FRIT 8132-Y01 Technology Plan Update

Administration of Technology Resources Brichaya Shah Mary Story Huffman Susan Rowland 4/26/2011

Part 1: Narrative The technology plan we evaluated in this assignment was for University of WisconsinGreen Bay for the year 2010. According to the document, in the fall of 2004, the technology council presented a draft technology plan to the campus community. After receiving feedback from various sources, the UWGB Technology Plan for 2010 was published. The technology plan is updated every 4 to 5 years by the technology council. The University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is a small- to mid-sized institution and enrolls about 6,500 students (2010b). Founded in 1965, the University has one of the most modern and attractive campuses in the tradition-rich University of Wisconsin System. The University prides itself on “connecting” (2010b). Students connect what happens in the classroom to needs in the community. They examine issues from multiple perspectives and work closely with talented and dedicated faculty members to address real-world problems. Strengths:  Goals and Objectives – The goals and objectives of this technology plan seems address the curriculum and learning outcomes through measurable activities and clear understanding of the mission of the University. The objectives for the campus IT plan were developed from information gathered between April and October, 2004 from the faculty, staff and students through web surveys, open forums and constituent group meetings. The objectives have been organized under three broad themes: 1. Faculty/Staff Investment: helping people make better use of technology 2. Technology Investment: maintaining and enhancing usability of current systems 3. Technology Investment: new initiatives  Funding Alternatives - There is an entire section in this technology plan that is dedicated to the issues of budget and financial information. All of the listed funds are also directed toward specified areas of technology. The plan lists sources of funding, including general program revenue, charge-backs, student fees, etc. This is one of the strongest components of the technology and to know that there are good resources available means finance is not a major issue when it comes to implementing new technology at the institution. Action Plan/Multi-year Planning: The objectives establish campus technology priorities through the year 2010. The “IT 2007 Action Plan” identifies the projects and activities for the period 2005-2007. A second action plan was developed in 2007 to guide technology projects and activities for 2008-2010. This plan has also been updated further to include plans for technology through 2010. These documents can be found at: http://www.uwgb.edu/techcouncil/plan/index.htm Staff Development - The Learning Technology Center (LTC) exists to help faculty and staff integrate technology in the teaching and learning process. To this end, it

acts as a clearing house for instructional technology information and training opportunities, showcases new technologies, and assists faculty and staff in developing technology expertise. LTC staff provides pedagogical and technical advice on technologies such as digital imaging, web page development, presentation software, electronic discussions, scanning, courseware and multimedia software. The LTC offers primary support for the Desire2Learn course management system, which is used by more than 50% of the faculty and students. The objectives listed above also support this area of the plan. Weakness:  Evaluation - The technology plan did not include any formal assessment process. The document states that the technology council is responsible for annually assessing the progress on strategies plan; however there is not mention of how or when specifically. It is one of the other important component missing in the current technology plan and without proper establishment of the evaluation, it is difficult to understand whether or not technology plan at the intuition in addressing the needs of the end user and also to support new endeavors. Needs Assessment: There is a reference to an annual assessment within the objectives section of the technology plan; however, this “action plan” is not defined as a direct, measurable assessment. We suggest that technology council can form an emerging technology sub-committee to understand the needs of campus community before implementing new technology or renew the old technology licenses. Questionnaires collected from faculty and staff during the professional development can also be used during the annual assessment.

Outline of Changes:  Program Integration - The University of Wisconsin – Green Bay Undergraduate Catalog lists “technological competence and information literacy” (University of Wisconsin, 2010b, para. 4) as one of its valuable skills. The Technology Plan is associated with this valuable skill and can be used to implement curriculum. The UW Office of Institutional Research (n.d.) publishes Learning Outcomes for General Education, with “ability to communicate effectively through listening, speaking, reading, writing, and the use of computers” listed as the first outcome. It is important to include a measureable learning outcome to identify what the tech plan hopes to accomplish. School Pilot Projects/Educational Research - The Association of College and Research Libraries (2000) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education provides research based standards, guidance and method of support for the Technology Plan. Additionally, the International Society for Technology in Education (2007) NETS for Students provides additional support for this Technology Plan. Although aimed at P12, the NETS for Students are adaptable to higher education and closely reflect the technology aspects of the ACRL document. By using this program, there is a more obvious outreach intended for the technology plan that brings the plan and its objectives full circle for community wide involvement. Software Agreements - Users may not install or change equipment configurations on desktop computers without prior approval of the Technology Council. Users may not install software on desktop computer systems located in student computing labs. Installation of software on assigned desktop systems will be subject to provisions outlined in The Technology Plan. By defining the

use of software in specific, the goals and objectives of the plan can become more obtainable and realistic. Intended Results: By instituting the above changes the intention is to create the best possible technology plan and create obtainable goals and objectives. We can only assume that this plan can and will be used to bring the technology of the University to its highest level and achieve a greater level of student, faculty, and community involvement. We also desire to see the measureable results of this plan as it states in in the vision, “to enhance learning, support preservation, creating and transmission of knowledge, and support institutional management.” As a side note, it should be said that it out of our research and work with University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s technology plan, we also would like to add that none of our home institutions had a clear, usable technology plan. So, the intended results for such changes would also be to encourage development and implementation of such a plan at the higher education level throughout the country. Part 2: Create/ Update the Technology Plan Suggested Section for Technology Plan: Broad-Based Support Needs Assessment: The Chancellor’s Resource and Planning Council and the 2009/2010 Technology Council Expand as necessary. (You don't have to write the actual instrument, but explain the specifics for how you would administer the needs assessment.) The mission of the University of Wisconsin System is to develop human resources, to discover and disseminate knowledge, to extend knowledge and its application beyond the boundaries of its campuses, and to serve and stimulate society by developing in students heightened intellectual, cultural, and humane sensitivities, scientific, professional and technological expertise, and a sense of purpose. Inherent in this broad mission are methods of instruction, research, extended training, and public service designed to educate people and improve the human condition. Basic to every purpose of the UW System is the search for truth. Vision. Technology is used by faculty, staff and students to enhance learning, support the preservation, creation and transmission of knowledge, and, support institutional management functions. The objectives for the campus IT plan were developed from information gathered between April and October, 2004 from the faculty, staff and students through web surveys, open forums and constituent group meetings. The objectives have been organized under three broad themes: 1. Faculty/Staff Investment: helping people make better use of technology 2. Technology Investment: maintaining and enhancing usability of current systems 3. Technology Investment: new initiatives

Mission

Vision

Goals and Objectives

The first theme focuses on people--assisting them to use our current technology more effectively. The second theme focuses on keeping up-to-date on hardware and software. The third theme challenges the campus to stretch a bit and explore new technologies. The 40 objectives outlined in this strategic plan will guide technology development over the next five years. Some of these objectives are more critical than others. For example, some of the objectives are necessary to maintaining services for the students, while other objectives are more discretionary. The objectives for Tech Plan 2015 were developed using information gathered from the faculty, staff and students, and researching technology trends in higher education. The objectives have been organized under four broad themes: 1. Enhancing learning - supporting the core educational mission of the university through the use of technology 2. Keeping up - maintaining the UWGB technology environment and keeping up with advancing technology in higher education to remain competitive. 3. Staying Safe - maintaining a safe and secure technology environment for students, faculty and staff to engage in their studies and work. 4. Going Green - follows the lead of the university in its efforts to be more environmentally respectful and energy efficient and to use resources wisely. The objectives establish campus technology priorities through the year 2010. The “IT 2007 Action Plan” identifies the projects and activities for the period 2005-2007. A second action plan was developed in 2007 to guide technology projects and activities for 2008-2010. This plan has also been updated further to include plans for technology through 2010. These documents can be found at: http://www.uwgb.edu/techcouncil/plan/index.htm The University of Wisconsin – Green Bay Undergraduate Catalog lists “technological competence and information literacy” (University of Wisconsin, 2010b, para. 4) as one of its valuable skills. The Technology Plan is associated with this valuable skill and can be used to implement curriculum. The Office of Institutional Research (n.d.) publishes Learning Outcomes for General Education, with “ability to communicate effectively through listening, speaking, reading, writing, and the use of computers” listed as the first outcome. Enhancing learning. This theme focuses on supporting the core educational mission of the university through the use of technology. 1.1 Provide faculty development opportunities for implementing technology in the classroom/curriculum that is adaptive to student learning styles (e.g. video, online discussion, group collaboration, text messaging, simulations and games, social networking, etc.) 1.2 Convert additional classrooms to full technology installations to support the growing use of technology for teaching.

Action Plan/Multiyear Planning

Program Integration

Curriculum Integration

1.3 Improve the reliability and usability of classroom technology by standardizing instructional technology installations/interfaces to improve ease of use and support. 1.4 Assist faculty in using technology tools to detect plagiarism. 1.5 Provide education on ethics of copyright and fair use. 1.6 Provide support for the use of electronic portfolios in the curriculum. 1.7 Support faculty experimentation with instructional technology inside and outside the classroom environment, including delivering instruction to mobile devices. 1.8 Provide opportunities for keeping up with technology practices in the field, including conducting research in the digital environment. 1.9 Provide opportunities for communicating and collaborating with colleagues across distance and time through file sharing, critiques, discussion groups, etc. 1.10 Expand lecture capture technology to support teaching and program delivery. 1.11 Explore quality control, standards and best practices for online courses using Quality Matters as a rubric. 1.12 Increase the quantity, quality and scope of digital video and audio equipment available to faculty and students and provide assistance in digitizing content (text, music, video, images) for curricular purposes. 1.13 Develop a model for a Learning Commons on campus. 1.14 Increase technology assistance to students, including the creation of a Student Technology Assistance Center. 1.15 Use web based conferencing to facilitate online meetings, student/faculty/staff interactions and collaboration among work groups. 1.16 Explore a laptop initiative. Evaluation The University of Wisconsin – Green Bay conducted its own value assessment of the Technology Plan and its results can be found at: http://www.uwgb.edu/techcouncil/plan/2015-Value-Assessment.pdf UW-Green Bay is committed to adopting common tools that ensure resources are used wisely to achieve equitable access to information technology for all students, faculty and staff. Adherence to these standards benefits the university community in the following ways:

Standards

collaboration; s their content and applications from anywhere at anytime -time for repair; and data; There are several sources of funding for technology: general program revenue, program revenue, charge-backs, student fees, grants and grant overhead, contracts, and gifts. General program revenue (GPR) is by far the largest source of funding for the campus and is used to fund the

Funding Alternatives

campus infrastructure including network backbone, firewall, servers, faculty/staff desktops and instructor workstations in classrooms. Campus-wide applications such as email, office applications, SIS, and library systems are included as part of basic IT services. The campus administration allocates funds to the Information Services Division to support these basic IT services for GPR-based units. Program revenue units must pay for their hardware, software and network services through a charge-back from CIT. The annual charge-back per workstation covers costs of software licenses, central server space, security protection, Help Desk services, and training. CIT orders replacement workstations for PR units every three years and charges the units at the time of purchase. Peripheral equipment, such as printers, scanners, editing equipment, is purchased with unit funds and ordered through CIT. The campus receives ear-marked funds from UW System to support special technology initiatives. These funds were acquired through special legislation and must be monitored for appropriate use. 1. General Access Funds for student general access computing lab 2. Lab/Classroom Modernization Funds for equipment used by students in classroom/lab settings, about 50% is allocated annually for special instructional computer labs. 3. Student Technology Fee is about 2% of tuition and must be used for student technology that benefits all students Grants, grant overhead dollars, contracts and gifts have all been used by individuals and departments to purchase hardware and software. This source of funding is not ideal because most grants and gifts are one-time revenue sources and computer technology needs to be replaced periodically. The Association of College and Research Libraries (2000) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education provides research based standards, guidance and method of support for the Technology Plan. Additionally, the International Society for Technology in Education (2007) NETS for Students provides additional support for this Technology Plan. Although aimed at P12, the NETS for Students is adaptable to higher education and closely reflects the technology aspects of the ACRL document. Configurations that are currently being used or proposed as a part of the technology plan are as follows: 1. Expansion of online learning by using Desire2Learn course management system 2. Interactive Response Systems (clickers) 3. Electronic Portfolios The Event Management System (EMS) manages campus facilities usage, room reservations and presents a web-based Campus Calendar of Events. Managed by central reservations in the University Union, the EMS system includes both client and web based systems. The web-based system functions as the Campus Calendar of Events and provides self-service to selected campus users for reserving campus

School Pilot Projects/Educational Research

Model Classroom Configurations

Facilities

space. In addition, the EMS system tracks room usage, rental charges and provides a reporting system to track current facility usage and project future space needs. There were several support systems listed as part of this plan, the following are the ones listed specifically in the plan that provide support to the university system as well as when they began use of the system on campus: Web site development & redesign 1998, 2002, 2004 Blackboard transaction system 1998 Shared Financial System 1999 Library Voyager System 1999, 2000 Library E-Reserves 2001 Library Universal Borrower 2002 TMA – Facilities Maintenance 2002 SimplexGrinnel – Fire & Security 2002 Student Information System 2002, 2003 Residential Management System 2003 Event Management Systems 2003 Ad Astra classroom scheduling 2003 Kronos TimeKeeping 2003 QuickBooks – Receivable & Billing 2003 ImageNow document imaging 2003 Desire2Learn course management 2004 On-Line Campus Keys Program 2004 FleetAnywhere – Fleet Management 2005 Lawson – Human Resources Pending

Maintenance/Support

                  

Users may not install or change equipment configurations on desktop computers without prior approval of the Technology Council. Users Software Agreements may not install software on desktop computer systems located in student computing labs. Installation of software on assigned desktop systems will be subject to provisions outlined in The Technology Plan.

The Technology Council is responsible for the development and oversight of policies relative to the use of technology by faculty, staff and students. Some policies are developed to ensure the equitable use of technology across campus, and others are developed at the direction of Federal or State agencies. Policies developed by the Technology Council are made available to the campus community for review during the development phase and are reviewed by campus governance groups prior to final approval by the Chancellor’s cabinet. The Technology Council reviews policies from time to time to determine if the policy is still fulfilling its purpose and meeting the Copyright/Acceptable needs of the campus. The following policies have been adopted by the Technology Council since 1998 and are published on the web. Use Policy Acceptable Use Policy for Technology & the Internet Computer Workstation Replacement E-mail Policy & Guidelines, Distribution List Information Security Program Web Site Policies & Procedures These policies can be found at the following: For Students: http://www.uwgb.edu/compserv/policies/studentaccpuse.htm For faculty and Staff: http://www.uwgb.edu/compserv/policies/acceptableusepolicy.htm As stated in the plan, “Grants, grant overhead dollars, contracts and gifts have all been used by individuals and departments to purchase hardware and software. This source of funding is not ideal because most grants and gifts are one-time revenue sources and computer technology needs to be replaced periodically.” With this statement it is assumed that the policy in place is that gifts are an accepted but not truly encouraged means of funding. The Learning Technology Center (LTC) exists to help faculty and staff integrate technology in the teaching and learning process. To this end, it acts as a clearing house for instructional technology information and training opportunities, showcases new technologies, and assists faculty and staff in developing technology expertise. LTC staff provides pedagogical and technical advice on technologies such as digital imaging, web page development, presentation software, electronic discussions, scanning, courseware and multimedia software. The LTC offers primary support for the Desire2Learn course management system, which is used by more than 50% of the faculty and students. The objectives listed above also support this area of the plan.

Gifts and Disposal

Staff Development

All information reported above comes from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s own Technology Council website: http://www.uwgb.edu/techcouncil/plan/index.htm

Reference List Association of College and Research Libraries. (2000). Information literacy competency standards for higher education. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/standards.pdf ITSE. (2007). NETS for students. Retrieved from http://www.iste.org/standards/nets-for-students/nets-student-standards-2007.aspx University of Wisconsin – Green Bay. (n.d.) Learning outcomes. Retrieved from http://www.uwgb.edu/oira/assessment/gened/learningOutcomes.asp University of Wisconsin – Green Bay. (2010) Technology council. Retrieved from http://www.uwgb.edu/techcouncil/plan/index.htm University of Wisconsin – Green Bay. (2010). 2010-2011 Undergraduate catalog. Retrieved from http://www.uwgb.edu/catalog/undrgrad/

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