cover the pie with the paste and bake Lord Braco. Cut the veal in small pieces. then season with pepper and Grease the bars of the gridiron. and keep all you get. the slices are brown on both A GENTLEMAN was One day disputing with Mirza Mohammed Ibrahim about the excellence of his cook.

of each layer. puir body. the bones.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. the water is reduced to one Then remove the with pepper bones. strew fine. 156. Season it with pepper and pieces of fat. encleaned. some yolks of eggs chopped A few oysters or button- . then a layer of cold thin — and so on. saying "it was not worth a nobleman's attention. put Take the bones and in a saucepan with them enough water till to cover them. put in a layer pf veal. 171 beggar passing at the same time. a layer till ham sliced very of ham and veal On the top alternately. A PIE OF COLD VEAL AND HAM. the dish is full. treated his lordship would give him the farthing. Line the bottom and sides of a pie dish with paste." replied his lordship. and carefully put the coin into his breeches pocket. Cut the meat from It should be in pieces about half an inch salt. Let them stew half. thicken the gravy with some butter rolled in flour." " Fin' a farthing yoursel'. square. and season it and salt to the taste.

172 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. mushrooms improve Pour Cover the top with paste. into thin take from it the skin and gristles fire put some butter over the with some little. class having failed. chopped onions . cut slices . Take a piece of veal that has been it roasted (but not over done). 157. fry them a . and bake the pie in a rather slow oven.^" said he. this pie. and put in some veal stock gravy. was asked what he intended to " I am going home to get acquainted with my do. in a little of the gravy. Some men devote themselves so exclusivel3^ to their business as almost entirely to neglect their gentleman of this domestic and social relations. a bunch of sweet herbs. leaving an opening in the centre.. A wife and children . it Serve in the dish it was baked in. with the remainder of the gravy in a sauce tureen. then shake some flour over them shake the pan round. put them in the veal with the yolk of two eggs . and some spice . TO COOK COLD SLICES OF VEAL.

173 beat up with milk. Of cold veal. salt to the Make it out in small cakes. They may any will be fried in sausage gravy left. and season w4th pepper and taste. to see this field of potatoes so diseased. and put in the dish." replied the farmer. Wilson. finely chopped. stir it one it way till it is thick and smooth.'" 11 . and fry them a light brown." said a sympathizing inspector. Mr. add the same quantity of cold mashed potatoes. 158. some parsley shred small. and a little juice . "Ah weel. In a country news room. " but there's one comfort Jach Tamson's is not a 1 bit better . if you have Cold potatoes for this dish left from dinner answer " I AM sorry.ALL. a grated nutmeg. some lemon-peel grated. : POTATO SAUSAGE. it's a great pity. flour them. learning to spell are requested to use yesterday's paper.— THE FAMILY SAVE. the following notice is written over the chimney " Gentlemen.

174 THE FAMILY SAVE. and flour slices of veal of a light brown . round bones. With the bones. VEAL. cutlets. and thicken the same to a proper consis- . and an onion. beef may be used instead of veal. If . left. add the same quantity of cold mashed potatoes season with pepper and salt to the taste make it out in small cakes flour them. there is any sausage gravy in. . A NICE RAGOUT OF COLD VEAL. little trimmings. the rough parts. To cold veal. make a and brown the good gravy melt some butter in a frying pan. SAUSAGE. strain the gravy into the pan. etc. Cut the cold trimming meat off into small. take them up. it is very good to fry them dinner Cold potatoes left from Cold may be used for this dish. and fry them a light brown on both sides. 159. 160.ALL. finely chopped..

which may be ornamented by leaves of paste . season with pepper and salt make a paste of two pounds of flour and one of butter Une the bottom and sides of a deep pie-dish put in the veal with some of the cold gravy which has been paste. set it in a quick oven. " jou continue to shave without a glass P^ PIE OF COLD VEAL. cover the top with the in leaving an opening the centre. serve the pie. put and let in the cutlets. then. and pour hot over the cutlets. left . 161. Said Tom. . I have eaten so much veal that I am ashamed to look a calf in the face!" "I s'pose. smooth and well mixed. and catsup skim the sauce.. mace. 175 tence with butter rolled in flour. small pieces. sir. is and as soon as the crust brown. " Since I have been abroad. . Cut the veal in . THE FAMILY S AYE-ALL. When season to ." said a wag. them simmer very slowly liking wdth pepper.

but hurtful. On the contrary. and put your chickens nicely . Partridges. and prudence. salt. your gridiron. without requiring any account of it. There is no error more fatal than imagining that pinching a youth in his pocket money will teach him fnlgalit3^ On the contrary.176 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. that will be of service to him through his whole life. as pinching him in his diet will make his If you put into appetite only the more rapacious. . small. grease the bars. the hands of your child more money than is suitable to his age anfl discretion. A certain. When he comes to be capable of keeping an account. Split them down the back. or ratlier forcing him. wash Heat them nicely and wipe them dry. BROILED CHICKENS. it will occasion his runninsf into extravasrances with so much more eagerness when he comes to have money in his own hands. he ought to be obliged to do it he will thereby acquire a habit of frugality. season them with pepbutter. per. . When done. 162. and a large piece of Send them to the table hot. regular income any child above six 3^ears of age ought to have. into extravairance and follv. over clear coals. Broil them be careful not to burn the legs and wings. is leading. pheas- ants and pigeons are broiled in the same way. you must expect to find that he has thrown it away upon what is not only idle. attention. to give a young person mone}^ to spend at will.

for I am sowing hemp. " Well. add some butter rolled in to thicken the gravy." ** said one of them. cut them in them with pepper and salt. . 163.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. A COUNTRYMAN was oncG sowingliis grass ground. salt if required. 164. but we reap the fruit of your labor. put a little water flour in the pan. wash them and dry them in a clean napkin sea. Wash your season chickens. riding that way. and fry them slowly till of a bright brown on . take them up. Cut the chicken in pieces. when two smart fellows." To which the countryman replied 'Tis very likely you may. pieces. Have in a pan some hot butter and lard mixed dust some flour over each piece. 'Tis your business to sow. and more pepper and spring chickens are Young only suitable for frying. called to hiin with an insolent air. both sides ." : CHICKEN POT PIE. 177 FRIED CHICKENS. trul}^. honest fellow.

. place it in front of the fire with a few coals under crust it. of the pot with paste. more flour mixed with Dish by putting the top crust on the sides of the dish. and between every layer of chicken put in a piece of butter rolled in squares of the paste if flour. cover the pot. justly. with you choose it. . add a butter. pour in enough cold water lid of to cover and put on a the paste. put in the pieces of chicken. top. and place the brown crust on the Serve the gravy in a sauce boat. the best part of Bacon says beauty is that which a picture cannot express. Line the sides son with salt and pepper. if may it is all around. When the gravy should not be thick little it enough. Turn the pot frequently that the be evenly browned done. leave an opening in the cen- tre of the top crust. lay the chicken in the centre.178 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

A DELICATE DISH FROM COLD FOWL OR VEAL. them first Fry the cut Grated cheese may dish be used to give a piquant flavor. some cream. your mother may have one I'll take the other. pieces in butter or nice lard." Parent " Well.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. with little pepper and salt. then in the crumbs. ^^ : : . The may be garnished with slices of fried potatoes. with the gravy. a quarter of mince them very a small. then. " Pa. 179 COLD ROAST FOWLS FRIED. 165. Sim- . to minced veal or parts of fowl. and this is two and one and two make three. Cut in the fowls into pieces and dip the egg. (a very smart boy) chickens are there on this dish?" Parent: "two my son. how many Eddie. and you shall have the third for your dinner. Beat the yolk of two eggs. there are three. and a little bit of butter rubbed in a flour." Eddie: "No. in a bit of butter. This is one. Stew a few small mushrooms an hour . and add them. 166.

Stew this in a little good gravy. turkey. or melted butter. without the intervention of a pan. 167. three or four mer minutes. to the mince. of cold lamb. salt and mace.. etc.180 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. or they may be baked forms. when she gave him some thin chicken broth. and serve on toasted bread. chickens. having a piece of paper under each . with a little grated ham. veal. Patties may be made etc. or the paste will be baked . Put a spoonful of cream and season with pepper. and mix Mince the white part of the it flesh. that she would try to coax that chicken just to wade through that soup once more ! The heard is PATTIES FROM COLD TURKEY OR CHICKENS. best description of weakness we have ever contained in the wag's prayer to his wife. in tin or earthenware pans of various in pans will generally Those baked be most approved because the paste will be more delicate. may be either baked in their paste. oysters. Patties and of lobster.

but do not let it boil again. heart. little little put it back in the saucepan. and giz- stewed well together. Good intentions are at least the seed of good actions and ever}^ man ought to sow them. together with the neck. PuiF paste should be employed. Give it a boil. liver. Pour this gravy over the nicely fried chicken. FRICASSEE FROM COLD BOILED CHICKEN. with a salt more and pepper if necessary. a grated nutmeg. salt.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. it Season well out the with pepper and chicken. zard. 181 and the meat afterwards put upon it. and whether he or any other gathers the . Some . 168. and a bit of butter rolled in flour. and keep Then take hot. and stir it over the fire. and serve hot. then add a little cream. simmer Cut up the chicken and put in a little it to gravy made of some of it the water in which was boiled. feet. and leave it to the soil and the seasons whether they come up or not. Strain the gravy. separately. fruit.

nish with thin slices of lemon. and used to thicken the gravy." said a gourmand. Serve hot. "as a far more interesting event than the discovery of a new star for we always have stars enough. Split the chicken down the back. and then crumbs. 169. it. Gar- forcemeat balls are sometimes added. I shall never consider the science sufficiently honored until we have a cook elected to Congrress. but can never have too many cooks. mashed. gentle fire. to and gizzard. after five or ten having simmered minutes." — BROILED COLD CHICKEN. may be taken out. have an egg beaten. . " I REGARD the discoveiy of a new dish.182 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The neck. may be boiled down make a gravy. dip the chicken into into some nicely-seasoned bread over a clear Broil feet. and the liver.

put the trimmings and bones in a saucepan with some pepper. pepper. chicken of a brood like the Why is the first foremast of a ship ? of the main hatch I Because it's a little for'ard AN EXCELLENT HASH FROM COLD POULTRY. and mince it set it over the fire in a little cream. a slice of lean ham. 170. it Simmer with a an hour. over which put some of butter. squeeze in a little lemon juice. salt and season with nutmeg. a little salt. and this for half onion. Cut the meat in pieces. 171. Before serving. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. bit of butter rolled then put in the meat. Bone the meat. and fill with bits crumbs of bread. Scorn to depress thy competitor by any dishonest or unworthy methods strive to raise thyself above . thicken in flour. . small .. and brown them. 183 VEHY NICE SCALLOPS FROM COLD CHICKEN. and then put it into scallop shells.

having called in a doctor as a forlorn hope. the latter spread a huge mustard plaster and clapped it on the poor fellow's Pat. and a little parsley. Mince the meat.184 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 172. ENTREE OF COLD CHICKEN. pounded mace. and Roll and fry. Season with . pickled mushrooms. '' Docthor. ham. water and clean them. OR VEAL. flour. 173. . bim only by excelling him so shall thy contest for superiority be crowned with honor. salt. put them into a saucepan with gravy. egg yolk. POOR emaciated Irishman. if not with success. TURKEY. docthor it strikes me upon it. grated bread. and a bit of butter rolled in flour. Soak the livers in Etc. Mix these with pepper. GAME.^" : A — ! RAGOUT OF LIVERS OF POULTRY. or a little catsup. said that's a dale of mustard for so little mate . with a tearful eye looking downward breast. and add suitable proportions of suet.

" said Mr. cover the paper over spit . with the other livers around. Singe the turkey and stuff it. Sidney Smith was once dining with a French gentleman. with half a pint of their liquor. and had ended by avowing himself a materialist. pepper and minutes. " Qui. and then take them it off.^^ was the replj''. TO ROAST A TURKEY WITH OYSTERS. a piece Let these stew of butter rolled in flour.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. it cut the liver to pieces and set fire over the in a stew-pan. Smith. salt. do you &est excellente. 185 twelve Stew for ten or The liver of a turkey may be broiled and set in the centre of the dish. with oysters. Smith. believe in a cook ?" inquired Mr. very gently about ten minutes. and which salt. Monsieur. oysters washed. *'Yery good soup this. leaves. some pepper and two blades of mace. 174. must be two bay strained. " Pray. sir. When it is trussed for roasting. who had been before dinner indulging in a variety of free-thinking speculations.

When the turkey done and in the dish. Mix some till it flour with a piece of little butter. and mace (pounded) a little it mushroom Oysters powder or catsup. lovingly and compassionately admonished. but at a set distance. may be added. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. While it roasting on a stew-pan with half a pint of essence of ham. it and lay down to a is good fire. with grated lemon . peel. — TTJIIKEY HASHED. 175. To BE continually judging and censuring those that were never privately and personally reproved. take off the beards. take into boiling a pint of oysters.186 it. add a little lemon juice. then put them into the essence of ham. white pepper. stir it into some cream and a veal gravy in pieces. throw them water. . put into the sauce. Cut the turkey it not too small. nor once earnestly and heartily prayed for by them this censorious spirit is a Christless spirit. give is them a boil. boils up. pour the sauce over it. Simmer up.

Franklin was once endeavoring to kill a turkey by electricit}?". to which add three ounces of butter. he goodhumoredly remarked. . side fill to taste. When Baste brown. all with pepper and well together. turn them over. in- and out with pepper and Then back with a them with the Place . he had nearly put an end to a goose. them on little the flour upward water nice dredge a sufficient to make gravy. . poultry. 187 of cold water. Recovering. over. dressing. EOAST DUCK. fre- quently hot. one large onion salt chopped fine. tightly. Dr. Mix Season the ducks both salt.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. that instead of a turkey. and skewer pan. 176. Clean and prepare them as other Crumb the inside of a small loaf of baker's bread. send to the table and eat with cranberry sauce. when he received the whole force of the battery himself. and when done. Fowls seem exceedingly grateful for the gift They never swallow a drop of it without turning up their eyes to heaven.

and boil them. Make a dressing a lit- of bread crumbs. pepper. A very good dressing for roast goose toes boiled is to substitute pota- and finely mashed instead of the . Add it the liquor they were boiled in to the gravy which dripped from the goose. some salt and pepper. Clean the and be careful not giblets. with very water. baste with butter. Whilst is roasting. tle salt. it . wash dry. put them on in a stew-pan. sweet marjoram and some onions finely Fill the goose minced. wipe salt. and with pepper and both inside and out. little to let it burn. truss it with this dressing. if Pour gravy in the boat.188 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. then season it it. ROAST GOOSE. it and put on the spit. Thicken with some butter rolled in a few minutes necessary. let it boil add more pepper this and salt. 177. it it firmly. flour. it Clean your goose. and serve with the goose. Some prefer a little sage added to the dressing in place of the sweet marjoram. butter.

A Man whose first wife was remarkably neat married a slattern. " There now I" exclaimed Oh no. bread crumbs. An awkward man dropped it attempting to carve a goose. ''it's safe. 178. When well done and tender. Cut cold ducks into convenient and warm them fine. Shred some red cabit. pieces. . serve. If it should get too dry. and in a stew-pan closely a little pepper and it salt. then add the pepper. it very gradually in some of their gravy." dear !" answered he.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. lay dish . On one occasion she mustered resolution to rub down the old mahogany table. add a it small glass of wine or vinegar. bage very sieve . wash and drain it on a put to stew with some butter. add a spoonful or two of the gravy. "we've lost our dinner. 189 salt. onions and sweet marjoram as before. *' on the floor. my the wife. covered. I have got my foot on itP^ COLD DUCKS STEWED WITH RED CABBAGE. on a and place the pieces of duck upon it. shaking frequently.

or this be omitted. the best cure for the hysterics In his opinion to discharge the servant girl. and serve Dr. and it awakens reminiscences of days that are gone." said he " for I now recognize it as an old acquaintance. to make up Put in the loss by stewing. them stew until the peas are then add a glass of red wine. under a close cover. Cayenne pepper and salt. It is unneccessary to say that the insulted lady bounced out of the room and declared as she slammed the door behind her. or garlic. gently. Marsh says. Her good man sat quietly regarding her nntil she had done. may Add some onion chopped little small. . and warm Season with lemon peel. She desired to know what had aflfected him in so unusual a manner? " The sight of that table. is hot. the duck. Add a little walnut catsup. when he burst into tears.190 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. for it always looked thus when my first wife was living. 179. Put a pint of the cold duck gravy in a stew- and a pint of green peas together pan." . COLD DUCK STEWED WITH PEAS. if liked. that she would make herself a slave to no man. and a more gravy. and let soft .

180. and the gizzard into four pieces. the wings and neck into three. pour a little . Some women think they want a physician. pieces. HASHED COLD DUCK. cut the legs in two. season them highly water on with pepper and salt. GIBLET 181. when they need a scrubbing- brush. Clean the PIE. boil after the off the fire wine is poured but be taken immediately. giblets.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and serve with green peas boiled and buttered. Cut the duck in salt. with enough water to keep from boil it burning. As soon as it comes to the add a glass of Madeira wine. 191 there is nothing like work to keep the nervous system from becoming unstrung. season with pepper and Slice some cold ham very thin. Lay the duck and ham it in a stew-pan. The hash should not in. put some pieces of butter rolled in flour.

the pie but the bones the be cracked and stewed with A TRAVELLER was lately boasting of the luxury of arriving at night after a hard da^^'s journey. till them and stew them take out the giblets. it necessary. put it over the fire in a if clean stew-pan.'" . to conceive its luxury. cover with paste. with more seasoning. and thicken with a little flour and butter. it tureen with the If you have any cold game or poultry in might be cut in pieces . and bake in a moderate oven.192 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. Then are cool when they put them in a deep dish with a little of the liquor they were stewed in. and the " Pray. to partake of the enjoyment of a well-cut ham. what is the peculiar left leg of a goose. you must find that it is the only leg that is left . luxury of a left leg ?" " Sir. sir. In the mean time take the remainder of the liquor. and tender. Serve this gravy in a sauce pie. and included should giblets. skim it free from fat.

and to the boiled in. put in the pour some of the gravy over them. well. liver. neck and gizzard of a goose. Take them out water they were salt if re- when tender. it as soon as it remove . Wash and clean your giblets. . cover the bottom and sides of a pie giblets. cover the top with paste. season with pepper. heart. 182. Have the remainder of the gravy hot and serve in a tureen with the pie.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. from the fire. clean Take the tips of the wings. boils and more and and a little flour. add pepper quired. ENGLISH GIBLET PIE. leaving an opening in the centre to permit the escape of the steam. 183. boil them them in enough salt and water to cover them. Make a good paste dish. 193 GIBLET PIE-ANOTHER WAY. head. put them in a stew-pan. and bake it in a quick oven.

and the gravy little is not quite thick enough. and fatten it for himself. and a little butter rolled in flour." The smiling countenance of the Irishman was turned to dismay he reflected for a moment. cover till them with water. on seeing chase. add a rolled in flour. crust.194 salt. Set the pie in the oven. A GREEN one. to ask the market woman . then turned back." said his friend to him. in the form of a square ornament this with leaves of the paste. set off to desire to possess a a neighboring town. " They've given you no giblets with him the goose. and actually walked a distance of two miles. leaving put on the top it an opening in the eentre of . they are Line the sides of your pie if dish with paste. . . resolved Having made to buy one. pour in the gravy. put in the giblets. stew them very tender. a bargain. you have been cheated. for the giblets of the live goose. is and when the crust done take it out. he was returning home when he was met by a waggish friend. to whom he showed his pur" Why. who had a great goose alive. more butter Let it boil once. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

and you may take the third. grease the bars to prevent the pigeons from sticking. he said to them. There*' upon he began. and be careful not to let the legs When they are done. season them with pepper and baste them well with butter on both sides. dish. fire. Have ready a bed of clear coals." said the father.THE FAMILY SAVE. and that is two." The father replied. 184. wash them and dry them on a clean napkin. nicest for Young them pigeons or squabs are the broiling. clean nicely.ALL. and one and two make three. and place them over the and wings burn. your mother shall have the first pigeon. my dear." " — Do so. 195 BROILED PIGEONS. heat your gridiron. A young student came during the holidays from college to see his parents. " This is one. As you have done it so nicely. Having one evening two pigeons for supper." . Cut them down the back. turn them frequently. put them on a and salt. I will keep the second. " I can prove by the rules of logic and arithmetic that those two pigeons are three. One and two are three.

and add these ingredients to the chopped meat. two rolls.196 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and a quarter of a pound of pickled pork. place it in a moderate oven and bake it at least two hours and a half. place them by and sprinkle dry bread crumbs over them. Put a very little water in the pan. roll six crackers. Mix all together thoroughly. mince a bunch of parsley fine. Beat two eggs light. IMITATION BONED TURKEY. . Season the whole with half a teaspoonful of salt and one grated nutmeg. Chop fine three and a half pounds of lean veal. with a Mince some cold chicken very little fine suetj season it with pepper. Make side the meat into side in a pan. Better to go debt. While cooking. 186. 185. baste with the gravy in the pan. to bed supperless than to rise in CROaiTETTES OF COLD CHICKEN.

"My hair is growing much too long I must have it cut !" And the next morning he dons number one again. dip egg. and fry fine them a brown. and add occasionally a tablespoonful . Every morning he puts on a peruke slightly differing from the others. and so on to numbers thirty and thirtyone. runs his fingers through his wig. the hair of number four is a trifle longer than that of number three. our ingenious beau visits his club. and says in a careless tone. pound to a paste. One would never guess the device adopted by one of the London dandies of ripe age to delude his acquaintances into the supposition that his luxuriant wig is the natural product of his own head. them into beaten and then into bread crumbs. it seems. Flour your hands. little 197 . and some parsley chopped grated fine add a nutmeg .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. . Upon reaching the last day of the month. Thus. of well-beaten egg then pound more of the till all is chicken in the same manner done. which look as though they needed cutting. caused to be manufactured as many wigs as there are days in the month. The gentleman. . each wig being provided with a box and a number. salt. The secret has been betra3^ed by a treacherous barber. put part of the mixit ture* into a marble mortar. make the meat into rolls of an oblong shape.

the grated rind of the quarter of a lemon. and stir into the flour stiff* till .ALL. into six ounces of dried flour beat the yolks of two fresh eggs with four tablespoonfuls of cold water. 187. season with the sixth part of a nutmeg. stand in a cool place cut up about half a free or six hours pound of cold fowl from skin into the . or add two ounces of either ham. let it . roll out the paste the eighth . Continue to pound are well the ingredients mixed . Rub two ounces of fresh butter . add sufficient till gravy all to moisten. half a saltspoonful of flour of mustard. grated. 198 THE FAMILY SAVE. with a piece of garlic the size of a pea and half a pint of water. CROaUETTES OF FOWLS. knead then till quite smooth roll it out twice for five .. and a quarter of a saltspoonful of salt. and stew for gravy . hung tongue. in a paste . pound the fowl to paste beef. pounded . half a saltspoonful of white pepper. (roast or boiled) put the bones and trimmings sauce-pan.

;

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.
of an inch thick
sized
pieces,
;

199

divide

it

into eight equal

about

three

inches

square;

brush over the surface with cold water ; put

an eighth part of the pounded meat into
each piece, in the form of a sausage
the paste over;
press
;

fold

the edges to

make
till

them adhere

;

then fry in plenty of boiling
of

lard or clarified dripping (one pound)

a yellow-brown color (about ten minutes)
drain on a sieve before the
fire,

and serve

on a neatly folded napkin, with or without
fried parsley in the centre.

Let thine own business engage thy attention leave the care of the State to the governors thereof.

;

PARTRIDGES-STEWED, BROILED, OR
ROASTED.

188.
roast,

When they may

partridges

are too old

to

be stewed in the following

manner.

Cut them in quarters, season with
salt,

pepper and

and put them

in a stewto

pan with nearly water enough

cover

200
them.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

When

tender,

add

some

butter,

mixed with

flour, to

thicken the gravy.
split

Partridges

are

usually

down

the

back,

washed, wiped dry,
salt,

and

seasoned

with

and

broiled.

When

done, dust

pepper over
butter.

them,

and baste well with
also

They may

be roasted

like

chickens.

A GENTLEMAN Complimented a lady on her improved appearance. "You are guilty of flattery!"
"Not so," replied the gentleman, "for I are as plump as a, partridge "At first," said the lady, " I thought you guilty of flattery only but now I find you are actually making game of me I"
said she.

vow you
;

y

ROASTED REED BIRDS.

189.

Pick your birds, and with a pair

of scissors cut and

draw them

as chickens.

Wash them clean, and wipe them dry. Make a dressing of bread crumbs, pepper,
salt; butter

enough

to

make

the crumbs

adhere together;

chopped onion

may

be

;

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

201

added, with a small quantity of any kind

of sweet herb finely powdered.
birds with this dressing, sew

Fill

the

them

up, put

them on

a

spit,

and baste them with butter

whilst they are roasting.

A CERTAIN barrister, who was remarkable for coming into court with dirty hands, observed that he " had been turning over Goke^ " I should have thought it had been coalJ^^ was the reply of a
neighboring counsel.

RABBIT A-LA-FRANCAISE.

190.
season
it

Cut

the

rabbit

in

pieces,

and

highly with salt and pepper, and

a very
water.

little

mace.

Just cover
is

it

with

When
flour

the meat

quite

tender,

mix some

with a large piece of butter
is

when

the gravy

quite thick, add half a

pint of port wine.

Send

it

to

the table

very hot.
Irish pedlar asked an itinerant poulterer the price of a pair of fowls. " Six shillings, sir. " " In my country, m}^ darling, you might buy them for

An

202

THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.

own dear
2')e7ices,

sixpence a-pacey " Why don't you remain in your country, then ?" " 'Case we have no six-

my jewel,"

said Pat.

FRICASSEED RABBIT.
191.

Take a stew-pan with a

tightly-

fitting cover,

cut up a couple of rabbits,

season
salt,

them well with Cayenne pepper,

and a sprig of mace.

Add

a large teatill

cup of hot water, and stew them

they

begin to be tender; then add two ounces
of butter, rolled in a
little flour, to
it

thicken

the gravy.
fire,

Just before taking

from the
Serve
instead

pour in a glass of Madeira.

immediately.
of the wine.

Cream may be added

A GAME-KEEPER, Writing a letter to a friend, determined to send him some rabbits. "Tell me," said he to a companion, " how many b's there are in rabbits?" "That depends upon circumstances,"
replied the rustic oracle;

"how many

rabbits are

you sending?" "Four." "Then eight b's of course, two for each rabbit." The keeper therefore wrote " I have the pleasure of sending you some rabbbbbbbbits !"

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

203

WHITE FRICASSEE OF RABBIT.
192.
soak
it

Cut the rabbit into
in cold water for

joints,

and

two hours.

Put

into a stew-pan three or four slices of fat

bacon, half a carrot, a large onion, half a
clove of garlic, half a head of celery,

a

bunch of parsley, a bay
and two
sprigs of

leaf,
all

a laurel
cut up.

leaf,

thyme,

Lay

in the rabbit,
slices of

and on that put three or four
Stand the stew-pan by the
an hour.

bacon.

side of the fire for

The

rabbit

should be firm and perfectly white.

Make
salt-

a sauce as follows

:

Half a pint of stock

(No. 2), a saltspoonful of loaf sugar, a

spoonful of

salt,

the tenth part of a nut-

meg

grated,

and a dessertspoonful of baked
up.

flour.

Boil
for

Put

in

the

rabbit,

and
the

simmer

twenty

minutes.
eggs with

Beat
a
gill

yolks of two fresh

of

good cream

;

lay the rabbit neatly on a hot

dish; pour the juice of a lemon over it;
stir

the cream and eggs into the sauce for
;

two minutes

pour

it

over the rabbit, and

204
serve.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

The bacon may be
fire,

rolled,

browned

before the

and used

to garnish the dish.

firmly believe that many a case of chronic ugliness mis^ht be cured throuo^h the means of healthy exercise. Get up, then, and shake off your sloth send that dead black blood through the channels of your body let it come up to your sallow cheeks in red waves. Come to the resolution that you give jour blood quicker circulation. Your hearts will be the sooner purified, and made meet for the joys, and strong for the trials of life.
; ;

We

RABBIT POT

PIE.

193.
son
it

Cut the rabbit

in small pieces, sea-

highly with salt and pepper.

Make

a paste, line the sides of a pot with the crust,

then put in the rabbit, with three ounces of
butter cut up and rolled in flour.

Roll out

some of the dough, cut

it

in pieces about
it

three inches square, and lay
pieces of rabbit;
will cover
it,

in with the
as

pour in as

much water

roll

out a sheet of paste and

place on the top, leaving an opening in the
centre.

Cover the pot with the

lid,

and

let

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.
it

205
done.
If

cook slowly
pie

till

the rabbit

is

when your

is

nearly done, the gravy

should not be thick enough, add a few more
pieces of butter rolled in flour.

When
on
it,

the

pie

is

done put the top or

soft crust at the

bottom of the
place the

dish, lay the rabbit

then

brown crust on the top with the
Serve the gravy in a gravy

brown
boat.

side up.

A

YOUNG woman meeting her former

fellow-ser-

" Yery vant, was asked how she liked her place. well." "Then you have nothing to complain of?" " Nothing only master and missis talk such very
;

bad grammar."

SMOTHERED RABBIT.
194r.
ly,
it

Clean the rabbit, wash
it

it

thorough-

season
flat

well with salt and pepper, lay
broil it slowly.

on the gridiron,

It

should be a fine brown

when
butter,

done.

Have

ready eight or ten large onions, boiled and

mashed with a piece of
and
salt.
13

some pepper

Baste the rabbit with butter, and

206

THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.
it,

pour the mashed onions over
cover
it

so as to

entirely.

Serve

it

immediately.

MISER caught a fly, put it into the sugar basin, over it. " What is that for ?" said a bystander. **Hush!" whispered the miser, "if the fly escapes, I shall know that some one has been at my sugar P^
and
set a plate

A

BEST

WAY

OF COOKING VENISON.
in rather thin
dish,

195.
slices,

Cut your venison

pound them, lay them on a

and

send them to the table.

Have

a chafing-dish

on the
in the

table, lay

some of the

slices of

venison

pan of the

chafing-dish,

throw on a

little salt,

but not so

much

as for other meat,

a

lump

of butter, and some currant jelly,
let
it

put the cover on the dish,

remain a

minute or two, take
slices of

ofi*

the cover, turn the

meat, place

it

on again, and in two
will be

or three minutes
sufficiently

more the venison

cooked.

Each person

at the

;

THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.
table adds pepper to suit the taste.

207

Some

prefer venison cooked without currant jelly.

Resolve
without
fail

to perform what what you resolve.

you ought: perform

VENISON STEAKS.

196.
it,

Cut your venison

in slices,

pound

and having heated your

gridiron, grease
it.

the bars and place the
tlie

meat on

Broil

venison very quickly over clear coals,
as it
is

and as soon

done put

it

on a dish,

season with pepper and salt and plenty of
butter.

Send
it

it

to the table immediately.
jelly.

Serve

with currant

The

plates

should be warm.

There

is

no objection to

broils in a house, so

they

be confined to the kitchen.

HASH OF COLD VENISON.
197.

Cut the meat

from the

bones

crack the bones and put them into a sauce-

208

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

pan with the trimmings, with barely enough
water to cover them
;

stew

till

the water

is

reduced one half; strain the liquid, and add

some pieces of butter

rolled in flour,
as it boils

and
add

some currant

jelly.

As soon

the venison, which should be cut in small
pieces.

In five minutes

it

will be ready to

serve.

Even a pig upon a spit has one consolation things are sure to take a turn.

;

When Dr. Johnson was asked why he was not invited out to dine as Garrick was, he answered, as if it was a triumph to him, " Because great lords and ladies don't like to have their mouths stopped 1"

A HASH OF COLD VENISON.
198.
slices.

Cut the cold venison into thin

Then make

a gravy by stewing the

bones and trimmings, which should be seasoned with some whole grains of pepper and
salt
;

thicken

it

with a piece of butter rolled
hot add a glass of port wine

in flour.

When

;

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

209
;

and a small

glass of currant jelly

then put

in the slices of venison

and simmer them
Serve with

slowly

for

a

few minutes.

toasted bread around the dish.

At a venison feast Sir Joshua Reynolds addressed his conversation to one of the company who sat near liim, but to his great surprise, could not get a
single word in answer; until, at length, his silent neighbor turned to him and said,," Sir Joshua, whenever you are at a venison feast, I advise you not to speak during dinner-time. Through that last question of j^ours, I have unfortunately swallowed a piece ofjine fat, without tasting the flavor /"

A NICE PIE FROM COLD VENISON.
199. Cut the venison into small squares and season it with grated numeg, pepper,
and
salt
;

line the sides

and edges of a dish

with puff paste, lay in the meat, and add
half a pint of rich gravy,

made with
add a

the

trimmings of the venison
port wine,

;

glass of

and the juice of half a lemon
paste and bake.

cover the dish with the

Pour a

little

more gravy into the pie when

;

210
it

TUE FAMILY SAVE- ALL.

comes from the oven.

Good

either hot or

cold.

An old gentleman being asked what lie liked for dinner replied: "A keen appetite, good company, something to eat, and a clean napkin.^^

A NICE STEW FROM COLD VENISON.

200.

Make

a gravy from the fragments
if

and bones, and add,

convenient, a
;

little

mutton gravy.

Let

this

simmer then skim
thickened with
if

and add browned butter
flour,

some catchup, a

little claret,

ap-

proved,

and a spoonful of currant
little

jelly.

Squeeze in a

lemon

;

give a boil, and

then while simmering add the pieces of venison thinly sliced.

Garnish with cut pickles

or with slices of lemon,

and

fried bread.

Old Mrs. Darnley is a pattern of household economy. She says she has made a pair of socks last fifteen years, by merely knitting new feet to them every winter, and new legs every other winter.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

211

ROAST

PIG.

201.
feet,

Prepare the pig by cutting off the

scraping and cleansing the head and

ears, cutting out

the tongue and eyes, and

cleaning
clean,

the

throat.
it

and wipe

Wash it perfectly dry. Make a dressing

of bread crumbs, some onions finely chopped, with
salt,
;

pepper, and sweet marjoram,
also butter

to the taste

enough to make

the crumbs adhere together.

Any

spice

may be added, and the grating of a lemon, but many prefer the dressing without spice.
Rub
fill it

the pig thoroughly inside with

salt,

Cayenne pepper, and powdered sage; then
with the dressing and sew
salt,
it

up.

Rub
before

the outside with
sage, put it

Cayenne pepper, and
and place
fire.

on the

spit,

it

a clear but not too hot a

Have

a piece
it

of clean sponge tied on a stick, dip

in

melted butter, and as the skin dries moisten
it.

A

common-sized pig takes from three

to four hours to roast.

An

excellent filling

may be made of potatoes

boiled

and mashed.

little water in the bottom of the roaster five and to tea- pounds of pork rub in well two salt. instead of the bread. If potatoes are used.212 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. It is said is Roast Pig relished by those who know. Put no as it flour on or baste it while cooking. that Lamb on by every one. it softens the skin and makes tough. piece of young pork. the bones Take across a nice middle joints. the dressing will require more butter. it. two teaspoon- and one of Cayenne pepper. add some water. skim of the fat. ROAST PORK. Pour the gravy into a pan. stir in off a part a little flour mixed with it cold water. wash it. and crack the middle. If . but do not it parallel with the spit. separate the break the skin. put it on the with a . and let boil once —then serve it in a gravy tureen. score ribs. spoonfuls and a half of fuls of sugar. 202.

Fry them a fine brown on both Place a form of cranberry sauce in the lay the slices of centre of the dish. always served with roast " What is Eternity ?" The following beautiful answer.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. slices. and pork around it. 203. by a pupil of the deaf-and-dumb school at Paris. sage. season with Cayenne pepper." — PORK STEAKS. Apple sauce pork. . Cut the pork into salt. contains a sublimity of conception scarcely to be equalled: " The lifetime of the Almighty. add a little more pepper or is salt as it may require. and pulverized sides. it 213 should not be sufficiently seasoned. Apple sauce may be preferred to the cranberry it — in which case must be piled up in the centre of the dish.

and put them in a pot with just as much water and is as will cover let them. pick out Take all the meat out of the it the bones. left This is generally made sausage of the feet. make boil it it as thick as thick mush. take and pour in pans. Season sage. Scrape and wash well the pieces de- signed for the scrapple. is preferable. salt. stir in gradually as will much Indian meal it ofi*. and any pieces which may be having after made all meat. and rubbed the taste. 1. not so solid buck- . cut it in slices. cut up fine. to fire. When it cold. with pepper. head. Let it a few minutes. just before as Set the pot over the it and begins to boil. Some buckwheat meal — this is added in the same Indian meal as is manner as the as it Indian. flour it.214 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. them boil the flesh perfectly soft and the bones loose. 204. and fry prefer in hot lard or sausage fat. and return it it to the liquor in the pot. pot. slowly Add till a little salt. No. SCRAPPLE.

mean time pepper. may added with the sage By the use of eye-glasses. feet. will require ten or fifteen minutes. and as soon as it begins to boil add as buckwheat flour as much Indian meal or will make it very thick. No. salt and water. set over the fire. . and pulverized Turn it . and after thoroughly cleansing them.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. which In the Stir it continually while it is boiling. season it highly with Cayenne sage. Take the head. wheat. until bones leave the strain off the liquor they all were boiled pick out the bones very carefully. Then pour it the liquor over the meat. . SCRAPPLE. put them into several flesh in. 215 be Sweet marjoram if preferred. salt. 2. and the boil them hours. 205. and with a large wooden spoon mash up the meat. you may see as much as is to be seen but by the use of another kind of glass you may see twice as much. and ears of a pig.

a salt. A NOBLE Lord asked a Clergyman once. Mince three quarters of a pound Season of lean roast pork and two shalots. quarter of a saltspoonful of sage in ^ne powder. add a tablespoonful of pork gravy. and a teaspoonful of baked flour. with a saltspoonful of ful of pepper. at the bottom of his table. Make up the meat into of the form of small cutlets (five or six) . cut it in and fry them a nice brown on both sides. 206. half a saltspoon- mustardspoonful of freshhalf a grain of Cayenne. When cold. and one well-beaten egg. out in pans to cool." said the clergyman. slices. MINCED PORK CUTLETS. that I shall never see a goose in future without thinking of your lordship P^ . why the goose was always placed near to the parson ? " Reall}^ my lord. a made mustard. Buckwheat meal and Indian meal be may mixed in equal proportions if preferred. " I can give no reason for it but your question is so odd.216 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

217 flour. and the sauce If it be diflacult to rule thine anger. 207. Serve with apple sauce. SAUSAGE MEAT. of brandy simmer for three quarters of till an hour . Peel made as follows and cut up four large apples.: THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. Place the cutlets round the dish. dredge them with baked plenty of boiling color fat) till and fry pale (in of a brown (about eight minutes). a pint of a gill Twenty-five pounds of pork. all occasions of falling into wrath. beat with a wooden spoon quite smooth. one gill of rubbed sage. put into a saucepan with them two tablespoon- fuls of moist sugar. equal size. half salt. or guard thyself against them whenever they occur. therefore. Avoid. half of black pepper. it is wise to prevent it. . one tablespoonful of Cayenne pepper. in the centre. and two tablepoonfuls .

Take after four or eight pigs' feet. and nice them a vinegar brown. until They should cook very slowly meat is the perfectly tender. cut them in put fry them in a pan with some lard.218 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. and thoroughly scraping and cleaning them. Take in four out the pieces. If approved. 209. in water with a proper quantity of When half. cut each foot . some may be added to the gravy. PIGS' FEET. but not half so creditable to have wooden heads. Pigs' feet should be scraped and thoroughly cleaned. 208. SOUSED FEET. thoroughly tender. salt put them on to boil in some and water. They may be eaten hot or cold. and boiled salt. large bones. It is considered very creditable to men to have hearts of oak.

and stand away it to get cold. Clean a pig's head nicely. rubbed sage and sweet marjoram to the Boil the whole till it is it quite thick in pans or and nearly dry. add a small quantity of ground and mace. . it boil until the it bones fall from the all Then take a up. HOG'S-HEAD CHEESE. wash little it and salt. Cut it in slices and send to the Some cloves prefer spice in hog's-head cheese in that case. . in.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 219 When If pre- pour cold vinegar over them. season with Cayenne 23epper and cold. well. forms. and return to the water was boiled Add down red and black pepper. ferred. take out the it bones and with wooden spoon it mash it up well. smooth it then pour over the top with the back it of the spoon. some grains of allspice and a sprig or two of mace may be added. with some Let flesh. boil it in very water. 210. table. salt. taste.

to place one in Never put a ham and be equally careful never boiling water. Lan" Every ting. in cold water. man work. he drink. ass work. with a or prime cider. TO COOK A HAM. work in dis cashire. let the water become lukewarm. wind work. Dr. First. HOW 211. used pleasantly to riepeat an observation of his negro servant. he sleep.220 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. and then put the it ham in. Massa. every ting work here but de hog . he walk about like gentleman /" . horse work. Let simmer or boil lightly for four or five hours it — five is better than four ofil —then Rub take out and shave the rind granu- lated sage into the whole surface of the so long as it ham it. bullock work. dog work. smoke work. . and let it baste an hour in a gentle heat. he eat. when the Doctor was making the tour of Derbyshire. country water work. Franklin. etc. can be made to receive in Place the bottle of ham a baking dish. fire work. when in England. he do noting all day. champagne Baste occasionally with juice.

but be it careful not to let as hardens and toughens the meat. it out of the water.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. When it is done. to cook each Allow twenty minutes pound of meat. 212. if it if not very salt let it need not be soaked old and dry. strip off the it. is Wash and it scrape your ham . which Put it should be changed several times. set it away to get it. take skin. round If it is it is not to be eaten whilst hot. soak twelve hours in luke- warm water. as soon as taken from the pot. Let it boil. cold. or ornament with sprigs of green parsley neatly twisted it. and serve Twist scalloped it letter paper round the shank. BOILED HAM. and is there any reason then that you should do less for God than others. in a large vessel filled it with cold w^ater. . then skin 14 by which means you pre- . simmer. and make your whole lives a long vacation ?" . 221 You that are rich have of all people the least cause to be idle God gives you more than others .

[e exclaimed to a friend. turn oil. may be garnished as above. entire. It serve all the juice of the meat. As I lately a sage on a fine ham was repasting for breakfast too savory I opine). or.. them. who sat silent and fasting. " When I'm making large extracts from Bacon P"* And MODE OF RE-DRESSING COLD ROAST 214. ham sift all over with the }>eaten (•racker. left When the shoulders are remove from them the skin. GLAZED HAM. cried. dip them into the best salad then . Beat the yolks of two eggs very cover your egg. 213. for he thought him mistaken " Why. what is it else ?" the sage quickly replied. PIG. "What a breakfast of learning is mine !" "A breakfast of learning!" with wonder he laugh'd. then over some grated and then set the ham in the oven to brown the (Though glazing. if you choose. 222 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. you may glaze it. light.

the size of egg. flour. also the skin. Remove Melt a the flesh from the bones. and we found her in every respect Creditable.. and free from nothing that was in any way wrong /" : A A VERY NICE ENTREE FROM COLD ROAST 215. and cut into convenient an pieces. enne and Broil them over a clear fire. them a dessertspoonful of . button mushrooms then and Shake them over the stir to three or four minutes. Serve with tomato sauce. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. in bread 223 crumbs highly seasoned with Caysalt. "No man. and send them to table while hot. and PIG. for he had been brought up with em from childhood /" ^ SERVANT girl received the following written character from a person who meant to recommend her " This is to certify that Isabel Wier served with us During the last half-year. Partington." says Mrs. "was better calculated to judge of pork than my poor husband he knew what good hogs were. and throw in six cleaned fire for or eight sliced. bit of butter.

BREAKFAST DISH FROM COLD BACON. Whenever our neighbor's house is on fire. it cannot be amiss for the engines to play a little on our own. Serve hot. Lay the rashers on . lay in the meat. and add two or three glasses of wine. boil gently until reduced nearly one third take out the parsley and mace. to and continue shake or toss them gently. a small quantity Cayenne pepper. but do not allow them to burn. and the strained juice of half a lemon. and half a pint of Let these . grate over them some crust of bread. and bring it slowly to the point of simmering. 216. Better to be despised for too anxious apprehension. and powder them well with it on both sides.224 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. than ruined by too confident security. some of salt. water. Add a small bunch of parsley. Stir to it the beaten yolks of three fresh eggs. a middling-sized blade of mace. Cut the bacon into slices about a quarter of an inch thick.

. and pulverized Broil them. baste them with They should be served with apple butter. lately appeared at the table. but the boarder said to his host. Cut some slices from the leg. when a rather unsavory ham presented itself for discussion. and when thoroughly hot. 225 a cheese-toaster. or cranberry sauce. not to smell 'emP^ in A New — STEAKS FROM COLD ROAST PORK. "what o' that? Take hold. It looked very well. man you come to the table to eat your victuals. FASTIDIOUS boarder.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." replied the other. Excellent to accompany poached or fried eggs. and for a garnish around veal cutlets. or sweetbreads. pepper. "How horrible it smells!" "Well. and salt. or dishes of green peas or beans. or hashed calf's head. 217. and brown them on both sides. at a cheap establishment York. season them with Cayenne sage.

A BREAKFAST DISH FROM COLD ROAST PORK. 219. and pulverized sage. with tomato sauce. them with Cayenne pepper. and some finely-powdered clear fire.226 THE FAMILY SAVE ALL. it Let it boil. Fry them slowly. and when flour of a fine brown take them out of a gravy by adding a little the pan. Broil them over a and take care Serve that they do not become scorched. Cut the pork in slices. sage. season salt. and pour over the steaks. Make and some water. . a Cut the lean part of the cold pork in slices. CUTLETS FROM COLD ROAST PORK. them highly with Cayenne pepper. season little salt. 218.

half head of cabbage. pare your potatoes and put them in with the cabbage. 227 A PIE OF COLD ROAST MEAT AND APPLES. and the purring of the cat. butter. (an ENGLISH DISH. Six potatoes. and bake until nicely browned. with a little it is water . and take out the core (preserving the pips and sticking them into the pulp) slices of cold .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and pour over the top a large cupful of ale. — POTATO KALE. and any of cold roasted ginger. Put into the dish a layer of each. Cut some apples into quarters. meat. When the potatoes are soft take . cut thick sort fat bacon. Put your cabbage on salt in the to boil. season with pounded and salt. Cover the dish with a paste. when nearly done. The three sweet fireside sounds The song of the tea-kettle. pepper. the chirping of the cricket. 221.) 220. one gill two ounces of of cream.

when eaten with loaves roast are very or nice beef mutton." exclaimed an indulgent husband to his better half. " ^^o. the other day. POTATO LOAVES. powdered with pepper . pan.: 228 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. A NOVEL WAY TO CLEAN A WATCH. or the pot they were boiled potatoes and cabbage into fine. prepared without milk. and are made of any portion of the mashed roots. stir it till Set the pot over the the potatoes are hot. because baby and 1 washed it in the basin ever so long this morning. pa. it. and it Serve immediately. " I know it don't want cleaning." conceive." said his petted daughter. by mixing with them a good quantity of very finely minced raw shallot. Potato 222. put the mash both very salt add the butter and cream with to and pepper fire the taste. my dear. This is very good with cold meat. —" I Cannot what's the matter with my watch I think it must want cleaning. them out —drain the cabbage—wipe a saucein.

that when so nearly done as to impart fat. with salt in and drop in the potatoes half is an hour before dinner colander. Have ready some a pot full of it.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Have ready a well warmed. 229 and a it salt. it. but in BOILED POTATOES. them under the meat it is to brown. served. 223. boiling water. and put them well in a vegetable dish. Prepare your potatoes. for three hours. throw the potatoes in shake them well. warmed. then beating up the whole with to bind it. some of the gravy along with the Op much speaking cometh silence is safety. and let them stand in cold water. — . lump of butter and dividing into small loaves of a conical form. and placing is. repentance. in an earthen pot. is like a potato the only good belonging to him is under ground. Sir Thomas Overbury says that the man who has not any thing to boast of but his illustrious ancestors.

and fry to a pale slice. (a GERMAN DISH. who had been a printer.) 225. and divide each quarter in cold water ten two . 224. with color.^ POTATO SALAD. two ounces of butter. FRIED POTATOES. onions they are the onions require .^ . let them stand minutes drain. and wipe them quite dry filled throw them into a stew-pan half boiling fat. 230 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. observed " that a youth might be compared to a comma. to which death puts Si period. into Pare the potatoes and cut them into four quarters. A FIELD-PREACHER. the taste. brown Take them out with a and place them sieve. till and vinegar and the Boil the potatoes soft. to Six potatoes. on a sheet of white blotting paper on a so as to absorb the fat before serving. pepper. . six salt onions. manhood to a semicolon. old age to a colon.

when presenting to him a re" If you say quest for the brevet of lieutenant. " Sire. set it over the fire and stir it till hot. and the juice of half a lemon. and add to the onions. and signed. 231 Wipe out the pot in which the potatoes were boiled. with parsley chopped. salt and vinegar it is . Boil and peel the them grow nearly cold then . 226. put into it a little white pepper and salt. about as long again as the potatoes. mash the onions in it. potatoes.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Some persons prefer without the vinegar. POTATOES A-LA-MAITRE D'HOTEL. one word. The king stared. put in the butter." said a soldier one day to Frederick the Great". toes. two. and warm them up in white sauce or melted butter. and let Or cold. whistled." replied the soldier. slice the pota- but do not mash them. boil the potatoes." answered the king." " Sign. let cut them into slices tolerably thick. when it will be it ready for the table. them become . " I will have you hanged. pepper.

then cut them into rather thick Put a lump of fresh butter into a stew-pan. in the potatoes covered with salt . and chop very finely moisten a tin them with brown gravy.. take cold cabbage or spinach. cover the top. . and send to table. chopped parsley. from the fire add a little lemon-juice. 227. add a cupful of water and a then put little cream . and put into a . 232 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. about a teaspoonful for a moderate dish when the flour has boiled a short time in the butter. and stew them for a few minutes. and then take them . Fill mould with layers of potatoes it and cabbage. beat all together. pepper. COLD POTATOES WITH SPINACH OR CABBAGE. and moisten them with a little white sauce . slices. Mash cold potatoes. add a little flour. One tear of a woman is oftentimes more formidable than the ''three tiers" of a ship of the line.

" Daddy. what is the meaning of ditto?" "Whj^. Potatoes are sometimes of very inferior quality. " she called me a cabbage heaclP^ TO IMPROVE POTATOES OF BAD aUALITY. The next da}^ being at work with his father. ain't it ?" "Yes. " I LOVE you like any thing. stew-pan of boiling water. The ardent lover was sorely puzzled to understand the meaning of ditto. 228. he said. long enough to 2f3^ it Let remain make dish the vegetables hot then turn them out and serve. " this here is one cabbage head. "Ditto." said the old man. and served same as the potatoes and cabbage described above." said she. being deficient in starch. that ere's ditto. carrots and turnips be may be added to soups or may warmed up and separately. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and put the into moulds layers.. very pretty for an Cold . a This forms entrie. The method to improve them by cooking ." "Drat it I" ejaculated the indignant son." "Well." said a young gardener to his sweetlieart. daddy.

. and put them again upon the make them hot without burning them then mash them with a forh. the water being put to them cold till . fill diminutive ones as will in them two or three waters about three minutes each time. pour a white sauce over them. them. toes prepared thus have been mistaken young ones at the best tables. Then drain the water from fire to . and boil them gently. until nearly done. thus very toes. The fork breaks them into pieces and allows the water to escape. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 229. to peel them. form as a dish . then let them steam Old potafor tender .234 is. and with a small scoop made for the purpose. and serve with the second course. Wash some many boil large potatoes. much improving the pota- OLD POTATOES TO LOOK LIKE YOUNG ONES.

sertspoonful of salt it boil press it down. 2d was states that the phrase " republic of letters" upon to insinuate that. and let rapidly (uncovered) for ten or twelve it minutes. 2.5 . THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. or SPINACH. drain through a sieve. 231. Pick off the stem of each leaf. No. waters. 1. and avoid using any that are old or discolored wash the spinach it in several waters. 230. as Wash it is it well through several apt to be gritty. finely chopped. SPINACH. eggs and strew over the which have been boiled hard and poached eggs. top. No. they had not a sovereign hit Hood amongst them. and press . Put it into a vegetable dish. taking the whole lot of authors together. and put into a quart of boiling water with a des.

Put the and bake them till Serve them hot. To To do good. mince quite fine. To worship To maintain wealth. The God. and cut it into triangles. 3. Each his person at the table dresses them on own plate. 2. shrivels. Garnish with fried sippets. . 232. cherish love. and fry to a pale brown color in plenty of butter or oil. Stir for six or eight minutes. 4. health. 5. — 1. them skin Put some tomatoes into a pan. and a teaspoonful of sugar. Place it the spinach on a vegetable dish. leading duties of life are To acquire wisdom. and put into a stew-pan with two ounces of butter. with a small lump of butter on each.236 out it THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. a saltspoonful of half the quantity of sifted white pepper. salt. in the oven. 6. smooth over with a knife. all the water . To gain BAKED TOMATOES. Cut a slice of bread into small three-cornered pieces.

237 TOMATO FRICANDEATJ. and to resolve to do what ought to be done and of the evening. 234. to examine whether we have done what we ought. pieces.' — . season them with pepper and salt. * That a special care is to be had of two portions of our time of the morning. 233. pound and wash them." THE FAMILY SAVE. of a light brown on both Stew some tomatoes very dry. They should be sides. strain them through a sieve to get out all the seeds. Kub them through a 15 sieve to extract the pulp. pour the pulp into the gravy after the meat has been taken out. and thicken in flour. it it with a piece of butter rolled this over the Pour meat and serve hot. to consider. and fry them slowly till they are done.ALL. " The Pythagoreans had a wise saying. TOMATO MUSTARD. Get some slices of veal cutlets. Cut a peck of tomatoes in small and boil them till tender. .

it is boiled the oil Put a tablespoonful of sweet bottle before it is on the top of each to exclude the air. my good fellow. and what risk you run. two tablespoonfuls of mustard seed. DeBalzac was lying awake in bed. and cold bottle it when and cork it tightly. when he saw a man enter his room cautiously. one teaspoonful of cloves. M. and attempt The rogue to pick the lock of his writing desk. Boil the whole a few moments. and two tablespoonfuls of salt. "to think what pains you are taking. If this should not be quite salt enough. boil which put on and until nearly dry. one tablespoonful of black pepper. was not a little disconcerted at hearing a loud laugh from the occupant of the apartment.238 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. DeBalzac. corked M. in hope of finding money by night in a desk where the lawful owner can never The thief "evacuated Flanfind any by day!" ders" at once. Then add one tablespoonful of Cayenne pepper. " Why do you laugh ?" asked " I am laughing. whom he supposed asleep. a little more may be added before last time." said the thief. .

and cook soft. when the skin will peel off Then cut them up. " Friend. cried out. and let them stand a few minutes. Alexander seeing him just sinking under the burden and going to throw it on the ground. put them without any water. salt. though with great difficulty." . — A poor Macedo- nian soldier was one day leading before Alexander a mule laden with gold for the king's use.it right through to — your tent. Humane Driver Rewarded. do not be weary yet try to carrj?. The beast being so tired that he was not able either to go or to sustain the load. the driver took it up and carried it. juicy. 235. If they are not very ripe. for it is all your own.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and They may be thickened if with bread crumbs or grated cracker preferred. dip some of the water and mash them fine. 239 STEWED TOMATOES. pour boiling water over them. Cayenne pepper. Season with butter. very easily. in a stew-pan them till they are If they prove too out.

Tomatoes pre- . . in salt half. put two halves together. and cut them in two round the tomato —that is. cells Wash them. take half a pint of bread crumbs. 240 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. so as the can be divested of the pulp and seeds which they contain. each piece with the dressing. BAKED TOMATOES. 236. one ounce of butter. To six tomatoes. sides. Put them gill pan with an ounce of butter and a of water. and tie them with a in a piece of thread. 237. set them in a moderate oven.. Cut the tomatoes season them with pepper and them in fresh lard. pepper Fill the cells of and salt to the taste. till they are TOMATOES WITH CREAM GRAVY. and then fry When they are brown on both add some butter and cream thicken the gravy with butter and flour mixed as for drawn butter. one large onion finely chopped. and cook them soft. parts.

and quite tender simmer till (about an hour). then rub it through a fine sieve. gill Beat the of thick yolks of four fresh eggs with a cream. " What were their fathers?" When it was Home Tooke's turn to answer. a general question arose among the young men. 238. Wash two it heads of fine white . . pared in this 241 way make a very palatable breakfast and tea relish. A GENTLEMAN met a half-witted lad in the road. The lad replied that " he wouldn't be greedy. and stir over a till fire for five or six minutes. celery." He was a poulterer in Clare-Market.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. the sauce thickens. and cut into small pieces put it into a pint and a quarter of new milk. When in company at college. he said his was "a Turkey merchant. and serve as directed. he'd keex^ the littlest P' CELERY SAUCE. asked him which of the two he would choose. and placing in his hands a sixpence and a penny. gentle mix all together.

to fifteen make crisp.242 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 239. half a of sweet oil. send it and to the table. one teaspoonful of French mustard. Make gill a dressing of the yolks of three eggs boiled hard. over. crack the the eajeh across middle. (FRENCH FASHION. half a gill of vinegar. CELERY DRESSED AS SLAW. or half a teaspoonful of common mustard. stir it Pour well. bone of Take six neck chops. then drain and pour the dressing Conspicuous by Absence. " Did j^ou observe any thing particular about the prisoner?" Witness — you observe with reference ness " That he had none — "Yes. this mixture over the celery. until about minutes before it it is sent to the table. It should be kept in it cold water. with salt and Cayenne pepper to the taste. and put ." !' Counsel — "What did to his whiskers ?" Wit- CELERY STEWED WITH LAMB.) 240. — his whiskers. Cut the celery in pieces 'about a quarter of an inch long.

then put them in with the meat. boil take As soon them out. In another pot put one quart of dried beans. which must have been carefully as the picked and washed. If the gravy stews little away much. in a little flour gill and with half a of water. Cut up aiie two large heads of celery and mix with the meat. 241. Roll two ounces of butter add to it. a. them till they are quite soft. pepper and salt to the taste. add a water . Boil and just cover the whole with water. . and let it simmer slowly the too celery is soft. Cover till it closely. ' . 243 them into a stew-pan. Put a piece of pickled pork in a pot with two quarts of water. BOILED DRIED BEANS. flour stir in a little mixed with cold water. beans begin to put them in a colander to drain. and if it should not be quite thick enough. and send them to the table.THE FAMILY SAVE-AtLt..

is When they are young. Drain them. those are what I sowed ! immediately ^fter my loss. But. fifteen minutes boil sufficient to them. neighbor." said a father's tico. me you seem to have a fine crop coming up . "while you were fretting^ I was working /" ! . it's going to have it?" asked his interested companion. Two gardeners. " Why. " we have got such a fine porand mahogany doors. I heard father tell mother this morning that we are going to have a mortgage and on the top is a cupola something else. and add butter.244 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. little These should be boiled in very water. them came to condole with the other. a pint of water and little if the peas are not very sweet add a sugar." " What coming up already?" "Yes. little boy who was boasting of his new house. "Ah !" cried he. bless I've done nothing but fret ever since. had their One of crops of early peas killed by the frost. and the taste. who were neighbors. and plate-glass windows! "Jem. salt." " What —and is upon it I" GSEEN PEAS." replied the other. "how unfortunate! Do you know. 242. to pepper. what sort are they?" "Why. with a teaspoonful of salt to .

place the carrots on a vegetable dish. with a dessertspoon- ful of salt and two tablespoonfuls of sugar. 243. and simmer gently an hour. when he was told that the sovereign of the country had no power to dispense with the laws. . the Czar expressed his astonishment and indignation that the persons who had thus violated the respect due to the representative of a crowned head. in Queen Anne's reign. 245 CARROTS A-LA-FRANCAISE. stir the eggs into the milk. to which he was himself subject.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Scrape the carrots. — . were not immediately put His astonishment was considerably into death. for one hour drain on a cloth . Peter the Great. When the Ambassador of Peter the Great was arrested for debt in London. pieces. Pour the sauce over the carrots and serve. and simmer two minutes. place them in a stew-pan with two ounces of the butter . Beat the yolks of two eggs. cut the small ends into two. butter. and the large ends into eight Boil in water. creased. and shake them till is nearly absorbed by the carrots of pour in half a pint for new milk.

Those who try the difference this. that he too had ])een abroad as far as through the among . When you are about to boil carrots do not scrape tliem^ but first brush and then wash them. in flavor is The improvement The carrot very in. rub skin with the back of the knife. because the juice has is been kept more affected by the ordinary than the system of peeling or scraping potato. which had grown so broad and high. with assumed seriousness. This. and that. company of persons. 244. AND CARROTS WITHOUT. CARROTS WITH FLAVOR. with all seriousness. will learn to estimate of carrots with flavor and carrots without. was a huge cabbage. five divisions of the earth other curiosities. that fifty armed riders might have stationed themselves under a single Some one leaf and performed their manoeuvres. according to his account. who heard him. he had met with one of which no writer had made mention. off the When the cooked. because the former contains a large proportion of sugar in a soluble form. great. said. A to a TRAVELLER once related.246 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. that he had passed . deeming this exaggeration not worth serious refutation.

both lengthwise to break and crosswise. season it this pan with the scored pepper and sweet it oil. Cut an egg-plant in half. to his astonishment. but be careful not the skin in so doing. he saw more than three hundred coppersmiths at work making a single kettle and within the same. " Nonsense !" exclaimed the traveller.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. where. 1 EGG-PLANT. and over pour some Set or melted butter if preferred. (FRENCH MODE. but do not cut off the rind. it in an oven and cook is slowly till the plant perfectly soft.) 245. 247 Japan. with salt. "what possible use could they haA'e " Use why. The top should be brown. were five hundred women polishing it. then with a sharp knife score it very deeply. . Place each half in a side up. to boil the for so large a kettle ?" cabbage which you saw 1" .

with salt and a dessertspoonful of to the taste. to be served in. take it out of the water. butter. in which there was a number of old maids. it When it done. then strew on some grated cracker — and it. and pepper it is Put it in the dish light. oven and brown Serve hot. lastly. the inside . BACHELOR Mend of ours.248 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. cut all in half. left a boarding-house. and scoop out fine. beat it an egg spread a portion of over the egg-plant. BROWNED 246. EGG-PLANT. Take six ears of new well. mash very and to every teacupful of mashed egg-plant add one tablespoonful of grated cracker. spread Set it it over the in the re- mainder of the egg. who went for a week to a watering-place. corn and and scrape them Beat one egg . Boil an egg-plant in water which it is has been salted until perfectly soft. grate MOCK OYSTERS. on account of " the miserable /air" set before him at the table I A 247.

248. them. MOCK OYSTER FRITTERS. very light. . like other fritters. it One and pint of grated as green corn. and a little pepper and salt. and season with pepper and Beat the yolks of two eggs very light. Then mix all together and fry them in lard or butter. Dip out a spoonful at a time. one tablespoonful of cream. Beat the eggs. beating well together. Wash some roots of salsify. 249. flour as will much wheat make adhere together. 249 all and add to it.$ THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. grate salt. and fry them CORN OYSTERS. two eggs. and enough flour make a Whisk the whites dry. stir them to into a pint of milk batter. salsify to and add them gradually with the the batter. one tablespoonful of flour.

be very salt. and two pounds of pickled pork. Put the pork on and be about half cooked before the vegetables . tie them in small bunches.250 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. One quart of green com cut off the cob. If the pork should it is soak it an hour before to boil. 250. mix them with the grated enough flour to and add form the whole into a paste. and boil them in a pot of water with some salt in dish it. Fry them of a ASPARAGUS. toast some nice of bread. light brown. in hot lard. and pour rich melted butter over them. corn. Before you slices them up. put let on to it boil. up Scrape your asparagus. one quart of lima beans. 251. lay the asparagus on the toast. SUCCOTASH.

take it off it the set it away to cool —then pour over . that means that ''Well. M." inquired a young urchin of his companion. hesitating. "that means an apen'y a mile I" — — COLD SLAW. P. are put it. conscious of his own wisdom. It should be a thick soup when done. AND A. light. a sharp knife shave down very Make half a a dressing of one egg well beaten. Cut a cabbage in it half. Take up. M. mean after them figures on that ere Railway bill ?" Jim responds. and a teaspoonful of butter. boil they are tender. As soon fire. but a few years older than himself. ?" means. gill of vinegar. is and butter. ''what does P." said Jim. and with finely. and add to it the vinegar. 252. dish. and A. 251 Then put off the till in the corn (which must be cut Let them all cob) and the beans. as the egg thick. salt to taste. Beat the egg salt. to be sure!" "Oh. "I say. M. " Penny-a-mile. M. Jim. put the meat on a and the very vegetables in a tureen.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.

having occasion to go to dinner. HOT SLAW. is Stir it frequently." THE RHUBARB LEAF AS A GREEN VEGETABLE. and serve hot. where you shall If you can't read this note. carry it down find me. and put them in the key-hole of his chamber door: "I have gone to the Elephant and Castle. and salt to the taste. left these directions written. add a it vinegar.252 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. shave it Cut very the cabbage in it half. An Irish lawyer of the Temple. and finely. Some prefer a little sugar in the egg and vinegar. little and when it quite tender. and mix it well together. to the stationer's and he will read it for you. Cover closely. 253. and let it stew. with a piece of butter. Put into a stew- pan. Pour it in just enough water to preit vent from sticking to the pan. the cabbage. 254. Take the leaf (the youngest it is the best) and divest of the five stems that .

The leaves should then be placed in boiling water. Thomas. pepper. it may be dished up that article in the following way : After boiling and pressing. let simmer minutes with a small quantity of butter. "you must have met him. and up the centre in connection with the fruit (those stems containing nearly ties all the fruit quali- of the rhubarb itself). after which well press them to exclude all liquor. To please palates of the most fastidious.— THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." rejoined the wit. and salt and when done it will puzzle some of the finest connoisseurs to detect the difference. medicinal properties. are upon a the par with the rhubarb. for you could never overtake him!" *' 16 . place it it in a saucepan without for ten water. and lovers as of spinach. "did you ever see a snail?" " Certainly. and kept boiling fast for twenty minutes . 253 run to the right and left hands. QuiN had a gardener who was very slow." "Then." said he. and with the necessary condiments of the table it will be found a welcome substitute while its for ordinary vegetable. as a mild aperient.

Ten minutes before they are ready. and press well out . serve in the saucepan with a piece of butter the size of a walnut. then put into cold water. Take two good endives. separate the leaves. and boil them If in two waters bitter. to extract the bitter. soft.254 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. salt. and about a teacupful of gravy or water. When . and a piece of about the size fire of a walnut. 255. still use a third water. throw in a handful of sorrel leaves. and add a little Shake them well over the as and the hot as possible. Endive forms an excellent vegetable when cooked for the dinner-table in the following manner. add a little salt and . not blanched. boil endive. season with of any rich fire. . ENDIVE MAY BE COOKED AS A DINNER VEGETABLE. drain it the water off. mix them well near the put this mixture with the vegetable. it Or. take them out and strain them then put them back pepper and gravy. take a good tablespoonful of butter flour.

Dish up plainly. pepper. months. but They for use. strongly. Or whence. comes your . during the winter slowly. taking care There are some happy moments in this lone desolate world of ours that well repay The toil of struggling through it. The The clothes do much upon the wit. and atone For many a long sad night. cut them and is boil them same way that cabbage done. and weary day. A delicious vegetable for the table may be obtained by sowing peas in shalat intervals low boxes. when we know not where. and And their power. the sounds are brought from. Though brief.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. proverb. and stew to avoid burning. tailor makes the man. will come up five When about inches in the high. 256. as weather Does upon the brain and then. is boundless. PEA TOPS USED AS AN ORDINARY VEGETABLE. . to be eaten as an ordinary green vegetable. They come upon the mind like some wild air Of distant music. sir. till 255 quite hot.

and wash nicely. or fried bread. " There is not a vegetable growing in our garden that is not best when arrived at maturity. vexed at having .256 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. eating unripe fruit and vegetables. and put around the dish pieces of toast. The above. An old physician was declaiming upon the propensity which a majority of people display for Said he. A VERY NICE AND NOVEL DISH WHERE WATER-CRESSES ARE PLENTIFUL." it's ripe as 'tis green. in " What's a very confident but modest manner. little Before serving. affording them in recreation. salt and water. and stew Drain and salt. from Pick. Season with pepper and add a little butter. made and thin. of children healthful Collect a tolerably large quantity^ water-cresses. in water for about ten minutes. as a sauce for boiled fowl. the free cress it strong insects." interrupted a little boy. 257. This may Lay to be done by on a holiday. add a vinegar. chop. and most of them are positively injurious unless fully " I know one thing that ain't so good when ripe. that?" sharply said the physician. is a good substitide for parsley butter. and return it to the stewpan until well heated.

PUFF-PASTE. set it put to it in a tin pan or on the ice Sift get hard. cut one third of the remainder . but said nothing. Lay it between clean napkins. as the warmth of your hands will make the paste heavy. cut the butter in four equal parts.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. butter in cold water to extract the work it well with a all broad wooden spoon in order to get out the water. one pound Wash your salt. your flour in a pan. plate. DESSERT. 258. of flour. One pound of butter. Add to the flour as much dough. his principle disputed 257 responded the lad. gently cold water as will make it a stifi* Turn it out on your pie-board. cut one fourth in very small pieces in the flour. eyes. her !^^ by a mere boy. roll it into sheets. ''A cucumThe doctor winked his PIES PUDDINGS. but do not touch it. but do not let it freeze.

258 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. out into a sheet thinner in the centre pie. The butter should be of the . of the butter into small pieces and lay over it. it. and bake in a tolerably quick oven. be The flour for pastry should be of It should the whitest and finest quality. PASTRY. as the moisture and it warmth of the hand makes heavy. roll out again. mixed with a broad knife. set now be on the ice. size you wish with whatever you choose. fold it over. sprinkle on it a very little flour. 259. roll out again. and put on the It should remainder of the butter. but should not come in contact with roll it When it is perfectly cold. and lay it put on a it little and fold as before. than at the edges of your a very sharp knife the Fill Cut it with it. in small pieces flour. cut one half of the is left butter which on.

take one pound of common lump it.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. lay it in the with only as much syrup as will . 260. and simmers shake the pan often over the It will fire. greens. put the rhubarb into as it with a tablespoonful of water. For a quart basin heaped. as if taste. and then take tart dish. the washed out of are Iron. it away RHUBARB PIE. plates the best for baking Always use cold water (in summer cannot in a cool iced water) to mix pastry. sugar . . all it is 259 it a little rancid will To make salt puflf-paste. best quality. the thin skin cut as them into so pieces about an inch long. turn yellow at first. it but keep it very gently doing until it off. When cold. or block-tin pastry. OR TART. and peel Take the off stalks from the leaves. and you do sprinkle a little fine sugar into the basin. and if it be baked immediately set place. it should have it.

pan. inquired of him whether he shaved as a reproach to nature for having made him a man and not a woman. cut them water. very moist. 261. however. Its absence was at first. if not. Diogenes. little more may be added.260 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Cover the stewfire. the water which adheres them a will be sufficient to cook ^ them . the dish Quarter the crust. Pare and core your apples. regarded as a mark of effeminacy. Many persons think the flavor of the rhubarb injured by taking off the peel. and was adopted only by low persons and fops. and throw them into cold of the water If the apples to Then take them out and put them into a stewpan. and with custard or cream. TO PREPARE APPLES FOR PIES. and place them near the Let . in slices. are tender. one da}^ meeting a man with a smoothly-shaven chin. is Put a light crust over tart will be fill and when that baked the done enough. it make it. The fashion of shaving the beard was introduced into Greece about the time of Alexander the Great.

and nutmeg to the taste. asked him. " is that An A all ?" So. Cover with brown. sugar. with a butter. " because you were not hanged. he quickly sympathized with the boy. you young dog. and the rind of a lemon grated. Then add a layer of pounded sugar. pie. Prepare the apples as for a dish. "because it has just come to my remembrance that m}^ poor grandmother died this day twelvemonth. " Only. the same day your grandmother died I" APPLE TART WITH aUINCE. " Phoo. little water.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 262. rose water. who. pufF-pasie." said he." said the other." said he. When they get nearly cold. then mash them^ and add half an ounce butter to each pint of the stewed apples. and and pour them on the apples. gentleman that sat by asked him why he wept. and bake to a light . why he wept? "Plague on you. with a malicious sneer. putting a bit into his mouth. whipping a large piece into his mouth. 261 them stew of till they are soft. add sugar. burnt it so that the tears ran down his cheeks. ajDple and lay them in Then stew two quinces. arch boy being at a table where there was a piping hot apple pie. seeing his eyes brim full. and burst.

262 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and pour a nice custard . put in a layer of apples sugar and —then sugar— another layer of the pot is until full. while hot. line a pot with paste. arrange them around the of a China bowl. and. 264. Pour in a little water. is brown and the apples and dish it with the side crust at the it. leaving an opening in the centre to allow the escape of the steam. the apples over the upper crust on the top. 263. and some apples Pare and slice some apples. APPLE POT PIE. cover the top with paste. bottom of the dish. Hang the or set it in an oven. pot over a slow fire. Place the fruit next to the pieces of crust. To be eaten with cream. and Avhen the crust soft. A NICE WAY TO SERVE THE REMAINS OF AN APPLE PIE. Cut the crust into triangular sides pieces.

A GENTLEMAN " friend. Calling One morning on a female was answered by the servant that she was not at home. roast 263 be de- Should the fruit or bake a few apples and place in the centre. into the centre. Then pare and them to some peaches. thrown off his guard by the unexpected gift. do not throw soap-suds. Bake it in a moderately hot oven. handing a card. "Yes. sugar fill your taste. and up the pot and cover the top with the paste. . ficient. " I will give it to her while you waitP^ PEACH POT PIE. give her this." said the lad. and giving the boy a sixpence. it and when cold serve with cream. Thank you.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. a paste Line the sides of a deep pot with made in the proportion of half a to slice pound of butter one pound of flour. Both ashes and soap-suds are manure for bushes and young plants. away good If you have a strip of land. 265. leaving an opening in the middle of the crust to permit the steam to escape while the pie is baking." said he.

on your pie-board. Stir it well with a knife. PASTE FOR DUMPLINGS WITHOUT "SHORTENING. to this flour enough to make dough flour lay a large cloth it. till Beat the potatoes and milk together they are very smooth . and cut it into pieces large enough to make one dumpling. and salt to taste. will be prosecuted according to law or any other nuisance. Boil about six good-sized potatoes. out. roll your dough put the apples in it. roll the crust up . add . Put into a pan as much flour as will make dough enough for the number of dumplings required." 266. Add a little salt.264 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." The meeting-house: CHEAP CRUST FOR DUMPLINGS. mash them with a teacupful of milk and a very small piece of butter. and pour over it as much boiling water as will make a soft dough. following notice appeared on the wall of a "Anybody sticking bills against this church. 267.

Bridget 'Flaherty the thing's so full of holes it's — no good at all !" DUMPLINGS MADE WITH APPLES. then lay the piece of crust a dish. to 265 the cloth. Cut a small piece off top of each dumpling. finely-shred lemon Then and apple in a portion of the puff-paste boil tie them close in separate cloths. and pour in some melted butter ." said a mistress to her Irish servant. roll it Make out a a good puff-paste crust. ma'am. it tie and put in boiling water. 268. it form one large dumpling. half. on again and . and core . I's jist after giving it to my sister's own cousin.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. them with an apple scoop with fill the opening sugar. place the dumplings in sift fine sugar over them. peel. Boil about an hour and a " Bridget. and thicker than little a silver dollar. . " Where's the cullender?" "An' sure. them the about one hour. roll ground cinnamon. Pare some large apples. fine and each .

the perpendicular height of each boy's mouth from the ground being five feet ? APPLE DUMPLINGS. take out the cores. being seated at dinner opposite to a silent gentleman with a high forehead. Coleridge. boil Tie them in cloths. 1. theorized himself into an exalted opinion of that person's intellectual powers. A dish of apple dumplings having been placed before them. and Serve them till the apples are tender.266 Query. the apple. He was impatient to hear the stranger speak. when he did. the rigid features of the intellectual gentleman gradually rehixod from a smile to a grin and rub})ing his hand. with sugar and butter. just touches each of their watery mouths. butter to Make a paste of six ounces of a j)ound of flour. or molasses and Don't judge by Appearances. — Two boys " snatch-apple. when put in motion. Pare your apples. which is suspended from the ceiling b}^ a string. the area of the section described by the string and apple." in a amusing themselves at room thirteen feet high. Required. and in a right line between them. THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. and cover them with the paste. find that by standing twelve feet from each other. "Them's the jockeys for me!" — — . he would utter something profound and original. he exclaimed. 269. cream. His wish was presently fulfilled. feeling almost certain that. No.

270. APPLE DUMPLINGS. Stone carefully one pound of best wash and pick one pound of currants. take enclose the apple a lump of the proper in it. Pare and core your apples or it clean some rice. until the rice is soft. size. quinces . 271. then in the rice.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL^ 267 2. BTTMPLINGS WITHOUT PASTE. . " The best vegetable pill an apple dumpling . roll it Tie each dumpling in a cloth. but do not wet Dip each apple or quince in water. up the centre with a mixture of butter and sugar. in a clean dry cloth. 272. raisins. and fill Scoop out the cores of the apples. by rubbing it. No." is RICH PLUM PUDDING. for curing a gnawing at the stomach it may be relied upon. Make a nice paste. and boil the dumplings in nets in place of cloths. and boil them Miss Speckles says.

it of a proper consistence with that it Remember must not be made too thin. or the fruit will sink to the bottom. suet. mixed spice quarter of a pound of moist sugar should be put into a basin. mixed together in a basin. and make milk. and allowed to stand three or four hours before the pudding is . chop very small one pound of fresh beef blanch and chop small. but be made to the consistence of good thick batter. with the pudding. with eight eggs. and add quarter of an ounce of . mix the whole sifted well together. two ounces of sweet almonds and one ounce of bitter ones. Two wineglassfuls of brandy should be poured over the fruit and spice. and well beaten together with a threestir this pronged fork. before it is mixed two with the flour. ounces each of preserved citron. with flour. orange and lemon peel. one pound of w^eight of and the same crumb of bread soaked i» milk. or pound. stir then squeeze dry and with a spoon until reduced to a mash.268 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Cut in small pieces.

and boiled for three hours. sift loaf sugar over the top. so much flour and a given quantit}^ of raisins to be beaten up together. will be found a great improvement. filled In addition have a metal sauce-boat set it with brandy. When done. to the wine-sauce. ordered a piece of roast beef. and pour a portion of slice in a flame It upon each of pudding. stirring them occasionally. alight it on the table. will be equally good. with the rest of the gentlemen who were in a public capacity at the same court. he gave them a receipt. it and with wine sauce in a boat. and will take five hours of constant boiling. The beef was easily cooked. determined on one gala day to have each of them a dish dressed after the manner of their respective countries. first came the French ambassador's dish then that of the Spanish am. and some poured round the pudding. but the court cooks not knowing how to make a plum pudding. 269 It made. — 17 . and Lord Paget. " So many eggs. used in the same proportion. for the honor of England. When the late Lord Paget was ambassador at Constantinople. so much milk. and a plum pudding. The pudding will be of considerable size. he. must be tied in a cloth. but half the quantity of materials." When dinner was served up. turn it out on a serve dish.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

half a pound of sugar. and add a of rum or brandy. and in five gallons drels have boiled it without one of water. half a pound of suet. ' bassador and next. half a pound of currants. the grated peel of a lemon. potatoes." " I forgot the bag. and a little milk stiff. two ounces peel. "Room for the English " By Jove. two fellows bearing a tremendous pan." It was a noble mess of plum broth. glass if too Boil for five hours." cried his lordambassador's dish. of candied lemon two ounces of citron. 273. too. Mix all well together. Take a coffee cup full of mashed and one of carrots. which must add to these be boiled and mashed apart half a pound of flour. . These quantities make a very large pudding. and these stupid scounship. — — A DELICIOUS PLUM PUDDING WITHOUT EGGS.270 THE FAMILY SAVE ALL. and bawling. . half a pound of raisins. and mixed spice to your taste. ten bitter almonds.

mix them for well together. also. some ." plate for this pudding ?" " Yes sir. A NICE WAY OF WARMING AND SERVING COLD PLUM PUDDING. Se}-ve in a mould three with wine or brandy sauce. was asked: "Are you the lad who took my " Bless me. and inventions sprung but from that same pudding? What is poetry but a pudding of words. A GENTLEMAN dining at a hotel where servants were few and far between despatched a lad among them for a plate of pudding.ALL. and hours. plots. sugar. poems. cur. and bread-crumbs and half a pint of milk boil . — AN EXCELLENT SUBSTITUTE FOR PLUM PUDDING AT SMALL EXPENSE. and fry them Fry.THE FAMILY SAVE. and whence have all rhymes. " how you have grown " . suet. raisins. 275. following ingredients rants. 271 The head of man is like a pudding." resumed the hungry wit. Cut the pudding into thin in butter. Take four ounces of each of the . 274. After a long time the lad returned. slices. and placing it before the hungrj^ gentleman. Hour.

drank off the contents of his vessel. . and on the outside. Powder all serve with pudding sauce in a tureen. the baked coating of the pudding.: . Remove dish. by and by Or. 272 fritters. and who felt called upon to take every thing set before him. placing the slices of pudding around with sugar. the musical composer. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. . rmfor na mail' cauld ivater . na. ayiy other reason why. and spread the remainder nicely Over the pudding pour a jelly or and add a few lumps of fruit. Aldrich. . preserved Dr. 270. when the butler put down another but the laird turned to him saying. Or lest we should be. An old gentleman who had never before seen finger glasses. " Na. fol- . upon a custard. and pile them in the centre of the dish. John.'" TO SERVE COLD RICE PUDDING. gave the lowing rhymed reasons for sitting after dinner Good wine a friend or being dry.

273 AN EXCELLENT PUDDING OF 277." quoth young hopeful. "can you eat that large piece of pudding with impunity?" "I don't know. stale PIECES OF STALE BREAD. "Johnny. Etc. who was evidently eating immoderately. " but 1 know I can with a spoon /" . and two teaspoonfuls of fresh ground cinnamon .. and mix with it half a pound of flour. just to keep the bread off under the water. 'ma. in plenty of water. and bake it for two hours. a quarter of currants which have been of a pound cleaned. Or it may be tied in a clean floured cloth. set in boiling water. with a plate laid on the top of them. half of a pound of sugar." said a doting mother to her son. of stale toast. next morning pour and squeeze out all the superfluous water then well mash the pieces of bread. Soak two pounds of pieces of dry or pieces bread. put the pudding into it. four ounces of suet chopped fine. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. then grease the inside of a baking dish with a bit of suet. and boiled for the same time. with a plate at the bottom. all night.

279. pick them into dish. three eggs. to the taste. Boil the milk. BREAD PUDDING. one currants. sauce. cover them with milk peel. One half of a four cent baker's gill one quart of milk. Stand away to Beat the eggs. bread. 278. to find happiness in a complete alienation from society. it half an hour in a moderate it Serve with or without sweet A WOMAN must have either a very good or a very bad conscience. put them fire on a gentle until the crumbs are well . add some cinnamon.274 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. loaf. and flour the currants. slice of dried Sugar the it. and grated nutmeg. lemon Take a pint of bread crumbs and . Wash. Put it pudding and bake oven. and pour it the boiling milk over cool. and add them and the sugar when the milk is cool. and in a stir the mixture. FRENCH BREAD PUDDING.

they will be quite soddened then take them and pull them in halves. and boil it an hour." the boy replied. or . cut. nine or ten years of age. with a view of ascertaining whether the bo3^ was sensible of the nature and importance of an oath. was called After the as a witness at a late trial at Cambridge. half a pound of currants. addressed him " Little bo3^ do you know what you have been doing?" *'Yes. LITTLE boy. boil five minutes . 280. beat the crumbs and milk well together. soaked. Having some stale muffins. oath was administered. make pudding of them in the following manner. or they will become close Pour over the halves of the . the chief justice. two ounces of sugar." : A A VERY NICE PUDDING.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. MADE FROM STALE MUFFINS. Banvard.5 Take out the cinnamon and lemon-peel. and let them up. They must not be and heavy. "I have been keeping pigs for 3Ir. 27. one ounce of butter. not more. add four eggs well beaten. Put them into a pot of boiling water.

mash the bread. Serve with . it Pour the mixture into a it pudding sweeten to the taste and the into some nutmeg. and serve. a knife muffins together and spread some of the same kind of preserve on the top of each over that.. pour some more sweet sauce. milk. in at- tempting hard words. dish. pour over them some boiling When soft. any other kind of put the pre- With again. asked for one lined with emanuel. A PUDDING FROM FRAGMENTS OF BREAD. some jam. being about to purchase a saucepan. Put some pieces of stale bread into a pan. famed for her frequent failures. 276 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. as she preferred it for cooking. sweet sauce previously pre- muffins some pared. gradually three eggs well beaten and enough milk to make grate a batter. 281. A COOK. Bake it pudding in a quick oven. or serve. and to stir in each pint of the bread.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

277

wine sauce, or

if

in season, with strawberries

or peaches well sugared.

TO SEND BOILED RICE TO THE TABLE IN THE FINEST CONDITION.

282.
Have

Soak

it for

seven hours in cold
has been added.

water, to which a

little salt

a stew-pan ready, containing boiling
rice,

water, into which put the soaked
boil it briskly for ten minutes.
it

and

Then pour
fire to

into a colander, set
it

it

by the

drain,

and serve
rate

up.

The

grains will be sepa-

and very

large.

Rice should be pre-

pared for puddings in this w^ay.

Be attentive to your neighbor at the dinner-table pass him what he requires and if he should unwittingly make an ill-natured remark, pass that also.
;
;

GLAZED RICE.

283.
soft,

Boil

some
it

rice in

a bag

till

quite
but-

then mash

fine

and add a

little

2/8
ter

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

and sugar

to the taste,
to

with enough rich
as thick as

milk or cream
nion batter.
dish,

make
it

it

com^

Turn

out in a deep baking
it

and

after
it

smoothing

over on the top,

spread over
first

the yolk of an egg which has
light, set
it

been beaten
as

in the oven,
it

and as soon

it is

brown, serve

with any

kind of sweet sauce, or with sugar and
cream.

When a newly-married woman was brought to the house of her husband, she was compelled by the Athenian law to carry with her 2i frying-pan in token of good housewifery.
,

RICE BALLS.
.

284.

Boil

some milk and thicken
flour,

it

with some rice

mixed with cold water.
to
boil, stir

When

the

milk begins

in

as as

much of the rice flour mixed as above, will make the whole about as thick as
custard.

a

When

sufficiently

boiled,

add a

small piece of butter and a

little salt.

Wet

;

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL,

279

your custard cups,
ture,

fill

them with the mix-

and when cold turn them out on a
and serve with sugar and cream,
sauce.

large dish,

or

any sweet

A GENTLEMAN meeting his coal merchant, the other day, inquired whetlier it was proper to lay in " Coal is coal now, sir," said the his winter fuel. merchant. To which his customer replied, " I'm very glad to hear it, for the last you sent me was
all slate."

GROUND RICE PUDDINGS.
285.
rice
gill

Moisten two
gill

ounces

of

ground

with half a

of
;

new
stir

milk, and add a
fire

of boiling milk

over the

for

ten minutes, then let

it

get cold.

Beat two

ounces of fresh butter to cream; beat three
fresh

eggs

;

mix

these well into the rice

add the grated rind of half a lemon and
three ounces of sifted loaf sugar.

Beat the
butter
six

mixture for twenty minutes;
small moulds
each,
;

put an equal quantity into
quick oven
about

and bake in a

;

280

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.
Serve immediately, with

eighteen minutes.

loaf sugar sifted over.
"

tress at
''

Master at home ?" home?" "No
I'll

I'm dripping wet,

sir, he's out." " Mis" Then as she's out." step in and sit by the fire."

"

No,

sir,

ThaV6

out too, air P'

A VERY NICE AND CHEAP

DISH.
rice (after
;

286.
soft,

Boil one

pound of good

being well washed) in plenty of water

when
The

add one ounce of butter, and

stir it in

then add one tablespoonful of sugar.
rice should not be boiled in
it

more water than
six apples,

will absorb.

Peel and slice
;

take out the core and pips

put them in a

stew-pan with
tender, and

a

little
;

water;

stew until

mash them

add a quarter of a
to

pound of

butter,

and sugar

the taste.
;

When

done, place the rice on a dish
it,

form

a hole in the midst of

in

which place the
for sauce a little

mashed apple

;

have ready

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.
cream, nutmeg and sugar ; pour
rice,
it

281
over the

and

serve.

Why
bell
?

does the cook make more noise than the Because one makes a din, but the other a

dinner !

PORTUGUESE SWEET RICE.

287.

Wash

three ounces of rice,

and

boil it in a pint

and a quarter of new milk,

and a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar and
a laurel
half).
leaf, till

quite soft (an hour and a
leaf,

Take out the

and

let
;

the rice

stand off the
in,

fire for five

minutes

then

stir

by degrees, four fresh
gill

eggs, well beaten,
Stir over
let it stand,

and half a
the

of thick cream.

fire till at boiling stir it

heat
till

;

then

and
it

occasionally

nearly cold.

Put

into a glass dish (or a pie dish),
in

and stand
Just

it

a cold

place
sift

for

two hours.

before serving,

over the surface a tea-

spoonful

of
dust.

powdered cinnamon or burnt

almond

282

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

Forget not thy helpless iiifanc}' nor the forwardness of th3^3^outh; indulge the infirmities of thy aged parents, and assist and support them in the decline of life.

BOILED RICE PUDDING.

288.
it

Take a

pint of whole rice, steep

in a pint of boiled

milk over night

;

in the

morning, take half a pound of beef suet,
shred
fine,

and mix with the

rice

and milk,
salt,

some grated nutmeg, and a

little

with

the yolks and whites of three eggs, a quarter of a

pound of currants, a quarter of a
as

pound of raisins, and
sweeten
close,
it;
stir

much

sugar as will
tie
it

well together,

very

and

boil

two hours.

To

be

served

with any kind of sweet sauce.

Fun is the most conservative element of society, and ought to be cherished and encouraged by all
People never plot mischief wlien lawful means. they are merry. Laughter is an enemy to malice,
It a fool to scandal, and a friend to ever}' virtue. promotes good temper, enlivens the heart and Let us laugh wlien we can ijrightens the intellect.

THE FAMILY SAVE- ALL.

28e3

RICE PUDDING WITH FRTTIT.

289.
very
little

Put your
milk
;

rice in a stew-pan,
is,

with

that

to
it

one cup of rice

one

gill

of milk.
;

Stand

where

it

will be

hot, but not boil
all

when
it

the rice has absorbed

the milk, add to

a quarter of a pound

of dried currants, and one egg, well beaten.
Boil
it
it

in a

bag

till

the rice

is

tender,

and
fruit

serve

with sugar and cream.
if it

More

may

be added to the rice

should be pre-

ferred.

house.

Leslie dined one day with Lamb at a friend's Returning to town in the stage coach, which was filled with the returning guests, they stopped for a minute or two at Kentish Town. A woman stepped toward the door and said. " Are Upon which Lamb put his head 3^ou full inside ?" through the window and said, " I am quite full that last piece of pudding of Mr. Gillan^s inside did the business for me/"
;

EICE FRITTERS.

290.

Wash,
;

drain,

and dry three ounces
into a sauce-pan with

of the best rice

put

it

;;

284

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

three ounces of sugar, the thin rind of half

a lemon, an inch of cinnamon, and nearly a
pint of milk
;

boil

(stirring frequently) for
;

three quarters of an hour

then rub through

a fine wire sieve.

Beat three fresh eggs,

yolks and whites separately ; add the yolks
beat for ten minutes
;

then add the whites
;

beat five minutes more
(in

then fry in butter
till

a small omelet pan)

of a golden
fire
;

color on both sides.
sift

Drain before the

fine

loaf sugar over,

and serve on a

neatly folded napkin.
Note. The quantity given will make five fritters three quarters of an ounce of butter will be required
for each.

Wrong none by

doing

injuries, or

omitting the

benefits that are our duty.

RICE FRITTERS.

291.

Boil a quarter of a

pound of

rice
is

in a quart of rice milk.
perfectly
soft,

When
it

the rice

remove

from the

fire.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

285

When
as

cold,

add six eggs well beaten, and

much

flour as will

make

a batter.
it

Have
a large
fritter.

ready a pan of hot lard, drop into

spoonful of the batter to form each

Serve with wine sauce, or sugar and cream.
Idleness is the parent of want and of pain the labor of virtue bringeth forth pleasure.
:

but

PARADISE PUDDING.

292.
a

Six moderately-sized apples, and

quarter of a pound of beef suet finely a

chopped,

quarter of
eight

a

pound of

fine

crumbs of bread,
sugar, the

ounces of moist

grated

rind and strained juice

of a Seville orange, the eighth part of a

nutmeg
and

grated, four fresh eggs, and a table-

spoonful of rum.

Mix
a a

these

ingredients,
for ten

beat

with

wooden spoon
basin,

minutes.

Butter
tie

put
it

in

the

mixture,
18

a cloth over, put

into fast-

boiling water,

and

boil

rapidly for

three

286
hours

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

—or bake

in a moderate oven for an

hour and a

half.

Serve with cream.

COOL RETORT. Ilenderson, the actor, was selto be in a passion. When at Oxford, he was one day debating with a furious fellowstudent, who threw a glass of wine in his face. Mr. Henderson cooll}" took out his handkerchief, wiped his face, and said, " That, sir, was a digres-

A

dom known

sion,

now

for the arsrument."

APPLE PUDDING.

293.

Half a pound of mashed apple,

half a pound of butter, half a pound of
sugar, G^ve eggs, half a nutmeg,

two

table-

spoonfuls of brandy,
ferred.

or

rosewater

if
;

pre-

Peel the apples and core them
in

cut

them
very

small

pieces,
till

and stew them in
soft.

little

water

they are
to free

Pass

them through a
lumps.

sieve

them from
;

Beat the butter and sugar smooth
to it
;

whisk the eggs, and add

then

stir in

the apples (which should be half a pound

when mashed), brandy
nutmeg.

or rosewater,

and

Cover your pie plates with a rich

THE FAMILY SAVE- ALL.
crust,

287
These

and bake

in a

moderate oven.

are very rich.
%

Avoid extremes forbear resenting much as you think they deserve.
;

injuries so

SWISS APPLE PUDDING.

294.

Line a deep dish with

a

rich

paste, put in a layer of sliced

apples, over

which sprinkle some sugar, then add another layer of apples and sugar until the
dish
is

full.

Cover the top with

crust,

leaving a large opening in the centre.
in a spoonful or

Pour
in

two of water, and bake

a moderate oven.

Peaches are very good

prepared in the same manner.
Captain Marryat expressed the opinion, in his book of American Travels, that a British army of thirty thousand men could walk from one end of We guess the}^ would frethe Union to the other. quently " break," like some trotting horses, into a
run.

288

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

GUERNSEY PUDDING.
295.
Peel, core,

and quarter six mode-

rate-sized apples.

Put them into a saucepan

with half a pound of loaf sugar^ the thin
rind of a lemon, two
cloves,

an inch of
a

cinnamon, the
grated,

sixth

part

of

nutmeg

and a wineglassful of white wine.
and
stir
till

Boil fast,

they become a rich
spice

marmalade; then take out the
peel,

and

and put the apples in a basin
three ounces of the best

to cool.

Wash
milk;

rice,

and

boil twenty-five

minutes in a pint of new
rice

drain;

sweeten the

with two

ounces of sifted sugar.

Cut into shreds six
beat five

ounces of mixed candied peel;
fresh
eggs,
all

whites and yolks separately.
ingredients
together,

Mix

the

adding

the whites
,

(well frothed) last.

Beat ten

minutes.

Make

a puff paste, line a plain

mould, put in the mixture, and bake in a

i

moderate oven

an hour

and a quarter.

Turn out

carefully,

and

serve.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

289

BREAD AND APPLES-RUSSIAN FASHION.

296.
into

Make

a syrup of one pound and

a half of sugar and one pint of water.
the

Put

syrup twenty-four
it

good

apples*,

peeled and sliced, and keep
it

stirred until

becomes a thick marmalade.

Put

it
it

into

a mould until quite cold, then turn

out

upon

a

dish

;

have a few spoonfuls of

currant jelly melted over the fire; add a
glass of

rum, and when partly cold pour

over,

and serve with whipped cream in the

centre, flavored with orange.

Furnish thyself with the proper accommocjsttioiis belonging to thy condition; yet spend not to the utmost of what thou canst afford, that the providence of thy youth may be a comfort to thy old age.

FRENCH COMPOTE OF APPLES.
297.
boiled,

Boil

one

pound of

rice

(well

washed) in plenty of water.

When

well

add one ounce of butter, and

stir it

round

;

then add one tablespoonful of sugar.

Peel. and improved the rice flavor. place the . which pour over the rice. the greatest The greatest truths are the simplest. and serve. Stew until all is tender. put them in a stew-pan. and slice twenty fine melt a quarter of a pound of fresh and stir in it half a pound of sugar. apples butter. men and women are sometimes so too. APPLE MIROTON. quantity of sauce. butter and sugar. Have ready a small made with a little cream. together with a beet-root little butter The ought to have given a nice pink color to the apples. . which is ready on a dish form a well or hole in the midst of the rice. in which place the apple. with six slices of beet-root and a pint of water. Peel and slice six apples. core. When done.290 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. . rice it The than should not be boiled in more water will consume. yv. ^ ^^ • 298. Mash them up and sugar. take out the core and pips.

as will fill Peel and core apples of the choicest kind. ma'am." said an old lady to a very pompous-looking old gentleman who was talking loudly about steam power. 299. stew in their syrup as many the dish. ah steam is eh? ah steam is steam!" "I knew that chap couldn't tell ye. would First. and powder with sugar. what is steam?" "Steam." said a rough-looking fellow standing by.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. sir. to have it well quarrels. Fry the apples in a dish. " Pray. is. Cover the dish with a thin . and make a marmalade of the rest. ''but steam is a buckat of water in a — — 1 — — !" I — tremendous perspiration APPLES BUTTERED. Quarrels. sir. " Pray. 291 the peel of one lemon grated. prevent —Two many . layer of this. well considered. and serve them Definition of Steam. things. marmalade place the apples on with a . Bake in the oven to a pale brown color. in this mixture. and the juice of two. bit of butter in the heart of into each lay the rest of the marmalade the vacancies.

and stew them with half a pound of sugar. to examine whether that on which we differ is worth contending about. and little bake or stew them with as water as and enough sugar soft. When the apples are put them into a till pie dish. one ounce of butter. the . a warm welcome. will not often dine with the great. rather than things and secondly. Peel. . 300. This may be eaten either hot or cold. ascertained whether we are not disputing about terms. He ideas. then pour over them an unboiled custard. and set the dish into an oven or before the is fire until the custard thick. that likes a hot dinner. APPLES WITH CUSTARD. to sweeten them. new and old wine. possible. Pare and core some apples. and let them stand cold . and slice one dozen large-sized apples. APPLE CHARLOTTE.292 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. core. 301.

Beat together half a pound of sugar and half a pound of butter. Cover a deep dish with a rich paste. half a stick of cinna- mon. color. and cover the whole with a piece of bread dipped in clarified butter. turn and serve in a dish. inch thick. Whisk . 293 peel of one lemon. Bake brown it in a hot oven till it is of a pale out. and when done. Fill the space with the apple marmalade. Apple and Sarah Apple but we could see no impropriety in making the two apples into one pair ! . boiling Continue them until the mixture becomes a thick paste. and half a pint of water.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Line the bottom and side of a mould with thin pieces of bread dipped in clarified butter. over which spread raspberry or any Let the jam be spread an kind of jam. 302. BAKEWELL PUDDING. All the papers copied the marriage of Mr. Sometimes a name will excite a remark.

slip When baked them on plates for the table. Stir together three quarters of a butter. three eggs very light. . root in Mix four tablespoonfuis of arrowBoil in half a pint some cold milk. fine. and mixture. and add butter and sugar. them to the Pour the mixture over it the jam in the dish. and the same quantity of are when they beaten to a cream. fill them with the above and cool. place it. add a pound of potatoes mashed very seven eggs beaten very light.294 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. take four pie plates. Make a light paste cover. one gill of brandy and one of cream. in the oven and bake POTATO PUDDING. pound of sugar . cut the edges nicely. 304. ARROW-ROOT PUDDING. 303.

295 of milk a few bitter almonds or lemon peel. take them out and pour the hot milk over stir it the dissolved arrow-root. . When served. To be eaten with sugar. pour in the mixture and bake it. beaten to together. light Dissolve three tablespoonfuls of arrow-root in cold milk. butter This pudding is and wine. is be made as dinner put upon the table. a deep dish. ARROW-ROOT PUDDING. ornament the top with whole or sliced. and set it stir away them to get cold. 305. Beat five eggs and into the cold arrow-root with as much Butter sugar as will make it quite sweet. jelly or fresh fruit. Then pour the mixture into a pint of boiling milk and bake it.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. beat three eggs very and add to the milk.

Mix a pint of a pint of buttermilk. as he boasted having seen all the crowned heads of Europe. BUTTERMILK PUDDING. make a Bake the pudding . a salt. and enough flour to batter. and mix with little the curd some bread crumbs. pour in the above mixture. A young man who had travelled much. drain whey. Line your pie plates with rich paste. and bake in a rather quick oven. four eggs. thinking that they were some princes that bore that name. replied.296 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Once. new milk with half Turn it to a curd off the with some rennet. two ounces of but- ter.'' — SCOTCH PUDDING. " Of course I have seen them. a grated lemon peel. little Mix thin together one pint of milk. and three eggs well beaten. since I dined several times with them. 307. The royal Dardanelles. thought he could give as truth every thing that passed through his head. 306. somebody asked him: " Have you seen the Dardanelles too ?" The boaster. to Add sugar enough make it quite sweet.

stir into this one pound of and Lastly the whites of nine . about an hour. and cut it into strips about six or eight inches wide. fruit jam or roll marmalade. Some sugar. Roll the strips wrap the in a well floured for pudding cloth and boil it two or three hours according to the size of the pudding. CHESHIRE PUDDING. 309. some . Wine it. these strips Spread. 308. Make Roll it a good paste of flour and thin. butter. Beat together three quarters of a pound of sugar and three quarters of a pound of butter grated nut. on of paste. sauce or cream sauce may be served with COCOANUT PUDDING. . and stirred together are suitable for sauce.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. 297 butter.

the milk of the cocoanut. prepared as they were accustomed to at home. wished to have a sheep's head. three ounces^ of beef-marrow. Two-thirds of a cocoa-nut." replied he. . chopped. a quarter of a pint of new milk. BAKED COCOANTJT PUDDING. 310. a wineglass of brandy and two tablespoonfuls of rose-water. two fresh eggs. heat these ingredients well together butter a pie-dish . six ounces of any dried fruit. A Scotch familj^ removed to London. and the juice of a lemon . three ounces of dried crumbs of bread. ." " Go." said she." " There's plenty of them. and they can do naething as the}^ ocht. ." ." said he " who ever heard of a sheep's head that could " Why. eggs beaten to a froth. "choose which you will." said she to the to procure one. "it's ye that sing." replied she in wrath. and sent a servant to the butcher's " My gude man.298 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. " I want a sheep's head. 'that winna do I want a sheep's head that will sing (singe). butcher." are the idiot for sheejfs head in Scotland can sing : but I discover yer English sheep are just as grit fides as their owners. a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar. you idiot." " Na. grated.

one tablespoonful of rose-water. then stir in the grated nut and liquor. Upon this the judge remarked. half a glass of wine and brandy mixed. them with the mixture. 311. or a in a 299 mould . a quarter of a pound of cocoanut. in a . until he declared himself to be so '' BARRISTER once tormented a witness with quesexhausted that he could not proceed without a drink of water. you must have done with the witness now for you have A pumped him dry. and bake moderate oven about an hour and a quarter. fill Cover your pie plates with rich crust. Turn out carefully.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and bake moderate oven. may also be boiled it requires Serve with thick cream. the whites of six eggs. three ounces of butter. serve. sir. I think. Beat the butter and sugar smooth. This pudding three hours. and sugar sifted over. put in the pudding." / COCOANITT PUDDING. tions. and . whisk the eggs and add to it. A quarter of a pound of sugar.

it. one dozen ears of corn add to the corn one . a little an ounce of butter. stir the whole butter some white paper. drop in the mixture on small balls. Add salt. and bake them in a moderate oven. . beaten. 313. COCOANUT BALLS. one dozen ears of corn. and add the Whisk white of one egg very dry together. to this. No. 314. thy desponit so but he that persevereth . diflicult3\ CORN PUDDING. Grate No. 1. to make Bake the whole in a pudding CORN PUDDING. three eggs well. 2.300 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Score and cut off the grains from . dish. grate weight of sifted sugar. to it its Pare a cocoanut. dency shall make shall overcome all If thou believest a thing impossible. 312. and flour enough a ver^ thin batter.

the yolks of three eggs. half teaspoonful sugar. sir. half and four pint Indian meal. two or three eggs. quart of milk. the sugar and eggs together. and enough flour to make a thin batter. tablespoonfuls Boil one pint of the milk. "It's full on the bottom. stir in the meal while boiling. whole in a pudding dish INDIAN PUDDING 315. but there^s none at all on the top /" 19 . salt. as she came from the kitchen. and stir Beat cold when the whole thoroughly. for half Bake the an hour. Biddy?" inquired a gentleman of an Irish servant. To be eaten either "Is there much water in the cistern. JK Take one quart of sweet milk. and add the remainder of the milk.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. cook five minutes. a small quantity of piece 301 salt. hot or cold. a of butter the size of an ordinary walnut. and bake one hour in a deep dish.

and stir in three or four tablespoonfuls of brandy. A quarter of a pound of butter. and stir while boiling as much Indian meal mush. than overwhelm it with their contempt for they know that there was a period when even a Bacon or a Newton were superficial and that he who has a little knowledge. stir in four eggs. 317. On the contrary. . two table- . and two ounces of When it cool. Boil it as will make it into a salt. Superficial Knowledge. 316. pour in the above mixture. — PUMPKIN PUDDING. they would rather assist it with their advice. is far more likely to get more than he that has none. others. into it Boil a quart of milk. add as much sugar as required grate some nutmeg into it. INDIAN PUDDING. add some butter. sugar to the taste. is ten minutes.302 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. which should be first beaten very light. Line your pud- ding dishes with paste. The profoundl}^ wise do not declaim against superficial knowledge in — much as the profoiuidly ignorant. and bake them. eight eggs. so .

one evening. FRUIT PUDDING. His astonishment. 303 spoonfuls of brandy. He stood perfectlj' still. which held a piece of stick at one end of his mouth. one teaspoonful of grated nutmeg. two tablespoonfuls Butter a mould or small . and a salt. One quart of flour. was great. when he saw an old blind rat. Stew the pumpkin in very little water. A GENTLEMAN Walking out in some meadows. and the whole troop passed close to him. one pint of mashed pumpkin. add of melted butter. two spoonfuls little of good baking powder. which they are in the habit of doing. while another rat had hold of the other end of it. 318.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. mash the it fine. however. observed a great number of rats in the act of going from one place to another. and pumpkin cool enough. and add the other Bake in a light paste. Mix to the consistency of drop biscuit with cold milk or water. and add the butter to it whilst it is hot. one teaspoonful of cin- namon. eggs. In this way he was leading his blind companion. stir into Whisk the when it is ingredients.

" said he afterward. Pile the it cream on the top of the to the table. about to cut him down. up the Then whisk . and dish. some Line the bottom and sides of a Pare halves. the Highlanders' piper. ripe peaches. When the British entered Lucknow. suddenl}^ found one of the enemy's cavalry. peaches and send A Bright Idea. had been fired off. who had lost his way. . PEACH CHARLOTTE. a pint sweetened all cream is as the froth rises. filled. and steam an hour and sauce. which so bayonet. alternating them until the vessel is Cover tight. Eat with liquid This is excellent without either milk or eggs. when relating the story. and lay in it a layer of the batter. and he had no time to raise his — "A bright idea. cut them of in fill sprinkle sugar over them. " struck me all at once I seized my bag-pipes and gave forth a shrill tone.304 tin pail THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. then a layer of any kind of fresh small fruit. dish with slices of fresh sponge cake. take it off* till done. 319. . His rifle sabre in hand. a half.

Beat Whisk the a paste. the grated pound of yellow rind and juice of one lemon. 305 startled the fellow that he bolted like a shot. "If said a I am not at home to-night at ten o'clock. precisely. then stir in lemon juice and grated rind. may be added. a quarter butter. e^ddently imagining it was some infernal machine. and gave him a bit of her mind before a large company. . to flavor it. the butter and sugar to a cream. significantly. And what do you think she did ? At ten o'clock. my dear." "I won't. five eggs." husband to his better half." LEMON PUDDING. the eggs and add to it." replied the lady. ''don't wait for me. My pipes saved my life. of a Half a pound of sugar. Make cover your pie plate. Two tableif pre- spoonfuls of brandy ferred. and bake in a moderate oven. pour in the mixture.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. she slipped on her bonnet and went for him. 320.

Make a paste with six ounces of finely-chopped suet and three quarters of . 321. resolution was known. Butter a pan and put in a layer of the bread crumbs. who lived — . till she made the If the pudding was good.306 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. 322. Bake twenty minutes. seasoned with lemon peel and cloves. ped fine. she let ifollowing rule the cook have the remainder of it if it was not. - good Puddings. JAM ROLLED PUDDING. told us it was a long time before she could get them made uniforml}' good. poor little Bow-wow seldom got the sweet treat after. Continue the full. then one of apples and sugar mixed. GERMAN PUDDING. layers alternately until the pan is always putting the sugar and apples together. three good-sized apples cut up small. : How AN Old Lady secured An old gentlewoman. almost entirely on puddings. Quarter of a pound of suet chopquarter of a pound of bread crumbs. quarter of a pound of sugar. then one of suet. But as soon as this she gave it to her lap-dog.

and add sufficient milk to moisten the carefully rub down all lumps with a . it tie it in a cloth . one . — Crowd ten fashionably-dressed ladies into one stage coach. . put it into a pan of boiling water. Turn out six pieces. 307 roll it it out a quarter of an Spread over with half a pound of any kind of jam. one ounce of butter. roll up into the form of a bolster adhere .. without bending boil quickly for and an hour and three quarters. Good Jam. . THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. carefully. Put the flour into a it basin. of the paste all Wet it the edge round . press the edge to make it. lemon and currants. juice. may be used instead of jam for a change. of milk.pint flour. Marmalade. chopped apples. 323. cut the pudding into and serve the cut side uppermost. three tablespoonfuls of little a salt. BOILED BATTER PUDDING. a pound of flour inch thick. Three eggs.

spoon. add the eggs and a pinch of and when the batter is quite smooth. it When the latter used. keep beating the salt. put it into a well-buttered basin. There was a delicious pudding. tie tightly. which should be previously melted . gentleman had just A . tlien pour in the remainder of the milk. and serve with sweet sauce. and put it into boiling Move the is basin about for a few minutes after it put into the water. to prevent the flour settling in any part. when boiled in a Send these puddings very quickly to table. down very water. and stir in the butter. QuiN was at a small dinner party. stewed or jam of any kind. of which the master of the house begged him to partake. a little of may be placed round the dish in small quantities as a garnish. is sauce. wine fruit. also be This pudding may boiled in a floured cloth that has been wetted in hot water — it will then take a few minutes less than basin.308 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. mixture. and boil for one hour and a quarter.

boil them twenty minutes in the third of a pint of new milk. looking first at the gentleman's plate and then at the dish. well cleaned and These will sink to the lower part of the pudding and blacken the surface. his cue. no finds himself. to it Make it is a thin light batter. is never perplexed.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. *' Pray. and two ounces of sweet almonds. and stir just before poured into the cloth. 309 before helped himself to ai^ immense piece of it. a sweet sauce. matter where he He always has A PUDDING FOR A PRINCE." said Qiiin. Send it to table with It is said that a Chinaman. and dish it with the dark side uppermost. half a dried. 324. pound of currants. then . "which is the pudding?" BLACK-CAP PUDDING. Blanch six bitter. 325. Boil it the usual time.

and steam over fast-boiling water for an hour and three quarters.310 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. one dessertspoonful dissolved . stick round in Vandykes with tie it dried cherries." replied the king. pound them When the milk is nearly cold. said she." ''That COLLEGE PUDDING. Mix." me badly. Butter a mould. to one pint of milk. Serve with sauce. to a paste. to Frederick the Great. a salt. "Your majesty. dients well. none of your business I" A LADY made a complaint king of Prussia. over with writing paper spread with butter." he replied. "That. "is of 2/ow. little Four eggs.these ingre. "my is none of my husband treats " But he speaks ill business. flour make a rather of thin batter." said the lady. 326. add four well-beaten fresh eggs. and two table. half a gill of thick cream. and beat for ten minutes in stir two ounces of it sifted loaf sugar. spoonfuls of brandy rub six ounces of stale sponge-cake to crumbs. pour in the mixture.

the eggs very light. currants. Beat the whole very hard for ten or fifteen minutes. and The then batter must not be thick. sufficiently to incorporate them with Lastly. and each ten ounces . suet. grated potatoes and carrots. in an and bake it oven about is as hot as for bread. sugar. one nut- meg and two ounces of candied orange peel. . milk.THE FAMILY carbonate of ammonia. Do are not beat the in. together ten ounces. stir in gently the whites of the egg. pour in the mixture. Butter well a cake mould or iron pan. This pudding sauce. RAILWAY PUDDING. S AYE-ALL. of Flour. raisins. add the flour. add the ammonia. very nice with wine or lemon it Cream sauce may be served with if preferred. batter it after the whites only stir it. which should have been whisked very dry. 327. 311 Beat the yolks of salt.

a little salt allspice. This should be put into a greased It pudding mould and boiled two hours. rather than to acknowledge with gratitude the blessings by which they are more than counterbalanced. of suet chopped fine. and make it the consistence of a pudding for boiling by stirring in molasses. may be served up either with or without sweet sauce. and all flour. 328. a quarter pound of raw carrots. fuls will About two tablespoonit be enough. There murmur exists in human nature a disposition to at the disappointments and calamities incident to it. and boiled for several hours. or may require rather more. scraped. To be served with brandy sauce. A quarter pound of raw potatoes. scraped. a quarter pound of currants. mixed together. and and the same quantity. each. . ENGLISH MOLASSES PUDDING.312 well THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Mix these well together.

VICTORIA'S PUDDING. three ounces of beef marrow. and his whole garment of nothing but fringes. let it stand in a cool place for an hour again for ten minutes. chopped.. and beat them briskly for ten minutes. 329. and three fresh eggs . and half. ounces of loaf sugar. put it beat into a mould rubbed well with butter. Three ounces of stale French roll in fine crumbs. put it into plenty of boiling water. then . 313 For a man to make mere recreations his main actions and grand employments. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. half a pint of milk. two ounces of sweet almonds. two blanched and pounded. mix these ingredients. and tastefully stuck with dried cherries or raisins (stoned) tie a cloth over. is full as foolish and unreasonable as if he should make all his diet of physic and sauces. one ounce of baked flour. half an ounce of ratafias. boil fast for two hours and a .

AN EXCELLENT FAMILY PUDDING OF COLD POTATOES. The proof of a pudding is in the eating the and proof of a woman is in making the pudding the proof of a man is in being able to appreciate . A little peach marmalade. then beat up eggs with a pint of good milk. ETC. or any kind of jam or preserves may be eaten with it. with water. or twelve middle-sized . 331. 330. WITH EGGS. half of the dripping to be little salt well rubbed into the flour.. with a then. bruise them through a colander with a wooden spoon. 314 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. A SAVORY OR SWEET DRIPPING PUDDING. roll it work into a stiff* paste out thin. Take some cold potatoes. and add the remainder of . and stir in the potatoes —the bake proportion of eggs to potatoes should be four eggs to six large potatoes . . both. sugar and season to taste half an hour. ounces of Six ounces of dripping to twelve flour.

When. you feel disposed to ask. then fold it it 31 thinly over the roll it over. mix these ingredients thoroughly together. " Is there any harm in doing this ?" pray answer it by asking yourself another. and add a wineglassful of brandy. and half a nutmeg .ALL. THE FAMILY SAVE. put it into a basin to boil as a set it in boiling water. and out again. . 332. crumb of about half a pound of bread beat six eggs into a froth shred some orange-peel. and some citron to taste . and then work into a round pudding . molasses. boiled Pick the meat from three wellcalf's feet . for and continue two hours. or sugar. it fine with half a pound of fresh beef suet the grate . the dripping by spreading paste. repeat the process. and cleaned chop .S . This may be eaten sweet pudding. " Is there any harm in letting it alone V PUDDING OF CALF'S FEET. with jam. in a case of doubtful morality.

" It is better to wear out than rust out. and as custard. boil in a cloth for three hours serve with sweet sauce. it and have be only out of the oven long enough to eaten. nutmeg It and wine or rose water. their power of cheering us when old. All the influence which women enjoy in society. quite then add five eggs well beaten. needs no sauce. water. 316 grated . depends so entirely upon their personal purity. being told by some of his friends that he would wear himself out by intense application. the wholesome restraint which they possess over the passions of mankind. may be made as sweet The tapioca needs washing first Bake it in a buttered dish.. soft Soak in a quart of water eight it is tablespoonfuls of tapioca. 333. in cold to your taste. that to insinuate a doubt of its real value is wilfully to remove the broadest cornerstone on which civil society rests." . THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. with all its benefits and all its comforts. until . warm when Bishop Cumberland. replied in the words of Bacon. TAPIOCA PUDDING.

chopped. and six bitter almonds. half a pound of sweet 20 . four tea- cupfuls of flour. the butter. 335.THE FAMILY SAVE. and with wine sauce. beaten to paste. thy heart shall not reproach thee. imputed unto thee for wisdom . and if thou wipest them from thy remembrance. serve it and a teaspoonful in a Bake the pudding mould. which instead of water. a quarter of a pound of mixed candied peel. it AMSTERDAM PUDDING. clarified by boiling in the juice of two oranges. a quarter of a pound of raisins. half a pound of loaf sugar. same quantity of of soda. 334. half a pound of fresh cream. shall be If thou bearest slight provocations with patience. Half a pound of sweet. one of brown sugar.ALL. stoned and chopped. Mix together four eggs. may be made with milk. blanched and pounded to a butter. 317 SODA PUDDING.

and lay in the almond mixture and is fruit in alternate layers till all used up . consist of the saving and judicious use of waste matter. cotton. and made to administer consolation to the afflicted. washed and rubbed dry.of a pound of apples. These rags are carefully collected and after having served the inferior purpose of clothing the body. paste. currants.3i8 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. they are made instrumental in adorning the mind. and courage to the fearful. chopped. Turn out carefully and serve. half a pint of thick cream. the cream eggs. butter. half a pound of orange marmalade. hot or cold. spirit. soft . Paper is merely the refuse linen. . . and beat all till in a smooth. in a great measure. a wineglassful of Schiedam. and tow of the rags of society. and six fresh eggs well beaten. The arts of life. the left-off clothes of the rich and the poor. They are translated from the temporal to the spiritual sphere they are invested with hol3' orders. and Mix the almonds. Mix the fruit together add the But- remainder of the sugar and the ter a tin cake mould. half of the sugar. a quarter . bake in a moderate oven about two hours.

and boil rapidly two hours. grated. beat four fresh mix these ingredients together. 336. Serve with the following : sauce in the dish Dissolve three ounces of . stir it over the fire for ten minutes get cold. it Muscadel put in the pudding. . raisins. add the sixth part of a nutmeg. then turn Stone and into a basin to mince two ounces of Muscadel raisins. wash and rub dry two ounces of currants and one ounce of sultana eggs. chopped. over a gentle when nearly boil- ing. a wineglassful of rum. stick raisins. and fire . and the grated rind of mto an enamelled saucepan. one ounce of flour. chojD two ounces of candied orange-peel. beat the mixture for a quarter of an hour. stir in six ounces of crumbs of bread. and one ounce of beef-marrow. and a wineglassful of orange water . 319 DIPLOMATIC PUDDING.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. a lemon place it Put half a pint of cream. or longer. three ounces of beef-suet. fancifully with Butter a mould. four ounces of loaf sugar. for tie it closely over.

eggs. Think. The more you draw from it the more clear and fruitful it will be. Throw let into a pint and a half of new milk lemon. If 3^ou neglect to think yourself. 337. and still another. for then simmer them together utes. Learn to think and 3^ou will learn to write the more you think the better you express your ideas. mix with them another . — — — — . and the very thin rind of a fresh it infuse for half an hour. 320 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. You cannot fathoiii your mind. — VERY GOOD OLD-FASHIONED BOILED CUSTARD. boil till it becomes a thick syrup then add three tablespoonfuls of rum. and use other people's thoughts giving them utterance only. Place one idea upon paper another will follow it. Thought engenders thought. There is a well of thought there which has no bottom. you will never know what you are capable of At first your ideas may come out in lumps homely and shapeless but no matter. loaf sugar in the strained juice of two sweet oranges . a few min- and add four ounces and a half of Beat thoroughly eight fresh half pint of white sugar. until you have written a page.. time and perseverance will arrange and refine them.

or omit A few bitter is ones bruised can be boiled in the milk." "Seven shillings. it stirred until nearly then add to by degrees. take out the lemon custard into a deep jug. until the brought to the point of boiling." replied the honest tradesman. "What's the price of ''Seven article?" inquired a deaf old lady. fire and turn the this over the in a pan of boiling water. this of Shopping." "Oh! seven shillings. ful and keep it. cut into spikes these at pleasure. when fire. stir the boiling milk quickly to peel. and two ounces of . set them. when their flavor preferred. instead of lemon peel.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. making ways touch the bottom of the mixture is jug. and keep the custard stirred gently. The art — . a wineglass- of good brandy. " is the price of the article." the lady retorted "111 give you^ue. until it begins to thicken. cold. but without ceasing. it it must be instantly taken from the will curdle in a or moment. " Seventeen shillings !" shillings." said the draper. 321 new milk . ''I'll give you thirteen. she exclaimed. then move it the al- spoon rather more quickly. blanched almonds. Pour it into a bowl." .

and by all sects without hypocrisy. till quite bit- tender. form a species of wall round a in the and pour a boiled custard Gold is the only idol that is worshipped in all lands without a temple. it. . 338. centre. TO ORNAMENT CUSTARDS.. an hour. the whites of eggs. for 339. together with two tablespoonfuls . of raspberry or red currant jelly lay it in any form upon a custard. and serve in a dish with cream round What fashionable game are the frogs fond of? Croquet (croaky). ter Boil some rice in milk. etc. almonds when cold. CUSTARD WITH RICE. to imitate rock.322 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. sweeten with pow- dered sugar glass dish. . two Whisk. with cinnamon and a very few .

cream. some lemon peel sweeten it with white sugar to beat the yolks of six eggs and the whites of four. flour mix a cold stir tablespoonful of to with some paste. and sugar . the taste . 341. Put till it over the stirring it all the time it a custard formed. then into the boiling Take is care to add the eggs when is the cream fire. and brown it with To be eaten cold. in a pint of milk. 340. Men are born with two eyes and with but one tongue. 323 BURNT CREAM. to the add four eggs well beaten. lemon peel. CUP CUSTARDS. in order that they should see twice as much as they say. Boil some pieces of it. then turn out into a dish and it strew sifted sugar over a salamander.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Strain and when cold. it a very smooth cream. nearly cold. Boil a pint of cream with .

Stew half a dozen tender apples. SNOW 342. mash them to a pulp whisk the whites i^i . then BALLS. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL A little nutmeg and two or tliree spoonfuls of wine may be added if approved. they will contain whey.324 taste. 343. and be careful to take them out of the oven as soon as they are thick. drops of essence Have ready in a very some white paper. . APPLE CREAM. add two or three of lemon. very dry. Set them moderate oven. when the sugar thoroughly incorporated. and with a spoon drop the mixture in balls. pour in cups. as. till Beat the whites of ten eggs add very gradually one pound of pulverized is sugar. if overdone. Mix well. and as soon as they are tinged with brown take them out.

ounces of pulverized loaf the whole till Whisk it will stand it up when placed on a sweetened dish. " remain here but one week longer. discovered a soldier endeavoring to pass the sentinel. " To tell you the truth. them ex- Put them into a pan with one pint of water and eight ounces of sugar beat the whites of five eggs. set it over the . too. in surveying one evening some of the advanced posts of his camp. '\your majesty has been so worsted in all your attempts. and if fortune does not mend in that time. that I was going to desert." ORANGE CREAM. add them to the eggs with five sugar. 344. and as Boon as the apples are cold. ceedingly Take the juice of four Seville oranges. or wine. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. six eggs till 325 they are very light. vanilla. I'll desert with you. and insisted on knowing where he was going. paring the rind of one of fine. Frederick the great." *' Were you?" answered the monarch." answered the soldier. Serve with cream flavored with lemon.. His majesty stopped him.

it one way it . put stir . having previously steeped a bit of it for orange peel in the cream is a short time. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. place it Make on the a pint of cream very sweet. 345. fire and let it boil. till it it over a slow it is ready to boil stir it till it put is in a dish to . then beat the yolks of it stir it till it is cold five eggs. cool. and it quite cold then empty into jelly glasses. it When out of a almost cold.326 fire. pour teapot on the orange juice. Put the juice of a large orange into a small deep glass. . FROTHED ORANGE CREAM. exceedingly well. in your fire pan with the cream. till it grows thick and white strain through a gauze sieve. and stir . holding the tea- pot as high up as possible.

to taste. It must be very smooth. Boil two ounces of loaf sugar and Seville orange two inches of the peel of a in half a gill of water. for ten minutes. Neither deride another. Add when over the the whites of this thickens six eggs well beaten. and a table spoonful of rum. and beaten till nearly cold. 327 ORANGE CREAM FOR PUDDING. then beat it Boil fast for into a gill of thick cream. peel of only two. add if the the two lemons. 346. LEMON CREAM. three minutes. and when a little. stirring the and keep cream until sufficiently It is best to thickened to prevent curdling. add the strained juice of a sweet orange. for it is dangerous. to this. Boast not of thyself. 347. small . for it shall bring contempt upon thee. also well beaten.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. or three Sweeten fire. . juice of To one pint of water. pour in the yolks.

— .328 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The only complaint extensively prevalent. and a pint and a half of cream the froth rises lay it and as on a Put the and lay remainder of your cream in glasses. choco. when it is stirred in a cup by an instrument called a molinet. The name. an Indian name. are very hard but the is generally healthy. ChocolatSy aite. sweeten mill sieve. the frothed cream upon them. it as much marble water as will dissolve mortar. and beat as it put it in a half an hour. is a stricture of the chest. in much fine sugar as will . 348. and your dessert will be de- licious as well as plentiful. The — country CHOCOLATE CREAM. this your glasses with cream. of the Scrape fine a quarter of a pound best chocolate. at present. as choco. and is which in the Mexican language signifies water and from the sound which the water wherein the chocolate is put makes. Put it. is compounded from or atle. Fill use an earthen pan. put to it. times. it. choco.

350. have the white of an egg well beaten. 349." under the pretence of avoiding a waiat . 329 MOCK CREAM. and place the whole over a slow nearly boils it —then strain for use. it and off. till only milk warm strain and stand in a cold place. ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE MOCK CREAM. with the yolk of one stir them in a pint on the fire. and when about half cold fire add until it. the Stir mixture well . it is Take and stir it it. of milk it . Pour half a pint of boiling milk on a teaspoonful of arrowroot well mixed with a small quantity of the milk. Economy is the art of drawing in as much as one can but it was never intended that young ladies should "draw in. . Whisk set it the whites of three eggs . .! THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. stir it until begins to boil.

or any other agreeable essence. follow the world in approving others it We . flavor it with orange- flower water. or put into glasses. all is till whisked it —then heap it upon a dish. Garnish with thinly- pared citron. five ounces of loaf sugar. and return the cream which drains from the froth. cut into any fanciful shape. dissolved in a . MILANESE CREAM. but go before in approving ourselves. WHIPPED CREAM. Whisk the cream thoroughly in a large pan. and add to a lump of sugar which has been rubbed upon the peels of two lemons — or. boiled three quarters gill of an ounce of isinglass. and serve. A pint of new milk and . lay it upon a sieve placed over another pan. rises and as the froth take it ofl*. Sweeten with powdered sugar a it quart of cream.330 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 351. 352.

Curacao. and the whites of three eggs. it is the part of wisdom to bear with patience their impertinence. Flavor with twenty-five drops of any kind of essence. Nevertheless. well beaten. gentle but not boiling. is the foolishness of folly. and till stand in a cool place firmly set. or rum. . to One quart of milk. 331 the yolks of eight fresh eggs. stir in the isinglass and a of thick cream. of water. Pour the mixture rubbed with the let it oil into a mould slightly of sweet almonds. Add the milk to the eggs while hot. 353. Stir over a fire till at strain into a gill basin. Sweeten the milk to it your taste.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and add wine if you prefer Then whisk the whites of the eggs to a dry froth. The pride of emptiness is an abomination and to talk such. FLOATING ISLAND. boiling heat . and to every egg . it. or with three tablespoonfuls of Maraschino. and to pity their absurdity.

the of a lemon rubbed in sugar and scraped. biscuits. Pour a boiled custard over the then cover the whole with the whisked cream. to be smitten with the curse of blindness. CREAM 354. add one teaspoonful of currant. TRIFLE. and take off the froth as in it rises. which are sponge biscuits. or any kind of jelly you choose . and a quarter of a pound of powdered loaf sugar. twelve ratafias. . add also one teaspoonful of white sugar to each white. like the Indian who madly fired his arrow at the sun.332 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. Whisk a the whole together in a dish. Have ready six glass dish. Put into a shallow dish half a peel pint of w^hite wine. and serve fall. as tliQ whites will When a malignant man strikes at the great benefactors of his race. he deserves. a pint and a half of cream. Pile the froth upon the milk. and six macaroons steeped in wine. quince. it soon.

355. Blanch one pound of sweet and bitter almonds. to take possession in the name of the Czar. and wring 21 up the it very . of some sixty tons. drain them on a and afterward dry them by rubbing in them a napkin. After this. was proceeding.! THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. coming on the coast of a remote and solitary island. take them out of the mortar . When. spread a napkin over an oval dish. and put them into a pan then with a silver spoon beat up the almonds gradually with half a pint of filtered water. to prevent their oiling. 333 Not many years ago. and hailed him. asking if he wanted a pilot 1 BLANC MANGE. ^twenty sieve. made her appearance round a point of the island. moistening them from time to time with half a teaspoonful of water. lo a sharpbuilt little sloop. and put the almonds upon it. A-LA-FRANCAISE. the commander of a Russian exploring expedition in the Arctic seas. as a matter of course. When they are pounded as fine as possible. then gather corners of the napkin. Pound them in a mortar.

that he went a journey by sea. sugar. two inches of stick inches of cinnamon.334 tight. The blanc mange ready to serve in two hours. when he might have gone by land. which should be will be previously iced. of Put into this milk twelve ounces crystallized sugar. a of rich cream. and add to one ounce of clarified isinglass. pass it the whole through a napkin. ten bitter and two ounces . 356. When the sugar dissolved. pour into the mould. dients. press out all the milk from the almonds. Have ready the following ingre: and proceed as directed five One ounce two of the best isinglass. J BLANC MANGE. to THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. ounces of loaf vanilla. When the whole is well incorpo- rated. Cato informs us that he never repented but of two things and the one was. a pint of gill new milk. made rather warm. broken is into small pieces.

pour the mixture into a mould. DUTCH. Put the milk. 357. cool.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and vanilla. of sweet almonds. while pounding. 335 Blanch the almonds and pound them to a paste. cinnamon. and when thoroughly mixed. and boil slowly dissolved till the sugar is —then stir in the isinglass When and that is dissolved. When and set. and boil dissolved. into an enamelled saucepan. stir in the milk of almonds and the cream. put it to the isinglass. Add by degrees. Beat up the yolks of three eggs in half a pint of sherry. with three ounces of . in a cold place till let it remain it firmly or put on ice for an hour. with the peel of a small lemon. sugar. then strain off the liquid. the third of a pint of cold water. strain into a basin. BLANC MANGE. Put an ounce of isinglass into it till half a pint of boiling water. Let it stand for two hours.

boil it THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. put into a When we we hear men boast of their own talents. lavish out their time and discourse meddling with other men's matters that nothing How many grossly abuse their time concern them in 1 How many in speaking too freely of persons. add the whites of two eggs. it begins to harden. and turn it into shapes. —then till strain it through a hair Stir nearly cold.336 sugar. and before it jellies. and few minutes sieve. perfectly then add the juice of a lemon. incline to think that their talents should be tlie reckoned as the lack! East Indians reckon rupees —by . and sugar. and it is beat the mixture until well frothed. it When mould. Mix for a the whole well together. When cold. when they should only speak of things ! LEMON SPONGE. 358. dissolved Boil half an ounce of isinglass in it is a pint of cold water until .

359. and as two eggs well much milk as will make a in thick batter. with it Boil two gills of rice till soft. mix two three gills of flour. and bake A Slight Mistake. 337 CAKES. one quart beaten. ounces of melted beaten. of milk. little salt. BREAKFAST ROLLS. in the milk and butter. it rise. a butter. stir Beat the eggs. AND TEA CAKES. Beat the batter quite smooth. among other commissions. Two four pounds of eggs well flour. Beat it till light. and two ounces of melted butter. then till add the flour. JERSEY WAFFLES. waffle irons. 360. to — . Many years ago a Hamburg merchant wrote to his correspondent at Lisbon and requested him.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. then add yeast sufficient to make RICE WAFFLES.

and her. add a quarter of a pound of melted two or three teaspoonfuls of good yeast. He therefore sent by the first vessel 84 monkeys. in which language o signifies or. and. clock speak so loud that all the town maj^ hear She should be like a snail prudent. raise Some prefer to the batter by adding soda and sour is milk. his friend read 102. Be careful to grease the irons thoroughly. 361.338 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. — — — . add a rise. three eggs well beaten. butter. if the yeast salt. and excused himself in his letter by saying that he could find no more but that he would not fail to let him have the others at the first . and yet those three things she should not resemble. in that case there no need of yeast. To a pound and a half of flour. little Let and bake in waffle irons. The o coming between the numerals 1 and 2. and bake the cakes a rich brown. send one or two monkeys. is it not salt enough. WAFFLES. The letter was written in the Italian. There are three things which a good wife should resemble. She should be like a town clock keep She should not be like a town time and regularity. opportunity.

362. Put in the whites of the egg well beaten. "I had it last year." said he." said she. "have you the Septennis psoriasis V^ "No. much flour as will then add half a pint of sour is milk. She should not be like an echo determined always to have the last word. She should be like an echo speak when spoken to. half a cup of melted butter. " Madam. years' itch. a profusion of botanical names. in which dissolved one teaspoonful of soda and two of cream of tartar. . Sydney Smith was once looking through the hothouse of a lady who was proud of her flowers." Septennis psoriasis is the medical name for the seven . and used. keep within 339 lier own house.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and I gave it to the Archbishop of Canterbury it came out beautifully in the spring. and as thicken it. — — — aUICK WAFFLES. one quart of milk. and bake immediately. Make a batter of the yellow of three eggs. She should not be like a snail carry all she has upon her back. not very accurately.

and as much flour make a batter. whites are having heated them. of the batter. and while lukewarm. lastly stir in the whites. yolks very stir it into the milk. bake the waffles on both it sides —when done out and butter These must be baked the moment they are mixed.340 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. as will Three eggs. . Grease your waffle irons fill The after full batter should not be beaten after the in. add to the milk and it alternately. Beat the yolks and whites separately. 363. WAFFLES WITHOUT YEAST. one pint of milk. beat well. Melt the butter. Whisk the flour light. which must be whisked very dry. one teaspoonful of butter. fire them nearly close them and place irons so as to them over the take — turn the it. Liberality and generosity of feeling are the surest test of a gentleman.

and a tablespoonful of melted and butter. them As soon full. . then add yeast enough to make and it rise. rolled. salt. them a little more than half and bake rather slowly. 364. 1. flour. No. A quarter of a pound of butter. Beat the whites to a froth. in at the last. a pinch of one teaspoonful of cinnamon. a salt. grease them well sugar with butter. make stir a batter.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. one pound of four eggs. four eggs. little One quart of milk. Make these ingredients into a batter with milk. 341 WAFERS. will salt. as the batter fill is light. and as much butter. grease your muffin rings. add the flour as milk. Beat the yolks of the eggs. and as soon as the wafers are baked they should be over them. 365. Heat your wafer irons. Sift MUFFINS.

the size of flour rise. tablespoonful of good yeast if four tablespoonfuls. five eggs. No. who was in the habit of spending a large portion of her time in the society of her neighbors. 367. three eggs. to taste. to and when light. salt suflicient to fire. and batter. form a batter. 2. to form a stiff Set them rings. stir in gill the melted butter and Lastly a Bake in muffin rings. A LADY. 342 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.. Place the butter near the dissolve. they are thick. 366. gill One quart and milk of flour. A lump of enough butter. as will make a thick batter salt. liappened one day to be taken ill. one . and sent her hus- . add them to the as with much milk of yeast. but not get hot. where it may till Beat the eggs flour. one of yeast. a tablespoonful of butter. MUFFINS. home made. three or One quart of milk. bake them in TOTTENHAM MUFFINS. a walnut.

and does the sun go down in this country with such a clap as that ?" ! SALLY LUNN. two ounces of brown sugar." exclaimed Paddy. " Sunset oh. Bake in muffin rings. but suddenly turned back. exclaiming " My dear. two ounces of eggs. " What's Why that's sunset 1" was the contemptuthat? ous reply. 368. " Sunset. 369. One quart of flour. an Irishman hearing the gun fired from a battery at sunset. inquired of one of the sailors what that was. and a teaspoonful of soda dissolved. ran a few yards. a small quantity . two two tablespoonfuls of yeast. with distended e3^es. butter. a little salt. One quart of wheat flour made into a stiff batter with water. where shall I find you when I come back f" WATER MUFFINS. Beat the batter until it will not adhere to the spoon or ladle. WITH SUGAR.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. On the arrival of an emigrant ship. band : 343 The husband in great haste for a physician.

SALLY LTJNN. with milk enough to make a soft it dough. 1. the butter. and the dough rise it. with eggs beaten light. . To be served hot. 370. salt to taste. mix for much it Butter a pan. . Butter your cake mould. No. into the flour. Allow three hours to Bake it forty minutes. gill A quarter of a pound of butter. When perfectly It is bake it in a moderate oven. bread. in a stir milk when the milk is lukewarm. but let and sugar softer. light. little it Cut up the butter and warm . and buttered when eaten. always eaten hot.344 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and the yeast. without working over rise. Warm as the milk. a pound of Hour. in it. and about half a pint of milk. caraway seed and cinuamoii. half a of yeast. two eggs. and set it near the fire to rise.

set it near the fire to rise. make a and warm it is dough. and milk to Cut up the butter milk . with the eggs beaten light. 3. in order to bake at seven o'clock. in a little stir it when the milk lukewarn. A quarter of a pound pound of flour. a taste. Sift into a pan. two eggs. It requires be put to it rise at three o'clock. into the flour.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and the and yeast. pounds of of it. two eggs. and a half flour make in a hole in the middle butter. Butter your cake mould. When per- . 2. and two tablespoonfuls of the best brewer s yeast. well beaten. 371. 345 SALLY LUNN. and pour two ounces of warmed in a pint of sweet milk. the flour well with the other ingredi- and bake it in a turban form. one . salt to gill of butter. to or bread pan well greased. 372. a saltspoon- ful of salt. Mix ents. half a soft of yeast. No. No. SALLY LUNN.

Faults. OR FLANNEL CAKES. CRUMPETS. 373. or too proud .346 fectly light is THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. One pint of milk. a salt. half a of yeast. much wheat the flour as will form a to- Warm milk and butter . it Take a pint of boiled rice. bake on a griddle. so there are some errors that might be denominated errors on the safe Thus. we seldom regret having been too mild. salt to taste. Add a teacupful of home made yeast. and enough flour to form a batter. bake it in a moderate oven. as batter. When light. As there are some faults that have been termed faults on the right side. or too humble but we often repent having been too violent. too precipitate. mash well. add three well beaten eggs. It always eaten hot. too cautious. side. one egg. — RICE BATTER CAKES. a quart little of milk. a teagill spoonful of butter. 374.

that the fluids have begun to be absorbed. These instances are in the same way to he understood and explained. are the persons most liable to carr}^ gray heirs. They are owing to the increased determination of the blood stimulating the absorbents into preternatural activitj^ and causing them to take up the coloring matter of the . are those whose hair latest affords signs that the last process has commenced. . Gray Hair. and the sickly. The agricultural laborer. It is well known that mental emotions and violent passions have. grease your bake-iron and bake them like buckwheat cakes. with very lew exceptions. . the seaman. in a night. it 347 should be lukewarm but not hot. hair. made the hair gray.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and all whose employment consists of or involves exercise in the open air. the studious. Set it to rise. those who are earliest visited with gray hair. it beat up the egg and add to with the salt. and the All whose emtextures dried up and withered. from whatever particularly if tocause. have least determination ward the head. gether. the debilitated. lastly the yeast. — The sedentary. are. and when light. ployment renders much sitting necessar}^ and little or no exercise possible all who. then flour enough to form a batter.

Bake immediately and serve. a CAKES. FLANNEL CAKES. four eggs well salt. a a small piece of butter melted. beaten. 376. Stir the whites into the batter just before baking. a teaspoonful of soda dissolved. salt. with soda. and as flour as will much make a batter. One quart of milk. WHARTON FLANNEL 377. is'used. If sour milk.348 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Mix a quart of flour. GRIDDLE CAKES. three eggs. some good buttermilk or sour milk. 375. a teaspoonful of soda . One quart of little milk. two eggs well beaten into a batter. the little yolks and whites beaten separately. no butter is needed.

a teaspoonful of soda dis- solved. BUCKWHEAT CAKES WITHOUT 378. necessity never made a good bargain. When and the latter is ready. Bake on a griddle. dissolved. the larger the profit charged for — it. and a teaspoonful of tartaric acid dissolved in a half a cup of water. The poorer a man is the more he pays for what he uses as Franklin very justly observed. add as YEAST. The smaller the quantity we purchase. 22 . then in the soda. put in the acid and beat stir the batter well. To one quart of lukewarm water as will much buckwheat meal make to a batter of the proper thickness. Man in his civilized state is supposed to eat more than a thousand times in every year of his life.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Stir in 349 enough flour to form a thin batter. Add this a little salt. bake immediately.

Corn cake may be made as above. four of- half a teaspoonful soda. make a batter. Bread the staff of life. and when soft. . and then add the whites of the eggs.. 380. is And FIVE MINUTE BUCKWHEAT CAKES. eggs. ^^6 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. one tea- spoonful cream of tartar. and yolks of the eggs. Pour the milk over the bread crumbs. beaten. one of soda. Bake immediately. Bread won't support a man a day. using meal instead of bread crumbs. 379. add the soda. When add one teaspoonful of tartaric acid dissolved in a little warm water. One pint of bread crumbs. Unless it first be broken. cream of tartar. they say. well beaten let it stand until you are ready to bake. teaspoonful dissolved in water mixed. be it also spoken. one quart of boil- ing milk. enough to Three pints of buckwheat. BREAD CAKES.

add a little salt. a dry froth ter. Beat the whites of the eggs to . one of Indian all to meal. 381. 351 Good nature must be a qualification peculiar to those nations who speak the English language. RYE BATTER CAKES. a tablespoonful of molasses. Mix a bat- with cold w^ater or milk. ter One cup of rye flour. as it is remarkable that there is no term for it in any other lanofuaare. Beat the yolks of two eggs very stir salt. Stir in enough . RYE CAKES. light little . Beat the whole very hard a quarter of an hour.ALL. and one of wheat.THE FAMILY SAVE. stir them gently into the bat- and bake immediately on a griddle. add a and enough rye form a batter. them into a quart of milk flour to . 382.

Thomas. Grease your cake pans. stir into In the morning. Just before baking add an egg. Serve them hot. drop in the batter. taking care to handle it as possible. BREAKFAST CAKES. well beaten. can you of the word " deride ?" sir . and bake a nice brown. so as make out into as little small rolls. with it Take as three pounds of flour. tell Master. — Thomas. the batter an ounce little flour it of melted butter. as will mix much warm water form a very thick batter. — Yes me the meaning it means to ride down hill. . 383.352 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. This should be done over night. Let it stand till light^ and bake in a rather quick oven. and yeast enough to make it rise. and add a to form a very soft dough. it good yeast to make rise.

sir.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. sir? No. and in a country inn !" exclaimed Matthews. sir. sir. "Confound . full teaspo©nfuls of cream of tartar. sir. sir. a rich brown color." " Eggs and bacon." fowl?" "Fowl. it I" at length said the hungrj " An traveller." "No fowl. with two Mix or rub well into three pints of flour." used to tell a story of pulling up at a roadside inn. sir. one small teasponful of bicarbonate of soda dissolved in a to little milk. and interrogating the waiter " Any hot as to what he could have for dinner. '''No." was the prompt response of the doleful waiter. 384." said the waiter "no eggs and bacon. " Let me have some eggs and bacon. Grease your tins and bake them in a quick oven. sir? " Can you broil me a is (J. sir ?" . " what have you got in the house ?" execution. no fowl. no hot joint. no cold one. some it salt. 353 BREAKFAST ROLLS. a piece of butter the size of an egg. sir. joint?" inquired the traveller. Old Charles Matthews. add enough milk make a very thick batter. in his entertainment entitled "At Home. sir." "Any cold one?" "Cold one.

a little soda dissolved in cold Roll milk. diseases come from the neglect of our body overwork of the brain. it is ten to one but what he finds the acute complaint. We live longer than our forefathers. connected with some chronic mental irritation. in a tolerably hot oven. but we suffer more than a thousand artifi- these days half our in the In this railway age the —In and cares. wear and tear of labor and intellect go on without pause or self-pity. and one tablespoonful of with one quart of flour. Incorporate well two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. Make a soft dough of flour. we exhaust the finer strength of the nerves and. rich buttermilk. when we send impatiently to the doctor. ROLLS. lard. and mix . which is all that we perceive. NEW YORK BREAKFAST 386. out the dough and bake in cake pans. A Melancholy Truism. Sir Bulwer Lytton. 85. They fatigued only the muscles. dissolve a small teaspoonful of bicarbonate of soda.— 354 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. or some unwholesome inveteracy of habit. cial anxieties . a couple of eggs beaten light. ENGLISH BREAKFAST ROLLS.

A YOUNG Irish servant. little salt. Bake immediately. but she lost it soon after- ward P^ POTATO ROLLS. travelling on board a steamer. one eg^. and a teacupful of yeast. and a finely mashed. and bake them in a moderately hot oven. 355 the whole together with cold sweet milk. which must be boiled and the eggs well beaten. had the ill luck to lose the " recommendation" which had been given her on leaving her last place. When light. . the accompanying ticket. add the potatoes. Rub the butter and flour together.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and which she presented when applying for a situation . Mix the whole with milk and a teacupful of good yeast. " this is to certify that Kathleen O'Brian had a good character when she left Albany. 387. She brought. roll it out as lightly as possible. cut it into cakes about half an inch thick. a quarter of a pound of butter or good lard. four potatoes. Two pounds of flour. some one had written for her. however.

or leisure. that there is no /i in exorbitant. 388. pieces. BUTTERMILK SHORT CAKES. to use blacker ink 3d. to round his letters and 4tli. Take the crust off a new loaf while warm. brown color. we'll see. if I had wealth. The following instructions are said to have been given by Lord Palmerston to a Foreign Office Clerk. several possessors their peculiar inconveniences. I should be happy for know. for answering a letter: '' Tell him 2d. them on a sheet of till paper. they al]^ of them bring their . Murmur not therefore at the dispensation of God. One pound' of flour. or power. and and bake in a slow oven of a golden crisp through. 389. . j BREAD NUTS. 1st. but correct thine own heart neither say within thyself. into which rub a quarter of a pound of butter. Dissolve a teaspoonful of soda into a pint of butter- . and pull the crumb into rough measuring about two inches each lay way.356 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." — . OR PULLED BREAD.

It will be very smooth and light when kneaded suffi- . milk or thick milk. pound and knead again. add more buttermilk. and then turns it over and skims it at the bottom. enough milk to very stiff it dough with .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Rub the butadd the form a . salt. MARYLAND 390. He skims his milk on the top. EoU out into cakes and bake them a nice brown. as BISCXTITS. a rolling-pin. butter. flour. and then pour on the flour and to butter. One pound of one ounce of the flour. pound dough and so Break the it in pieces.then lastly just and and flour together thoroughly. He is the meanest fellow in the world. Stir into this it 357 one egg well beaten. The following is Aunt Deborah's description of her milkman. If this should not be sufficient stiff form a moderately dough. on for two or three hours. ter much luke-warm milk as will wet Salt just to taste. knead the dough.

pour the melted butter into the sponge. one flour as will of yeast.ALL. stir in it enough flour to it form to well and stand it is away As soon as perfectly light. as little much salt. in the set it This should be done in the even- morning cut up the fire butter. BISCUITS. and add the yeast. humbled . MILK 391. . then a dough. a Stir flour into the milk so as to form a very is thick batter. THE FAMILY SAVE. and showeth them as pearls and with the applause of his brethren deliffhteth he himself The . but not get hot. ing. Make it out in small biscuits and bake in a moderate oven. . butter your tins.358 ciently. wise man feeleth his imperfections. gill one quart of milk. A quarter of a pound of butter. this called a sponge. make out the dough in small . knead rise. and near the where it will dissolve. and is he laboreth in vain for his own approbation but the fool peepeth in the shallow stream of his own mind. form the dough. and is pleased with the pebbles which he seeth at the bottom he bringeth them up.

what time do you folks dine ?" " As soon as you goes away. 392. 369 they are and let them rise. light. and mix into it flour as will make it a light it dough roll it out very thin. sir. them wash the tops over with water. yeast. and send them to the table hot. cakes. take out. . and cut into long pieces two inches broad. as To a pint of rich milk. " Sally. Prick them and bake them in a slow oven upon tin plates. the}^ will be a snare unto thee thou shalt never be quit of the obligation.^^ them's misuses' orders. When bake them in a very quick oven." CRACKNELS. put about two ounces of butter and a good spoonful of Make much fine . well. Refuse the favors of a mercenary man. . it just warm.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

and stir it warm well into the milk. out. CREAM CRACKERS. and bake in a quick oven for fifteen or twenty minutes. To a quart of flour. 394. which pour all upon the together. afterward Lord Eldon." answered the other. cream is sour. sitting at the table over against the learned John Scott. divide it into it cake with a paste cutter. Beat the eggs very ents together. flour sufiicient to light. A PRAGMATICAL young fellow. form a stifi" dough. . with One pint of cream and six eggs. flour while foaming.360 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. add a pint of salt. asked him. what difference there was between Scott and Sot? "Just the breadth of the table. diss/rfve little buttermilk and a teaspoonful of a dessertspoonful of soda in a water. 393. and least half mix all the ingredifor at pound the dough If the an hour. Beat adding flour enough to make a Roll it smooth dough. ENGLISH BUTTERMILK CAKES.

put in two ounces of butter . there At Leyburn ** was painted over a shop door. cut into cakes and bake in a quick oven. little soda dissolved in some of the TEA BISCUITS. one teaspoonful of cream of tartar. 395. 361 add a cream. No. Stir this into the flour little and butter. and Funeral biscuits. Bride cakes. it. and a little salt. 1.THE FAMILY SAVE ALL." PONE. add the soda. milk so as to form it Roll out in sheets about half an inch thick. 396. Pour as much boiling water on a pint of Indian meal as will thoroughly wet While hot. then a a rather soft dough. rub a quarter of a pound of butter. Into three pounds of flour. dissolve little one spoonful of bicarbonate of soda in a milk.

Pour boiling water on one quart of Indian meal. grease your pans. No. and bake immediately. Put in a teacupful of good it homemade rise. No. 1. with one quart of boiling milk. 2. 398. little and a salt. to Beat three eggs very the Indian meal in light. yeast. Then stir a rather thick bat- ter.362 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. mix all well together. pour in the batter. in which two ounces of butter have been melted. well. it to and when grease your pans. and bake in a moderate oven. Beat light. Scald one quart of Indian meal. . 397. PONE. well. butter. INDIAN PONE. and add them when it enough milk to make Beat it is cool. add to this two ounces of Make Set it into a stiff batter.

one pint of wheat flour. cream of one teaspoonful of bicarbo- nate of soda dissolved. it make rise . add two eggs well beaten. 2. 363 When and a lukewarm. two tartar. oven. add sugar. They should be brown when INDIAN PONE. cream of One quart of Indian meal. Bake in shallow pans. one wheat tartar. 399. dissolved. teaspoonfuls of one teaspoonful of bicarbo- nate of soda. 3. little salt.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. to them two tablespoonfuls of mix all the ingredients together with one quart of milk. No. No. let after it is light. in a moderate done. flour. 400. INDIAN PONE. two teaspoonfuls of Beat three eggs. stand two hours to bake in a slow oven. Grease your pans well. a thin cake. pint of One quart of Indian meal. add . Beat three eggs.

Almost every one is interested now in knowing how to make corn cakes most palatable. mix the other with water. Scald at night half the quantity of meal you are going cold to use . rate oven. . Fry slowly. sugar. is morning. " Man that begins the world late can hardly grow a ver}^ rich man as bees that swarm late get no great store of honey. having it the consistency of little thick batter. with one quart in shallow pans. where meat has been best for frying boiled.364 to all THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. to rise." . them two tablespoonfuls of Bake Mix mode- the ingredients together. and set it need no yeast. The following is said to be an excellent receipt. It Add will a salt. the cakes will be light and Skimmings. in a of milk. them with. 401. since much of it will be used in these straitened times. CORN GRIDDLE CAKES. In the crisp.

with a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in it. Add a little salt. 403. and she imploreth th}^ assistance with tears of sorrow." replied the youth. LAZY. is Bake the cakes as soon as the batter mixed. "but it^s slower P^ his work.TM When widow's heart FAMILY SAVE-ALL. rather less Indian chan wheat two eggs. Use flour. The batter itself should be thin enough to spread of on the griddle. some thick or sour milk. returning from dinner to was asked by his master "if he had no other motion than that. A INDIAN SLAPPERS. when the is sunk. gill One pint boiling of Indian meal. one teaspoonful of butter. O pity her affliction. INDIAN-AND-WHEAT BATTER CAKES." " Yes. and extend thy hand to those who have none to help them. well beaten. one of milk. 365 the fatherless call upon thee. one gill of 23 wheat . 402. salt just to taste. over-fed lad.

butter in the Indian meal. Cut up the salt.366 flour. 404. with as much milk the yeast. can Some persons can be everywhere at home others sit musinglj^ at home and be everywhere. — INDIAN MEAL BREAKFAST CAKES. two eggs. Beat the eggs. one gill of yeast. half an ounce of butter. One quart of Indian meal. two eggs. as will form a batter. your griddle. Cut up the pour over it. the batter Then add grease When is light. salt to taste. a teaspoonful of dissolved salaeratus. and bake them as buckwheat cakes. is cool. then to it enough boiling water wet When it . Beat the eggs very thick butter in and meal. light. milk sufficient to make the a thick batter. and add the then stir into it the gill of boiling milk. to and milk sufficient make a batter. and when the meal add them and the wheat flour to it. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

used. but the majority by commencing without a shilling. four eggs. is 367 pour the cool. cut them into squares and serve An English Judge." CORN CAKES. and bake in pans. tablespoonfuls to of the sugar. being asked what contributed most to success at the bar. done. add the eggs and salt. Butter square tin pans. must be well beaten. and soda enough sweeten milk. them but about two thirds. Mix all To have the eggs is any corn cake. replied. any prepara- .THE FAMILY SAVE. dissolved saloBratus into the milk. and add as much milk as will make it into a thick fill ])atter. 405.ALL. with eggs. it When it salgeratus is always desirable to to dissolve it thoroughly before adding tion of corn meal. well together. well beaten. " Some succeed by great talent. two Take one pint of corn meal. When hot. some by a miracle. light. one quart of sour milk. and bake in a quick oven.

" What is the chief use of bread ?" asked an The chief use examiner at a school examination. of bread. ai> parently aroused by the simplicity of the inquiry. one pint of corn meal. is to spread butter and molasses upon /" ** ** CORN BREAD." answered a contemplative urchin. 2. two eggs. Miss. "the reason is plain. and both shoot from the eyeP^ CORN BREAD. a little salt. and bake in pans for about half an hour." replied Padd}-. two tablespoonfuls of melted butter. Mix together. 368 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. cool. One pint of milk. 406. No. and one little tea- spoonful of soda. dissolved in a milk. 1. Dissolve one tablespoonful of butter in three pints of boiling milk. They're indigenous ijlants. who was working hard b}^ " Faith. a little . Into When add half a pint of wheat flour.. 407. No. this stir one quart of Indian meal. Pat. "Why To is love like a 'tatoe?" said Jane the gardener.

Scald two quarts of Indian meal water. to it form a dough. with cooled. half a pint of good of molasses. . flour and half a teacupful into it Knead sufficient wheat rise. for there's an inclined plane '*Ah. boiling When sufficiently salt. in a Set it rise it to Make time. Ned? not a very hard job.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. Why don't you wheel that barrow of coal. and two eggs." replied Ned. slightly To one quart of buttermilk. sugar. Let the second and bake moderate oven. well beaten. put a teaspoonful of soda. INDIAN BREAD. and bake on well but- tered tins. Mix well together. but hang me if I am !" " it's WHEAT-AND-INDIAN BREAD. add a teaspoonful of yeast. into loaves. 369 some salt. warmed. "the plane to relieve 3^011?" may be inclined. 409. 408.

grease your pans. lard. return it to the fire. Bake on a board before the slowly. and bake the other side. . Speak not but what may self. Pour boiling water on a quart of stir in Indian meal. HOE CAKE. turn by running a thread between the cake and the board. fire. will make a thick beat it for a few minutes. salt. a little and a tablespoonful of melted into this butter. well beaten. and bake quickly. 410. stiff. Let the dough be it Knead it or work for ten minutes. two eggs.370 dissolved. a spoonful of butter or and a little salt. benefit others or your- Avoid triflino^ conversation. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. it When nicely brown on one side. as Stir as much Indian meal batter.

Bake quick oven. 413. 412. well beaten. a teaspoonful of soda dissolved batter should be The in a rather stijff. Mix all and beat very 'hard for ten or fifteen minutes. together. four ounces of melted butter. a handful of wheat flour. One pint and a half of Indian meal. one quart of milk. INDIAN MUFFINS. SMALL POUND CAKES. Mix in the whole with buttermilk. one pound of ten eggs. cup of one third of a cup of molasses. one flour. a . or sour milk. 371 JOHNNY CAKE. One pound of butter. with it. Bake in rings. pound of sugar. one flour. a little salt. and a little salt.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. four eggs. 4-11. Three cups of Indian meal.

"to set some have somebody in our . The ingredients are —one pound and a half of butter. to your liking of brandy. pans. four eggs. Beat the butter and sugar very light. To be mixed the same thickness as pound cake batter. half a pound of sugar. one pint of molasses. one pint of milk. gill nutmeg." keeper over one's self —to says Seneca. Add the brandy. and one cloves. and beat the whole several minutes. be stirred into the batter. washed and floured. may MOLASSES POUND CAKE. moderate oven. to them only about half and bake in a allow for swelling. fill Butter small round full. A few dried currants. 414-. of brandy.— 372 gill THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. one tablespoonful of pearl ash — cin- namon. and add them to the butter and sugar. Stir in the flour gradually. whisk the egg yolks and whites together till they are thick. "It is profitable.

and very uncertain let our improvement therefore be as speedy and great as . eight eggs. SODA BISCITITS. and were an eye-witness and spectator of all we did. four tablespoonfuls of brandy. 415. Mix the . one teaspoonful of ground cinnamon. INDIAN POUND CAKE. 373 eye whom we may suppose to be present and privy to our very thoughts to do every thing we do as if somebody looked on. two spoonfuls of soda. 416. may be. sugar. and half a teacupful of lard or butter. half a pound of butter. ounces of Indian a quarter of a pound of wheat^ flour. one pint of sweet milk. grated. To two quarts of flour take four tea- teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. Three quarters of a nine pound of meal." .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. one nutmeg. Our time is short.

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream. and pour in the mixture. or bake it in an earthen mould in a moderate oven. three quarters of a pound of sugar. then the flour add the Line spices liquor. half an flour. with a little rose water to prevent . one pound of eggs. adding but a few at a time. . 417.374 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. beat the eggs . wheat and Indian meal and add and Stir the butter and sugar to a cream light to it. them from getting oily add to them the remainder of . two of rose tablespoonfuls water. your pan with paper well buttered. and beat it well. Pour boiling water over the almonds. little let them stand a time. Rose- water may be substituted for the brandy. pound them in a mortar. together. LADY CAKE. the whites of sixteen ounce of bitter almonds. blanch them. Three quarters of a pound of butter.

twenty-five. is equal to three pounds of potatoes. three quarters of a pound of bread. pounds of nutritious matter butcher's meat. averaging the various sorts. One pound of good bread is equal to near!}' three pounds of potatoes and sevent3^-five pounds of bread and thirty pounds of meat. eightyturnips. . 418. half a pound of sugar. the rose water . . and bake them in a moderate oven. and stir them gradually flour. thirty-five French beans (in the grain). . . eggs. carrots. — hundred weight of bread contains eighty . broad beans. It may be baked in one large cake. Whisk the the whites into the very dry. ninety-two broad beans.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. One pound of flour. Ever}' . two tablespoonfuls of rosewater. . are equal to three hundred pounds of potatoes. COMPOSITION CAKE. and five ounces of meat. Or. and potatoes. . eight . 375 then stir the ahnonds into the butter and sugar. to go more into detail. or French beans. Comparative Nutritive Properties of Food. nine peas. half . half a pound seven of butter. ninety-three greens. are equal to three pounds of potatoes one pound of potatoes is equal to four pounds of cabbage and three of turnips but one pound of rice. eight. butter and sugar with Butter your pans. fourteen.

The currants must be washed. that at sat next to a person. Beat the butter and sugar together. shaved in very thin This cake should be baked in a slow oven. and can beat you!" ! SPONGE CAKE. " Do so. kept exclaiming. one tumbler half full of water mixed with a cup of powdered . a pound of dried currants. if you will. and . beat the eggs well. being displeased with the course matters were taking.. It is told of the celebrated some public meeting he John Wilkes. dried. and then slightly floured the raisins must be picked and seeded. stir them into the butter and in- sugar then add the flour and other gredients. " I cannot allow this to go on I must take the sense of the meeting on this point !" Whereupon Wilkes whispered to him. and slightly floured . who. 419. I'll take the nonsense of the meeting against you. Four eggs. and the citron should be bits. picked. 376 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. or the fruit will scorch. half a pound of raisins. quarter of a pound of citron.

4-20. CHEAP SPONGE CAKE. Beat up . yolks and whites separate cupful add the yolks a tea- and a half of sugar. add a teaspoonful of soda. dissolved in water. Bake about an hour. after they have been beaten to a froth. four to eggs. is not thick enough. and add to fuls of cold water. beat them together. sugar. add a little Just before baking. Flavor with either lemon or vanilla. Lastly. speak accordingly. . then add the whites of the eggs. Sift 377 two teaspoon fuls of cream of tartar into a cup of flour. if When mixed. add one of teaspoonful soda dissolved in water. Flavor with a few drops of essence of vanilla or of lemon. think innocently and and you speak. hurtful if deceit . flour. them four tablespoon- and one teacupful of into Stir the flour the yolks and sugar. the batter flour. Use no justly .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

sir. "we always did like that A sermon !" WASHINGTON CAKE. half pint of milk. after service. that ever}^ time a wife scolds her husband. spice.ALL. CLERGYMAN who bouglit liis sermoDS readywritten. and Butter your pans. it will remove one of the old ivrinkleH 1 . It is thought the she adds a ivrinkle to her face. well beaten." said the sexton. yet fondly believed his manuscripts peculiar to himself. One pound and a half of flour. flour. one pound of sugar. how it was liked. announcement of this fact will have a most satisfactory effect. a teaspoonful of soda. Beat the butter and sugar to a cream. one pound of butter. "Oh.378 THE FAMILY SAVE. 421. dissolved. very much indeed. then the milk. and bake in a moderate oven. especially as it is understood that every time a wife smiles on her husband. was invited to preach in a church at some distance. instead of composing them himself. four eggs. a teaspoonful of cinna- mon. Imagining that his sermon had created a sensation. add the eggs. he asked the sexton. half a teaspoonful of nutmeg. It is said to have been satisfactorily demonstrated.

Rub down pound of ounces of fresh . cut and bake on tins in a moderate oven. . as much it flour as will form a Roll out the dough about the eighth in cakes. . Cut a half do pound of shelled almonds not pound them . in pieces. to which Beat add the grated peel of an orange. but mix them with the eggs and sugar. Beat four eggs with half a pound till of sifted sugar quite smooth. cast off the folly of being wise in thine own conceit. "* CREAM CAKE. butter into a fine flour then mix thoroughly with sifted sugar them half a pound of salt . 379 EMPEROR'S CAKE. is to know that thou art ignorant and if thou wouldst not be esteemed foolish in the judgment of others. The first step toward wisdom. and dough. five 423. of an inch thick. and a few grains of add half a pint of thick and rather sour cream.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 422. mixed with two eggs well whisked.

OSWEGO CAKES. Butter the inside of the moulds fill thoroughly. and bake in a quick oven for eight or ten minutes. corn Six ounces of Os>vego flour or starch. fill Butter some small tin moulds. 380 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. chop- . to cool.. and beat ten minutes. and full. 424. and a tablespoonful of ents new milk. and lay them on sieve reversed. them only two thirds Bake them for three quarters of an hour in a moderate oven. beaten. upon a He that And And is out of clothes is out of fashion out of fashion is out of countenance out of countenance is out of wit. Turn them from its side the mould. Currants. half them with the mixture. seven ounces of sifted loaf sugar. Mix for these ingredi- together. beaten to cream. five ounces of fresh butter. . three fresh eggs. it thoroughly with half a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda which has been dissolved in water.

instead of returning to the purlieus of civilization. ters of a Two pounds of flour. he would have sucAn idea similar to this. or caraway seeds. 425. last few years been realized at Manchester. which used to be washed into the Irish Channel. and six eggs well beaten. Some years ago a London chemist conceived the idea of collecting all the soapsuds of the metropolis. 24 After the flour and . which would be much more useful to society. and recovering the soap that had been used in washing and could he only have organized a plan of collecting the suds.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. patented. one grated nutmeg. one pound of pulverised sugar. with The invention has been the refuse of the factories. . and an immense amount of waste tallow is thus recovered. The Thames carries down many thousand tons of good soap and candles. TEMPERANCE CAKE. in that domestic form and character. ped. the wash-houses and bed-chambers. three-quar- pound of butter. and more grateful to the senses. has within the ceeded. candied peel. Some years ago a patent was taken out for a mode of recovering a large portion of this tallow but it has not yet been carried into practical operation. than in those they now sustain in their voyage to the ocean. . to wash the skins and the garments of the million. 381 may be added.

to a froth. Beat together half a pound of but- and one pound of sugar.382 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and bake in a moderate oven. and half Beat to the a pound of butter beaten to a cream. ALBANY CAKE. cut into cakes. then add the eggs. Then whisk them into the three eggs to a froth. then flour. and bake in a quick oven. and add them stir in butter and sugar. lay the sugar in. Koll can be moulded with the hands. one pound of a wineglass of brandy. it thin. FEDERAL CAKE. till it Mix all well together with a spoon. dissolved. 426. and pour upon it a small teaspoonful of soda. butter have been thoroughly rubbed together. two eggs Half a pound of sugar. the same of rose water. and stir . 427. ter.

and a half of flour. 428. Five cups of flour. lastly. Put a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda into a half a teacup of milk. will When it it is entirely as add it. and hard ten minutes. cut them with a cutter or with the edge of a small sized tumbler. . butter and sugar. Beat the whole very Grease your pans. the butter to it . and sugar. and add soda and milk. and two tablespoonfuls of brandy. one cup of milk or cream. a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg. FRENCH CAKE. and as much more milk form a dough. half a cup of butter. and a teaspoonful of soda. 383 one pound Add. bake in a moderate oven. and bake tins. three eggs.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Beat eggs. Roll out in cakes. them on a light brown. three of sugar. then add the whisk the flour. dissolved. dissolved.

and sugar together. of course. four eggs. one teaspoonful of nutmeg. pride in dress. he took occasion to notice. what they had at the first place they stopped. Bake in a moderate oven. among other things. asked him. ter." "What next?" " A "Two glasses of wine. CAKE. A clergyman had two daughters who were much too fond of dress. half a wineglass of rose-water. on cross-examining the witness. " Four sjlasses of ale. Whisk and add with the other ingredients. After speaking some conBiderable time on this subject." next?" "One GERMAN 429.384 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. ter Beat the butthe eggs. — . Three-quarters of a pound of but- one pound and a half of sugar." "What "What next?" glass of brandy. Roll out the dough in sheets. one pound of dried currants. He answered. two pounds of flour. which was a great grief to him. cut them in cakes with a tin cutter. counsel." fight. or the top of a tumbler. lie had often reproved them in vain and preaching one Sunday on the sin of pride. he suddenlj' stopped . In the examination of an Irish case for assault and battery. A CUTTING REBUKE.

a teaspoonful of seeds. and spice. a nutmeg grated. fill and pour in the cake it. all cut into narrow strips. a little at a time. 385 short and said. the same . with much feeling and expression. add the sugar." SCOTCH CAKE. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.. and butter Take a pound and a half of in dried sifted flour. My good friends I do look at home till my heart a. threequarters of a pound of candied orange peel half a pound of citron. quantity of loaf sugar finely powdered six ounces of blanched sweet almonds. and . lastly. butter the hoop so or tin pan. fifteen pounded caraway eggs. look at home.ches. stir in a glass of brandy. ** But you will say. then with the hand beat the butter to a cream. and then the eggs gradually mix in the flour. the same quantity of fresh rose washed water. and then the sweetmeats. the yolks and whites separately beaten. 430. as nearly to smooth it on the top. almonds.

one and a half pounds pounds . one . sugar. and add a little lemon juice at the last. well together. three-quarters of a pound . .386 strew over THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Three cups of . ladies and gentlemen. citron. Beat all dissolved. I am giving these things away !" " Are you ?" said an old lady " well. one half pound . two cups of sugar. two eggs. 431. one cup of butter one cup of milk. really. T ivill thank you for the silver milk jug you have in your hand P^ . one and a half pounds butter. . and a half almonds. * it caraway it comfits. seeds. fifteen brandy. An auctioneer exclaimed — "Why. nutmeg. one . as shaking will cause the sweetmeats to sink to the bottom. Bake it in till a moderate overi. flour. one PARRISH CAKE. Flour. and one small teaspoonful of soda. six ounces candied orange . caraway . one teaspoonful wineglassful. peel. eggs. must not be moved it nearly done. .

although upon his sign were the words "In from ten to one. and stir them . stir in the flour and milk with the soda. and add it. half a teaspoonful of soda. 432. half and six eggs. beat the butter and sugar together. whisk the egg till light. after trying to find the Consul several days without success. A United States' Consul was very rarely to be found in his office. half a||^ cup of milk." An indignainit Captain." COCOANUT CAKE. half a cup of butter. a pound of Have ready two into the cocoanuts. grated. dissolved in a little milk. half of each at a time. one cup and a half of sugar. one egg. 433. Beat together — as for a pound —one pound of sugar. ter a But- pan or mould. took a paint brush and altered the offlciaPs sign. " Ten to one he is not in. and bake in a moderate oven.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. so that it read. cake butter. ^ 387 BUZBY CAKE. Two cups of flour.

half cup of flour. A few drops of oil of almonds will give a fine flavor.388 batter THE FAMILY SAVE. 435. the whites of four eggs. and stir them in gently at the last. one teaspoon of cream of tartar. instead of the whites. ex- cept the yolks of the four eggs.ALL. cut it and bake them ^^ a moderate oven. then roll it out. One cup of sugar. but- 434. ter. one and a half cups of half cup of milk. after it is thoroughly mixed into cakes. half teaspoon of soda. GOLD CAKE. then add the milk and flour with the soda and cream of tartar. . on ' SILVER CAKE. The same recipe as the above. should be used. Beat the butter and sugar to a cream. . whisk the whites of the eggs to a froth.

two of sugar. one-third of a cup of cream. Mix all well together.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and bake in a moderate oven. and a little cinna- mon. 389 FAMILY CAKE. CUP CAKE ANOTHER WAY. two and one-third cupfuls of milk. one of butter. two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar and one of soda. 437. CUP CAKE. one large spoonful salaeratus. three eggs. dissolved separately. one teaspoonful . ' 438. eggs well beaten. two nutmegs. two of sugar. Six cupfuls of flour. five Three cups of flour. four of molasses. Three cups of flour. two cupfuls of currants. one of butter. 436. one and a half cupfuls of butter. four eggs.

and before evening comes nay. the whites of six eggs. add the flour ately. our hearts and our spirits free." It is possible one hour to shudder at the thought of sin. One pound of sweet almonds and pound and a half of four pounds of bitter almonds. In . MACAROONS. stir them into the butter and sugar. 439. and shame. plunge us into guilt. without design. Beat the butter and sugar very light. and other ingredients. and one powdered sugar. over all succeeding 3ears from which there was no refuge but through the darkness of the grave was committed without pr^emeditation. dissolved. circumstances may occur which shall call for the exercise of no ordinary share of grace and unless we are on our guard. We many sin life we find that the withering shade. Bake immedi- light — may arise in the morning with. whisk the eggs to a froth. and them . Blanch the almonds by let pouring hot water over them. simply by being "off one's guard. to be the thing you a dismal story of private which threw — its chill — shudder at. in one short hour. and distress.390 THE FAMILr SAVE-ALL. and before that hour has passed away. of soda.

about twenty minutes. stand a few minutes . 440. then add the sugar very gradually. Roll the paste into small balls. spread it it on a dish. Move them from the and store tin while they are warm. and put them VERY FINE COCOANUT MACAROONS. let dry gradually for a Add to it double its weight of fine sifted sugar. and couple of days. only a small spoonful at a time. place Roll the mixture into small buttered tin. them on a in and bake them a very gentle oven. then stir in the almonds. balls. Rasp a fresh cocoanut. and place them on sheets Place the of paper some distance apart. . them in a very dry canister as soon as they are cold. sheets of paper on cake-tins.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and the whites of eight eggs. 391 then pound them in a the eggs till mortar to a paste. Whisk they are to a dry froth. in a cool oven. beaten to a solid froth.

. flour. and bake them oven. 441. three eggs. "to have hands tied to prevent their doing harm. one pint of molasses. roll cakes." said he. on being appointed Regent of France. Half a pound of butter. cut it Knead in the dough well. and add the other it ingredients." ing. One pint of molasses. 442. one tablespoonful of flour Rub the and butter to- gether. out. insisted on having the power of pardon" I have no objection. wash them over with molasses in a and water. but I have them free to do orood. two pounds of salaeratus. COMMON GINGERBREAD. cupful four cupfuls of flour. moderate The Duke of Orleans.392 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. one of sour . half a teacupful of ginger. The hand of diligence defeateth want prosperity and success are the industrious man's attendants. my will SOFT GINGER CAKE.

flour alternately. he would reckon himself half distracted. whisk the eggs light. 443. "but of all noises. mixed." replied the doctor. If a man should write down his thoughts. one pound of flour. a sonato on the pianoforte. and read them at night. but of one day." A SUGAR CAKE. I think music is the least disao-reeable. one cupful of butter and lard. dissolved in taste'. spices according to the LADY. Beat the butter and sugar together. and be greatly amazed at himself . and bake in a moderate oven. " No. madam. with the most brilliant execution. 393 cream. after performing. pound of eggs. Johnson. Half a pound of butter. so as to form a Roll it out. one teaspoonful of saloeratus. in cakes.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and add them cut — then it stir in the milk and dough. three milk enough to form a dough. in the presence of Dr. took the liberty of asking him if he was fond of music. the cream. half a sugar. turning to the philosopher.

the same quantity of fresh butter. — . 394 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. cakes. Gracious hearts reflect most upon themselves they do not seek so much what to reprove in others. Take half a pound of flour. eleven eggs beaten light. as what to amend in themselves they love to look inward and he'mg sensible of their own failings. bake Mix all well together.. . on the weaknesses of others. Eleven ounces of flour. Make tin. into a paste. rub the and add the yolk of an egg beaten of cream. with a tablespoonful and two it tablespoonfuls of rosewater. are tender in reflectino. and a quarter then mix to in of a pound of sifted sugar gether the butter. 445. 444. —young eyes will NAPLES BISCUITS. and three quarters of a pound of sugar. and in small tins. SUGAR CAKES. roll and cut it into small round which bake upon a floured Hope is the prophet of youth always look forward. . flour and sugar.

serenades given as a lure. times led out from the pla}^ tickets for two or three times. those who are most prying into the lives of others. THE FAMILY S AYE-ALL. cut the cakes with a cutter. are most careless in reforming their own. Bake in a moderate oven. oaths how much they endure. Cut up the butter and put in the flour and the sugar. Knead it till it becomes perfectly smooth and it light. messages sent in one day. 446. balls or love-letters writ all in rhymes months. DEAN swift's RECEIPT FOR COURTSHIP. . keeping strict to these rules. two or three treats. a quarter of a pound of butter. one teaspoonful of dissolved salaeratus.. in the salseratus and milk together. 395 Whereas. Can never fail making a couple of fools. three quarters of a pound of sugar. TRAVELLER'S BISCUIT. so as to form a dough. or the top of a tumbler. Two Two Two Two Two Two Two Two Two or or or or or or or or or three three three three three three three three three dears and two or three sweets. milk sufficient to form a dough. Roll in sheets about the eighth of an inch thick. Two pounds flour.

one egg. . finely sifted.. Half a pound of dry one pound of loaf sugar. cut it into small cakes. a quarter of a pound of butter. beaten light. Mix the whole with a wineglassful of brandy or rum. 396 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. BISCUITS. and a quarter of a pound of dried currants then add half a pint of milk. in which has been dissolved a quarter of a teaspoonful of soda. one pound of butter. 448. Mix together one pound of flour. powdered. a quarter of a pound of sugar. and bake in a quick oven. and bake them on tins in a tolerably cool oven. roll out to a thin paste. CINNAMON BISCUITS. flour. WINE 447. Roll out the dough quite thin. and an ounce of cinnamon.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 449. salt. The stream of boiling milk should not be thicker at first than a coarse knitting-needle. three quarters of a sugar. 397 LUNCH BISCUITS. the boiling milk Stir very gradually on the eggs and sugar. 450. till One pound and a half of half a pound of butter. pound of solved. thoroughly mixed. DOUGHNUTS. flour. in cakes. When luke- warm. melt in Boil one quart of it new milk. a teaspoonful of soda. a little and 25 flour enough to form a very thick . beating it all the time. stir in a teacupful of yeast. dis- Beat the butter and sugar together flour. cut them and bake quickly. and half a pound of butter. Beat three eggs with two pounds of sugar and two grated nutmegs. then add the as and much milk as will form a dough. Roll into sheets.

three quarsugar. half pound of butter. and on all just and fit occasions open our mouths with boldness in the cause of God and goodness. 452. one of rosewater. the second time. 451. Henceforth let us have a care of our words. ever speak to some useful purpose. one egg. batter or a very soft dough. ters of a One pound pound of of flour. CHRISTMAS JUMBLES. When Let quite it rise add a little more flour. and then boil the dough- nuts in lard. half pound of butter. one glass of wine.398 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. let us give our voice to wisdom. dis- . one nutmeg. and half a pound of dried currants. one pound of raisins. DUTCH LOAF. one pound of sugar. Two pounds of flour. a teaspoonful of soda. light. two eggs.

and sugar together.^" A STOLLEN. . pound of of bitter sweet and quarter of six a pound of almonds. pounds of one one and three quarter pounds of sifted butter. one quart of milk. found him at home in his study." replied the writer. set To be to rise with good yeast. whisk the stir in and add them. one pound of raisins.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. solved in 399 enough buttermilk a to mix the Beat the eggs. GENTLEMAN having occasion to call upon an author. well ounces citron. four eggs. and said. one pound of currants. batter to batter proper consistency." "So it ought to be. pound and a half of half loaf sugar. " for here it is I make my bread . the flour and but- Add the fruit last. as the fruit will not admit of a hot oven. He remarked the great heat of the apartment. A FAMOUS GERMAN CAKE. four 453. beaten. Bake slowly. " It is as hot as an oven. warmed. The butter. flour. Ingredients. rosewater and spices to your liking. then termilk.

It is makes us LUNCHEON CAKE. but what we remember. into which stir as much flour as will make a thick batter. and as make a soft dough. let rise again. . it much milk as will Knead it well. and a quarter of a pound of raisins Flour the fruit. to and be worked in afterward. that makes us strong. 454. It is not what we eat. and bake in a moderate oven. pound dried currants nicely washed.. It is not what we read. and add it to the sponge when light. that makes us learned. and a a cupful of of home-made yeast. not what we earn. Stir together half a pound of sugar with three ounces of butter add this. with one pound of flour. other ingredients. All this is very simple. Make a sponge of a pint of lukewarm water. Have stoned. to the other ingredients. Add a little salt. 400 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. but it is worth recollecting. but what we digest. but what we save. put it it in a pan. that rich.

Mrs. Sir Richard asked his servant for the oil. Before he left his home he gave it in charge to his man. then add the yeast. when wanted. of a One pound of flour. add the sugar. and . 455. Piozzi mentioned one of Sir Richard Jebb. and stir in lastly the spices to and rose water. and let it rise Butter your pans. pound of sugar. it is all used. and gave it to the company !" SPANISH BUNS. half a pint of milk. sir ?" " I put it in the castor.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. eggs. very pure. half a teaspoonful of nutmeg. beat the eggs very light. " Used !" said Sir Richard. The the fill next morning second time. After a lapse of a considerable time. and when. stir it again. One day somebody had given him a bottle of castor oil. one teaspoonful of cinna- mon. four one gill of yeast. with milk enough form a very thick batter. Cut up the butter and rub it well with the flour. It had but lately been brought into use. " Oh. " how. telling him to be careful of it. half a pound of two tablespoonfuls of rose-water. three-quarters butter. 401 After telling several amusing anecdotes." replied he.

456." said an extravagant wife to a too frugal husband. Mix : well together the following ingredients One pound of raisins. Simpkins. . one pound of currants. a saltspoonful of powdered ginger. six ounces of mixed canal- died peel. well washed and dried. three ounces of sweet monds. them and When they are done cold. stoned and chopped. for our little Ah. duck}'. " Plenty of chairs. three parts full. and a saltspoonful of white pepper add two fresh eggs beaten with a tablespoonful of brandy. Simpkins. Make a dough as follows : Rub . sift sugar over. Mr. SCOTCH SPICED BUN. the same of powdered cinnamon. chopped. half a powdered cloves. but a ^^ replied Mr. we have not chairs enough company. a grain of Cayenne. much company. a saltspoon- saltspoonful of ful of caraway seeds. and with a sharp knife cut " them in squares. blanched and chopped. with a knowing wink. six ounces of moist sugar.4l02 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

Rub into a pint of flour. 457. and heard waverer. for nearly three and bake in a slow oven hours. knead to a dough ." " He is at me already. of a preacher singularly happy in his choice of texts. driven J)y winds. and tin . press it over .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. gave out the text in the following words James the first and sixth. and one teacupful and a . The preacher. line a long plain cake press the corners. put in the down closely cover over with dough . of England and YI. of Scotland was a He was aware of this defect. turn it out of the tin. and tossed. pound of add a saltspoonful of salt . James appointed him to preach before him. with a small teaspoonful of carbonate of soda dissolved in it . When cold. . notch the edge round with a knife. six ounces of lard into one 403 flour. : POOR MAN'S POUNL CAKE. that he might put his abilities to the test. with the utmost gravity." said the King. James I. moisten with the third of a pint of tepid water. in the latter part of the verse : " He that wavereth is like a wave of the sea. roll out the third of an inch thick. that the crust all may be of equal thickness fruit. one tea- cupful of butter.

" Then. who never knew what fear was.. Wnisk the whites flour. reading aji ostentatious inscription on the monument of a Spanish officer. beaten. TEST OF COURAGE. one cup of flour. as cake. Beat the sugar and to yolks froth." said the king. In the latter case use two eggs instead of one. flour. One cup of sio^ar. " he never snuflfed a candle with his fingers. and milk. To in a this Bake mould or may be eaten hot. with sauce. in which mix with a cup of sour add one egg well dish. and add them with the Mix and the cream of tartar dry with the dissolve the soda in water or milk. The son of a small shopkeeper having put some candles Jn a cellar one day." etc. together. half of sugar. and of cream of tartar.. of France. 458. his father told him he ." A — RAILEOAD CAKE. Henry lY. " Here lies the body of Don. one teaspoonful of soda. two a three eggs. or when cold. It a teaspoonful of soda has been dissolved.404 THE FAMILY SAVE. etc. as a pudding.ALL.

Three pounds of flour. to mould candles. and that they would be likely to mould. 405 thought it was too damp a place for them. and perhaps they will turn . set it to rise when light. " Likely to mould 1" replied the lad "if that is the case. a small teacupful of home-made rose-water.. out gently with as little . one pound butter. yeast. Roll it out." CRULLERS. and flour enough to form a dough. half a pound of gill sugar. ounces of butter. one of thick cream. and a tablespoon ful of Mix roll all together. cut the dough into strips. 459. 460. twist them and drop them in boiling lard. one teaspoonful of cinnamon. WONDERS. of sugar. a quarter of a pound of nine eggs well beaten. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. we had better put all our dips there. three Four eggs.

ounces of three ounces of sugar. in the course of a discussion on the Poor Laws " You must bear in mind. COMMON PLUM 462. twist them. Add . I am aware of that you turned it all to A the — into cheese several yean ago /" JENNY LIND CAKES. that I have got rid of that sort of stutf which you poets Lamb looked at call ''milk of human kindness/" him steadily. in lard. said to Charles Lamb. three spoonfuls of sour little soda dissolved. one cup of sugar. and enough a stiff" make batter. and milk half a tea- enough to form a dough. sir. One pound and butter. three ounces of currants. " Yes. one egg. a flour to One spoonful of butter. and gave acquiescence in these pithy words. and boil them RETIRED cheesemonger. who hated any allusion business that had enriched him. 461. three CAKE. a half of flour. as possible. cut the dough in strips. milk.— 406 flour THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

Beat the butter and sugar together. and half a teaspoonful of soda. no. One pound of flour. 463. after that I shan't think an}^ thing about it. one large teaspoonful of cream of tartar. cupful of 407 home-made yeast with the milk set it to rise. A friend No." said the fair mourtried to console her. whisk the eggs very light and add stir in them flour . and bake in a moderate oven. when light. who had just lost her husband. and. grease your pan. dissolved separately. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. half pound of sugar. A WIDOW. was weeping bitterly for the dear departed. three eggs. ner. then the cream of tartar. add the soda." *' LOAF CAKE. half pound of butter.. . *'let me have my cry out. bake it in a moderate oven. and stiff with milk enough to make a very batter.

and skim fill then add the sugar. Boil the it. The best cure for low spirits is business. 2. CURRANT JELLY. No. ETC. When the sugar is add a piece of isinglass.408 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The best fun in the world is activity. 1. PRESERVES. and squeeze the juice through your pint of juice allow a pound of white dissolved. No. and cold. 464. When prove a fine jelly. Squeeze the juice out of the which must have been picked on Measure the juice. JELLIES. jelly bag. CURRANT JELLY. twenty minutes. it will your glasses. currants. and to every pint weigh out a juice pound of sugar. Mash your To every fruit with a wooden spoon. a dry day. dissolved . sugar. 465. One half of the melancholy that you run against is caused by indolence.

only requires but three quarters of a pound of sugar to a pint of juice. to clarify the jelly. The next day put brandy paper over them. and paste them. kind to use for this purpose. oranges. bottom in a mass. the jelly done. Squeeze the juice from the and to every pint of the juice add a pound of sugar and a quarter of an ounce of dissolved isinglass is the isinglass. Black currant jelly it is made in the same way. ORANGE JELLY. and put in glasses while warm. The Kussian formed.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 466. then take it the fire. in 409 warm water. it till Boil and skim a jelly is which you may tell by letting a drop fall in if it falls to is a glass of cold water — and the Or. will be sufficient. A quarter of an ounce of isinglass to five pints of juice. it till Boil and skim it off a jelly is formed. .

that they lose their hardness.ALL. The grapes have is which not unpalatable. Grapes are preserved in vinegar after the following fashion. GRAPES PRESERVED IN VINEGAR. little out in a spoon. CALVES' FEET FOR JELLIES. by the Persians The grapes and put into are gathered when half ripe. bottles half filled with vinegar. 467. and yet do not become too a sweet acid taste. let the wrath of another be a lesson to thyself. See'st thou not that the angry man loseth his understanding ? Whilst thou art yet in thy senses. which so macerates them. 468. Always select those feet which have been dressed with the skins on — they . and especially refreshing during the great heats.410 take a THE FAMILY SAVE. soft. and expose it to the cool air for a few minutes.

washed. and soaked for an hour or two. Boil it the whole about five minutes. Take out the lemon. It may be flavored with wine instead of the lemon.THE FAMILY SAVE. One of the company began bathing her temples and head with rum. Mix two tablespoonfuls of arrow- root with half a pint of water. Have ready half a pint of boiling water in which some lemon peel has been boiled. " For goodness' sake put nothing on that will change the color of hairP^ my ARROWROOT JELLY. and those which have better in quality. Before cooking. . pour the dissolved arrowroot into the boiling water. 469. A LADY thought it would look interesting to faint away at a party the other evening. when the lady exclaimed. and pour in a mould or dish to get cold. the feet should be thoroughly scraped. add sufficient sugar to sweeten it.ALL. will 411 make a larger quantity of jelly. and nutmeg to the taste. than been skinned.

as gives small fruits a handsome a syrup fruit. every six . dissolved in warm the water. large. When sugar is dissolved. Make of a pound of sugar to each pound of and a gill of water to a pound of sugar. bursting. add a quarter of an ounce of isinglass. to prevent them from Leave a portion of the stem on it each. To a pound of fruit. and take out the core. 470. 471. make the syrup. appearance on the table. PRESERVED PEARS. dissolved warm water. the sugar with just enough water to wet it. to five pounds of sugar.412 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. PRESERVED GREEN GAGES. and cook the fruit until it is clear. and if they are each one in four pieces. weigh a dissolve pound of sugar. Add a quarter of an in ounce of to isinglass. Prepare the fruit by pricking each one with a needle. cut Peel the pears.

Wash the kettle. put it When the sugar dis- with the dissolved isinglass over the it fire. PEACH MARMALADE. and pour the syrup over warm. boil. Put in the jars while warm. looks clear. put the fruit in jars. and boil it it till. and to a pound of fruit add a sugar. strain the syrup. 472. by holding one toward the light. put the syrup back again. Paste them up the next day. it the sugar is dis- over the fire. set till it is Pare and cut up the peaches in small pieces. solved. put in the fruit. 413 is pounds of sugar. and paste them over the next day. Take the gages out one at a time. and it let it boil smooth Stir all the time it is boiling. it When paste.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and skim it —then pour out of the kettle. pound of solved. 26 .

this will be found a very good receipt. put one third of the sugar to the Let . . cider. A (English) is supposed to consume annually the produce of rather more than three and one eighth acres of land half an acre of — human being — bread . pieces . Take equal weights and breaking the till of fruit and fire together. bruise the fruit with the back of a spoon. and put on the stirring fruit till the sugar melts. Pare the rind. PINE-APPLE MARMALADE. RASPBERRY JAM. 474.. one eighth for beer. moist sugar. and boil them together more juice is for half an hour. juice of currants. one fiftieth for vegetables two and a half for animal food. then boil it will jelly on a Though simple. . etc. add the as for jelly. Keep plate. take equal weight and roughly-pounded loaf sugar. of fruit Or. drawn Consumption of Agricultural Produce. 473. If a little wanted. and cut into small the same weight of sugar as fruit fruit. 414 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

rub off the skins with a cloth. let stand for two or three days. and about a minute and a will out.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. of half a Make to a syrup pound of sugar a pound of . 475. then boil clear with the re- mainder of the sugar. with another third of the sugar. so as to extract the juice. known by the name of the '' Heath peach. BRANDY PEACHES. let them remain Take them half. lemon. and throw them into another vessel of cold water. Let it stand again another it day or two. gives to the marmalade an agreeable acid. if The juice of a added. it 415 stand it all night. or until the skin rub off with your finger. Select the white cling-stones. When are done in this manner. then repeat the boiling. for Boil on the following day it a short time. and throw them all in a vessel of cold water. put in a few peaches at a time." Make a hot ley of ashes and water.

—prepare it in the in same manner as for let preserves. Lay thick paper over the fruit in the jar. set the jar in a saucepan of cold water. their shape. if packed too closely.416 fruit THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. When and put it into your jars. Take them and add to each pint of syrup a quart of the very best white brandy. cork. the fruit is cool. fire. . remove the and As soon as it is quite let cool. into a jar that has a close cover. them one a piece of and brandy sufficient to cover them. out. and them to be boil until they are sufficiently tender easily pierced with a straw. Put your peaches. APRICOTS IN BRANDY. and when the brandy becomes jar. put it over the hot. fourth Put apricots. 476. seal securely. add to their weight of sugar. fill leave plenty of room to them with the they lose syrup — as. whole. Do not the brandy remain on the fire after it is hot.

the fruit will break in half. put on the fire to ten pounds of sugar add the half of the white of an egg. 417 PRESERVED PEACHES. Set the kettle over the . by placing one hand on each half of the peach.'* known by name of the "Heath Insert the knife at the stem and cut them longitudinally through to the stone. With a pointed may easily be extracted. for Then weigh fruit. and allow a to of water each pound of sugar. dissolved fuls of water. 477. Choose the the white cling-stones. or a piece of Russian isinglass.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. all After the peaches have been prepared in this manner. a pound of sugar each pound of Put the sugar into gill a preserving kettle. leaving the stone attached to knife it one side. it is Let the sugar it stand until is perfectly dissolved before . peach. well beaten. and suddenly giving each a turn in opposite directions . Wring out the stones. pare and weigh them. about an inch square. in two tablespoonfire.

lukewarm. and pour it into a wash the kettle. as soon as it. a piece at a time. Stem the masher. put them a a pan. and place it over a brisk the fruit boil fast for about an hour and a quarter. the and pour the syrup over STRAWBERRY 478. when held on a fork toward the Then take your Put the syrup peaches out very carefully. and inside of the sieve. rub strawberries. to rise. let pour the fruit to syrup back into the kettle. . which adheres to the sides. skim When scum has ceased fire. and with a wooden spoon or potato them fine.418 and THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. add the it. and place them on in pans until fruit in jars. Now fire. take the syrup off the pan. Then put it. in JELLY. it is dishes. Put sieve over a pan. or until it appears translucent light. from boiling into the fruit. in order to pre- vent the scum. the the syrup begins to boil.

gave a quantitj^ of them to some Irish laborers. Dissolve one ounce of gelatine in half a pint of water. and paste them when A GENTLEMAN having in his garden a superabundance of peaches that were over ripe. he said they were very good. or fifteen grains of it tartaric acid). and pour into the mould. 419 strain the through this. EASPBERRY JELLY. add three quarters of a pint of raspberry syrup (with a spoonful of lemon juice. On asking one of the men how he liked the fruit. . spread a piece of thin muslin juice . and to a pint add one an ounce pound of sugar. Pour it into glasses while cold. set the kettle over the fire till and boil it it is it to is a jelly.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 479. but the seeds scratched his throat. with a quarter of of isinglass dissolved. warm. boil and skim. When the sugar is dis- solved. in water to every five pounds of sugar.

ALL. it sheds a brightness over every thing it is the sweetener of toil. Good temper is like a sunny day. PUNCH JELLY. upon the punch. till pan with and let them boil gently reduced to two quarts. the juice oranges four lemons. and put in a mould. . and the soother of disquietude. a wineglassful of brandy. Melt the isinglass in a pint or it more of boil- ing water. one ounce and a half of isinglass. and one of rum. Put a into a set of calf's feet. five quarts of water. let quite cold. then strain fine sieve it quite hot through a Stir it. 480.420 THE FAMILY SATE. then add one . of four Take a pound Seville of loaf sugar. and clear from the sediment. CALF'S FEET JELLY. skim the fat off clean. Beat the whites of eight eggs to a froth. well cleaned. the jelly become Then take the jelly out the feet. 481.

and the peel of five or six. it If loosening the edges and shaking the sufficient.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The or eggs and wine must be carefully mixed. to prevent . and be nearly cold before going into the mould. pour it into a flannel and it let it run into a basin. it and then put into the pan. will curdle. from curdling then add a little more stock it and still keep stirring. after boilit pouring into the bag. before settle a little. take three spoonfuls of it and keep stirring it with the wine and eggs. . Sweeten it to the taste (about two pounds and a quarter of loaf sugar). is boiling. or lay under a cloth that has been dipped in hot water. jellies or blancmange is not try dipping the mould for one instant into it very hot water. let boil twenty minutes. and about the middle of the time pour in half a teacup of cold water bag. bottle 421 of raisin wine or sherry. ing. When the stock it. squeeze in the juice of from eight to twelve lemons. Keep till it pouring back into the bag gently Let it runs clear. .

will just cover them. put three-quarters . them into Quarter a peck of codlings. 483. pulp. strain through a jelly bag. as little it. one pound sugar. nearly half a bottle of raisin wine. and put into a mould. four lemons. then run them through a and to every pint of juice.422 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. white of egg necessary to clear as the egg takes from the stiffness of the jelly. dissolved in about a quart of loaf of water. put a preserving-pan with the peel of a lemon. JELLY WITH GELATINE. 482. or a little brandy and is less of the wine. add as much spring water as Boil the whole to a jelly-bag. Take two ounces and three quar- ters of gelatine. Boil altogether. APPLE JELLY. of a pound of good loaf-sugar boil it fast . a small piece of cinnamon. and six cloves.

but do not press it . but not jelly. To into JELLY. Crabs greatly improve this to be had. MARMALADE 484. August the best time to make when the codlings are full grown. skimming until it then pour the whole through a jelly-bag. take what remains in the bag. put three pints of water. this jelly. keeping out all the seeds. little ripe. until it 423 jellies. This method saves the and prevents waste. a and when they are not lemon juice. boiling and will jelly .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. cut the oranges quarters. every pound of Seville oranges. and boil the same time. and boil it a quarter of an hour for jam. Jelly may be made fruit of any kind of fruit by putting the with its into a preserving-pan own weight it of sugar. . then pour is it into pots or moulds. trouble of pressing. and put the juice into another stew-pan.

424 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. but very quickly. run all through a jelly-bag. The peel requires to be boiled some hours. or even longer. tiH the water becomes a thick . At Sam Rackett's we can cut the sofa. it is tender . 485. then boil least half it at an hour. and not pared. this ain't a nice house. and ride the shovel and tongs over the carpet but here we can't have any fun at all !" . to take off the bitter. put a quantity of the fairest golden pippins. " mamma. in slices not very thin. first. Into two quarts of boiling water." said a little fellow. separate the rind and steep it in water twenty-four hours. and to every pint add one pound of loaf sugar. then boil the peel slowly till with the oranges. is A lemon or two. TO PRESERVE WHOLE OR HALF aUINCES. and pull out the hair. cut up with the oranges. Boil them close covered. whose mother had "Mamma. an improvement. forbade him to draw horses and ships on the mahogany sideboard with a sharp nail. wiped clean.

them remain a . 486. skim it. boil it. put one pound of the finest sugar . fortnight clean out the pulp boil them till tender. The quantity jelly. let When you have squeezed the throw the peels -into salt . and one pound of sugar. and when they are tolerably dry. 425 then scald the quinces. juice. and let it boil very and those that are . before taking it off the fire. jelly. fast . boil a small quantity of syrup of common loaf sugar and . whole into the syrup at once. and when the fruit is put some of the syrup into a glass to it try whether jellies.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. to one pound of sugar. and skim it clear. to be in halves by themselves clear. those quinces that are to be done. To every Put pint of pippin jelly. of quinces is to be one pound. and water. already boiled with the TO KEEP ORANGES OR LEMONS FOR PASTRY. strain them.

other roots. eighty-one hundred pounds.426 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and put over them . and simmer . will generally find. . kept in syrup. water. in a week boil them gently in it. that the ei^eninrfs amusement hear the mornincfs reflection. and several will not hours longer. and dried as wanted. They may be rich. on consulting the looking-glass. Pare them very thin. two thousand quarts of milk a year. A cow consumes on an average one hundred pounds of green food in twenty-four hours. for one hundred and eighty-five days of summer. Make drain the syrup richer. This. and simmer again. this till and repeat they are clear. One. 487. is eighteen thousand five hundred pounds. TO PRESERVE PEARS. which makes them more moist and Jargo- nelles are the best for this purpose. a very time. In winter. in the then and dry them little sun or a cool oven. till they look clear. . forty-five pounds of roots a day or for one hundred and eighty days. if well fed. third of this may be potatoes the rest. A YOUNG lady. after danciugall night. But she gives. in a thin syrup let them lie a day or two.

To improve the flavor of a melon. for and slow let fire. as to permit the scooping out of the seeds. on the last day it is ing the syrup until very rich. Scrape off th^ thin outside skin. take it out and put into a preserving-pan. taking care not to allow it to boil . water and sugar. as will cover it . and the juice of two lemons. then fill up the hollow with . 427 TO PRESERVE A MELON. or white wine close the . it remain Eepeat an hour. make a hole in the top. THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. with the rind of one. on three successive days. for half an for three hour every day boil- ensuing days. and as much water then cover the pan closely. drain the melon carefully out of the liquor. closely covered. cut out so much of the large end. set it over a slow fire. make a thin syrup. and put it into the syrup.. 488. and after it has remained twelve it hours. take out the seeds then throw the melon into water. on a very this process three times. take it when nearly ripe. with a large piece of loaf-sugar.

the nectarines. take out the stones. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Here. The next day take them out of the sugar. 489. you may sometimes copy the gambler. the syrup. cover them. drain them. Skim the liquor. reverses. clarified and put the nectarines into they take it sugar well. till Split the fruit. dusting sugar over them . and lay them on a stove. and them by until the next day. Play the game of boldly. give them a good boil. boiling until it will flow put in skim. for as many days will d^ as it remains good. TO PRESERVE NECTARINES.428 top. place them separately. put the melon in a net exposed to the sun. . who doubles his stakes as fast Sink not beneath life as he loses. set cover the nectarines with paper. it Add sugar to . or into a cool oven to dry. the next day put them on the stove. but mush melon requires no im- provement. acquire A loater melon thus a fine flavor. at least.

but put in the things as they come into season. Those people who turn np their noses at the world. SAUCES. any of these lay them on a hair sieve. If the fruit is put in. Take white cabbage quartered. or till very dry . bruised close. French beans. 429 PICKLES. might do well to reflect that it is as good a world as they were ever in. . THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. then prepare the cabbage. The jar need never be emptied. cauliflowers. . put into a gallon of vinegar. plums all. 27 . with two ounces of pepper. or apples. OR INDIAN PICKLE. adding fresh vinegar. and salt water. it must be green. melons. and a much better one than they are likely ever to get into again.. strew over a large handful of salt. set them in the sun for three or four days. a quarter of a pound of mustard seed. cucumbers. the next day scrape and slice it and dry it in the sun. half an ounce of turmeric. put them pickle into a stone jar with the following : Put a pound of ginger into salt it. PICCALILLI. ETC. 490. stop the pickle etc.

he was thus detected. complained to the Cadi. PICKLED ONIONS. and pour To each quart of the vinegar." The thief. and so on are cooked jars. and a tablespoonful of mustard seed . half a tablespoonful of pep- per grains. Giving each a piece of stick. when they are cold. as soon as they look place clear. 4-91. half a dozen cloves. put them in spiced vinegar over them. when they were summoned bj^ the Cadi to produce their sticks. and throw a few at a time in a pan of boiling salt and water . Choose snrnll white onions. boil all these spices in it. all of equal lengths. alarmed. peel them. three or four small pieces of mace. person having a bag of coin stolen from his house. take them out carefully. and pour boiling hot. and sieve to dry. " whoever is the thief. . over the pickles. he said. who ordered all the people of the house before him. the vinegar.430 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. —A . his stick will be a finger's breadth longer than the rest. cut a finger's breadth off his stick and next day. Oriental justice. then put in till all them on a more. put one tablespoonful of whole allspice. .

and pour the vinegar over when cold.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Three cabbages. Cut the cab- bages as for slaw . 492. peace. Choose two middling-sized. in which there is no — parade nor affectation. 493. shred them very pulling off the outside leaves. colored. a first mix with them half them up for pound of and let salt. well and firm cabbages. tie in a thin cloth. twenty-five pepseed. cleanliness. pers. chop the peppers very . which manifest themselves in kind words and alfectionate looks cluster natu- — rally and gracefully. The bright fire is the eye of the home . 431 PICKLED RED CABBAGE. half an ounce of black pepper. finely. then boil a quart of vine- gar. CHOW CHOW. chipped. Put the cabbage into it jars. half a pint of mustard three sticks of horseradish. with an ounce of ginger. about it the sweet courtesies of life. and a quarter of an ounce of cloves. comfort. them hang twelve hours. it bespeaks cheerfulness.

Put little in a jar. but kings are scarce. of the brine. up the jars with cold vinegar.. he asked for two or three eggs. " How is this ?" said his majesty. PICKLED TOMATOES. THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. and stand the whole away . 494.432 fine. which were brought him. needle. on a journey to Hanover. gar. this some so on. them with and lay them them hours. to be paid. a salt." " Pardon me. horseradish till all is and then mustard fill and in. and charged two hundred florins. " eggs must be very scarce in the place. I. in strong salt and water eight days. in every quart of which dissolve two ounces of sugar. with hot or cold meat. very then a layer of peppers. and lay for twenty-four Then take them out in vinegar and water. a layer of cabbage. prick Take one peck a large of ripe tomatoes. " eggs are plenty enough. This is very good. Scald a dozen small onions in vineto get cold." The king smiled and ordered the money villaofe George in Holland. stopped at a and while the horses were sretting read}'. sprinkle over seed." said the host.

433 Drain the tomatoes. He stood confounded. and boil it half an hour. No. . Great was my anxiety to know the success of my measure and it succeeded only too well. . Day passed after day. his fingers sought again for the button. At length I observed that when a question was asked him. spices in the proportion given boil and add the below. In his distress he looked down for it it was to be seen no more than to be felt. he always fumbled with his fingers at a particular button in the lower part of his waistcoat. When the boy was again questioned. with two wineseed. . and I ''took him down.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. strain it Cut the fruit in half. TOMATO CATSUP. glasses of cloves. became expedient in my eye and in an evil moment. and still he kept his place. it was cut off. To remove that button. 495. mustard and an ounce of Force of habit. do what I would. squeeze out the juice and through a hair sieve or coarse cloth. . therefore. and add them to the cold onions and vinegar. Let the whole three hours. who stood always : — at the top nor could I with all my efforts supplant him." . Sir Walter Scott saj^s " There was a boy in my class at school. 1. but it was not to be found.

when they sieve. 2. 496. Salt to suit the taste. and sprinkle over some salt then another layer of tomatoes. put a layer in a deep vessel. thus drained out. . powdered. the grocer always sends it an ounce short ?" " Oh. my dear. when you must add half a pint of vinegar for each peck of to- matoes. dear. Slice the tomatoes. half ounce of mace. pound of is it. and all salt till are in. half ounce spice. one quarter ounce of black. fire to boil. over the Add Cayenne pepper. over a slow stand till Pour it out. fire. are soft. it's only a j^eculiar Why weigh he has !" TOMATO CATSUP. mace. 434 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. two ounces mustard. whole black pepper. half all finely " all- ounce cloves. them through a and put the pulp. that whenever we send for a tea or coffee. Stand them in the sun for two pass or three days. No. and let it the next day. For each peck of tomatoes.. one eighth of an ounce of red pepper.

mace. we would prefer to he eaten by the gentle- man of the hou^ey PEPPER SAUCE. as spokesman for his brother.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. a tablespoonful of and two of . When cold. allspice. add a clove of garlic. a tablespoon^ ful of mustard seed." which is not to be matched in literature of higher preten- my During the parley with the Ogre's wife. and peppers. hero says. let boil it is it. oil bottle it off. a tablespoonful ojp whole allspice. a couple of sprigs of salt. a charming tit-bit A MATTER OP TASTE. a dozen cloves. cloves. to a quart of the cut cabbage. on the top of each and is seal the corks. Cut some green peppers very fine with double the quantity of cabbage. " If you do iiot give us a night's lodging. and sooner than that. 497. by tasting if it is you can judge seasoned to your taste. the sions. —There in the quaint history of " Hop o' Thumb. if thick. put a tablespoonful of sweet bottle. add a stick of horseradish grated. 435 and a it little till race ginger. you like . it is quite certain that the wolves in the forest will devour us.

498. To of vinegar. one gill Grate a stick of horseradish. it and while hot. and the same of sugar. in three pints of good vinegar. pour over the peppers and cabbage. 1. add to it as much vinegar as will cover it. a little Mix them well together. a little salt. . When dry cold. with salt. and keep in a cool. Boil the spices and sugar. No. HOESERADISH SAUCE.436 sugar. Grate a stick of horseradish. and stir into the horseradish. 499. 2. add a small tablespoon- ful of mustard. and a teaspoonful of sugar. place. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. cover the jars. HORSERADISH SAUCE. No.

rolled in Stew very slowly. Thicken with a piece of flour. No. and an onion minced fine. per. Boil equal quantities of onions in another . Peel a quart of mushrooms. No. butter.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. add a piece of butter rolled in flour. 2. 500. 437 1. When the vegeis tables This sauce good with cold meat. with about a pint of button mushrooms. put them into a stew-pan. 501. VEGETABLE SAUCE. put them into a stew-pan with the water which adheres to them. Season with Cayenne pepper and salt. POTATO SAUCE. Season with salt and pep- stew them slowly. are tender serve it. and when nearly done. Slice half a dozen large tomatoes. VEGETABLE SAUCE. 502. Boil some potatoes till tender.

when the latter are soft. salt. ful Peel some tomatoes and cut them Make oil. Add Then cut the potatoes in pieces about an inch square. . mixed mustard. Mix this dress- ing with the tomatoes and serve them^ This is a good sauce for cold roast beef. to pour in enough vinegar to it Dish up immediately. half a teaspoonful of per. add them to the onions. drain fine. them season also a through a colander. in slices. and serve is hot.438 pot. 503. and flavor. again a few minutes. mash them highly with pepper and piece of butter. This sauce an accompaniment to any kind of cold roast meat or poultry. cayenne pep- and salt to the taste. mix them fire well together. put them over the get hot.ALL. a dressing of a tablespoon- of sweet the same of vinegar. TOMATO SAUCE. THE FAMILY SAVE.

Put them little in a pre- serving kettle with very water. chop Pick and wash some spear mint. pepper and and add a piece of butter. and pour on enough vinegar gill to wet it. 439 ONION SATJCE. MINT SAUCE. season them with salt. Mix it CRANBERRY SAUCE. add a well. 505. to each Pick and wash the cranberries. To each of vinegar. 504. Stew them till they are soft. soft. and allow three quarters of a pound of sugar pound of fruit.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. them "When in Peel some white onions. and boil milk and water. mash them. and pour them into . it fine. without salt. 506. quarter of a pound of sugar.

507. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. them in a Pare and slice some apples. soft. APPLE SAUCE. put little stewpan with very water. apples and quinces proportions. In the morning . Ripe quinces make a good sauce prepared in the same way as directed for apples. Or.440 moulds. cover them to keep in the steam. When mash them. Wash some Let them stand all dried apples. The good are better made by ill. 508. Rinse the moulds in cold water to prevent them from sticking. may be mixed in equal DRIED APPLE SAUCE. ana pour over them enough hot w^ater to cover them. and add sugar to the taste. night. As odors crushed are sweeter still.

When quite soft. to the taste. 509. mash them. add some more. SAUCE. then add gradually the white of one egg beaten to a froth. Sweeten DRIED PEACH SAUCE. into a kettle. WINE 510. manner They are prepared in the same as dried apples. and . They may be sea- soned with cinnamon or nutmeg. boil a few minutes. and if there is not enough water to cook them.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. They slices are greatly improved by stewing some of lemon peel with them. and a tablespoonful of stir this into a half pint of boiling water. 441 put the apples and the water they were soaked in. to which add Let enough sugar it to make it quite sweet. Mix together two ounces of butter flour .

it will certainly be tough. and the fat hard and skinny. it gill Grate nutmeg over and serve while hot. yolk of a fresh eg^ with half a fresh cream. 512. . open grain the color of the fat should be white. Stir over a slow it fire till the sauce thickens then serve ^ at once. It is of tine.ALL. If the color be dark and of a brick dust hue. of thick Add the milk slowly mix in by degrees the strained juice of a lemon. LIVER SAUCE. of new milk. Boil the livers of fowls a few min. 442 a it. WHITE SAUCE FOR 511. utes in water rub them fine with part of Ihe water in which they have been boiled . beat the gill . easily distinguislied Good beef eye. is by a practiced . THE FAMILY SAVE.. and dear at any price. Boil a gill FISH. smootli. and unwholesome. of Madeira wine. and the lean a bright red.

hot vinegar and sugar as will cover them to each gallon of vinegar allow four pounds of sugar. found One of the guests. 443 and some butter comes This As soon it as the sauce fire. season with pepper. remove the specked ones. '* Why. all Pick over your cherries. remove from the sauce is good with cold roasted fowl or Serve it turkey. " Have you such a thing as a powder flask ?" "No. pour it hot over . then pour off the vineit gar and boil as before. I sir.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. rolled in flour. Boil fruit. and pour over them much . taking supper at a country tavern. do you want one?" think the shortest way would be to blow this fellow A PICKLED CHERRIES. and skim Let it it. salt. hot. after the poultry rather tough. yes. exercising his ingenuit}" to no eifect in tr3'ing to dissect an old fowl. 513. in a sauce tureen while PARTY. to the boil. turned to the waiter and asked. Put them into a as jar. and pour it hot over the stand a week. we have not.

As soon as they are cold tie them closely. yet there may is be used it is a particu- lar sort for this purpose. which the gardenafter ers know. boils Stop close. Vill allow. as pickles are spoiled . with pepper. the cherries the second time. salt. and on the last. through that take out the seeds. and should be mangoed soon they are gathered. before Although any melon quite ripe. Observe that there be if plenty of vinegar. just as up. it and replace the cut pack-thread. stuff the melon as full as the space piece. sweet spices ginger. Cut a small piece out of one end. . Bind for up with To allow wasting. put flour of mustard and scraped it horseradish into the vinegar. 514. and mix with them mustard-seed and shred garlic . MANGOES. boil a good quantity of vinegar.444 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and any of the it then pour boihng hot over the mangoes for four successive days.

cut out the thick stalk. or." prepared in the same way. and upon a dry day strip off the leaves. too much them them blown. divide give it a boil. put hours to them on a colander drain. 445 Large cucumbers. and are sooner fit to be eaten. 515. if it for twenty-four When dry. and put into cold vinegar previously boiled with 28 . then put them carefully into jars. are excellent. cover- . scald and water. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and be taken out immediately. previously boiled with spices or the cauliin salt may have one boil and vinegar. which has . in salt to boil and quarter the stalk. be large. called " green turley. it.. Cut them before they are . ing them that they sprinkle may not salt lose their color them with and water. but do not allow then lay them to cool. and split the flower into eight or ten pieces. TO PICKLE CAULIFLOWERS. not well covered. and cover been them with flowers cold vinegar.

" What did his dinner consist of? Of course jou give it up. them there wash days covered then off the salt. one ounce each of mustardseed and ginger. sprin- between every for three layer.a 446 spices THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. or cinnamon. to allow some of the juice to exude. but keep it for the pickle. however. with half ounce each of mace and nutmeg. " lean wife roasted. A A — TO PICKIE TOMATOES. and leave . and here's the answer spare rib and ajDple-ssLUce. Brocoli and the tops of asparagus may be pickled in the same manner. on being asked what he had for dinner. replied. three quarts of vinegar. and cover them with a to pickle of cold vinegar. 516. be varied. Put them into a deep earthen kle salt vessel. gentIaEMAN. which add the . ones are For this purpose the small best. and the ruin of man for sauce. to every the spices may. —two ounces each of coriander-seed and turmeric. round the and each should be pricked with a fork.

517. There is a mistake. though long it has stood. tho' the saying is old. and look beautiful on the table. Pour on cold vinegar enough to cover them. juice.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. For I never heard of a cold that was good. To four large boil three eggs hard. To hear a man tell you he has a had cold must drop the saying. The eggs imbibe the color of the beets. . remove the shells. beets till tender. It makes an excellent sauce for roast meat. 447 mus- mixed with a large handful of tard-seed and one ounce each of cloves and white pepper. slice them a quarter of an inch thick. and then put in the beets with a little salt. not quite Boil your soft. but beets. as being generally sufficient for one peck of fruit. take off the skin by laying them for a few minutes in cold water it and then stripping off. put the eggs at the bottom. and will be ready in about a fortnight. We . PICKLED BEETS. when the beets are done.

to dissolve the salt. It Some add to it either shalot or garlic. dish near the or in the sun if the weather be hot. TO PICKLE LEMONS. limes. cold. cut to them deeply from end place. or very small lemons. end in more than one but not quite through.ALL. upon the lemons when It was first originally prepared by the cook of the Earl of Orford. people. and repeat this during three weeks. however. and a very and pour it little turmeric . half that quantity of cloves and allspice.448 THE FAMILY SAVE. one-quarter to one-half pound of bruised ginger. with a handful of white if it mustard-seed be large. then put them into a jar. a few chilis. the same . and fill the incisions with put each on end. Take the finest with the thickest rind you can get. 518. but will keep for many For years. salt . boil in vinegar. can hardly be ready in less than six months. and lay them in a fire.

the small long sort the best for pickling. a pickle with the ginger. minutes vinegar. pickle a little When as throw in the cuboil cumbers. and let them stand all night. pour over them a strong cover brine of salt and water boiling hot. quickly as possible for three or four . white wine vinegar. and make them a jar with closely . are If full-grown. but do not rub them . them close. and dry cloth make and boils. drain them on a . CUCUMBEKS. The next day them on a best (long stir them gently to take off the sand. pull off the blossoms. 449 will not method must be pursued. only they require above half the time.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. cover them. cold. when put in a sprig of the seed down- . put them into the and cover them dill. Let them be fresh gathered. pepper garlic' and the round). 519. sieve.

them fire. near the leaves . pour the vinegar into another jar. and pour it boiling on the cucumbers. . 520. but if they do not appear to be of a fine color.450 ward. them on drain Choose nice young ones. and let them lie a week. covering with fresh leaves and thus do till they are of as good a color as you wish. and to bear it when becomes too hot not to boil. TO PICKLE GHERKINS. with a small bit of alum. covered with plenty of vine if they do not become a tolerably good green. set it it over the hot hearth. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. As an additional reason for preparing them at . and putting them in a Set jar. your hand. spread dishes. then them. but still pour over them again. pour boiling vinegar over them. They will be exceedingly crisp and green. done in this manner . salt them. boil up the pickle the next day.

taste. Pour boiling water upon bruised cranberries. the dealers using brass or bell-metal vessels. mace. to strain off the liquor. kettle. CRANBERRY WATER. and mustard-seed. to every quart of vinegar in the proportion of rather less than half an ounce each of the former. If spices be not mixed among the pickle. . to one ounce of the seed. which. 521. 451 home. MISCELLANEOUS. and sweeten the This forms an agreeable and refresh- ing beverage for invalids.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. when vinegar is become highly poisonous. very it 'is indeed well pickles fine green known that the are made so by put into them. in a thin muslin bag. put into the allspice. let them stand for a few hours.

4:52 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. it A little wine and nutmeg may be added. a pint of boil- ing water. return stewpan. over some of the letting leaves in a and . — if the former. ing water teapot. stirring it all the time to prevent the oatmeal from burning at the bottom of the stewpan. if thick or thin the latter. by degrees. mix well together. Is made by simply pouring them infuse. BALM TEA. are to eat if it. in a pint basin. and let it boil for five minutes. set it into the on the fire. with three of cold water spoonfuls. use two table- Have ready. 522. it to the oatmeal you have mixed. one tablespoonful of oatmeal. TO MAKE GRUEL. pour this. in a stewpan. by degrees. boil- 523. they like Ask it those who . skim and strain through a hair sieve.

525. two quarts of fresh water until reduced to one quart. and add sugar and lemon juice to the taste. and boil half a pint of water. then strain it. and pour enough boiling water over them to cover them. little and flavor with a lemon. Slice some apples. strain the liquid. and when sweeten it cold. Wash two ounces of pearl barley it thoroughly. one quart of slices. One pound of beef. %EEF TEA 526. for a few minutes in Strain the water off Boil the barley in it is and throw it away. Cut the beef in thin and . 40 APPLE WATER. put them in a deep pan. Place the cover on the pan. cold water. if agreeable.3 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. BARLEY WATER. 524.

pieces. veal in thin cold water. 528. dissolved the papal hull. SLIPPERY-ELM TEA. Strain and hot or cold as recommended by the Salt it physician. pieces. Cut one pound of a knuckle of slices. it a quart of Cover and let it simmer for .. to the taste. Strip your slippery-elm into small take two tablespoonfuls of these and pour over them two teacups of water. 527. pour on the water. be- comes mucilaginous. 454 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and then strain VEAL TEA. will simmer serve it for half an hour. When was beef tea first introduced into England? Wiien Henry VIII. boiling Let it stand until it it. pour over it. a Cover it and set it in warm place for three-quarters of an hour it then put over a slow fire where it it.

I say. 529. Scotch minister was once ordered " beef tea " The next day the patient comby " Why. Soak half an ounce of the moss in .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." So. Add salt to the taste. putting some in a skillet. A decoction of the same quantity . " Man. minisplained that it had made him sick. 455 an hour and a it half." says the minister." " It may be suppit ? It's excelbe gude that way. man and then see hoo ye like it. but try it wi' that. " A What ither way should it lent. cold water for a few minutes then withsprig. shaking the water from each boil it in a quart of milk till it attains the consistence of jelly. and told the minister it was excellent. and sweeten to the taste. he warmed it. draw and it. "is that the way ye sup it?" his physician. When boiled to a jelly will keep for three or four days. and may it be used at any time by pouring over little a boiling water and letting it stand near the fire." said the doctor. " I'll try the tea myseP. I doctor. ter. minister. it wi' the cream and sugar. tasted it." try IKISH MOSS OR CARRIGAN.

. shall live to lament the want of its . whole mixture through a hair it and into a china bowl. 530. The next day over with sweet out. . and pass the sieve. Neither let prosperity put out the e3^es of circumspection. and stick it all almonds.ALL. then put to two ounces of sweet. is of moss in a quart of water also used as a deinulceut in coughs. and run the liquid through a jelly bag . ISINGLASS BLANCMANGE. nor abundance cut ofl' the hands of frugality he that too much indulges in the superfluities of life. with two spoonfuls of water — it to keep the eggs from to poaching — and sugar enough bitter make it very sweet. 456 THE FAMILY SATE. almonds . and half an ounce of give them a empty turn it scald in your jelly. Boil one ounce of isinglass in one till quart of water it is reduced to a pint then add the whites of four eggs. blanched and cut lengthwise. necessaries.

divide the kernels. 533. or roast them too much. ALE POSSET. and When roasted. ally. ounces of pearl barley. ACORN COFFEE. not to burn. Peel the husks from sound ripe acorns. 531. till boil it in a . and to a pint Wash two strain it. dry them graduclose and roast them in a vessel while roasting they should be stirred continually. they may be ground used as ordinary coffee. quart of water reduced and add sugar and wine to the taste. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 457 BARLEY GRUEL. new milk with a of toasted bread pour a bottle of mild . slice Boil a pint of .. and small pieces of butter added Care must be taken from time to time. 532.

BREAD PUDDING FOR INFANTS.458 ale THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 534. half a gill of vinegar. 535. pour boiling milk over and when Boil it mix with the yolk for a quarter of of an egg. Make a dressing of the yolks of three eggs boiled hard. and then pour the boiling milk over it. cold. half a gill of sweet oil. it and send to the table. in a cup an hour. CELERY DRESSED AS SLAW. stir it Pour well mixture over the celery. with salt and Cayenne pepper this to the taste. one teaspoonful of teaspoonful of French mustard. Cut the celery in pieces about a quarter of an inch long. It should be . or half a common mustard. sweeten and add spices. into a punch bowl. Grate some stale bread into a tea* it. cup.

until is kept in cold water to make about fifteen the table." ECONOMICAL TJSE OF NUTMEGS. and not by time. though it be not of any great extent and length. 536. and extending throughout the centre fruit. yet may be of much weight and worth. those being attached to no other part. " LuT us endeavor that our life. sists This is because the centre con- of a number of fibres issuing from the stalk. would prove solid to the last. the stalk is grated away. of the When fibres. is formed through the whole .THE FAMILY SAVE. it will prove hol- low throughout whereas the same nutmeg grated from the other end. lose their hold. 459 crisp.ALL. and drop out. it minutes before drain it it sent to then and pour the dressing over. If ^ meg from the person begins to grate a nutstalk end. and a hollow nut. Let us measure it by work. .

460 THE FAMILY SAVE. OR FONDU. two ounces of butter. some Cut the meat in pieces about an inch square. stir it over a slow till it becomes like smooth thick cream (but . as the other has in some ailment of the stomach.ALL. or a little of the cold gravy. BREAKFAST DISH OF COLD MEAT. grated. 537. the sixth part of a nutmeg. salt. two tablespoonfuls of baked gill flour. a grain of Cayenne. A -f CHEESE SOTJFFLE. 538. with a teaspoonful of flour of mustard. put it into an enamelled saucepan. a saltspoonful of white pepper. FASTIDIOUS taste is like a squeamish appetite . and serve. and a fire of new milk . Season with pepper and the meat is As soon little as very hot. put them mto a stewpan with butter. the one has its origin in some diseases of the mind. add a flour to thicken the gravy. Grate six ounces of rich cheese is (Parmesan the best) .

. he forces his blood permanently into a more rapid movement.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. An ingenious author asserts that the length of a man's life may be estimated by the number of pulsations he has strength to perform. of six beat for ten minutes then to tin. allowing seventy years for the common age of man. and sixty pulses in a minute for the usual measure of pulses in a temperate person. 539. . by intemperance or other causes. — . TO CLARIFY DRIPPING. Human Pulsation. it 461 must not eggs boil) . take Set it on the fire in a clean pan.520. so as to give seventy-five pulses to the minute. and bake in a quick oven for twenty minutes. Thus.000 but if. add the well-beaten yolk .207. the same number of pulses would be completed in fifty-six years consequently shortening his life by fourteen years. the number of pulsations in his whole life would amount to 2. Serve imme- diately. pour the mixture into a a card-board mould. to boil. add the whites of the eggs beaten stiff a or froth . and when melted and just going it off and pour it into another pan half 29 .

stir the two well together with a broad. and mace . Then slightly strain off the liquid. You will find that you can collect . jar. and then remove the pan into a till cool place the next day. pepper. with boiling hot water . and put the whole into a stone cover that will with a Set make it water tight. and season it with salt. the jar in a large kettle of boiling water. or. when the clarified drip- ping will be found floating on the surface of the water. Take a large chicken. and set it again in a kettle of boiling water. with loaf sugar and lemon juice.462 filled THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. CHICKEN JELLY. Bruise the bones. and keep it boiling for three hours. taste of the person for according to the it whom is intended. wooden spoon. 540. cut it up into very small pieces. Eeturn the fragments of the chicken to the jar.

Bottle and keep it. gentlemen. one ounce of cream of tartar. for brutes never drink more than they want. add Let it.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. GINGER BEER. and one lemon. then skim it. a teaspoonful of yeast to each gallon." "Then. it in a cool place before you drink "Now." said a nobleman to his guests as the ladies left the room. Put these ingredi- ents into an earthen pan. to every gallon of water. who asked him whether he had seen the eclipse of the sun. that he had so much business to do upon earth. 541. and pour upon them the water boiling. "let us understand each other are we to drink like men or like brutes ?" The guests. Duke de Alba once replied to the king. One ounce and a half of ginger well bruised." replied he. This jelly may be made of an old fowl. exclaimed. "we are going to get jolly drunk." — . it stand twenty-four hours. When cold. that he had no time to look up to heaven. somewhat indignant. of course. nearly as 563 much jelly by the second boiling. "like men. one pound of loaf sugar.

if for pink.464 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. add to the cherries a pound of sugar. . If made from jams. you must rub a sieve. then place in glasses. add the white of an it egg whipt up. 542. put them the juice of two lemons. water. pass them through a hair sieve into an earthen pan . 543. with a . into pounded it work the it cherries up with it well until has set. little and a half pound of sugar when they have boiled. and strain on them the lemon juice and together kernels. Stone two pounds of ripe cherries. of jam. before you add to the best if half of a pint of spring water. pound a handful in a basin with of the kernels. CHERRY ICE. adding thick boiled them through coloring syrup and lemon juice. bruise and set them on the fire. it mix the whole a freezer with and put ice . WATER ICES GENERALLY. and some jelly and .

half a drachm. Take of loaf sugar. white is When w^ anted it it only necessary to dissolve in a tumbler of cold water. by a few drop» ture at a time. a piece for use. . 544. containing the flavor of the juice and peel of the lemon. and pour the essence of lemon upon them. the whole added divide then mix it them thoroughly and into twelve equal parts. if from fruits with syrup. mix them together. 465 in you must have a good pint of mixture all. you will not require water. tartaric acid. . and ready sweetened. wrapping of each up separately in paper. half an three ounces essence lemon. and fine lemonade will be obtained. ounce of . . stirring the till mixis after each addition.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. to make a quart mould . Powder the a tartaric acid and the sugar very fine in marble or Wedgewood mortar (observe never to use a metal one). PORTABLE LEMONADE.

lay hi the eggs carefully. To four gallons of water. half a teacupful of ginger. fit for use in twenty-four hours. two spoonfuls of cream of tartar. take two pounds of sugar. and of sassafras. one pint of sots. 546. BEER. Put the spices into bags. it it into jugs. Break four or five eggs carefully . let stand over night. one and a half spoonfuls of ground three drops of oil allspice. take out the bags of spices. then skim off the top of the liquid. 545.466 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. bottles. When the butter boils. and over each sprinkle . BUTTERED EGGS. one quart of molasses. mix the whole of the it ingredients in an open vessel. carefully will be and or a pour keg. into separate cups put two ounces of good it butter into a bright tin dish. heat the it water and pour over the spices . and j)ut into the oven.

be particu- have an exceedingly clean saucepan. it Put into in the proportions of a small teacupful of water. The fire. but it it is must not be put near the ready to be melted. or by occasion- . white pepper and salt 467 put very lightly. 547. in. This simple luxury. and so do I. until When move once upon the it keep it stirred. them in the oven for five or six minutes. cause we are both of one mind. She wants to be master. often any thing but a luxury. owing is to ignorance or carelessness in making. lar to First.ALL. fire. flour should be mixed smoothly with the cold liquid before if it is is put near the and the mixture allowed to stand an hour before melting so much the better fire ." MELTED BUTTER. two ounces of butter and a large teaspoonful of flour.THE FAMILY SAVE. Serve in the dish they are cooked " What is the reason your wife and you always " Bedisagree ?" asked one Irishman of another.

— Charles Stillingfleet.. Churn it afresh with new milkj to in the proportion of a pound of butter a quart of milk. bote togedder. " I'll tell you candidly majesty. asked Bishop happened that he generally preached without a book. to will be oiled." . and will be found an improvement." ** Well." "Well. II." A King's Speech. if it sometimes it moves to the right and then to the left." replied his merry parliament. but use the it utmost caution to or sliake so that the liquid should always go around in the saucepan in the same way . how it . where is the rake?" "Why. where are they both?" " Why. Doctor. The bishop asked in turn why he read his speeches in " Why. massa you 'pears to be berry 'ticular dis mornin'. wid de hoe. TO FEESHEN SALT BUTTER. A little cream or good milk may be used instead of part water. . Where is the hoe. massa. is and then the best thing it do to throw away. 548. well.468 ally THE FAilILT SAYE-ALL. Sambo?'' "Wid de rake. shaking the saucepan stir . I have asked them so often for money that I am ashamed to look them in the face. but always read the sermons which he delivered before the court.

it in half a gill of water over the fire —then add a boil. increase the strength of the food. — PRESERVING EGGS. as dis* ease is far more contaojious than health. a gill of milk.unvarying Buccess. 549. When ofi* it comes to stir in a good half teaspoonful taken the fire. As the child becomes older. in is When two tablespoonfuls of cream. Those who have resources who can dare to live alone. because we are more apt to within themselves. 550* tried for The To following receipt has been several years with . best know how to prize them the most.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL* 469 FOOD FOR DELICATE INFANTS. stir of arrowroot. Vice and Virtue. This food suitable for a child four or five months old. solve ' Take a piece of gelatin (or Ameri* dis- can isinglass) about one inch square. five quarts of cold water add . want friends the least. But no company is far preferable to bad. but. at the same time. catch the vices of others than their virtues.

though not as witty as Falstafi*.''^ . as conveto fifty eggs and from thirty in may be for done one jar. Pleasant Travelling. It is his custom when he travels to book two places. stirring the eggs (w^hich it twice a day. and one ounce of for salt- boil tegether about twenty minutes. Additional layers nient. it Let stand three days. and thus to secure half of the inside of the coach to himself. but must not be taken out of the lime till they are about to be used. — who is : . I booked 3^ou one in and one out. . and pour the mixture upon them. salt one pound of petre . They will keep months. C In Edinburgh resides as hnge. The lime should cover inches above them. and when nearly cold. The man returned " I've with the following pleasing intelligence booked 3'ou. the eggs full two Mr. add four tablespoonfuls of pounded quick lime. sir but as there wern't two inside places left. when they will be found to be perfectly fresh. may be added. He sent his servant the other day to book him for Glasgow.470 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Place fresh) should be quite in a jar. with the small end down- ward.

" any hour will not suit rich and poor too. and to each pint of juice. pour the beaten mto it." "But it will." said the man. Have ready a pan of hot butter. " a rich man can dine any hour. eggs Beat four eggs very light. 551. and fry it till it is of a fine brown on the under you lap side. and serve fore it. Strain the juice through a jelly bag. hot." retorted the philosopher. though. put them large a pan. in Take ripe raspberries. and one . "Any hour. little Just besalt sprinkle a and pepper over the top.THE FAMILY SAVE ALL. but a poor man any hour that lie can." "Nay. that he likes . then lap one half it over the other. PERSON asking Diogenes what was the best dinner-hour. and mash them with a wooden spoon or masher. onion Chopped parsley or it may be mixed with the egg before is fried. he answered. 471 PLAIN OMELETTE.^^ A RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 552. add one pound of loaf sugar.

and assure 3"ou that it will." "Then I will send it to 3^ou to-morrow ujdou the understanding that that amount will make 3'our happiness perfect. quart of vinegar." . . "Oh! RESTORATIVE JELLY FOR INVALIDS. hours . two." "I thank 3'ou. and skim it.ALL. madam ?" said the dear sir. spring water. place the When the sugar has disfire whole over the let it boil a in a preserving kettle. one gum arable . then simmer over a slow or in a . happ3'. " you have proved that the twenty would not make you happy nor would any other sum. She was no sooner outside the door than she thought she might as well have asked and received forty so she stepped back. ounce of Take two ounces of isinglass. who was employed in the family of a governor.472 THE FAMILY SAVE. and minute or it. your excellency. When will be cold. 553. LAUNDRESS." she said. Put these into half a pint of and let them remain eight fire." " How little. . twenty pounds would make me perfectly happy." ing. and took her departure. " Only think. and one ounce of sugar candy. how small a sum of money would A make me governor. say" Ah! I am released. solved. ^^ please make it fiwty y said the governor. bottle fit cork it well. said to him with a sigh. and it for use.

And to have a good heart. and changeth and doubteth not ignorance. of which people partake. to do a man's best. flavor and. " 'Tis being. man doubteth often.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. jar in the oven. that make All the pleasures and pains. and put bit of butter into a pan. the . Teue wisdom wise fool is obstinate is less presuming than his . and doing. in the bottom of the dish. and it stir it till the cheese Serve with toasted bread. is the way to be blest. fire. Place over a gentle dissolves. To be what God pleases. * excellent. until dissolved. Cut it it some cheese into thin shavings. mind the he knoweth all things but his own TOASTED CHEESE. known as with a This preparation is popularly Welsh Rahhit or Rarebit. 473 a pint of good sherry. and having. . folly . Add half when nearly This is with nutmeg or cloves. cold. 554.

as pepper.ALL. Cut butter it the bread moderately thin. should be boiled the day before. Chicken . . put them one on the other. season with tard. aUEEN'S TOAST. and when thoroughly done pressed in a mould. lay the meat cut thin. and they tempt the : SANDWICHES. may be eaten with butter and sugar. some boiling water Place remove the them in layers on a dish. tempts proverb runs thus The devil except idle men. slices of stale bread a slice brown then dip each to quickly in grease. . 555. Turkish all. and mus- may be required cover with a sec- ond slice of bread. They may Serve or they be put in the form of a pyramid. A devU. trim the edges. with any kind of sweet sauce . 556. and cover with a damp cloth until required. fine Fry some .474 THE FAMILY SATE. very slightly indeed salt. it Where tongue is used.

add one pound of white sugar. All kinds of meat used for sandwiches should be thoroughly done.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 558. Slice some cold boiled ham very little and spread over them a Place a slices of slice French mustard. 557. taking care not to break the crust. tered bread roll it up. HAM SANDWICHES. Why should starvation be unknown in the desert ? Because of the sand-which-is there. 475 boned and forced with a small quantity of forced veal and ham. But how came the sandwiches there ? Noah sent Ham. To one quart of blackberry juice. of the ham between Or the of butslice two thin bread and butter. ham may be laid on a very thin . thin. and his descendants bred and mustered. half an ounce . will make excellent sandwiches. and treated in the same way. BLACKBERRY CORDIAL.

pulverized fine cinnamon. put the mixture in your coffee pot. 559. for ten or fifteen minutes. cold water as will just moisten the coffee water. and to one teacupful of ground coffee. COFFEE. no more scum rises. muslin bag. stir all do not put in much it cold well together. Cloves and allspice may be added in the proportion of a quarter of an ounce of each. and pour over Let it six tea- cupfuls of boiling water. will do in a few minutes after fire. of grated nutmeg. which they it. boil it hard When begins it to boil. boil the whole and skim When cold. Beat an egg. set it away to get and add one pint of best brandy. add one-third of the beaten and as much . and half an ounce of Tie the spice in a it. egg. and never leave until the grounds sink.476 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. stir it frequently. has been on the let Be careful and do not your coffee .

She was getting in a very bad way. and let cool. had it not been for the ingenuity of a servant girl she took the coffee mill into my aunVs bed-room. boil over. 30 raisins. never slept a wink she missed the snoring. and ground her to sleep at once I . RAISIN WINE. He could be heard as far as a blacksmith's forge but my aunt became so accustomed to it. with iiig water. and consequently the coffee will if it be weakened. — . Coffee and tea lose much flavor if served cold. Then and put into a cask. They were a very domestic couple never slept far apart for many years. At length my uncle was required to leave home for some daj^s on busiThe first night after his departure. which it is to be the wine. and serve of their hot. that it soothed her repose. hoil- be silver or Britannia metal. Rinse your pot. My uncle P was an awful snorer.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 560. and probably it would have been serious. used for Boil the water. as 477 by that means you lose a great deal of the grounds. for Put the fruit . eight pounds of each gallon of water. . The second night was passed in the same restless manner. my aunt ness. it pour the coffee into it.

and the cask sun. As soon bung as fermenta- tion ceases. 478 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. 561. ginger. Then with draw it off in a clean cask. A WIT and a fool in company. and then makes small work of him. water into the cask alternately. and fine it a piece of isinglass tied in a muslin bag. are like a crab and an oyster the one watches till the other opens his mouth. . Lay the bung in lightly the wine every day or two. and half a pound of bruised together. put eight pounds of white sugar.. put the in tightly. Keep the cold cask full by the addition of water which has been boiled. if fresh water be set in the poured over them. and suspended in the raisins liquor. The refuse make good vinegar. and leave the wine untouched for a year. GINGER WINE. Boil the whole in a vessel to and pour the liquor . until the cask stir is quite full. To four gallons of water.

my dear ?" " No. says an okl adage. she only said she would ask you. When cold it may be cut into . cool. 562. which will be in two or three weeks.ALL.THE FAMILY SATE. It may be eaten with sugar and good milk or cream. and. and put in the As soon into a cask. Toast a piece of bread. be bottled. should be boiled very slowly until quite soft. add the juice and rind of four lemons. 479 To each gallon.^^ SAMP. it cover liquor. "Mother sent me. This dish is made of new Indian It corn crushed^ but not ground. and sea- soned with a little salt. it with fresh yeast. ma'am. as it begins to ferment. " to come and ask you to take tea with her this evening. or with molasses. In two months it may tell Children and fools." said a little girl. always the truth. add two pounds of raisins which have been stoned." " Did she say at what time. then it would he off her mind. put it When the fermentation subsides.

spoon. This latter dish is very appropriate for breakfast. and season and a lump of butter. with pepper." said the clerk. sides. " then how do you manage to follow me through the service ?" " Why. who had to preach a charity sermon." TO PRESERVE MILK. milk. 563. in water. put Take any quantity it of really fresh into a bottle well corked. well beaten." clergyman. I am deaf. salt. and fry a light brown on both A come CLERK was assisting a clergyman. and a couple of eggs. or grated Have ready some bread crumbs With a dip it cracker. sir. MOCK OYSTERS. 564. when he said to him." said the sir. When soft. and fried a nice brown. take out some of the salsify. a it Boil some salsify. " I looks up. and .480 slices THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. and then in the cracker. mj^ good man. mash it. to robe before the service commenced. with little salt. in the egg. and when you shuts your mouth I opens mine. *' Please " Indeed.

Our attention has lately been directed to an invention for obtaining milk in a solidified form. says it must sea-voyages. 481 plunge into boiling water for a quarter of an hour. an urn with a it spirit lamp under table.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. As soon as the first cups are poured out. boiling water on Pour enough the tea leaves to rather more than wet them. and allow a teaspoonful of tea for each person and one over. article for The most convenient is hot water it. and pour on some boiling water. for solidified milk must obviously be "quite the cheese. 565* Scald your teapot with boiling water. which the keeps boiling on the But .-^ A TEA. Let it stand fifteen pour on as much boiling water as serve one cup to each one of the company. minutes will . for funny friend of ours. be a capital invention. add half a teaspoonful for each person.

ties its When tea is made out essential volatile and are frequently dissipated It is before comes ness. had the leaves boiled. after a long examination. was then unknown. decided that it was some dried The}^ abandoned to him this precious eataherb. Tea came than in Scotland. to retain the aroma. THE BEST METHOD OF MAKING TEA. and find the The guests did not garden stutf to their taste. may be kept sufficiently hot in an ordinary teapot. and ordered the cook to come. into general use sooner in England In ] 685 the widow of the Duke of Monmouth sent a pound of it to one of her This Chinese production relations in Scotland. Consequently he ble to use as he thought proper. of the properit 566. They examined it with great attention. room.482 water THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Some who are particular about their tea. who. not the bitterthe tea but the fragrance of that . to the table. stop the spout of the teapot with a cork while the tea is drawing. threw the water away. served them up like spinach. and its reputation in Scotland thus s Littered for a long time.

dry. and develops by solution the bitter principle. Whether tea should depends in some measure upon the constitution and inclination of the consumer. is 483 refreshing. Put the tea. and a fragrant will infusion be immediately be boiled produced. "I hope you won't buy any more gunpowder tea for mother.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. because boiling dissipates the volatile extract which disturbs the nervous system. pot. "Father. before any portion of the water is added. then pour upon it the boiling water. a stronger infusion will be obtained. then place the pot before the or is on the hot plate of an oven till the tea well heated. is If it generally found to be too exciting. into the empty fire. but not burned. before the larger quantity of is water added. But the tea and the pot are both warmed dry. should he boiled a few minutes. The if tea should be wetted or steeped. and if also a full and the slightly bitter tea infusion is preferred. or not." said a roguish boy." .

it Bung the cask closely. it and in three or four days will be fit for use. Mix this well together. and to every gallon add four pounds of sugar. the juice and half the rind of a lemon . Pour two bottles of porter into three quarts of water and one pint of the best molasses. up /" " Go to bed. stirring it well two or three times a day. add a gallon of cold water. into a tub for eight or nine days. immediately.484 " THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. '* RHUBARB WINE. 568. isinglass dissolved in a little of Add a gill of brandy. Bottle in ten or twelve months. " Why not ?" Because every time she sits doWli to the tea-table. 567* Cut and put it five pounds of rhubarb into small pieces. . Strain the liquor. put it in a cask. she blows us sir. with half an ounce of the liquor. A CHEAP SUMMER DRINK.

two pounds of a half of brown one ounce and potash." said he. 570. To every hundred pounds of pork. and four gallons of water. none at all. A PRUDENT man advised his drunken servant to put by his money for a rainy day. In a few weeks the master inquired how much of his wages he had " Faith. fine salt The it meat may be rubbed with is when packed down. The should be poured over the pork after the tub for about two days. . salt. eight pounds of two ounces of sugar. three take a bushel and half a peck of salt. This brine is sufficient for every one hundred brine it pounds of meat. 569. then dry them several days before smoking. " it rained saved. yesterday. The meat should be thoroughly cool before packing. has laid in Let the hams remain in the brine six weeks. saltpetre. and it all went.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL* 485 TO CURE HAMS. Mix together." ANOTHER MODE OF CURING HAMS.

At the end of nine days. and cut into small dice. three pounds of sugar. take out the meat.. saltpetre. etc. Weigh let the meat. sir. who made his appearance at the " Late breakfast table al)0iit ten o' clock. 571. take out the hams at the and put those which were at the top bottom. and two quarts of molasses." ! "What COLD MEAT." for the future don't remain so long up with the lark. Mix these and rub the meat with it w^ell. and put an equal weight of bread crumbs to soak in cold there be a it little fat with the Squeeze meat.486 pounds of THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. ^ the water from the bread put in the pan . ingredients. why ''Well. but come down a little earlier to breakfast. rub the hams often with the it is while in the tub. makes j'ou get up so late. GAME OR POULTRY. father I was up with the lark. w^ater. sir?" said a father to his son. then. In three weeks. to Remember salt. so that every part may be thoroughly impregnated. DRESSED AS FRITTERS.

eggs. 572. boil in water with salt . enough to season the tripe when very tender. afterward chops. and pour on a Roll into the shape of small fry. egg mix quickly. BOILED TRIPE.THE FAMILY SAVE. then add gradually two eggs well beaten dish to cool. salt. and then comes with little puffs. and bread crumb them. and sauce. stir . till . and a lump of butter . . Serve plain with any appropriate What wind does a hungry sailor like best ? One that blows foul. boiled and washed. and well seasoned with pepper. add a nutmeg. 487 table- two ounces of butter or spoonfuls of onion. if approved . put the onions in a deep dish. and two fine . have ready some onions. with a wooden spoon the meat taste.ALL. until rather dry then add season with salt and pepper to little . lard. Scrape and wash the tripe very it clean. chopped fry two minutes. stir quite hot . then add the bread.

573. answer accordingly. . in gravy. Tripe may it be fried in egg and is bread crumbs like oysters. should first be boiled it may be fried without the egg or little crumbs. Wear your learning like your watch. and like tripe boiled plainly in served with onion sauce and mustard. . and let a "An idle head man do nothing is FRIED TRIPE. and then a till very nice dish tender . but if you are asked what o'clock it is. . bring in a stock of evil thoughts. and commence his regular business of producing sin. YiRTUE comes from industry morality. or serve them . the old adversary will get possession of his pate. and don't pull it out to show that you have one . in a private pocket. tripe and lay the on the top. Some persons water.488 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. start the machinery of low passions. quite as much as from Satan's workshop . in separate dishes. thickened with a flour." for a fortnight. and flavored with catchup or vinegar.

and it will become after solid. Set in a cool place for a little time. put about five spoonfuls into a then a layer of baked sweetened. turned over best for dinner. in to eat order have them good and-fresh. through . Rice may be used in Serve with any sweet sauce. can be made to without burning quart basin of any sort. and allowed either in stand wanted. as it Boil a teacupful of sago as thick boil. to To preserve chestnuts. over with a plate sago boils boiling water. 574.. the same way. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. It is best when made to shortly till breakfast. The when soaked in cold water for a few hours before using. or before the fire. 489 AN EXCELLENT SUBSTITUTE FOR PASTRY FOR THE BYSPEPTIC. and fill fruit the basin to the brim fruit with alternate layers of and sago. an oven. to warm it. 575. TO KEEP CHESTNUTS.

and its beauty was spoiled. and ends. and will sparkle with happiness but if impure. gravies. and covered over by lon of chestnuts. they of the chestnuts. Just so our characters are forming. the icicle looked foul. If the water was clean. the icicle remained clear. your chestnuts sweet. then put them into a box or barrel. If every thought be pure. are used for flavoring soups. and Have you ever watched an icicle You noticed how it froze one drop . fine mixed with. there will always be wretchedness. sand to get to the air and thus you have fresh.490 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. sound. as it formed ? at a time. three gallons of sand. to one If there be maggots in will any of the chestnuts. Celery leaves. and sparkled in the sun but if the water was slightly muddy. CELERY FOR FLAVORING. and gal- dry sand. you must make tliem perfectly dry after they have come out of their green husks . . the soul will be lovely. sauces. 76. and come out work up through the . Oue little thought or feeling at a time. . etc. the winter. adds its influence.

in a large teacupful of brandy. 491. A few drops will soup.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. How few do ESSENCE OF CELERY. to embolden and enlarge tention to preserve the their bodies. when she breaks a plate^ does she manage to pick up the pieces ! The . thieving propensities of "the cat" are well How does "the cat" contrive to open the side-board ? How is it. It does not eat and drink. let until cool. not merely with an inbody in health and strength. she never seems intoxicated ? Whatever can the cat do with the tea ? And how. For every four quarts of cream. pour on half a pint of boiling water. it stand and strain the liquor into the hurt the flavor. 578. cream. care and caution. but with such prudence. that after drinking our gin. it grate one middling sized carrot. as not to over cherish and pamper. suffice to flavor a quart of known. 577. TO COLOR BUTTER. Soak a tablespoonful of celery- seeds.

" At two fi'iends. it. Boil in it and two ounces of ginger. the same width for tops . Cut the crumb of a loaf. into square or round pieces. put five it quarts of water. Jerrold was dining with one of whom. among other pleasant things. pounds of sugar. after dinner. that was always a promise of wit.. now. is By leaving out said to resemble a hotel at Hastings." said Douglas. " Mind. ordered. " a bottle of old port. with that twinkle of the eye. Vif PATTIES OF FRIED BREAD. by putting it a slice of toast covered with fresh yeast. 492 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and cut bits. and let four hours. not your elder port. stand twentyit . To ten quarts of berries. Then boil and skim strain and to every gallon of the liquor put three cloves. half an ounce of one ounce of cinnamon. ELDERBERRY WINE." "Waiter. 579. the spices. bottle of your old port. 580. nearly three inches high. and fer- ment it. again. this wine Port.

put on the tops. MOLASSES CANDY. Scoop out the inside crumb. Put the molasses in a it with the Sugar. bread of a light brown color. fill the space with meat . I wonder what he will do next /" . which you can easily little by dropping a it in cold water . taking care not to go too near the bottom. The sailor fell in a potato field. if done. There were to be fireworks at the conclusion but they accidentally exploded and blew up the room. just outside. A SAILOR went to a conjuror's exhibition. boil fire. and serve. to let it boil. 493 fry the mark them neatly with a knife. it will be crisp. Stir it . " Confound the fellow. . and shook himself. if not.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. stops bubbling. half a pound of sugar. the juice of kettle one lemon. steady tell is done. 581. unhurt he got up. A is good way 31 to judge till it if it is boiled enough. will be stringy. One quart of West India brown molasses. in fine lard. exclaiming. and walked back toward the room. till i-t over a slow.

Some and add roasted ground-nuts. 494 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. may CHEESE TOASTED. a slice of toasted bread. Jerome gives . and just before off the fire. that the devil always find thee well employed. until the cheese dis- solves. Molasses candy may be flavored with any flavor with lemon. 582. 'Tis good advice that St. and put bit of butter. it Butter a shallow tin pan. the crust pared Two city ladies meeting at a visit. Cut it some cheese into thin shavings. one of them a grocer's wife. and pour in to get cold. or almonds blanched. still be doing some warrantable work.. stirring it occasionally. thing you choose. taken add the lemon juice. known with a place it This as preparation or is popularly Welsh rahhit rarebit. than some of their betters would have done . into a cheese toaster before the fire. it is very frequently. and the other a cheesemonger's (who perhaps stood more upon the punctilio of precedence. Serve with oflf.

pour on a fruit . Select large full grown berries. pulling her back by the tail of her gown. add four pounds of five gallons. . Put the little berries in a clean tub. when the}^ had risen up and took their leaves. "No. and to every one the quart of the best French brandy. as the cask should be full." said she. the cheesemonger's wife was going out of the room first. and stepping before her. Allow a lon of water to every three pounds of fruit. gal- before they begin to turn red. comes after cheese. pound and mash the then the add the remainder of the water. cloth. 583. madam. Cover the tub with a clean it and let stand four days. 495 at the court end of the town). and stir whole well. . " nothino.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. u}3on which the grocer's lady. and put just it Mix into a clean cask that will hold it. whole. white sugar." GOOSEBEREY CHAMPAGNE. Stir it frequently and thoroughly then strain the liquid through a jelly bag. or coarse linen cloth. water. and to each gallon.

. a peck of good Take a quarter of it white bran. MAKE COTTAGE BEER. to Then bottle and be careful drive the corks in tightly. until is the fermentation it. with two tablespoonfuls of yeast.ALL. As soon as the molasses is thoroughly in- corporated. or more. and when it is about lukewarm. and in six months. boil the whole together until the bran and the hops sink to the bottom. and lay the bung in loosely. cannot be shaken or moved. as the least disturbance will injure the wine. with three handfuls of hops. Then strain it through a hair sieve into a cooler. subsided.496 THE FAMILY SAVE. so that it Secure the cask firmly. pour the whole into a nine gal- lon cask. Let it work for two weeks. Place the cask in a cool dry place. TO 584:. and put into ten gallons of water. Lay the bottles on their sides. the wine will be fit for use. add two quarts of molasses.

if drawn off into stone jars. to casks. but consider how soon it takes away is — yours. have not become rotten press or mill. it bung (it up the cask. will be Table beer. and the whites of four bag of thin muslin. and in four days for use. ripe. fectly Let the pears be sweet and perbut take care that the cores . will and securely corked. it warmed. 585.''^ TO MAKE PERRY.THE FAMILY SAVE.ALL. with the bung-holes open. 497 When the fermentation has subsided. which must stand in the in a very cool place. take them to the juice. drop Put this in a in . and squeeze out the is from whence the liquor removed open air. with a lump of white sugar in each. The fermentation pint of flour is accomplished by mixing a little new yeast with a honey and eggs. " keep good for This !" *' head capital ale see how long it keeps its Aye. several months.

" said another. "I have seen the time. taking care that does not it touch the bottom of the vessel. and may be drawn off from the lees into smaller casks. Pour eight gallons of cold water . "when it made 3'on lean. otherwise MAN praising Perry. If works the liquor will have cleared itself in five or six days. winter." ''When?" asked the " Last night against a wall. and sixteen pounds of molasses. A SPRUCE BEER. add half . 586. and free from frosts or draughts of In it summer. the vesssels or bottles containing must be moved they will burst. air. then put in six tablespoonfuls of essence of spruce. said it was so excellent a beverage. well.''^ eulogist. and suspend from the bung-hole it by a string. to a cool place. it the cask.— 498 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. that in great quantities it alwa3"s made him fat. into a barrel to this add eight gallons of boiling water . or bottled. Perry requires to be kept In warm. When sufficiently cold.

a pint of yeast. the juice. so I drank it. like A — waste I" THE BEST GINGER SEEK. one pound. white ginger. . and the honey with the remainder . White sugar. and roll it 499 the cask about. twenty- two ounces. bruised. eighteen ounces honey. twenty pounds. that his " Scoundrel 1" exservant had emptied them both. to prevent its turning sour there's nothing I abominate. then add the sugar. sir. and it will be use in a week. " what do you mean by this?'* " Why. discovered. I saw plainly enough by the clouds that it was going to thunder. Keep warm . or put in for stone jars well corked. lemon or lime juice. eighteen gallons. 587. Boil the bruised ginger in three gallons of water for half an hour . claimed the master. or in a shake it well. just before dinner.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. place for this time suffiit fit two days. water. Bottle it. GENTLEMAN who had put aside two bottles of choice ale. with the bung open by the fermentation will have subsided ciently for bottling.

To fifteen pounds of morella cherof the best French add one gallon brandy or good Monongahela whisky. pulled the servant by the tail of his *' coat. and expostulated with him. Boil and strain. in the usual way. then off the liquor. bottle it. and add to the cherries two quarts of water. egg. What is this glass for ? Does your master intend to keep me here all night P^ CHERRY BOUNCE. which should remain on them three weeks . being on a visit to a neighboring squire. and half an ounce to ferment Allow Then will in about four days and it keep be for months. 588. add the white of an of essence of lemon. pour off the water . Let them stand pour for three or four months. of the water.500 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. When it cold. ries. when a very small glass was set before him after dinner. redu- Smaller quantities may made by cing the ingredients in equal proportions. A TOPER.

and two fresh eggs. with a tablespoonful of salt in it. ounces of butter. beaten with a gill of thick cream . add salt- a teaspoonful of flour of mustard. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. though he be not hungry. let it sieve. and the butter is over the fire till absorbed then add a quart of gently till new milk and simmer very tender (about an quite hour and a half). a spoonful of white pepper. the sixth part of a nutmeg. (NAPLES RECEIPT. thirsty.) 589. SAVORY MACARONI. 501 and add it to the liquor. to all of which add four pounds of sugar made into a syrup. grated. Beware of such food as persuades a man. a grain of Cayenne.. three ounces of grated Parmesan cheese. to eat and those liquors that prevail with a man to drink them when he is not . Blanch six ounces of Naples macaroni in two quarts of boiling water. then drain on a Put into an enamelled saucepan with two stir . remain it till cold.

small pieces bake in a quick oven. An Irish officer said. over 'the cabto bage . on a dish and sift grated Parmesan . together. on the range stir in when salt. till of a pale brown color. gill Beat up two eggs . for he had nothing to do with water if he only got his tea in the morning. Serve very hot. and a general complaint of the want of it. At Gibraltar there was a great scarcity of water.502 place it THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. mixed. and a teaspoonful of pour it When stir it cold. 590. "He was veiy easy about the matter. One of the very best of all earthly possessions is self-possession. it begins to thicken. cheese thickly over (three ounces) lay an ounce of butter. . add to it one it of vinegar and water. a sugar. or before the fire. in on that . place . a piece of butter the size of a small little walnut." . it was all that he wanted. DRESSING FOR COLD SLAU. and punch at night. from twelve to fifteen minutes. and before sending table sprinkle with a little black pepper.

When cold. and a small pro- made mustard . instead of weighing it every time he leaves port. portion of Take two parts of grated Parme- san cheese. 592. 603 CHEESE SANDWICHES. strain out the peel. press cover with another slice them together and cut mouthfuls. cover slices of bread with a it slices little of this. and lay over of ham or any of into cured meat. that they fork. may be lifted with a can't the captain of a vessel keep a memothe weight of his anchor.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. pour the . bread. Squeeze the juice all out of . six lemons. and take out the pulp then pour two quarts of boiling milk and ten heaping tablespoonfuls of sifted sugar over the skins. one of butter. 591. and cover the whole very tightly. Why randum of LEMON SHERBERT. pound them in a mortar .

milk into the and when half stir it well. lemon Four pounds of sugar.] strong drink upon the sj^stem. and rammed into a cellar under ground. a considerable portion of the water is found frozen next morning. Thus they are deposited in the evenii>g. may be regulated accord- A effects of TOPER was asked what he thought of the " Hot ig^. freezer.604 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. made of unglazed and porous earthenware. the ice freezes into a solid mass. The ice is collected before sunrise. owing to the accumulated cold. and lined with straw. where. which they line with dried sugar canes or Indian corn. half a pint of peach brandy. The method adopted by the Indians to obtain ice. five quarts of water. The quantity of liquor ing to the taste. is very ingenious. half a pint of French brandy. and IcE IN India. frozen. On this they place very shallow dishes. juice. and filled with soft water that has been boiled. . and in consequence of the evaporation from the outside of the dishes. — PUNCH. . one pint of one pint of Jamaica spirits. 593. They dig pits in the ground about two feet deep. let it add the lemon juice freeze.

and taken in too large quantities. when the latter cannot be obtained. " You can do any thing if you will only have patience. in both puddings and pancakes. and the sooner used after It is taken in-doors the better. when very hot. to be beaten in. if that be possible. Take is from a clean it is spot. Tea instance. as As is eggs are dear in the season of to snow. drinks. fuls Two tablespoon- may it be taken as the equivalent of an it egg. 594. it a help economy to Tcnc/w the It is equivalent to a supply of fresh eggs. si^ut . snow is It is not generally known that a good substitute for egg. might ultimately do harml" and coffee. above." said an old uncle who had made a fortune. SNOW PANCAKES AND PTJDDINGS. Powdered ice will answer as well as snow.'' 505 he replied. " Water to a nephew who had nearly SDMjt one. " are bad. just as little eggs are. for .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.-THE COST OF EGGS SAVED IN THE DEAREST SEASON. and should be handled as possible. decidedly bad. undoubtedly hurtful and even hot punch.

Remove the stalks of Chili pep. if you can only wait. are vainly wet for their a drought in the spring is not to be repaired by a deluge in the autumn. for and two or hours. small. " Till it freezes .'" How USE OF BONES IN COOKING. who was impatient for the old man's obituary. 596. 595. s-ufferings for their sins.506 THE FAMILY S AYE-ALL. by ¥ . a very nutritious jelly will be obtained. His uncle coolly replied. and put the pods into a colander set it before the fij^br about twelve hours. Iron or porcelain lined vessels are the only proper kinds for this purpose. may " be carried in a sieve. according to the quantity of When the water is half boiled away. be added to soup or gravy. Eyes dry HOME-MADE CAYENNE PEPPER. This jelly may ." long ?" asked the petulant spendthrift. Crack the bones very boil them in plenty of water three bones. pers.

by slow degrees. however. pound the and sift A farmer's wife lately entered a druggist's shop. Then pour them into a mortar. with one fourth their salt. Finding. stir these well together. in. a teaspoonful of good salad and work like the mixture round until cream. and then again. 507 which time they will be dry. with a little salt and Cayenne . and handed him two prescriptions to be prepared. work the sauce until it re- sumes the smoothness of cream. nearly half pint of to continuing at each interval as at first. saying. weight in and pound and rub them sift till they are as fine as possible. and not a .^^ ^^ MAYONNAISE. one for her husband and the other for her cow. that she had not sufficient cash to pay for both. it appears Pour oil. Put into a large basin the yolks of two new laid eggs. then add oil. little through a residue. To-morrow will do for my husbarid. muslin.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. she took away that for the cow. 597.

508 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." (the A CHEAP METHOD OF OBTAINING A CONSTANT SUPPLY OF PURE VINEGAR. for when cool. keeping place. them together a jar. 598. and I counted nineteen. it in a warm and and it will produce very good in about six weeks. half a pound of molasses. ter whether they were all right. is wholesome vinegar The vinegar plant a minute fungus. Paddy. twenty minutes . put the whole into and lay a vinegar Cover plant on the surface of the liquor. half a sugar. the jar with paper. pound of and boil Take one gallon of water. and one tablespoonful of cold water to whiten the sauce. . . add a teacupful of yeast. " Faith. being sent to count some pigs number being twenty). was asked by his masHe said. I could not count him at all. but one little beggar ran about so fast. particle of the oil remains visible then add two tablespoonfuls of tarragon vinegar. one day.

is green and plentiful. he found the knife rather dull. changes the sugar and water into vinegar. and the princij^al dish was a fine roast fowl. earth do you mean?' exclaimed the old gentleman. and. When the old gentleman undertook to carve it. young man seized the fowl. into bottles. The dining-room was on the second floor. and with admirable " What on dexterity. to accelerate the process of vinegar making." A bit of this thrown into the above liquid rapidly increases. ANY SEASON OF 599. flung Whereupon the it down stairs after the servant. " I beg your pardon !" was the cool reply. cut it When mint fine. ''I thought you were going to dine down stairs. hurried it after the knife. forming what is 509 commonly called "the and mother of vinegar. There is a story extant of a young wag who was invited to dine with a gentleman of rather sudden temper. in a sudden passion. but this will require a longer time.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. Afterward it may be divided and trans- ferred to other quantities of the mixture. Fill the up and put it .'" TO OBTAIN MINT SAUCE AT THE YEAR. The plant will form of itself in the first in- stance.

No one can tell the difference of mint so prepared from that newly gathered from the bed. B.510 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. This makes a very wholesome dish for children. The sugar can be added when required for use. . For those who like mint sauce. MILK PORRIDGE. Boil some grits very thoroughly.'" . a Western settler found considerable difficulty in separating its joints. When cold." was the reply. the above may be eaten with lamb or mutton chops. hot. *' My dear. bottles with vinegar. one day." / believe this old hen scratched it up . In attempting to carve a fowl. and cork closely. the grits may be warmed up in milk and served ." said the enraged man's wife. 600. he sowed the first patch of corn that was planted in our set" I know that. pour over rich milk or. " and tlement. and exclaimed against the man who had sold him an old hen for a chicken. " don't talk so much against the aged and respectable Mr.

for a long time by greasing them well with suet. mix with an ounce cream of the eggs Stir all well together. ma'am. I " !" " I " .THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. defy any one to beat them." Customer. and a half pound of when tartar. 511 TO PRESERVE EGGS. can eggs be made into a sponge cake. fresh is Another way of keeping to them pour a gallon of boiling water on lime. two quarts of (pick of salt . — Can't be beaten Shopkeeper. yes! be beaten. with end down- wards. — Then they won't do for me how Customer. 601." Customer. melted mutton and placing them their small in a bin of bran. is put and see that there enough hquor to cover them. cold. They may be kept several weeks by putting them in ajar of salt or lime water with the They may be kept small end downwards. I — " wish to purchase some eggs to they must be very fresh. — No. unless they can he beaten ?" ." have some that can't Shopkeeper. make a sponge cake . in. — "Ah. Eggs should not be more than twenty-four hours old when they are stored.

512 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. turn it out and serve with thick cream. EICE FLUMMERY. it it. in about half a pint or more of old . aild peel. and add to a pint of boiled milk. stir When lukewarm. Add some salt. When cold. potatoes little . 602. or thin custard around A PERSON complaining of the smallness of some chops brought to table. 603. and a table- spoonful of brown sugar. an incorrigible wag observed that " Probably the sheep was fed upon short commons !^^ POTATO YEAST. Boil this. of a peck of mash them and thin them a with the water in which they have been boiled. pour it into a mould. Boil a quarter fine. sweetened and flavored with cinnamon and lemon stirring it constantly. flour Mix two little tablespoonfuls of rice it with a cold milk. sufliciently when thick.

and boil Tie a pint of hops in a thin bag. it is light. Tie a large handful of hops in a thin bag. and boil them in three quarts of sufficient Moisten with cold water a stir in quantity of flour. then cover closely and put in a cool place. while boiling hot. Make a thin paste of flour and . YEAST. them in three quarts of water. and the hop. yeast. 513 it Let it it rise. and stand it in a cool place.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. When cover it. and then add about a pint of old yeast. Add three tablespoonfuls of salt and two of molasses. ANOTHER WAY TO MAKE YEAST. 604. water. Add it is a handful of Let it stand until about lukewarm. 605.water salt.

and as soon as it is light stand it away in a cool place. cold water. but we mean approbation. Dissolve separately tartaric acid. Let it stand until becomes lukewarm.514 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and lastly stir in the HAM 607. Take out the hops and pour over the gradually the thin paste into the hop-water. add some old yeast. the soda into your batter. one drachm and a half of and the same First put quantity of bi-carbonate of soda. and add as { them much grated ham as will flavor . to OMELETTE. light. 606. YEAST POWDERS. or whatever you wish to make tartaric acid. Beat four eggs very light. then place it fire and let it boil it a few minutes. We ask advice.

before serving it up they . and a tablespoonful of chopped parsley. mischievously contrived to sprinkle it well with Scotch snuff. now?" said one of the boarders. try the following: Beat up the yolks of three eggs. Serve it immediately.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. residing in the vicinity of A WORTHY old nothing " " fit Mahopeck. " Hang it. Isaac sat down to the crow. with " You see I ken eat a crow. ada half of a good-sized onion. farmer." Can you eat a crow." "Bet you a hat. The bet was made. the crow shot. was worried to death by unruly boarders. and said he had to eat. chopped very fine. 615 with gait and pepper to the till it taste. I can eat any thing. and succeeded.'" CHEAP OMELETTE. 608. and when he had finished. what a fuss you're making. The shredding of the onion to a sufficient degree ." said old Isaac. I ken eat a crow. He took a good bite and began to chew away. I confess / shouldn't he inclined to hanker arter it . but singular grimace." said the guest. . They found fault with his table. he said. and roasted but. "Yes. Fry it in hot butter is brown on the lower side. but he made an awful face however. it. to If there are no social objections your eating onions. he persevered.

609. when It the beaten is It should be of a light side. green corn Take from ." A . SERVANT being sent to match a china plate. that learning in ladies should be as onions properly are in cookery 3^^011 should perceive the flavor. brown on the under may be browned on the hot the top by holding the pan of shovel over it. returned with one of a very different pattern. add to this three eggs beaten light. which should be boiling hot stirred in. It was remarked by an eminent barrister. " Stupid. "only one of 'em is different. four to six ears of grate it off the cob . is very important." was the reply. do you not see that the two are entirely different ?" "No mum. — GREEN CORN OMELETTE. the mistress said. as the short tune required to fry the omelette would be sufficient to cook the onion. Have ready egg some butter or nice dripping. but not the thing itself. salt and pepper to I the taste.516 of fineness THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. After scolding for some time.

Bosom Friend. and three eggs. no Bat I have my freedom. 611. two pounds of seven pounds of sugar. 610. a dessert spoonful of ground allspice. to the flour and milk. I had an onion yesterday. beat light. and that's a great comfort. tell me. dear. my dear. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. are you any the happier far it ?" Interesting Widow. one small tea- .. now that you are a widow. season with butter a pan. flour gradually Moisten the it with the milk. one pint of milk. Five pounds of beef or tongue. Do you know. " Oh. very smooth. seven pounds of apples. 517 BAKED EGG OMELETTE. beat the eggs very and add them salt . pour in the mixture bake in a quick oven about three quarters of an hour. three nut- megs. Two tablespoonfuls of flour. three pounds of currants. two ounces of cinnamon. three pounds of raisins. for the first time these fourteen years ?" — — ! CED MEAT. " Well. suet.

cold. and add the currants. chop the meat. lemon. stand away. If you wish to keep your mince^neat for several weeks. pack the mixture tightly in a it stone jar. sugar. and dry your cur- prepare the spices. Boil the meat in water. and the grated rind of one. chop the meat very fine. ^ -raisins. raisins. which has been salted in the proportion of one teaspoonful of salt. it is tender. fine.) (also the brandy and . lemon juice. and cider. rants. the juice of two lemons. add the sugar. Moisten it with equal portions of wine. Mix for use the whole thoroughly it will be fit on the follomng day. and grated lemon rind. mix the moisten it other ingredients. and cover close. wine. and merely with brandy . but leave out the apples.518 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. before it Wash. When pick. to get perfectly chopped. and spice. to every it is quart of water. When you . Brandy the taste. wine. and spice. them fruit. spoonful of ground mace. and seed the chop Pare and core the apples. and to cider.

taste. chop your apples. mince Take^jL much cold roasted lean veal as will it fi^i small cake mould.ALL. two eggs well beaten. and pretions. pare to improve your position by fresh energies. a piece of the crumb of bread soaked in cold milk.THE FAMILY SAVE. season with pepwell together. together with a slice of ham. with and add wine and brandy your Things to be remembered in December. Be charitable to the poor. and by warmth at home in foggy and damp days and nights. not by reading the puffs of "quackery. take out some of the meat. — A NICE LUNCHEON OR SUPPER CAKE FROM COLD VEAL. the same of onion and mix fill . and fine. and bake an . butter the mould. and it mix with Moisten to in the proportion given above. 519 wish to make it into pies. a small bit of butter. and be just to your connecExamine the state of your affairs. in per and salt. all it. Take care of your health." and swallowing quack nostrums. cider. but by exercising in fine w^eather. 612.

strain upon a piece of lemon taste . . put Boil it one pound of sugar. produced. not affronted at a jest if one throw salt at thou wilt take no harm. BREAD JELLY. unless thou hast sore . 614. To one pint of cherry juice. places. ten minutes. boil them gently in water till enough a jelly putit to rather is more than cover them. Garnish with pickled eggs and parsley. ting a little in a spoon to cool peel. and sweeten This to is a little wine may ^fc|dded. for THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and toast them equally of a pale brown . a light and pleasant repaj^ror invalids. Cut the crumb of a roll into thin slices.520 oven cold. about an hour . BEVERAGE FROM CHERRIES. Be thee. 613. which may be known by . turn it out when and cut into slices.

a covei* little nutmeg. fare. we can stock ourselves and thrive. 615. of garlic. and half litfn . and finding it excellent. display Much good treasure for the great rent da^'.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. When cool. he ordered a dish. ^Kon bit it with pepper. ladies and all. prepared as follows Shred cold veal or fowl. put to it a little cream . yet may. The^^ liked the dish wonderfully. TOURIST stopping at a hotel saw on the bill of '' Fried Water Chicken. A and became frog-eaters without knowing it. and a crust. AND HAM. dish. . Lay fill the crust into a shallow pieit and : with the meat. bottle and it tight. the quantity of mostly lean ." Desiring to know what this meant. and skim cork it. OR CHICKEN. recommended it to the rest of his party. A NICE PIE OF COLD VEAL. We If are but farmers of ourselves . with and turn out of the dish when baked. 521 it.

a shallow tub under the and take care that there are two or three small holes near the bung or in it. in wine. place tap of the cask. perfectly new.522 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. hold the bottle under the tap in a leaning position. they are If the off to driven in with a wooden mallet. the choice of good corks they should be flexible . well cut. 616. spots on them should be When the wine runs clear. BOTTLING WINE. Champagne bottles must have their corks driven about . not soaked. it must be cut than a quarter of an inch. is The first thing to be attended to . The corks should be dipped. to allow the air an ingress. there may remain quarters of an inch of |Dace between the wine and the lower end^^the cork. and should enter with difficulty . cork less is to be waxed. to supply the place of the wine withdrawn. and any having black rejected. so that when three- the cork comes in. Fill the bottle to within two inches of the top of the neck. All being ready.

or the deposit may mix to with atfd injure the wine. and about to be removed. how- . separated from the gross and have attained perfect clearness by the fining. half way. and fixed 523 down by off. except some particular is method lasts employed. being poured into the cask and floating on the surface of air. but it must also remain a certain time . in tlie cask to ripen for this no precise rule cnn be laid down. the wine. the wine should be decanted into fresh bottles. for Wine only be be fit bottling must not lees. Generally speaking. a bottle of fine olive which. almost certain to be is the best prevention of this.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. deposited in excess. a wire. it is While a cask imposvsible to bottling exclude the admission of air to the surface of the liquor. or precipitation of is wine in is bottles. acidity or mouldiness for a whole When the crust. this makes them easy of wine is to draw. the wine injured . and if is the operation some time. oil. totally excludes the and pre- vents year.

617. 'tis nothing but a little ale glass together. which went the wrong way." '''Ah. then stew them together . no longer is liable to fermentation. the skin from a chicken. while they were taking a " Oh. THE FA:\rTLY SAVE-ALL. in the chicken. " That was a severe con orbing fit. cut it Remove up. especially if the weather be fine and clear. Fry two or three sliced onions in butter. when of a light brown put together and fry them till the chicken in becomes brown. When wine bottled s"^ too often ferments and remain always sharp tion the best time to perform this operain the is month of March or October.'" CHICKEN CURRY. "you always lay the I coffin oil the bier ." replied the sexton. until it wine should not be bottled and is has lost its sharpness. soon.524 ever." said the sexton to the undertaker. ha that's just like you. it . roll and flour eacM^piece in curry (a table- powder and mixed together spoonful of flour to half an ounce of curry).

add the milk. happened to determine a cause unjustly to the prejudice of a poor widow. ordered her to be paid out of his own purse.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. . recovered his senses. who. This is an example worthy of imitation. double the sum she was to have lost. 619." The king. stir it all 33 Put it is the time roasting when . Six eggs. TO ROAST COFFEE. Do nothiDg in a passion why wilt thou put to sea in the violence of a storm ? EGG-NOG. if More water may be added too thick. and Pick the black or it imperfect in a pan. one pint of milk. a little 625 water for two or three hours. having drank too much wine. king of Macedon. . boldly cried out. " I appeal to Philip sober. Beat the eggs very light and thick. sugar and brandy. half a pint of brandy. Philip. 618. struck with the peculiarity of the event. and. heard the cause afresh. finding his mistake. when she heard his decree. half a pound of loaf sugar. grains from the coffee.

526
done,
it

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.
should be the color of the hull
It

of a ripe chestnut.

should be brown

all

through, but not black.
before
it is

About ten minutes
Whilst hot,

done,

add to two pounds of

coffee, half

an ounce of butter.

put

it

in a box,

and cover

it closely.

Notice of coffee, from Sir H. Blunt's travels in "They (the Turks) have another drink, 1534. called cauphe, made of a berry as big as a small bean, dried in a furnace and beat to a powder, of a sooty color, that the}^ seethe and drink, in taste, a it is thought little bitterish, but as ma}^ be endured to be the old black broth, used so much by the Lacedemonians it drieth ill humors in the stomach, comforteth the brain, etc."

;

USES FOR STALE BREAD.

020.
slices,

Stale

bread

may

be

cut

into

and softened, by pouring a small
it.

quantity of boiling water over
the pan containing
it,

Cover

to prevent the escape

of the steam.

As soon

as the bread

is soft,

season the slices with pepper and

salt,

have

some hot

lard,

ham

fat,

or sausage dripping,

;

THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.
in a pan, dust a little flour, or Indian

527

meal

on

each

slice,

and fry them
if

a

delicate
it, is

brown.
ter

Boiling milk,

you have

bet-

than water to soften the bread.

ANOTHER WAY TO USE STALE BREAD
621.
them.
quite

Rub
Let

the bread crumbs

fine,

pour

enough hot

milk over them to moisten

them

stand

until

they

are

soft.

Beat up one egg, very

light, to

every pint of crumbs.

Add

the egg to the

bread, and beat the whole

till

very smooth
raise

add a
the

little

salt,

and enough yeast to
light,

batter.

When

bake

it

on

a

griddle like

buckwheat cakes.

ANOTHER USE FOR STALE BREAD.
622.
Soak some bread in cold milk,
off,

drain the milk

mash the bread very

fine

528

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.
it

and mix with
boiled rice.
little

a quarter of a pound of
light,

Beat up two eggs

add a

salt,

mix
bag

all

together thoroughly, and

boil it in a

for

an hour.
sauce.

Serve

it

with

any kind of sweet

" Papa, I've been seeing cook make bread and can you tell me why dough resembles the sun ?" " The sun, Freddy ?" " Yes, Pa." " No, I cannot.'* Fredd}', with great glee, " Because, when it rises it^s
;

lighV

PANCAKES WITHOUT

EGGS.

623.
flour

Mix

four tablespoonfuls of dried
ale
;

with a pint of mild

beat the batDissolve half
lard,

ter for a quarter of

an hour.

an ounce of fresh dripping, or

in a

small frying-pan, pour in a fourth part of

the batter, and fry both sides a pale brown
color.

Place the pancakes one on the other

with a dessertspoonful of moist sugar sprinkled between.

Each pancake

requires half

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

529
to

an ounce of dripping, and ten minutes
fry.

SAD CASE. We were visiting at the house of a where there were a number of young children. One of them had the measles, one the hooping cough. They were all receiving the greatest sj'mpathy and attention, while one little girl, about live years old, sat in the corner, crying bitterly. We asked her what was the matter ? She replied, bursting out into a heart-breaking gush of tears. " Evei'y one has got the measles and hooping cough, and I ain't got nothing, boo hoo hoo !"

A

friend,

!

CARAMELS.

624.

One cup of grated

chocolate, one

cup of milk, one cup of molasses, a piece of
butter the size of an egg, one cup of sugar.

Being at home. The highest home grows out of a special state

style of being at of the affections

rather than of the intellect. Who has not met with individuals whose faces would be a passport to any society, and whose manners, the unstudied and spontaneous expressions of their inner selves, make

them visibly welcome wherever they go, and attract unbounded confidence toward them in whatever the}' undertake ? They are frank, because they have
nothing to conceal affable, because their natures overflow with benevolence unflurried, because they dread nothing; always at home, because they carry
;

;

530

THE FAMILr SAVE-ALL.

within themselves that which can trust to itself anywhere and everywhere purit}^ of soul with fulness of health. Such are our best guarantees for feeling at home in all society to which duty takes us, and in every occupation upon which it obliges us to enter. The}' who live least for themselves are also the least

embarrassed by uncertainties.

CAKES MADE OF COLD MEAT OR POULTRY.

625.
and mince
salt,

Take any
it fine
;

cold poultry, or meat,

season with pepper and
;

to

the

taste

mix thoroughly, and
eggs,

make

into •small cakes, with bread crumbs,

and yolks of boiled
forcemeats.
Fr}^ the

or

any of the

cakes a light brown,

and serve them

hot.

" It seems," said one dand}'^ to another, at a party, " that they give no supper to night." To which the other coolly replied, " Then I stop my expeiises,'*^ and coolly took off his new gloves
1

NEW ENGLAND BROWN
626.
Take equal
meal and rye
flour, scald

BREAD.

quantities of Indian

the Indian meal,

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

581
flour.

and when lukewarm, add the rye
Stir in

enough lukewarm water
little

to

form a

dough a

softer

than

for

wheat bread.

Add
bake

half a pint of good yeast and half a

teacup of molasses.
it

When

it

has risen,

well in a moderate oven.

SODA BREAD.

627.
fuls of

Three pints of

flour,

two teaspoon-

cream of

tartar,

one teaspoonful of

bicarbonate of soda, dissolved in half a tea-

cup of

warm

water.

Rub

the cream of tar-

tar in the flour,

add a

little salt,

and

stir in

gradually some sweet milk and the soda,
so as to form a dough.
loaves,

Mould

it

out into

and bake

in a moderate oven, so as

to let it rise.
ters of

It requires

about three-quar-

an hour to bake, and should be a

light brown.

532

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

MUSH BREAD.
628.
some
salt,

Boil

some Indian mush in the

usual way, and

when lukewarm add
Let
it rise;

to it

yeast and enough wheat flour to

form a

soft
it

dough.

when
it

light,

knead
it

with only enough flour to prevent

adhering to the board.

Make
is

into
rise

loaves, put

them

in the pans, let

them

again,

and bake them.
bread

This
that

a more

economical
wheat.

than

made with

CORN BREAD.

629.

To two

quarts of meal add one
;

pint of bread sponge

water sufficient to
flour

wet the whole

;

add half a pint of
of salt;
let
it

and
then

a tablespoonful

rise;

knead well

for the second time,
tlie

and place
it

the dough in

oven, and allow

to

bake

an hour and a

half.

An industrious peasant in Picardy, being observed to purchase weekly live loaves, was asked what oc-

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

533

casion he could possibly have for so much bread. "One," replied the honest fellow, "is for myself; one I give away one I return, and the other two I " Wh}- ," " How do you make that out ?" lend." returned the peasant, " the one which I take myself is for my own uae ; the second, which I give away, is for my mother in law ; the loaf I return, is for ray father ; and the other two, which I lend, are those with which I keep my two children, in hopes that they will one day return them to me."
;

MILK BREAD.

630.
your
flour

Procure good yeast,

put

it

into

with
it

sufficient

salt.

Warm

the

milk, add to

half a teaspoonful of bi-car-

bonate of soda, and knead the dough for
three quarters of an hour.
light,

Let

it rise

very

then knead
Place
in a

it it

again fifteen or twenty
in

minutes.

your bread pans and

bake
it rise

it

moderate oven without letting

the second time.

A Squire had a friend to visit him on business, and was very much annoyed when his wife came to ask him what he wanted for dinner. " Go away!
let UH alone ;" impatiently said the squire. Business detained his friend till dinner time, and the squire urged him to remain. To the surprise of both, they

631

THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.

8aw nothing but a huge bowl of salad, which the good wife began quietly to serve up. " My dear," said the squire, " where are the meats ?" "You didn't " I order any," coolly answered the housewife. asked what you would have, and you said, 'Lettuce alone Here it is." The friend burst into a laugh, and the squire, after looking lurid for a moment, " Wife, I give it up. Here is the joined him. money j^ou wanted for that carpet which I denied you. Now let's have peace, and some dinner." The good woman pocketed the money, rang the bell, and a sumptuous repast was brought in.
!'

BREAD FRITTERS.
631.
a dish,
grate

Strew half a pound of currants on

and dredge them well with

jQiour;

some bread into a pan
is

until a pint of

crumbs

produced

;

pour over them a pint

of boiling milk, in which two ounces of
butter have been stirred
let
it
;

cover the pan and

stand for an hour.

Then

beat the

mixture thoroughly, and add half a nutmeg
grated,

a quarter
sugar,

of

a pound

of

white
of

powdered
brandy.
stir

and

a
till

wineglassful

Beat six eggs

very
the

light,

and

them

by degrees

into

mixture.

THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.

535

Lastly, add the currants, a few at a time,

and mix the whole, thoroughly.

It

should
a thin

be brought to the consistence of
batter,
little

and

if it

turns out too thin, add a

flour.

Have ready

a heated frying-

pan with
large

boiling lard.

Put in the batter in
fritters

spoonfuls,

and fry the

to a

light brown.

Drain them on a perforated

skimmer, or an inverted sieve placed in a
deep pan, and send them to the table hot.
Serve with wine and powdered sugar.

GERMAN
632.
pound of

PUFFS.

One

pint of milk, three eggs, one

flour,

one dessertspoonful of

dis-

solved salseratus, a teaspoonful of butter, a

saltspoon of
eggs,

salt.

Beat the whites of the

separately.

The yolks must be

as

thick as batter,
dry.

and the whites perfectly
milk and
is

Add

to the yolks half the
it

half the flour, stir

well until the batter

536

THE FAMILY SAA^E-ALL.

smooth, then add the remainder of the flour

and milk.

Warm
full

the butter,

and

stir
it

in
is

and beat the batter thus made,
light
ratus,

till

and

of bubbles.

Stir in the salae-

and

lastly,

the whites

—but

do not

beat

it

after the whites

have been added, as
Butter teacups,

that will

make
it

it

tough.

or an earthen mould, pour in the batter,

and bake

in

a moderate oven.

Serve

with butter and sugar, or any kind of sauce

which may be

preferred.

They

require

from half an hour

to three quarters to bake.
;

A
that

VAIN hope
is

flattereth the heart of a fool
it

but he

wise pursueth

not.

POTATO PUFFS.

633.
in

Dissolve two ounces of loaf sugar

a wineglassful of
of

new milk

;

rub three
to
fine

ounces

mealy potato

(boiled)

powder; mix these together; add the grated
rind of a small lemon and the yolks of three
fresh eggs
;

beat for ten minutes

;

then add

THE FAMILY SAVE- ALL.

537

the whites, beaten to a froth; butter five
small tin moulds
;

put a

fifth

part of the

mixture into each, and bake in a quick

oven about eighteen minutes.
diately,

Serve imme-

with sugar

sifted

over them.

futurity,
forth.

This instant is thine, the next, is in the womb of and thou knowest not what it may bring

A CHARTREUSE OF APPLE AND

RICE.

634.
stick of
stirring

Boil six ounces

of

rice,,

with a
is

cinnamon, in milk until
in

it

thick,

a spoonful of

rose

water or

orange flower water.
apples

Pare ten or twelve

—golden

pippins are the best
fill

—scoop
with

out the core, and
raspberry jam.

up the

orifice

Border a deep dish with

paste; put in the apples, leaving a space

between, and

fill

it

up with

rice.

Brush

the whole over with the yolk of an egg,

and

sift

sugar thickly over

it

;

form a

538

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

pattern on top with sweatmeats, and bake
it

for

one hour in a quick oven.

Influence of light upon the

Dupuytren, the French physician, relates tion. the case of a lady whose maladies had baffled the The lady reskill of several eminent practitioners. sided in a dark room, into which the sun never After shone, in one of the narrow streets of Paris. a careful examination, Dupuytren was led to refer her complaints to the absence of light, and recommended her removal to a more cheerful situation. This change was followed by the most beneficial reSir James sults, and all her complaints vanished. Wylie has given a remarkable instance of the influence of light. He states that the cases of disease on the dark side of a barrack at St. Petersburg have been uniforml}^ for many years, in the proportion of three to one to those on the side exposed to strong light. The experiments of Dr. Edwards are He has shown that if tadpoles are conclusive. nourished with proper food, and exposed to the constantly renewed contact of water (so that their beneficial respiration may be maintained), but are entirely deprived of light, their growth continues, but their metamorphosis into the condition of airbreathing animals is arrested, and they remain in Dr. Edwards also obthe form of large tadpoles. serves that jjersons who live in caves or cellars, or in very dark and narrow streets are apt to produce and that men who work in deformed children
;

Human

Constitu-

mines are liable to disease, which can onl}' be attributed to the withdrawal of the blessings of light.

under the water spouts. otherwise the clothes cannot Soap. instead of dissolving will made clean. and forming suds. in the propor- tion of one gallon of lye to three or four of water. Soda is sometimes used. They should stand on . must be be All the water used for washing soft. injures the texture of the Where or all the water is hard it is usual to save rain water by catching casks placed it in cisterns. is The to best way it of a softening hard water mix with large quantity of strong lye. 539 HOUSEWIFERY.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. float always curdle and is on the surface of water that either hard from being impregnated with lime or other mineral substances. 635. or brackish from its vicinity to the sea. should Rain covers water casks always have to prevent impurities from getting feet into the water. WASHING. but it it is objectionable as clothes.

the best method water to boil three quarters of a pound of soap and an ounce of soda in a gallon of till they are completely dissolved.640 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALI. The bleaching effected of linen or muslin is best by first washing the articles in cool soap suds. wash out of the water . then pour the liquid out to be used at once. TO WASH A COUNTERPANE. no it. Rub it 636. and put it over night in a tub of it lukewarm water. and where a sufficiency can be obtained. well with soap. it Without an abun- dance of water is impossible to wash the clothes clean. or to make them a good color. good washer will be sparing in the use of Washing In in dirty suds is of very little avail. using is soda in washing. for and be furnished with a spigot the water drawing when wanted.. repeat this pro- few days. and laying them on the grass at night to receive the cess for a dew . it Next morning.

wrong in toward evening it side outward. hang in the it sun to dry. out and wash after in some clean soap suds it which wash the cold through a second sud warmer than Rinse it first. twice through plenty of last it. have been washed 34 The water should be warm. as that . but by no means hot. then wring it . 541 was soaked it in. Have ready plenty It colored clothes wash them in the dirty suds the white clothes in. Take and the next day hang side out. soft to 637. of clean. In washing a quilt or counterpane never use soda. It with the right must on no account be put slightest away with the It dampness about it. water. may take three days to dry perfectly.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. little The blue in it rinse water should have a pane Wring the counter- out. TO WASH COLORED spoils DRESSES. water.

clap it. filled and rinse Have ready with weak starch.542 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. then wash in a second clean well. a tablespoonful. soap make a strong lather before the chintz is put into it it Wash it tho- roughly . If the colors are once injured. colors. so as to spread them wide. clothes continue wet too long. taking the sleeve by the cuffs and pinning them up to the skirt. be much improved by mixing . nothing can restore . out immediately to dry in the shade. Put the dress into it. They till must always be done the as fast as possible. gum and it arable water with the starch for instance. it through the starch. warm a pan little suds. Would injure the in the water to Rub enough it. and If colored causing them to dry the sooner. no precaution can prevent the colors from running into streaks. it Then squeeze and hang it open well. is whole process completed. run out. This will certainly happen lie if they are allowed to in the water. tinged with a Painted lawns or muslins will a little blue.

DRESS. but nor ironed. but by good management they .ALL. may per- always be preserved priced calicoes. They should up closely in a towel. 543 them . TO WASH A BOOK MUSLIN water. they should not be always starched rolled washed and dried. . without great care. unless in coarse low of them many is wash is As soon It it as the dress quite dry^ take to fold it in. Wash it through a second suds. always the best way and iron immediately. and fectly well. .THE FAMILY SAVE. soap Make and warm it a strong suds with white Put in the dress and wash rather well squeezing and pressing it. than rubbing as book muslin tears easily. the be If dresses are to be put by for winter season. will not last long." and. 638. Another is to way dress of fixing the colors in a dress into grate raw potato is the water in which the washed.

544 THE FAMILY SAVE. then .ALL. if you This is a good plan. till and clap in your hands clear all over. hems of their thin muslin dresses. it Have too dry irons ready. stretch it even. through a thin starch. . are willing to take the trouble. Stretch it. hem Many persons. and hang it in it sun to dry. and iron side. diluted with water either warm the or cold. previous rip out the having them washed. roll it Afterward. When it done. Then open it it out. a clean fine sprinkle and up in towel. and pass it through little . letting it lie for half an hour or more. be very careful to even. do not in a press or fold the dress. but hang up wardrobe. afterward run- ning them over again. before it is on the wrong whenever practicable. waters adding a very blue to the Then open out run it the dress and while wet. Take it care that the irons are not too hot. as will scorch easily. two rinsing last. get the to In ironing.

Then add pounds of washing soda. settle Let three and pour off.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Have ready a stirring it well. TO PREPARE STARCH. and mix with the lime water. A pint or a quart of the hot water it is may be allowed. kettle of boiling water. boiling water. use a large wineglassful to each pailful of water. 640. with just enough of clear cold water to convert it into a thin paste. to three gallons of soft. according as desired that . 639. Add one gill of soft soap to a pailful of water. When dissolved. and mix it gradually. 645 TO MAKE WASHING FLUID. Put two or three tablespoonfuls of starch into a bowl. it then pour it into skillet. pressing out all the till lumps with the back of the spoon becomes perfectly smooth a clean pipkin or . it Add one pound of unslaked lime. and by degrees add some of it to the starch.

for When minutes. it has it boiled about fifteen stir a few times. and squeeze into it a very little blue from the it indigo bag. Strain the starch through a white cloth into a large pan. but must be very little. or of a moderate consistence. thin. Put a sufficient quantity of dry starch (for instance. it K not well boiled. 641. sprinkle in a about a tea- spoonful to a pint of starch or throw in a piece of loaf sugar. from two to three tablespoonfuis) into a bowl. starch should be thick.546 the THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. will fail to be glutinous. with the end of a spermaceti will candle. sticky. Finish by stirring it vigorously with a spoon. for a moment becoming is each time. This prevent it If a spermaceti little candle salt. not at hand. TO PREPARE COMMON STARCH. Set it on hot coals and boil it thoroughly for half an hour. and mix it gradually .

and by degrees add it some of it to the starch. loaf sugar. If not well boiled. 547 with just enough of clear cold water to make get it it a thin paste. according as you wish to have the starch thick. a few times (merely for a moment each time) with the end of a spermaceti candle. Have ready stirring a kettle of boiling water. When stir it it has boiled about fifteen minutes. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. You may allow from a pint to a quart of the hot water. which answer a similar purpose. Strain the starch through a white cloth . Set it on the fire.. and boil it well for half it an hour. thin. you into Then pour it a clean pipkin or skillet. well. This will prevent stir its it being sticky but take care not to too much. or moderate. pressing out all till the lumps with the back of the spoon perfectly smooth. or throw in a lump of Finish by stirring it hard with a spoon. sprinkle salt in a little (about a teaspoonful will to a pint of starch). If you have no spermaceti. will not be glutinous.

is If the starch properly prepared and the above rules to. " Father. soda. stiffness A and little gum arabic and common added to the starch. gives extreme gloss to collars. " pray." said a little boy.548 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. the " No. Dip them into per- warm fectly. An inquiry. starch and let them dry again They must then be dipped into cold water. into a large pan. For common colored dresses jou may make above. spread out smoothly on a clean towel and rolled up tightly. 642. STIFFNESS TO COLLARS. the starch with fine flour mixed as Gentlemen's collars should be quite dry before they are starched. " are not sailors very small men my dear. and squeeze into it a little blue from the indigo bag. what leads you — V . adhered the linen will have a fine gloss when ironed." replied the father. other day.

" replied the child. out every scallop Needlework should always be ironed side. on the wrong In ironing collars. and evenly and with the point sepa- of the iron press rately. then crossways. . narrow but . "I read the other day of a sailor going to sleep in his watch. care should be taken not to stretch one half the collar more than the other first They should be ironed lengthways." RULES IN REGARD TO IRONING. not to stretch them crooked. 549 to suppose they are so small ?" " Because. strips. straight. Chintz should be ironed on the wrong side. as the starch is apt to show on colored clothing when ironed on the right side. Be or careful in ironing lace. as too great heat is injure the colors.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. Sheets and table-cloths should be ironed with a large iron pressed on them heavily. 643. iron them slowly. All colored clothes require a cooler iron than white liable to clothes. ribbons. any long.

A skirt board should be made wdde at the bottom gradually narrowing toward the top. or any part which may hang down. so touch the Hoor. begin at the bosom. with coarse muslin be both of which must sewed over it tightly and smoothly. covered like that used for will be found dresses. next the sleeves. and then . which may thus be ironed without a Puffings or gatherings should be folded or creased in half along the middle. set a chair in a convenient receive the sleeves. when ironing . crease. if When phice to the table is not large enough. then iron the sleeves. and lastly the back. and lastly the skirt. it Cover first with a piece of blanket.550 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. A small board. as not to let them First iron the body. and ironed out like a flounce or ruffle. ironing a dress. This board is to slip into the skirt of a dress. In ironing a shirt. very useful to shirts slip under the bosoms of them.

with the plum-end next " Is it possible ?" said the mate. up the dish. rub them with a use a brush." said both laughed. shake them. who after helping himself. . taking to himself. is told of a Yankee captain Whenever there was a plum pudmate ding made by the captain's orders. he said. " This cost me two shillings in Liverpool. " you've found me out so we'll just cut the pudding lengthwise this time. passed it to the mate. . and turning it round. young'n. and that placed next The following story : and his — the captain." . be washed Or the articles may in soapsuds. then lay them in dry powdered magnesia." and putting it down as if without design. Make a lather of soap and water. piece of flannel or. " I shouldn't suppose it was worth more than a shilling . if embossed. put them in a bag with some clean fresh bran. who no sooner perceived the alteration than picking up the dish. and at the mate " I'll tell you what. the mate prevailed on the steward to place the suet-end next to the captain. TO CLEAN GOLB ORNAMENTS. and wash the articles. all the plums were put into one end of it. 551 644:.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. the captain. he put it down the contrary way. as if to examine the china. When . who never found any plums in any part of it. and have the plums fairly distributed hereafter. After this game had been played for some time. or sawdust. dry." and. as if in perfect innocence. and while wet. and they will look almost like new. The captain looked the mate looked at the captain.

Yet be not puffed up in thine own conceit. then . 552 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. TO TAKE STAINS OUT OF SILVER. the space of four hours then cover it over it with whiting. 646. . PASTE FOR CLEANING PLATE. add three quarters of a stir till of spirits of wine. a soft paste. and put the whiting into the oven to dry. stir well. Steep the silver in soap ley for . mix in half of the whiting into gill it . so that may lie thick upon it. then put it into covered pots the rest of the whiting to be kept in a lump for polishing. 645. it into three pints of cold water. . neither the dearest of boast of superior understanding human knowledge is but blindness and folly. wet with vinegar. so as to Break up two cakes of whiting. Scrape off the sandy sediment. let it oflf wash out all the grit. and dry it by a fire .. stand till it settles to the bottom pour the water. Dissolve three quarters of a pound of soft soap .

howby making a ever. TO REMOVE INK STAINS FROM SILVER. hour^s industry will do fulness. and retrieve your than a month's moaning. 648. 647. and rubbing upon the An affairs. after 553 it which rub off the whiting. and pass over with dry bran. with pulverized whiting . little It may. which is difficult move by ordinary means. The most common is method of cleaning silver. but the silver will look exceedingly bright. The tops and other portions of silver ink-stands frequently become deeply to re- discolored with ink. and the spots will not only disappear.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. be completely eradicated chloride of lime it into a paste with stains. more to beget cheersuppress evil humors. TO CLEAN SILVER WARE. water.

rub between the prongs of the forks. rag. it off them like flour. after which. for if there any coarse or rough particles among the silver either . thinly over a large plate. but not very near it the paste must become so dry on the articles that you may soft dust cloth. and coat the silver all over all with the mixture. which better . it. spirits of and whisky. they will scratch it you may powder it very finely.. and place before the of fire to dry. with a afterwards. after which. dip a flannel or sponge into it. with the smallest brush. or by it it tying up in a clean and beating spread it with a hammer. lay the articles in the sun to dry. with whisky or spirits of wine. or place them on an old waiter before the fire. then sift it through a piece leno. 554 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and go over all . coarse book-muslin or mix the whiting into a paste or cream. by pounding it in a mortar. the whiting must be are made as fine as possible. the minute or the plain or un- delicate parts of the silver . or with is wine.

or next to nothing. before it with a soft silk you begin to clean your plate. The jDatient. applied . . read of an " urgent case" of this kind recorded of an eminent surgeon. say. He had been sent for by a gentleman who had just received a slight wound. they show the most trifling scratches next polish with a buckskin or a finish chamois leather. and gave his servant orders to go home with all haste imaginable. are best rubbed with as . sir. and fetch a certain plaster.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. that no grease or syrup may remain on it. I hope there is no danger !" " Indeed there is. said " Heaven. one teaspoonful of one teacup of water. wash in boiling water. Nothing so much vexes and to find after We . and handkerchief." answered the surgeon " for if the fellow doesn't run like a race-horse the wound will be healed before he can possibly get back!" in great haste. Silver door-plates are most ex- peditiously cleaned with a weak solution of ammonia and ammonia to water. 555 ornamented parts flannel. is the matter with his patient. a surgeon as to be sent for his arrival that nothing. 649. ANOTHER MODE OF CLEANING SILVER. turning a little pale.

with an emphatic gesticulation. Etc. " And suppose she is. you scoundrel !" He had just raised his foot to kick monsieur into the street.'" " What you dying for my wife ! get out of my house. . with a wet rag it is equally useful in clean- ing other silver plate and gold jewelry. . little and go over the outside with a oil. he met the husband of the lady at the door. Then take a soft linen cloth. Mr. Having washed the block tin articles quite clean in warm water. as it happened. who is an economical body. 650. sweet Next rub and it all over with fine whiting. lives in street. save . when the timely appearance of the lady led to the necessary explanation. His wife.556 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. ! TO CLEAN BLOCK TIN DISH-COVERS. when. powdered Afterward sifted and put on dry. what do you want with her?" " Oh! 1 am dying for her. '*Is madam within ?" asked the Frenchman. had sent a silk gown to a French The d3xr called to ask for some further ind3'er. finish with a clean dry cloth. structions than those he had received. rub the inside with soft rags moistened with fine wet whiting.

. because somebody once wrote a wise saw to the effect. or a little scum of cream on boiled milk. would so unjustifiably tyrannize. Eock alum. but in their case a purgatorial infliction. even in the person of the smallest child and he who would act otherwise is himself smaller than the child over whom he —we refer to Why should its — . 1. 651. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. provided that they are always wiped dry as soon as they are brought from the table. one part . Whenever there is this decided antipathy nature should be respected. TO CLEAN BRASS. tin fine Block pans and kettles may be cleaned with whiting and water. No." We have often seen the poor little victims shudder and choke at the sight of a bit of fat meat.• . as well as the repugnance of an adult ? "We consider it a great piece of cruelty to force a child to eat things that are repulsive to it. toothsome enough to those who like them. 35 Finely-powdered salammoniac water to moisten. 557 Block tin dish covers cleaned in this with oil way their and whiting will preserve polish. " that children should eat whatever is set before them. and continue to look new. inside and outside. not a child's fancy in the way of food intense dislike of certain things be regarded.

558 water. then rub with either of the above mixtures. sixteen parts. through oil a of muslin. Rub on the brass with a flannel. Dissolve in a pint of soft water acid. Brass cleaned in this manner looks beautifully. 652. as to be liquid. 2. For cleaning brasses belonging to mar hogany furniture. Mix. No. This process will give them the brilliancy of gold. it off and then wipe with a buckskin. with tripoli. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. let it rest ten minutes. Have ready some sifted pulverized piece rotten-stone." Always shake it well before using it. an ounce of oxalic and keep it in a it bottle labelled " Poison. and warm finish the articles to be cleaned. either powdered whiting . and then take a dry flannel to polish it. TO CLEAN BRASS. Rub this on with a cloth. and mixed with so of turpentine.

while you clean with the other.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. repeating it at intervals during TO CLEAN BRASS. when . immediately get a bowlful. care liquid gets must be taken that none of the into your eyes. and then wipe it off. seeing that none of the brass. Powder half fine. No. rest a little while. otherwise the handle will soon become loosened by the unsteadiness of the friction. used for rubbing. a pound of it rotten- stone very and mix with an ounce . . 559 mixed with sweet is and rubbed on with a buckskin. to the brim. Oxalic acid being poisonous. till the pain abates the day. of cold water. mixture lodges in the hollows of the In cleaning brass handles. 653. and hold the eyes open in it. hold the handle firmly with one hand. Let well it ex- cellent. Should this by any accident happen. or scraped rotten-stone oil. 3.

After washing the kettle it with warm water. and put it ^^ in a bottle use. oil as will make a well on the brass with the then take another clean leather it." TO CLEAN A BRASS OR COPPER KETTLE. Poison. Kub it leather. and polish A WITTY fellow slipped clown on an icy pavement. is strong poison. otherwise it will collect rust or verdigris. and label it. but I sincerely wish the streets were laid in ashes. or copper kettle should always is be cleaned immedi- used. ately after it A it brass. dissolved in as as will make for it it a stiff paste much water when perfectly it dry . 654. he muttered. " I have no desire to see the town burnt. bell metal. put into a teacupful . of oxalic acid.5G0 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. While sitting." When you as wish to use mix a little it with stiff much sweet paste. powder very fine. Even when not used which a will require occasional cleaning.

*WiNK at small injuries rather than avenge them. through a muslin as or hair sieve as will bring mix with it it much soft soap . be it made up will soon into balls. and a tablespoonful of it 561 salt. taking care that the salt and vinegar shall touch every part then wash it with warm water . rub the kettle thoroughly with a cloth.. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. or put into gallipots become hard. you throw down the hive. and by rinsing it and wiping dry. when hot. 655. to the stifihess of putty to about half a pound of this add two ounces of oil of turpentine. It may . TO CLEAN BRITANNIA METAL. it and scour well. or fine sand. of vinegar. and time. If to destroy a single bee. next take some wood it ashes. will keep any length of is When the metal to be cleaned. Sift rotten-stone . place over the fire. . afterward wash finish it with hot soap in cold water suds. instead of one enemy you make a thousand.

but in the right use of strength and strength is not used rightly when it onl^^ serves to carry a man above 1^^ is thu his fellows for his own solitar}. articles will Metal afterward need polishing with plate-powder.gl<Jiygreatest whose strength carries up the most hearts by the attraction of his own. Greatness lies not in being strong.562 rub - THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. . as fire to melt there is danger of melting the solder or injuring the plating. then wash the article with soap and hot water. Whether the candlesticks first be care plated. when dry. Never place them before the the grease. and im- mediately wiping them with a soft cloth. silver. the polish pro- duced . with sweet then apply a till little of the is paste with the finger. it first with a piece of flannel moistened oil . soft wash-leather. the must be remove the drops of grease by pouring boiling water upon them. to or japanned. rub with whiting. and a little fine TO CLEAN CANDLESTICKS. 656. . and.

having a little bit of buckskin on to pre- vent the head of the nail from injuring or wearing out the mat. cloth. and threads or knot the lengthway two together. do by washing with a large coarse . much dampness is injurious When it it is necessary to clean a floor mat. 657. 563 TO CLEAN MATTING. obviates inconvenience of a thick conspicuous ridge. be and tack them down to the . as it. floor in putting down a join it you have occasion to across. and.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The mat. ends of the turning under breadths. Then turning to all these knotted threads underneath. . lay one edge over the other of the pieces joined. as you pro- wiping it dry with another coarse prevent If. their This ravelling the and knotting and the threads. salt will the matting from turning yellow. . to Straw matting should be washed but seldom. ravel about an inch at the end of tie each breadth. cloth dipped in salt water ceed. floor with a row of very small tacks each tack it.

A MAN in Lowell has. even before the day has fairly closed. . that it becomes necessary for him to retire when the hens go to rooat. rub the greasy spots gently once or and the grease will disappear. For a long time he was unable to discover the cause. Worsted . there is some doubt. is the edge of the matting full folded under in its substance.564 if THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. with his breakfast. secure the edge of the safer to suffi- mat with the ciently durable binding of colored linen or thick cotton tape. when the hens begin to stir. and he conceives that they have so entered into his system. the But of this result would probably be beneficial. 658. He has been in the habit of eating egga. Dip a piece of flannel in spirits of wine. and raw. If it also has the effect of arousing him in the morning. twice. but at last did so. TO EXTRACT GREASE FROM PAPERED WALLS. binding is is generally used for matting but as this it is sometimes destroyed by moths. been sadly afflicted with drowsiness. for many weeks past. and a desire to sleep. fried. boiled.

. 659.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Master. in the lightest and beginning it wipe downwards crumb. manner with go upward. go round again. the Do not cross or The fall dirt of the paper and the crumbs will half a all together. and after doing the lit- upper part. John. you will make the dirt adhere to the paper. —Something to be . what is the meaning of "friafried. If you do not do extremely lightly. 565 A YOUNG lady should often maintain a prudent reserve and silence in the presence of her lover he will be certain to fancy her a great deal wiser than she can show herself by her talk. Do not wipe above yard at a stroke. ble?" —John. Then divide a loaf of stale take the crust into your hand. white bread . at the top of the paper. TO CLEAN PAPER HANGINGS. All the dust must first be brushed from the walls. beginning a tle above where you it left off.

and go till on thus the whole surface has been . and wash to the same part over again. first with the cleans- and then with the pure water. dip another flannel into a pail of perfectly clean hot water. 660. in the proportion of an ounce of soap and a drachm of soda to each two gallons of water. The method of washing is to dip a clean flannel into the cleansing liquid and quickly wash . while it is and it let off. can dry. then brush and the grease have disappeared. portion. Then proceed wash another ing. must be taken up. over a certain portion of the carpet before it then. Carpets must be washed with boiling water in which common yellow soap and soda have been dissolved. remove the grease and shaken which must be effected by means of a paste made all of boiling water poured on equal quantities of magnesia and fuller's earth cover the grease spots with this paste hot.. The carpets . beaten spots. 566 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. TO CLEAN GREASY CARPETS. it remain till quite will dry.

"Oh. to be consistent I also began to drink beer. little moved. and then wax. and dry rubbing makes . then wipe them with a and when all dust and spots are reflannel. now a bottle manufacturer. flannel ." Avas the reply. and use but rub only enough to give a little smoothness. A GENTLEMAN. was recently asked by an acquaintance how he could reconcile his former professions with his present practice. though tedious. "when I started bottle making. When perfectly dry it should be flannel.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. rub with a waxed with a clean one . This process." TO CLEAN FLOOR-CLOTHS. 567 cleansed and rinsed in the clean water: not more than a yard square should be washed at once. Sweep. again rubbed over with a clean dipped in a strong solution of ox-gall and water. entirefaded and soiled and greasy ly renovates carpets. after the Washing now and then with milk above sweeping. 661. at One time a strong advocate of teetotalism.

them will bring off the paint. 662.5G8 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. be scrubbed with a brush first but. kept under Should they however become . them look An oilcloth should never . and soon stained by the smoke or atmosphere. derives Alabaster for is a species of soft marble used its ornamental purposes. all objects should be preserved from these external influences by being glass shades. after being swept. it should be cleaned by washing with a large soft cloth and lukewarm water. TO CLEAN ALABASTER. or take water that as either of hot . As this composition is of a delicate nature. easily scratched. executed from the stone found in the neighboring mountains. a town name from of Egypt. where a manufactory formerly existed of works of art in domestic vessels. On no is account use soap. which Alabastron. fresh.

and Re- peat this operation three times. TO CLEAN IRON FROM RUST.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. lay upon sift a strong coat of gum-water. . your powdered glass. after the stains by brushing with soap and water. and the sjpots which remove the whitewash. cloth Pound some glass to fine powder. and thereon some of let it dry. rub the part with a soft stained cloth. and the last covering of powdered when glass is dry. you may easily rub off the rust from iron utensils with the cloth thus prepared. or a of turpentine. and then let it whitewash remain for the stained some hours. Grease may be removed by rubbing the blemishes little oil with powdered French chalk. the following is 569 the best method. having nailed some linen or woolen it upon a board. 663. stains will have disappeared. stained. and. Remove part.

or concern yourself at all. YiRTUE WITHOUT FEAR." replied my h^ joined the first. Shake the brushes in them in some clean water. what impertinent censures or reflections the world will pass upon it. 665. A little borax in water will clean them very nicely." rehonor. " I have. have be- come hard and can be made nearly . do it boldly and do not affect privacy in it. rinse Put a few drops of hartshorn in it. a quart of water. it ought . 3^ou do very foolishly to stand in fear of those who will themselves do ill in censuring and condemning what you do well. and stand them on their ends to dry. When. ^ liberation. And if it be.— 570 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. upon mature deyou are persuaded a thing is fit to be done. — not to be attempted at all. " Have you dined ?" said a lounger to his friend. TO CLEANSE MATTRESSES. 664. TO CLEAN HAIR BRUSHES. " if you have dined upon your honor . though never so secretly. For if the thing be not just and innocent. Epictetus. Hair mattresses that dirty. upon " Then. you must have made but a scanty meal.

excellent. several days." said Sir Walter. who said. I can't say. and picking the hair free from bunches. but the pork chops were first-rate. it fill it and tack together. morning he met one of the guests." said he. For large vessels ley may be used. dry the lightly with the hair ticking well. "but that's the very thing that I was going to recommend to you. " Well. . farmer. "for I didnH taste 'em . in a spoonful or more in Empty them clean. where there was On the following music. how did you enjoy yourself last night ? really. Were not the quartettes excellent ?" " Why sir. she told Sir Walter Farquhar she thought Bath would do her good. as 571 good as new. 666. and of pearlash. fill an hour. "It's very odd. stir Fill them with hot water. washing the ticking. and keeping it in a dry. by ripping them. Clutterbuck's story of the old lady (his aunt) is Being very nervous. vocal and instrumental. and if not perfectly again and let them stand a few hours. airy place. An honest farmer was invited to attend a party at a village squire's one evening.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." TO CLEANSE THE INSIDE OF JARS.

these will not injure or discolor them. I have a great mind to open his letter. " Dear Davis. and on arriving at Newberry." The lady. feeling as usual very nervous. 668." In vain her friend represented to her the breach of confidence this would be. of 667. and see what he has stated of m}^ case to the Bath physician. to which some . furnished with the letter. giving grace the corner-stone of the and strength to the whole structure. keep the old lady three weeks. " Long as Sir Walter has attended me.572 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and then send her back again. The reasoning power is intellectual building. he has never explained to me what ails me. TO CLEAN MARBLE. little Marble is best cleaned with a clean soap and water. set off. she said to her confidant. Lamp shades ground glass should be cleaned with soap or pearlash." TO CLEAN LAMP SHADES. in whose hands you will be well taken care of. clever I will write the particulars of 5^our case to a very man there. She opened the letter. and read.

" replied the pastry cook "but you will find plenty of them as you go along. are all ob- ^4 . 36 The greatest care is necessary in are . Rub them of fine sandpaper." " Why. sir.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. TO CLEAN DECANTERS. for birds of a feather will flock together. door Acids should be steps avoided. TO WHITEN PIANO KEYS. ox-gall 573 may be added. 670. No soap should be used. " Pray. sir. " pies of all sorts. Marble should be cleaned with sand and clean water. " let me have a '' That is the only sort of pie in which I mag-pie.''^ do not deal. as he strolled into a pastry cook's shop. There several used for the purpose pounded wood ashes or sand. do you sell pies ?" said a gentleman." replied the pastry cook. carefully with a piece 669. decanters. then. cleaning materials egg-shells." . " Oh yes." said the gentleman. they say.

a piece of paper should be put around the stopper to keep it from sticking. or a piece of sponge. if mildew will entirely spoil decanters are put by empty. in which a little pearlash has been dissolved. end of a and the outside with the glass cloth. left will generally. rinse with cold water. scratch the jectionable as being liable to glass . some lukewarm soap very suds.574 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. then dry the inside with a soft rag. then brush the outside in a bowl of soap suds with a glass brush. may be used to finish the it polish of the inside after has been several times rinsed with cold water. tied to the stick or whalebone. and leave the stopper out till the inside of the decanter is perfectly dry. all when crust remove the on the sides . and some small pieces of raw potato thrown into the water well shaken about. as spots of it. the dust from getting into the bottle if . tied to the end of a long piece of whalebone. drain in a rack for ten minutes. a bottle brush. and to prevent .

which preserves the wine decanters . the wisest course is. quit his company if he slanders you. Dilute half a teaspoonful of the oil of vitriol with a large spoonful of water. as the lead and arsenic used in the manufacture of shot. take care to live so that nobody will believe him. the better for the neighbors. when combined with the acid which exists in fermented liquors. In nine cases out of ten. TO TAKE INK STAINS OUT OF MAHOGANY. well to it 575 it is take out the stopper and replace with a cork. form a dangerous poison. better The more —the .THE FAMILY SAVE. 671. they are put by with wine in them. . and bottles are often cleaned with shot when this is done. and touch the brush. a camel's hair Rub it and repeat the process until the spot disappears. . to quit dealing with him if he be abusive. the better for ourselves.ALL. better. stain with off quickly. quietly and peaceably we get on. care left should be taken that no grain be in the bottle. if a man cheat you.

I told you the time not a minute ago. sir. As soon take up as as 672. taking up the liquid little it . sir." . " No. and when his colleague came in. A — . spilled. "but this is for another To tric TO REMOVE FRESH INK FROM A CARPET." replied the lad.676 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. he asked him to preach for him as he was very wet. CLERGYMAN." was the prompt reply " preach yourself you will be dry enough in the pulpit. was standing before the session-room fire to dry his clothes. and then pour on cold water still peatedly. happening to get wet." said the astonished tobacconist. the ink has as been much you can with a re- sponge. tell me what time it is. I thank you. Fume has put up an ElecClock in his shop." " Why. a little shaver came in with the usual " Please. then rub on some hartshorn. attract customers. " Yes. sir. next rub the place with a or salt of sorrel. The other evening as we were buying a cigar. and is terri])ly anno3^ed by boys running in to inquire the time of day. wet oxalic acid off and wash immediately with cold water.

and the whole well shaken for a quarter of filled an hour. Wet . The most must be rubbed on preparation for re- A effective moving ink-spots may be made by the sal- following receipt.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. into a quart bottle. the stain will entirely disappear. a pint of to water added them. Of course. and leave there in bits. The bottle may little be then longer. 577 TO REMOVE INK-SPOTS CLOTHES. rub hard on the ink-spots. . This must be the clothes are washed. shaken a and corked. colored clothes cannot be boiled without entirely fading them. tallow We know^ it to be effi- cacious. Pick some tallow from it the bottom of a clean mould candle. FROM WHITE done before 673. Then and if be washed and boiled merely common ink. this remedy as can only be used for white things. let the article it is till it sticking next day or longer. cold. with water. An ounce each of ammonia and must be put cold s(^t salt of tartar well mixed.

that before a man is twenty -five years old he does not himself know what he wants. truth is. . .578 the THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 674. and the stain will almost instantly disappear. or the acid will injure the fabric. Don't imagine that any disappointment in love which takes place before you are twenty-one years The old will be of any material damage to you. the better wife you will be able to obtain and one year's possession of the heart and hand of a really noble woman is worth nine hundred and ninety-nine years' possession of a sweet creature with two ideas in her head and nothing new to bay about either of them. Dissolve some oxalic acid in water. and repeat the process the stains disappear. are uniformly modest. —«-•*•» ANOTHER METHOD OF REMOVING INKSPOTS. The more of a man you become. who possess the most desirable qualities. Wash the linen immediately in clean water. and hold their charms in humble estimation. marked linen effectually with till this mixture. . and the more manliness you become capable of exhibiting in your association with women. wet the spot with the liqufd. We know that men naturally shrink from the attempt to obtain companions who are their superiors but they will find that really intelligent women.

There are a great many cements glass by which broken and china may be joined.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 676. will unite articles more strongly than thick ones. 675. ful of till Dissolve half an ounce of isinglass in a little spirits of wine. add a tablespoonfire water . it forms it transparent Then spread nicely on the edges of the broken . It is an important rule in the use of all cements that only a small quantity should be employed . judiciously applied. and the selection of one of these from among a number must mainly depend upon the transparency or color of the to be article mended. warm a it slowly over the glue. generally speaking. and other considerations. ^ 579 VARIOUS METHODS OF MENDING ^ROKEN ARTICLES. and that. TO JOIN GLASS THAT HAS BEEN BROKEN. thin cements. the nature of the fracture.

and place them in a tin pan. or it other level surface. and grow up into benevolence in the mind of others. . and all of them will bear fruit of happiness in the bosom whence they sprang. the juice.580 glass. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. ANOTHER WAY TO JOIN BROKEN 677. Good and friendly conduct may meet with an unworth}^. to express Wet the broken edges of the glass with this juice. and stick them firmly remain un- together . tie — Get some cloves them in a rag. Once blest are all the virtues always twice blest sometimes. and let disturbed for a fortnight. pounding them with a hammer. giver. and in a few minutes the joining will be firm and scarcely perceptible. Broken glass may be mended as of garlic. with an ungrateful return but the absence of gratitude on the part of the receiver cannot de. Some of them will inevitably fall on good ground. . stand the article upon a plate. stroy the self-approbation which recompenses the And we may scatter the seeds of courtes}^ and kindness around us at so little expense. ui}#te them. follows : GLASS.

as follows China or : glass may be mended —Slake and lime. and add the slaked lime to as to so form a thin paste. 679. etc. 678.. will and form a cement that will unite it china so completely that rated by any means. some of the powder of the Take the white of an egg and well beat with an equal bulk of it. and will be found to be very resisting the action and capable of of boiling water. strong.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 581 CEMENT FOR BROKEN GLASS OR CHINA. cannot be sepa- Cracked vessels of China earthenware. It must be used speedily. ANOTHER WAY TO MEND CHINA. water. it some collect quicklime with fine boiled water. such as chimney ornaments and vases. into a paste with the white of an egg. rub it it Grind a piece of flint glass on a painter's stone to the very finest powder. .

and stick them together.582 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. be repaired by putting on the inside of tape. articles of fancy-work. Make a very thick solution of stir into it plaster gum-arabic in water. and of Paris until the mixture becomes a thick paste. dissolved with about one third weight of coarse brown sugar in the smallest quantity of boiling water. Apply it with a brush to the frac- tured edges. the best its glue. it may be . 681. is very good. and small cardboard. For uniting ETC. The whiteness of the cement renders valuable. When this is in a liquid state. 680. it doubly GLTJE FOR UNITING CARDBOARD. paper. may strips rubbed over with white lead. ANOTHER WAY TO MEND BROKEN CHINA.

for dropped in a thin cake upon a allowed to dry. 583 plate. But to . Men till are frequently like tea the real strength and goodness are not properly drawn out of them they have been a short time in hot water. is poisonous. When required one end of the cake may be moistened by the mouth. and rubbed on the substances to be joined. and well mixing This paste . A may paste to resist the attacks of insects be made by omitting the alum. The uses of flour paste are very well known. it will be found a great little improvement before freely. . add a it alum to it boiling will then work flour it more not the particles of will separate from the water. putting to each half pint of paste.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and surfaces will unite much more firmly. and corrosive it. 682. and use. fifteen grains of sublimate in powder. < % •* FLOUR PASTE.

and properly made and applied. simmer gently over a slow This if excellent for joining paper. CEMENT FOR MENDING STONE. Mix in fine dry powder twenty sifted sand. 685. RICE GLUE. the joining strong. glass. rice flour Thoroughly let it is with cold water. fire. 683. This is suitable for fill- ing up cracks etc. 684. It sets in a few hours. . MASTIC CEMENT. mix Rice glue is a very delicate and suitable article for fancy work.584 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. ETC. and one of freshly burned and slacked quicklime.. etc. suitable for china. will be found very When dry it is almost transparent. or mastic glue. Mastic cement. the finer stones. parts of well washed and two of litharge. and has the appearance of light stone.

and scarcely perceptible. said . Put the two mixtures together vessel over a gentle heat. marbles. spirits of wine as will isinglass it Soak an ounce of in water till quite soft. went one day to see how the job was getting on. after which the fracture will be as secure as any part of the vessel. then dissolve it in pure rum to or brandy until forms a strong glue.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. in an earthen and when well and keep for it united. is 585 as fol- made lows : To one ounce of mastic. or even for metals. and mixed. and observing a quantit}^ of nails lying about. gum ammoniac. cement is applied. put into a small bottle well bottle stopped. which add about a quarter of an ounce of well rubbed. When wanted set in use. the must be warm water. until the cement is fully set. and the china or glass articles must be fore the surfaces. A GENTLEMAN wliose hoiise was under repair. wurmed beThe broken be when carefully fitted. should kept in close contact for twelve hours at least. add as much dis- highly rectified solve it.

CEMENT FOR LEATHER. two ounces of pitch. is cloth. one . of several composed from a parts. ** you'll j^wd them all in the hilV' Why TO MEND ALABASTER ORNAMENTS. they are liable. 687. and the parts to be joined previously should be damped with luke- warm water." replied Master Chopstick. four ounces of India rubber. they'll certainly be lost ?" " No.. variety of causes. to become disjoined. The cement should be used immediately that it is mixed. made as follows Take one ounce of gutta percha. As alabaster objects are 686.: 586 THE FAMILY SAVE. don't j^ou take care of these to a carpenter. " nails. and when this occurs the parts may be rejoined by a cement made from the white of one egg mixed with a teaspoonful of quicklime. leather. An adhesive material for joining etc.ALL.

CHEAP LOTION FOR CHAPPED HANDS. There is no policy like politeness . and every time you wash your hands. 689. manner is the best thing in the world. a good name or to supply the want of CEMENT FOR ALABASTER ORNAMENTS.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. dip your wet finger into the honey and rub it over your hands ivhile wet. ounce of shellac^ and two ounces of Melt these ingredients together and use the mixture while hot. and a good either to get it. Have a pot of strained honey on your wash-stand. Mix the white of one eg^ with a teaspoonful of quick lime. The parts to be joined should be dampened with lukewarm water. and the cement should be put on the moment it is mixed. 688. 587 oil. Wipe them very dry and the skin will be .

" I should like to buy some of those cucumbers. Mix a quarter of a pound of unsalted hoe's lard. Take some dry Indian meal. 690. make them METHOD OF WASHING THE HANDS. your hands and rub them wdth then wash them with This is soap and tepid water.588 soft THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. granma !" " Why not ?" " Because I should be ashamed to be seen carrying them home when everybody knows they're only a penny apiece. A few drops of glycerine daily will rubbed on the hands soft. as good and much cheaper than sand soap. which has been washed . never dreamed until lately that there was an aristocracy of appetites. wet it. if you will carry them home." said the lady. 691. don't.^' We We PASTE FOR CHAPPED HANDS." " No. even in the coldest weather. overheard in the market the following brief dialogue between an old lady and a little girl: " Mary.

soft In order to preserve the hands and vhite. waste nothing..THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." RECEIPT FOR MAKING THE HANDS WHITE. in a manner. 692. in water 689 and then in rose-water. Mix half an ounce of glycerine and two scruples of borax in half a pint of boiling water. and dried with a moderately coarse every time to towel. they should always be washed in warm water with carefully fine soap. spoonful of honey. with the yolks of two new-laid eggs. as the very time past were lived over again. To live if good as much in a little time is. or almond paste. no expense but to do good to others or i. e. " Use morning and evening. 693. OINTMENT FOR CHAPPED HANDS. and a large fine oat- Add as much meal. as will paste. being well rubbed 37 . work into a Make yourself.

590 insure THE FAMILY SAVE. First . WASH 694. one drachm. and three drachms of spermaceti. . TO WHITEN THE NAILS. of bitter almonds add to them three ounces oil. The Take following a serviceable pomade for rub: bing the hands on retiring to rest two ounces of sweet almonds. than which nothing can be more effectual in promoting a transparent paste is and soft appearance. then dip the finger into the wash. spring four ounces. of l^mon-juice. water. Almond of essential use in preIt is serving the delicacy of the hands. made thus : Blanch and beat up four ounces . beat with three drachms of white wax.ALL. cleanse with white soap. two drachms Mix. put up carefully in rose-water. Tincture of myrrh. diluted sulphuric acid. a brisk circulation. three ounces of almond and a little is weak spirits of wine.

ALL. and well and plentifully rubbed in the hair. Of Nothing but good can be derived hair. thin and dry hair will require those more seldom than hair. it individual. Once a week is perhaps but this will depend upon the persons with light. with thick. beyond the and even as seventy-fifth degree of north latitude low as the seventieth degree these phenomena are very rare. — . The soap should be mild. When the great Lord Clive was in India his sisters sent him some handsome presents from . . Nothing than soap and water. I used to get hold of our writing-master's copies and trace them against the window hence the plain hand I now write.^^ CLEANSING THE HAIR. When I was a schoolboy. It is inexcusable in any one to write illegibly. 691 Thunder and lightning are believed not to occur in the Arctic or Antarctic regions. Bad Writing.^. desirable. an immoderate use of water not beneficial. strong or is who better perspire very freely. is from a due attention to cleansing the course. i . 695.THE FAMILY SAVE.

Let it. a piece of common soda about the size of a hazel nut. It is then ready for use. Put it in a jug. it stand for twelve hours. to If the hair falls off much. then strain glassful of and add a wine- rum. taking care to wet the skin thoroughly." ^ — ** TO CLEANSE AND PREVENT THE HAIR FROM FALLING OFF. Then rub dry with a towel. The announcement threw them into the utmost perplexity. 696. for what could they possibly do with the animal? The word meant was equivalent. and use only as much hairs. brush well. . and a drachm of camphor. pour on it it a quart of boiling water. and cover to keep closely the steam in. England and he informed them by letter that he had returned them an " elephant^ (at least so they read the word). mary Take two large handfuls of rose- leaves.592 . THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. pomade as the as will keep down the short soft wash makes the hair and glossy. the wash ought be applied to the roots with a piece of sponge. every other day.

" said his friend." said the other. 697. —A young Englishman. " that is a gentleman of the first rank. was introduced at an assembly of one of the first ladies b}^ a Neapolitan gentleman. oil of almonds.— THE FAMILY SAVE. being at another house. d'ye see ? I cut my hair — it now cuts me. While he was there his snuff box was stolen from him." " I don't care. two drachms of palm half an ounce of white wax." " Pray. is taking snuff out the box stolen from me yesterday. A RECEIPT FOR POMADE. three quarters of a drachm of the oil. for several months in and a piece of camphor in each. A Thief Outwitted. ^. — 503 This will keep good bottles well corked. Three ounces of olive oil. He ran to his friend " There. . I'll go and ask him for it. and three quarters of a drachm of the essence of bergamot." said he. whilst at Naples. "that person in blue. a quarter of a pound of lard. My hair and I are quits. *' I must have my snuff box again." said the Englishman. Do you know him ? Is he not a sharper ?" " Take care. The next day.ALL. he saw a person taking snuflT. with gold embroidery.

594

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

"be quiet, and leave the matter to me." Upon this assurance, the Englishman went away after inviting his friend to dine with him next day. He accordingly came, and as he entered " There," said he, *' '* 1 have brought you your snuff box." Well, how did you obtain it?" '' Why," said the Neapolitan nobleman, " I did not wish to make any noise about it, so I picked his pocket."

CASTOR OIL CREAM FOR THE HAIR.

698.

Put half a pound of fresh lard and pour a quart of boiling
;

into a basin,

water over
melted.

it

stir

it,

that

it

may

be well

When
it

cold, take it off the water,
it

squeeze
fork
till

dry, and beat

with a wooden

in soft

cream

;

then add, by degrees,
oil

an ounce and a half of fresh castor
twenty-five drops of essential
oil

and

of berga-

mot, or any other perfume preferred.
it till

Beat
it

quite like a thick cream.

Put

into

covered toilet pots.

Harbor not revenge in thy breast, it will torment thy heart, and discolor its best inclinations

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

595

POMATUM FOR CHILDREN'S HAIR.
699.
Pick carefully and wash a quarter
;

of a pound of beef-marrow

put

it

into

an

earthen jar, with a quarter of a pound of
fresh lard;

stand

it

in

boiling water
it

till

melted and clear; then strain
basin,

into

a

add a

gill

of rose water.

Stir it well,

and
it

let it get cold.

Break

it

up and squeeze
begins to be
it

through the rose water
;

till it

soft

then press out the water, and beat
;

with a wooden fork
olive
oil.
oil,

add one ounce of pure

and half an ounce of violet-scented
till it is

Beat

quite smooth, and put

it

into covered toilet pots.

(The mixing of
better be done

every kind of
in

pomatum had

a cool place; more particularly
is

when

castor oil

used.)

Red-tape Routine. By a singular regulation the government couriers in Austria are ordered, when charged with despatches, sealed with only one if with two seals, to seal, to go at a walking pace trot and if with three, to gallop. courier, bearing a despatch with three seals, passing lately through a garrison town, was requested by the commandant to take a despatch to the next town.
; ;

A

596

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

but perceiving that it he refused to take charge of it, saying, that the regulations ordered him to walk his horse with such a despatch, and as he had another with which he was ordered to gallop, he could not possibly take both of them.
this he willingly agreed,
seal,

To

had only one

CHILDREN'S CURLS.

700.
brushing
spirits of

If the hair be soft
it

and

fine,

try

with a brush dipped slightly in
;

hartshorn

or melt a bit of white

wax
olive

the size of a nut-kernel, in an ounce of
oil,

and dress the hair

in curls with

it.

Hath any one wronged thee ? be bravely revenged.
Slight
it,

and the work has begun

;

forgive

it,

and

it is finished.

CURLING FLUID, FOR THE HAIR.

701.
about the
olive
oil,

Melt a piece of white beeswax
size of

a

filbert

in

an ounce

of

and add one or two drops of otto

of roses.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

597

BANDOLINE.

702.
must be
reduced

An
half,

ounce of the seed of quinces
till

boiled in three pints of water

then strain

it,

and add a few
it.

drops of essence to perfume

Keep

it

in wide-mouthed, well-corked bottles.

ANOTHER KIND OF BANDOLINE.
703.
Boil a quarter of an ounce of Irish

moss in one quart of water.
ciently thick, bottle
it,

When

suffi-

and put a teaspoonful

of rectified spirits in each bottle to prevent

mildew.

LIP SALVE.

704-.

Take two ounces of

oil

of sweet

almonds, half an ounce of white wax, and
half an ounce of rose-water
into small pieces, put
;

cut the

wax
and

them

in a mortar,

598
set the

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

mortar in a vessel of boiling water.
the

When

wax

has melted, take out the
oil
;

mortar, and add the
the pestle until
it is

by

degrees, beating

cool

mix

the rose-water

with the mass.

To
oil

color

it,

rub a
it

little

carmine with the
the wax.
oil,

before mixing

with

A

little

beeswax melted
lip salve.

in sweet

makes a cheap

be, neither let

to be first in thy calling whatever it any one go before thee in well-doing nevertheless, do not envy the merits of another, but improve thine own talents.
;

Endeavor

ESSENCE OF JESSAMINE.

705. way A
:

This

is

obtained in the following
is

layer of flowers
sieve,

spread over the

bottom of a hair
is

and upon the flower and detached
bits

laid a layer of small

of the finest cotton wool, which have been

dipped in
ble to
cid.

oil

of Ben

—that
it
is

oil

being prefera-

any

other, as

does not become ranlaid another layer

Over the cotton

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

599

of flowers^ and so on alternately cotton and
flowers, until the sieve is full.

When

these

have lain twenty-four hours, the flowers
arQ

removed and fresh ones introduced, a
is

process repeated until the cotton

quite im-

pregnated with the odor.
pressed out of the cotton.

The

oil is

then

Add

to

it

some

highly rectified
it

spirits of

wine, and keep

in closely stopped bottles.
heliotrope,

The

jonquil

rose, or

may

be served in the

same way.

TO

MAKE A SCENT

JAR.
fine day,
jar,

706.
lay

Gather rose leaves on a
in

them
a

a broad mouthed

and

sprinkle

little

common

salt

over each

layer of leaves.

Lavender blossoms or any

sweet-scented flowers

may

be added.

Strew
well

over

the whole,

a
orris

little

bay

salt,

pounded,

some

root,

sliced,

cloves,

cinnamon, and angelica

root, sliced.

Mix

the

ingredients and cover the jar close.

600

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

really believes he shall ever die. a feeling of eternity in youth which makes us amends for every thing. Death, old age, are words without a meaning a dream, a fiction. To be young is to be as one of thei immortals.

No young man
is

There

BOUaTJET DE LA REINE.

707.

A

highly

fragrant

and

much

esteemed perfume

for the handkerchief, etc.,
:

compounded

as

follows

Oils

of bergamot
;

and lavender, of each, thirty drops
fifteen

neroli,

drops;
five

oils

of verbena and cloves,
essence
of

of

each,

drops;

musk,

ambergris,

and jasmine, of each, half a

drachm;
mix.

rectified spirit of wine,

two ounces;

If you woo the company of angels in your waking hours, they will be sure to come to you in your
sleep.

HONEY
708.
Cut
into

SOAP.
thin shavings,

two

pounds of common yellow or white soap;

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.
set it over the fire

601

with just enough water
;

to keep

it

from burning

when

quite melted,
stir

add a quarter of a pound of honey, and
the mixture
till

it

boils;

then take

it

off

and add a few drops of any agreeable

per-

fume

;

pour

it

into a deep dish to cool.

Take care always to form your establishment so much within your income as to leave a sufficient
fund for unexpected contingencies and a prudent liberality. There is hardly a day in any man's life in which a small sum of ready money may not be

employed to great advantage.

VIOLET PERFUME.

709.

Drop twelve drops of

oil

of rho-

dium on a

piece of loaf sugar, grind this

well in a glass mortar,

and mix
of

it

tho-

roughly with three

pounds

orris-root

powder.
of violet.

This will resemble the perfume
If

more

oil

of rhodium be added,

a rose perfume, instead of violet, will be
produced.
Tolerate no uncleanliness
habitation.
in body, clothes or


602
THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.
OFF.

WHITEWASH THAT WILL NOT RUB
710.

Slake the lime in the usual way.
gill

Mix one
water,

of flour with
to
it

a

little

cold

taking care
;

beat

out

all

the

lumps

then pour on
it

boiling water

enough

to thicken

to the consistency of

common
it

starch

when

boiled for use.

Pour

while

hot into a bucket of the slaked lime, and

add one pound of whiting.
together.

Stir all well

A

little

"blue water," made by
little

squeezing the indigo bag, or a
ized indigo

pulverit.

mixed with water, improves

A Frenchman being afflicted with the gout, was asked what difference there was between that and " One very great deferance !" the rheumatism. " Suppose you take one vice, replied Monsieur. you put your finger in, you turn de screw till 3^ou bear him no longer dat is the rheumatis den, spose you give him one turn more, dat is de gout.^^

ENDS OF CANDLES COJnTERTED INTO NIGHT LIGHTS.
711.

Supposing a few night lights to be
in places

wanted

where they cannot be pro-

THE FAMILY
cured, they

S AYE-ALL.

603
of

may

be

made from the ends
as

candles in the following manner.

Collect a

few old pill-boxes

;

make

wicks as you have boxes,
ton

many fine cotton and wax the cotthem
to

with beeswax

;

cut

the reol

quisite length,

and ^x them in the centre

the boxes, through a pin-hole in the bottom.

Melt the grease
the better) and

(if
fill

mixed with a

little

wax

the boxes, keeping the

cotton in a central position while the grease
cools.

When

set to burn, place the

box

in

a saucer, with sufficient water to surround

the bottom, about the sixteenth of an inch
in depth.

have heard of a would-be wit who kept a nntmeg-grater on his table, in order to say when a great man was mentioned, " There's a greater.''^

We

THE TURKISH BATH UPON A SMALL
SCALE.

712.

Place the patient
tie

upon a large
a large blan-

cane-bottomed chair, and

604

THE FAMILY SAVE- ALL.

ket around his neck, so as to completely

envelope the chair and his body

;

underfull

neath the chair, place a saucer

of

alcohol (spirits of wine) and set a light to
it.

The
filled

space within the blanket will soon

be

with hot

air,

and a profuse per-

spiration will be produced.

A SIMPLE METHOD OF CATCHING AND
DESTKOYING FLIES.
713. Take some
fill

jars,

mugs, or -tumblers,
;

them half

full

with soapy water

cover

them

as jam-pots are covered, with a piece

of paper, either tied

down

or tucked under

the rim.

Let this paper be rubbed inside

with wet sugar, molasses, honey, or jam, or

any thing sweet, cut a small hole
centre, large
flies settle

in the

enough

for a fly to enter.

The

on the
;

top, attracted

by the smell

of the bait
hole,
to

they then crawl through the

feed

upon

the

sweet

beneath.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

605
weather

Meanwhile

the

warmth

of

the

causes the soapy water to ferment, and pro-

duces a gas which overpowers the

flies,

and

they drop down into the vessel.

Thousands

may

be destroyed this way, and the traps

last a long time.

TIN<JTTJRE OF

NUTMEG.

714.
ready
for

A

very useful tincture of nutmeg,
use,

immediate

may

be

made by
smaller

adding three ounces of bruised or grated

nutmeg
quantity

to a quart of brandy.

A
be

may

be made, by observing the

same

proportions.

This will

a
in

very

grateful addition to all

compounds

which

nutmeg

is

used

;

a few drops will suflice to

impart a

flavor.

" The candles you sold me last were very bad," " Indeed, sir, I said Suett, to a tallow-chandler. am sorr}^ for that." "Yes, sir, do you know that they burnt to the middle, and would then biirn no " You surprise me what, sir, did they go longer.''^ out ?" " No, sir, no; they burnt shorter.^'
;

38

606

THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL.

TO PREVENT THE

BREAKAGE OF LAMP

CHIMNEYS.
715.
sene
oil,

Every housewife who uses kero-

knows that
all

it

affords the best
oils.

and

cheapest light of

illuminating

But

she also knows that the constant expense

and annoyance from the breakage of lamp
chimneys, almost
if

not quite counterbalits

ances the advantages of
glass

use.

Put the
it

chimney in lukewarm water, heat
it

to

the boiling point, and boil

one hour; after
till it

which leave

it

in the water

cools.

The chimney

will be less liable to crack

by

sudden changes of temperature.

TO PREPARE FEATHERS FOR BEDS.

716.

Feathers should be put into bags
;

of brown paper as soon as they are plucked

the

ffoose

feathers,

which are
be

the

most

valuable, should always

kept separate

from those of the ducks or chickens; the

them on and spread them them to dry on the floor of an empty garret.) and washing them through of strong soapsuds. Old may be greatly improved by empty- ing the tick. rinse water. of As soon as a sufiicient quantity feathers have been fill collected. . ceiling warm place. they will soon be- come perfectly dry there. which must be kept from the feathers. and the pinions and large feathers must be stripped from the quills. their drying may be accelerated by sewing in a coarse sheet. and putting them after the into the oven on a baking day. it is the best plan to a pillow with them . feathers flesh 607 no must be picked skin carefully that or adhere to them. (which should also be washed. in a The bags must be kept hung If the kitchen be lofty.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. the goose feathers can afterward . and they can be suspended from the without inconvenience. be transferred to a bed-tick fowls being feathers the feathers of commonly used for pillows. drain several lathers in cold them well sieves.

and snugly ensconced with a genteel family as maid of all work. . They should be gathered on a dry day in the autumn. for this purpose. " Does ye think I'd be ateing the boxing ?" little startled. The chafT of newly-thrashed oats also forms wholesome and comfortable beds. Bridget. Her mistress observed her. carefull}'' scraping it from the uuder-crust. as and will not harbor vermin. and said. and letting them remain till next morning. . just arrived from sweet Erin. why do you eat the pie in that manner ?" A Bridget looked up. drawn. then put basfs them into and beat them.G08 bread there is THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. she came to an apple-pie. Beech leaves are recommended they are very elastic. 717. " Bridget. and exclaimed. It was something entirely new to her. and examined it ver3'' minutely. She then removed the upper-crust and commenced eating the apple. and l)e perfectly dried. Having diminished the substantials. She viewed it from all quarters. BEDS FOR THE POOR. this should be several times repeated. sat down to her first meal.

during a frost. other A ne\7 keg. and rinse it. scald the vessel well with boiling water. They may have put tlie feathers in 'em. cliurn. for the sufficient reason that he was intoxicated. with cold before you use A PARISH official. scald it it well with plain hot water. but darn me if I donH think t/iey^ve left the fowls in too P^ A Yankee way TO REMOVE THE TASTE OF NEW WOOD. 609 sittir/r on a A-ery hard seat in a railcarriage. bucket. of sedate manners. To prevent this incon- venience. they tell me these here cushions air stuffed with feathers. he asked. said. will generally com- municate a disagreeable taste to any thing that is put into first it. vessel well with this solution. fell on the pavement. " Wal. "Are our by-laws to be enforced or not. or 718. and wash the inside of the Afterward. I should like to know ? Why don't you spread ashes /^^ before your houses .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. letting the water remain in it till cold. adding a little bit of lime to it. or soda. in luke-warm water. Turning to the bystanders. Then dissolve some pearlash. wooden vessel.

side. sand. Magnesia will effectually remove it grease spots from silk on rubbing in well and soft after standing awhile.vn . 720. TO SCOTJR BOARDS. —not crossing from board then dry with clean cloths. and rub thoroughly. rubbing Floors hard up and down the same way. can be carefully with removed by washing the spot warm water. but very . Lay a on the boards with a scrubbing brush. should not often be wetted. Be careful to clean straight up to and board dc. two parts. on w^hich press a warm iron gently and what grease is not absorbed by the paper. three little soft soap. Mix lime. 719. and thou wilt wonder that any fools should be wroth. one part. apply a piece of brown paper to the wrong . parts . 610 TO THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.. Consider how few things are worthy of anger. REMOVE GREASE SPOTS.

is and rub with a nel until the polish produced. 722. First carefully clean the article with a piece of pumice stone dipped in water. TO POLISH ALABASTER ORNAMENTS. then apply a thick paste made of whiting. flan- dry it with a soft cloth. and perfectly done. when this is wash the article thoroughly. or a mixture of the two. soap and milk. thoroughly 611 when done . TO IMITATE ALABASTER. white wax. Alabaster ornaments may be imitated by brushing over plaster of Paris models with spermaceti. and once a week they may be dry-rubbed with hot sand and a heavy brush —the right way of the boards. is fire Zeal without knowledge without light. or by steeping the .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 721.

Strew the surface of the ground with coal ashes as soon as the peas are put in the ground. they may be brushed over several times with white of egg. he has tliat which nothing can subvert. . he has that which renders him a monarch. So long as a man has this. There is nothing in the universe more desirable than a free mind. They are said to prevent if the depredations of garden mice the surface of the mould. 723. said to accelerate the spread over Coal ashes are appearance of early sown peas. he has that which nothing can subdne. and they will appear three or four days earlier than when no ashes are spread. Only models made of the for these processes. finest plaster are suited USES OF COAL ASHES. though he may lie down upon the bare cold bosom of his mother earth. models in the warm mixture. allowing each coating sufficient time to dry.612 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Or instead of this process.

Good temper — TO PREVENT RUST.a THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. It re- quires but little time and trouble to this soap. whole over the fire. imparting warmth. and when the soap and is borax are dissolved the soap done.*the soap will be harder. It is. etc. very healing to the is hands. varnish Mix with fat oil is varnish. to The be applied by means of a . gem is the philosophy of the heart of the treasury within. moreover. cleaning paint. If less water used. to soap into thin which add one ounce Put the of borax and ten quarts of water. SOAP. . four fifths of well rectified spirits of turpentine. light. and life to all within the spheres of its influence. 725. whose rays are reflected on all outward objects a perpetual sunshine. make wash- which is very valuable for ing dishes. Cut two pounds of common brown slices. scrubbing floors. 613 CHEAP 724.

Like his couuterpart Shakspeare. BO as to If linen has been scorched and the mark has not penetrated damage the entirely through it texture. Articles varnislied in this man- ner will retain their metallic brilliancy and never contract ariy spots of rust. by being brought into contact with water. record one. of my friends are bad arithmeticians. THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. Sir Walter Among a thouScott was much given to punning. I consider it necessary to remind you. we friend borrowing a book one day. which. 726. trust me. may be re- moved by the following process: peel and . that A this volume should be I find that although keeijera. Sir Walter put it into his hands with these words " Xow. sand instances of this propensity in the latter. and to the preservation of philosophical instruments. It may be applied to copper. many TO REMOVE SCORCH MARKS. almost all of them are good book- soon returned .: 614 sponge. are liable to lose their splendor and become tarnished.^^ for.

thrown out by a given . when cool. will be found to and the mark removed. The a more thoroughly. should never be full at filled more fuel than three parts ignites one time. . SAVING OF FUEL. and extract the juice by squeezing or pounding. composition well then spread it. is and greater amount of heat amount of coal. 727. slice 615 two onions. Afterward. add two ounces of fuller's earth. wash out the linen. and let it dry on.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The grate or cavity for the recep- tion of coal. is. Then cut up half an ounce of white soap. over the scorched part of the linen. and mix them with the onion Boil this juice and half a pint of vinegar. have been The reason why policemen are never run over they are never in the way.

it off. keeping the lace in the sun. The French blond washed by sewing it round a may be bottle." " I knowMr. Repeat the process every it day for a week." It is unnecessary to add. and rubbing lather is gently every time the renewed. lace 728. Then it unfold the lace from the and pin on a large pillow or cushion tightly. Then Set place the bottle upright in a strong lather of white soap and clear soft water. fold and put by. Green. TO WASH BLOND LACE. Miss Filkins. Let it dry perfectly on the it then unpin and take starch. and if 3^011 would act wisely.616 " THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The fire is going out. bottle. using a separate pin for every scallop. but it do not loosely or press it. that Greeu never came to see that young lady again. . pillow. and rub the lace gently with your hands. and placing it very straight and even. it in the sun. it. iron. j^ou would follow its example. as in the direction for thread lace on page 618.

729. ." "On my word. Two of soft soap and the juice of a lemon. How many in ground TO TAKE OUT MILDEW FROM LINEN. and it will come out at . the linen Take soap and rub on the gra«s well then scrape some fine chalk. it No. Lay it on the with a brush. tablespoonfuls No. and rub that also in . coxcomb." said a The Prince — TO TAKE OUT MILDEW PROM LINEN. on both sides of the Let it lie a day or two till the stains disappear. and J '11 treat you to a jug of whisky punch. 1. destroys forever a tliousand th^wers of hope that were ready to spring up along his pathway. wet once. " Here." answered Barney.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. "come and tell me the greatest lie you can. " yer honor's a gintleman !" trotter. 2. it a little. lay it . 730. with a patronizing air. 617 a man by throwing himself to the despair. as it dries. you bogop Gentlemen. spots linen.

take care not to crumple or fold in any of the scollops or pearlings. of very clear a strong. though vain of the talent that enabled them to emerge from it. lace from the care- 731. Having . roll the lace very smoothly and securely round a clean black bottle.618 THE FAMILY S A YE. dipping in your finger. touch lightly it on the lace while proceeding to wind on the bottle greasy. which has been covered with new white linen. and fully picked out the loose bits of thread. it Have ready made a wash kettle. little Pour into a saucer a very sweet it oil. sewed on tightly. cold lather and white Castile soap. to keep it it lace with a needle .ALL. Men TO WASH THREAD LACE. article to Having ripped the which it was attached. when they often talk of the hnTnbleness of their origin are really ashamed of it. and smooth and in wrapping round the bottle. of the best and. — too much oil will make water. Tack each end of the thread.

nor iron- ing. within a sheet of smooth white it paper. or white all till the lace is clean and out. We can safely recommend this as the best possible method of doing up thread lace. lay it in long folds. and come out the scollops at the edge will perfectly even. and press or two. and set the bottle in the sun. .THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. it and tie a string round the neck. to pre- vent its knocking about and breaking while fire. which there is neither rinsing. in a large book for a in day By this simple process. filled 619 it the bottle with cold water to keep set it from bursting. transparency. upright in the suds. starching. securing to the ears or handle of the kettle. the lace will acquire the same consis- tence. and tint that it had when new. if and roll it round a wide ribbon block. and as the only one . over the Let it boil in the suds for an hour or more. drain through. Then take it off the suds. for the lace to dry on lace When it is quite dry. it. remove the from the bottle. vou have one place it otherwise.

till It well not to put the oil on the lace in you have the soapsuds ready that the bottle if the kettle. and authors. . may off.620 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. to rinse them. then pass tepid. The purest. Then hold them a fire. it which gives is a truly new appearance. 732. coldest maxims are poured down on us from pulpits. like flakes of snow. a Draw the feathers gently through warm soap lather several times. luit fiist as they fall tliey do not prevent the volcano of our passions from burning. and drawing each portion of the feather briskly between the pin and the thumb. them through and finally through cold water. drip much of the oil will run down and TO CLEAN WHITE FEATHERS. short distance from the and curl the it separate parts of the feather as dries by holding a steel knitting pin in the hand. so . go in immediately as allowed to stand.

and press iron till with a cooler the wax has disappeared. the wax it melts. TO SELECT FLOOR OIL CLOTHS. off. The durability of the cloth will depend much on If the figures rise as well as the time the paint has been allowed to dry. which should be well covered with color. on the quality of the colors used. 734. a very cloth.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. The best floor cloths are those painted on fine cloth. they soon wear off. if they are painted well and seasoned some months before they are laid down. but not on. 39 . much above the ground. use will deface the for Old carpets answer very well floor common cloths. Then Lay a clean blotting paper over the place. scrape it Hold a very hot iron till near. the spot. If the paint has not little become sufficiently hardened. 621 TO TAKE OUT WAX. 733.

be perfectly cleaned by washing in water with white soap and beat a squeeze of blue them against clean white paper. fire. and said " Father. and when no one was looking. feather. Take of choloform.. Apply on a . phor. I seed a lot of men putting letters in a little place. my son. then dry them in the curl air. I slipped yours in for Post Office. letter to the — " James. cotton wool. 622 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. : take this and pay the postage. shake gently for a few minutes before the fire. and afterward them. 735." FOR TOOTHACHE. TO CURL FEATHERS. each one little drachm. Clever Stupidity. White feathers soft may . Heat them gently before the fire then with the back of a knife applied to the they will curl well and quickly. nothing. hold the feathers before a bright and draw the back of a knife along the back of the feathers and they will curl again. 736. Or. spirits of cam- and laudanum.'' The boy returned highly elated.

who was much given one cla}^ TO KEEP SILK. case. astic cant.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. " Do you suppose that j^ou have any real religion ?" " None to speak of " was the excellent reply. the writing In such a sul- must be washed with phate of ammonia. If the writing the preceding process will not be sufefficacious. the written paper repeatedly with it and afterward wash tralize with lime water. ficiently owing to the change which the ink has undergone. It may then be washed with a hair pencil. any acid which may be The writing will be thus removed. before the oxymuriatic acid is applied. as the chloride of lime . A YOUNG divine. Silk articles should not be kept folded in white paper. 738. is old. to enthusisaid to Dr. Wash acid. to neuleft. i523 TO OBLITERATE WRITING. Recently written matter may be completely removed by oxymuriatic acid (concentrated and in solution). Lajiihorpe. 737.

Hold the wrong side of the velvet over boiling water. 739. Brown paper better . of Venetian well While warm. Melt yellow wax with an equal quantity of resin. used in bleaching the paper will probably impair the color of the is silk. the yellowish smooth India paper all. or of to which part add. CEMENT FOR BOTTLE CORKS. and the pile of velvet will be gradually raised. one dried. . 740. common turpentine when thoroughly red.624 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. is best of TO RAISE THE CRUSH PILE OE VELVET. dip the neck of the so as to cover the cork bottle in and edge of the bottle with the wax. mixed. resin.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 625 TO DRIVE AWAY MTJSaUITOES. aromatic vinegar the best antidote. . Camphorated applied as perfume to the face and hands will 23rove an effectual preventive . TO IMPROVE GILDING. A camphor bag hung up will prove an open casement an effectual barspirits rier to their entrance. 743. and their color will be much improved. but is when bitten by them. and two parts spermaceti. two parts white wax. and one ounce of common over gilt salt. in 741. 742. Four parts lard. Mix a gill of water with two ounces of purified nitre. Lay this articles with a brush. one ounce of alum. CHEAP SIMPLE CERATE.

626 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and then wiped dry for use. have a small pan appropriated this also and should it have the loose crumbs wiped from daily. so as to allow a current of air to pass under them. so the rage of an angry man throweth mischief around him danger and destruction wait on his hand. destruction Peas may be preserved from by mice by sowing soot with . Loaves which have been cut should to them. pan When bread is perfectly cold it should be laid into a large covered earthen . made by means of two flat wedges of wood. frequently scalded. . in- stead of standing on the should be placed upon a proper stand or frame for the purpose. this should be kept free from crumbs. pans. TO KEEP BREAD. USE OF SOOT. 744. As the whirlwind in its fuiy teareth up trees and deformeth the face of nature or as an earthquake in its convulsions overturneth whole cities. The bread floor. 745. .

obviously of the first importance that they should be gathered at the right time and dried in the best manner. "you will have the less to count. called after him. " Never mind that. saying that he had not left money enough. if soot tl^m and when the peas come . and throwing two The baker cents on the counter. "Never mind that." replied the lad." TO OBTAIN HERBS OF THE FINEST FLAVOR. 627 up. be sprinkled over them while will not touch them. is not only a destroyer of insects. birds also invaluable for carnations and tulips in It any ground where wire-worms abound. "you will have the less to carry." said young Sooty. Herbs should be gathered just before . they are Soot is damp.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL." said the man of dough. but a rich manure. When herbs are to be kept for it is flavoring dishes. remarked to the baker that he did not believe it was weight." " True. A chimney-sweeper's boy went into a baker's shop for a two penny loaf. 746. left the shop. and conceiving it to be diminutive in size.

on a dry day. a cloth wet with hot water. passed through a hair sieve. who had been all weakness . 747.628 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. decanter When is the stopper of a glass too tight. before the sun has been long upon them. When dried leaves in a intended for preservation they should be cleaned from in dirt and dust. they begin to flower. the finger In a phial the warmth of be sufficient. The newspapers plain cooks. off. and gradually a cool oven. advertise. are full of advertisements of Pretty cooks have no occasion to TO REMOVE GLASS STOPPERS. and applied to the neck. may soft Nothing can be more touching than to behold a and tender woman. will cause the glass to expand. and the powders be preserved separately in well- stopped bottles. The should then be picked pounded mortar. and the stojDper may be removed.

OR BLACK VARNISH FOR BASKETS. and will look equal to RED. it dry. should be his stay and solace when smitten with sudden calamity. Pulverize either red. white. clasp it it in the hands and pull new. so woman. and bind up its shattered boughs. cling round it with its caressing tendrils. graceful foliage about the oak. then take it out. with a small piece of glue in Immerse faded and rusty black crape this for a in few minutes. Make scalding hot skim-milk and it. 749. put it in a phial . or black sealing wax.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. who is the dependent and ornament of man in his happier hours. sift it. TO RESTORE BLACK CRAPE. WHITE. and been lifted by it into sunshine. will when the hardy tree is rifted by the thunder-bolts. 748. suddenly rising in mental force to be the comforter and supporter of her husband under misAs the vine which has long twined its fortunes. water. 629 and dependence while treading the prosperous paths of life.

the latter crop will be more first. be course A double crop of potatoes may obtained : by pursuing the potatoes the following when have come to maturity. when it will be ready for seest the naked wanderer of the with cold. and destitute of habitation. 750. productive than the ." MEANS OF DOUBLING A CROP OF POTATOES WITHOUT INCREASED EXPENDITURE. 630 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. use. pick away for immediate use be careful not to disturb the main stalk. and add a little more earth. wine to just cover Stand it in a very warm place for a couple of days. In about two months after. shivering *'When thou may live. and thine own soul street. let the wings of charity shelter him from death.. then cover over the small ones that are left. let bouut}^ open thine heart. take off the loose earth carefully without disturbing the old stem the tubers that are fit . spirits of with enough it.

for which equal to lard. T 631 planted some potatoes in our garden. and longer To as clarify dripping. cool place. summer. especially if the clarify- ing be repeated twice over. and should supply the place of butter for it is common pies. let the spare dripping stand a few minutes to settle. let boil. then pour it through a sieve into a pan. fresh Well clarified dripping. let it stand till it is a little cooled.. put it into a clean fire. over a stove or slow as soon it a scum forms. After frying. when and sweet. skim it well. 751. it in If kept in a may be preserved a fortnight in winter. potatoes.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. "Papa. " and what do you think came up ?" *' Why. indeed. saucepan." " No. there came up a drove of hogs and eat them all /" THE ECONOMY OF DRIPPING-MEANS OF SAVING THE CONSUMPTION OF BUTTER. etc. will baste every thing as well as butter. of course. and then pour it ." said one of the smart lads of this generation.

and free from dust. The cuttings of Russia leather etc. efiectually prevent moth. and it will it do a second and a third did the first . blankets.632 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. time as well as in but the fat which fish has been other fried. The must be kept in a dry place. article Camphor also a good thing. through a sieve into a clean basin or stone pan. must not be frying used for any other fish. will is placed with furs. Wring it a coarse cloth out of clean water. is purpose than "Why is hot bread like a caterpillar ? Because it the grub that makes the butter Jiy ? TO PREVENT MOTH. 753. TO KILL MOTHS IN CARPETS.. carpet where moths are . 752. spread smoothly on the part of the suspected to be. cloth.

slowly. and it will be ready for use at any moment. 754. if the iron is not pressed on too heavily. Then add. Take a wide-mouthed it bottle. This process will not injure the pile of the carpet. This preparation does not gelatinize. such as mending his pulpit china. by setting it in a and heating until dissolved. and dissolve in eight ounces of the best glue in half a pint of water. Recently. moth as well as LiaUID GLUE. repairing cabinet work. vessel of water. two and a half ounces of strong aqua fortis (nitric acid). a clergyman. etc.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. 633 with a hot iron send the steam from the wet cloth into the carpet. stirring all the while. It is necessary to destroy the the eggs. nor undergo putrefaction nor fermentation. Keep it well corked. while announcing from an appointment for the ladies of his con- . cable for It is appli- many domestic uses.

before going The soles of dress boots may be made out. impervious to wet or snow. " Do take a little honey." : WATERPROOF LEATHER BOOTS THAT WILL RESIST THE SEVEREST WEATHER. Muddle. of his manners and his especial politeness toward the fair sex. on a beneficiary visit to the institution. Take half a pint of linseed oil. from dirt. so as not to eat up the orphans. 755. Dr. set completely them by for two or three days after oiling the using.634 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. wash them clean from and oil when dry. and well with until this mixture before the saturated. first time. Have the rub them fire. and half a pint of neat's foot and boil them free together. handing . and after dirt. closed the announcement with the following words " The ladies will take with them their own refreshments. by the same mixture. gregation to meet at the Orphan's Asylum. so like yourself" A Mr. oil. he said in his wonted man'tis so ner. boots dry. at a party at his house. or upon the feet. M . Miss sweet. Handing a dish of honey to a lady. was reputed for the suavity The Rev.

taking care to turn day. soak When it used. Before is a pint or more of good yeast. After as the yeast has become quite light. YEAST CAKES. 635 the butter dish to the host. " Do take a 'tis so like yourself. them and add through until it to them two pounds of Pour the boiling hop water over the quite smooth. stir in much Indian meal as it will take. OR PRESERVED YEAST. three large potatoes until they are tender. roll it out in cakes. it it is warm. stir in and half a quite cold.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. exclaimed. and should be kept in a dry place. add two tablespoonfuls of teacupful of sugar. of these cakes. them every or ten days At the end of a week they may be put into a bag. and beat is While salt. 756." little butter. take one in some milk-warm . Mash flour. Put a large handful of hops into Boil two quarts of boiling water. flour it a sieve or colander. doctor . and place them on a cloth in a dry place.

The ear trumpet ought likewise to be occasionally used. and drawn the veil of charity over faults which. insert a piece of cotton wool. . " William. mash it up smoothj and use it as any other kind of yeast. confused This is usually acconipanied with sounds. seemed to us without a virtue to balance them. In such cases. " 'cept it be that east makes every thing rise. on which a very little oil of cloves or cinor namon has been of dropped. which might have knit our hearts to theirs for ever in a brotherhood of love. which has spirit been dipped in equal parts of aromatic ammonia and tincture of lavender. "can you tell me why the sun rises in the east?" " Don't know. and noises of various kinds in the inside of the ear itself. How lamentable that we should go through the world so misunderstanding one another letting slip golden opportunities for glimpses into men's better nature. 757. in our blindness. THE FAMILY S AYE-ALL. sir. .636 water." said a teacher to one of his pupils." replied William." DEAFNESS IN OLD PERSONS.

THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. An old bachelor says that he is delighted at having been called " honey" by the girl he loves. Put the white of an egg in a plate. effectual preventive of 40 rheumatism. the curd is some- times used as a poultice for an inflammation of the eyes. 637 Angels turn sorrowing away from this sour blindness of ours. an It is asserted by some. and with a lump of alum rub the egg until a thick curd is formed . . carried habitually in the pocket. and fiends laugh over the final fall of despair which our helping hand might at such moments have averted. 758. dry. because she saluted him at their last meeting as old *' Bees-wax I" THE POTATO REMEDY FOR RHEUMATISM. 759. Well for us all it is that he who is himself without sin. more merciful than man. that a raw is potato. ALUM CURD. sees gathering tears in eyes that we deem hard and .

Do you know any one who would lend me a half-penny without ever requiring '* it back asain?" . not to ask any . circulation. —A naughty little boy. keep the and hands parfriction after ticularly dry. more of any one. TO AVOID CHILBLAINS. to Commence feet . in order not to break the promise. if well as many of. The next day came his father's partner and the boy. was in the habit of asking money from all the gentlemen who came to see his The latter. made him promise. in indignation. and take plenty of exercise to pro- mote ter. in. fire approach the immediately after coming in-doors from frosty air. said to him. using abundant washing. made timely use More ways than father. lat- as much as any other Never which induces chilblains. 760.638 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. It is the want of the cause. only six years of age. as other complaints. one. early. and will effectually keep away chilblains. under pain of punishment. before frost sets rub the and hands with opodeldoc this should be feet (soap liniment) done night and morning . the A skipping-rope affords admirable house exercise for children.

Small vermin of all kinds may be killed and effectually cleared out of their favorite resorts fluid. 763. its by the free use of burning Caution.THE FAMILY SAVE. if she had seen her vegetable friend? "My vegetable " Wh}^ the young man I met friend who's that with you yesterday who has carrotiy hair. a turn-up nose. must be used in application to woodwork. Lay the lamp-wicks in vinegar for an hour. 762. 761. TO PREVENT LAMP SMOKE. and hot water to make a thin wash. sufficient one pound of Spanish brown." I V ! RED WASH FOR BRICK PAVEMENT. as it injures paint. reddish whiskers. 639 TO DESTROY VERMIN. and add half a pound of Venetian red. . dry them well before they are used. however. to this Dissolve an ounce of glue.ALL. and is full of capers. Bemus asked Jemima. a few days since.

the thief. and leave Set beside each plate. is.— 640 THE — FAmLY SAVE-ALL. of the plates a Another method of to getting rid of rats strew pounded potash gets in their coats. The Great Spirit has just told me so. To oil attract toward it. it Mix some ground pLaster of Paris with brown sugar and Indian meal. Cuban plij^sician having been robl3ecl to a serious extent in his tobacco-works. " 'tis thou who hast robbed me. the Great Spirit appeared to thus me during the night." cried the master his finger to his nose. holes. The potash into their and . you may little sprinkle on the edges of the of rhodium. When them the rats have eaten the mixture they will drink the water and die. at this instant this very instant have a parrot's feather at the point of his nose. 764. about on old plates." : A — TO DESTROY EATS AND MICE. discovered the Having thief by the following ingenious artifice. anxious to find out if his guilt had declared itself. a saucer or pan of wate^. put " Man. he addressed them " My friends." On this announcement. and told me that the person who stole my money should. called his negro slaves together. instantly.

Shut the doors and windows and fire. To prevent becoming rats dying in their holes and offensive. The vapor chimney flame. . of the brimstone ascending the effectually is will extinguish the If brimstone not at hand.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and are unable to return. great thirst. throw some powdered brimstone on the and stop up the front of the chimney to pre- vent the fumes from entering the room. irritates their 641 skin. the rats leave their holes to drink. poison them by mixing It produces half a pound of Carbonate of Barytes with a quarter of a pound of lard. throw some salt on the fire. 766. TO COOL A ROOM. TO EXTINGUISH FIRE IN A CHIMNEY 765. cool a The simplest and cheapest to way to room is wet a cloth of any size. and the rats desert the place.

half full of brandy. ''for silk can never be wor6tedy . In a party of ladies. Fill a wdde-mouthed pint bottle spirits." rejoined the witty one. Let the room be well ventilated. on its being reported that a Captain Silk had arrived in town. This is the plan adopted by many eastern nations. " What a name for a soldier 1" "The fittest name in the world for a Captain. they exclaimed. etc. and drop it into the brandy. TINCTURE FROM SCRAPS OF LEMON-PEEL. it the larger the better. spirit This will strongly impregnate the with essence of lemon. and the temperature will sink from ten to twenty degrees in less than an hour. pare the yellow part very thin. or proof and whenever you have bits of waste lemon rind. 767. with one exception. and form an excellent flavoring custards.G42 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. for tarts. and suspend place in the you want cooled.

768. down one Take your it pocket-handkerchief. tied under the chin. double third over the other part. full and laying out the square. Lift the whole and you will see the form of a cap. A VENERABLE lady of a celebrated physician. 643 A NIGHT-CAP MADE IN A MOMENT. Then take and hold of the two remaining corners. Then take hold and draw its of one of the folded corners. when applied to the head. so that the third folded down shall lie underneath. . or a boat of paper. will cover the head and ears. observed her husband in the funeral procession of one of his . which. so as to suit the head. and turn it over. Then raise the whole. will not practice will enable a come Very little person to regulate the size of the folds. one day casting her eye out of the window. conit tinue to roll until meets the doubled corners brought to the centre and catches them up a little. as in making a cocked hat. point toward the centre then do the same with the other. and being off. twisting the hem it of the handkerchief.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL.

. 770. He Must that is angry without a cause. gradually. 769. DR. This used. made by melting ^yq stir in parts of black resin and one part of yellow wax when entirely melted. glass to The red cement used for uniting is metals. at which she exclaimed husband would keep away from such processions it appears too much like a tailor carrying home his work. each half an ounce honey or .. cement should be melted before it is and it is it adheres better if the objects to which applied are warmed. flour j of mustard. fine one part of red ochre. get pleased without amends. Take of flowers of sulphur.^^ RED CEMENT. 644 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. or Venetian red in powder. JOHNSON'S RECEIPT FOR RHEUMATISM. : " I do wish my patients. and previously well dried.

and Half placing fill them over the mantel-piece. 645 quantity to form an The size of a nutmeg to be taken several times a day. Take a or ripe acorn. quantity of water consumed daily in London equal to the contents of a lake fifty acres in exThis tent. The is ACORN TREES. quantity is by no means proportionate to the great and growing wants of the population. drinking after it a quarter of a pint of the decoction of lovage root. a sufficient electuary. glass. or in damp moss or mould .THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. According to the last returns. parlor to Very pretty ornaments for the may be produced by setting acorns in germinate hyacinth glasses. and of a mean depth of three feet. with the aid of a piece of . a white one of those usually employed for bulbous roots. 771. with rain water. in which has been for a day two steeped rain water. molasses. there were seventy thousand houses without any supply whatever.

re- nothing must be done to them except .646 THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. turbid. and if any fungi appear upon the acorn. Let the cork or cardboard fit the mouth of the glass tightly. Should the water become green or it must be changed . the acorn must be raised. two or three years — the important points for their preservation being the changing of the water. be pushed through the cork or cardboard. and the interesting process of the germination of one of our noblest to trees may be the watched from time time. they carefully brushed or must be wiped away. When the acorns are put to grow. leaving the young plant suspended. will. and the cleansing of the roots when fungous first plants appear. so as to exclude the air. cork or cardboard suspend the acorn about a quarter of an inch above the water. When leaves reach the cork another arrangement must be adopted the leaves . In a few weeks the acorns will begin to grow. The oak most plants thus flourish for produced with attention.

the shell of the acorn must Sir Thomas Overbury says that the man who has nothing to boast of but his illustrious ancestors. 772.ALL. -. TO PREVENT INSECTS CLIMBING UP FRUIT TREES. in the condition of a thick viscid juice. 647 moving the cup be uninjured. burnt over a into which it will gradually drop. and then tied times round the trunk of the tree. is like a poto^o—the only good thing belonging to him is under ground. which state it will retain for any length of time. that the will be prevented. He ascribes it to the rot-tator-y A movement I .THE FAMILY SAVE. The melted substance insects is so very sticky. Let a piece of India rubber be gallipot. " and generally it. India rubber. be smeared with Having melted the worsted several let a piece of cord. or it. captured in their attempts to pass over SCIENTIFIC j^outh has discovered the cause of the potato disease.

648 THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. ture smooth Make the mortar-like mixit and even by spreading It will with in a piece of board." (the ladies will understand this. not very fine. add one bushel of very fine gravel. 774. Fill a wide-mouthed it glass jar with water. become hard There are a good many people in the world who spend half their time in thinking what they would do if they were rich. and the other half in conjecturing what they 6hall do as they are not. a few days. PEA VINES A WINTER ORNAMENT.) cover that over with a layer of peas. 773. and cover over with a piece of " foundation. Add water to these. until they become about as Spread over the walks. . sifted To three bushels of coal ashes. COAL ASHES USEFUL FOR MAKING GARDEN WALKS. the surface of which should previously be slightly broken and raked smooth. and mix them soft as mortar.

large.THE FAMILY SAYE-ALL. the roots growing down into the water. whole are when the plants only a few inches high. is The following a copy of an excuse recently . in and very much all fit for measure. nearly the table or the market. three of the strongest. HOW 775. pressing it . Growers may assure themselves of the efiicacy of this method. To improve the size of potatoes. or TO GROW LARGE POTATOES. The tubers will consequently be fewer. by first experimenting upon a few rows. also. or at most. 649 down so that the peas will lie in the water they will then swell and sprout. set this in a window. larger. whether planted with small or even-cut tubers. and vines to grow up which can be conducted any height. two. their fine fibres presenting a beautiful ap- pearance will . let the shoots be reduced by pulling them up to one.

but if in darkness. 777. they rot . should be laid in a perfectly after the dark place for some days If thaw has commenced. POTATOES SLIGHTLY DISEASED PRESERVED BY PEAT CHARCOAL. time of potatoes that have been affected thereby. In the POTATOES. way two years.— 650 handed THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. sprinkling peat charcoal among them. . When potatoes are slightly dis- eased. they do not rot and they lose very little of their natural properties. some Potatoes may be kept in this third. takes smell. away and renders them sweet and wholefood. thawed in open day. The char- . and when planted the they will produce a good crop." Kept at home to go a-taturing ! REMEDY FOR FROZEN 776. in to a schoolmaster for the non-attendance of one of his scholars: '* Cepatomtogoatatiiring. the bad instantly stays the rot. frosts.

and beat in a mortar to a strong froth. The charcoal need not be lost . 778.THE FAMILY SAVE. If liquid. the cracks over and pins of the bedstead. it may be mixed with other manures when the toes are removed. coal will also 651 prevent the sound potatoes from being infected by the diseased ones. : spread it with the better. not . use the white of one egg only. An effectual mode is of destroying these offensive insects walls. all feather of a quill or. is with of turpentine. which equally de- structive to the insect and to its eggs. beds. One for of the best remedies and preventives bed-bugs is to procure from a druggist an it ounce of quicksilver. oil to brush over the or floors infested with them. and thick like an ointment. pota- TO DESTROY BUGS.ALL. what is still with a large old camel's hair brush. wdth the w^hites of two eggs : or if you wish it very powerful.

If off still you have made an ointment of with your better finger. their haunts should be . there will be little danger of bed-bugs . it. where the habits of the family are neat. rub it This is considered a remedy than the common mercurial ointment. these disgusting sects frequently and intolerable in- make their appearance with the commencement of the warm weather. and if the chambers effect are papered. and see that it penetrates thoroughly. In a new house. from having been un- pardonably allowed to gei possession even of the crevices of the wood-work on the walls. they often contrive to a lodgment between the edges of the paper and the plastering.652 THE FAMILY SAVE. ices of If bugs are found in the crev- an old house. but cannot always be as promptly obtained. but on removing to an old house which has had various occu- pants. forgetting the under side of all the joints. and a general attention is paid to cleanliness throughout.ALL. and sometimes before.

also. or with a decoction of red peppers. boiled in water. well 653 waslied with a strong decoction of tobacco. same way. floors. Another mode of destroying the vermin is. and up with putty or wadding. a saturated solution of alum applied hot. or with quick-lime mixed with water. even on the inside of the joint. should be rubbed with quicksilver beaten up with the white of an egg afterward filled . walls. tha. to every joint and crevice that can possibly harbor them.THE FAMILY SAVE-ALL. and cold water washing the joints with to and brown soap. with a brush. If these washes (which by frequent repetition generally succeed) should fail to destroy them. but has been found effectual. as a last resource. applied in the Spirits of naphcold. A have most all effectual remedy against bugs is to the bedsteads in the house taken after down. where the whole room. 41 and ceilings. are infested. In very bad cases. have the whole bedstead completely varnished. the . the crevices.

T SAVE-ALL. and even every chink and crevice in the room that might admit air . the doors.654 THE FAMH. then close every opening. and place in the pan. RECEIPT FOR PRESERVING AND MAKING LEATHER WATERPROOF. In twenty-four hours no living creature will exist in the apartment. to leather without fear of injuring . You can apply the above in its boiling state it. tallow. One part oil. melt the whole and apply while hot. leaving the closing them room without delay. the door and covering even the key-hole. to the leather. light some of linen dipped in brimstone. is only effectual remedy fumigation. pasting paper over the joints of etc. Then cut up four ounces of slips brimstone into an iron pan. 779. Ke- move every thing from are satisfied is the room that you perfectly free from the vermin. make is repeated applications until the leather saturated. one part best sperm one part tar.

Asparagus. relish. 226. 484. ornaments. Alum curd. 611. 587. 637. 271. trees. 119. or supper cake from cold veal. 611. 58G. 645. made from stale muffins. fricassee from fragments of cold beef. 128. dish of cold lamb and cucumbers. 457. 100. No. entree from cold roasted pork. (655) . dish from fragments of cold fish. 138. 256. A nice breakfast luncheon. 155.273. luncheon. 250. summer drink. 537. A very nice pudding.etc. supper 129. A delicate dish from fowl or veal. 519. 2. substitute for plum pudding at small expense. dish from cold beef and mashed potatoes. fillet of veal. No. to polish.INDEX An A A breakfast dish from cold roasted pork. with mashed potatoes. 382. soup. Acorn coffee. excellent pudding of stale bread. chartreuse of apple and rice. 123. 280. Ale posset. or A cheap method 508. No. or spinach. 2. of obtaining a constant supply of pure vinegar. to mend. Albany cake. 457. from potted cold beef. to imitate. are Alabaster ornaments. 101. 1. ornaments. A-la-mode beef. 81. dish of mutton and mashed potatoes. cold A A A delicious plum pudding without eggs. cheap dish of rice. 275. 270. 223. 43. 179. 143. to cement. dish from cold beef. and novel dish where water-cresses plentiful.

from cold potted. stew. 307. 100. sauce. Arrow-root pudding. 123. 324. 597. way of serving up any kind of cold fish with stale bread. gruel. 1. a-la-mode. 1. cold. corned. Amsterdam pudding. Apples with custard. cold. 1. 2. No.G5G A wash INDEX. method of ragout of cold veal. 422. 292. and cold potatoes. 265. cakes. 174. 1. Ashes. and mashed potatoes. No. Beans (dried). No. 537. No. 78. Charlotte. 1. 4S9. 149. fillet and Yorkshire 99. 101. 120. Apple water. a nice breakfast luncheon. 240. No. way of warming cold plum pudding. No. Beef. dressing. a breakfast dish. coal. 416. 457. 293. 261. useful for solidifying garden walks. cream. 287. 317. of veal. cold. A to whiten the finger nails. 243. No. Bakewell pudding. 124. Balm tea. jelly. 102. economical. 2^. 2. 132. 440. A nigh^t-cap made in a mo- and ment. . 271. a French compote. 262. 153. 440. 1. Swiss. A nice way to serve the re- mains of an apple pie. fricassee from cold of. 2. 290. 119. tart with quince. 286. 131. substitute for pastry for Bacon. 291. ragout from cold lamb. B. Baked beef. 365. 118. 126. pudding. No. Indian wheat. 156. cold. 121. pot pie. cold. jelly. 125. cold. pudding. or mutton. cakes. 3. fragments 266. cold. Bandoline. 262. the dyspeptic. Russian fashion. 2. No. 590. Barley water. pudding. bread. sirloiu. 103. baked in forms. 128. 411. and rice a chartreuse. 453. Batter cakes (rye). with poached eggs. No. 648. Bean soup. tomatoes. No. 643. 289. 292. or supper relish. with potatoes. cold. No. 236. 267. 294. 128. Apricots in brandy. 597. boiled. 2. sauce (dried). 295. rissoles. buttered. miroton. 453. and pudding (boiled). dumplings. 2. No. 351. 289. 452. 129. re-cooked. hashed with vinegar.

shad. 122. 2. No. tea. ham. 606. Biscuits. to make waterproof. lunch. 361. Bones. patties. tripe. 309. 46b". fried. 120. best). 105. 137. method of redressing. minced. Blackberry cordial. 333. Brass kettle. lunch from cold roast. Blanc mange. 104. potatoes. roasted. 320. Beef. fried with wine. dried beans. 117. 600. Bouquet de la Reine. 3. 40. Naples. 1. 45. with cucumbers.INDEX. rice. 71. Black cap pudding. turkey. 169. cinnamon 396. 487. 112. Biscuit. 334. 111. stewed. 142. roasted. 520. Boards to scour. Best way of cooking venison. stew. soup. Brains. 416. sweet-breads. 106.) of. with oysters. 335. milk. 243. Boiled herrings. stuffed. of isinglass. (old fashioned). rock. 164. steak. meats. 277. Boots. to prepare feathers for. mutton. roast ribs. to clean. 1. 397. hashed. 97. 447. like game. in cooking. Beds for the poor. 113. 96. 558. 498. 396. 108 Beef's heart. 229. curried. 146. 2. No. 41. underdone. 395. 415. 39. 114. No. 456. to clean. pie. . French. a-la-Fran9aise. 499. Beverage from cherries. soup. 1. No. (imitation. kidney. Beer. travelers. made of cold roast. wine. 104. 496. leg of lamb. broiled 115. 109. 112. No. Beets. 107 Boned 196. use 506. 559. 657 Boiled custard. fried (calves). tongue. Brandy peaches. 206. 634. 68. to make cottage. Brandied apricots. a la Fran9aise. 221. Dutch. (ginger. 610. 608. spruce. 2. No. ginger. Maryland. or sirloin. fried. 358. Bouillon. potatoes. served as steaks.110. tea. soda. 463. 394. 109. 73. 373. 453. Italian 10(j. 475. 357. 130. 557. pickled. No. 560.

uses of stale. 534. 350. pigeons. . 467. 369. melted. buttermilk. 527. 296. 626. 360. English. English. rolls. uses of stale. 375. soda. 532. pudding. Buns. 323. cold chicken. yeast. 532. Breast of veal in hodge-podge. Scotch spiced. jelly.65. 651. Bugs. nuts. meal. Russian fashion. cakes five made in minutes. 368. 2). 492. pudding for infants. mush. 458. Britannia metal. 352. Buttermilk cakes. corn griddle. fritters. 366. 289. 366. New England brown. from dish cold bacon. Cake. minutes. 369. 2. patties. (No. No. 195. 3). 350. rolls. composition. 66. Breast of veal stewed white. 367. 527. Broiled beefs heart. Broiled chickens. French. 2. Buzbv short cake. cocoanut. pudding. 520. 387. 150. corn. 364. of fried. Buttered apples. made in five buckwheat. 350. rolls. to freshen salt. No. 460. 291. Cakes. 400. 176. 350. No. 356. pudding. cake. to keep. buckwheat. 1. 389. 526. shad. Buckwheat cakes without yeast. to clean. 115. to destroy. 491. 532. Breakfast cakes. Bread and apples. milk. (No. 354. 387. breakfast. to color. 274. Cake. corn. 368. 1. 561. breakfast. 360. 352. New York.8 INDEX. bread. 274. 389. 182. 466. 531. No. 387. 349. 530. 353. 151. No. 356. buzby. 402. wheat and Indian. cup. or pulled. Albany. 276. without English. Burnt cream. Butter. pudding from fragments. 468. Cakes. Cake. dish of cold meat. Indian. 224. 354. uses of stale. 382. cream. eggs. 379. 349. 3. Indian Indian meal. Spanish. cakes.

rye batter. German. griddle. No. so as to retain flavor. 378. 3. 370. Cakes. soup. federal. loaf. to clean. 371. temperance. 2. 490. luncheon. a paste 588. 582. small pound. stew'd with lamb. 47. 379. apple. to pickle. 64. 644. Cat-fish. Cake. Cake. pound. 160. No. Cauliflowers. lady. 393. 410. Cement for alabaster ornaments. 2. rice batter. Cabbage. Celery dressed as slaw. 374. 594. for broken glass or china. . 382. 351. 1. Cake. Cake. for bottle corks. Indian and wheat Catsup. 433» 434. hands. 371. 169. to pickle. No. 376. Cakes. flannel. liver broiled. 242. 346. 388. No. 377. cheap. 79. 581. 587. 406. Calves' brains fried. sponge. 404. No. 389. 384. 420. plum common. Cheap crust 264. 458. 169. 381. 586. hoe. cold cod Castor-oil cream for the hair. flannel. No. red. a-la-Fran^aise. 406. 587. red. poor man's 403. 445. flannel. 348. Cakes. gold. lotion for dumplings. Johnny. tomato. 348. Oswego. 587. Jenny Lind. lo- hands. Charlotte. 315. Chapped hands. 245. for. to prepare. molasses. 304.INDEX. Cake. railroad. French. 407. 351. Carrots. sauce. Cake. sponge. for chapped hands. silver. 348* Cake. rye. Cakes. feet jelly. for broken china. Cakes. 365. 581. Wharton. essence of. 388. family. emperor's. 589. 39 2>. 246. batter. No. 659 Calves' head stewed with oyster sauce. No. peach. 562. 530. for flavoring. Scotch. pudding. 529. Candlesticks. 491. for leather. for mending stone. feet for jellies. 2. Washington. 292. 584. parrish. Candy. 394. a cheap tion. 346. sugar. 493. 385. an ointment for. ginger. 386. 241. 2. 624. 584. 1. Caramels. poultry. mastic. 431. 380. 1. soft. Cakes made of cold meat or made from fish. 400. 383.

638. Common gingerbread. potatoes with spinach or cabbage. 120. 177. INDEX. broiled. pot pie. 219. Chicken. breast of mutton or veal. a nice dish with Cheese. 524. 581. potatoes. with ham. Cinnamon biscuits. 2. toasted. 525. cold. toad in the hole. 81. 123. ' Codfish. 179. 177. 179. 503. Cherry bounce. No. meat. jelly. a delicate dish made from. salted. Chickens. curry. 131. ice. (cold) broiled. slaw. mashed toes. croquettes. cakes made 79. 476. or veal. hog's head. 80. to roast. souffle. No. . fish^ fish. 1. Cheshire pudding. 392. Chocolate cream. 232. 183. a nice dish made of. to avoid. 2. sirloin of beef. Cold beef. cold. a nice pie. pota- hashed with vinegar. an entree from boiled rock fish. 328. 398. 473. 1. meat. spin- meat. No. beef. nice scallops. Coffee. 502. 500. 396. roast fowls fried. 581. 375. or mutton with poached eggs. souced. Collars. from. 196. 124. 141. 73. game or poultry. 486. mutton re-cooked with wine. No. 138. 176. from fragments a nice way of serving up with stale bread. Chicken. 1. 431. 72. patties from cold. 520. of acorns. lamb. rock fish. a nice dish with cucumbers or ach. No. 464. slaw (dressing). 180. Christmas jumbles. 613. 3. sandwiches. 462. 582. No. 78. 143. cement for broken. from cold boiled. turnovers. 53. cold. 548. dressed as fritters. China. 184. fowl or veal. 251. 521.660 Cheap soap. 457. to make stiff. method of dressing. Chilblains. pickled. 126. 182. Clam soup. fried. Composition cake. Chow chow. 181. 443. 297. 126. Cherries. 2. 460. mutton minced. 54. mutton. re-cooked. beverage from. No. 148. with 118. fricassee. 127. 494.

No. No. with rice. 573. 300. water. 299. 2. Crullers. 190. cold. 330. 190. 451. of apples (French). old fashioned. No. Curried boiled mutton. Corn griddle cakes. 329. 360. No. No. chocolate. 329. oysters. Crackers. 516. Cup cake. 389. 310. Cream. 292. roasted Cutlets from cold pork. 439. 134. children's. Curry. whipped. chicken. Currant jelly. Cottage beer. 389. cold. wash. Compote 289. 77. 326. 320. 137. 379. 532. 327. 102. 327. of cold roast lamb or mutton. of fowls. to pickle. 103. Milanese. 360. cream. 496. pudding. apple. 661 Croquettes of cold chicken 196. No. 1. baked. 325. 297. 367. a book muslin. 322. 2. No. cold. Curls. 322. Corned beef. No. lemon. 2. 319. 390. 368. Decanters. No. trifle. No. blackberry. stewed with red cabbage. Custard. hashed. to restore. Cocoanut balls. with Portuguese sauce. Curd alum. Crape. to clean. 475. No. 387. 637. orange. stewed with peas. omelette. 2. Cucumbers. 405. 330. to colored. 226. 300. with apples. 2. for the hair 596. 198. 323. to wash. Dresses.INDEX. mutton. No. 629. Cordial. 3. No. 636. to make. 368. 322. boiled. macaroons. 323. Cranberry sauce.. 298. Duck.l. 328. D. 543. 1. cake. pudding. 1. custards. of fish. 449. cakes. Diplomatic pudding. to ornament. Dress. 300. 541. No. beef.^ crackers. 2. 1. Doughnuts. 397. orange frothed. 147. 408. 323. 2. College pudding. . 189. Deafness in old persons. 524. Corn bread. 408. cake. 359. burnt. Curling fluid. mock. 596. boiled. black. 324. orange for pudding. Custards. 1. No. 364. Cracknels. boiled. pudding. 1. cup. 249.

Fish. F. 237. chickens. Fowls. 346. Family cake. 77. 398. French cake. Economical stew. of rabbits. 348. Flannel cakes or crumpets. 62. 254. catfish. 528. turkey. Entree from cold roast pork. No. cheap 266. 193. fried. 469. 179. Economy of dripping. 187. 79. 109. 265. Feathers. 60. without paste. 121. 181. 331. cold roast fowls. Eggs. Feet. crust. stew. from cold boiled chickens. to clean. Egg. 1. apple. 598. croquettes. means of saving butter. method to catch and Egg soup. Dutch 267. 198. beef. 389. 201. 517. potatoes. INDEX. Flies. 641. loaf. 110. 2. croquettes. 218. baked omelette. Food for delicate infants. or veal. fritters. Federal cake. to prepare for beds. No. 264. English giblet pie. paste without shortening. gumbo. Emperor's cake. of cold chicken. 264. 379. 62. 469. 2H7. French mode. 75. 177.662 Ducks. to choose. beefsteak. 247. made with ples. 382. ap- Dumplings. No. 2. 64. to preserve. 1. pig's. Flour paste. Esseuce of jessamine. 248. Fricasseed rabbits. 111. 604. as food. 2. to cure. 1. Fricassee. Egg nog. 223. cold. No. 230. 184. . pig's. (Wharton). Elderberry wine. No. 202. plant browned. 2. 606. 631. Endive cooked as a dinner vegetable. Fried beefsteak with wine. No. destroy. white. 218. roasted. 583. white. Flummery. 620. 511. Floating island. E. buttered. Eggs. rice. 492. Fricandeau of tomatoes. 525. Feathers. 54. herring. to extinguish. pancakes without. 1. soused. 383. beef. Economical mode of cooking salmon. 75. Fire in chimney. 109. No. 622. Dumplings. 179. No. 466. Fresh herrings. 512. 51. 348. cakes. roasted.

514. gages. cold meat. 63. common. broken. 633. 303. 58. 597. Bweet-breads. to join. Fuel. liquid. 283. 478. 79. omelette. Fried oysters. to remove. 410. rice. 587. to boil. to make. 485. 3. 663 Glue for uniting cardboard. 70. chapped. to clean the. Ham. 628. Gingerbread. preserved. how Ham to cook. 591. 2. 594. wine. dressed 486. 485. No. 222. 596. fish. 59. No. bandoline No. 463. pomatum for children's. No. 584. No. 306. shad. Gruel. 163. soft. 2. . No. 1. G. 450. to glaze. No. 499. Gilding. 1. 488. 193. 596. Ham. H. 284. 452. 610. 1. Hair brushes. to cure. etc. roasted. 392. pudding. 579. No. a cheap .Gold cake. No. 392. Halibut. veal with 154. Fritters. sweet-breads. rock. best. to pickle. 1. 1. cream for the. to save. German cake. peas. Fruit pudding. 51. sandwiches. Glass. as. 570. Gooseberry champagne. 597. Giblet pie. 82. 615. curling fluid for the. No. Grapes preserved in vinegar. 191. 2. 222. for the. Hams. Gelatine jelly. 2. 68. rice. 422. bread. lo- Goose. 2. Hands. 582. Grease spots. tion. No. children's curls. No. to clean. 1. 188. 388.. 288. 475. Ginger beer. 625. 1. 57. No. Gumbo. 277. Fried tripe. 244. puffs. 60. stoppers. Gherkins. Ginger cake. 589.INDEX. 220. barley. 534. 384. 412. tomatoes. 535. French. 495. Griddle cakes. 221. 163. rice. Guernsey pudding. to remove. 348. No. 2. Glazed ham. poultry. pea soup without meat. castor-oil 394. 2. Green corn soup. game. to improve. No. 457.

No. spots. 301. 2. currant. 3. stew. obtain. No. Insects. Imitation boned turkey. 136. 139. No. meal breakfast cakee 366. 576. to remove from a carpet. 252. Hashes. turkey. for. 186. 575. to take out of mahogany. 1. cherry. 472. Ice. 549. Hot slaw. Honey soap. mutton. of cold venison. pone. 578. 423. 75. to ter sauce. baked. cook ham. gelatine. rules in regard to. No. No. 73. 408. 411. mock turtle. 1. chicken. Indian bread. fresh. No. calf's feet. to make white. pudding. 373. stewed with oysHerbs. 365. boiled. 2. 369. No. 588. for invalids. 422. 363. 183. 219. 1.436. 207. 76. 160.664 Hauds. to protect fruit trees from. potted. 577. 1. 627. Hog's-head cheese. 22(X grow large potatoes. 362. of mutton. cold duck. 363. Ink. 456. Ironing. fresh. Isinglass blancmange. Jars. How How to to 649. muffins. Jam. arrow-root. 208. a paste 588. Irish moss or carrigan. calf's. Jelly. 462. spots. Hashed mutton in the style of venison. 191. 422. INDEX. No. 371. 75. 117. > J. No. 162. No. . chapped. spots. 2. 1. No. 370. to clean the 571. 74. 2. to remove from white clothes. 106. bread. Horseradish sauce. or piccalili. 455. 115. fried. Italian beefsteak. to wash. slappers. pound cake. Hash of cold venisou. Home-made Cayenne pepper. of fine flavor. No. 600. Head. Hoe cake. to remove from white clothes. 420. 2. apple. 506. Herring. inside of. marmalade. 408. 589. 520. Hashed beef a-la-fran9aise. 2.436. 302. 1. 196. ^47. No. 140. raspberry. 464. from cold poultry. 414. Indian pickle 429.

savory. 112. Loaf cake. sherbet. orange. Maccaroons. cold. 633. 407. fragments. raspberry. Mastic cement. 390. Luncheon cake. Liver sauce. poultry. 406. to wash. 584. boiled.. to clean. 617. 147. cold. to clean. 413. etc. 423. 92. Lace. Lobster or crab. M. biscuits. salad. Lemonade. choose. 448. pine apple. method of re-dressing. 444. 507. Lady cake. Kale.. 465. Lunch from cold 122. Linen. 467. 142. 642. 397. a nice ragout. 572. to make tincture from scraps. to wash. 418. 409. Meats. cutlets of cold roast. Kidney beef's. ragout. punch. (Scotch). 597. 503. pudding. Lemons. . potato. to clean. 305. 93. 157. Lamb. No. 2. 630. 96. coUops. to cement. Leather. 132. peel. 570. 419. 357. Jenny Lind cakes. Maryland roasted. Lamp chimneys. Marble. thread. 371. 146. Liquid glue. calf's. potatoes without increased expenditure. sponge. to clean. Liver. Jelly. 501. 391. 327. 414. 1. Lunch biscuits. 586. 169. to Melted butter. to make a nice relish out of Johnny cake. Lemon to pickle. 530. Maccaroni. cold. to preserve. Meats. 148. Lip salve. Livers of poultry etc. 374. broiled. portable. shades. Mayonnaise. Mattrasses. 563. cocoanut. 420. 639. Mangoes. 442. Method of dressing cold sirloin of beef. peach. Means of doubling a crop of stewed with onions. Meat. 427. Christmas. 227. K. cakes made of. Lemon cream. Jumbles. roast beef. 598. 617. 606. jelly. Matting.INDEX. cold. to take out mildew. No. shoulder. Melon. 665 strawberry. blonde. to prevent. 184. boiled. 149. 572. to prevent the breakage of. Marmalade. smoke. fried. 95. 616. leg. Jersey waffles. 124. 400. 618. 336. 337.

120. Nails. Mice and rats. Mode of re-dressing cold roast pig. Moth. 144. a wash to whiten the. 1. 141. No. No. 143. Indian. uiutton. 517. sauce. Minced beef. pork cutlets. oysters. No. 439. 2. Molasses candy. English. No. 136. a very nice dish with mashed potatoes. 342. cold minced. meat. 2. to preserve. very nice sausage balls. 341. to preserve. 509. a nice hash. 2. 371. 602. 75. chops with lemon. 493. 480. cold. 134. No. No. 1. No. 123. cold. ring. 605. turtle soup. 480. Naples biscuits. to dress. re-cooked. 1. to take out of linen. . economical use 459. 145. Milanese cream. cutlets with Portuguese sauce. Mint sauce. 135. biscuits. 142. 126. 222. 625. 343. 617. 640. oyster fritters. of. 147. pound cake. 372. 142. water. to destroy. Irish stew. to drive away. 617. 394. 47. 249. Mildew. 590. Mustard sauce for red her. rissoles. pie with potato crust. 428. Night lights. cold. Nectarines. 632. chop. cold. Mutton. Nutmeg.666 Method INDEX. 1. 312. or lamb. Musquitoes. 148. N. Milk bread. Tottenham. 632. 216. cold breast. cutlets of cold roast. to prevent. 136. roasted. 329. 358. 330. 158. re-cooked with wine. 162. hashed in the style of venison. pudding. tincture of. Muffins. to obtain at all seasons. 329. Mock cream. 248. No. turtle of calf's head. cold. or beef cold with poached eggs. method of re-dressing. 143. cold. 533. from ends of candles. Mutton. 139. Mush bread. 2. 342. 120. to kill in carpet. Nutmegs. 140. 532. meal. of re-dressing cold roast beef. 139.

413. Oysters. 255. No. No. 426. charlotte. 180. 191. Peaches. 258. fried. 514. 435. No. 304. 263. No. of cold veal and ham. 1. giblet. Peach sauce. 517. Paper hangings. 441. sauce. 515. preserved. 2. 2. preserved. 90. 417. No. red wash for. 193. mock. 3. English giblet. to preserve. stewed. jelly. 430. 264. plain. oyster. 193. 262. Pears. 430. of fried bread. of cold veal. 326. Peach. Paste. of cold roast veal. Pie. baked egg. 227. to clean. pickled. 380. 480. 88. 87. to make. vines. frothed. marmalade. . Omelette. or chicken and ham. Oswego cakes. oyster. 85. 113. 85. Partridges. cheap. 415. 90. 2. 2. o. Onions. No.INDEX. 240. dried. 639. for dumplings without shortening. Pavement. Patties from cold chicken or turkey. 565. 1. 285. a winter ornament. Perry. Orange cream. fritters. flour. oyster. Paradise pudding. pickled. 325. 175. No. pudding. apple pot. No. No. 209. "Pepper pot. of cold roasted meat and apples. from cold venison. Oil cloths. to select. 648. 84. a nice. pie. crust. 386. for 327. 492. 83. of cold veal. 409. chicken pot. Oyster omelette. plain. 130. mock. Oyster soup. Pastry. 497. No. 516. 52. 2. green corn. 82. 170. 86. 620. 88. 199. 171. stewed with cream. Pea tops used as a vegetable. 521. ham. scalloped. No. 55. with potato Pancakes without eggs. 3. or roasted. 667 Parrish cake. 471. 145. 1. Oysters. corn. broiled. Old potatoes to look like young ones. 85. mutton. 528. brandied. No. made of cold roast beef. 1. 86. 1. Peaches. 177. pot pie. 412. 583. 248. 234. 249. sauce. from underdone beef. 85.

peach. Paddings and pancakes made with snow. 650. Potato kale. 362. 228. 429. Potato pudding. 230. 414. common. cutlets. 287. 234. Potatoes. Piccalilli. peaches. Potatoes. Indian. Pomatum for children's hair. rabbit. cutlets from a cold roast. old. 216. 231. pot. s t e aks from cold roasted. Indian. 372. 88 Potted herrings. remedy Pig's feet. how to grow large ones. No. 424. oyster patties. 412. Pound roasted. 227. cold. with spinach Pickled cauliflowers. Pig. fried. 2. rheuma- Pomade. 593. 363. 263. rhubarb. 232. diseased preserved by peat charcoal. Potato yeast. cakes. INDEX. 637. apple. molasses. Potatoes. cold roast. No. 536. 286. cold. to look like young ones. 225. 3. made Pork. milk. Plain omelette. 510. 222. chicken. 294. Pigeons. 371. veal. pot. 212. 373. No. Pudding. 83. to improve the quality. 204. Swiss. and beef. 204. 412. 362. 403. 74. 650. a for. 471. 177. 211. peach. 156. puffs. 595. of. 317. loaves. a breakfast dish from a cold roast. nice entree. steaks. mode of re-dressing. cold. Plum cake. Poultry. No. broiled. an excellent hash from cold. Preserve quinces. 156. 437. . 223. 263. roasted. 226. 512. cakes 530. Potato k la maitre d' hotel. Porridge. small. 195. 406. a very frozen. pears. No. No. cake. 1. roasted. 363. boiled. 173. 233. salad. Pot pie. minced. Potato and veal sausage. 445. 213. 230. 69. Pig. Preserved green gages. 355. remedy in tism. apple. 417. 125. 2.668 Pie. pot. Poor man'H pound cake. No. 505. 1. Pine apple marmalade. Potatoes. 218. 361. sweet-bread. sauce. apple. 84. rolls. 166. 183. or Indian pickle. Amsterdam. 229. 2. 262. veal. 1. Pone. rabbit. 649. 223. Pickled oysters. or cabbage. cold. Potted shad. 259.

474. 202. Indian. 296. 276. baked. 309. rich plum. cocoanut. 297. No. smothered. Quinces. 1. of stale bread. 279. soda. 306. fruit. Corn. Puffs.. rolled jam. Ragout of livers of poultry. Puff paste. Punch. 314. 2.299. 300. Pudding. 312. No. 420. 270. French. 315. 293. plum. 669 excellent substitute at small Pudding. batter. No. 295. No. very nice. Railroad cake. No. 309. 1. 285. 282. for 458. white. 271. 296. 288. boiled. savory or sweet dripping. 313.INDEX. English. 301. 201. 800. excellent. 302. 273. expense. bread. 424. bread. 204. pot pie. with fruit. railway. potato. eggs. 298. 42 . R. Rabbit h la fran9aise. 535. buttermilk. college. 272. potatoes. made from stale muffins. pumpkin. Puffs. Cheshire. 184. 274. delicious 1. No. infants. boiled rice. 271. paradise. 283. 303. German. nice way of warming and serving. of cold with 314. 302. 190. diplomatic. 294. to preserve. No. 294. 536. for a prince. 2. 315. 306. 404. No. 1. Yorkshire and baked beef. 302. Scotch. jelly.. fricasseed. Queen's toast. 317. calf's feet. Pumpkin pudding. etc.297. lemon. 310. from fragments of bread. 504. 305. without eggs. molasses. etc. 267. tapioca. arrow-root. 307. 205. plum. Victoria's. ground rice. rice. potato. 2. to serve cold. fricasseed. 311. 99. rice. black cap. cocoanut. 257. 2. bakewell. 319. gurnsey. arrow-root. plum. German. game. 275. 274.

230. 70. 353. for frozen potatoes. mutton. Red wash for pavement. 279. 75. Dr. or veal. 283. 241. No. 346. 512. 200. Portuguese. glazed. potato. 2. roasted. cheese. Rock. No. sweet. 474. 1. Rye cakes. 640. 123. boiled. Red cement. 644. 211. 1. Johnson's receipt. breakfast. 440. 355. boiled. 44. 152. 280. 166. English. INDEX. 267. 92. Rich plum pudding. No. 278. 337. potato remedy. boiled. 354. to serve cold. onion. mustard for red herring. 475. 503. boiled. 187. Roasted beef's tongue. Remedy 650. 471. 2. 188. 277. Roast pork. 419. Raspberry jam. 3. Rissoles from cold beef. Rhubarb pie. 430. cold. Rolls. horse-radish. 442. 282. with custard. 439. 104. 344. 637. dried. 281. lobster. potato. 306. jelly. 71. Roasted reed birds. Rock-fish. 439. 72. 343. batter cakes. Salted cod-fish. wine. 351. fritters. apple. glue. Rust. 284. . ground. veal. 613. pig. 584. 654. No. Rats and mice. 200. Sandwiches. soused. No. Rolled jam pudding. Roast duck. mint. waffles. to destroy. No. to prevent. 345. a nice cheap dish. Rice. No. Reed birds. 272. 311. pudding. 484. 252. (New York) 354. 644. 81. 639. Sago soup. fruit. 436. vinegar. balls. celery. 73. Sauce. flummery. Raisin wine. Sally Lunn. economical mode of cooking. sweet-breads. 62. 439. breakfast. fried. goose. Salad. liver. 2. 259. 436. 414. 277. 212. Salmon. with 283. with sugar. or tart. 345. ham. Rheumatism. 322. leaves as a green vegetable. 477. 1. Receipt for making leather water-proof.670 Railway pudding. cranberry.

boiled. Silk. white. 356. Simple cerate. 58. 402. 1. 317. sago. 442. to remove. of veal and potato. 388. 52. 251. to prepare. 1. 173. Steaks from pork. 41. 376. cold. 69. 401. 69. green peas. Scalloped oysters. No. 438. mock turtle. 437. 2. Silver. 67. Spanish buns. without meat. common. a cheap. to without meat. pudding. Scorch marks. without mea. 614. 2. 377. 156. to remove ink stains. No. 57. clam. 45. 214. 671 balls. 441. 235. 59. Spruce beer. 50. 531. 215. 546. Soap. Slippery elm tea. potted. green corn. No. tomato. 60. 625. 553. white. 3. veal. 502. or sweet dripping pudding. from calves' feet. Silver cake. biscuits. 205. honey. 68.INDEX. 314. for fish. 373. 553. summer. Short cake. No. to prepare. cold roasted Stewed beefsteaks. dried. Starch. 43. white. No. Slaw. green peas. cheap. use of. 66. 1. peach. kidney collops. egg. 67. 6-:3. Soda. Sausage meat. 626. 56. to cure. 324. Savory. keep. Sponge cake. 498. Indian. Smothered rabbit. No. 1. lemon. 503. dressing. 441. 2. Scrapple. buttermilk. wine. No. 53. shad. 45. potato. cheap. 6Q. 47. 251. 2. 545. 2. 235. Scotch cake. hot. 65. to clean. Snow pancakes and puddings. to take stains out of. 54. No. 87. Sherbet. 437. . Spiced veal. boiled. of veal. Soot. Shad. 454. fried. 296. 58. Spinach. 600. 174. pudding. 218. 44. Soup. 437.t. Sauce. roasted on a board. 157. of beef's heart.beef. 225. 1. No. bean. No. 217. Soused feet. 385. soused. Slappers. No. 365. No. 106. spiced buns. 68. 49. 613. white. cheap. 2. vegetable. 54. 47. 555. 552. bread. 505. oyster. 57.

562. with onions. 557. iron from rust. with red cabbage. 605. To choose fish. To cleanse and prevent the hair from falling off. of plate (paste). T. Sweet-bread cutlets. with peas. 250. 494. beef. with cream. 569. Sweet-breads.172. 2. 210. 167. sweet-breads. 165. No. Tincture of nutmeg. 242. 2. 2. 3. tomatoes. "Toad in the hole" from cold meat. 565. 570. 481. silver. 1. brass. floor-cloths. To clean paper hangings. 159. No. 572. fried. Tea Tea. 239. No. To clean block tin dish covers. Temperance cake. 558. French. 591. 620. Stollen (German cake). 394. 190. duck. Toasted cheese. No. No. with lamb. to fricassee. No. To cleanse mattresses. roasted.. stewed. 163. 559. 164. 572. Tea. Stew from cold veuison. 132. Strawberry jelly. brittannia 561. 592. 167. Sugar cake. 399. 316. 88. 418. 552. the best method making. To cook cold slices of veal. 553. 473. balm. celerj. 568. 1. Tapioca pudding. To clean alabaster. The only "cold shoulder" which can be shown to » friend without offence. oysters. Tea. 555. No. 482. Stewed lamb.672 INDEX. 570. 62. 2. 168. No. Sweet-breads. Stew of veal. white feathers. 566. to make. 148. 189. 1. 393. 573. 556. 361. 104. No. matting. Stuffed beef's heart. etc. 2. 91. 163. veal. candlesticks. 461. Sweet-breads. 165. Stewed cold duck. Terrapins. 1. metal. 452. marble. poultry. 454. To cool a room. 551 greasy carpets. No. hair-brushes. clean the insides of jars. 567. boiled. etc. a No. 381. 560. Sweet-bread pie. To avoid chilblains. lamp shades. Succotash. 95. cleanse the hair. 127. To clarify drippings. 166. decanters. To To . brass or copper kettle. 563. biscuits. 638. 641. meats.. 1. gold ornaments. 453. 571.

1. a scent jar. To To cure shad. 446. To join broken glass (another way). To improve gilding. 489. To To for pastry. 480. 627. Tomato fricaudeau. 425. 673 237. 606. . 599. Tomatoes. 485. To destroy bugs. potatoes of bad quality. 2. breakage of lamp chimneys. curl feathers. 428. 240. 65. 447. 469. 237. To mend alabaster ornaments 586. 432 No. To fricassee sweet-breads. No. No. baked. No. To obtain herbs of the flavor. 432. 438. cucumbers. onions. 639. 580. 322. starch. 613. prevent insects from climbing up fruit trees. kill moths in carpets. 2. No. preserve a melon. 450. To imitate alabaster. 139. nectarines. No. stewed. pickled. 622. 623. milk. vermin. No. eggs. 606. To join To red cabbage. with cream gravy. To cold lobster or crab. 1. make a nice relish out of fragments of feathers for beds. 233. gherkins. gruel. 427. 564. 625. 449. 642. 626. Tomato sauce. 236. 446. 1. mustard. No. 426. 240. 625. 651. glass that has been broken. Tomato catsup. water- proof. silk. 1. 434. To obliterate writing. To pickle beets. To prepare apples for pies.INDEX. 639. No. to pickle. 433. 611. 2. starch. polish alabaster orna- ments. 93. •443. 165. Tooth-ache. To from lemon Tomatoes. 640. To freshen salt butter. 611. To drive away musquitoes. 452. To keep bread. rats and mice. 448. 623. 579. 632. chestnuts. 468. pears. 2. 491. 511. moth. 2. 545. 654. To cure hams. To ornament custards. lemons. lamp smoke. 430. 622. finest To extract grease from papered walls. - leather tincture scraps of peel. To color butter. cherries. 485. 632. No. rust. 647. Tomatoes. tomatoes. 260 oranges or lemons common 546. 239. To dress cold mutton or veal. 1. 431.

and and ham pie. and black. 618. Traveller's biscuits. boned 196. k la mode. 141. To roast a turkey with oysters. 540. To scour boards. 395. 621. No. re-cooked. 525. cold. 621. To save fuel. potato sausage. (imitation). rissoles. white. 552. raise the pile of velvet. hashed. 277. 150. Uses of coal ashes. Tripe. a nice pie with ham. fried. 171. 184. 629. served as scorch marks. an entree from 184. clothes. 616. cream. a counterpane. 519. 573. out wax. To whiten piano keys. 126. an entree from cold. To restore black crape. boiled. Veal. colored dresses. 186. 488. 2. 543. to dress. 1. To wash a book muslin dress. coflfee. 553. Varnish. 332. 612. Turkey. breast in hodge-podge. Trifle. 578. 609. 180. Various methods of mending broken articles. the taste of new wood. thread lace. To send boiled rice to the table in the finest condition. fillet. 521. Use of soot. 139. stains out of silver. 15]^ stewed white. 541. . white No. blond lace. 114. 487. 588. 615. 614. Underdone beef. 576. V. cax'pet. To select oil cloths. ink-spots from Turnovers of cold meat. a nice ragout. red. patties from. French stew. 510. 579. cold. 575. 185. 174. 159. 626. U. 610. 155. ink stains from silver. for baskets. 185. bath on a small scale. To take ink spots out of mahogany. baked 153. 173. 126. a nice luncheon or supper dish from cold. 628 grease spots. steaks. 629. the hands. breast. to roast with oysters. To remove fresh ink from a Turkish 603. glass stoppers. 123. 624.674 To INDEX. 578. Turkey.

477. 313. 639. steaks. 338. 207. Wax. 337. to make. rice. 152. Velvet. Veal. 2. to take out. 207. sauce. 1. Wheat and Indian bread. 158. cold. 437. biscuits. 396. 341. 256. •Vegetable sauce. 209. 514. soup. best way of cooking. 623. 513. 471. THE END. 539. 339. 141. Violet perfume. sausage. Wonders. cakes. elderberry. No. pie of cold. Water-cresses. cold. Victoria's pudding. fried 154. Writing. rhubarb. stewed. to destroy. 175. 492. 624. or preserved yeast. berry. 675 with tomatoes. to obliterate. Wafers. a nice pie from cold. pie of cold roast. soup. 1. roasted. 156. W. 156'. 405. No. to cook cold slices. No. Whitewash that will not rub off. . 484. 442. 49. powders. raisin. Waffles. 339. 330. 45. 1. Water ices. 513. 50. No. 464. 478. Jersey. Washington cake. to bottle. 174.INDEX. raspberry. to select. without yeast. 369. 210. Vinegar. scallops from cold chicken. 183. 601. 378. spiced. sauce for fish. ginger. 522. quick. 495. 208. Waffles. 2. minced. 454. pot pie. 170. 20G. 545. 172. a novel dish where plentiful. nice sausage balls (Champagne) goose- Very from cold mutton. 2. 441. Washing fluid. Venison. Wine 602. 69. No. 635. 437. soup without meat. tea. hashed. Washing. Yeast No. 621. Whipped cream. White potted shad. to raise the pile of. 634. 144. Water-proof leather boots. 340. to prepare.

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