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AIMCAT0906 Analysis

AIMCAT0906 was the quintessential ‘CAT’ paper. It had very easy questions, questions that were tricky and ones
that were designed to spring a trap on the careless ones. This was as close as one could get to an ‘actual’ CAT
paper as it had something for everyone. Students should have realized that the paper had quite a lot of easy
questions and should have been careful in reading directions to be able to score heavily.

Section I – Quant:

With two new question types and a sizeable proportion of relatively unfamiliar models of questions, this section
would almost surely have upset any casual CAT aspirant. Not to mention, the avalanching effect that such a
fumble in the first few minutes of the test could have had over the rest of the paper. However, for those who
persisted with a keen presence of mind, the section could have been easily managed to their advantage. With
sub section B containing a large proportion of question in sets, the decision to pick questions for attempting
would have become slightly more difficult than what is usual in quant. However, a closer look at even the set
questions would reveal that one need not crack the entire set as a whole and that most of the questions involved
were stand alone and of various levels of difficulty. Hence, if one had spared the usual time spent on reading
questions and assessing them before attempting/leaving out, one should have been able to identify the right
questions without much difficulty. This section underscores the fact that superficial changes need not affect one’s
performance if ones basics are well grounded and the approach to the test is level headed.

Some of the questions in this section that should have definitely been attempted were Q. Nos. 1, 4, 7, 9, 14 and
15. Some of the other questions that could have been attempted were Q. Nos. 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 13, 26, 27, 28 and
30.

On the whole, an average student could have managed a score of 14+ marks in this section. Any score from 22
to 36 would be good, 37 to 50 very good and 50+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 21-25 marks.

Section II - Verbal

The Verbal section of AIMCAT0906 had a good mix of easy medium and difficult questions which were quite
cleverly masked in the 2 and 4 mark questions. The para-jumble questions were easy as the connections were
easy to establish but they were a bit lengthy for comfort. The fill in the blank questions were absolute sitters and
would have allowed for some very easy scoring. Passage – I and II were easy to read and they should have
been attempted. Qs 53-56 would have caught students unaware as one had to fill in the blanks with
‘inappropriate’ words but otherwise would have been the easiest of the 4 markers.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43,
44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 53, 54, 55 and 56.

An average student in Verbal could have managed a score of around 10+ marks and any score from 15 to 22
marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 23 to 29 would be very good and 29+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 28-32 marks.

Section III – Logic & Data Interpretation

The Logic & Data Interpretation section of AIMCAT0906 must have come as a breather to most after some very
difficult papers. The 2 markers were a cinch and the sets on ‘World Wildlife Fund’ and ‘Gloti’ were absolute
sitters. The set on DS+DI was a novel concept and involved lengthy calculations to be solved. The set on ‘ABC
Ltd.’ was doable and should have been attempted. The set on ‘Formula 5’ and the one on ‘Financial analyst’
were tricky and tough and should have been avoided. The set on ‘Champions League’ was quite easy as the
entire information was available and it should have been done.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 361, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 71,
72, 73, 74, 83, 84, 85 and 86.
An average student in Logic & Data Interpretation could have managed a score of around 12+ marks and any
score from 18 to 25 marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 26 to 32 would be very good and 32+,
excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 27-31 marks.

The overall cut-off for at least 1 IIM call would be in the range of 90-94 marks and any score in the range of 102-
106 should fetch 3 or more IIM calls.

AIMCAT0907 Analysis

AIMCAT0907 was a test of patience and stamina. Any paper with so many questions will afford many scoring
opportunities and one should concentrate fully on maximizing their score. Papers like these would reduce the
advantage of the seriously well prepared students and it is such students who need to put the ‘disappointment’ of
seeing an ‘easy’ paper and concentrate on maintaining their ‘relative’ advantage over the others. Students who
have not been doing well should understand that an easy paper would not necessarily mean a better percentile
and they should capitalize on the easy questions to the fullest possible extent. The AIMCAT series tries to
simulate all possible scenarios in CAT so that students can identify a plan/strategy to approach such a paper and
students not doing well in these ‘easy’ papers should question whether their preparation is up to the required
level and whether their results are at the mercy of the paper-setter and the pattern of the exam!!

Section I – Logic & Data Interpretation

The Logic & Data Interpretation section of AIMCAT0907 for a change had numerous sets which were doable and
students would have been spoilt for choice and this could have led to indecision. In such a scenario one must
plan to spend around 45 minutes in the section and divide this time into 3 tranches of 15 minutes each. In first
such tranche one must try to look at Qs 1-20 and try and pick the easiest sets and answer them. The same
approach needs to be followed in the second and third tranche, this time for Qs 21-40 and 41-60 respectively. In
this way one would have been able to pick up the easiest of the easy questions scattered throughout the paper
and in this way maximize the score.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 33, 34, 35, 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 24, 41, 42, 43, 51, 54, 56, 57, and 60.

An average student in Logic & Data Interpretation could have managed a score of around 12+ marks and any
score from 18 to 25 marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 26 to 32 would be very good and 32+,
excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 18-20 marks.

Section II – Quantitative

The quantitative section of AIMCAT0907 was of the medium level of difficulty. A surprising feature of this test was
the low weightage accorded to Numbers, Geometry and Mensuration - which was less than 25% of the total
questions. Operator based questions were plentiful and quite a few of them were doable though there were
some that were quite tricky.

Some of the easy questions that should have been attempted are Q. Nos., 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 69, 71, 72, 78, 80,
81, 86, 87, 97, 99, 107, 113, 114, 115, 117, 118, 119, 120. Qs 61, 62, 68, 70, 76, 93, 94, 95, 96, 103, 104, 106,
108, 109, 110 could also have been attempted.

A student with an average ability in QA could have scored around 10+ marks in this section and a score of
around 16 to 22 marks can be considered to be a good score. Any score from 23 to 30 can be considered very
good and 30+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 16-18 marks


Section III - Verbal

The Verbal section of AIMCAT0907 would have played into the hands of those who have had problems with
Reading Comprehension and consider Verbal to be their strong area. There were four passages with a total of
20 Qs which were definitely very easy to read and were a far cry from the very tough RCs that one has got
accustomed to seeing in the AIMCATs. There were 40 Qs from the Verbal area which tested students primarily
on their Vocabulary and Grammar skills. One should have allocated around 25-30 minutes for the Verbal area
and around 15-20 minutes for the Reading comprehension passages.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 121, 122, 123, 124, 125,
126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 177, 178, and 179.

An average student in Verbal could have managed a score of around 10+ marks and any score from 15 to 22
marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 23 to 29 would be very good and 29+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 15-17 marks.

The overall cut-off for at least 1 IIM call would be in the range of 58-60 marks and any score in the range of 67-
69 should fetch 3 or more IIM calls.

AIMCAT0908 Analysis

After a few weeks of ‘different’ type of AIMCATs where one was exposed to different scenarios which would have
contributed significantly to ones learning, we revert to the tried and tested 75Q format in AIMCAT0908. We
believe that experimentation in the format of the exam needs to be within the realms of possibility and should not
be done just for the sake of variety. The experimentation in the AIMCATs comes in the form of the types of
questions, format of the questions and the difficulty level of the paper and students doing the post exam analysis
would benefit the most from this test series. AIMCAT0908 was of a lower level of difficulty compared to the
previous AIMCATs and the scores are expected to move up and so are the cut-offs. Let us now look at each
section of AIMCAT0908 in greater detail.

Section I – Logic & Data Interpretation

The Logic & Data Interpretation section of AIMCAT0908 had five sets of 5Qs each and students should have had
no difficulty in picking up the easy sets. This paper in contrast to AIMCAT0909 had many sets which were
‘understandable’ and also ‘doable’ and therefore the cut-offs should increase quite a bit here. The first set on the
‘Windfall gains’ was fairly straightforward and anyone adept at number-manipulation would have quite easily
cracked the set though quite a bit time would have gone into this on account of the frequent checking rechecking
to be done with each one of the questions. The second set on ‘players in a basketball team’ was difficult and
students would have done well to avoid this set. The third set on ‘India’s next Superstar’ was an absolute sitter
and should have easily boosted ones score and the cut-offs. The fourth set on the ‘New International school’ was
of medium difficulty level and someone who figured out that the best approach for this question was to work on
the IX and X class students data would have easily solved this set. The fifth set on ‘Tournament Statistics’ was
verbose and lengthy and with its different representation would have daunted students but actually it was one of
the easier sets in this paper and a must-do set to increase ones score.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5, 11, 12, 13, 14,
15, 21, 22, 23 and 24.
An average student in Logic & Data Interpretation could have managed a score of around 20+ marks and any
score from 30 to 44 marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 45 to 56 would be very good and 56+,
excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 30-34 marks.

Section II - Verbal

The Verbal section of AIMCAT0908 had a good mix of easy and difficult questions and a judicious selection
strategy would have resulted in a high score for this section. This section had three passages of 5 Qs each and
10Qs in the Verbal area from FIJs and appropriate way to complete the paragraph. The first passage on ‘Facial
Expressions’ was the easiest of the lot and students attempting it would have found it quite easy to clear the cut-
offs. The second passage on ‘Reason’ was difficult and should have been avoided whereas the third passage on
‘Empowerment’ was of moderate difficulty level and should have been attempted. The questions on FIJs were
‘tricky’ as usual and students might have found their error rate creeping up if they weren’t too careful here.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 26, 27, 28, 29, 38, 39, 40,
47, 48, 49 and 50.

An average student in Verbal could have managed a score of around 16+ marks and any score from 22 to 35
marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 36 to 48 would be very good and 48+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 22-26 marks.

Section III – Quantitative

For a change, the questions on Numbers and Geometry/Mensuration were not as conspicuous as they usually
are. This section had a rather well distributed array of topics covered in it. However, keeping in line with the
usual trend of almost every page having two or more easy/doable questions, this section too had an ample
number of doable questions scattered all over it. Some of the easy questions that one should have definitely
looked at in this section were Q. Nos. 52, 54, 58, 59, 63, 68 and 69. Some of the doable questions that could
have also been looked at were Q. Nos. 55, 56, 57, 64, 70, 71 and 75.

A student with an average ability in QA could have scored around 14+ marks in this section and a score of
around 23 to 36 marks can be considered to be a good score. Any score from 37 to 50 can be considered very
good and 50+, excellent.
The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 19-23 marks

The overall cut-off for at least 1 IIM call would be in the range of 100-104 marks and any score in the range of
118-122 should fetch 3 or more IIM calls.

AIMCAT0909 Analysis

A paper with just 60Qs is the real litmus test for any serious aspirant and should be seen as a serious wake-up
call for those who depend on the test setter to give them enough ‘easy’ questions to clear the cutoffs. This paper
is as realistic as a 75, 90, 120 or 150+ question paper as it helps to separate the ‘men from the boys’ and
students should not be discount this paper in terms of the probability of this coming in CAT2008. Any paper with
fewer questions would play into the hands of those preparing seriously and those who look to clearing cutoffs
based on an intelligent choice of easy questions would have seen their performance seriously undermined. A
good approach for this paper would be stick to a 45-45-45-15 minute time allocation strategy and allocate the
buffer time of 15 minutes to the section that is most difficult or the one which happens to be a weak area. Once
again we would reiterate that all those who haven’t done well (relatively speaking that is) in this mock have some
serious chinks in their armor which needs to be removed and the preparation fortified over the next couple of
months for them to have a chance of a coveted IIM call. Let us now look at the sections in detail.

Section I - Verbal

The Verbal section of AIMCAT0909 was certainly among the easiest of the 3 sections in this paper and most
students would have tried to maximise their attempts here. Any paper with just 20Qs would have a far higher
level of difficulty and would make life difficult in terms of scoring. The biggest problem that students would have
faced with this section was the tricky nature of the questions and atleast 2-3 choices appearing to be ‘certain’
answers!! The 3Qs on Grammar tested students to the hilt and those whose fundamentals were shaky would
have found that they had a 100% error rate. The questions on vocabulary (word replacement) were the easiest
and should have been attempted. The Upstream-Downstream questions were difficult but were easier than the
Para-jumble questions and should have been preferred over the latter. Of the three passages - the first (on
religion based classification); the third (on War and Women) had some doable easy questions and were easy to
read and should have been attempted.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15 and 16.

An average student in Verbal could have managed a score of around 10+ marks and any score from 15 to 24
marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 25 to 36 would be very good and 37+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 15-17 marks.

Section II – Quantitative

The quant section of today's AIMCAT can be said to be both the shortest and the most intensive quant sections
of the season. There were very few questions which could be termed as simple. Most of the questions were
rather strange and unfamiliar to even look at! The basic observation that can be made regarding this section was
that the questions were an involved mix of two or more concepts, blended thoroughly, demanding an excellent
grasp of the basics and their application. With just twenty questions in the section, it would have been a
deceptively simple situation to start with, and one could easily have wasted their time in the wrong kind of
questions and completely gone off track and realized their folly only after it was too late. Though the cut off is
bound to be low, the key to crossing the cut off in this section was to read every question thoroughly and identify
those four to five question that were amongst the simplest and then attempt them. Only after those few simple
questions were dealt with, should one have bothered to try their hand at the other more complicated questions.
Some of the questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 21, 25, 26, 28, 30, 38 and 39.
Among the rest, some of the questions that were worth looking at were Q. Nos. 23, 24, 32, 33, 34, 35 and 36.

On the whole, an average student could have managed a score of 10+ marks in this section. Any score from 13
to 20 would be good, 21 to 33 very good and 33+, excellent.
The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 13-15 marks.

Section III – Logic & Data Interpretation

The Logic & Data Interpretation section of AIMCAT0909 had just four sets of 5Qs each and a majority of the
students would have been thereby constrained by the choice available. The saving grace of the paper was the
ordering of the sets – with the easier ones at the beginning and the tough brain twisters at the end. The first set
on “Part-distances” was the easiest of the questions in this paper and should have been the first set to be
attempted.. Considering the lack of options in this paper this is the set that should have been attempted to clear
the cut-offs. The second set on “Student Elections” was on the lines of the set that came in an earlier CAT paper.
Though this was of above average difficulty level it should have been preferred over the last two sets. This set
emphasised the importance of reading every statement in a logical DI set carefully. Though the set was quite
lengthy it was quite solvable if one paid attention to all details given. The third set on “Employees of company X”
was very lengthy and quite difficult and should have been attempted only if one had solved the first two sets and
there was enough time left over to attempt a third set. The fourth set on “Wheat sold at Mandi” was the toughest
of the sets and students would have done well to leave this set. Even in this set if one had solved the table till
Day 4, Qs 56 & 59 could be answered. Q57 which talks of the day on which all three items were dealt with could
also be answered based on the table solved till this point.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46 and
47.

An average student in Logic & Data Interpretation could have managed a score of around 8+ marks and any
score from 12 to 22 marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 23 to 32 would be very good and 32+,
excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 12-14 marks.

The overall cut-off for at least 1 IIM call would be in the range of 50-54 marks and any score in the range of 65-
69 should fetch 3 or more IIM calls.

AIMCAT0910 Analysis

AIMCAT0910 was a deviation from the ‘usual’ 75Q format and with 150 Qs, was quite lengthy. Students who
relish difficult papers would have found their ‘edge’ being neutralized by the relatively easier paper but then the
challenge would be to maximize ones score and maintain the edge in terms of the percentile score. Though this
paper afforded many opportunities to score yet the absolute scores will remain low on account of the 1-mark per
question scheme being followed. The best strategy for these kind of papers is to stick to the 45-45-45-15 pattern
of time allocation i.e. 45 minutes to each section to achieve cut-offs and 15 minute buffer section to maximize the
score in a particular section. Let us now look at the individual sections:

Section I – Quantitative

The quant section of AIMCAT0910 was of an average level of difficulty. However, it would have been perceived
to be either difficult or easy depending on how well a student was able to adapt to the rather drastic change in
length of the paper and the accompanying modifications in the overall approach to the paper. Crossing the cut-
off in this section would have proved to be quite tricky for since most of the easy/doable questions were
distributed rather inconspicuously among several questions that were either simply difficult of worth leaving out
for being too time consuming. In such a section, a high level of discretion and discipline in attempting and
leaving out the right kind of questions would make all the difference. Some of the questions that should have
been attempted were Q. Nos. 2, 3, 5, 6, 12, 14, 18, 19, 27, 28, 29, 30, 39, 40, 43, 44, 45 and 47. Some of the
other questions that could have been attempted were Q. Nos. 1, 8, 17, 20, 21, 22, 31, 32, 34, 35, 46, and 48.

On the whole, an average student could have managed a score of 8+ marks in this section. Any score from 13 o
19 would be good, 20 to 28 very good and 28+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 13-14 marks.


Section II - Verbal

And finally RCs that were comprehensible and a Verbal section that would have lit up the faces of most students!
AIMCAT0910 had 25Qs from the RC area and 25Qs from the Verbal area. The RCs were direct and very easy to
read – Passage 1 on ‘Oil’ was easy to read but was followed by inference based questions which could have
been quite easily answered if the passage was read carefully. Passage 3 on the ‘POTA’ was very short, easy to
read and should have been attempted by most students. Passage 5 on ‘Youthfulness’ wouldn’t have taken much
time to read and students could have expected to score some easy marks here. Thought the RCs were easy yet
this section became slightly difficult on account of the tricky Verbal questions. The Para-jumbles would have
afforded the maximum chance for a student to increase their score – most of them were very direct and
establishing connections wasn’t an issue at all. The same cannot be said of the ‘alternate summaries’ type of
questions which were very verbose and tricky and should have been avoided. Generally questions on word
usage help one to increase their score, however the ones given in AIMCAT0910 were difficult and would have
induced quite a few mistakes if one wasn’t paying too much attention to the structure of the sentence. The
questions on ‘Fill in the blanks’ were relatively easy and should have been attempted. All in all a feel good
section which reverses the trend of low scores seen in this section in the AIMCATs so far.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 51, 52, 53, 54, 58, 59, 61,
66, 67, 68, 69, 76, 77, 78, 79, 94 and 96.

An average student in Verbal could have managed a score of around 10+ marks and any score from 15 to 22
marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 23 to 28 would be very good and 29+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 15-16 marks.

Section III – Logic & Data Interpretation

The Logic & Data Interpretation section of AIMCAT0910 would have come as a breath of fresh air after the really
difficult papers that students faced in this section. Though there were plenty of ‘easy’ questions yet students
would have found that scoring heavily wasn’t to be on account of the marking scheme of 1 mark per question
which would have naturally brought down the cut-off (in absolute terms). The set on ‘Trends in Power
Generation’ was very easy to understand and involved application of speed math concepts and should have
been attempted. The set on the distribution of money among friends involved numerical reasoning and was
definitely doable. The set on pie charts involved maximize-minimise principles and students who had acquired a
comfort level in them (on account of the previous tough sets in this area in AIMCATs) should have maximized
their score. The set on the ‘Shonaki-Smaraki’ game was quite tricky and would have posed problems for most
students. The network problem was difficult on account of the numerous routes possible and the attendant
combinations. The table graph on ‘Bus service operations’ was easy to understand and had some very simple
questions and should have been attempted. The questions on logical conclusions, deductions and connectives
were the easiest but not many would have attempted them on account of their lack of practice in this area. All in
all this was a section that would have come as a relief and thereby leading to some high scores.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 101, 102, 103, 104, 105,
106, 108, 109, 110, 112, 128, 129, 131, 132, 140, 141, 143, 144 and 145.

An average student in Logic & Data Interpretation could have managed a score of around 12+ marks and any
score from 15 to 22 marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 23 to 28 would be very good and 28+,
excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 15-16 marks.

The overall cut-off for at least 1 IIM call would be in the range of 49-51 marks and any score in excess of 56
should fetch 3 or more IIM calls.

AIMCAT0911 Analysis

This was a week to consolidate the gains made over the past two months and get into a positive frame of mind
before we embark on the second half of this grueling test series. The only way to gain from the AIMCATs is to
analyze the paper and work out every question once you get back home and not just use the test as a
measuring tape of ones ability. AIMCAT0911 was patterned on the lines of the CAT of the 2006 and 2007 but can
be considered to be of a lower level of difficulty. We have discussed the entire paper in detail in the CD that was
given after the test and hope that you derive maximum benefit from the words of the experts. Let us now look at
individual sections of the test.

Section I – Logic & Data Interpretation

The Logic & Data Interpretation section of AIMCAT0911 can be classified as “moderately difficult”. There were
quite a few sets which can be termed as ‘sitters’ (given that we are half-way mark of the AIMCATs) and most
students should have capitalised on them to clear the cut-offs. The set on the ‘tennis tournament’ was a standard
tournament-based one and was among the easiest in this paper. Students who approached this set with the
knowledge that the sum of the seedings of the opponents should add upto 65 (in the first round), 33 (in the
second round provided there are no upsets in the R1) and so on, would have been able to quite easily crack this
set. The set on ‘Marketing Manager’ required students to find the way in which various components changed
from year to year and thereby identify a trend among them. This was one of the easier sets and should have
been attempted in this paper. The set on ‘Lage Raho Ltd.’ was very verbose and the easiest way to solve this set
would have been to create a table listing out the days of the week and the activities possible in the two slots. The
sets on ‘SAT scores’ and ‘control panel switches’ were tricky and should have been attempted by only those who
consider the Logic & Data Interpretation area as their stronger section.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 16, 18
and 19.

An average student in Logic & Data Interpretation could have managed a score of around 16+ marks and any
score from 27 to 38 marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 39 to 48 would be very good and 48+,
excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 27 marks.

Section II – Quantitative

The quant section of AIMCAT0911 can be rated to be of an above average level of difficulty. There were not
many questions that were easy/familiar, at least at a first glance. However, one interesting observation that can
be made, in retrospect, was that most of the doable questions were to be found in the first half of the section
itself, and this would have helped most students to ease into the not-so-easy later half of the section. Though the
questions that appeared were from a varied mix across topics the areas of Geometry/Mensuration and Numbers
both made their presence felt distinctly with a significant chunk of questions coming from these two areas
combined. Several questions that seemed intimidating or unfamiliar to look at were really rather simple and could
have been solved with mere common sense and/or preliminary calculations/observation. Questions like Q. Nos.
26, 28, 29, 31, 39 were of this type. Some of the other easy questions that should have been attempted by one
and all were Q. Nos. 27, 32, 37, 41, 42, 46 and 49.

An average student in quantitative could have managed a score of about 15+ marks in this section and any
score from 24 to 35 can be considered to be good. Any score from 36 to 50 would be very good and 50 +,
excellent.

The cut-off for this section is expected to be around 24 marks

Section III - Verbal

The Verbal section of AIMCAT0911 was shorn of its usual difficulty level and therefore one can expect to see the
scores moving north. It was a pleasant surprise to see the RC passages which were easy on the eye and were
not the abstract/philosophy based ones which are very tedious to read. The passage on ‘Israel’ and the one
pertaining to ‘affluenza’ should have been attempted. The verbal area comprised of questions from Logical
reasoning (Q56-58), appropriate way to complete paragraph and grammar. Of these the questions on Grammar
were of the moderate difficulty level and should have been attempted to clear the cut-offs and get a good score.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 51, 52, 53, 59, 61, 62, 72,
74 and 75.
An average student in Verbal could have managed a score of around 20+ marks and any score from 35 to 46
marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 47 to 60 would be very good and 60+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 35 marks.

The overall cut-off for at least 1 IIM call would be in the range of 100-102 marks and any score in excess of 118
should fetch 3 or more IIM calls.

AIMCAT0912 Analysis
AIMCAT0912 was of the familiar 75 Q pattern. With just one more mock to go to hit the half-way milestone in the
AIMCAT series, the key to one’s cracking CAT2008 now hinges on figuring out a strategy that works best for
them. One should have by now, over the past nine mocks, made a thorough assessment of one’s strengths and
weaknesses. Focused effort on overcoming the weak areas and honing up the strong ones is what is now
expected of the students. A quick rounding up of all of one’s basics by the end of this month should be the
immediate target for one and all, following which intensive analysis of all AIMCATs written should become the
focus for the last couple of months. Today’s AIMCAT was patterned on a mix of the CAT pattern of the last two
years, wherein the DI section borrowed its pattern form CAT2006 and the other two sections were based on the
pattern of CAT2007. The overall level of difficulty of the paper was average to slightly above average.

Let us now take a brief look at each of the sections:

Section I – Quantitative

The quant section of today’s AIMCATs was the most difficult of the three sections. Though the concepts on which
most of the questions were based seemed very familiar, somehow the exact models of most questions would
have seemed quite new to the students. This would definitely have made the going very tough for the students.
However, we all know the age old adage that when the going gets tough the tough get going! On a more
practical note, being able to put down the information available in the question in a structured format would
greatly simplify the entire process of selecting the questions to be attempted. There were several simple
questions that needed only a closer look to be identified as such. The DS questions were especially easy and
one could have easily attempted three of the four questions given. Some of the questions that should have been
identified and attempted in this section were Q. Nos. 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 14, 16, 21, 22, 23 and 25.

An average student in quant could have managed a score of around 14+ marks and any score from 20 to 32
marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 33 to 50 would be very good and 50+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 20 marks

Section II – Logic & Data Interpretation

This section had just five sets that had five questions each, which meant that students would not have had
enough choice in case they encountered sets that were tricky or difficult to solve. However AIMCAT0912 did
have enough sets which were ‘understandable’ and thus ‘doable’ and students who avoided the tricky ‘maximise-
minimise’ and ‘tournament’ based sets would have been able to score quite handsomely in this section. The set
on the ‘lying habits of Praful and Karan’ should have been attempted by most students as quite a few questions
were very straightforward and required little effort to crack. An example of this was Q31-34 which could have
been easily worked out through the options!! The set pertaining to ‘travel between cities’ involved tedious
calculations but was quite easy to understand. Similarly the set on ‘Sales & Expenses of an Automobile
manufacturer’ was easy to read and understand and had quite a few questions which were sitters. The set on
‘peoplereach’ was a difficult maximise-minimise type of question and should have been avoided. The ‘IPL
tournament’ was a slightly different version of tournament based questions and students would have found the
going quite tough in this set. As usual, perusing through all question sets before deciding the ones to attempt
and the ones to avoid would have helped students achieve the cut-offs.

Some of the easy questions that should definitely have been attempted were Q. Nos. 31, 32, 33, 41, 43, 44, 45,
46 and 47.
An average student in logic & data interpretation could have managed a score of around 16+ marks and any
score from 25 to 40 marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 41 to 50 would be very good and 50+,
excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 25 marks.

Section III – Verbal

With a full four RC passages and another four sets of questions on verbal ability, the going in this section would
definitely have been a slow affair. The section was patterned very closely on the lines of the VA section of
CAT2007. The passages were all reasonably concise but, the stumbling block was that each of them was closely
followed by a few tricky questions – with that one impeccably and ominously close answer choice, inevitably
recognized as so only after the exam is over! The easiest set of questions in this section were clearly the last
three, on selecting the most appropriate word/phrase, which should definitely have been attempted by one and
all. Also, the questions on para completion and the PFQs were also doable and worth attempting. On the whole,
the section was of a medium to difficult level in terms of difficulty.

An average student in verbal ability could have managed a score of around 18+ marks and any score from 26 to
40 marks can be considered to be good. Any score from 41 to 50 would be very good and 50+, excellent.

The cut-off score in this section is expected to be around 26 marks.

The overall cut-off score in this paper for at least one IIM call should be around 84-86 marks and any score
above 96 should fetch at least 3 to 4 IIM calls.