Low in upper 50s tonight

with 20
percent
chance of
showers
becom-
ing 30
percent
chance
Sunday with high
in the mid 70s.
1
HIGH SCHOOL SCOREBOARD
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at Ohio State Lima
Ohio State Lima is your door to all the
academic opportunities, resources and
traditions of the state’s
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Tours are offered daily.
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SEPTEMBER 15-18
Thursday
The Toast 5 p.m.
“On the Beach band 7-10
Friday
Battle of the Businesses 6-8
“REDNECKS” 8-12
Saturday
PURSE BINGO 3-5
PIG RACES 6-8
“EXPLOIT’ 8-1
Sunday
PARADE 2 pm
“SOMEONE’S KIDS” 3-6
FULL SCHEDULE OF EVENTS AT WWW.DELPHOSCHAMBER.COM/CANALDAYS PLUS...FREE BLACK & WHITE CAB SERVICE
CANAL DAYS 2011
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Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-8
Kid’s page 8
Church 9
Classifieds 10
TV 11
World news 12
Index
Saturday, September 10, 2011
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Upfront
www.delphosherald.com
Dutch Hollow to
close for 3 weeks
Beginning Monday,
Dutch Hollow Road
between Allentown (SR
81) and East roads will be
closed for three weeks.
The Allen County
Engineers will
replace a culvert.
Fort Jennings hosts grandparents
Fort Jennings elementary and high school music teacher Rosemary Warnecke leads second grade students and
their grandparents in song Friday. Grandparents toured the building and met teachers during the school’s annual
Grandparents Day open house.
Mike Ford photo
Sukup interim
superintendent
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphoshearld.
com
DELPHOS — Long-time
Fort Jennings Local Schools
Superintendent Frank Sukup
will take the helm at Delphos
City Schools as interim
superintendent.
School officials
announced Friday
the school board and
Sukup had reached a
tentative agreement
and the board plans to
approve a contract at
Monday’s meeting.
The long-time
educator will be
contracted for up to 200
days on a daily basis while the
district searches for a permanent
replacement for Superintendent
Jeff Price, who is leaving the
district this month.
Sukup, who retired from Fort
Jennings in 2010, is looking
forward to keeping his hand in
education.
“I am comfortable with the
interim position,” Sukup said
Friday. “Delphos is a good
system and I’m going to keep
the district moving. There won’t
be any major changes.”
Sukup spent the 2010-
11 school year as interim
superintendent at Edon
Northwest Local
School and is ready to
jump into the position
in Delphos.
“It’s kind of hard
to quit cold turkey,”
Sukup said. “You’re
used to being on a
schedule and doing
things with the kids
and guiding what they
learn. Education is a
good profession to be in.”
Sukup will start his duties on
Tuesday.
“I’m looking forward to
working with the kids and the
people of Delphos,” he added.
Sukup said he is not
interested in the permanent
position.
Delphos City Schools
Sukup
NY, Washington, aware of
terror threat but not afraid
By EILEEN SULLIVAN
and LOLITA C. BALDOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Undaunted by talk of a new
terror threat, New Yorkers
and Washingtonians wove
among police armed with
assault rifles and waited with
varying degrees of patience
at security checkpoints Friday
while intelligence officials
scrambled to nail down infor-
mation on a possible al-Qaida
strike timed to coincide with
the 10th anniversary of 9/11.
Counterterrorism officials
have been working around the
clock to determine whether
the threat is accurate, and extra
security was put in place to
protect the people in the two
cities that took the brunt of
the jetliner attacks that killed
nearly 3,000 people at the
World Trade Center and the
Pentagon a decade ago. It was
the worst terror assault in the
nation’s history, and al-Qaida
has long dreamed of striking
again to mark the anniversary.
But it could be weeks before
the intelligence community
can say whether this particular
threat is real.
Security worker Eric
Martinez wore a pin depicting
the twin towers on his lapel
as he headed to work in lower
Manhattan on Friday where
he also worked 10 years ago
when the towers came down.
“If you’re going to be afraid,
you’re just going to stay
home,” he said.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg,
too, made a point of taking the
subway to City Hall.
Briefed on the threat Friday
morning, President Barack
Obama instructed his secu-
rity team to take “all neces-
sary precautions,” the White
House said. Obama still plans
to travel to New York on
Sunday to mark the 10th anni-
versary with stops that day at
the Pentagon and Shanksville,
Pa.
Washington commuters
were well aware of the terror
talk.
Cheryl Francis, of
Chantilly, Va., said she trav-
els over the Roosevelt bridge
into Washington every day
and doesn’t plan to change
her habits. Francis, who was
in Washington on Sept. 11,
2001, said a decade later the
country is more aware and
alert.
“It’s almost like sleeping
with one eye open,” she said,
but she added that people need
to continue living their lives.
Late Wednesday, U.S.
officials received information
about a threat that included
details they considered specif-
ic: It involved up to three peo-
ple, either in the U.S. or who
were traveling to the country;
a plan concocted with the help
of al-Qaida leader Ayman al-
Zawahri; a car bomb as a pos-
sible weapon and New York
or Washington as potential
targets.
Officials described the
information to The Associated
Press only on condition of
anonymity because they were
not authorized to publicly
discuss the sensitive matters.
Counterterrorism officials
were looking for certain names
associated with the threat, but
it was unclear whether the
names were real or fake.
At least one of the three
people involved in the plot
was thought to be a U.S. citi-
zen, several senior U.S. offi-
cials said.
The intelligence communi-
ty regularly receives tips and
information of this nature. But
the timing of this particular
threat had officials especially
concerned, because it was the
first “active plot” that came
to light as the country marked
the significant anniversary, a
moment that was also sig-
nificant to al-Qaida, accord-
ing to information gleaned in
May from Osama bin Laden’s
compound.
Photo submitted
Gospel trio Trinity will perform at Delphos Wesleyan
Church at the 10:30 a.m. service on Sunday.
Wesleyan to host Trinity
Southern Gospel Group Trinity will perform at the 10:30
a.m. service on Sunday at Delphos Wesleyan Church.
Trinity includes Gary Adams, Cheryl Burk and Kim Mason.
It began its music ministry in the early 1980s, singing a wide
variety of Christian music but has turned it’s focus toward
Southern Gospel in the last 16 years.
Trinity will sponsor its “Southern Gospel Expo” April 12-
15, 2012, in Van Wert.
Bluffton 37
Jefferson 28
Elida 42
St. Marys 23
Spencerville 62
Allen East 27
LCC 49
Paulding 0
Col. Grove. 34
Ada 33
Coldwater 17
Anna 0
Versailles 46
Ft. Recovery 33
Marion Local 55
New Bremen 8
St. Henry 42
Parkway 13
2
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on Fifth
940 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
(419) 692-6856
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for beautiful flowers
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Delphos, OH 45833
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Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
CANAL DAYS
LUNCHEON
First Presbyterian
Church
310 N. Second St., Delphos
Fri., Sept. 16...11-4
$7.00
Chicken & Beef
Sandwiches
Nachos • Salads
Desserts •Drinks
2 – The Herald Satuday, September 10, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERAL
LOTTERY
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 75
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising
manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Delphos City Schools
Week of Sept. 12-16
Monday: Mini Corn Dogs,
bread and butter, mixed vegetables,
Mandarin oranges, lowfat milk
Tuesday: Nachos w/cheese &
meatsauce, breadsticks, corn, mixed
fruit, lowfat milk.
Wednesday: Cheese Pizza, tossed
salad, fruit, lowfat milk
Thursday: Chicken nuggets,
bread & butter, green beans, chilled
peaches, lowfat milk
Friday: Spaghetti w/ meat sauce,
garlic bread, Romaine salad, sher-
bert, lowfat milk
Delphos St. John’s:
Week of Sept. 12-16
Monday: Hamburger sandwich/
pickle & onion or cold meat sand-
wich, assorted fries, salad, pears,
milk
Tuesday: Beef stew/roll or Mini
corn dogs, corn, salad applesauce,
milk
Wednesday: Pancakes & sausage
or shredded beef sandwich, hash
browns, salad, orange juice, milk
Thursday: Chili/roll & crack-
ers or BBQ Rib sandwich, pudding,
salad, sherbet, milk
Friday: Sub Sandwich/lettuce/
tomato/pickle or BBQ pork sand-
wich, salad, fruit bar, cheddar
whales, milk
Landeck Elementary:
Week of Sept. 12-16
Monday: Breaded corn dogs,
green beans, fruit milk
Tuesday: Breaded popcorn,
chicken, butter/peanut butter bread,
corn, fruit, milk
Wednesday: Turkey sandwich,
potato rounds, fruit, milk
Thursday: Pizza burgers, peas,
fruit, milk
Friday: Macaroni & cheese, but-
ter/peanut butter bread, lettuce salad,
fruit, milk
Ft Jennings:
Week of Sept. 12-16
Monday: Cheese Rotini, bread-
stick, green beans, fruit
Tuesday: Salisbury steak, mashed
potatoes, corn, dinner roll, fruit
Wednesday: Sausage pizza, peas,
G-force bar, fruit
Thursday: Chicken Fajita, mixed
vegetables, cheese rice, fruit
Friday: Breaded chicken sand-
wich, carrots, cheese slice, cookie,
fruit
Ottoville:
Week of Sept. 12-16
Monday: Turkey sub, corn chips,
corn, pineapple, milk
Tuesday: Chicken strips, augra-
tin potatoes, butter bread, peaches,
milk
Wednesday: Sausage patty, tri-
tator, omelet, french toast stix, apple-
sauce
Thursday: Chili soup w/cracker,
butter-pb-tuna bread, relish-cheese
stix, peaches, cowboy cake
Friday: Corn dog, french fries,
cookie, Mandarin oranges, milk
Elida, Gomer:
Week of Sept. 12-16
Monday: Chicken tenders, sea-
soned carrots, pineapple tidbits, soft
twist pretzel, low fat milk
Tuesday: Grilled cheese sand-
wich, yogurt, broccoli & cheese,
diced pears, low fat milk
Wednesday: Real slice cheese
pizza, green beans, Mandarin orang-
es, low fat milk
Thursday: Salisbury steak,
mashed potatoes, diced peaches, din-
ner roll, low fat milk
Friday: NO SCHOOL - STAFF
DEVELOPMENT DAY
Spencerville:
Week of Sept. 12-16
Monday: French Toast Sticks w/
syrup, sausage links, 100% orange
juice
Tuesday: Shredded beef &
cheese sandwich, curly fries, pine-
apple, milk
Wednesday: Cheese pizza, corn,
applesauce, milk
Thursday: Spaghetti, salad w/
veggies, garlic bread, peaches, milk
Friday: Shredded chicken sand-
wich, Au Gratin potatoes, Mandarin
oranges, milk
Lincolnview:
Week of Sept. 12-16
Monday: Fajitas/ Tortilla, glazed
carrots, rice, grapes, milk
Tuesday: Cheese pizza, green
beans, mandarin oranges, milk
Wednesday: Turkey/cheese/bun,
carrots/celery/dip, banana, milk
Thursday: Country fried steak,
mashed potatoes, dinner roll, pears,
milk
Friday: Mini corn dogs, baked
beans, fritos, applesauce, milk
Sadly
missed by
wife,
children,
grandchildren
&
great-
grandchildren
Bob “Ozzie”
Osburn
6-29-36 9-11-06
Some things just are
NANCY SPENCER
On the
Other hand
Don’t sweat the small stuff; it’s all small
stuff.
We’ve all heard it before.
Life is stressful. There is so much more
going on now.
I have found the secret to keeping my san-
ity. If I truly cannot change the outcome of
something, I don’t invest in it.
If I have no control over something, why
worry about it?
I always used to tease my mom about it.
She’d say, “Yeah, but. ...”
And I’d tell her, “The yeah-buts are
dead.”
She was and still is a worrier. I have said
if she doesn’t have anything to worry about,
she makes it up. If I truly wanted to know all
the ramification of an action, I’d just sick my
mom on it. She would come up with every
possible pitfall and down side.
However, on the flip side, some things
need worried about. They need time, atten-
tion and nurturing for us to get the maximum
benefit.
Then there are the things that just are what
they are.
Cameron has at times been upset because
someone he was really close to before he went
to prison hasn’t written or made attempts to
keep in touch. I had to tell him that he was
the one who went away. Life goes on — with
or without you.
He also went away a time in a person’s
life when a lot of changes take place. He was
just out of high school and trying to figure
out how the real world work, etc. He wasn’t
too impressed that his less-than-motivated
lifestyle was getting him a little less than he
thought he deserved.
The things that filled his days and nights
as a high-schooler were lost in the pages of
his yearbook.
Cameron just hit a hiccup. He had to stand
at the sidelines and wait for his turn.
In five weeks, he will be out on his own.
SCARY! (In a Disney falsetto voice.) But
it’s also a wonderful, exhilarating time when
he gets to really make it on his own. He’ll
be making decision that can make or break
him but at least he gets to make them — and
his mistakes. Hopefully they won’t be too
painful.
Cameron deserves a break. He has worked
really hard just to be in a position to make the
decisions — right or wrong.
A new challenge Cameron has had to face
is finding the right people to associate with.
In the halfway house he doesn’t have a lot of
choice. They are, I’m sure, a motley crew.
However, he also has the opportunity to
meet new people through work and some of
the events his restaurant hosts.
It’s easy to want to be around people who
fun and not so much to be around people who
make you think, question yourself and want
you to work toward your goals.
I know a lot of people who are much older
than Cameron and still trying to get it right.
He has gained a lot of wisdom and had quite
a few “aha” moments.
Life can be as difficult as you make it;
as complicated as you let it; and everything
you want it to be if you’re willing to put in
the time.
We make our own luck and no one
who forges our path for us is doing us any
favors.
The best advice I have for him is the
Serenity Prayer.
God grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference.
And the knowledge some things just are
what they are — with or without you and no
matter what you do.
Feb. 12, 1940-Sept. 9, 2011
Richard L. Suever, 71, of
Dephos, died at 4:50 a.m.
Friday at St. Rita’s Medical
Center.
He was born Feb. 12, 1940,
in Allen County, to Anton and
Catherine (Hugenard) Suever.
On Oct. 9, 1971, he mar-
ried Jeanine A. Suever, who
died on Dec. 22, 2009.
Survivors include sister
Rose (Paul) Sever of Delphos
and brother Ralph (Nova)
Suever of Elida.
He was also preceded in
death by his daughter, Andrea
“Renee” Suever; brothers
Albert, Wilford and Melvin
Suever; and sister Ruth
Norbeck Bradshaw.
Mr. Suever was a United
States Army veteran who
worked for Superior Coach
and at the Lima Tank Plant. He
was a member of St. John the
Evangelist Catholic Church;
was a life member of Delphos
Eagles, Veterans of Foreign
Wars and past member of the
Delphos Fire Department for
15 years.
Mass of Christian Burial
begins at 11 a.m. Tuesday
at St. John the Evangelist
Catholic Church, the Rev. Mel
Verhoff officiating. Burial
will follow in Resurrection
Cemetery with military rites
by Delphos Veterans Council.
Friends may call from
2-4 and 6-8 p.m. Monday at
Harter and Schier Funeral
Home, where the parish wake
starts at 7:30 p.m.
Memorials are to St. John’s
Schools.
Richard L. Suever
March 19, 1951-Sept. 9,
2011
Susan D. (Gillespie)
McMahon, 60, of Delphos,
died at 12:42 a.m. Friday at
St. Rita’s Medical Center.
She was born March
19, 1951, in Fostoria to
Robert “Dewey” and Elsie
(Lanning) Gillespie, who
preceded in death.
She had been married to
John Czerwinski, then she
married Pete McMahon.
They both survive.
Other survivors include
son Rob (Devonne)
Czerwinski of Delphos;
daughter Erin (Eric) Suever
of Delphos; brothers Patrick
Gillespie of Delphos and
Douglas (Dana) Gillespie
of Ashland; grandchildren
Devin and Taylor Coronado,
Hailey Czerwinski, Brennan
and Maleah Suever and
and J.D. Czerwinski; spe-
cial aunt Carole Rinehart
of Fostoria; special friends
Connie Stemen, Nikki
Betz and Christy Suever of
Delphos; and several nieces
and nephews.
Mr s. McMahon
was retired from Lima
Correctional Institute
and had also worked at
Niedecken’s Carry-out.
She was a member of St.
Peter Lutheran Church, the
Delphos Optimist Club and
was a past member of the
Delphos Eagles. She loved
spending time with her chil-
dren and her grandchildren
were her pride and joy.
Funeral services begin
at 11 a.m. Monday at St.
Peter Lutheran Church, the
Rev. Angela Khabeb offici-
ating. Burial will follow in
Memory Gardens.
Friends may call from
2-8 p.m. Sunday at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home.
Memorials are to the
Delphos Optimist Club.
Susan D. (Gillespie)
McMahon
HERMILLER, Franklin
A., 83, of Columbus Grove,
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at 10 a.m. today
at St. Anthony Catholic
Church, the Rev. Thomas
Extejt officiating. Burial
will be in the church cem-
etery. Preferred memori-
als are to St. Anthony’s
School Endowment Fund or
Life Teen Program of St.
Anthony.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
The winning numbers in
Friday evening’s drawing of
the Ohio Lottery:
Pick 3
4-8-0
Pick 4
4-5-3-6
Rolling Cash 5
09-29-30-31-39
Ten OH
04-05-09-13-27-28-35-39-
41-43-44-48-50-51-53-62-67-
74-76-77
The following is the
report concerning construc-
tion and maintenance work
on state highways within
the Ohio Department of
Transportation District 1,
which includes the coun-
ties of Allen, Defiance,
Hancock, Hardin, Paulding,
Putnam, Van Wert and
Wyandot. This report
is issued each Thursday
beginning in April and con-
tinues through November.
(All work will take place
weather permitting and dur-
ing daytime hours Monday
through Friday only unless
otherwise indicated.)
Allen County
Interstate 75 at Breese
Road will have both the
entrance and exit ramps
reduced to one lane on
September 12 for partial
depth pavement repair.
Interstate 75 at 4th
Street will have both the
entrance and exit ramps
reduced to one lane on
September 13 for pave-
ment repair.
Ohio 696 at Hillville
Road will close for seven
days beginning September
19 for a project which will
lower the profile of the
road to provide for better
sight distance and replace
two culverts.
Ohio 309 (Elida Road)
from Robb Avenue to
Eastown Road on the
west side of Lima is cur-
rently restricted to one lane
in the westbound direction
for a safety upgrade proj-
ect. Crews are working in
the zone most hours of the
day and night. Motorists
are asked to drive cautious-
ly through the area and
remain aware of equipment
moving in and out of the
work zone. The project will
continue until November.
Putnam County
Ohio 109 from Ohio
613 to the Henry County
Line will be restricted to
one lane through the work
zone for tarring and chip-
ping of the roadway.
Van Wert County
U.S. 30 from Middle
Point-Wetzel Road to
Fifth Street in Delphos
will be reduced to one lane
through the work zone for
a resurfacing project. Work
will be completed in early
November.
Ohio 118 (Shannon
Street) between Ervin
Road and Main Street
remains open to local traf-
fic only during reconstruc-
tion, widening, and water
line and sanitary installa-
tion which began in 2010.
Localized, one-block clo-
sures will occur throughout
the project. The intersec-
tion of Ervin Road and
Shannon Street reopened
to traffic on Tuesday. The
project is expected to be
completed in October.
ODOT
Check us out online:
www.delphosherald.com
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Records show the suspect in
the May slaying of four Ohio
family members told a relative
after the killings that he would
rather die than go to jail.
Randle Roberts, who died
in a shootout that injured three
police officers, told his stepfa-
ther he had committed murder
and was not going to jail for the
rest of his life.
In records released to The
Associated Press Friday,
Roberts’ mother says after her
son made those statements, he
walked past her and started
shooting at police officers out-
side the house.
Several relatives interviewed
by police say Roberts became
addicted to painkillers after a
2008 back surgery and stole fre-
quently to support his habit.
No surrender for
slaying suspect
1
12 MONTH NO INTEREST FINANCING
AUGUST 14-SEPTEMBER 15
HOBBY AND HARVEST
CRAFT FAIR
Laurel Oaks Park - Elida
Saturday September 17th, 2011
Time 9 am - 3 pm
Park at Elida Elementary (North parking
lot) and ride the shuttle -
Elida elementary located
behind Speedway in Elida
Food - Games for Kids
$1.00 admission at the gate.
BLACK SWAMP
ANTIQUES
& ANTIQUE MALL
• Old Cookie Jars
• McCoy Pottery
•Boyds Bears • Fenton
- Carnival - Depression
Glass • Comic Books
• Toys • Vintage Books
• Dish Sets • Hull
Pottery• Indian Artifacts
• Collectibles • Pictures
• Collector Plates
• Arcade Games
• Neon Lights • And
Much More!
238 North Main Street, Delphos, Ohio
Open Monday-Saturday 9-6; Sunday 12-4
“You’ll Find A Treasure
Around Every Corner”
The Black
Swamp Antique
Mall is now
accepting
new vendors.
Space as Low as
$1.00 per
Square Foot A
Month!
877-260-0348
LET US DO THE SELLING FOR YOU!
Spring on in to our
We’re growing to serve you better! Come see our expanded full-service pet hospital!
1825 East Fifth Street 419-692-9941
Coming soon…..www.delphosanimalhospital.com
April 25th 2:00-4:00 pm
GUEST EXHIBITORS
* Hollowell Dog Training *
* MaryAnn’s Kountry Kennels *
* Elida Dog Grooming *
* Marc Walters Photography *
* Roger Bice—Shawnee Run
Kennels *
Enjoy Food,
Refreshments,
Demonstrations,
Door Prizes,
and more!
Picture of the 4
veterinarians (on file
at Delphos Herald)
1825 East Fifth Street 419-692-9941
www.delphosanimalhospital.com
RABIES VACCINE CLINIC
Saturday, Sept. 24, 2011 ... 1-4 p.m.
for dogs, cats, ferrets,
and horses!
Open to our current clients and the general public
Rabies Vaccinations are $15
Microchipping available.
Walk-ins welcome.
In support of
WORLD RABIES DAY
September 28
th
Delphos Animal Hospital is sponsoring a
Refreshments and door prizes!
Horse owners are encouraged to call for an
appointment. Bring proof of previous rabies
vaccine, if applicable.
FREE Parenting Workshop!
6 Week Series
Thursday Evenings
Sept. 15th - Oct. 20th
5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Van Wert Hospital
Conference Room B & C
For Parents of Teens and ‘Tweens
You’re invited to attend
Active Parenting of Teens :)
Register By Calling 419.238.8672
WANTED
HOMES THAT NEED ROOFING
A select number of homeowners in Delphos
and the surrounding areas will be given the
opportunity to have a lifetime Erie Metal
Roofng System installed on their home at
a reasonable cost.
1-877-650-6464
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TM
Saturday, September 10, 2011 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
Briefs
www.delphosherald.com
On the Banks of Yesteryear
From the Delphos Canal Commission
That Horn
Canal Days is fast approaching and one of the events that
draws a lot of people is the waterball contest. Area firefighters
come together to participate in a wet game of “who can get the
ball across the opponents line”. If you have never experienced
this event, you need to check it out this year.
Contests between fire departments are nothing new.
Delphos was a bustling town of almost 2,000 citizens on May
3, 1872, when a fire started in the rear of Shenk and Lang’s
Drug Store and quickly spread through the wooden structures
in the area bordered by Washington Street to the east, Second
Street to the south, Canal Street to the west, and Third Street
to the north, burning 45 of them completely to the ground. The
only means of fighting the fire were bucket brigades using
water from the canal.
This disaster was labeled the “Black Friday Fire.”
On July 1,1872, just two months later, the Washington
Volunteer Fire Company was organized and quickly made
a name for itself. An 1870’s Delphos Herald printed the fol-
lowing :
We know our Lima neighbors will pardon us if
we proceed to a little blowing over the mere
matter of “taking a horn,” an indulgence to
which our friends at the county seat are not
entirely strangers. On this occasion it was
taken straight and a good deal of it. But as
there are so many kinds of horns, we ought
to specify the particular horn referred to above.
It was a large horn — a very fine horn — a horn
upon which Lima had set its eye. It was a
fireman’s silver horn, or more properly
speaking, trumpet, offered at the Catholic
fair held at Lima last week to the most pop-
ular fire company. Sometimes popularity is
bought, and if this was of the merchantable
kind, it is none the less prized, as the market
was open and accessible to all.
The Washington boys of Delphos received
364 votes, which, being a majority, entitled
them to the trumpet. It is a valuable companion
to the banner carried by them from the State
Tournament, and of course, will be highly
prized. Next!
And from the 1885 History of Allen County,
The prizes carried off by this company are named as
follows: Ohio State Banner, at Galion, Ohio, in 1873;
Northwestern Ohio State Banner, at Van Wert, Ohio 1874;
a trumpet at Lima, Ohio, 1876; a trumpet at Van Wert, Ohio
1877; a trumpet at Delphos, Ohio 1882; a United States flag
at Delphos, Ohio, 1882; a money prize at Northwestern Ohio
tournament, held at St. Mary’s, Ohio, 1883, and a money prize
at Sandusky, Ohio in 1884.
The museum has the three trumpets and recently received
a banner from a thoughtful donor who saw it for sale in
Michigan and bought it for us.
We will be open during Canal Days so stop in to see the
horns and our new displays on the main floor and upstairs.
While you are there, check out the nine beautiful baskets that
some lucky persons will win during our raffle. If you purchase
some tickets, it could be you.
FREE
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SCHOOL
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after taking course.
Flexible schedules,
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Courses start
Sept. 15
Liberty Tax Service
Small fee for books.
Call
419-229-1040
662 Elida Ave., Delphos 419-692-0007
Open 5 a.m.-9 p.m.
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
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COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio
State University has collected
record money from a record
number of private donors and
also has received its largest
number of pledges for gifts in
the millions.
University officials tell The
Columbus Dispatch the fiscal
year that ended June 30 was
a blockbuster for fundraising,
despite the economy and the
school’s football scandal.
Senior vice president of
development Jeff Kaplan
says people seem to believe
in Ohio State and what the
university does for its students
and the state.
More than 177,000 private
donors contributed $259 to
Ohio State during the fiscal
year. The school also received
an all-time high 40 pledges for
future donations of at least $1
million.
OSU reports
record year
for fundraising
CINCINNATI (AP) — An
Ohio bride’s “something old”
is her Sept. 9 wedding date:
it’s been a tradition in her
family for a century.
Angelynn Perchermeier is
getting married in Cincinnati
on Friday, 100 years to the
day that her great-great-grand-
parents exchanged their vows.
Her great-grandparents also
got hitched on Sept. 9, and
so did her grandmother and
grandfather.
Perchermeier’s groom
says when they were pick-
ing a date, she shared with
him family newspaper clip-
pings from the previous wed-
dings and he knew she had her
heart set on Sept. 9. Air Force
Staff Sgt. Kyle Ray tells The
Cincinnati Enquirer he hopes
their children will continue
the tradition and choose the
same date for their nuptials.
Ohio couple’s
wedding date a
100-yr tradition
AKRON (AP) — An Ohio
woman who was jailed for
using her father’s address to
enroll her children in a neigh-
boring school district says she’s
grateful for her break from the
governor.
Kelley Williams-Bolar told
Cleveland’s WJW-TV on
Thursday she can live her life
and be a productive citizen now
that she’s no longer a convicted
felon.
Gov. John Kasich reduced
the Akron woman’s records
tampering counts to misde-
meanors this week. He said the
original penalty was too harsh.
Williams-Bolar says she
knows that what she did wasn’t
right, but she was looking out
for her daughters.
Kasich steps in
to help mother
sUBsCriBe TODAY!
Phone
419-695-0015
CINCINNATI (AP) —
President Barack Obama has
put a clogged, deteriorating
bridge over the Ohio River
into the middle of his jobs plan
pitch, raising hopes among
some Ohio and Kentucky offi-
cials that construction work will
get a high-level push.
The bridge carries both
Interstate 75 and Interstate 71
traffic over the Ohio River.
Overhaul is expected to cost
well over $2 billion and take
years, but still lacks all the
funding needed from the fed-
eral government and the two
states.
Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky
says he’s pleased Obama men-
tioned the bridge in his Thursday
evening speech, but criticized
the president for lumping it in
with a call for more stimulus
spending and taxes.
Outdated bridge
in new focus
after speech
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Another condemned Ohio inmate
is seeking to have his execution
delayed, citing a judge’s criti-
cism of the state’s death penalty
process that has already post-
poned three executions.
Joseph Murphy is scheduled
to die Oct. 18 for killing 72-year-
old Ruth Predmore in her Marion
home in 1987.
The 46-year-old Murphy is
making the same arguments that
led a federal judge in June to
criticize Ohio’s capital punish-
ment procedures as haphazard.
That decision by U.S. District
Judge Gregory Frost delayed one
execution, and Gov. John Kasich
has since postponed two others.
The state has announced a
new policy that it says should
address Frost’s concerns, but the
judge hasn’t ruled on the updated
procedures.
Condemned
killer seeks
execution delay
COLUMBUS (AP) — A
citizens’ coalition submitting
proposals for shrinking Ohio’s
congressional landscape by
two districts is expressing
concern that the public won’t
have ample time to review
the official map drawn by
Republicans.
The majority House GOP’s
map, to serve as the basis
of congressional boundaries
for the next decade, is being
readied for Tuesday, when the
State Government & Elections
Committee holds its next hear-
ing. That will miss a Friday
deadline set for public maps.
A committee vote on
the official map is likely
Wednesday, with a vote by
the full House possible by
Thursday.
Map coming to
scrap 2 Ohio
congressional
districts
WASHINGTON — The
legacy of 9/11 can’t be fully
measured even now, but
perhaps the most damaging
aspect can be found in our
national discourse.
Taking the long view, it
is possible to see the roots of
today’s political dysfunction
— the hate, fear, anger and
resentment — firmly planted
in the soil at Ground Zero.
Did Osama bin Laden
envision such a thing when he
plotted the attacks? Probably
not. He might have imag-
ined that we would retaliate,
and this would cost us lives
and treasure. But he couldn’t
have known that we even-
tually would lose our com-
mon sense of who we are.
This has been the big surprise
of 9/11 — an ongoing, self-
perpetuating act of American
self-destruction.
Something was unleashed
10 years ago that bears our
scrutiny. It wasn’t only evil,
though the attacks were cer-
tainly that. The event was
so cataclysmic and horri-
fying that it caused a sort
of emotional breakdown in
the American constitution.
Simply put, it damaged our
collective soul and seems to
have released a free-ranging
hysteria that has contami-
nated our interactions ever
since.
No matter how many
prayers uttered; no mat-
ter how many hands held or
pledges made; no matter how
many bombs dropped or cof-
fins draped. A nation can-
not heal itself without self-
awareness. On this score we
have fallen short. We seem
not to want to recognize that
we don’t have a problem; we
are the problem.
Putting it bluntly, 9/11
caused us to go temporarily
insane. Being for or against
the war, first in Afghanistan
and later in Iraq, divided
us as wars do, but this time
was different.
Friendships ended, marriag-
es suffered, people crossed
the street to avoid those with
whom they disagreed. Ten
years later, we are still at war.
Tack on the global financial
crisis, stagnant unemploy-
ment, the further dissolution
of trust in our institutions and
we have all the ingredients
for moral panic.
And now, alas, another
election season is upon us
with all the froth and spittle
we love to loathe. President
Obama understands the
nation has a psychological
problem, but no president
in his own right mind can
afford to speak publicly of
such things. If Jimmy Carter
was brought down by his
“crisis of confidence,” aka
“malaise,” speech, imagine if
Obama, who already suffers
an image of elitist conde-
scension, mentioned that the
nation could use a little time
on the couch.
We stumble at last upon a
purpose for columnists — to
say that which no one else
dares.
Obama tried to unite the
nation with his purple rheto-
ric, but he missed his window
when it came time to act. The
jobs speech he gave Thursday
night was two and a half
years late and the health care
reform bill he pushed through
against a tide of opposition
was a calamity of bad tim-
ing.
These missteps, nonethe-
less, don’t justify the “You
lie!” hysteria of his opposi-
tion. Emotional excess and a
lack of self-control in the pub-
lic sphere are but two of the
manifestations of our unrav-
eling. Even as Americans lis-
tened to the jobs speech, we
were reminded of the source
of this ambient dysfunction
as tweets flashed across com-
puter screens about a new,
credible terrorist threat.
Though we all pray this
latest alarm is just the result
of nasty chatter, the news
may have been ironically
providential. It reminds us
that we are one people with
a common enemy and that
the cure for hysteria is pur-
pose. Obama tried to outline
one purpose with his jobs
speech and a command to the
Congress — a la Reagan to
Gorbachev — to “Pass This
Bill!” But he likely failed
to reach much beyond the
choir.
Instead of commanding,
Obama seemed bossy. Rather
than inspiring, he came across
as hectoring. This is partly
because Obama was trying to
be something he’s not. He is
not a pot-banging politician,
but reflective and cautious.
Rather than quell the emo-
tional disarray born of fear
and resentment, he pounded
the drum of class warfare. He
shouldn’t expect to see white
flags in response.
As we reflect on the events
10 years ago, it would be
nice if all sides could resolve
to invite America’s better
angels back to the huddle.
Another terrorist attack
would put things in perspec-
tive, all right, but our sur-
vival ultimately depends on
our willingness to marshal
reason and restraint against
the emotional terrorism that
surely will bring us down.
At the risk of sounding
bossy: America, heal thyself.
Please.

Kathleen Parker’s email
address is kathleenparker@
washpost.com.
“If there is no knowledge, there is no understanding; if there is no under-
standing, there is no knowledge.”
— The Talmud
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Saturday, September 10, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
KATHLEEN PARKER
Point
of View
One Year Ago
• There are just some people you can’t tell things. Eric
Schier and Eric Fritz fall into this category. The Rev. Jacob
Gordon told them he had never been in a demolition derby
but might like to try it. The next thing he knew, he had a car
and T-shirts for his supporters. His derby debut is at 5 p.m.
Saturday at the Allen County Fairgrounds.
25 Years Ago — 1986
• Leslie Ann Klaus of Delphos is the winner of the Canal
Days queen contest co-sponsored by the Delphos Chamber of
Commerce and Delphos Jaycees. Connie Ream placed second,
and Sally Spring was third. The contest winner was determined
by contestants selling tickets to raise funds for the two sponsor-
ing organizations.
• When two Delphos men went squirrel hunting recently,
they came home with something more than squirrels. Brothers
Bart and Randy Baldauf found two balloons entangled in
telephone wires near Converse-Roselm Road. Attached to the
balloons were notes from kindergarten students at St. John de
la Salle School in Chicago, Ill. The youngsters in their notes
asked the finders to let them know where the balloons were
found.
• Fort Jennings volleyball team downed the Columbus
Grove Bulldogs in three games 15-7, 9-15 and 15-5. Serve
leaders for Fort Jennings were Karen Lindeman, 18-for-20 and
Laura Broecker, 9-for-9. The team was 52 of 62.
50 Years Ago — 1961
• Elinor Stetler has announced that she will open a dental
laboratory here within the next several days. The Delphos
Dental Laboratory will be located at 155 W. Third St. and will
probably be in operation by Sept. 15. It will serve local and
area dentists. Stetler was a dental assistant to the late Dr. L. B.
Brunk of Lima for ten years and operated the United Dental
laboratory in Lima for 22 years.
• Two exceptionally large tomatoes from the garden of Mrs.
Lawrence Patzer and Mrs. Don Finks are on display in the
window of the Commercial Bank. One weighs three pounds, is
18 inches in circumference and is three and three-fourths inch
high. The other weighs two and three-fourths pounds, is 18
inches in circumference and is three inches high.
• A near capacity crowd was on hand Friday night at the
local stadium to see the Delphos St. John’s Blue Jays open their
1961 football season with a 6-0 win over the highly touted Van
Wert Cougars. Coach Ed Zalar’s Jays outplayed the Van Wert
gridders all the way, but after playing scoreless ball for better
than three quarters of the game, the Jays unleashed a couple of
passes that set up and negotiated the payoff touchdown.
75 Years Ago — 1936
• The annual reunion of the Venedocia male chorus, which
was quite active several years ago under Haydn Morgan’s
leadership, was held recently at Cambrian Hall in Venedocia.
Guest, including the wives of the chorus members, were pres-
ent for the banquet and entertainment. Each year, members of
the chorus, which originally number 33, hold a get-together.
• With the Ohio Kiwanis District convention scheduled for
Oct. 25-28 in Dayton, members of the Delphos Kiwanis Club
are laying plans for attendance, according to Melvin Westrich,
secretary of the local club. Special arrangements are being
made for wives of Kiwanians who take the trip. “See Dayton”
tours, theatre parties, card parties, receptions and entertainment
is scheduled.
• The members of the United Brethren Aid Society and
three guests met Wednesday evening at the home of Mrs.
Jacob Ladd, South Jefferson Street. Mrs. John Tegenkamp,
Mrs. Robert Blythe and Olive Blythe were guests. In two
week, the society will meet with Lillie Harpster, South Pierce
Street.
Bike
riding,
fun &
safety
This
and
That
by HELEN
KAVERMAN
I remember learning to
ride a bicycle – down on
the Mueller Farm. I got on
the bike and Mary Ellen’s
brother pushed me a bit to
get me going. I didn’t get
too far till I fell down and
scratched my elbow. The
stones in the barn yard were
those big ones. Their grand-
pa owned the farm and the
bigger stones were cheaper.
He didn’t ride a bike but
her grandma made the best
sugar cookies and they had
a player piano. What fun
we had!
Our first bike was my
Uncle Irvin’s old one.
We got it after he left
for the U. S. Navy. During
and after World War II any-
thing made of metal was
in short supply. Dad put
his name on a list wher-
ever bikes were sold. My
brother, Nub’s bike came in
first at a store in Van Wert.
It was a nice red Schwinn.
Later my girl’s bike came
it at the Western Auto Store
in Delphos. It was blue and
I was so happy.
Bike riding became one
of my favorite pastimes. My
friends and I spent many
Sunday afternoons out bike
riding. That was before
shorts and slacks were in
fashion. We wore dresses
or skirts and had to be care-
ful that our skirts didn’t get
caught in the chain. Then
pedal pushers came in. Now
they call them capris or
something.
Later I often rode my
bike to work or to the gro-
cery.
As our children were
growing up, they, along with
the neighbor kids, loved to
get on their bikes on the hill
in front of the farm barn.
From there they could coast
almost to the road. There
wasn’t so much traffic back
then.
My grandson Chris and
his wife live in the country
south of Dayton. They have
two sons, 6 and 4. They all
go bike riding, even some
of the long distance riding.
Chris has done a “century”
(100+ miles). Their 6 year
old did an eight-mile ride on
Mackinac Island this sum-
mer and their 3 year old is
learning on a balance bike,
which has two wheels but
no pedals. Kids push the
bike with their feet, sort of
like running while sitting
down. Their youngster man-
aged a mile on that thing on
a bike path. When he wore
out, Chris put him and the
bike in the trailer he pulled
behind his Racer.
The Dayton region has
many bike trails. The Little
Miami path is part of the
Ohio-to-Erie trail that
will connect Cincinnati to
Cleveland via paved paths.
You can almost ride a bike
from Piqua to Cincinnati
and completely avoid rid-
ing on roads, following
the Great Miami. You can
also ride from Columbus to
Cincy without riding on a
road. The Miami-Erie canal
also has some bike trails.
Now I feel the need to get
up on my soap box. Many
bike riders, young and old,
do not know which side of
the road to ride on.
You must ride with the
traffic on the right hand side
of the road. You use the
left side for walking. Last
week, I was coming home
from Ottawa, just after sun-
set. We were driving with
lights on. As I was heading
west on the “back road to
Kalida,” I suddenly saw two
women riding toward me
(on the wrong side of the
road) and two cars coming
toward me in the East bound
side of the road. I did man-
age to put the breaks on in
time but it was pretty scary.
The Delphos police said
there is a problem with bike
riders running red lights and
stop signs. That’s just plain
dangerous. The League of
American Bicyclists has
some steps to follow, which
include: Follow the rules
of the road — ride with
the traffic, obey traffic signs
and red lights; Be visible
with bright colored clothes;
At night use a white front
light and red rear lights or
reflectors; Be predictable
such as riding a straight line
and don’t swerve between
parked cars. Be extra care-
ful at intersections and wear
a helmet. Riding after dark
is dangerous, even if you do
have lights.
NOW! Have Fun! Obey
the rules of the road and
stay safe.
Finally! May I suggest
that you visit the Bicycle
Museum in New Bremen.
It’s a real treat. This collec-
tion contains nearly every
kind of bicycle ever made,
going back as early as 1810.
There is much more to see
in this town, down on Route
66. It is loaded with Miami-
Erie Canal History. You
can’t get lost and you will
discover it to be a real treat.
The fall and winter hours
are:
M – F 11-5
Sat 11-2
Phone 419-629-9249
7 West Monroe St. (St
Rt 274)
New Bremen, OH
45869
Legacy of hysteria
DES MOINES, Iowa
(AP) — Republican Michele
Bachmann’s presidential cam-
paign fell just as quickly as it
rose. Now, she’s looking to
Iowa — at the expense of other
early voting states — to get
back on track.
It’s a strategy of necessity
for the Minnesota congress-
woman. A victory in Iowa this
winter would keep her afloat
in the GOP nomination fight;
a loss would almost certainly
end her bid.
“We know that when
Michele is in Iowa, she
wins,” said Bachmann’s Iowa
campaign chairman, Kent
Sorenson. “If she’s here, she’ll
win Iowa.”
That explains why, start-
ing this weekend, Bachmann
plans to campaign almost
exclusively in the state as she
tries to reassert herself in a
race that’s become a two-can-
didate contest between Texas
Gov. Rick Perry and former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt
Romney.
She’s in a far different posi-
tion than she was earlier this
summer when she entered the
race and seemingly overnight
began hovering atop state and
national public opinion polls.
In August, she rode that wave
of popularity to an Iowa straw
poll victory. But that same
day, Perry became a candi-
date. He quickly filled the role
of the GOP field’s insurgent
outsider, stalled Bachmann’s
momentum and infringed on
her base of support.
Since then, Bachmann has
faced criticism from voters
and activists for appearing too
scripted. She’s also shuffled
her top campaign leadership.
And she found herself eclipsed
in Wednesday’s debate in
California after figuring prom-
inently in previous ones and
winning praise for her poise.
Her newfound strategy calls
for an intense focus on Iowa,
where she already has a strong
organization and a natural
base of support with evangeli-
cal Republicans, home-school
advocates and tea partyers.
The hope among Bachmann
advisers is that an Iowa vic-
tory could propel her to the
South Carolina primary, where
Republican voters resemble
Iowa’s heavy segment of
Christian conservatives. She
spent a chunk of the past
month in the state, as well as
in Florida, courting tea party
activists and other conserva-
tives.
But the renewed focus on
Iowa — she plans to spend
much of the next five months
there — means Bachmann
is likely to bypass Nevada’s
under-the-radar caucuses
and remain scarce in New
Hampshire, where she has
almost no organization in
place for the first-in-the-nation
primary.
There are scheduling obsta-
cles she must contend with
though: Bachmann is making
time for two upcoming debates
in Florida and a previously
scheduled speech to the state
GOP convention in California
next week. Plus, she could be
forced back to Washington on
short notice for votes on emer-
gency jobs measures.
The next few weeks rep-
resent a critical period for
Bachmann. She is hoping to
right her campaign and take
advantage of a time when
Perry is facing heightened
scrutiny that’s certain to come
with more debates this month
and the end of his first fund-
raising quarter at the end of
September.
Bachmann seeks
campaign jolt
If you want to see your kids read
more, let them see YOU read more.
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AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek with all high end amenities..A
Must See, granite counters, sinks, faucets,
showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop in &
pedestal sinks, top brand toilets & sinks.
FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm,
berbers, plush, carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼”
to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry, hickory,
walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine,
marble medallions, laminates. EXTERIOR
DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany, maple, &
cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts, sliding &
patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine, flush,
bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace. TRIM: Casing,
baseboard, crown, chair rail, spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS: Frame, finish, brad, & floor
nailers, air comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT: A-grade pavers &
stone, light fixtures, lock sets, lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., SEPT. 24th @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek with all high end amenities..A
Must See, granite counters, sinks, faucets,
showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop in &
pedestal sinks, top brand toilets & sinks.
FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm,
berbers, plush, carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼”
to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry, hickory,
walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine,
marble medallions, laminates. EXTERIOR
DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany, maple, &
cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts, sliding &
patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine, flush,
bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace. TRIM: Casing,
baseboard, crown, chair rail, spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS: Frame, finish, brad, & floor
nailers, air comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT: A-grade pavers &
stone, light fixtures, lock sets, lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., SEPT. 24th @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek with all high end amenities..A
Must See, granite counters, sinks, faucets,
showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop in &
pedestal sinks, top brand toilets & sinks.
FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm,
berbers, plush, carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼”
to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry, hickory,
walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine,
marble medallions, laminates. EXTERIOR
DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany, maple, &
cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts, sliding &
patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine, flush,
bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace. TRIM: Casing,
baseboard, crown, chair rail, spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS: Frame, finish, brad, & floor
nailers, air comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT: A-grade pavers &
stone, light fixtures, lock sets, lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., SEPT. 24th @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek with all high end amenities..A
Must See, granite counters, sinks, faucets,
showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop in &
pedestal sinks, top brand toilets & sinks.
FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm,
berbers, plush, carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼”
to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry, hickory,
walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine,
marble medallions, laminates. EXTERIOR
DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany, maple, &
cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts, sliding &
patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine, flush,
bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace. TRIM: Casing,
baseboard, crown, chair rail, spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS: Frame, finish, brad, & floor
nailers, air comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT: A-grade pavers &
stone, light fixtures, lock sets, lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., SEPT. 24th @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek with all high end amenities..A
Must See, granite counters, sinks, faucets,
showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop in &
pedestal sinks, top brand toilets & sinks.
FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm,
berbers, plush, carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼”
to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry, hickory,
walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine,
marble medallions, laminates. EXTERIOR
DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany, maple, &
cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts, sliding &
patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine, flush,
bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace. TRIM: Casing,
baseboard, crown, chair rail, spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS: Frame, finish, brad, & floor
nailers, air comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT: A-grade pavers &
stone, light fixtures, lock sets, lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., SEPT. 24th @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek with all high end amenities..A
Must See, granite counters, sinks, faucets,
showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop in &
pedestal sinks, top brand toilets & sinks.
FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm,
berbers, plush, carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼”
to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry, hickory,
walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine,
marble medallions, laminates. EXTERIOR
DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany, maple, &
cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts, sliding &
patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine, flush,
bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace. TRIM: Casing,
baseboard, crown, chair rail, spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS: Frame, finish, brad, & floor
nailers, air comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT: A-grade pavers &
stone, light fixtures, lock sets, lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
Saturday, September 10, 2011 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
www.delphosherald.com
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
8:30-11:30 a.m. — St.
John’s High School recycle,
600 block of East Second
Street.
9 a.m. - noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
Cloverdale recycle at vil-
lage park.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam County
Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
6 p.m. — Middle Point
Village Council meets
Photo submitted
St. John’s High School class of ’61 holds reunion
St. John’s High School class of 1961 held its 50th class reunion on Aug. 27 starting with a mass at St. John’s the Evangelist Catholic Church. Following was a dinner,
entertainment and lots of reminiscing at the Delphos Eagles. Those attending were, front from left, Janice (Spieles) Garlich, Sister Yvonne (Arlene) Fischer, Jack Reis, Marie
(Buettner) Fullerton, John Grone, Bob Sickels, Jerry Hoffman, Joyce (Martin) Ellerbrock, Irma (Carder) Kill and Mike Noonan; row two, Peggy (Gerdeman) Rizor, Edna
(Brinkman) Pelfrey, Alice (Trentman) Hilvers, Doris (Ellerbrock) Tenwalde, Mary Jane (Friemoth) Eversole, Virginia Osting, Lois (Grothouse) Miller, Sister Gail (Dorothy)
Wrasman, Myrna (Bradshaw) Heller and Agnes (Hempfling) Wheeler; row three, Mary Ann (Utrup) Lisk, Carolyn (Merschman) Hardeman, Margaret (Pohlman) Miller,
Velma (Bonifas) Frei, Lois (Trentman) Luersman, Jane Freund, Lois (Gerdeman) Blankemeyer, Mary Kay (Wurst) Stegaman, Jeanne (Schimmoeller) Dickrede, Beverly
(Kemper) Hale, Darlene (Hotz) Hoover, Patricia (Kaverman) Keller, Margie (Etzkorn) Reiter, Carol (Liebrecht) Fischer and Roseanne (Eversole) Roop; row four, Jane
(Kundert) McIntosh, Janice (Pothast) Hoehn, Harry Wallace, Brother Nick (Eugene) Renner, Paul Deters, Jerry Osting, Ron Wittler, Dan Rupert, Greg Gerschutz, Charles
Scherger, Connie (Remlinger) Trounstine, Gus Plumpe and Frances (Wiecher) Scuilli; and back, Tom McCabe, Dave Helmkamp, Dick Odenweller, Arnie Wienken, Deiter
Schnieder, Gary Kimmet, Lew Seffernick, Dave Kill, Joe Seffernick and Father Pat Hanser.
SEPT. 11
Jeff Miller
Daniel L. Hennon
Elenora Ricker
Becky Korte
SEPT 12
Brandon Line
PET CORNER
Bubbles is a young and
playful pit-bull mix that still
needs some training. She’s
friendly with other dogs and
people, and is a very happy
dog that we haven’t found any
issues with.
Corbin is 4 years old and
needs a quiet home that will
give him enough time to adjust
to his true personality.
The following pets are avail-
able for adoption through The
Animal Protective League:
Cats
M, 1 year, orange, gray and
long haired, shots, name Bentley
and Scratch
F, 3 years, multi color, fixed,
long haired, name Gracie, no
other cats
F, 3 years, black
F, 1 year, dark calico
M, F, 2 years, different col-
ors
Kittens
M, F, 6 weeks, orange, black
and white
M, F, 10 months, black and
gray
M, F, 9 weeks, black, calico
Dogs
Schnauzer, 3 years, standard
size, silver, spayed, shots, name
Haley
Schnauzer, 6 years, charcoal
color, fixed and shots, name
Harry
Puppies
Walker Pom Coon Shepherd,
M, 3 months, black and brown,
name Maverick and Rocky
For more information on
these pets or if you are in need
of finding a home for your pet
contact The Animal Protective
League from 9-5 weekdays at
419-749-2976. Donations or
correspondence can be sent to
PO Box 321, Van Wert OH
45891.
The Humane Society of
Allen County has many pets
waiting for adoption. Each
comes with a spay or neuter,
first shots and a heartworm
test. Call 419-991-1775.
Wright State students attain
summer dean’s list
A total of 577 Ohio
students at Wright State
University earned dean’s list
honors during the summer
2011 quarter, based on their
grade point averages.
All students must take
12 or more credit hours and
must have achieved at least
a 3.5 grade point average
to be placed on the dean’s
list.
Those in the list include:
Brittany Piasecki of Fort
Jennings; Tiffany Barber and
Alyssa Etzkorn of Delphos;
Katherine Lammers of
Spencerville; and Chelsea
Baucom and Avery Etzler of
Middle Point.
CAMPUS NOTE
1
6 – The Herald Saturday, September 10, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF
NATURAL RESOURCES
CENTRAL OHIO
Buckeye Lake (Fairfield/
Licking/Perry counties) - As water
temperatures start to cool, hybrid-
striped bass will become more
active; try chicken livers fished on
the bottom or troll spinners along
the north shore from Seller’s Point
to the north boat ramp at SR 79.
Channel catfish are being taken
right now using cut bait on the bot-
tom. Crappies from 9-12 inches
are becoming active; use minnows
and jigs around points, especially
in the east half of the lake.
O’Shaughnessy Reservoir
(Delaware Co.) - This 912-acre
site north of Columbus is a good
place to catch largemouth bass
and channel catfish. For large-
mouths, try tubes, spinner baits
and crankbaits around shoreline
cover, targeting drop-offs and
points. Channel catfish can be
caught on cut baits, nightcrawlers
and shrimp fished on the bottom.
Crappies are also being caught
around woody cover using min-
nows and jigs.
NORTHWEST OHIO
Metzger and Ferguson reser-
voirs (Allen Co.) - These two are
side-by-side on the east side of
Lima. Some really nice yellow
perch are being caught in both. At
Ferguson, try fishing the drop-off
on the south bank at
the bottom under slip
bobbers. At Metzger,
the best location is on
the edge of “the hump”
while drifting, casting,
or simply still-fishing
in 18-22 feet of water;
spikes or waxworms
has been the best for
yellow perch. Anglers
using wax worms or
nightcrawlers have
been catching some nice blue-
gill using the same method. In
Ferguson, anglers are catching
crappies all over the lake using
wax worms and minnows.
Oxbow Lake (Defiance Co.) -
This lake is located on the Oxbow
Lake Wildlife area northwest of
Defiance just off of SR 15. Bluegill
are being caught using redworms
under a slip bobber while still-
fishing in 8-10 feet of water.
NORTHEAST OHIO
Mosquito Lake (Trumbull
Co.) - Like a flick of a light
switch, we have gone from sum-
mer to fall temperatures. Those
late-night lows and cooler daytime
temperatures are a perfect recipe
for triggering the fall crappie bite.
Individuals have found recent suc-
cess fishing for crappie here; cast-
ing jigs and minnows have proven
to be the meal ticket. The best bet
for catching crappie right now is
to fish in deeper water but as the
temperature continues to decline,
the crappie will move shallower.
Portage Lakes (Summit Co.)
- Turkeyfoot Lake, one of the
many lakes that make up the
Portage Lakes, has once again
turned on the sunfish bite. Nice
size Redear are being caught with
a pinmin tipped with a wax worm
under a slip bobber in 6-8 feet of
water. “Eater-sized” bluegill are
also being caught by fly anglers
using small poppers and dry flies
mimicking mosquitoes in the eve-
nings.
SOUTHEAST OHIO
Salt Fork Lake (Guernsey
Co.) - Catfish opportunities for
both channel cats and flatheads
should be plentiful right now after
the recent rainfall; try targeting
any of the tributaries that flow
into the lake with chicken liv-
ers, nightcrawlers, or cut shad.
Largemouths can also be caught
but you may have to bring some
patience; they prefer top-water
plugs, even though they will take
a plastic worm or artificial lure.
Use the “twitch and wait” method
— cast the plugs, let it lie on top of
the water and occasionally twitch
the bait.
Lake Logan (Hocking Co.) -
Largemouths may be caught in
the early evening on a variety of
top-water plugs, flies, crayfish, or
plastic worms. Saugeye fishing
should begin to pick up here as
water temperatures begin to drop;
the area near the beach in the early
evening is best. Use lead-head
jigs dressed with 3-inch twisters
tipped with a minnow for best
results.
Lake White (Pike Co.) - This
333-acre lake is part of Lake
White State Park but most of
the shoreline is privately-owned.
Anglers with a boat will have bet-
ter opportunities to get to the inlet
area where channel catfish and
flatheads can be found; target the
area where Pee Pee Creek dumps
into the lake with chicken livers,
crayfish and nightcrawlers.
SOUTHWEST OHIO
Buck Creek State Park (Clark
Co.) - Channel catfish are being
caught using chicken livers, cut
bait or earthworms; Fish the bait
slowly along the bottom and into
deep pools. Fishing is good near
the mouth of Buck Creek; Keep
the bait greater than 10 feet deep.
Cowan Lake (Clinton Co.) -
Channel catfish are
being caught using
chicken livers, cut
bait, shrimp or earth-
worms. Cast from the
pier area; Kep the bait
off of the bottom and
about 3-6 feet deep.
OHIO RIVER
Meldahl Dam
area (Clermont Co.) -
Anglers are reporting
steady fishing, with
catches of gar, catfish and a few
white bass. Daylight hours until
dusk have been producing good
numbers but early evening until
dawn have been good for catfish;
try chicken liver and cut shad.
Belmont County - Smallmouth
bass fishing will begin to pick
up as temperatures decrease and
water levels increase; anglers cast-
ing for smallies have done well
casting into areas of current, espe-
cially in rocky areas using a vari-
ety of artifiical baits or minnows.
Anglers have been catching 12- to
15-inch channel catfish by tight-
lining off the shore using a hook
and sinker baited with cut bait or
nightcrawlers.
LAKE ERIE
Daily Bag Limit Regulations
to Remember: Lake Erie walleye
- 6 fish, with the minimum size
limit of 15 inches; Yellow perch
- 30 fish per angler on all Ohio
waters of Lake Erie; Steelhead - 2
fish per angler; Lake Erie black
bass (largemouth and smallmouth)
- 5 fish and a minimum size limit
of 14 inches.
Western Basin: Walleye fish-
ing remained slow over the past
week. Some reports came from
the reef complex, from N of West
Sister Island, NW of Gull Island
Shoal and N of Kelleys Island.
Fish have been caught by trolling
with divers and spoons, on inline
weights with worm harnesses, as
well as by casting mayfly rigs or
drifting with bottom-bouncers and
worm harnesses. ... Yellow perch
fishing continues to be good. The
best areas have been W of West
Sister Island around the gravel
pit, NE of the turnaround buoy
of the Toledo shipping channel,
around “B” can of the Camp Perry
firing range, SW of South Bass
Island, between Kelleys Island
and South Bass Island, N of North
Bass Island and N of Lucy’s Point;
anglers are using spreaders with
shiners fished near the bottom.
FISHING REPORT

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 10,992.13 -303.68
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,467.99 -61.15
S&P 500 INDEX 1,154.23 -31.67
AUTOZONE INC. 314.49 -1.61
BUNGE LTD 62.52 -1.26
EATON CORP. 38.66 -1.10
BP PLC ADR 36.00 -1.08
DOMINION RES INC 47.19 -0.96
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 36.80 -0.89
CVS CAREMARK CRP 36.50 -0.52
CITIGROUP INC 26.74 -1.24
FIRST DEFIANCE 12.98 +0.08
FST FIN BNCP 14.62 -0.60
FORD MOTOR CO 10.05 -0.29
GENERAL DYNAMICS 59.00 -1.40
GENERAL MOTORS 21.76 -0.72
GOODYEAR TIRE 10.78 -0.46
HEALTHCARE REIT 49.17 -1.38
HOME DEPOT INC. 31.87 -0.59
HONDA MOTOR CO 29.67 -0.89
HUNTGTN BKSHR 4.60 -0.21
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 63.64 -1.31
JPMORGAN CHASE 32.08 -1.43
KOHLS CORP. 42.60 -1.27
LOWES COMPANIES 18.96 -0.62
MCDONALDS CORP. 85.03 -3.58
MICROSOFT CP 25.74 -0.48
PEPSICO INC. 59.99 -1.35
PROCTER & GAMBLE 61.84 -1.07
RITE AID CORP. 1.07 -0.03
SPRINT NEXTEL 3.45 0
TIME WARNER INC. 28.89 -0.95
US BANCORP 22.00 -0.86
UTD BANKSHARES 8.50 0
VERIZON COMMS 35.24 -0.14
WAL-MART STORES 51.36 --0.85
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business Sept. 9, 2011
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@
delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Bluffton
mentor Dennis Lee wanted
his football team to get off
to a fast start Friday night
versus Jefferson at Stadium
Park, something they hadn’t
done in their first two wins.
That the Pirates did, scor-
ing the first 20 points of the
contest.
Then they needed to hold
on, getting some big plays
from their special teams and
defense, to secure a 37-22
Northwest Conference tri-
umph.
“We talked about that all
week, how we can’t keep
digging a hole. That was the
best start we could have,”
Lee noted. “We got a 3-and-
out on their first possession
and basically had three short
fields to work with. That
helps an offense a lot.”
The Wildcats (1-2, 1-1
NWC) started at the 20 or
inside their first three posses-
sions and suffered a turnover
sandwiched around a pair of
punts in the process.
The Pirates (3-0, 1-0 NWC)
took advantage of the short
field all three times: a 6-play,
55-yard drive that ended with
a Keshaun Hughes 3-yard
burst over left tackle at the
7:57 mark of the first period;
a 2-play drive that started at
the Delphos 35 when Matt
Gillett recovered a fumble
and culmimated as Hunter
Joseph (14-of-22 passing,
258 yards) went up top to a
wide-open R.J. Stratton (3
grabs, 105 yards) down the
right sideline for a 44-yard
TD toss at 6:20; and a 6-play
drive starting at the host 40
(set up by a 12-yard punt
return by Brandon Deeds)
that was finished on a 3-yard
bull run by Jeremy Basinger
at 1:24.
Matt Deter added the con-
version on the first two drives
and the third never got off,
leaving a 20-0 Pirate edge.
“They got us right off the
bat. We had just too slow
a start; field position killed
us early,” Jefferson coach
Bub Lindeman began. “We
felt coming in that could be
a major part of this game.
Overall, our special teams
hurt us; that is something
we’ll look at the film about
and see what changes we
need to make.”
The Wildcats finally got
something going, keyed by
a 37-yard kick return by
sophomore Zavier Buzard
to the 40. They drove the
field in 10 plays, getting a
personal foul facemask on a
4th-and-14 at the Pirate 27
to set up the scoring play. At
the Bluffton 14, senior Curtis
Miller (18 rushes, 96 yards)
took a toss off left tackle and
simply shook off attempted
tacklers on his way to the
end zone. However, the extra
point by Quentin Wessell was
blocked, keeping the score at
20-6 at the 8:32 mark of the
second.
The visitors replied,
thanks to a 50-yard kickoff
runback by Stratton, with a
7-play, 27-yard sequence. At
the 12, Noah Stratton took
an option pitch from Joseph
to the right side, sped to the
pylon and dove over the goal
line. Deter’s kick made it
27-6 at 6:07.
Back came the Wildcats,
buoyed by Buzard’s 42-yard
return and a personal foul on
the visitors to begin at the
Pirate 33. Two plays later at
the 20, sophomore signalcal-
ler Austin Jettinghoff (10-of-
17 passing, 135 yards) rolled
left, stopped and popped
to a wide-open classmate,
Ross Thompson, in the left
side of the end zone. On the
spread extra point, the holder,
Thompson, rolled right and
found senior Shayn Klinger
in the back of the end zone,
reducing the deficit to 27-14
at 4:44 of the second.
Bluffton retaliated with
a 7-play, 61-yarder. Joseph
found R.J. Stratton for 35 on
a third-and-3 and finished it
off with a 1-yard sneak inside
left guard at 1:20. Deter made
it 34-14.
Jefferson tried to answered
but a holding penalty and a
late interception by Christian
Lane Montgomery sealed the
half.
Bluffton looked for the
dagger to start the second
half, starting from its 30 and
driving to the Delphos 12
in seven plays. However,
Joseph tried for Stratton on a
jump ball in the left corner of
the end zone but senior Tony
George outfought him for the
pick.
That jump-started a 9-play
journey, seven of them rush-
es by Miller (34 yards). The
other two were a Jettinghoff
throw to Wessell (17 yards)
and a George reverse pass to
Klinger (4 grabs, 68 yards)
for 29. Miller finished it off
with a 3-yard run off right
tackle where he virtually
walked in. On the spread EP,
Thompson again rolled right
and found Klinger in the back
of the end zone for a 34-22
deficit with 3:53 on the third-
period clock.
Bluffton again answered:
an 8-play drive that started
at the 37 and ended on a
31-yard Deter field goal at 57
ticks for a 37-22 lead.
The Wildcats had to go
the long way to reply: an
8-play, 76-yarder, keyed by
a 40-yard jaunt by senior
Braxton Hammons. At the
Bluffton 2, Miller took a toss
off right tackle and showed
second and even third effort
to get over the line. However,
Wessell’s kick was blocked,
leaving a 37-28 hole with
10:43 remaining.
Jefferson forced a Pirate
punt inside Delphos space,
pinning them at their 10 with
7:16 left. They used up 15
plays but on 4th-and-16 at
the Bluffton 36, Jettinghoff,
sacked six times (minus-48
yards), was hurried into an
incomplete pass.
Jefferson again forced a
punt but had to go 63 yards
in a hurry (with no timeouts)
in 1:11. A pass interference
penalty (including a loss of
down) pushed them back
and a 4th-and-29 completion
was far too short, ending the
comeback.
“We can’t spot a team like
Bluffton 20 points. However,
I was proud of the effort we
gave in coming back and
getting close,” Lindeman
added. “We’re a young team
learning on the fly; those are
things that you have to expe-
rience. Our offense did a nice
job once it got going. Our
defense just struggled to stop
them consistently.”
Jefferson visits Allen East
Friday.
“We had a chance to really
pout the game away. Hunter
made some nice decisions but
he also missed some open
receivers the second half,”
Lee added. “Those are areas
we have to clean up. Our
defense has struggled but
has made big plays, as it did
tonight.”
Bluffton hosts Crestview
Friday.
Pirates hold on after fast start vs. Wildcats
Jefferson senior tailback Curtis Miller shakes off an
arm tackle by Bluffton’s Jacob Nienberg on his way to the
end zone Friday night at Stadium Park. Miller ran for 96
yards and three scores but it was not enough as the visiting
Pirates grabbed a 37-22 triumph.
Tom Morris photo
BLUFFTON 37, JEFFERSON
22
Bluffton 20 14 3 0 - 37
Jefferson 0 14 8 0 - 22
FIRST QUARTER
BL — Keshaun Hughes 3 run
(Matt Deter kick), 7:57
BL — R.J. Stratton 44 pass from
Hunter Joseph (Deter kick), 6:20
BL — Jeremy Basinger 3 run
(kick failed), 1:24
SECOND QUARTER
DJ — Curtis Miller 14 run (kick
blocked), 8:32
BL — Noah Stratton 12 run
(Deter kick), 6:07
DJ — Ross Thompson 20 pass
from Austin Jettinghoff (Shayn
Klinger pass from Thompson), 4:44
BL — Joseph 1 run (Deter kick),
1:20
THIRD QUARTER
DJ — Miller 3 run (Klinger pass
from Thompson), 3:53
BL — Deter 31 field goal, :57
FOURTH QUARTER
DJ — Miller 2 run (kick blocked),
10:43
TEAM STATS
Bluffton Jefferson
First Downs 15 19
Total Yards 325 320
Rushes-Yards 2 9 - 6 7
45-156
Passing Yards 258 164
Comps.-Atts. 1 4 - 2 2
11-18
Intercepted by 1 1
Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1
Penalties-Yards 4 - 4 9
5-43
Punts-Aver. 2 - 3 1 . 5
2-36.5
INDIVIDUAL
BLUFFTON
RUSHING: Joseph 8-23,
Basinger 8-20, Hughes 10-17, N.
Stratton 2-16, R. Stratton 1-(-)9.
PASSING: Joseph 14-22-258-
1-1.
RECEIVING: Jacob Nienberg
4-55, R. Stratton 3-105, Brandon
Deeds 3-46, Matt Gillett 2-19, N.
Stratton 1-20, Basinger 1-18.
JEFFERSON
RUSHING: Miller 18-96, Braxton
Hammons 5-56, Quentin Wessell
5-19, Zavier Buzard 1-2, Team 1-(-
)5, Austin Jettinghoff 15-(-)7.
PASSING: Jettinghoff 10-17-
135-1-1, Tony George 1-1-29-0-0.
RECEIVING: Klinger 4-68,
George 2-35, Wessell 2-27,
Thompson 1-20, Buzard 1-8, Evan
Neubert 1-8.
By Jim Cox
Times Bulletin
Correspondent
sports@timesbulletin.com
SPENCERVILLE -
Spencerville rushed for 333
yards in a 62-27 rout of
Allen East Friday night. The
Bearcats are now 2-1 overall
and 1-1 in the Northwest
Conference. The Mustangs
are 0-3 and 0-2.
Spencerville senior Niko
Molina had a career night
with 172 yards on 14 car-
ries and four touchdowns.
Molina’s first score put the
’Cats up 6-0 with 10:43 left
in the first quarter, when he
blocked a Mustang punt and
ran it to the house from 45
yards out. Senior Zach Gay
booted the PAT to make it
7-0.
Molina’s 35-yard run
with 7:04 remaining in the
first period upped the margin
to 13-0 and Gay’s PAT made
it 14-0.
Sophomore Ross Stewart
was the Mustangs’ work-
house, toting the ball 33
times for 93 yards and one
TD. He also caught a scoring
pass from junior quarterback
Casey Crow to get Allen
East on the scoreboard at the
4:50 mark of the first quar-
ter. The point-after kick by
junior Austin Lloyd got the
Mustangs back in it at 14-7.
However, a 13-yard
Molina TD run, a 9-yard
scamper by Bearcat junior
quarterback Derek Goecke
and Goecke’s 2-point con-
version run had the home
team up 28-7 after the first
12 minutes.
Stewart’s 11-yard scoring
run and Lloyd’s PAT kick
pulled the visitors within
28-14 with 4:49 remaining
in the second quarter; that’s
where it stayed until early
in the third period. Goeke’s
15-yard sweep and Gay’s
kick upped the spread to
35-14 with 11:08 showing
on the clock.
Allen East gave it one last
shot and pulled within 35-20
on a 4-yard scoring toss from
Crow to sophomore Evan
Thomas with 7:10 left in the
third.
The ’Cats erased all doubt
shortly thereafter, however,
getting two more TDs in
the third period, one on an
11-yard run by senior Austin
Lotz, another on a 38-yard
scamper by Molina. Gay
kicked both PATs and it was
49-20 after three.
Molina added a 43-yard
TD early in the fourth
period (PAT missed) and
senior Daniel Binkley
returned a punt 64 yards
for Spencerville’s last score
(PAT by Gay). Binkley also
had two interceptions in the
game.
Lotz also had a good day
with 17 carries, 104 yards
and a TD. Goeke scored two
times and only threw one
pass (which was dropped) in
the game.
Allen East totalled 254
yards in the game -- 153
rushing and 101 passing.
Crow hit on 7-of-14 passes
for two TD’s.
Spencerville hosts
Paulding Friday, while Allen
East brings in Jefferson.
Scoring Summary:
1st Quarter -
10:43 - SV - Niko Molina -
Blocked punt return - 45 yards. PAT
kick - Zach Gay. 7-0, SV.
7:04 - SV - Molina - 35-yard
run. PAT kick - Gay. 14-0, SV.
4:50 - AE - Ross Stewart -
5-yard pass from Casey Crow. PAT
kick - Austin Lloyd. 14-7, SV.
2:24 - SV - Molina - 13-yard
run. PAT kick missed. 20-7, SV.
0:00 - SV - Derek Goeke -
9-yard run. PAT run - Goeke. 28-7,
SV.
2nd Quarter -
4:49 - AE - Stewart - 11-yard
run. PAT kick - Lloyd. 28-14, SV.
3rd Quarter -
11:08 - SV - Goeke - 15-yard
run. PAT kick - Gay. 35-14, SV.
7:10 - AE - Evan Thomas -
4-yard pass from Crow. PAT kick
missed. 35-20, SV.
3:57 - SV - Austin Lotz - 11-yard
run. PAT kick - Gay. 42-20, SV.
2:15 - SV - Molina - 38-yard
run. PAT kick - Gay. 49-20, SV.
4th Quarter -
11:08 - SV - Molina - 43-yard
run. PAT kick missed. 55-20, SV.
8:49 - SV - Daniel Binkley -
64-yard punt return. PAT kick -
Gay. 62-20, SV.
3:36 - AE - Lloyd - 1-yard run.
PAT kick - Lloyd. 62-27, SV.
Bearcats run over Mustangs in NWC rout
FOOTBALL ROUNDUP
Grove edges Ada in NWC
By Charlie Warnimont
Delphos Herald Correspondent
COLUMBUS GROVE — In
a second half where offense ruled
play, Columbus Grove needed to
make just one play on defense to
beat Ada.
While it didn’t look good after
Ada ripped off three straight first
downs to start their final possession,
Columbus Grove was able to get the
job done.
Colin Grothaus stepped in front
of a Konnor Baker pass late in the
fourth quarter that sealed the host
Bulldogs’ slim 34-33 win over Ada
in a Northwest Conference battle at
Clymer Stadium. Columbus Grove
is now 2-0 in conference play and
3-0 overall, while Ada slipped to 1-1
in the conference and 2-1 overall.
Columbus Grove had taken a
34-33 lead when Connor Kohls
nailed an extra point after Derek
Rieman hauled in a 15-yard scor-
ing strike from Jordan Travis on a
fourth-down play with 3:05 left. The
scoring pass came after the Bulldogs
drove to the Ada 12 with eight
straight runs as Wade Heffner and
Trent Kerns shared the duties. On
third down, the Bulldogs just missed
taking the lead when a pass in the
end zone glanced off the fingertips
of a Bulldog receiver.
Ada took possession on their
own 22 after the kickoff and went to
work as Baker hit Jacob Ansley with
a pass for 13 yards before taking off
on an 11-yard run. After an 11-yard
pickup by Micah Roberson, Ada
appeared to hit a big play as Kellen
Decker took a pass and rambled 25
yards to the Columbus Grove 19.
The play was called back for a block
See ROUNDUP, page 7
1
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Saturday, September 10, 2011 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@
delphosherald.com
St. John’s has endured
two very tough losses to start
the 2011 gridiron
season, including
last week’s hard-
fought 14-7 loss to
Michigan Division
I power Detroit
Central Catholic.
Despite that, the
Blue Jays of head
coach Todd Schulte
are confident head-
ing into tonight’s
Midwest Athletic
Conference lid-lift-
er with Minster at
Stadium Park.
“We’ve had a great week
of practice. That is reassuring
as a coach that the kids have
responded as well as they
have,” Schulte noted. “When
you look at last week, the
kids showed a lot of grit and
toughness in a very physical
game against a much bigger
opponent. We played well
and played with great effort.
Now, all we have to do is
match that grit and toughness
with execution.”
However, the Jays will be
minus starting senior quar-
terback Alex Clark (9-of-28
passing, 156 yards, 1 TD, 3
picks; 15 rushes, 57 yards),
out at least 3-4 weeks (“best-
case scenario”), with junior
Mark Boggs (2-of-4 pass-
ing, 10 yards) now under
center. Jordan Bergfeld (17
rushes, 96 yards, 2 TDs) and
Tanner Calvelage (4 grabs,
104 yards, 1 score),
amongst others, will
have to pick up the
slack for an offense
averaging 10.5
points per game.
They are also
facing a 2-0 Minster
team that is bal-
anced offensively
and active defen-
sively.
“One thing that
concerns me the
most is their bal-
ance; they mix in
the run and pass very well
to keep you honest. Two
guys that stand out the most
are Adam Niemeyer and
Daniel Gusching,” Schulte
explained. “Niemeyer started
against us as a freshman —
he was injured last year —
and he has a lot of poise and
calmness back there in the
pocket; that is perfect for an
offense. Gusching goes 6-3,
217 and he is a multi-purpose
skill player: they line him up
outside, at running back and
even as the ‘Wildcat’ quarter-
back and he runs downhill.
“Defensively, they are
very active at linebacker;
those guys are flowing hard
to the ball, so our line has
to get to them off the dou-
ble teams. Their defensive
line throws a lot of stunts
at you, which is something
we haven’t faced this year,
so that has been a
big focus of our
line practice this
week.”
With sophomore
Tyler Jettinghoff
(14 solos, 8 assists)
stepping into a
starting linebacker
spot for Boggs (1
and 4), the Jays’
other linebackers,
Brett Schwinnen
(13 and 12) and
Kyle Neumeier (10
and 12), as well
as Garth Lucius (6 and 9),
Logan Looser (6 and 8) and
Ryan Densel (6 and 7), will
also be called upon to help a
‘D’ ceding 17.5 points.
The Wildcats of Nate
Moore have continued the
success of their regional-final
run of a year ago.
“It’s all about leader-
ship. We had a heck of a
senior class last year that led
by example and this year’s
senior class has picked up the
mantle from those guys. They
have become more vocal and
stepped up as far as showing
the younger kids how it’s
done,” Moore acknowledged.
“We have always tried to
be balanced offensively but
the running game has been
strong so far; you go with
what’s working. We have a
good line to lead the way
— four of the five starters
are back from last
year — and we
have good backs in
Daniel (Gusching),
Korey Schultz and
Troy Kauffman that
run hard.”
Two of those
senior leaders: two-
way linemen Ryan
Will (6-2, 198,
senior) and Clay
Bornhorst (6-3,
217, senior) are
the acknowledged
standard-bearers for
Minster so far this season.
However, with the Jays
at 0-2, Moore figures his
Wildcats will see a team
playing like crazy.
“They are the best 0-2
team in the state, especially
in the smaller-school divi-
sions. They have played two
excellent teams and lost by a
total of 14 points,” he added.
“Their backs are a little bit
against the wall right now but
with the MAC starting, it’s a
new season for them. Coach
Schulte will have them ready
to go and I expect we will
face their best effort.”
Kickoff tonight is 7:30
p.m.
Blue Jays seek 1st grid win of 2011
Calvelage
Bergfeld
Roundup (continued from Page 6)
By MALLORY KEMPER
The Delphos Herald
mkemper2011@
hotmail.com

KALIDA – Kalida scored
two goals versus Ft. Jennings
on a wet Friday night at
Kalida Soccer Stadium dur-
ing a Putnam County League
matchup, grabbing a rug-
ged 2-0 girls soccer duel to
stay undefeated in the PCL.
Kalida stands at 4-0-1, 2-0
(PCL), while the Musketeers
are 3-2, 1-2 (PCL).
The shots on-goal were
almost even as Kalida had
seven, compared to Ft.
Jennings nine. Particularly
effective were senior Nicole
Kaufman, junior Summer
Holtkamp and freshman
Jackie Gardner for the
Wildcats.
“We had a very hard-
fought game tonight and
we were fortunate enough
to come out with a win,”
Kalida coach David Kehres
said. “We are undefeated
in the league and with our
last three games, we played
quality opponents (Wauseon,
Miller City, Ft. Jennings)
and we survived.”
It took less than five
minutes for the home team
to crack the scoreboard.
Kaufman had almost a per-
fect corner kick right to the
middle where Gardner used
her head to give the Wildcats
a 1-0 lead as Kelsey Von
Lehmden (5 saves) tried to
save it but came up short.
Junior Emily McElroy
had the next big attempt;
a 10-yard laser at 36:14
that Jennings’ goalie Von
Lehmden deflected to stop
another Kalida goal.
At the 15:25 mark, Ft.
Jennings had their only good
look at the goal the first
half. Sophomore Ashley
Gable made a nice move
to get an open look to her
teammate, Macy Schroeder,
who shot on the left side
from about four yards out,
but Kalida’s goalie, Erika
Brinkman (9 saves) came up
with the save.
“I think we are pretty
much equal,” Ft. Jennings
coach Rodney Wagner stat-
ed. “We just couldn’t get
any good shots at the goal.”
The second half began
in the Musketeers’ favor as
Wildcats’ senior speaking
captain Kaufman went down
hard the first half with an
injury.
“I told the girls during
halftime that they need to
put everything in the back
of their mind and come out
mentally tough the second,”
Kehres explained.
As the second half began,
both teams came out ready
to play defensively as the
first shot on-goal didn’t
come until the 26:58 mark
when Schroeder got an
attempt at the goal from
about eight yards out but
couldn’t score.
Gardner was wide open
just outside the goalie box
when she attempted a shot at
the goal but the ball bounced
off the post and Holtkamp
was right there to score from
about four yards out on the
left, while VonLehmden was
controlling the right side of
the net.
“The second half, we
really showed how mental-
ly tough we are,” Kehres
added. “We fought hard
and Jennings was pressur-
ing to get that goal back but
our defense came ready to
play.”
The visitors had two more
attempts at the goal; howev-
er, senior keeper Brinkman
stopped every effort from
the Musketeers.
“It was a hard-fought
PCL game and Kalida has
a good team but I think we
outplayed them,” Wagner
added. “We just didn’t get
the goals and they did.”
Again, Kehres concurred:
“I couldn’t be prouder of our
team. We played very well
tonight and I am excited to
come away with the vic-
tory.”
Kalida is at Jennings
against Jefferson Monday,
while the Musketeers travel
to Crestview Thursday.
Kalida gets PCL win
over Jennings girls
in the back as Ada suddenly
found themselves back near mid-
field. On the next play, Baker
dropped back and threw a pass
downfield that Grothaus picked
off at the Bulldog 25. From there,
Columbus Grove took a knee three
times to run out the remaining time
on the clock.
“Before that last drive, we told
our kids just make one play and we
will win this football game and they
did,” Columbus Grove coach Scott
Palte said. “We were fortunate. This
was a heck of a win. They have
two great athletes in their backfield
and we didn’t tackle well at times
tonight. And Derek made a heck of
a catch in the endz one to score. We
have a good quarterback and our
game plan tonight was to run the
ball. We thought that was our best
option but we have guys that can
catch the ball and throw it; we made
that one play there that won the ball
game for us.”
While the game was billed as
a matchup between the Bulldogs’
running game and Ada’s passing,
both teams took advantage of tiring
defenses in the second half to break
off long runs. Columbus Grove fin-
ished the night with 314 yards on
the ground as they were led by
Grothaus with 111 yards on 14 car-
ries, Heffner had 109 yards on 14
carries and Kerns 102 yards on 20
caries. Ada finished the night with
239 rushing yards as Decker had
140 yards on 16 carries and Baker
95 yards on 20 attempts.
Baker did not disappoint in the
passing department as he was 11-of-
22 passing for 244 yards with three
touchdowns. However, he did throw
two picks, one in the end zone in the
first quarter.
Ada opened the scoring as they
took the opening kickoff and drove
95 yards to take a 6-0 lead as Decker
scored on a 23 yard run.
The Ada defense then held the
Bulldogs on downs as a fake punt
attempt near midfield by Grove
came up short. Ada’s offense went
back to work, driving to the Grove
15. On first down from the 15 Baker
dropped back and threw a pass over
the middle that was picked off by
Travis.
Columbus Grove took advantage
of the mistake and drove 92 yards to
tie the game at 6-6 as Kerns scored
on a 21-yard run.
Ada came right back with a
2-play scoring drive as Ansley
caught the first of his three touch-
down passes taking a pass and going
40 yards to the end zone. The extra
point made it 13-6.
Columbus Grove came right
back to tie the game at 13-13 with
an 11-play scoring drive. The drive
was kept alive by a pass interfer-
ence call on Ada after it appeared
Columbus Grove had been stopped
on downs. Dakota Vogt scored on
a 1-yard run.
Although the game was an offen-
sive showcase, the Bulldog defense
came up big right before halftime as
they made a goalline stand against
Ada at the 3-yard line. Ada drove
there but three running plays were
unable to get the Bulldogs any closer
to the goalline. On fourth down, a
Baker pass was just out of the reach
of one of his receivers in the corner
of the end zone.
Columbus Grove came out of
the locker room and appeared ready
to take their first lead as Heffner
returned the second-half kickoff to
the Ada 16. Columbus Grove was
unable to take advantage of the field
position as Travis was sacked on a
fourth-down pass play.
Ada needed just two plays to get
the lead as Ansley (4 catches, 156
yards) hauled in a Baker pass and
went 79 yards to put Ada up. The
extra point missed, giving Ada a
19-13 lead.
See ROUNDUP, page 8
2
8– The Herald Saturday, September 10, 2011
www.delphosherald.com
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Have a
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I am going to have Mr. David
Boninsegna shot, put to the rack,
drawn and quartered, burned at the
stake and beheaded (pretty serious-
ly, ain’t I?) already for his 8-4 mark
last week in the opening salvo of the
Pigskin Picks — versus the horrible,
horrific, terrible and even mediocre
5-7 put together by Guest Picker
Brian Bassett and myself.
This is all good-natured fun,
isn’t it???
This week, the professionals
weigh in for opening week.
Brian returns for his second
installment.
Again, he can hardly contain his
excitement!!
COLLEGE: Mississippi State
at Auburn; Alabama at Penn State;
South Carolina at Georgia; Notre
Dame at Michigan; BYU at Texas;
California at Colorado.
PROS: Cincinnati at Cleveland;
Pittsburgh at Baltimore; New York
Giants at Washington; Dallas at
New York Jets; Atlanta at Chicago;
Oakland at Denver (Monday).
JIM METCALFE
College:
AUBURN: Tigers gave up a lot of
points last week in near-disastrous loss
to Utah State, while MSU
blew out Memphis. This is
not the Memphis Tigers.
I imagine the Auburn
defense got a good talking
to this week in practice
and they respond with
much better performance.
PENN STATE: Both
teams had cupcakes to
open the season, so the
opening week is no indi-
cation. Nittany Lions were
embarrassed last year in
Tuscaloosa. I expect a stronger perfor-
mance in Happy Valley this year and
am going with an upset special.
SOUTH CAROLINA: Gamecocks
also gave up a lot of points to the
Pirates of East Carolina, though the
offense scored a ton. Steve Spurrier
has built a solid defense at the Other
USC, so I anticipate a bounceback in
spades. Bulldogs did nothing against
Boise State at “home”. This one is
Between the Hedges in Athens but
Spurrier’s defense comes up big in
road “W”.
NOTRE DAME: I don’t know
how good ND will be with new QB
Tommy Rees, though he started when
Dane Crist got hurt last fall. The
judgement is still out on how good
Wolverines’ defense will be this year.
Expect a wild, high-scoring Saturday
night (the first one ever at The Big
House) but Irish will find a lot easier
offense this week. One piece of advice
for the Irish ‘D’ this week; tackle
Robinson by the hair!!!
TEXAS: BYU edged past Ole
Miss last week, while UT bopped
Rice. Longhorns are seeking come-
back from disastrous 2010. UT will
have too much talent, speed and ath-
leticism for Cougars to handle, though
it could be another close one in Austin.
CALIFORNIA: Golden Bears got the
best of Fresno State, while Buffaloes
were doubled up by Hawaii. California
gets the “leftovers” from the talent-rich
state after USC, UCLA and Stanford
get their pick, which means they are
pretty good. Perhaps Dan Hawkins
shouldn’t have left Boise for Boulder!
Pros:
BALTIMORE: At some point, age
will creep up on the Steelers’ defense
— unless Mike Tomlin has discovered
the Fountain of Youth. The Ravens’
‘D’ is also showing some age, espe-
cially Ray Lewis. I think Joe Flacco is
the key here; my guess is his maturity
should help Baltimore get a huge vic-
tory over hated archrivals from The
Steel City in a 21-17 classic.
NEW YORK GIANTS: It’s not
that G-Men are that great, though their
defense should be just fine. It’s that
the Redskins are in such disarray. Rex
Grossman ain’t the answer under cen-
ter, period, and their stars on defense
are getting long in the tooth.
NEW YORK JETS: I am not sure
how Tony Romo will rebound
from injury-plagued 2010,
especially behind a question-
able offensive line against this
loaded-for-bear Jets’ defense.
Cowboys have secondary
issues, so Mark Sanchez
should do well, especially
with an upgraded receiver
corps. It kills me to pick the
Jets but Cowboys have some
areas to shore up,
ATLANTA: The Falcons
have a “Bear weather” type
of mentality but Matt Ryan is quickly
becoming in the elite realm of NFL
quarterbacks. Jake Cutler is still a
question mark under center and the
offensive line is rebuilding. Give
“Dirty Birds” a road win in week 1.
DEMVER: Raiders have Jason
Campbell at quarterback and Darren
McFadden at tailback against a
revamped — and should be much
better — Broncos defense under
Wade Phillips (he CAN coach a 3-4
defense!). Kyle Orton/Tim Tebow are
operating with better personnel behind
a better offensive line. Broncos want
payback after two humiliating losses
last year in one of NFL’s fiercest
rivalries.
DAVE BONINSEGNA
COLLEGE:
Mississippi State: Auburn barely
survived its season-opener against
Utah State; the Bulldogs are no Utah
State. Another lackluster effort likely
won’t cut it with Mississippi State
coming to town. Although the Tigers
are the reigning BCS champions, this
is a new team and the Bulldogs are
coming off a romping win. Despite
being at home, I’m going with the
‘Dogs to take the Tigers.
Alabama: The Crimson Tide leads
the Lions in almost every offensive
and defensive category except for
rushing yards but this should be a
passing game; therefore, I’m going to
take the Tide to make it a not-so-happy
time for the folks in Happy Valley.
South Carolina: South Carolina
wasn’t actually impressive in their sea-
son opening with against East Carolina
and Mark Richt was none-too-pleased
with Georgia’s discouraging opening
loss to Bosie State. The Bulldogs need
a win in the worst way on Saturday
and Richt’s Dogs could be
without a key defensive player
Saturday at Sanford Stadium.
As much as I like Georgia, for
the second week in a row, I’m
going with the visitors.
Michigan: This game not
as big as OSU/Michigan but
for the team from “up north”,
it’s number two on their rivalry
list. Michigan will host a night
game for the first time in the
program’s 132-year history.
The Irish turned the ball over five times
against South Florida, while Michigan
beat Western Michigan. If ND wins, it
will be five straight; they need to play
better this week or that won’t happen.
First night game EVER, I think the
intensity will be there for Michigan;
they break the streak and get the win.
Texas: Both teams are 1-0. Last
week, BYU squeaked to a 1-point win,
while Texas pounded Rice, but it was
Rice. This week, a bit tougher oppo-
nent in the Cougars and the Longhorns
are better in every category; it may not
be the pasting they put on last week
but Texas goes to 2-0 after this week.
California: Cal had an easy time
with Fresno last week, while the
Buffaloes looked like they were on
vacation when they traveled to Hawaii
to take on the Warriors or Rainbow
Warriors or whatever they are called
this week. Look for Cal to show
dominance against the much weaker
Buffalo squad.
PROS:
Cleveland: Different year, differ-
ent team, same Bengals. I’m not a fair-
weather fan and am still sticking with
them but the Browns have improved
and the Bengals have not. Cleveland
— not in a blowout but you only have
to win by one.
Baltimore: A great contest but
I really like the Ravens; they and
the Steelers are there every year but
Baltimore seems to have the Steelers’
number.
Washington: The New York
Giants’ offseason probably could not
have gone much worse; they have a
lot of injuries and Jason Tuck is out
on Sunday with a neck injury. The
Washington Redskins’ offseason was
a whole lot better than it was a year
ago; the ’Skins are at home and despite
losing six in a row to the G-men, I’m
taking the Redskins to win in DC. It’s
9/11 and it’s going to be emotional for
each team.
New York Jets: The Jets are
picked by many to go back to the
AFC Championship game for the third
consecutive time; again a game in
New York, another emotional game
on 9/11. After leading the New York
Jets to back-to-back AFC champion-
ship game appearances, Rex Ryan
says he’s more anxious about this
season’s opener than those games. It’s
brother vs. brother with Rex
Ryan going up against Rob
Ryan as Rob will be making
his debut as Dallas Cowboys’
defensive coordinator on the
opposing sideline. The Jets
and Cowboys meet Sunday
night at the newly-renamed
MetLife Stadium in what
figures to be an emotionally-
charged atmosphere on the
10th anniversary of the Sept.
11 attacks. The Jets use the
emotion to take the win.
Atlanta: The Falcons have lost five
straight in Chicago but the Bears still
having some offensive issues and the
Falcons have rectified that problem;
they break the streak and win in the
Windy City.
Denver: The Raiders are always
going to be the Raiders. I like Denver
for no other reason than other than the
Bengals, Oakland is the second-worst
franchise in football.
BRIAN BASSETT
College:
Mississippi State - Chris Rolfe is
this year’s Cam Newton.
Bama - Roll Tide.
South Carolina - Mark Richt is
still there. right? (Editor’s note:
yup!)
Michigan - Someone once told
me Notre Dame used to be good. I
didn’t believe them.
Texas - Can’t be bad too years
in a row.
Cal - Colorado is just plain bad.
Pros:
Cleveland - Two teams going in
opposite directions.
Baltimore - Old but still good
Redskins - Yes, I said Redskins,
Giants taking volunteers for DB.
Jets - Not high on Romo.
Chicago - Will be improved
from a good team last year.
Oakland - Pryor over Tebow.
(Editor’s Note: Pryor unable to
even practice for first 5 games!).
Boninsegna
Metcalfe
Roundup (continued from Page 7)
Columbus Grove came right back
to take the lead as they went 69 yards on
eight running plays as Heffner scored
on a 4-yard run. Kohls’ extra point put
Grove up 20-19.
The teams continued to trade scores
as Ada came back to go up 25-20 as
Ansley hauled in a 24-yard scoring
pass. Columbus Grove answered back
with a scoring drive that was capped off
by a Kerns 6-yard run.
Ada replied to score as Decker
bulled over from a yard out. Ada went
for two points and was successful as
Ansley caught a pass from Baker. That
left the rest of the game up to the
Columbus Grove ground game and one
big defensive play.
Grove visits Lima Central Catholic
Sept. 17.
----
Mauk has way with Cougar
defense
By Brian Bassett
Times Bulletin Sports Editor
sports@timesbulletin.com
VAN WERT - The Van Wert
Cougar football team hosted the Kenton
offensive machine operated by Maty
Mauk Friday night and the high-octane
Wildcat offense was too much for the
Cougars to handle - handing the hosts
a 66-13 Western Buckeye League
defeat.
Mauk - a commit to the University
of Missouri - racked up 542 yards
through the air on 35-of-48 attempts,
while connecting with his receivers for
eight touchdowns.
The scoring started for the Wildcats
on the first play from scrimmage as
Mauk connected on a 58-yard touch-
down pass to Justin Sawmiller (13
grabs, 217 yards) just 19 ticks into the
game - the first of the tandem’s six
touchdown hook-ups on the night.
Van Wert briefly moved the ball
on the Wildcats behind the running
of fullback Austin Reichert but had
to punt. The Wildcat offense took the
ball on their own 20-yard line, then put
together an 80-yard scoring drive, cul-
minated by another Mauk touchdown
pass to Sawmiller - this time for 10
yards - with 8:06 showing.
The pair got together again for a
12-yard touchdown pass with 4:26 left
in the first quarter; a failed 2-point con-
version made the score 20-0, Wildcats.
After Cougar 3-and-out the follow-
ing drive, Mauk again led the Wildcats
down the field to the Cougar 19. The
second quarter started much like the
first for Kenton as they scored on the
first play from scrimmage - a 19-yard
pass for Sawmiller’s fourth consecutive
touchdown reception. Another failed
two-point-conversion made the score
26-0, Kenton, seven seconds into the
quarter.
The Cougars fumbled the ensuing
kickoff return, putting the ball right
back in the hands of Mauk. Kenton
made the Cougars pay, driving 42
yards, connecting with Zach Wolowicz
for a 12-yard touchdown pass. Mauk
was then stopped at the goal-line by a
host of Cougars on the 2-point conver-
sion attempt, making the score 32-0,
Kenton, at 9:25.
The Wildcats added to their lead
with 6:13 left in the second quarter as
Mauk completed an 11-yard touch-
down pass to Noah Furbush, making
the score 38-0.
The Cougar offense briefly moved
the ball the following drive but was
forced to punt.
After taking over on their own
37, the Wildcats drove the field, this
time scoring on a Mauk pass to Kasey
Rollins. The failed conversion left the
score 44-0, Wildcats, with 2:11 left in
the first half.
The first play on the ensuing drive
for the Cougars was a pass which
was intercepted by Kenton’s Kuert
Lautenschlager and taken to the 50-yard
line. Mauk wasted no time finding
the end zone again, finding Sawmiller
again from 30 yards out. A pass to
Kieran Fetter on the conversion made
the score 52-0, Wildcats, with 1:28 to
play in the second quarter.
Van Wert received the ball to start
the second half and following a 1-yard
run on first-and-10, a Lucas Sullivan
68-yard TD run put the Cougars on the
board. Reichert added the PAT, making
the score 52-7, Kenton, at 11:05.
Kenton answered on the ensuing
drive; Mauk and the Wildcats drove
the field and scored as he ran the ball
in from seven yards out. Mauk then
scrambled for the 2-point conversion -
extending the Wildcat lead to 60-7 with
7:25 in the third.
The was all the action Mauk would
see on the night, as Grant Sherman took
over the signal-calling duties the next
Wildcat drive.
Sherman and the Wildcats took
over on the Van Wert 40-yard line later
on and marched down the field for
another score, an 18-yard pass to Colyn
Blackford. The score and a missed con-
version made the score 66-7, Wildcats.
Later in the fourth quarter, Chandler
Adams came in at quarterback to relieve
Cougar starter Tyler Williams. Adams
faked the dive to the right and optioned
left; he took the keeper 50 yards to
the end zone for the Cougars’ second
touchdown of the night at 1:32. Van
Wert could not convert on the conver-
sion attempt, making the score 66-13.
Aside from passing, Mauk ran for
102 yards on 10 carries and one touch-
down.
The Cougars tallied 222 yards on
the ground in the game.
“They did a great job. They run
with the ball, they do a great job of
blocking down field. They make people
miss,” Van Wert coach Bob Priest said.
“I think we’re better than what we
showed tonight. We just didn’t execute;
we didn’t make plays. We will have to
learn from this game and move forward
as there are no easy games in the WBL.
We need to watch the film. There’s a
lot of things we can learn, specifically
offensively.”
Van Wert is at Elida Friday.
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234 N. Canal St.
Delphos, O.
Ph. 692-1010
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Ph. 692-0055
Toll Free 1-800-589-7876
HARTER
& SCHIER
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209 W. 3rd St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
419-692-8055
130 N. MAIN ST.
DELPHOS
PHONE
419-692-0861
•CARPET
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Daily 9-5:30
Sat. 9-4, Sun. 12-4
Vanamatic
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AUTOMATIC
AND HAND
SCREW MACHINE
PRODUCTS
701 Ambrose Drive
Delphos, O.
A.C.T.S.
NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor
Jaye Wannemacher-Worship Leader
Contact: 419-695-3566
Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study with
worship @ ACTS Chapel-8277 German
Rd., Delphos
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For Such A
Time As This” All & Non Denominational
Tri-County Community Intercessory
Prayer Meeting @ Presbyterian Church
(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St. Delphos -
Everyone Welcome.
DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry McKissack
302 N Main, Delphos
Contact: 419-692-0061 or 419-302-6423
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School
(All Ages) , 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service,
6:00 p.m Sunday Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study,
Youth Study
Nursery available for all services.
FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN
310 W. Second St.
419-692-5737
Pastor Harry Tolhurst
Sermon - “Conflict Resolution”
Scripture: Romans 13:8-14,
Matthew 18:15-20
Sunday - Labor Day; 11:00 Worship
Service - Everyone Welcome
Communion first Sunday of every
month.
Communion at Van Crest Health
Care Center - First Sunday of each
month at 2:30 p.m., Nursing Home and
assisted living.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
422 North Pierce St., Delphos
Phone 419-695-2616
Rev. Angela Khabeb
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Rally Sunday;
10:00 a.m. Worship Service, 11:00 a.m.
Pot-Luck Dinner; 6:00 p.m. Council
Meeting
Monday - 7:00 p.m. WELCA Meeting
Wednesday-9:00 a.m. SW Conference
Clergy/Leadership Meeting; 11:00
am Good Morning, Good Shepherd
Meeting
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
“Where Jesus is Healing
Hurting Hearts!”
808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos
One block south of Stadium Park.
419-692-6741
Senior Pastor - Dan Eaton
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - Sunday wor-
ship Celebration @10:30am with Kids
Chruch & Nursery provided; 6:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry at The ROC
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Prayer
Other ministries take place at vari-
ous times. Check out www.delphos-
firstassemblyofgod.com.
DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION
Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish
470 S. Franklin St., (419) 692-9940
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Sunday morning service.
Youth ministry every Wednesday
from 6-8 p.m.
Children’s ministry every third
Saturday from 11 to 1:30.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST
335 S. Main St. Delphos
Pastor - Rev. David Howell
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service

DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH
11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723
Pastor Wayne Prater
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15
a.m. Sunday School for all ages.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service and
prayer meeting.
TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
211 E. Third St., Delphos
Rev. David Howell, Pastor
Week of Sept. 11, 2011
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship Service/
Communion; 9:15 a.m. Adult Sunday
Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship service.
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Spencerville
Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Church School;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
AGAPE FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES
9250 Armstrong Road, Spencerville
Pastors Phil & Deb Lee
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
Wed. - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Independent Fundamental)
Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial
Rt. 2, Box 11550
Spencerville 45887
Rev. Robert King, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday school;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Evening worship and Teens Alive
(grades 7-12).
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible ser-
vice.
Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to preach the
“Word of God?” This is your time to
do it. Come share your love of Christ
with us.
IMMANUEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807
Pastor Gary Rode
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional; 10:45
a.m. contemporary
LIGHT OF LIFE CHAPEL
4680 North Kemp Rd., Elida
Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberling
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Service; 6:30 p.m. Service.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Midweek
Service.
NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER
2240 Baty Road, Elida Ph. 339-5673
Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor
Sunday – 10 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday – 7 p.m. Evening ser-
vice.
CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida
Phone: 339-3339
Rev. Frank Hartman
Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School (all
ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6 p.m.
Evening Service.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer
Meeting.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday,
8-noon, 1-4- p.m.
ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of Zion Church & Conant Rd.,
Elida
Pastors: Mark and D.J. Fuerstenau
Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.
PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH
3995 McBride Rd., Elida
Phone 419-339-3961
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD
Elida - Ph. 222-8054
Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor
Service schedule: Sunday– 10 a.m.
School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 6
p.m. Sunday evening.
FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
4750 East Road, Elida
Pastor - Brian McManus
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship, nursery avail-
able.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Youth
Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Adult
Prayer and Bible Study; 8:00 p.m. -
Choir.
GOMER UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio
419-642-2681
gomererucc@bright.net
Rev. Brian Knoderer
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship
BREAKTHROUGH
101 N. Adams St., Middle Point
Pastor Scott & Karen Fleming
Sunday – Church Service - 10 a.m,
6 p.m.
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
CALVARY EVANGELICAL CHURCH
10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio
419-238-9426
Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor
Sunday, Sept. 10
Sunday-8:45 a.m. Friends and
Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday School
LIVE; 9:55 a.m. 5 til 10 meet you at
the Altar; 10:00 a.m. Worship LIVE;
11:30 Calvary Youth Parents
Monday - 6:30 p.m. Flicker Chicks
Tuesday - 9:30 a.m. Hearth & Home
Ministry
Wednesday - 1:30 p.m. Adult
Prayer & Bible Studay; 6:45 AWANS,
Calvary Youth; 6:45 Women’s Bible
Study
Thursday - 9:30 a.m. Lit ‘n Latte
SALEM UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
15240 Main St. Venedocia
Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor
Church Phone: 419-667-4142
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. - Adult Bell
Choir; 8:45 a.m. Jr. Choir; 9:30
a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. - Sunday
school; 6:30 p.m. - Capital Funds
Committee.
Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.
ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.;
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.;
Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30
a.m. - Communion Service; Friday
8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.
VAN WERT VICTORY
CHURCH OF GOD
10698 US 127S., Van Wert
(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)
Darryl Ramey, Lead Pastor
Chuck Brantley, Executive Pastor
Bryce Cadawallader, Youth
& Assimilations Director
Sunday - 10:00 am Worship Service
& Children’s Ministry
www.vanwertvictorychurch.com
www.acoolchurch.com
419-232-HOPE
TRINITY LUTHERAN
303 S. Adams, Middle Point
Rev. Tom Cover
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.
GRACE FAMILY CHURCH
634 N. Washington St., Van Wert
Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt
Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship with Pulpit Supply.
KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST
15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert
Phone: 419-965-2771
Pastor Chuck Glover
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship
- 10:25 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Prayer and
Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.
Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00 p.m.
Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.
TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH
605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert 45891
Ph: (419) 238-2788
Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage
Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. - Prayer time;
9:00 a.m. Worship, Sunday School,
SWAT, Nursery; Single; 10:30 a.m.
Worship, Nursery, Children’s Church,
Discipleship class; Noon - Lunch
Break; 2:00 p.m. Service for men
at Van Wert Correctional Fac.; 3:00
p.m. Service for women at Van Wert
Correctional Fac., Service at Paulding
jail
Tuesday - 1:00 p.m. - Share, Care,
Prayer Group in Fireside Room;
10-noon - Banquet Table Food
Pantry; 6:30 p.m. Quilting Friends
in Fellowship Hall; 7 p.m. B.R.E.A.L.
Women’s group in Room 108.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Small
groups, Discipleship Series in sanc-
tuary, Christian Life Club, Nursery,
Preschool; 7 p.m. R.O.C.K. Youth; 8
p.m. Worship Team rehearsal.
Thursday - 4-5:30 p.m. Banquet
Table Food Pantry.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Ph. 419-238-0333
Children’s Storyline: 419-238-2201
Email: fbaptvw@bright.net
Pastor Steven A. Robinson
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Family Worship
Hour; 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Hour.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word of Life
Student Ministries; 6:45 p.m. AWANA;
7:00 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study.
MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION
Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
all ages. 10:30 a.m. Worship
Services; 7:00 p.m Worship.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer meet-
ing.
PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH
Pastors: Bill Watson
Rev. Ronald Defore
1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert 45891
Phone (419) 238-5813
Head Usher: Ted Kelly
10:00 a.m. - Sunday School 11:10
a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m. until 11:30
a.m. - Wednesday Morning Bible Class
6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday
Evening Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible
Study.
Thursday - Choir Rehearsal
Anchored in Jesus Prayer Line -
(419) 238-4427 or (419) 232-4379.
Emergency - (419) 993-5855
FAITH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Road U, Rushmore
Pastor Robert Morrison
Sunday – 10 am Church School;
11:00 Church Service; 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening
Service
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA
CATHOLIC CHURCH
512 W. Sycamore, Col. Grove
Office 419-659-2263
Fax: 419-659-5202
Father Tom Extejt
Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00 a.m.;
First Friday of the month - 7 p.m.;
Saturday - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday - 8:30
a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Confessions - Saturday 3:30 p.m.,
anytime by appointment.
CHURCH OF GOD
18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer
419-642-5264 Fax: 419-642-3061
Rev. Mark Walls
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor
7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland
Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Ottoville
Rev. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday - 4 p.m.;
Sunday - 10:30 a.m.

ST. BARBARA CHURCH
160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827
419-488-2391
Fr. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30 p.m.,
Sunday 8:00 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
135 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings
Rev. Joe Przybysz
Phone: 419-286-2132
Mass schedule: Saturday 5 p.m.;
Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL CHURCH
Kalida
Fr. Mark Hoying
Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.
Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m.
Masses.
Weekdays: Masses on Mon., Tues.,
Wed. and Friday at 8:00 am; Thurs.
7:30 p.m.
School Class; 9:15 a.m. Walk with God
Series; 9:30 a.m. Promotion Sunday;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service/Baptism;
11:30 a.m. Radio Worship on WDOH;
1:00 p.m. Jr. High Kick-Off @ Waldick’s;
6:30 p.m. Walk with God @ Middlepoint
UMC Grandparents Sunday
Monday - Office Hours: 8:00-Noon;
6:15 p.m. United Methodist Men’s
Dinner
Tuesday- Office Hours: 8:00-Noon; 3:15
p.m. Walk with God @ Vancrest Asst.
Living; 6:00 Weight Watchers
Wednesday- Office Hours: 8:00-Noon;
7:00 p.m Chancel Choir; 7:30 p.m. United
Methodist Women’s General Meeting
Thursday - Office Hours: 8:00-Noon;
8:00 a.m. Pie Crust Making Day; 4:30
p.m.-6:30 p.m. Supper on Us; 6:45 p.m.-
7:45 p.m. Walk with God in Parlor
Friday - Office Hours: 8:00-Noon; 8:00
a.m. Pie Baking Day; Canal Days
Saturday - Laurel Oaks; Canal Days
MARION BAPTIST CHURCH
2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos
Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319
Services: Sunday - 11:00 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
331 E. Second St., Delphos
419-695-4050
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Rev. Jacob Gordon, Asst. Pastor
Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker, Deacons
Mary Beth Will, Liturgical
Coordinator; Mrs. Trina Shultz, Pastoral
Associate. Mel Rode, Parish Council
President
Celebration of the Sacraments
Eucharist – Lord’s Day Observance;
Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 7:30, 9:15,
11:30 a.m.; Weekdays as announced on
Sunday bulletin.
Baptism – Celebrated first Sunday
of month at 1:30 p.m. Call rectory to
schedule Pre-Baptismal instructions.
Reconciliation – Tuesday and
Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday 3:30-
4:00 p.m. Anytime by request.
Matrimony – Arrangements must be
made through the rectory six months
in advance.
Anointing of the Sick – Communal
celebration in May and October.
Administered upon request.
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Administrative aide: Rita Suever
Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
Sacrament of Reconciliation:
Saturday.
Newcomers register at parish.
Marriages: Please call the parish
house six months in advance.
Baptism: Please call the parish.
ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH
500 S. Canal, Spencerville
419-647-6202
Saturday - 4:30 p.m. Reconciliation;
5 p.m. Mass, May 1 - Oct. 30. Sunday -
10:30 a.m. Mass.
SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL
107 Broadway St., Spencerville
Pastor Charles Muter
Home Ph. 419-657-6019
Sunday: Morning Services - 10:00
a.m. Evening Services - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship ser-
vice.
AMANDA BAPTIST CHURCH
Back to Christ’s Ministry
Conant Road & SR. 117
Ph. 647-5100 - Rev. Mike Decker
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship &
Fellowship. Wednesday – 6-9 p.m.
Bible Study.
SPENCERVILLE CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
317 West North St. - 419-296-2561
Pastor Tom Shobe
9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30
a.m. Morning Worship; 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
Corner of Fourth & Main, Spencerville
Phone 419-647-5321
Elida/lima/GomEr
Van WErt County
Putnam County
landECk
dElPhos
sPEnCErVillE
Our local churches invite you to join them for their activities and services.
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www.delphosherald.com
The Herald —9 Saturday, September 10, 2011
From Texas Baptist to Orthodox Saint?
Wherever bishops travel, churches plan
lavish banquets and other solemn tributes to
honor their hierarchs.
Visitations by Archbishop Dmitri Royster
of the Orthodox Church in America were dif-
ferent, since the faithful in the 14-state Dio-
cese of the South knew that one memorable
event would take care of itself. All they had
to do was take their leader to a children’s
Sunday school class and let him answer
questions.
During a 1999 visit to Knoxville, Tenn.,
the lanky Texan folded down onto a kid-
sized chair and faced a circle of preschool
and elementary school children. With his
long white hair and fowing white beard, he
resembled an icon of St. Nicholas -- as in St.
Nicholas, the monk and fourth-century bish-
op of Myra.
As snacks were served, a child asked if
Dmitri liked his donuts plain or with sprin-
kles. With a straight face, the scholarly arch-
bishop explained that he had theological
reasons -- based on centuries of church tradi-
tion -- for preferring donuts with icing and
sprinkles.
A parent in the back of the room whis-
pered: “Here we go.” Some of the children
giggled, amused at the sight of the bemused
bishop holding up a colorful pastry as if he
were performing a ritual.
“In Orthodoxy, there are seasons in which
we fast from many of the foods we love,”
he said. “When we fast, we should fast. But
when we feast, we should truly feast and be
thankful.” Thus, he reasoned with a smile,
donuts with sprinkles and icing were “more
Orthodox” than plain donuts.
Archbishop Dmitri made that Knoxville
trip to ordain yet another priest in his dio-
cese, which grew from a dozen parishes to
70 during his three decades. The 87-year-old
missionary died last Sunday (Aug. 28) in
his simple bungalow -- complete with leaky
kitchen roof -- next to Saint Seraphim Cathe-
dral, the parish he founded in 1954. Parish-
ioners were worried the upstairs foor might
buckle under the weight of those praying
around his deathbed.
The future archbishop was raised South-
ern Baptist in the town of Teague, Texas, be-
fore moving to Dallas. As teens, Royster and
his sister became intrigued with the history of
the major Christian holidays and began visit-
ing a variety of churches, including an Or-
thodox parish. The services were completely
in Greek, but they joined anyway -- decades
before evangelical-to-Orthodox conversions
became common.
During World War II the young Texan
learned Japanese in order to interrogate pris-
oners of war, while serving on Gen. Douglas
MacArthur’s staff. A gifted linguist, he later
taught Greek and Spanish classes on the cam-
pus of Southern Methodist University. While
training to serve in the OCA, which has Rus-
sian roots, he learned Old Russian and some
modern Russian.
Early in his priesthood, the Dallas parish
was so small that Dmitri helped his sister
operate a restaurant to support the ministry,
thus becoming a skilled chef who became fa-
mous for his hospitality and love of cooking
for his focks. During his years as a mission-
ary bishop, driving back and forth from Dal-
las to Miami, monks in New Orleans saved
him packages of his favorite chicory coffee
and Hispanic parishioners offered bottles of
homemade hot sauce, which he stashed in
special compartments in his Byzantine mi-
tre’s traveling case.
A pivotal moment in his career came just
before the creation of the Diocese of the
South. In 1970, then Bishop Dmitri was elect-
ed -- in a landslide -- as the OCA metropoli-
tan, to lead the national hierarchy in Syosset,
New York. But the ethnic Slavic core in the
synod of bishops ignored the clergy vote and
appointed one of its own.
Decades later, the Orthodox theologian
Father Thomas Hopko described the impact
of that election this way: “One could have
gone to Syosset and become a metropolitan,
or go to Dallas and become a saint.”
The priest ordained in Tennessee on that
Sunday back in 1999 shared this judgment,
when reacting to the death of “Vladika” (in
English, “master”) Dmitri.
“There are a number of saints within Or-
thodox history who are given the title ‘Equal
to the Apostles,’” noted Father J. Stephen
Freeman of Oak Ridge. “I cannot rush be-
yond the church and declare a saint where the
church has not done so, but I can think of no
better description of the life and ministry of
Vladika Dmitri here in the South than ‘Equal
to the Apostles.’”
Terry Mattingly is the director of the Washington
Journalism Center at the Council for Christian Colleges
and Universities and leads the GetReligion.org project
to study religion and the news.
TERRY MATTINGLY
On
Religion
10 – The Herald Saturday, September 10, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
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• Deadwooding
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in print & online
www.delphosherald.com
Call
419-695-0015
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THE DELPHOS HERALD
CLASSIFIEDS
Turn your clutter into
cash with the Classifieds.
Place Your
Ad Today
419 695-0015
IS YOUR
AD HERE?
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419-695-0015
Commercial Lender/Ag Lender
First Federal Bank is seeking a Commercial/Ag Lender for our
Delphos office. The position requires managing an existing
agriculture and commercial portfolio, with an emphasis on
customer service and risk management. Knowledge of agri-
culture and agriculture lending preferred. Bachelor’s degree in
business or finance preferred. Previous agriculture and commer-
cial lending and 1-2 years credit analyst experience preferred.
First Federal offers a friendly, professional work environment,
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If you would like to be considered for this position, please ap-
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No phone calls please. EOE
You Are Invited
Come celebrate Delphos Canal Days! Hope to see you there!
SCHRADER REALTY LLC
202 N. W
R rc Pr
“Put your dreams in our hands”
These are just a few of our listings, view a full list at www.schraderrealty.net
Under $40,000 - Delphos
135 E. Cleveland St.
Call Amie
419-236-0688
219 Elizabeth St.,
Spencerville
3 BR, 2 car garage.
Call Amie
419-236-0688
NOW 20’S
ONLY 30’S
812 N. Jefferson St.
Call Janet
419-236-7894
Gatehouse Condos
Call Krista
for details.
419-233-3737
4971 Marciel, Elida
3 BR, 2.5 bath ranch, built in 2004, 2
car garage, Elida schools.
Call Amie 419-236-0688
5051 Lobo, Elida
Ranch w/3 BR, 2
1
⁄2 bath, finished basement,
Elida schools, 2 car garage.
Call Krista 419-233-3737
500 W. Northern, Lima
3 BR ranch a must see! Totally remodeled inside
& out w/taste & class!
Call Krista 419-233-3737
233 E. 9th St., Delphos
3 BR ranch w/1 car garage, new
furnace & Central Air, family room.
Call Krista 419-233-3737
Krista Schrader
Owner/Broker
419-233-3737
Ruth Baldauf
Liebrecht
419-234-5202
Amie Nungester
419-236-0688
Stephanie
(Grothouse) Clemons
419-234-0940
Janet Kroeger
419-236-7894
Judy M. W. Bosch
419-230-1983
Jon Moorman
419-234-8797
Molly Aregood
419-605-5265
2275 Cable Rd.
901 Copus Road, Lima
4 BR, 2 bath, over 2,000 sq. ft., 2
1
⁄2 car garage,
Shawnee schools.
Call Krista 419-233-3737
180 Max Street, Ottoville
3 BR, 2 bath ranch, 3 city lots, 2 car att. garage.
Call Janet 419-236-7894
11595 Ridge Road, Delphos
Brick 2 BR possible 3rd BR edge of town, 2 car garage.
Call Janet 419-236-7894
8989 Ridge Road, Delphos
Country 4 BR, 2000 sq. ft., 2 car gar., 1 acre, bsmt.,
Delphos schools.
Call Krista 419-233-3737
921 N. Canal Street, Delphos
3 BR, bsmt., 2 car garage, close to park & p ool .
Call Krista 419-233-3737
430 N. Canal Street, Delphos
Commercial building in prime location!
Over 5,600 sq. ft. Rental income.
Call Krista 419-233-3737
Krista
Schrader
Owner/Broker
419-233-3737
Ruth
Baldauf
Liebrecht
419-234-5202
Molly
Aregood
419-605-5265
Stephanie
(Grothouse) Clemons
419-234-0940
Janet
Kroeger
419-236-7894
Judy
M. W. Bosch
419-230-1983
Amie
Nungester
419-236-0688
Jon
Moorman
419-234-8797
Jodi
Moenter
419-296-9561
180 Max Street, Ottoville
3 BR, 2 bath ranch 3 city lots,
2 car att. garage.
Call Janet 419-236-7894
406 N. Scott Street, Delphos
Spacious 4BR, 2BA, over 2,000 sq.
ft., garage, basement and more.
Call Krista 419-233-3737
428 S. Franklin Street, Delphos
3BR, 1.5 baths, fenced yard,
nished basement.
Call Ruth 419-234-5202
4971 Marciel, Elida
3 BR, 2.5 bath ranch, built in
2004, 2 car garage. Elida schools.
Call Amie 419-236-0688
430 N. Canal Street, Delphos
Commercial building in prime
location! Over 5,600 sq. ft. Rental income.
Call Krista 419-233-3737
These are just
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view a full list at
www.schraderrealty.net
Gatehouse Condos. 5
Condos available for sale.
Buy 1 or buy all 5 in a
package deal! Elida Schools
Call Krista for details.
419-233-3737
2275
Cable Rd.
961 Southridge Drive, Delphos
Ranch w/3BRs, 2 baths, 2 car
garage, full basement ready to
nish, country feel.
Call Stephanie 419-234-0940
Building Lot
Build your dream home! State
Road between Delphos and Elida.
1.6 acres with septic system!
Call Jodi 419-296-9561
1602 Garland, Lima
Only 30’s! 3 BR, 1.5 bath ranch,
move in ready! Perry Schools.
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679 E. 7th Street, Delphos
3 BR, 2 bath, many updates,
family room with replace, deck,
basement, all appliances stay.
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611 N. Scott St., Delphos
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basement, 2 car garage, fenced
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2501 Debbie Drive, Lima
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back off the road w/3 BR plus
an additional 4th BR/of ce in
basement. Master BR w/Master
Bath. 3 full baths. Finished
basement area includes family
room with replace, laundry
room, lots of storage & more!
Neutral & tasteful décor
throughout! Large deck with
2 entries off of Dining room
& master bedroom. Deck over
looks fenced in half acre lot and
in ground swimming pool.
2 car garage.
Call Krista 419-233-3737
501 S. Perry Street, Wapak
3 BR, 1.5 bath, completely
remodeled, only $70’s.
Call Amie 419-236-0688
You Are Invited!
FREE food, refreshments & fun!
Come see our building and meet our real estate team!
Enter to win AWESOME door prizes!
Come celebrate Delphos Canal Days!
Hope to you there!
to join us at the 3rd Annual
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Saturday, September 17th, 2011
Located at
202 N. Washington Street,
Delphos
Stop in to see us anytime
between
11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.!
VIEW ALL LISTINGS AND
PICTURES ON OUR WEBSITE
www.schraderrealty.net
SOLD
SOLD
to join us at the 3rd annual
SCHRADER REALTY
OPEN HOUSE!
Saturday, Sept. 17th, 2011
Located at
202 N. Washington St., Delphos
Stop in to see us anytime
between 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.!
FREE food, refreshments & fun!
Come see our building and meet our real estate team!
ENTER TO WIN AWESOME DOOR PRIZES!
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www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
OPEN HOUSES
SUNDAY
SEPT. 11
Phone: 419-695-1006
Phone: 419-879-1006
312 N. Main St. Delphos, OH
675 W. Market St., Suite 120, Lima, OH
Don’t make a move without us!
View all our listings at
dickclarkrealestate.com
OPEN 1:00 - 2:30
432 East Cleveland Street Delphos $84,900 Michele Black 419-302-6878
513 S. Franklin Street Delphos $87,500 Rick Gable 419-230-1504
220 North West Street Delphos $109,500 Kim Eilerman 419-303-3013
8725 Lincoln Highway Elida $119,500 Brian Overholt 419-231-5385
1330 Joshua Street Delphos $258,000 Chuck Peters 419-204-7238
806 North Canal Street Delphos $99,000 Melanie Thorbahn 419-234-5493
OPEN 3:00 - 4:30
3480 Providence Circle Elida $106,900 Kim Eilerman 419-303-3013
155 East 9th Street Delphos $136,900 Michele Black 419-302-6878
603 West 2nd Street Delphos $139,000 Rick Gable 419-230-1504
441 East Cleveland Street Delphos $139,900 Dick Clark 419-230-5553
201 Holland Avenue Delphos $79,000 Chuck Peters 419-204-7238
OPEN 5:00 - 6:00
675 East 7th Street Delphos $63,900 Dick Clark 419-230-5553
822 N. Clay Street Delphos $79,000 Rick Gable 419-230-1504
828 North Clay Street Delphos $99,990 Chuck Peters 419-204-7238
OPEN SATURDAY 1:00-3:00
419-692-SOLD
419-453-2281
Check out all of our listings at: WWW.TLREA.COM
20105 Rd R, Ft. Jennings:
3 BR, Country Home, Large
Barn, 1 Acre, Updated. Call
Tony.
40 W. 4th St., Ft. Jennings:
Excellent 3 BR, 1 1/2 Bath
in great location. Updated.
Basement. Call Tony.
337 Walnut, Ottoville: Great
Big Beauty!!! 3 BR, 2 Baths,
Sunroom, Basement, Fish Pond,
Excellent location. Call Tony.
NEW!!! 125 Sunset Drive,
Ottoville: 3 BR, 1 ½ Bath.
Nice ranch in exceptional
neighborhood. $103K. Tony:
233-7911.
NEW! 309 4th St., Ottoville: 4
BR, 1 ½ Bath in excellent con-
dition. Big corner lot, bsmt, ga-
rage. Only asking $90’s. Tony
535 E. 2nd, Ottoville: 4 BR,
big lot with 40’ x 42’ Garage.
$90’s. Call Tony: 233-7911.
NEW!!! 215 Monroe, Delphos:
3 BR, 1 Bath, Very affordable
living. Lynn: 234-2314.
17879 SR 66, Ottoville SD:
3 BR, 2 Bath on 1.8 Acre Lot.
Huge, new garage. Denny:
532-3482
REDUCED! 15631 17-N, Ka-
lida: 3 BR, 2 ½ Bath, Full Fin
Bsmt. Finished shop. Almost
3 acres, Fenced yard. New
shingles. Tony: 233-7911.
932 N Washington, Delphos:
Vacant lot. Asking $14,000.
Call Lynn; 234-2314.
OTTOVILLE SUBDIVISION
LOTS: Next to school. Call
Tony for details: 233-7911.
Kalida Golf Course: 2 Lots
available. Tony.
303 W. 5th, Delphos: 3 BR,
1 Bath. Great starter. $55K.
Tony: 233-7911.
828 N. Main, Delphos: 4/2
Vinyl Siding, Make offer. Tony:
233-7911.
710 S. Main, Delphos: 4/2 on
large lot. Only asking $79K.
Lynn: 234-2314.
414 W. 6th, Delphos: 3 BR,
Fenced Yard, 2 Car Garage:
$60’s. Lynn: 234-2314.
NEW!! 1029 N. Franklin, Del-
phos: Nice 2 BR on corner
lot, newer windows and other
improvements. $60’s. Lynn:
234-2314.
22705 Kemp Road: 3 BR, 2
Baths, Pond. Call Lynn : 234-
2314.
New Listing! 121 E 7th, Del-
phos: 3 BR, 1 Bath on Corner
Lot. Only asking $40’s. Gary
Holdgreve: 692-1910.
New Listing! 229 Douglas,
Delphos: 4 BR, 1 ½ Bath, 2,000
sq. ft., corner lot. $80’s. Call
Gary Holdgreve: 692-1910.
466 Dewey, Delphos: Neat and
clean 2 BR in excellent condi-
tion. Call Gary: 692-1910
OPEN SUNDAY 12:00-2:00
OPEN SUNDAY 12:00-1:00
OPEN SUNDAY 1:00-2:00
OPEN SUNDAY 2:00-3:00
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
“The Key
To Buying
Or Selling”
940 E. FIFTH ST., DELPHOS
419-692-7773 Fax 419-692-7775
www.rsre.com
BY APPOINTMENT
$93,500-Spencerville SD
Renovated 4-bedroom Farmhouse-style home. This entic-
ing 1-1/2 story features formal dining room. Private drive.
Big bedrooms, laundry room. Two-car garage, newer roof.
(004) Chet Hittepole 419-234-2458
$92,500-Spencerville SD
Updated 3-bedroom two-story vinyl-sided home provides
formal dining room, gas fireplace and large rooms. Addi-
tional lot w/income property, mobile home (008) Barb Coil
419-302-3478
$239,000-Lincolnview SD
Near Delphos. Peaceful setting. Brick 1860ís home remod-
eled with integrity. 2 car garage. Two nice barns. Apx. 3.44
acres. (141) Bonnie Shelley 419-235-2521
$55,000-Spencerville SD
1-story home with 3 bedrooms, 1 bath located on 1 acre lot.
2 car attached garage. Above ground pool. (167) Angela
Rosebrook 419-303-4693
$80,000-Delphos SD
Discover the values in this very special 3BR/2BA two-story!
Charming vinyl-sided residence providing pleasant living.
Two-car garage, basement. (190) Mike Reindel 419-235-
3607
$50,000-Delphos SD
Single-story with 2-bedrooms plus neat touches. Engaging
residence offering a delightful ambiance. The pleasures of
home!! (192) Mike Reindel 419-235-3607
$56,000-Delphos SD
3-bedroom 1-1/2 story with 1 car detached garage. Fresh
interior paint. Some appliances included. (194) Mike Rein-
del 419-235-3607
$134,900-Lincolnview SD
Large country 2-story home with 4 bedrooms and 2 baths
on approx. 1.7 acres. Updated kitchen and bath. 2 car at-
tached garage. Includes large barn. (235) Mike Reindel
419-235-3607
SCHRADER
REALTY LLC
“Put your dreams in our hands”
202 N. Washington Street
Delphos, OH 45833
Office: 419-692-2249
Fax: 419-692-2205
FOR A FULL LIST OF OUR LISTINGS, PLEASE VIEW:
WWW.SCHRADERREALTY.NET
Ruth Baldauf-Liebrecht ... 419-234-5202
Amie Nungester ............... 419-236-0688
Janet Kroeger .................. 419-236-7894
Jodi Moenter .................... 419-296-9561
Stephanie Clemons...... 419-234-0940
Judy M.W. Bosch ......... 419-230-1983
Molly Aregood .............. 419-605-5265
Jon Moorman ............... 419-234-8797
OPEN HOUSES
SUN.,
SEPT. 11
Krista Schrader ................ 419-233-3737
12:00-1:00
628 W. First Street, Delphos
PRICE REDUCED! Now only $99,900! 4BR, 2 1/2 BA, many
improvements must see inside! New kitchen, windows, fur-
nace, walk in steam shower and more! 3 car garage, base-
ment. Jodi will greet you!
1:00-3:00
12348 Delphos Southworth Rd., Delphos
Custom newer built country 3BR, 2BA ranch, office/4th BR,
basement, 2 car attached garage plus additional 2 car garage,
large deck with pool, 1.5 acres, a must see! Owner/Agent.
Krista will greet you.
4760 Gomer Road, Elida
FIRST TIME OPEN! 3BR, 2BA, 2.6 acres, garage, barn, Elida
schools, Jon will greet you.
1:30-2:30
406 N. Scott Street, Delphos
Spacious 4BR, 2BA, family room, basement, garage, Jodi will
greet you.
428 S. Franklin Street, Delphos
3BR, 1 1/2 BA, finished basement, garage, fenced yard, Ruth
will greet you.
679 E. Seventh Street, Delphos
3BR, 2BA, many updates, family room w/fireplace, deck, base-
ment, Janet will greet you.
3:00-4:00
615 W. Fifth Street, Delphos
3BR w/natural woodwork & hardwood floors, basement, ga-
rage, pool, Ruth will greet you.
VIEW PICTURES AND DETAILS
JIMLANGHALSREALTY.COM
419-692-9652
integrity • professionalism • service
Since 1980
JUST LISTED
630 S. CLAY ST.
3 bedrm. ranch style home,
conv. kitch. and util rm., spac.
liv. rm., nice backyard, with
deck. 70’s.
8375 REDD RD.
DELPHOS
Fantastic property on 3 acres,
all brick home with large out-
building, must see to appreci-
ate this property!
3 bedrm. 2 bath
home on 1 acre,
built 1999, vinyl
siding 2 car gar.
Asking 80’s.
NEW LISTING • 3123 McBRIDE RD.
The Daily Herald
CLASSIFIED ADS
To place an ad call: 419-695-0015
SERVICE DIRECTORY
001

Card Of Thanks
IN REGARDS to our son,
Ryan Karhoff, who has
been di agnosed wi th
Acute Monocystic Leuke-
mia, we wish to thank eve-
ryone on 5K at St. Rita’s
Medical Center. The won-
derful staff, nurses, doc-
tors, especially Dr. Gerad
for the excellent care that
he is providing for Ryan.
Ryan has been in and out
of the hospital and is fac-
ing a long journey ahead
of him for a bone marrow
transplant. We wish to
thank our families, friends,
community, businesses
and sponsors, and every-
one else for showing sup-
port for the Ryan Karhoff
benefit and our families
throughout this difficult
time. Please continue to
keep Ryan i n your
thoughts and prayers.
Thank you and may God
bless you.
Sincerely,
Rick & Donna Bonds
& family
001

Card Of Thanks
THANK YOU for all the
cards, prayers and visits
while I was in the hospital
and recuperating at home.
Darlene Klausing
THE FAMILY of Lou We-
ber wishes to thank every-
one for the donations,
cards, thoughts, flowers,
and prayers. A special
thanks to Father Mel for
his support, prayers and
uplifting funeral mass. Lou
will be missed by all. He
was a great husband, fa-
ther, grandfather, brother
& uncle.
Thanks also to Cammy
and crew for preparing the
dinner at The Eagles
Lodge.
Ruth Weber
005

Lost & Found
LOST SMALL blonde
dog. Landeck area, has
red collar. 419-236-4934
or 567-209-0597.
010

Announcements
Delphos Trading Post
528 N. Washington St.
DELPHOS, OHIO
FLEA MALL
NOW OPEN
Every Saturday
7am to 4pm
Come See Variety
VENDORS
WANTED
Call
601-347-7525
or Stop By
for Information -
Setup
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
SEPTEMBER MASSAGE
SPECIAL
New Quiet Room
Offering 1/2 hr.
massage $22
Mary Ricker
(419)203-3297
at Peak 24 Hr. Fitness
080

Help Wanted
Current Openings:
Roberts Manufacturing
Co., Inc. of Oakwood, OH
is seeking experienced
CNC Machining Opera-
tors, Experience Preferred
Established area manu-
facturer with an outstand-
ing reputation for quality
and delivery is currently
seeking individuals to fill
first and second shift
full-time positions in the
areas of CNC Turning
Center, CNC Machining
Center and Precision
Gri ndi ng. Candi dat es
should at minimum pos-
sess a high school di -
ploma or equivalent with
heavy emphasi s on
mathematics, reading, and
communi cati on ski l l s.
Starting wage commensu-
rate with experience.
Robert’s Mfg. Co., Inc.
24338 Paulding County
Road 148
Oakwood, Ohio 45873
Telephone
(419)-594-2712,
Fax (419)-594-2900
www.robertsmanufacturing.net
Attn: Chuck Behrens
chuckbehrens@rmci1.net
080

Help Wanted
Class A CDL & 8 Mths. Exp. Req’d
(800) 677-5627
www.westsidetransport.com
Drivers
Protect your CSA score
Work for a company with
GREAT equipment
REGIONAL & OTR
$1,000 Sign On
Bonus!
NEW PAY ~ .38
¢
-.45
¢
/Mile
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
Church is seeking a
part-time Children’s Pro-
gram Director/Educator. A
minimum of an under -
graduate degree or three
years experience along
with an understanding of
the Reformed Heritage in
the Presbyterian Church is
desired. Hours are flexi-
ble, with some evening
hours required. Salary will
be commensurate with
education and experience.
Please submit a cover let-
ter and resume by Sep-
tember 14, 2011 via email
to hal@vwpresby.org or
mail to 110 W. Crawford
St Van Wert, Ohio 45891.
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
99% no touch freight!
We will treat you with re-
spect!
PLEASE CALL
419-222-1630
Christian non-
profit organization has
opening for a SHOP
COORDINATOR.
Position requires retail
experience, high school
diploma/GED, experi-
ence and knowledge
to appropriately price
goods at market value,
be able to communicate
well and be compat-
ible with the public and
co-workers, able to
multi-task, and be able
to maintain a positive,
calm demeanor in a
high volume environ-
ment. Approximately
35 hrs. per week; some
benefits available, some
lifting required. Send
resume to:
Human Resources,
102 N. Main St.,
Delphos, OH 45833.
MATT’S HEATING and
Cooling is a well establish
business looking for a full
time Experienced and Pro-
fessional HVAC Techni-
cian. Must have experi-
enced in Installation/Serv-
ice and knowledgeable
about plumbing. You can
f a x r e s u me t o
419-647-5362/e-mail to
billy@watchtv.net./or send
to 1000 S. Defiance Trail
Spencerville, Ohio 45887.
NOW HIRING: Experi-
enced cooks, bartenders
and waitresses. Apply in
person, Brentily’s, 209
Main St., Delphos.
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
RELIABLE STNA
for home health care
business needed for Lima
area. Weekends only.
Email resume to
rosehomehealth@aol.com
or call (419)423-5600.
8pm-10pm shift also
available in Lima area.
110

School &
Instruction
VANTAGE CAREER
Center is now enrolling
students for:
Pipe Welding
Transportation Supervisor
Both programs provide: In-
dustry license and certifi-
cation training. Financial
Aid available. For more
details call: Sara Ricker
ext121 at Vantage Career
Center
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN
pillow-top mattress set,
can deliver $125. Call
(260)749-6100.
340

Garage Sales
HUMONGOUS BARN
Sale. Rita Turnwald’s Es-
tate. Lamps, books, relig-
ious articles, household
items, linens, furniture, 3X
clothing, greeting cards,
much more.
Thursday, Sept. 4pm-?
Friday, September 9,
9am-9pm.
Saturday, Sept. 10,
9am-9pm.
17770 Road 26,
Ft. Jennings.
1 mile west of Ottoville just
off of St. Rt. 224.
ONE DAY Only Sat. Sept.
10, 8am-5pm. 418 W. 5th
St. Many nice items, curio
cabinets, TV, washer &
dryer, computer desk,
child’s dresser, end tables,
adult clothes, jewelry,
vases, glassware, purses,
stuffed animals, etc.
501

Misc. for Sale
CENTRAL BOILER out-
door wood furnaces start-
ing at $4995.00. Up to
$1,000 Rebate, limited
time. (419)358-5342
FOR SALE: 5 by 8 drive
on trailer. $450. Call
(419)204-2318.
HEAVY DUTY Frigidaire
washer, Amana commer-
cial dryer, Huffy exercise
bi ke & TV. Cal l
(419)286-2864
LOFT BED
Good for college
$50 OBO
(419)796-0230
Fort Jennings
OLD TYCO train set, en-
gines, box cars, flat beds,
transformers and lots of
curve and straight tracks.
Many more pieces! Call to
make arrangements to
see. 419-203-1796 or
419-203-1506.
560

Lawn & Garden
TOPSOIL
CLEAN, black, pulverized
for easy use. Load you or
del i ver ed. CALL
(419)968-2940
590

House For Rent
2 BDRM, Very clean
house. 612 Harmon St. No
Pets, Call 419-234-5626
600

Apts. for Rent
228 N. Jefferson
1 BDRM upstairs Apt.
295/mo. and deposit.
419-996-9870
800

House For Sale
$
43
95
2 WHEEL
ALIGNMENT
Includes check and
adjust camber & toe
(front only).
Additional parts & labor
may be required on
some vehicles.

See Service Advisor
for details.
plus parts
& tax
Over 85
years
serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
800

House For Sale
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 9-11-11
2pm-4pm
708 Ft. Jennings Rd.
Delphos
$139,000.00
2,074 sq. ft.
4 BDRM,
1 1/2 BA,
419-695-5405
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
850

Recreational
Vehicles
1994 POLARIS size 400
4x4, 4 wheeler, looks
good. $1, 250. Cal l
(419)439-1703.
890

Autos for Sale
2001 DODGE Durango
4x4, 4 door. 135,000
miles. Body and paint
good. $1, 800. Cal l
(419)439-1703.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE: 2 kitchen chairs.
Call (419)286-2864.
Classifieds Sell
IS YOUR
AD HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Sunday Evening September 11, 2011
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Extreme Makeover 20/20 20/20 Local
WHIO/CBS 9/11: 10 Years Later The Good Wife Local
WLIO/NBC Football NFL Football Local Dateline NBC
WOHL/FOX Simpsons Family Guy Crockett Local
ION Monk Monk Psych Psych Psych
Cable Channels
A & E Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds
AMC We Were Soldiers Breaking Bad Breaking Bad The Killing
ANIM Handfishin' Handfishin' Handfishin' Handfishin' Handfishin'
BET Dirty Laundry Down in the Delta Born to Dance Paid BET's Wee
BRAVO Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Real Housewives
CMT CMT Made CMT Made Extreme Makeover Extreme Makeover: Home Edition
CNN CNN Presents Beyond Bravery CNN Newsroom CNN Presents Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Employee of the Month Scary Movie 2 Tosh.0 Scary Movie 2
DISC Curiosity Dinosaur Revolution Dinosaur Revolution Curiosity Dinosaur Revolution
DISN Good Luck Shake It Random ANT Farm Good Luck Good Luck Random Good Luck Wizards Wizards
E! Kardashian Kardashian Kardas Kardas Fashion Chelsea Kardas Kardas
ESPN MLB Baseball SportsCenter SportsCtr
ESPN2 Basketball SportsCenter Basketball
FAM Princess Diaries 2 Sweet Home Alabama J. Osteen Ed Young
FOOD Cupcake Wars Food Truck Race Iron Chef America Restaurant: Im. Food Truck Race
FX X-Men Origins X-Men Origins
HGTV Holmes Inspection Handyman House Hunters Design Star Handyman
HIST 9/11 Memorial 102 Min. That Changed America Witnesses To Be Announced 9/11 Memorial
LIFE Sister Act Sister Act 2: Back Movie
MTV Jersey Shore Jersey Shore Teen Mom Awkward. Awkward. Ridic. Ridic.
NICK Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Prince Caspian Merlin
SPIKE Auction Auction Auction Auction Bar Rescue Bar Rescue Behind Enemy Lines
TBS Legally Blonde Legally Blonde
TCM Casablanca Mister Roberts All-Young
TLC Hoard-Buried Hoard-Buried World's Smallest Man Hoard-Buried World's Smallest Man
TNT The Terminal Forrest Gump Almost Famous
TOON Gumball Looney Delocated Childrens King-Hill Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Robot Chicken
TRAV Truck Stp Truck Stp No Reservation No Reservation Bizarre Foods No Reservation
TV LAND M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Raymond Everybody-Raymond Raymond
USA NCIS The Space Between Towers The Space Between Twin Towers
VH1 Concerts Celebrity Rehab Celebrity Rehab Celebrity Rehab
WGN How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met News/Nine Replay Monk Monk
Premium Channels
HBO Boardwalk Empire True Blood Curb Entourage True Blood Entourage Curb
MAX My Soul Due Date Bad Boys II Chemistry
SHOW Dexter Rebirth The Love We Make Letters
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Saturday Evening September 10, 2011
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC NASCAR Racing Local
WHIO/CBS U.S. Tennis 48 Hours Mystery Local
WLIO/NBC Who Do You Law Order: CI Law & Order: SVU Local Saturday Night Live
WOHL/FOX Cops Cops Amer. Dad Cleveland Local Fringe Crockett Local
ION Monk Monk Psych Psych Psych
Cable Channels
A & E Flight 93 Portraits From Ground Zero Jewels Flight 93
AMC True Grit Hondo
ANIM America's Cutest Dog Bad Dog! Bad Dog! Bad Dog! Bad Dog!
BET The Perfect Holiday Dirty Laundry Down in the Delta
BRAVO Pirates of the Caribbean: End Pirates-Worlds
CMT Planes, Trains and Automobiles Stripes Planes
CNN Beyond 911 Gupta Reports CNN Newsroom Beyond 911 24/7 Mayweather
COMEDY Employee-Mnth Dane Cook ISo.
DISC Cops & Coyotes Almost, Away I Faked My Own Death Almost, Away I Faked My Own Death
DISN ANT Farm Good Luck Random Good Luck Random Shake It Wizards ANT Farm ANT Farm Good Luck
E! The Wedding Planner Kardas The Soup Chelsea Kardashian
ESPN College Football SportsCenter Football Final
ESPN2 College Football Football Scoreboard NASCAR Now Baseball Tonight
FAM The Princess Diaries Princess Diaries 2 Head Over Heels
FOOD Chopped Chopped Chopped Iron Chef America Chopped
FX X-Men Origins: Wolverine Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men Sunny Sunny Louie
HGTV HGTV'd High Low Secrets Novogratz Dina's Pa Donna Dec Hunters Hunters Secrets Novogratz
HIST Modern Marvels Voices From Inside the Towers The Lost Kennedy Home Movies Modern Marvels
LIFE Movie Reign Over Me Movie
MTV Teen Mom Awkward. Awkward. Ridic. Death Jersey Shore House of Wax
NICK iCarly Victoriou Ninjas iCarly Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends Friends
SCI Yeti Jabberwock Cyclops
SPIKE Kill Bill: Vol. 1 Kill Bill: Vol. 2
TBS Miss Congeniality Miss Congeniality 2
TCM Loneliness-Runner The Innocents Dead of Night
TLC Flight-Watched 9/11: Heroes Flight-Watched 9/11: Heroes
TNT The Pelican Brief The Terminal
TOON Witch Mount Oblongs King-Hill King/Hill Fam. Guy Boondocks Boondocks Bleach Durarara
TRAV Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures Ghost Adventures
TV LAND AllFamily AllFamily Raymond Raymond Raymond Everybody-Raymond Everybody Loves Raymond
USA NCIS NCIS NCIS NCIS Action Sports
VH1 SNL in the 2000s 40 Funniest Fails Celebrity Rehab
WGN Funniest Home Videos Funniest Home Videos WGN News at Nine Scrubs How I Met South Pk South Pk
Premium Channels
HBO 127 Hours 24/7 Boxing
MAX Independence Day Strike Back Due Date Strike Back Busty Cop
SHOW The Switch The Love We Make Strikeforce GP
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Saturday, September 10, 2011 The Herald –11
Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
www.delphosherald.com
SUNDAY, SEPT. 11, 2011
Several brand-new ways to
generate additional earnings may
be in the making for you in the year
ahead, if you dig a little. Your treasure
hunt might take you to places or areas
where fortune never smiled on you
previously.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Even if it’s an unheard-of occurrence,
for some reason you should find
yourself quite relaxed when involved
in a partnership situation. You’ll find
the perfect person with whom you’ll
share much in common.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- An old project that was going
nowhere can be resurrected and made
meaningful at this time. You’ll do so
with a little dab of ingenuity here and
a touch of elbow grease there.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Achieving social acceptance isn’t
likely to be a problem for you. Your
strong, charismatic personality will
emerge and function like a magnet,
drawing everyone to you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Influences that have a strong
effect on your occupation are trending
in your favor. Look to reap benefits
even from situations engineered by
and for others.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- If you can, take care of some of the
obligations you have with others, be
they social or work-related. After you
develop your plans, call and invite
those who are available.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- A favorable upswing in your
affairs is indicated to take place. In
fact, even some serious worries could
be favorably sorted out.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Keep your lines of communication
open to as many people as possible.
Good news could be on its way
pertaining to something that might
be tremendously significant.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
People in general are likely to treat
you in a very generous fashion. One
might even be somebody whom you
didn’t think gave a hoot about you or
your welfare.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- The chances that nice things
could happen to you will increase
considerably. If you rarely get out
to see people, do what you can to
circulate as much as possible.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Don’t be afraid to strive for objectives
that might test your capabilities and
talents. The harder you try to climb
the ladder of success, the luckier you
are likely to get.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- You are likely to have an accurate
grasp of most situations, whether
they are social or commercial in
nature. If you have any thoughts on
how to handle your affairs, put them
to the test.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Something of a profitable nature can
be developed, generating additional
income from something other than
your usual source. Diligently search
for new, lucrative venues.

MONDAY, SEPT. 12, 2011
In the next year try to develop
friendships or associations with
people who could help you further
your ambitions. Just be careful not
to do so in a manner that would
cause you to be labeled a user or a
manipulator.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Unfortunately, you might be forced
to associate with people who make
you feel extremely uncomfortable.
Suppress any abrasive comments and
remain tactful at all times.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If
you’ve been sweeping a number
of unpleasant tasks under the rug,
it might turn out to be the day of
reckoning. Unfortunately, you won’t
be able to put off burdensome tasks
any longer.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Don’t fall into a trap made by
someone you consider to be a friend
but who is always trying to bait you
into an argument about politics or
religion. No one can win.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- You must know that making
unreasonable demands or requests on
your mate or other family members
will be rejected, so why go down that
avenue? Don’t be a troublemaker.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Waking up on the wrong side of the
bed might put you in a bad mood all
day long. You could even get steamed
about things you’ve always tolerated
previously.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --
This might not be one of your better
days where money is concerned. It
would be best not to take on any new
financial obligations or pay out what
you can’t afford to lose.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Strong, unexpected opposition could
be awaiting you from a nest of people
who think differently than you. Keep
yourself from overreacting and
making things worse.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Something you never promised is
likely to be expected of you anyway.
Rather than go into battle over it, do
it if you have the time.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Unless you can avoid the company
of those who have superior attitudes,
you can expect to be bossed around a
bit. However, I doubt you’ll stand by
and take it.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Those who are usually around to
pick up the pieces and/or back you
up aren’t likely to be there for you
when you need them the most. You
had better be prepared to be totally
self-reliant.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Don’t get angry and try to force
compliance on those you thought
were in accordance with your
proposals but obviously aren’t. It’s
not their fault you were misled or that
you misunderstood.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Unless
you can say no and mean it, you’re
likely to open yourself up to being
pressured into doing something you
dislike, by someone who has figured
out how to manipulate you.
COPYRIGHT 2011, UNITED FEATURE
SYNDICATE
2
From newborns to teens and young adults, we know children often need
special care throughout the various stages of development. That’s why
we’re proud to collaborate with Nationwide Children’s Hospital (NCH) to bring
expanded neonatology and pediatric services to Lima and the surrounding
communities.
In addition to NCH doctors already on campus
at St. Rita’s, this collaboration implements
high-denition video conferencing for direct
access to pediatric specialists at both
locations. It also allows us to enhance our pediatric Pulmonary, Cardiology,
Neonatology, Genetics, Endocrinology and Gastroenterology services so
patients are more likely to get the care they need close to home.
For more information about our neonatology and pediatric services,
visit www.stritasNCH.org.
730 W. Market St., Lima, OH 45801 • 419.227.3361 • www.stritas.org
We’re putting our
heads together.
Collaboration for expanded pediatric care.
The Region’s Leader In Pediatric Care.
12 – The Herald Saturday, September 10, 2011
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Friday’s questions:
Brearley School in New York City will set you back
$26,000 a year for your 4-year-old.
Bob Hope was Johnny Carson’s most frequent Tonight
Show guest.
Today’s questions:
What healthy food did Jesus eat after his resurrection to
prove he was not a phantom?
How many American artists’ works hang permanently
in the Louvre in Paris?
Answers in Monday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Countercaster: a person dealing in numbers
Oneity: allness
By MARK SCOLFORO
and MICHAEL
RUBINKAM
Associated Press
BLOOMSBURG, Pa. —
The swollen Susquehanna
River began returning to its
banks Friday in Pennsylvania
and New York after swamp-
ing thousands of homes and
businesses in some of the
highest floodwaters ever
seen. But most of the 100,000
people forced from their
homes could do little more
than worry as they waited for
the all-clear.
“I haven’t even been able
to get close to it to see what’s
left. I don’t know what we’re
going to do,” said 68-year-
old Carolyn White of West
Pittston, Pa., who is disabled
and uses a scooter to get
around. Her son managed to
get close enough to see that
the first floor of her house
was flooded, but that was
about all she knew.
The Susquehanna and
its tributaries raged out of
control after the remnants of
Tropical Storm Lee dumped
heavy rain on the already-
soggy Northeast on Thursday.
In many places, the river
broke the high-water records
set nearly 40 years ago in
the catastrophic aftermath of
Hurricane Agnes.
Swirling brown waters
carried off at least 10 houses
in Pennsylvania alone, spilled
into basements, lapped at
doorsteps and filled some
homes to the rooftops, forcing
rescues by boat and helicop-
ter and putting severe strain
on the floodwalls that protect
some towns. Downstream,
communities in Maryland
awaited the worst from the
still-rising river.
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom
Corbett issued a stern warn-
ing to evacuated residents to
stay away: “This is still a
dangerous time, even though
it’s nice and sunny out.”
At least 15 deaths have been
blamed on Lee and its after-
math: seven in Pennsylvania,
three in Virginia, one in
Maryland, and four others
killed when it came ashore
on the Gulf Coast last week.
President Barack Obama
declared states of emergency
in Pennsylvania and New
York, opening the way for
federal aid.
The central Pennsylvania
town of Bloomsburg endured
its worst flood in more than a
century as the Susquehanna
inundated hundreds of homes,
destroying some of them.
The high water prevented fire
crews from reaching blazes
in a high school maintenance
shed and the town’s recycling
center.
The river crested at nearly
42.7 feet Thursday night in
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. — beyond
the design capacity of the
region’s levee system and
higher than the record set dur-
ing Agnes in 1972. Officials
said the levees keeping back
the Susquehanna were under
“extreme stress” but holding,
and crews scrambled to shore
up weak points.
Corbett toured the region
by helicopter and scolded res-
idents who scaled the weak-
ened levees or walked across
partially flooded bridges to
get a closer look at the river.
“There were many people
out on the street oblivious to
the danger they were in,” he
said.
About 135 water and sew-
age plants in Pennsylvania
were flooded, causing sew-
age to spill into streams and
rivers. The state capital of
Harrisburg evacuated 6,000 to
10,000 residents in low-lying
areas, while about 70,000
people were ordered to leave
the Wilkes-Barre area.
As the northernmost reach-
es of the Susquehanna began
retreating, the first of about
20,000 evacuees in the city
and suburbs of Binghamton,
N.Y., returned to their homes
to survey the damage from
what the mayor called the
worst flood in more than 60
years.
Robert Smith made it back
home around noon. Mud and
debris covered the pavement,
and water still blocked streets
closest to the river. But he
said he felt inspired by the
time he spent in a shelter.
When a woman collapsed
on the floor there, he said,
strangers rushed to tend to
her.
“Everybody was help-
ing each other out, just total
strangers,” he said. “You’ve
never seen it before in your
life.”
The flooding came a week
and a half after the dousing
that Hurricane Irene gave the
East Coast. And even before
Irene, this was a wet summer
in much of the Northeast.
In West Pittston, which
is upriver from Wilkes-
Barre and is not protected
by levees, 300 to 325 homes
were flooded — a tough
blow in a community of
only about 5,000 residents.
National Guardsmen used a
boat Friday to rescue 11 peo-
ple, including two children,
trapped on the second floor
of a house.
Floodwaters covered street
after street, inundating some
homes to the roof. One hom-
eowner who got 18 inches in
his basement during Agnes
was flooded with eight feet
of dirty river water this time
around.
Rescuers in Wyoming
County, upriver from Wilkes-
Barre, pulled more than a
dozen people from their
stranded cars and got a fam-
ily of three into a boat just
before their home was swept
into the Susquehanna.
The heavy rains also shut
down parts of the Capital
Beltway in Fairfax County,
Va.
In Maryland, most of
the 1,000 residents of Port
Deposit were told to evacu-
ate after the big Conowingo
Dam, upstream on the
Susquehanna, opened its
spill gates and flooded the
town with four feet of water.
Hundreds more were told to
leave their homes in Havre
de Grace, where the river
empties into the Chesapeake
Bay.
Homes, businesses swamped by floodwater
By MICHAEL R. BLOOD
and ELLIOT SPAGAT
Associated Press
SAN DIEGO — A blackout
that swept across parts of the
Southwest and Mexico appar-
ently began with a single utility
worker and a minor repair job.
How it then rippled from
that worker in the Arizona
desert, to southern California
and across the border, plung-
ing millions of people into
darkness, has authorities and
experts puzzled, especially
since the power grid is built to
withstand such mishaps.
However it spread,
Thursday’s outage was a
reminder that the nation’s
transmission lines remain all
too vulnerable to cascading
power failures.
“There are a lot of criti-
cal pieces of equipment on
the system and we have less
defense than we think,” said
Rich Sedano at the Regulatory
Assistance Project, a utility
industry think tank based in
Montpelier, Vt.
There have been several
similar failures in recent years.
In 2003, a blackout knocked
out power to 50 million peo-
ple in the Midwest and the
Northeast. And in 2005, a
major outage struck the Los
Angeles metropolitan area.
That same year, Congress
required utilities to comply with
federal reliability standards for
the electricity grid, instead
of self-regulation. Layers of
safeguards and backups were
intended to isolate problems
and make sure the power keeps
flowing.
But that didn’t happen on
Thursday.
The Arizona Public Service
Co. worker was switching out
a capacitor, which controls
voltage levels, outside Yuma,
Ariz., near the California bor-
der. Shortly after, a section
of a major regional power
line failed, eventually spread-
ing trouble further down in
California and later Mexico,
officials said.
And the lights began to go
out in a border region of rough-
ly 6 million people.
The outage knocked out
traffic lights, causing gridlock
on the roads in the San Diego
area. Two reactors at a nuclear
power plant up the California
coast went offline after losing
electricity. More than 2 mil-
lion gallons of sewage spilled
into the water off San Diego,
closing beaches in the nation’s
eighth-largest city.
A local think tank, the
National University System
Institute for Policy Research,
estimates the outage cost the
San Diego-area economy more
than $100 million.
Many had to spend the
night, on both sides of the U.S-
Mexico border, struggling to
fall asleep in the high tempera-
tures.
Federal and state investiga-
tors are trying to determine
what caused the blackout and
how future problems can be
prevented. If regulatory viola-
tions are found, the govern-
ment could issue fines of up
to $1 million per day for every
violation, officials said.
Among the questions they
will be asking is why the safe-
guards to keep power flow-
ing appeared to work, at least
at first. There was a roughly
10-minute gap between the
time the power line failed and
customers lost electricity, said
Daniel Froetscher, vice pres-
ident of energy delivery for
Phoenix-based APS.
The line has been “solid,
reliable” with no history of
problems, Froetscher said.
San Diego Gas & Electric
Co. should have isolated the
problem by shutting down
the 500-kilovolt Southwest
Powerlink as it did during
2007 wildfires, said Michael
Shames, executive director of
the advocacy group, Utility
Consumers’ Action Network.
“If a fire breaks out in the
kitchen, the first thing you do
is shut the door to the kitchen
to stop it from spreading,” he
said.
He also questioned why
the San Onofre nuclear power
plant was forced to shut down,
and why other back-up energy
didn’t kick in.
Shames said blaming the
Arizona utility worker would
be like overlooking the role of
wooden buildings and inad-
equate firefighting protection
in Chicago’s 1871 fire.
Blackout a reminder of power grid vulnerabilities
By CHRISTOPHER
SHERMAN
Associated Press
BASTROP, Texas —
Residents left homeless by a
massive Central Texas wildfire
turned their attention Friday to
what they need to move for-
ward, with some voicing frus-
tration over a perceived delay in
federal response even as early
signs of recovery appeared in
reopened neighborhoods.
Firefighters focused on
extinguishing hotspots and had
isolated remaining flames from
the blaze that has burned for
almost a week in and around
the city of Bastrop, destroying
nearly 1,400 homes and sweep-
ing across about 45 square miles
of rain-starved landscape.
“We believe the forward
progress (of the fire) has been
stopped, thank God for that,”
Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst told
evacuated residents gathered at
the fire command center.
Still, thousands of evacuees
were prevented from return-
ing to their homes for a sixth
day because trees continued to
burn underground, loose power
lines hung from scorched poles
and more than 800 firefighters
were working tamp down the
remainder of the fire 25 miles
east of Austin.
“It’s just really frustrating,”
said Dee Redenius, 40, who
came to the fire command cen-
ter for answers. “You want to
know if your house is there or
if it’s not. ... They don’t let you
in, you know. You can’t get
assistance.”
Dewhurst said the state
is working with the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency and state emergency
management personnel on spe-
cific fire declarations. FEMA
spokeswoman Rachel Racusen
said on Friday the agency
“received the first request from
the governor for individual aid
to help Texas residents whose
homes were damaged or
destroyed in the fires, or who
suffered other personal losses.”
FEMA “will work with the
White House to review this
request as expeditiously as pos-
sible,” she said.
Dewhurst also made a pub-
lic plea for President Barack
Obama to make a major disas-
ter declaration that he said
would remove red tape and
give the state access to more
resources.
“I have just signed another
letter asking (Obama) again to
make a major disaster decla-
ration for the state of Texas.
We need help yesterday ... Mr.
President, we need a statewide
disaster declaration right away,”
Dewhurst said. A message left
with the White House was
not immediately returned, but
Obama has said the requests for
additional assistance would be
quickly assessed.
Texas is in the midst of its
worst wildfire outbreak in state
history. A perilous mix of hot
temperatures, strong winds and
a historic drought spawned the
Bastrop-area fire, the largest
of the nearly 190 wildfires the
state forest service says erupted
this week, killing four people,
destroying more than 1,700
homes and forcing thousands
to evacuate.
The Texas Forest Service
said Friday that the Bastrop
fire had racked up a bill of at
least $1.2 million so far. But
the agency cautioned the figure
was an early estimate and was
expected to climb. The early
price tag includes firefighting
costs but not damage caused by
the blaze.
A DC-10 jet originally
meant to dump fire retardant on
the Central Texas wildfires was
diverted Friday to help fire-
fighters with a stubborn 22,000-
acre blaze straddling three rural
counties northwest of Houston.
The fire in Montgomery,
Grimes and Waller counties
forced some people in the area
to leave their homes, but was
not threatening any towns or
cities, Texas Forest Service
spokesman Ralph Collum said.
Frustration grows for Texas wildfre evacuees
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
The first phase of jury selec-
tion in the trial of Michael
Jackson’s doctor concluded
Friday with 145 prospective
jurors cleared for further ques-
tioning after answering an in-
depth questionnaire probing
their views about the King
of Pop and the criminal case
against his doctor.
The 30-page questionnaire,
which seeks extensive person-
al information, challenged pro-
spective jurors to share their
feelings about the dead super-
star and about the fact that
his famous family members
will be in court every day for
testimony.
They were asked whether
they have seen the posthumous
Jackson concert movie, “This
Is It,” and whether they have
bought Jackson CDs, DVDs or
memorabilia.
“Have you ever consid-
ered yourself a fan of Michael
Jackson or the Jackson fam-
ily?” they were asked.
They were required to spec-
ify how much they know about
the involuntary manslaugh-
ter case against Dr. Conrad
Murray, who has pleaded not
guilty in Jackson’s death from
an overdose of the anesthetic
propofol.
Among the questions: Have
potential jurors read newspa-
per stories about the King of
Pop’s death? Have they fol-
lowed coverage of legal devel-
opments? Did they watch the
funeral or memorial service for
Jackson who died on June 25,
2009, or did they try to attend
the services in person?
The form also gave pro-
spective jurors a warning that
publicity about the case will be
heavy and they must ignore it.
“There will be cameras,
reporters members of the
Murray and Jackson families,
and members of the public
present in the courtroom,” said
one question. “... Would the
presence of cameras and these
people affect your responsibil-
ity to be completely fair and
impartial to both parties in the
case?”
One question already
answered in court was that
every member of the jury pool
has heard of the high profile
case.
The questionnaire included
a list of 27 drugs including the
anesthetic propofol. Potential
jurors were asked whether they
had a familiarity with the sub-
stances, whether they or any-
one they know has taken them
and whether they have ever
had anesthetic for a medical
procedure.
Murray is accused of gross
negligence in his treatment of
Jackson and prospective jurors
were asked about their atti-
tudes toward doctors.
The prospects were asked if
they followed media coverage
on high profile cases including
those of O.J. Simpson, Robert
Blake, Phil Spector and Casey
Anthony.
“Did you form any opin-
ions about the criminal justice
system as a result of following
these cases?” the form asked.
Jackson jury survey released

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