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@John Jay

Worth Noting
September 22-25 Spirit Week
Times and locations vary A weeklong series of “Welcome to John Jay” events

News and Events of Interest to the College Community September 17, 2008

Emergency-Response Center Honors the Spirit of 9/11 Hero Firefighter
He was cut down in his prime, as one of the heroic first-responders who perished in the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001, but the name and spirit of one probationary firefighter lives on in the new Christian Regenhard Center for Emergency Response Studies at John Jay. The Center, which was formally launched on September 4, will serve as a research repository and information clearinghouse for the study of emergency responses to natural and manmade disasters. The opening ceremony held at the College was attended by members of the Regenhard family, elected officials, top brass from the Fire Department and members of Regenhard’s probationary school class. Regenhard had graduated from the Fire Academy less than six weeks prior to the attack on the World Trade Center. He was just 28 years old, assigned to Ladder 131 in Brooklyn, when he was killed in the collapse of the Twin Towers. “The Center will undertake important research for developing an integrated, comprehensive approach to the study of emergency responses to large-scale disasters,” said President Jeremy Travis, who acknowledged the support of Senators Hillary Clinton and Charles Schumer and Representative Jerrold Nadler in securing a $169,000 Congressional earmark to fund the work of the Center. Noting that 67 members of the College community — alumni, students and others — were killed in the terrorist attacks, Travis said, “We feel compelled to use our talents and energies to honor their memory and their sacrifice.” Congressman Nadler, who was on hand for the ceremony, said he was “very glad to have helped” with securing an appropriation for the Center. “Congress has a right and a duty to appropriate money for things like the Christian Regenhard Center,” Nadler said. “We have to make sure that some good and some benefit comes out of the tragedies and disasters we face.” “For the Regenhard family, this Center will

September 25 11:00 AM The Wire: Drugs, Prison and Community Survival
A student forum on current U.S. drug policy and mass incarceration Room 630 Haaren Hall

October 7 6:00 PM A Celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the Gerald W. Lynch Theater
Performances by students, faculty and friends of John Jay Gerald W. Lynch Theater

October 15 6:00 PM The Castle

Fighting back tears, Sally Regenhard (above, at microphone) addresses reporters and others gathered for the September 4 ceremony to launch the Christian Regenhard Center for Emergency Response Studies, named for her son, Firefighter Christian Regenhard (inset). Joining Mrs. Regenhard were her husband and daughter, FDNY Chief of Department Salvatore Cassano (left) and members of Regenhard’s Fire Academy class.

A play conceived and directed by David Rothenberg Tickets: $15 ( free for CUNY students with ID). Call 212-279-4200 for reservations Gerald W. Lynch Theater

October 22 6:00 PM Patrick V. Murphy Lecture
Room 630 Haaren Hall

October 30 5:00 PM When Will U.S. Courts Join the International Constitutional Conversation?
A lecture by Drew S. Days III, former U.S. Solicitor General Presented by the Center for International Human Rights

carry on Christian’s legacy,” said Regenhard’s mother, Sally, who as founder and chairwoman of the Skyscraper Safety Campaign has advocated for construction reforms and pressured Congress to investigate the collapse of the World Trade Center. “I wanted something in the academic realm that would have relevance to helping save first-responders and members of the public. Through the work of its dedicated faculty, this Center will honor all first-responders who lost their lives as a result of 9/11 and can help to ensure the safety of all responders in the future.” Professor Charles Jennings of the Department of Protection Management will serve as the Center’s first Director. He gave attendees at the launch ceremony his “personal assurance that this Center will work to live up to the promise of its namesake.” The Center plans an ambitious agenda of applied research and data collection aimed at promoting “best practices” and “good practices”

on issues pertaining to homeland security and emergency response. To that end, the Center will collect and analyze such information as oral histories of emergency response workers, GIS data and maps, communication transcripts, incident reports and digital photographs. Its staff will develop after-action and lessons-learned reports, publish periodic industry alerts, and produce scholarly and industry articles in the area of homeland security. With the help of the Lloyd Sealy Library, the Center also hopes to make public-domain documents available online. On October 1-3, the Center will co-sponsor a symposium on data structures for incidentrelated archives, which will help determine the structure of the Center’s repository of incidentspecific information. “We have a lot of work ahead of us,” said Professor Glenn Corbett, Chair of the Department of Protection Management and Chair of the Center’s Advisory Board.

Gerald W. Lynch Theater Lobby

English and Language Faculty in New Home
John Jay’s departments of English and foreign languages are up and running at their new home, the West 54th Street Academic Annex. This new facility is located on the seventh floor of the “Movie Lab” building at 619 West 54th Street between 11th and 12th Avenues. The annex houses 79 offices, two conference rooms, a kitchen and lounge area. Some faculty members’ office will provide bird’s-eye views of the John Jay women’s softball games at neighboring Clinton Field next spring, while others will overlook the Hudson River. The departments were relocated to the Academic Annex during the 2008 spring break. The quarters they formerly occupied on the first floor of North Hall are being converted to house consolidated student services. A shuttle service is being provided between the Academic Annex, the Westport Building and North Hall, operating on a fixed schedule between 7:45 AM and 7:50 PM. In addition, the shuttle will provide drop-offs at the Columbus Circle subway station upon request. “The College’s critical need for space will be assisted by this dynamic and very attractive addition to the campus,” said President Jeremy Travis.

Fresh Faces by the Hundreds

They came streaming in by the hundreds, filling the theater, the gym and numerous classrooms, as the fall 2008 freshman orientation on August 21 and 22 welcomed new students to John Jay. The supporting cast for the event, attended by more than 2,300 freshmen and their parents, included 48 student orientation leaders, representatives of the John Jay Alumni Association and members of the Office of Undergraduate Studies (at right, promoting the “Subway Series” freshman learning experience). President Travis hosted a luncheon reception for the newest members of the John Jay family.

New Semester, New Departments, New Faculty
The fall 2008 semester saw John Jay welcome 40 new full-time faculty members in 14 academic departments. These new professors include specialists to support the newest majors in Economics and English. President Jeremy Travis, pointing to what he called “the infusion of new energy and talent at the College,” noted that 35 percent of the fulltime faculty now at the College were hired in the past four years. “This new generation of faculty, with their demonstrated scholarly potential and devotion to excellence in teaching, will provide leadership at the College for decades to come.” Several new departments debuted as well. The former Department of Art, Music and Philosophy has been split in two, with the philosophy faculty having a new independent department while the art and music faculty remain together. The Department of Public Management has spun off a new Department of Protection Management and a new Department of Economics. The most recent additions to the faculty are: ANTHROPOLOGY R. Terry Furst, PhD, assistant professor, New School University (ethnography/substance abuse) Anthony Marcus, PhD, associate professor, CUNY Graduate Center (cultural anthropology) Patricia Tovar, PhD, associate professor, CUNY Graduate Center (urban anthropology) COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE ARTS Lyell Davies, PhD, assistant professor, University of Rochester (visual and cultural studies) ENGLISH Al Coppola, PhD, assistant professor, Fordham University (British literature) Jay Paul Gates, PhD, assistant professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison (medieval studies) Olivera Jokic, PhD, assistant professor, University of Michigan (Romanticism/women’s studies) Alexander Long, PhD, assistant professor, University of Delaware (creative writing) Richard Perez, assistant professor, CUNY Graduate Center (Latina/o literature) FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES Clara Castro Ponce, PhD, assistant professor, Brown University (Hispanic studies) Raul Rubio, PhD, assistant professor, Tulane University (Spanish) GOVERNMENT Susan Kang, PhD, assistant professor, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities (political science) Monica Weller Varsanyi, PhD, assistant professor, University of California-Los Angeles (urban/ political/legal geography) HISTORY Andrea Balis, PhD, lecturer, CUNY Graduate Center (health-care history) Anissa Helie, PhD, assistant professor, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (contemporary history) Tracy Musacchio, assistant professor, University of Pennsylvania (Egyptology) Hyunee Park, PhD, assistant professor, Yale University (history) Matthew J. Perry, PhD, assistant professor, University of Chicago (ancient history) LAW, POLICE SCIENCE AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION Joseph Pollini, lecturer, John Jay College of Criminal Justice (police science) Jon M. Shane, assistant professor, Rutgers University, (police administration) Cecile Van de Voorde, D Crim, assistant professor, University of South Florida (criminology) Klaus von Lampe, JD, assistant professor, Goethe Universität (organized crime) LIBRARY Karen Okamoto, assistant professor, University of Western Ontario (reference) MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Hunter Johnson, PhD, assistant professor, University of Maryland (computer science) Shaobai Kan, PhD, assistant professor, Wayne State University (systems science) PHILOSOPHY Hernando Estevez, PhD, assistant professor, DePaul University (social/political philosophy) Sarah Louise Scott, PhD, assistant professor, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (philosophy) PSYCHOLOGY Kevin Yabut Nadal, PhD, assistant professor, Columbia University (counseling psychology) Deryn Strange, PhD, assistant professor, Victoria University of Wellington (psychology) Daryl A. Wout, PhD, assistant professor, University of Michigan (social psychology) PUBLIC MANAGEMENT Amit Kumar, PhD, assistant professor, American University (public administration) David Shapiro, JD, assistant professor, Seton Hall University (commercial law) SCIENCES Jason Rauceo, PhD, assistant professor, CUNY Graduate Center (genetics/biomedical analysis) Richard Li, PhD, associate professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison (molecular biology) John Reffner, PhD, associate professor, University of Connecticut (polymer science) Shu-Yuan Cheng, PhD, assistant professor, St. John’s University (biochemistry/toxicology) SOCIOLOGY Mucahit Bilici, PhD, assistant professor, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor (sociology) David A. Green, PhD, assistant professor, St. John’s College, Cambridge, England (criminology) Antonio Pastrana Jr., PhD, assistant professor, CUNY Graduate Center (Latina/o studies) Lucia Trimbur, PhD, assistant professor, Yale University (sociology/African American studies)

College Now Program Gives Voice to “Poets for Justice”
Twenty 11th-graders from New York City were complemented by real-world accounts public high schools got an unusual taste of of guest artists such as renowned poet and John Jay in July through the first annual Poets playwright Amiri Baraka, founder of the Black for Justice Summer Institute, sponsored by the Arts Movement. College Now program. Students were also given the opportunity College Now partnered with two local arts to create, produce and perform their own organizations, Urban Word NYC and the Hipvocal works. They acquired hands-on skills in Hop Project, to produce a three-week program such areas as songwriting, music production that exposed high school students to the college and theory, audio engineering and marketing. environment and the expectations of collegeInstructors worked with students to produce an level coursework. Part history seminar and part audio CD, and the program culminated on July creative-writing workshop, the Institute examined 31 with a performance by students at the famed the historical roots and contemporary use of Nuyorican Poets’ Café. poetry as an instrument of social and political movement. “The Institute embraced the concept that poetry, particularly in hip-hop and spoken-word forms, provides a unique and effective way to engage youth in the educational process and to teach powerful lessons about democratic citizenship,” said David Jean-Paul, program director of College Now. The “justice poets,” as the students were called, were given a comprehensive overview of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s With acclaimed poet and playwright Amiri Baraka looking on, Vanessa Capistrano and its direct lineage to of Information Technology High School and Joseph Mercedes of Manhattan Village Academy present their work during the Poets for Justice Summer Institute. hip-hop. Course readings

Students to Reap Benefit from John Jay/DEA Partnership
John Jay College is on the brink of establishing a trailblazing relationship with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) that will promote career paths, professional development, research and other opportunities for students. A Memorandum of Intent and Purpose is due to be signed by President Jeremy Travis and several key DEA officials in late September. The memorandum’s stated purpose is to create a partnership between the College and the DEA’s Equal Employment Opportunity staff and Minority College Relations Program (MCRP) in which participants can conduct DEA activities geared toward fostering educational excellence and fulfilling the agency’s mission. The DEA will increase its outreach to students in disciplines such as criminal justice, finance and accounting, physical sciences and computer science. Under the terms of the two-year agreement, the DEA will recommend employment opportunities for students and graduates through the Volunteer Student Program, the Student Temporary Employment Program, the Student Career Experience Program and the Summer Honors Program. The agency will provide career advice and assistance to students, offer forums and workshops aimed at increasing career and educational achievement, and training opportunities at DEA for students and educators. The DEA will also initiate direct transfers of computer equipment and other technology to the College. The College’s responsibilities under the agreement include providing the DEA with facilities and services for hosting special educational and training programs for students, inviting government personnel to participate in training and conferences, and working with the DEA’s MCRP manager to establish a consistent and positive rapport with members of the College community.

FACULTY / STAFF NOTES
PRESENTING…
GLORIA PRONI (Sciences) presented a paper titled “Chiral Recognition by a CD-sensitive Dimeric Porphyrin Host: Recent Advances in the Assignment of Absolute Configuration” at the 235th American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition, April 6-10, 2008 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The work was done in collaboration with the laboratory of chemistry professor Nina Berova of Columbia University. Later in the spring, Proni presented a research talk, “Detection of Opioids in Urine by NMR Spectroscopy: Preliminary Studies” at the 40th Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting (MARM), May 17–21 in Bayside, Queens. Donna Wilson, a forensic science graduate student, worked on this project as a fulfillment of her thesis requirement. The work was conducted jointly with ELISE CHAMPEIL (Sciences). In late August, Proni presented a poster titled “Synthesis and Chiral Recognition of a Fish Pheromone by CD-Sensitive Dimeric Zinc Porphyrin Host” at the American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition in Philadelphia. Ekaterina Chadwick, an undergraduate forensic science student, coauthored the presentation. EFFIE PAPATZIKOU COCHRAN (English) was the lead discussant on a panel titled “Four Interrogating Concepts and Cases: Family, Law, and Language” at the Law and Society Annual Conference in Montreal, Canada, on May 31. ABBY STEIN (Interdisciplinary Studies) spoke at the International Psychohistorical Association on June 4 at Fordham University. Her presentation was titled, “From His Cradle to Your Grave: How Child Abuse Drives Violent Crime.” Stein also served as the invited “Critical Issues” columnist for the spring issue of ISSTD News, published by the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation. Her column focused on “First Defense: Dissociated States and Criminal Violence.” R. TERRY FURST (Anthropology) presented a paper, “A Qualitative Exploration of an OfficeBased Buprenorphine Demonstration Program in New York City,” at the Society for the Study of Social Problems in Boston. He also presented “A Harm Reduction Approach to the Provision of Bupernorphine” at a conference on the Developments in the Treatment of Dependence on Opiate: Practices and Perspectives, in France, and co-authored “Low Threshold Buprenorphine Prescribing,” a paper presented at the International Harm Reduction Conference in Barcelona, Spain. ELISE CHAMPEIL and GLORIA PRONI (Sciences) co-authored the lecture “Use of NMR Spectroscopy for the Detection of Opioids in Human Fluids” that was presented at the American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition in Philadelphia in late August. Donna Wilson, a recent graduate of the master’s degree program in forensic science, collaborated with the professors on this project as a fulfillment of her thesis requirement. depth study of changüí, a style of music and dance in Guantánamo, Cuba, that contributed to the development of salsa. KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) and MICHAEL AMAN (Communication and Theatre Arts) co-authored an article, “No Country for Old Men: Psychopathic Elements in an AcademyAward-Winning Film,” in which they stress the importance of criminal justice professionals learning elements of psychopathy from the film. The article appeared in the July/August issue of Community Corrections Report on Law and Corrections Practice.

PEER REVIEW
ROBERT GAROT (Sociology) has won a faculty fellowship for the spring 2009 semester at the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute at Queens College. The fellowship will help facilitate Garot’s research project on “Immigrants and the Law in Contemporary Tuscany.” ALLISON KAVEY (History) has been awarded a $15,000 faculty development grant by the City University of New York to fund her proposal, “Teaching Portfolios: An Analysis of their Uses for History Pedagogy.”

@ John Jay is published by the Department of Institutional Advancement John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Avenue, New York, NY 10019 www.jjay.cuny.edu Editor Peter Dodenhoff Submissions should be faxed or e-mailed to: Office of Communications fax: (212) 237-8642 e-mail: pdodenhoff@jjay.cuny.edu

BETWEEN THE COVERS
BENJAMIN LAPIDUS (Art and Music) will have his new book, Origins of Cuban Music and Dance: Changüí, published by The Scarecrow Press on October 28. The book is the first in-

educating for justice

@John Jay
Worth Noting
September 4 11:30 AM Launch of the Christian Regenhard Center for Emergency Response Studies
For information, contact Elizabeth McCabe, Director of Intergovernmental Affairs, (212) 237-8918 6th Floor, Haaren Hall

News and Events of Interest to the College Community August 27, 2008

Freshmen Can “Get on Track” with Subway Series Learning Experience
review by a Subway Series Evaluation Team made up of John Jay faculty. Students then become eligible to win prizes that include Barnes & Noble discount cards, one-month MetroCards and iPods. “The more stops you take, the more prizes you can win,” Byrne notes. “We are confident that your participation in this learning program will help you to develop the skills you will need to succeed at John Jay and beyond,” Travis tells students in his introduction. The Subway Series learning experience was conceived by Professor Mark McBeth of the English department and developed for the College’s Web site by a team from the Department of Institutional Advancement led by Director of Communications Christine Godek and including Johnny Taveras, Lenis Perez, Anh Phan and Doreen Viñas. It was unveiled at freshman orientation on August 21 and 22, and formally launched online on August 27.

September 12 8:30 AM Prisoner Reentry Institute Occasional Series on Reentry Research
Women, Reentry and Everyday Life: Time to Work? Venezia Michalsen Women’s Prison Association Room 630, Haaren Hall

September 12 9:00 AM Interrogation and Torture Controversy: Crisis in Psychology

Presented by the Center on Terrorism, the Division of Social Issues of the New York State Psychological Association and York College Gerald W. Lynch Theater

September 15 4:00 PM Book & Author Lecture

For the Thrill of It: Leopold, Loeb, and the Murder that Shocked Chicago Simon Baatz Room 630, Haaren Hall

September 18 3:30 PM Fall Faculty & Staff Meeting
Gerald W. Lynch Theater

September 22-25 Spirit Week
Times and locations vary

A weeklong series of “Welcome to John Jay” events

All aboard! The John Jay Subway Series is in the station, ready for incoming freshmen to begin the “journey of a lifetime.” The Subway Series is an innovative Web-based learning program aimed at helping new John Jay students make a successful transition from high school to college through what is described as “an (un)common learning experience.” This online experience seeks to “introduce you to some of the disciplines, knowledge, habits and abilities that you will encounter in your first semesters at college,” President Jeremy Travis tells students in a videotaped introduction to the pilot program. “We chose the subway system as the context for this learning experience because most students will come to John Jay by public transportation,” said interim Dean of Undergraduate Studies José Luis Morín. The flashy yet instructive Web site accompanying the pilot learning program opens with a fanciful rendering of the Columbus Circle subway entrance that encourages freshmen to “get on track.” After clicking on the entrance, students find themselves at the turnstiles to a station for an introductory message that explains the learning experience. Another click to “start the journey” brings students inside a subway car, complete with doors that open with a familiar “dingdong” sound to reveal a route map. Professor Dara Byrne of the Department of Communication and Theatre Arts serves as the students’ “guide” in a videotaped introduction. She points out: “Imagine yourself as a new passenger on this fun and challenging journey. By boarding John Jay’s ‘subway,’ you will learn new academic habits, strategies and abilities that will prepare you for the challenges you will face as you attend college classes.” The John Jay subway system has nine “learning stops,” each of which introduces the student to a different academic discipline. Students can

get off at one or two of the stops, or as many as all nine. After selecting a discipline, such as art, mathematics, science, anthropology, sociology or English, students are asked to read online materials that will help them to complete various assignments, which are then submitted for

Major Developments: College Adds New English, Economics Programs
It has been more than 30 years since John Jay College last offered an English major, but that has now changed with the unveiling of a new undergraduate major that includes what is said to be the country’s first “rich and rigorous curriculum in literature and the law.” The English major is one of two new curricular offerings at the College, along with a Bachelor of Science program in economics that will include an optional concentration in forensic financial analysis. Both new majors, recently approved by The City University of New York, make their formal debut with the fall 2008 semester. “Mission-specific” and “writing-intensive,” according to the proposal approved by the College’s Curriculum Committee, the English major will include a core requirement in Literature and the Law, along with an optional concentration in this field. Students may also opt for a concentration in more traditional literary study. Designed partly in recognition of the nearly one-third of John Jay students who say they aspire to attend law school, the English major is aimed at developing “moral acuity and independent thought,” according to the proposal. It will provide students with critical skills in analysis and argumentation, and “reinforce the interpretive and linguistic competencies desired of law school candidates.” The 36-credit major includes a mix of new and existing courses, including “The Word as Weapon,” “Shakespeare and Justice,” “Courtroom Drama,” and “Law in African Literature.” There will also be a capstone Senior Seminar in Literature and the Law. The new economics major, to be offered by the Department of Public Management, also takes notice of John Jay students’ law school aspirations. Students with a bachelor’s degree in economics are “among the most sought students in law school admissions,” the proposal for the new major states, citing a 1995 study suggesting that a “criminal justice student planning on applying to law school have a dual major or at least a minor in…economics.” Three concentrations will be offered within the new major: Economic Analysis, Investigation of Economic Crimes, and Forensic Financial Analysis. A new two-course sequence in forensic accounting and auditing will be offered, along with two new senior-level seminars. With the new economics major, John Jay assumes a leadership position in the rapidly growing fields of economics and crime and the investigation and analysis of commercial and economic criminal activity. Only one other college in the United States is said to offer a bachelor’s degree in economics and crime. The College’s economics faculty has secured a formal pledge of assistance from the faculty in the Department of Accounting at Borough of Manhattan Community College in further developing the new major.

John Jay Employees in Summer Spotlight
The largest on-the-job training winners of the Bravo! Employee initiative in John Jay’s history took Recognition Awards place to rave reviews on June 19“It’s not a stretch to say that 20. More than 400 employees took the satisfaction of being part of part in a variety of professional and the John Jay community comes personal development workshops, from knowing that, by doing our social networking opportunities and jobs well, we provide something entertainment offerings as part of of value and importance to the the first Bravo! Employee Summer world at large,” President Jeremy Institute. Travis said at a June 25 breakfast Organized and presented by the ceremony. college’s Department of Human The newest Bravo! honorees Resources, the Summer Institute are: Hector Bracero (Facilities), — subtitled “Building the Future Inez Brown (Strategic Planning), Together” — provided dozens of Rima Douglas (Student Activities), small-group sessions led by inMarianne Kahn (Physical house experts as well as outside Education and Athletics), President Travis and Senior Vice President Robert Pignatello (center rear) join the Bravo! award specialists. Participants could learn Katherine Killoran (Undergraduate winners in an enthusiastic thumbs-up salute at the June 25 recognition ceremony.. how to manage their money, deal Studies), Angelos Kyriacou what to expect but I was profoundly impressed with difficult co-workers, improve their health (Enrollment Management/International Students), by the buzz and energy in the air,” said Director and fitness, protect themselves against identity Luzennette Lima (Facilities), Marisol Marrero of Human Resources Services Christel Colon. theft, use an iPod or a Facebook account, or run (One-Stop Center), Tara Mastrorilli (Academic “Without exception, the feedback then and to various computer programs. Affairs), Shavonne McKiever (Enrollment date remains enthusiastic. I think the Summer Each day included a complimentary Management), Litna McNickle (Freshman Institute was a great success on so many levels continental breakfast and lunch, which were Services), Selwyn Morris (Facilities), Luis Negron and I can’t wait to do it again next year.” provided by corporate sponsors. At the end of (Media Services), Tyrone Oree (Physical Education a full morning and afternoon of workshops, and Athletics), Rafael Quiles (Undergraduate Making a difference employees could play softball or volleyball, Admissions), Cindy Robles (Payroll), Marilyn A week after the Summer Institute, 18 John participate in a yoga session or enjoy a jazz Simpson (Continuing and Professional Studies), Jay employees who are “making a difference” concert in the Gerald W. Lynch Theater. and Crystal Vasquez (Affirmative Action/Disabled with creative problem-solving and superior “Being so new to the College, I did not know Student Services). customer service were honored as the latest

Taking San Juan by Storm:

Biennial Justice Conference Is a Multinational Success
In the past, John Jay College has held its biennial International Conference on Justice and Policing in Diverse Societies in such cities as St. Petersburg, Russia; Bologna, Italy; Budapest, Hungary, and London. This June, the conference was sited for the first time in the Western Hemisphere, drawing an enthusiastic throng of more than 225 prominent scholars, civic leaders and government officials to San Juan, Puerto Rico. The three-day conference was cosponsored by several leading institutions of higher education in Puerto Rico, including the Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, the Catholic University of Puerto Rico, Universidad del Sagrado Corazón, the University of Puerto Rico Law School and El Sistema Universitario Ana G. Méndez. More than 20 countries from every continent except Antarctica were represented at the June 9-12 gathering, where 45 panel discussions and presentations explored the latest research on various criminal justice topics. “This conference provided a framework for criminal justice scholars and professionals to share knowledge and discuss strategies to address the most serious challenges of the 21st century,” said President Jeremy Travis. “John Jay College, our faculty and our conference partners are uniquely positioned to foster this important dialogue.” Led by President Travis, the John Jay delegation included 75 faculty members, college officials, and doctoral and graduate students. The conference’s opening plenary address on “Gender Justice at the International Criminal Court,” was delivered by the Hon. Navanethem Pillay, the only African judge of the appellate division of the International Criminal Court at The Hague. Other plenary speakers were Hugo Fruhling, director of the Center for Studies on Public Safety and professor at the Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Chile, and Jan J.M. van Dijk, a professor of victimology at Tilburg University in The Netherlands and former Policy Director on Crimes Issues for the United Nations in Vienna. A number of top government officials from Puerto Rico participated in the conference, at which sessions were held in both English and Spanish. Among them were Miguel Pereira, the commonwealth’s Secretary of Corrections, and

President Travis (standing, 4th from left) is joined by a blue-chip array of Puerto Rican officials, international criminal justice luminaries and John Jay College representatives at the governor’s mansion in Old San Juan during a welcoming reception before the opening of the International Conference on Justice and Policing in Diverse Societies. Among those on hand were Professor Mangai Natarajan, chair of the conference organizing committee (seated, 3rd from left) and the Hon. Navanethem Pillay (seated at right), the only African judge of the appellate division of the International Criminal Court at The Hague, who was the keynote speaker for the conference’s opening plenary session.

Marta A. Mercado Sierra, a prosecutor with the Puerto Rico Office of Women’s Affairs. Panelists and presenters discussed a broad array of topics, including governance and cybercrime, counterterrorism, therapeutic jurisprudence, international perspectives on domestic violence, curbing public corruption, Latin American prisons and justice, evolving

sentencing systems, juvenile justice, human trafficking, and much more. The Office of Gov. Anibal Acevedo Vilá of Puerto Rico underscored the importance of the International Conference by hosting an openingnight reception for attendees at La Fortaleza, the 16th-century fortress in Old San Juan that serves as the governor’s official residence.

It’s Back to School for Police Officials:
Combine 22 top Arizona police officials, an all-star faculty of current and former law enforcement luminaries, the staff of the John Jay Leadership Academy, stir thoroughly for three days, and you have the makings of “an unequivocal success,” according to Dr. Ellen Scrivner, the academy’s director. The program, held in Phoenix from June 2426, was a first for the academy’s Public Safety Executive leadership Institute, and was presented in conjunction with the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. “These sessions afforded participants an opportunity to sharpen their professional skills in responding to the increasingly complex public safety issues they confront daily,” said Scrivner. The Public Safety Executive Leadership Institute is a unique national program designed solely for top law enforcement officials. Its curriculum focuses on the complex interaction of strategic, cultural and political processes and how they combine to influence the effectiveness of public safety leadership. The faculty for the Arizona program included

Leadership Academy Scores with Arizona Road Show
Darrel Stephens, retired Chief of the CharlotteMecklenburg, NC, Police Department and former executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum; Paul Evans, retired Commissioner of the Boston, MA, Police Department; Frank Straub, Commissioner of the White Plains, NY, Police Department and an alumnus of John Jay, and George DeLama, former Managing Editor of the Chicago Tribune. The faculty led participants through a series of interactive learning dialogs — the Leadership Academy’s signature activity — to explore real-world, real-time public safety leadership challenges and solve multidimensional leadership

problems. Participants were required to shift their focus from discrete management skills and tactical activities to seeing the “big picture” through action-learning experiences. The Leadership Academy has been invited to deliver similar executive institute programs in two additional states.

College Experts to Screen Faulty Arson Cases
A $250,000 grant from the JEHT Foundation will allow John Jay College to establish an Arson Screening Project that will marshal the College’s forensic science, law enforcement and legal expertise to develop a process for screening arson cases, apply that process to a growing backlog of “bad science” convictions, and disseminate the assessments to the media and criminal justice agencies. The screening project will be run by John Jay’s Center for Modern Forensic Practice. “This will enable the College to utilize its expertise in examining cases where questionable forensic techniques were used to obtain an arson conviction,” said President Jeremy Travis. “Receiving this kind of support reaffirms John Jay’s position as a leader in criminal justice research.” James M. Doyle, the Center’s director, pointed out that the Arson Screening Project was developed in consultation with the Innocence Project, which already has a backlog of arson cases in need of scrutiny. The Innocence Project limits its own direct involvement to cases in which biological evidence can provide a conclusive answer. “This funding will enable the Center to collect and evaluate claims of wrongful conviction based on the use of a faulty, folk-science of fire indicators over the past 20 years,” said Doyle. “For the first time, we will expand beyond the Innocence Project tradition to take a systemic look at old convictions where there is no DNA evidence.” The project will be led by Doyle, along with Professor Peter D. DeForest of the Department of Sciences and Peter Diaczuk, the Center’s director of forensic science training. The New York-based JEHT Foundation supports research and best practices in areas relevant to the foundation’s core values of justice, equality, human dignity and tolerance.

FACULTY / STAFF NOTES
ON BOARD
LAURA DRAZDOWSKI (Physical Education and Athletics) was appointed head coach of the John Jay women’s softball team. Drazdowski, the College’s Assistant Director of Athletics for Marketing and Promotion, served as interim softball coach for the 2008 season, leading the team to a 12-23 record and a fourth place finish in conference play. Over the summer, John Jay added two other new head coaches. CARL NEDELL was named women’s tennis coach, succeeding AMY ROWLAND, who resigned earlier this year. Nedell had previously coached the John Jay men’s tennis team during the 2000 season, and has also coached for Hunter College, James Monroe High School and Forest Hills High School. JESSICA KOLACKOVSKY will serve as interim coach of the women’s swimming team for the 2008-09 season, filling in for JANE KATZ, who will be on sabbatical. Kolackovsky served as a volunteer assistant under Katz last season, and also serves as the College’s head lifeguard. She was a Big East Conference Academic All-Star as an undergraduate swimmer at Seton Hall University.

BETWEEN THE COVERS
ANDREW SIDMAN (Government) has an article, “Forecasting Non-Incumbent Presidential Elections: Lessons Learned from the 2000 Election,” due out in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Forecasting. Sidman also has 12 entries in the recently published Encyclopedia of U.S. Campaigns, Election, and Electoral Behavior (Sage, 2008). MARY GIBSON (History) received a Senior Fulbright Research Grant and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship to finish a book on the history of prisons in modern Italy. Her article “Ai margini della cittadinanza: le detenute dopo l’Unità italiana (1860-1915) [At the Margins of Citizenship: Women Prisoners after Italian Unification]” has been published in the journal Storia delle Donne [Women’s History]. NATHAN LENTS (Sciences) had his manuscript “Identification and Characterization of a Novel Mdm2 Splice Variant Acutely Induced by the Chemotherapeutic Agents Adriamycin and Actinomycin D” published in the journal Cell Cycle in June. DANIELLE SAPSE (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration), ELISE CHAMPEIL and ANNE-MARIE SAPSE (Sciences), working in collaboration with two professors from the University of Rouen, France,

had their paper “Interaction of DNA Fragments with Methyl Lithium” accepted for publication in the journal Comptes Rendus des Séances de L’Académie Française. The paper applies theoretical methods to the study of DNA fragments interaction with methyl lithium and its possible use for criminal investigation.

Academy of Scientific Criminal Investigation. KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) spoke to the Correctional Services Division of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department on May 23, about the educational needs of adult offenders and the programs funded by the National Institute of Corrections. M. VICTORIA PÉREZ-RÍOS (Government) presented a paper on “Western Bias in International Law: Francisco de Vitoria’s Writings and the Third World School” at the International Studies Association Annual Conference in San Francisco, CA, in late March.

PRESENTING…
EDGARDO DIAZ DIAZ (Foreign Languages) addressed a full house of doctoral students and faculty members at the University of Padova, Italy, on April 22. Diaz, an ethnomusicologist, spoke about the meaning and influence of Italian opera in the Caribbean. JANICE BOCKMEYER (Government) moderated the roundtable “Maximum Feasible Misunderstanding at 40: The Midlife Crisis of Community Participation?” at the annual meeting of the Urban Affairs Association in Philadelphia in late April. The roundtable explored the impacts of federal community development policies in the 40 years since the War on Poverty urban initiatives. MARGARET WALLACE (Sciences) was an invited speaker at the Fourth Annual Conference of the Korean Academy of Scientific Criminal Investigation. Wallace’s presentation on “Forensic Science: The Interface between Scientific and the Law” discussed the role of forensic biology in human identification and genotyping botanical and entomological samples. Wallace was also named Foreign Editor of the Journal of the Korean

PEER REVIEW
MARIA HARTWIG (Psychology) received the “Early Career Award” from the European Association of Psychology and Law, for her “excellent track-record in peer-reviewed papers in international journals and chapters in national and international volumes, and for being an inspiring example showing how a young researcher from a small place can find her way to a top position in the international arena.” PETER DODENHOFF (Institutional Advancement) recently earned his U.S. Coast Guard merchant captain’s certification. The license, awarded on the basis of experience, test scores, fitness, character references and other criteria, allows the for-hire operation of merchant and recreational vessels in U.S. coastal waters, including charters and yacht deliveries.

@ John Jay is published by the Department of Institutional Advancement John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Avenue, New York, NY 10019 www.jjay.cuny.edu Editor Peter Dodenhoff Submissions should be faxed or e-mailed to: Office of Communications fax: (212) 237-8642 e-mail: pdodenhoff@jjay.cuny.edu

educating for justice

@John Jay
Worth Noting
May 12 9:00 AM Media, Race and Capital Punishment
Presented by the Center on Media, Crime and Justice, the Center on Race, Crime and Justice, and the Department of Psychology Featuring David Kaczynski of New Yorkers Against the Death Penalty, and screenings of the documentaries Race to Execution and Juror Number Six Room 630, Haaren Hall

News and Events of Interest to the College Community May 7, 2008

Once Again, a Pulitzer Prize Has John Jay Professor’s Name on It
Professor John Matteson of the English department recently became the second member of the John Jay faculty to win a Pulitzer Prize for literature. He won the 2008 Prize for Biography for his acclaimed book Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father. The book examines the relationship between the celebrated author of Little Women and her father, the 19th-century utopian idealist and philosopher Bronson Alcott. Matteson was bowled over by winning the Pulitzer, echoing the words of John Steinbeck when he won a Nobel Prize for Literature, who said he felt “wrapped and shellacked.” nent member of our faculty,” said “I am extraordinarily pleased,” said President Jeremy Travis. “We are Matteson. “I am so thankful to have delighted to join the world in our celebeen able to do this with and for John bration of Professor Matteson’s talents.” Jay College, which hired me when no CUNY Chancellor Matthew one else would and has supported me Goldstein added: “Professor Matteson’s through thick and thin.” achievement adds to the luster of the Matteson, who holds a PhD in English University’s impressive roster of awardfrom Columbia University and a law winning faculty. I congratulate him on degree from Harvard Law School, has winning the Pulitzer Prize for his first taught literature and legal writing at book as he joins the winners’ circle of John Jay since 1997. His biography of Professor John Matteson beams after learning that his book Eden’s Outcasts (above CUNY faculty.” the Alcotts — the first to examine Louisa right) won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Biography. Mike Wallace, a Distinguished May and her father jointly — has been Professor of History at John Jay, won a Pulitzer books of 2007, is due out in a paperback edition hailed by critics as “engrossing,” “elegantly Prize for History in 1999 for his book Gotham: A later this year. written” and “impossible to put down.” The History of New York City to 1898. “This is a stunning achievement by a promibook, which was already cited as one of the best

May 27 5:30 PM Commencement Awards Ceremony

Gerald W. Lynch Theater

May 28 6:00 PM Honorary Degree Recipients’ Dinner
Office of the President

May 28 7:30 PM - 11:30 PM Night of the Stars: A Celebration to Honor the Graduating Class of 2008
(Event limited to members of the graduating class.) 6th Floor, Haaren Hall

May 29 10:30 AM & 3:30 PM 2008 Commencement Ceremonies
The Theater at Madison Square Garden

June 2 8:30 AM Immigration and Justice: Where Do We Go From Here?
Presented by the Center on Media, Crime and Justice Room 630, Haaren Hall

Spring Semester Brings a Bumper Crop of Student Scholarship & Fellowship Winners
Top John Jay students continue to win the notice of various outside entities, as scholarships, fellowships and other accolades —some of them first-time achievements for the College — have been pouring in over the past several months. “This is great news,” said President Jeremy Travis. “We have developed quality selection processes that have resulted in John Jay students being accepted to prestigious programs.” Below are highlights about these highachieving students. of the Phi Eta Sigma honor society, is concerned with studying alternatives to incarceration for mentally ill and juvenile offenders. The scholarship provided by the Greenwich, CT-based foundation allows outstanding students to connect with acknowledged leaders in public, private and nonprofit organizations. psychology and a law degree with a focus on human rights and gender law; RICHARD FERRIS, a McNair Scholar majoring in government, who has interned in the office of New York City Public Advocate Betsy Gotbaum, and hopes to pursue a doctorate in public policy; DI’INDRA FORGENIE, a justice studies major, who has her sights set on becoming an immigration or international human rights attorney; RENNAE FRANCIS, a forensic science major from Dominica in the Caribbean, who plans to pursue graduate degrees in criminal justice and business administration; EDWIN M. HERNANDEZ GARCIA, a Justice Scholar majoring in public administration, who plans to attend law school in hopes of playing a key role in the future development of his native Dominican Republic; DOMINIQUE MORGAN, a Peter Vallone Scholarship winner majoring in justice studies, who is currently a New York State Assembly intern and hopes to become a lawyer focusing on international human rights; DAVID MORGANTE, a CUNY Baccalaureate student majoring in international crime and terrorism studies, who served with the U.S. Marines in Iraq and hopes to become a special agent with the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Diplomatic Security; ELIZABETH SOTO, a public administration major, who is planning a career as a Foreign Service officer with the State Department, and is currently in line for a summer internship with the department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs; CHRISTOPHER YU, an international criminal justice major, who was recently awarded an internship with the Unitarian Universalist United Nations Office, a non-governmental organization. (More Student Achievers on Page 2)

Literary Journal Tackles Criminal Justice Issues
A new literary journal that, like John Jay College, takes a multidisciplinary approach to criminal justice issues will make its debut in May. The J Journal: New Writing on Justice “is framed within John Jay’s principal points of academic focus and was generated when we found no outlet for those writing creatively within the criminal justice field,” said Professor Adam Berlin of the English department, who is co-editor of the journal along with his colleague, English professor Jeffrey Heiman. The inaugural issue includes fiction, poetry and personal essays examining justice issues from a variety of angles. “Our contributors are professional writers, criminal justice professionals, lawyers, professors, police officers and inmates,” Heiman noted. “Responses to our calls for submissions were enthusiastic and came from all parts of the country.” The editors foresee two target audiences for the J Journal: readers of literary journals and criminal justice professionals interested in creative writing about such issues. They also hope to build a subscription base that includes libraries, criminal justice institutions, other criminal justice programs and targeted listservs. “Professors might find the journal a fruitful addition to scholarly reading lists,” Berlin added.

Alpine Ambassadors
As spring break arrived for John Jay students, a delegation of 10 high-achieving undergraduates once again made their way to Salzburg, Austria, to serve as student ambassadors to the prestigious 2008 Salzburg International Study Program. Professors Mark McBeth and Rosemary Barberet led the John Jay contingent, the members of which — all Dean’s List or honors students — included: ARIE BRAIZBLOT, an international criminal justice major, who plans to pursue graduate study in international relations and a career with a federal or international agency; KIMMESHA EDWARDS, a forensic psychology major and McNair Scholar, who hopes to pursue a doctorate in clinical

O Kaplan, My Kaplan!
John Jay’s first effort to compete in the Kaplan Leadership Program was an immediate success with the selection of JANET ARAYA, a criminal justice major. She was chosen along with nine other City University students for the program’s 2008 cohort, its largest to date. The Kaplan Leadership Program is aimed at helping associate degree students move into and successfully complete a bachelor’s degree. Araya’s acceptance letter from the foundation noted, “Your academic success, commitment to pursuing your education, the strength of your application and the positive impression you made during your interviews all contributed to our decision.”

Second Steamboat
AMANDA INGLE, a junior majoring in forensic psychology, recently became the second John Jay student to win a prestigious Steamboat Foundation Summer Scholarship. Like John Jay’s previous Steamboat Scholar, Abdoulaye Diallo, who won the award in 2007, Ingle will be partnered with the Center for Court Innovation. Ingle, a Justice Scholar and president

A mountain scene that greeted John Jay’s student ambassadors to the Salzburg International Study Program.

It’s Springtime, And Student CAMPUS SCENES THE PLAY’S Achievement Is in Bloom THE THING
CSTEPping Out
Two John Jay students won prizes at the 16th annual CSTEP (Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program) Statewide Student Conference, held April 4-6. Four students presented posters in the Natural Science category, with ANA SANCHEZ taking second place for her presentation on “Depurination of RNA by Pokeweed Antiviral Protein (PAP): FLuorometric Determination of Released Adenine.” EKATERINA CHADWICK won third prize for “Chiral Recognition of a Fish Pheromone by CDSensitive Dimeric Zinc Pophyrin Host.” A total of eight John Jay CSTEP students and two staff members attended the conference, at which 50 colleges and universities in New York were represented. This marked the second consecutive year in which John Jay students won prizes at the CSTEP conference. SCULLIN, ALI BESSYONI, NORHAN BASUNI, PAWEL MILKO, MONIKA LEKARCZYK, NORY BOIATCHIAN, LATOYA BROWN, MEGGIN SIMMERS, SUSANNE DUQUE, KSENIA KHAIMOVA, YURI HARRY, KAFAY LOUIE LIANG, ANEESA BABOOLAL, EWA HELENA HERNIK and RALITSA RUSKI. Research support was provided by students ARIE BRAIZBLOT, MARGARET COLBERT and SYBIL D’ANGELO.
Jonathan Butler, as a defendant, and Todd Davis, a prison guard, interact in a scene from In The Moment, a oneact play staged at John Jay on March 6, followed by a thought-provoking panel discussion. Written by Butler, a Hoboken, NJ, police officer, and Ross London, a former Hoboken judge, and produced by Professor Lorraine Moller of the Department of Speech, Theater and Media Studies, the play challenges audience assumptions about race, class, police shootings, black-on-black crime and prison dynamics. Said London: “What we are trying to do is...let the audience take a look from the inside of the young African-American cop faced with a life-and-death situation.”

Model Student
The state capitol in Albany came calling for John Jay junior MALYNDA RASCOE in April, with the news that she had won a scholarship to attend the Model State Senate Session Project. Rascoe, a government major with double minors in history and philosophy, plans to attend law school after graduating from John Jay in 2009, with the goal of getting involved in politics. The Model Senate Project, administered by the City University’s Edward T. Rogowsky Internship Program in Government and Public Affairs, each year brings together more than 60 CUNY and SUNY students for a series of intensive training seminars on state policy formulation, legislative processes, representation and leadership.

FREE AT LAST
Ishmael Beah fields a question from the audience at the April 10 Book & Author discussion where he spoke about his book A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier. The book chronicles his experience as a precocious 12-year-old boy in Sierra Leone who got swept up in that country’s brutal civil war in the 1990s. Beah became a machine gun-toting soldier living a drug-fueled life of casual mass slaughter, before he escaped army life at age 15 with help from UNICEF. Two years later, he made it to the United States, where in 2004 he graduated from Oberlin College in Ohio. He is now an outspoken children’s-rights advocate.

Taking on the World
A team of John Jay students won the Distinguished Delegation award at the National Model United Nations Conference that concluded on April 26 — the fourth consecutive year that that John Jay’s Model UN team has brought home a major award. “Our is the only John Jay team that participates in an academic competition at the international level and wins major awards on a regular basis,” said Professor George Andreopoulos, director of the John Jay Center for International Human Rights and an advisor to the team. “This year’s award is particularly satisfying for me since we were representing Greece” — Andreopoulos’s native country. The Model UN team is coached by Matthew Zommer, a lecturer in the Department of Government. The delegation members were: GABRIELE URSITTI, JOSEPH SIMONE, CHRISTINA LEE, SARAH REHMAN, PATRICK

Jolly Good Fellow
CAROLINA ALMARANTE, a McNair Scholar and former Salzburg student ambassador, who will graduate May 29 with a bachelor’s degree in public administration, has won a highly competitive Coro Fellowship in Public Affairs. The fellowship will give Almarante the opportunity to engage in a series of two- to seven-week projects in the St. Louis, MO, area. Completion of the fellowship also comes with automatic admission and possible scholarships to a number of selective graduate programs

New President in Store for Student Council
Shaheen Wallace, a junior majoring in government, will take office June 6 as president of the John Jay College Student Council for the 2008-2009 academic year. Wallace, who served this past year as a member of the council’s Judicial Committee, won the election handily during three days of balloting on March 29 and 31 and April 1. Serving with Wallace will be vice president Clement James, a graduating senior majoring in criminal justice, who also held that office this past year. Treasurer-elect Nadine Hylton, a BA/MA student in forensic psychology, was previously a council member at-large. James and Hylton are receipients of the 2008 CUNY Leadership Award. Class representatives also elected to the 2008 council, include: freshman Benigno Macias; sophomores Stephanie Montero and Natalie Vasquez; juniors Reeshad Ali, Sekou Kesselly, Victoria Oyaniran and Edwin Hernandez; and seniors Attalah Cox and Porfirio Fernandez. Davinder Sahota was elected to an at-large seat.

AUTHOR! AUTHOR!
Faculty members (above) from a wide range of disciplines who authored books published in 2007 were feted in President Jeremy Travis’s office on April 8. Their books, seen displayed at left, included everything from biographies of Louisa May Alcott and Johnny Depp to thoughtful examinations of gangs, comparative policing, issues in constitutional law and philosopher Martin Heidegger, among other topics.

FACULTY / STAFF NOTES
PRESENTING…
SUSAN OPOTOW (Sociology) presented a paper on “After the American Civil War: Moral Inclusion and Exclusion in the Reconstruction and Jim Crow Eras” and co-presented “Post 9/11 Conflicts in New York City, 2001-2006” at the Western Social Science Association convention in Denver, CO, on April 25. At the annual meeting of the American Association of Museums in Denver on April 29, she chaired a panel on “Quantifying Fun in the Museum Environment: Results of Recent Research.” An article by Opotow, “Not So Much as Place to Lay our Head: Moral Inclusion and Exclusion in the American Civil War Reconstruction,” was published in the March 2008 issue of the journal Social Justice Research. GLORIA BROWNE-MARSHALL (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) was a participant in an April 12 seminar on the Supreme Court’s 1857 Dred Scott decision. The
@ John Jay is published by the Department of Institutional Advancement John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Avenue, New York, NY 10019 www.jjay.cuny.edu Editor Peter Dodenhoff Submissions should be faxed or e-mailed to: Office of Communications fax: (212) 237-8642 e-mail: pdodenhoff@jjay.cuny.edu

seminar was sponsored by the Black History Committee of the Dutchess County Historical Society. Also participating in the seminar was EDWARD J. SHAUGHNESSY (professor emeritus of sociology). ELISE LANGAN (Government) presented a paper on “Muslims in Non-Muslim Countries” at the Comparative and International Education Society at Teachers College, Columbia University on March 17. On March 27, she presented her paper, “A Survey of Identity and Attitudes in French Higher and Secondary Education” at the American Educational Research Association in New York City. ITAI SNEH (History) served as a judge in the “Mock Trial on the Responsibility of States to Take Armed Action to Stop Genocide at the International Court of Justice,” and presented a paper on “Human Rights as the Missing Link in U.S. Foreign Policy: Justice, Politics and Publicity,” at the International Studies Association annual conference, held in San Francisco in late March. GENE O’DONNELL (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) was the keynote speaker at the annual James Connolly/Mike Quill Labor Celebration hosted in March by the Transport Workers Union, Local 100. BENJAMIN LAPIDUS (Art, Music and Philosophy) will be the scholar-in-residence for

the Jewish Museum of New York’s humanitarian mission to the Jewish community of Cuba from May 27 to June 3. On July 13, he will be performing at the Central Park Summerstage, and in August he will be performing in Japan with celebrated flutist Kaori Fujii. NATHAN LENTS and DIANA FRIEDLAND (Sciences) both presented their research at the recent annual conference of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, held in San Diego, CA. Lents presented a poster titled “Discovery and Characterization of a Novel DNA Damage-Induced Splice Variant of Mdm2.” Friedland delivered a lecture on “Pokeweed Antiviral Protein, an Unusual Ribosome Inactivating Protein.” She also presented the most recent data from her John Jay laboratory at a poster session, with a poster titled “Characterization of Pokeweed Antiviral Protein’s Interaction with Eukaryotic Initiation Factors and an S/R Loop Oligoribonucleotide.”

Stein was also an invited speaker at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Division 39, held on April 10 at the Waldorf Astoria in New York. GEORGE ANDREOPOULOS (Government) recently had his book Human Rights Education for the 21st Century, which he co-authored with Richard Pierre Claude, published in Portuguese by the University of Sao Paulo Press in Brazil. This is the third foreign language edition of the book; it previously appeared in Japanese and Chinese editions.

PEER REVIEW
DELORES JONES BROWN (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) received the 2008 William Bracey Award from the New York Chapter of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) on May 7. The award recognizes outstanding achievements benefiting the African-American community. ROBERT D. MCCRIE (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) was recently honored with the Richter H. Moore Jr. Educator Award by the Security and Crime Prevention Section of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. The award, presented by MARVIE BROOKS (Library), cited McCrie as a superb teacher who has helped many students to become good practitioners and educators, and who mentors students even after they graduate.

BETWEEN THE COVERS
ANN A. HUSE (English) published a review of Patricia Phillippy’s book Painting Women: Cosmetics, Canvases, and Early Modern Culture in the latest issue of Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History. ABBY STEIN (Interdisciplinary Studies) published her article “This Is Your Brain on Trauma” in the spring 2008 issue of the Journal of Psychiatry.

educating for justice

@John Jay
Worth Noting
April 30 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM 2008 Alumni Reunion
Gymnasium

News and Events of Interest to the College Community April 16, 2008

Improving Reentry Through Education
A two-day roundtable — “From the Classroom to the Community: Exploring the Role of Education during Incarceration and Reentry” — explored the role education plays in incarceration and reentry, in hopes of bridging the gap between the disparate worlds of corrections and academia. Hosted by John Jay’s Prisoner Reentry Institute and the Urban Institute Justice Policy Center on March 31 and April 1, the conference drew observers and participants from more than 20 states and from such professional spheres as academia, state and federal government, and the nonprofit sector. “We gather in this format to explore the difficult, complex and controversial phenomenon of increased incarceration and coming home, what that means for us and our communities,” said President Jeremy Travis, who served as the roundtable’s facilitator. Travis noted that there has been a “changed national mood” about incarceration and reentry, exemplified by passage of the Second Chance Act of 2007, which would reauthorize a grant program for returning offenders. With this, Travis said, our government is “making a statement about investing in people coming back from prison.” Topics raised by roundtable participants ranged from the moral imperative of providing inmates with an education to the practical means for doing so and the strategic reasons why it serves the best interests of communities. Asked for one good idea that would move the field forward, they responded with such suggestions as creating educational programs for inmates that could be transferred to schools on the outside; an information campaign for the public on how correctional education helps improve public safety; forming strategic partnerships that would raise employment among ex-convicts; and fostering the understanding that small measures can create big changes over time. In a presentation titled “Race, Poverty, and

Conference Looks at Role of Colleges in Aiding Ex-Offenders

April 30 - May 4 8:00 PM Mother Courage and Her Children: A Chronicle of War

Presented by the Department of Speech, Theatre and Media Studies

Gerald W. Lynch Theater (Call 212-237-8363 for ticket reservations.)

May 2 - 3 9:00 AM Human Trafficking and Migrant Smuggling

Part of the Policing Across Borders Project. Presented by the Center for International Human Rights, in collaboration with the Center for Security Studies of the Greek Ministry of the Interior (By invitation. For more information, call 212-484-1353.) Room 630, Haaren Hall

May 6 4:00 PM Behind Bars: Latinos/as in Prison
Room 630, Haaren Hall

Interim Dean of Undergraduate Studies Jose Luis Morin has the happy assignment of presenting Vaneza Guevara (center) with the 2008 Prisoner Reentry Fellowship, created and funded by El Diario/La Prensa, as the newspaper’s Publisher and CEO, Rossana Rosado, looks on. The fellowship, presented at the prisoner reentry conference on March 31, gives a highachieving undergraduate a $1,000 prize and the opportunity to work with the College’s Prisoner Reentry Institute.

Presented by the Department of Puerto Rican/Latin American Studies

May 7 4:00 PM Book & Author Lecture

Cop in the Hood: My Year Policing Baltimore’s Eastern District Peter Moskos Room 630, Haaren Hall

May 12 9:00 AM Media, Race and Capital Punishment

Education: Intersections with Incarcerations and Reentry,” Theodore M. Shaw, former president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, commented on the lack of a civil rights movement, such as there was in the 1960s, that would include the incarcerated. While there are civil rights organizations, he posited, there is no “organic movement” to draw people committed to these issues. Exploring the significance of providing postsecondary education for prisoners, Jeanne Woodford, a former warden at San Quentin and now chief adult probation officer for San Francisco County, CA, maintained that college is important to inmates. “San Quentin is popular for its college programs,” she said. Under California laws, returning inmates are released back into

their old communities, many of which have unemployment rates of 40 percent. “This makes it hard to succeed with or without college.” Myriad challenges exist to providing postsecondary education for inmates. Participants pointed to resistance from lawmakers who consider basic education in prison an amenity. Furthermore, they noted, the Internet has had such an enormous impact on education that if that technology cannot be used as a tool in inmate education programs to contact libraries, it will be tremendously difficult to provide collegelevel scholarship. Steve Schwalb, a veteran correctional administrator who is president and CEO of Pioneer Human Services, cautioned, however that “leadership on technology needs to come from prison administrators, not educators.”

Presented by the Center on Media, Crime and Justice, the Center on Race, Crime and Justice, the Department of Psychology, and the Office for the Advancement of Research Featuring David Kaczynski of New Yorkers Against the Death Penalty, and screenings of the documentaries Race to Execution and Juror Number Six Room 630, Haaren Hall

Center Makes Teaching “Visible & Valued”
One of John Jay’s newest academic innovations, the Center for the Advancement of Teaching, was formally launched on March 25 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony that also saluted the individuals whose insight and enterprise brought the new center into being. “What more important thing can we do than celebrate and elevate teaching?” said President Jeremy Travis at the ceremony, before a packed house in the center’s new office space in Room 333 Haaren Hall. The center, whose stated aim is “making teaching visible and valued,” is under the direction of Meghan Duffy, a 1999 graduate of John Jay who is currently a PhD candidate in theater studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. At the ribbon cutting, Provost Jane Bowers gave a special tip of the hat to the person she called her “noodge-in-chief,” Kathy Killoran, who brought the center from concept to reality. “The center,” said Bowers, “will put John Jay on the map as a place that really knows how to teach.” One of the first initiatives by the center is the production of an e-handbook providing a variety of helpful information Meghan Duffy, director of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching, and refor faculty at John Jay, which cently retired English professor Elisabeth Gitter, who served as the center’s interim will be accessible on the College director before Duffy. {Photo: Steve Singer] Intranet.On April 1, the center Gitter, who served as the first interim director and the Lloyd Sealy Library co-sponsored of the center, with the first “Innovations in a workshop titled “Exploring the Web of Collaboration Award” in recognition of her Knowledge,” aimed at helping faculty members “contributions to the life of the College over so and graduate students learn how to track experts many years.” The award will become an annual from a wide range of disciplines who are citing honor presented to a John Jay faculty member in their publications. Gitter’s name. The launch ceremony included a tribute to “I’ve had fun every year I’ve been here,” Professor Betsy Gitter, who recently retired said Gitter. “I’ve had an enviable career, and after a long career as a faculty member in the the collaboration with colleagues has been Department of English. President Travis presented wonderfully invigorating.”

The Big Day Nears for Graduating Class of 2008
Get ready, Class of 2008 — your graduation ceremonies are just around the corner! On Thursday, May 29, at the Theatre at Madison Square Garden, John Jay will present degrees to an anticipated graduating class of more than 2,800 students. Duplicating the success of last year’s commencement exercises, there will once again be two graduation ceremonies, one at 10:30 AM and one at 3:30 PM. The 10:30 ceremony will be for students receiving degrees in computer information systems, criminology, deviant behavior, government, international criminal justice, judicial studies, justice studies, forensic psychology, forensic computing and legal studies, as well as for recipients of dispute resolution certificates. At 3:30, the College will present degrees in forensic science, corrections, criminal justice, fire science, police studies, public administration, protection management and security management. The College will award honorary doctoral degrees to Gary L. Wells, a distinguished professor at Iowa State University and a pioneering expert in eyewitness identification; Ellen Wolf Schrecker, a professor at Yeshiva University and one of the leading historians of the Cold War era, and Dr. Paul Farmer, a physician who is founding director of Partners In Health, an international organization that treats some of the world’s poorest populations. This year’s commencement-related festivities will also include more than two dozen awards’ ceremonies, receptions, dinners, and a rooftop cocktail party and dance for the Class of 2008. For complete information on the 2008 commencement, consult the College Website at www.jjay.cuny.edu/academics/1230.php.

Race, Crime & Justice Center Gets Permanent Director
Jones Brown Removes “Interim” from Title
Professor Delores Jones Brown of the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration was formally announced as director of the College’s Center on Race, Crime and Justice on March 26, after having served as the center’s interim director since late 2005. “This is an auspicious day for John Jay,” President Jeremy Travis said at a reception honoring Jones Brown. “This center will be one of the most important activities for the College in the decades to come. Nobody else does this. Professor Jones Brown nurtured the center through its incubation stage and put it on the map.” To date, the center has sponsored or cosponsored a variety of seminars, symposia and discussions on such topics as stop-and-frisk practices, the death penalty, racial profiling, the Scottsboro Boys case, prisoner reentry and minorities in policing. The center recently welcomed its second visiting scholar, Rod Brunson, an assistant professor of justice studies at the University of Alabama-Birmingham. The center is a continuation of an idea that Travis first began to consider while he was a senior fellow at the Urban Institute. Seed money to plan and create the center was provided by the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation. A former Monmouth County, NJ prosecutor, Jones Brown received high praise from Dean for Research James P. Levine for her “boldness, inclusiveness and congeniality.” He noted that she received an award for excellence from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences in 2006 for her work in launching the center.

Professor’s Book Sizes Up Life After Prison in “Zebratown”
The Elmira, NY, area is home to four correctional facilities, as well as to an unusual mixed-race neighborhood known to locals as “Zebratown.” For the past several years, the area has also served as a part-time home of sorts for John Jay Professor Greg Donaldson. His forthcoming book, with the working title of Zebratown, will examine issues of prisoner reentry through the lens of ex-convict Kevin Davis, one of the area’s Professor Greg Donaldson (rear, at microphone) discusses the five years of research that residents. went into the writing of his manuscript Zebratown. On March 27, before a The fact is that we’ve become addicted to certain standing-room-only audience, Donaldson disstereotypes.” He then decided to try writing a cussed the genesis of his research, some of the book about “Killer Kev’s reentry into society.” pitfalls he has encountered, and the process of A hulking, hyper-alert man with zero tolerance writing what he calls “creative nonfiction.” for disrespect, Davis “always wanted to be a star, A member of the Department of Speech, and saw the possibility of a new book about him Theater and Media Studies, Donaldson first met as a capstone to his career,” Donaldson said. Davis while doing research for his book The Methodically fielding a steady barrage of quesVille: Cops and Kids in Urban America (Ticknor tions from the students and faculty members in & Fields, 1993), a no-holds-barred look at life in the audience, Donaldson said he made sure Davis New York City’s tough Brownsville neighborhood. was aware that his story would be told “flaws Davis, known by the street name Killer Kev, and all.” He approached the research and writing served 10 years in prison for murder, and did two of the book “as a journalist, not an academic.” things upon his release. He decided not to return The research included numerous visits to Elmira to New York City, but rather to remain in Elmira, to meet with Davis and his wife, a white woman in the Zebratown section that was home to nufrom Pennsylvania. He used court records, prison merous other ex-inmates and mixed-race couples records, diaries, interviews and other sources to and families. He also promptly got in touch with come up with the truth of the story. “You have Donaldson. to triangulate your data, and you have to have Donaldson acknowledged that he had been 20 times more information than you’re likely to eager to research and write a book about a peruse,” Donaldson said. Through it all, he never son “behind the gangsta types in rap songs,” found Davis to exaggerate “even one single bit.” although he admitted that his motivation was Davis has visited Donaldson’s “Criminal Justice fraught with misgivings. “Why would I want in the Theater” class, where he always comes off to write about and reinforce a stereotype?” he as “polite, soft-spoken and understated.” mused. “I realized a good story isn’t enough.

President Travis introduces Professor Delores Jones Brown as the new Director of the Center on Race, Crime and Justice.

Federal Funds Help Train New Homeland Security Scholars
John Jay faculty will continue to make a powerful contribution to the nation’s antiterrorism and domestic security efforts, aided by $580,063 in new multiyear grants from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The funds will be used to support education, research and professional development aimed at training the next generation of homeland security experts and scholars. According to President Jeremy Travis, the homeland security grants “solidify John Jay’s role as a premier research institution for the study of terrorism and other domestic security issues. These grants will help to support innovative faculty projects that will prepare our students for future leadership roles.” One three-year grant of $291,835 will fund a team of researchers from the CUNY Graduate Center and John Jay College of Criminal Justice. This funding will enable the institution to recruit, support and train an interdisciplinary group of criminal justice faculty and students in the CUNY Criminal Justice Doctoral Program and the undergraduate John Jay Criminal Justice Honors Program to teach and conduct research on homeland security and terrorism, targeting applicants from traditionally underrepresented groups. Under the direction of Professors Stephen Rice of the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration and Joshua Freilich of the Department of Sociology, this grant will also afford students the opportunity to participate in internships with peer institutions as well as develop and present their own empirical research. A second grant, totaling $288,768, will fund a project titled “Educating Tomorrow’s Homeland Security Leaders Today.” Led by Professor Peter Romaniuk of the Department of Government, the project will enhance the focus of John Jay’s graduate curriculum on homeland security, and increase the ability of junior faculty members to conduct research into homeland security topics involving the social, behavioral and economic sciences. The grant will also help to create a Homeland Security Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (HS-STEM) community of students and support the recruitment and retention of minority graduate students interested in homeland security careers.

FACULTY / STAFF NOTES
BETWEEN THE COVERS
TODD CLEAR (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) has had his book Imprisoning Communities: How Mass Incarceration Makes Disadvantaged Communities Worse (Oxford University Press, 2007) chosen as one of the finalists for the annual C. Wright Mills Book Award, presented by the Society for the Study of Social Problems. GEORGE ANDREOPOULOS (Government) recently published “The Challenges and Perils of Normative Overstretch” in The United Nations and the Politics of International Authority (Routledge, 2008). Andreopoulos was also recently a Visiting Professor at the Institut des Études Politiques of the University of Toulouse in France, where he lectured on “Crimes of War and Crimes of Peace.”

PEER REVIEW
GLORIA PRONI (Sciences) has been selected by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation to receive a 2008 Special Grant in the Chemical Sciences. The $31,180 award will support Proni’s project titled “Chemistry is All Around Us.”

the College’s Offender Profiling and Crime Scene Analysis Research Unit. JEREMY TRAVIS (President) gave the Orison S. Marden Lecture at the New York Bar Association on March 19, on the subject of “Race, Crime and Justice: A Fresh Look at Old Questions.”

THOMAS A. KUBIC (Sciences) moderated a session on forensic microscopy at the recent 46th Annual Eastern Analytical Symposium in Somerset, NJ. Among the more than 3,500 scientists and students in attendance were John Jay science faculty members PETER DE FOREST, NICHOLAS PETRACO and PETER DIACZUK.

PRESENTING…
EFFIE PAPATZIKOU COCHRAN (English) was the invited keynote speaker on March 18 at the spring faculty development workshop at Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, NY. Her topic was “Creating Inclusive Pedagogies for Diverse Classrooms: Building Bridges and Forging Links.” ELLEN BELCHER (Library) presented a paper titled “Interpreting Halaf Figurines: Empirical Proposals” at the recent annual conference of the British Association of Near Eastern Archaeologists, in Liverpool, UK. On March 4, she presented a paper on “The Halaf Beads and Pendants from Domuztepe (Kahramanmara, Turkey): Technological and Reductive Strategies,” at the Sixth International Conference on Chipped and Ground Stone Tools of the Fertile Crescent, in Manchester, UK. GABRIELLE SALFATI (Psychology) was the featured speaker in March at the monthly meeting of the Society of Professional Investigators in Manhattan. Salfati is director of

@ John Jay is published by the Department of Institutional Advancement John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Avenue, New York, NY 10019 www.jjay.cuny.edu Editor Peter Dodenhoff Submissions should be faxed or e-mailed to: Office of Communications fax: (212) 237-8642 e-mail: pdodenhoff@jjay.cuny.edu

Smiles of Fame

The newest members of the John Jay Athletics Hall of Fame sport high-wattage smiles after their March 19 induction ceremony. Joined by former Director of Athletics Susan Larkin (left) and her successor, Davidson Umeh (right), the inductees are: Derrick Tinsley, basketball and baseball; Gregory Andrew, basketball; Carri Raffone, softball, and William Allard, pistol shooting. Full details on the athletic greats and their accomplishments can be found by visiting the Hall of Fame on the fourth floor of Haaren Hall.

educating for justice

@John Jay
Worth Noting
March 27 12:30 PM “Zebratown”
A research discussion by Professor Greg Donaldson Presented by the Center on Race, Crime and Justice, the Department of Speech, Theater and Media Studies, the Department of African-American Studies, and the Office for the Advancement of Research Room 630, Haaren Hall
The Second Annual Law Day at John Jay, held on March 1, turned into a day of firsts, as the College presented its first John Jay Medal for Justice to the Hon. Judith Kaye, the first woman to serve as Chief Judge of the State of New York. John Jay, one of the nation’s founding fathers, was the first person to hold the chief judgeship in New York.

News and Events of Interest to the College Community March 26, 2008

Law Day Is a Blue (and Gold)-Ribbon Event as College Salutes New York’s Chief Judge
Speakers Map Out Paths to Legal Careers for John Jay Students

April 3 3:15 PM The DNA Wars: Science, Law and Controversy in the Making of DNA Profiling
Professor Jay Aronson, Carnegie Mellon University Presented by the Office for the Advancement of Research Room 610, Haaren Hall

At the Law Day event, sponsored by the College’s Pre-Law Institute, Kaye delivered the first Samuel and Anna Jacobs Foundation Lecture on the Law and the Legal Profession. Kaye told the more than 250 students who had come to learn more about legal careers that they should believe in themselves and have the confidence to pursue their dreams. “However difficult your path may seem, the only obstacles are the ones you create,” the Chief Judge said. “No calling offers so many opportunities to contribute to policy-making, change the world or change one person at a time.”

President Jeremy Travis presents New York State Chief Judge Judith Kaye with the first-ever John Jay Medal for Justice at the second annual Law Day event on March 1. At right, Bronx Supreme Court Justice Wilma Guzman, a 1978 graduate of John Jay, with her Alumni Honoree award.

April 7 5:30 PM Graduate Lecture Series

Poisoning: The Interface between Clinical and Forensic Science Dr. Lewis Nelson, Director, New York City Poison Control Center Multi-Purpose Room, North Hall

April 10 3:30 PM Book & Author Lecture
A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier Ishmael Beah

Gender biases were very noticeable when Kaye first entered the legal profession, she recalled, with separate ladies’ entrances to the court and a separate lunch club for women. In fact, she said, some challenges still exist with regard to promoting diversity in the legal system. Kaye drew a parallel between John Jay the

man and John Jay College, noting that both are committed to justice. “John Jay College carries forth its namesake John Jay’s tradition of commitment to the public good and advancement of our collective knowledge in the rule of law,” she said, calling the College “a great local, state and global leader” and President Jeremy Travis a “cool, dynamic president.” The Law Day event included workshops and panel discussions on the law school application process, financial aid options and how to prepare

for the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). Attendees also learned about life as a law school student from a distinguished panel of John Jay alumni who are now practicing law. One of those former John Jay students on hand for Law Day was Bronx Supreme Court Justice Wilma Guzman, a 1978 graduate who was the day’s Alumni Honoree. Guzman urged the students to “work in the trenches, and know everything there is to know.” “The American Dream happens every year at John Jay,” Guzman said.

Gerald W. Lynch Theater Lobby

“Energized” Bowers Named as Provost
After an exhaustive ideas about ways to support national search, President scholarship and teaching, Jeremy Travis named Dr. and strong interpersonal Jane Bowers as the College’s skills. I am confident that new Provost and Senior she will provide energetic Vice President for Academic and creative leadership Affairs. during the critical next Travis formally announced phase of our journey toward the appointment to academic excellence.” enthusiastic applause at Travis specifically noted the Spring Faculty and Staff that during Bowers’ tenure Meeting held on March 3. as interim Provost, she has Bowers had been serving created new financial and as interim Provost since budgetary systems, opened July 1, 2007. Previously, new lines of communication she was John Jay’s Dean of with fellow administrators Undergraduate Studies. and the faculty, forged Dr. Jane Bowers is all smiles after the formal an“Jane is passionately new relationships between nouncement of her appointment as Provost and devoted to our College,” Academic Affairs and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. Travis said. “In a time of Student Development, historic change at John Jay, we are fortunate and worked to recruit and retain “the very best to have as our academic leader someone with faculty.” deep knowledge of our community, creative As Dean of Undergraduate Studies, and subsequently as interim Provost, Bowers played a key role in the design and implementation of educational partnerships with CUNY community colleges and the development of new liberal arts majors at John Jay. Bowers, who was a member of John Jay’s English department faculty from 1987-1997, said she was “excited by the opportunity come back to a college I love and help shape its future. It’s a privilege and a dream come true.” “I have a lot of ambition for the College,” Bowers said, “and I’d like to help students realize their ambitions. Love is not too strong a word for how I feel about the students here.” One of the best parts of her job, Bowers said, is getting to know the future faculty of John Jay through her involvement in the recruitment process. “It’s exciting to have all this fresh energy and vision.” “I am gratified and very much energized by President Travis’s vote of confidence in me, and the many expressions of congratulation I’ve gotten from colleagues at John Jay.”

April 11 8:30 AM - 5:15 PM Literature and Law Conference
Presented by the Department of English Registration required. Online at http://literatureandlaw.blogspot.com Various campus locations

On With the Show
College Names New Theater Director
Shannon R. Mayers, a long-time veteran of the New York City performing arts scene, joined the John Jay community on March 10 as the College’s new Theater Services Director. Mayers was director of production at the Arts World Financial Center in New York from 20022007, and production manager at the Sylvia and Danny Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College from 1998-2000. She is no stranger to the City University, having served as an adjunct professor of drama, theater and dance at Queens College. In the summer of 2007, Mayers was program director for the Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy, where she negotiated the largest income-generating event for the park, the Microsoft Zune Concert, and increased revenues for the park and the conservancy. She has also worked with the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Theater for a New Audience, the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, and the Ellen DeGeneres show, among other venues. “I am confident that her broad knowledge of the arts and the educational community will help expand, enhance and transform the theater’s ongoing mission at John Jay to become a substantial performing arts center,” said Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration Robert Pignatello. “She will help integrate this enormous asset into the life of our students, the curriculum and the outside community.”

Once Again, Rifle Team Finds Its Mark
among other schools. With the recent spate of Leading the rifle team in the championship seasons accumulating for championship meet, as he had all John Jay College athletic teams, the coseason, was sophomore Stephen ed rifle team was not about to be left Wilson, who scored 562 in small-bore behind. On March 1, the team captured and 548 in air rifle. its fourth Mid Atlantic Conference The rifle team’s victory also (MAC) title in five years, capping off brings to four the number of John a winning season that began back in Jay athletic teams that are reigning October. conference champions, along with The championship-winning meet in the baseball, men’s cross-country and Cambridge, MA, included a 2028-1909 men’s basketball teams. At a victory victory over Massachusetts Maritime celebration on March 4, head rifle Academy in small bore rifle. In a threecoach Vincent Maiorino acknowledged way matchup in the air-rifle discipline, Head coach Vincent Maiorino (right) and the championship John Jay rifle team. the championship company his team the John Jay team shot a 2131 to was keeping. “It’s nice to be among the elite in defeat SUNY Maritime College, with 2095, and regularly compete against Hofstra University, the the College along with the basketball, baseball Massachusetts Maritime, with 1984. University of Akron, Virginia Military Institute, and cross-country teams,” he told the audience. Competing in the Mid Atlantic Conference, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Massachusetts “I also would like to thank the many who have since the CUNY Athletic Conference does not Institute of Technology, Princeton University supported us through all our success.” include a rifle program, the John Jay shooters and the US Naval and Coast Guard academies,

Irish Eyes Are Smiling at Annual McCabe Breakfast
The annual “wearing o’ the green” took place March 14 at John Jay, as the McCabe Fellowship Breakfast honored a “firm advocate, supporter and fan” of the College, New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn. The event celebrates the exchange program that was created in memory of Irish police detective Jerry McCabe, who was killed in the line of duty during an attempted robbery in June 1996. Each year, two or more members of An Garda Síochána, the Irish national police, come to John Jay for an intensive course of study toward a graduate degree. Quinn was introduced by President Jeremy Travis, who called her “someone known to this community, the community of people who care about New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn gestures during her remarks as policing.” Travis recalled how, in keynoter at the annual McCabe Fellowship Breakfast on March 14. the aftermath of the murder of Hanafin, the Irish Minister for Education and John Jay graduate student Imette St. Guillen in Science, who noted that “the top education February 2006, “Christine Quinn came through provided at John Jay College makes a major for us and we were able to turn our grief into contribution to the success of policing in something very positive,” namely the all-day Northern Ireland.” Nightlife Safety Summit that was held at the College in September of that year. “This is a College very much rooted here in With the summit session, Quinn told the New York, yet with an international outreach and audience, “John Jay College lived up to the influence,” said Hanafin. best sense of what a public university should be Continuing on the morning’s theme, Sir Hugh about.” Orde, Chief Constable of the Police Service of Quinn, whose support for the NYPD includes Northern Ireland, said the McCabe Fellowship a successful effort to provide upgraded, “demonstrates just how much good can come customized body armor for all uniformed officers, from something so tragic.” Niall Burgess, the praised police by noting that they exhibit “a Irish Consul General in New York, recalled that tremendous amount of bravery to do a job with Detective McCabe “embodied excellence in far less recognition than they deserve.” policing in every respect.” The McCabe breakfast, Over the next year, Quinn said, “I hope to he added, has become “an extraordinarily deepen the City Council’s commitment to people important event on a busy St. Patrick’s Day in our uniformed services.” calendar in New York.” One of numerous speakers who paid tribute to Anne McCabe, the slain detective’s widow, the ongoing success of the McCabe Fellowship pointed out “how consoling it is for me and my program, Quinn called it “a great opportunity family to stand shoulder to shoulder with people to learn, to plagiarize even, and to do the most who stand for the same rights and beliefs as we can to provide the best police training we we.” can.” She was followed to the podium by Mary “Of all the memorials to Jerry,” she said, “the fellowship program at John Jay has a very special place in my heart.”

CAMPUS SCENES

THE EVIL THAT MEN DO . . .
One of the world’s leading experts on torture, Dr. Darius Rejali, a professor of political science at Reed College in Oregon and author of Torture and Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2007), addressed a full house of students and faculty at John Jay on March 13 on the subject of “Torture, Democracy and Our Future.” Presented by John Jay’s Center for International Human Rights and the CUNY PhD/MA Program in Political Science, Rejali noted that throughout history, democratic societies have sometimes set the pace when it comes to torture, although their track record is nowhere near as bad as that of authoritative regimes. Torture, Rejali said, remains “an absolute danger to democratic life.”

REMEMBERING JIM FYFE . . .
Dean for Research James Levine presents the 2008 Fyfe Fellowship award to Kevin McCarthy, at the 2nd James Fyfe Police Accountability Conference, “Stop and Frisk: Policy, Practice and Research,” on February 28. On hand to remember the late John Jay distinguished professor were (from left): Fyfe’s widow, Dr. Candace McCoy; Dr. Karen Terry, executive officer of the PhD Program in Criminal Justice; 2007 Fyfe Fellow Charles Lieberman; Levine; Fyfe’s sister, Dorothy R. Fyfe; Dr. Delores Jones Brown, director of the Center on Race, Crime and Justice; and McCarthy.

LIFE OF RILEY . . .
New Orleans Police Superintendent Warren J. Riley gave the Big Apple a taste of policing in the Big Easy when he visited John Jay on February 27 as the keynote speaker for the annual Lloyd Sealy Memorial Lecture, co-sponsored by the College and the New York chapter of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE). Riley, a 27-year policing veteran, took the reins of the New Orleans department in the fall of 2005, less than a month after his city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina.

Sign Up Now for CUNY Alert

An aggressive sign-up period has begun to encourage John Jay students, faculty and staff to participate in CUNY Alert, the new universitywide emergency notification system that will soon go online CUNY Alert will enable the University’s campuses to provide alerts and timely information in emergencies, such as severeweather scenarios, fires and bomb threats, civil disturbances, major road closings and threats to personal safety. Participation is elective in the secure, Web-based alert system, which will provide messages ranging from specific instructions to general warnings, depending on the severity of a given incident. By signing up online at www.cuny.edu/alert — or on campus at one of several information kiosks — participants can choose how they wish to receive voice or text notifications: cell phone, home phone, e-mail or IM, or any combination of these. The Web page provides step-by-step instructions for signing up, and the process takes less than two minutes. “The College is committed to doing all we can to ensure the safety of all members of the College community,” said President Jeremy Travis. “CUNY Alert will help us achieve this goal.”
@ John Jay is published by the Department of Institutional Advancement John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Avenue, New York, NY 10019 www.jjay.cuny.edu Editor Peter Dodenhoff Submissions should be faxed or e-mailed to: Office of Communications fax: (212) 237-8642 e-mail: pdodenhoff@jjay.cuny.edu

This year’s McCabe fellows are Gardaí Eleanor O’Halloran, who is in the Public AdministrationInspector General program, and Olivia Markham, who is pursuing a master’s in criminal justice. They will both complete their graduate studies at John Jay this summer.

FACULTY / STAFF NOTES
PRESENTING…
YI HE (Sciences) recently presented a work titled “Determination of Chloroanilines in Environmental Waters Using Hollow Fiber Supported Liquid-Liquid Microextraction,” at the Pittcon 2008 conference held in New Orleans March 2-7. published in the conference proceedings of the Second European IAFL Conference on Forensic Linguistics/Language and the Law. The paper was originally presented at the International Association of Forensic Linguistics (IAFL) Conference in Barcelona, Spain. DOROTHY MOSES SCHULZ (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) coauthored an article, “Making Rank: The Lingering Effects of Tokenism on Female Police Officers’ Promotion Aspirations,” which appears in the March 2008 issue of Police Quarterly. Professor Carol A. Archbold of North Dakota State University was her co-author.

BETWEEN THE COVERS
JOSHUA FREILICH (Sociology) co-authored a research brief, “Surveying State Police Agencies about Domestic Terrorism and FarRight Extremism,” that the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) recently published. The lead author of the brief was JOSEPH SIMONE JR., a graduating senior at John Jay, who was awarded two START undergraduate research fellowships to work with Freilich and Professor Steven M. Chermak of Michigan State University on the project. KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) authored an article titled “Providing Incentives to Offenders in the Reentry Process,” which appeared in a recent issue of the Journal of Community Corrections. EFFIE PAPATZIKOU COCHRAN (English) had a paper, “Judicial Syntax: A U.S. History,”

Professors Joseph King and Serguei Cheloukhine with their credentials from the Russian Academy for the Study of National Security.

PEER REVIEW
DANIELLE SAPSE (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) received a $3,000 PSC-CUNY grant for research into the application of theoretical methods to forensic science and its legal aspects, and the presentation of the results in a series of lectures at the University of Rouen in France this fall. JOSEPH KING and SERGUEI CHELOUKHINE (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) were elected as distinguished professors of the Russian Academy for the Study of National Security. In addition, their article,

“Corruption Networks as a Sphere of Investment Activities in Modern Russia,” which was featured in the March 2007 issue of the Journal of Communist and Post-Communist Studies, was named one of the “Top 25 Hottest Articles” for 2007 by the website ScienceDirect. RICHARD KOEHLER (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration, retired) was recently honored by the municipal government of Valadares, Brazil, for the 15 years of service that he and his law firm, Koehler & Isaacs LLP, have provided to Brazilian immigrants living in the United States. The 23-attorney, New Yorkbased firm specializes in immigration, labor and employment, personal injury, real estate, criminal, matrimonial and general practice cases.

educating for justice

@John Jay
Worth Noting
March 10 9:15 AM High-Tech Surveillance Societies and Our Privacy
Presented by the Center for Cybercrime Studies Jeff Jonas, Chief Scientist, Entity Analytic Solutions Room 630, Haaren Hall

News and Events of Interest to the College Community March 5, 2008

Best-Selling Author Gives John Jay $1M for New Crime Scene Academy
Patricia Cornwell, the best-selling crime writer, has donated $1 million to John Jay College to establish a Crime Scene Academy that will become the first and only international center for crime scene training for professionals, students and interested members of the general public. Cornwell’s numerous fiction and nonfiction works have been published in dozens of countries and languages, and have earned her widespread acclaim for her meticulous research and insistence on detailed accuracy, especially in forensic medicine and law enforcement procedures. “I’ve always respected and admired law enforcement professionals, and am intimately aware of the dangers and difficulties of their jobs,” she said. “Police, forensic scientists and pathologists, and so many others have been unfailingly generous in sharing their expertise with me. Now it is my privilege to give something back. The greatest gift is knowledge, and there’s no better place to get it than John Jay College.” John Jay presented Cornwell with an honorary doctorate of letters at the May 2007 commencement ceremony, citing her “commitment to the principles of academic Crime writer Patricia Cornwell, the recipient of an honorary doctorate excellence and understanding for all.” from John Jay in 2007. Her $1-million gift to the College will establish a The Crime Scene Academy will comprise pioneering Crime Scene Academy. five central components: A Cornwell Fellowship Program in crime include a series of weeklong symposiums for scene decision-making, through which law senior law enforcement executives to promote enforcement professionals from across the better understanding of the management of a country will be recruited and brought to John criminal case from the crime scene through the Jay to learn the latest advances in crime scene investigative and adjudicative processes. Police investigation and set the standards necessary executives will interact with John Jay faculty for modernizing the practice. Over time, it is experts in forensic science, psychology, law and envisioned that this network of Cornwell Fellows police science. will create a national cohort that will assume Law Enforcement and Crime Scene leadership roles in the evolution of the forensic Laboratory Training Modules, to provide science community. college-level instruction in state-of-the-art crime A Police Leadership Program, which will scene investigation techniques. In conjunction

Cornwell: “My Privilege to Give Something Back” to Policing
with these modules, the Crime Scene Academy will develop a train-the-trainers program supplemented by online training. A Post-Baccalaureate Forensic Science Certificate Program, an intensive 10-week summer certificate program that will give students with undergraduate degrees in the natural sciences the comprehensive training in forensic science and criminalistics they need to compete for jobs in forensic laboratories. K-12 Teacher Programs/Continuing Education Public Programs, a series of training sessions for teachers, middleschool students and the general public. The program for teachers will incorporate into its curriculum materials developed by the John Jay Department of Sciences for an established weeklong training session for K-12 science teachers. President Jeremy Travis said in accepting the gift: “Patricia Cornwell, who is noted for her realistic portrayal of forensic investigations and law enforcement, has been educating millions of devoted fans about forensic science and medicine through her best-selling crime novels for more than 15 years. This makes her the perfect partner for John Jay College, which has long been recognized as the premier center for forensic study in the United States. This generous gift will allow us to address the critical need to enhance the quality of crime scene analysis around the country. It will also further realize our mission of providing students with the latest innovations in modern forensics and their applications in crime scene investigations and analysis. The Crime Scene Academy will serve a national constituency of law enforcement personnel.” A national search will be conducted for a director of the new Crime Scene Academy.

March 14 8:30 AM McCabe Fellowship Breakfast
Guest speaker: New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn Auxiliary Gymnasium

March 21 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM Prisoner Reentry Institute Occasional Series on Reentry Research
Transitional Jobs for Formerly Incarcerated Individuals Dan Bloom MDRC Room 630, Haaren Hall

March 27 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Graduate Lecture Series
The Physical Evidence Record and Alternate Sources of Information in Criminal Investigations Professor Peter DeForest Science Department Multi-Purpose Room, North Hall

Mark Your Calendar March 14 is the application deadline for top 2008 commencement awards.
For details, contact Mary Nampiaparapil, director of scholarships. (646) 557-4516. mnampiaparampil@jjay.cuny.edu.

Hoop Dreams Come True as John Jay Wins CUNY Title
The New York Giants are no longer the only underdog champions in town. The John Jay Bloodhounds on February 22 capped a Cinderella run through the CUNY Athletic Conference postseason tournament with a stirring 68-54 victory over York College to capture the College’s firstever men’s basketball championship. The top-seeded and heavily favored York team had beaten John Jay handily during the regular season, and took the court for the finals as the conference’s two-time defending champion. The Bloodhounds, meanwhile, began the tournament as the sixth seed with a 10-15 regular-season record, but proceeded to knock off the College of Staten Island (CSI) and New York City College of Technology en route to the championship game. It was the team’s first appearance in the finals since 1990, and the players made the most of it. “I thought we were supposed to be the underdog in this game,” said President Jeremy Travis. “Apparently someone forgot to tell our players.” The Bloodhounds’ wounded warrior, senior forward Hakeem Kased, won the tournament’s Most Valuable Player award for his 13-point performance in the finals and 23-point outburst in the quarterfinals against CSI, as well as his constant on-the-court leadership. “This means everything,” said Kased, the team captain, who was in tears after the final buzzer sounded and his team’s championship became official. “This is for four years of hard work, for all the running. This is for all the student-athletes who have too much on their plates. I knew that if we played consistently in this tournament, no one could stop us.” Kased’s own plate is kept full with athletics, academics and a full-time job with the New York City Transit Authority, where he works the overnight shift as a track maintainer. He missed the entire 2006-2007 season with a knee injury, and played much of this season with a variety of ailments, including an injured back. His teammate Vaughn Mason, a junior forward, led the Bloodhounds with 14 points in the championship game before fouling out. Both Mason and Kased were named to the alltournament team. “It’s a tremendous compliment to see these young men who believed in the coaches and themselves, day in and day out, to get to this point and get out there and do it on the court,” said third-year head coach Charles Jackson. The men’s basketball team next moves on to its first-ever appearance in the NCAA Division III post-season tournament, against an opponent yet to be determined.

Hometown Hero
Chris Jaeger, a sophomore forward for the Bloodhounds, was featured in the February 11 sports section of USA Today, in an article focusing on his experience with the U.S. Army in Iraq for 12 months in 2004 and 2005. Jaeger compared heroics on the basketball

The John Jay men’s basketball team, led by tournament Most Valuable Player Hakeem Kased (left), celebrate at center court after dominating York College 68-54 on February 22 to capture the CUNY Athletic Conference championship — the team’s first conference title ever.

court with heroics under fire, saying: “In sports, a good athlete has good instincts. Same with being a good soldier. You want to be someone you can count on. You don’t have to sit there and think about what to do.” His experience in Iraq, he said, gave him a

deeper appreciation for basketball, which he was unable to play in the extreme conditions of the war zone. “Basketball was always where I could forget all my problems,” he said. “That was the one thing you could do to relieve your stress over there and you didn’t have that option.”

Breakfast Salutes Those Whose Future Honors the Past
Braving a blast of inclement wintry weather, attendees at the 18th annual Malcolm/King Breakfast on February 22 heard speaker after speaker exhort them to never lose sight of the importance of education and doing one’s best. The breakfast, named for slain civil rights activists Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., drew an enthusiastic group of faculty, staff and students to the College gymnasium. The 2008 event honored playwright and novelist David Lamb, whose first novel Do Platanos Go Wit Collard Greens? achieved critical and commercial success with its exploration of relations between blacks and Latinos. He also wrote the plays Platanos and Collard Greens and From Auction Block to Hip Hop. Richard James Ferris, a senior major in government at John Jay, followed Lamb to the podium, addressing most of his remarks to fellow students in the crowd. “If we truly want to honor the memory of Martin and Malcolm,” Ferris said, “we should pursue education. We must make sure that tomorrow belongs to us.” The morning’s keynote speaker, awardwinning reporter and commentator Dominic Carter of the NY1 news channel, said with a smile that he felt upstaged by Ferris’s brief remarks. “I should’ve spoken before you — you delivered the keynote address,” he said to Ferris. “You have an outstanding future.” Like Ferris before him, Carter addressed his comments largely to the students who were present. Asking them to stand up and be recognized, roughly half the audience rose to its feet, including about a dozen high school students. “This is what it’s all about,” Carter observed. “This is what Dr. King and Malcolm X ultimately gave their lives for.” Carter grew up in a Bronx housing project, where he was raised by a grandmother he described as having “a PhD in loving me.” He called himself a “proud product” of affirmative action, noting, “without that opportunity, I would not be standing here today.”

Children’s Concert Launches Mozart Academy Program
The formal debut of the Mozart Academy at John Jay College took place on Sunday, February 3 with a program presented by the academy’s Concerts By Children division. Hundreds of enthusiastic families filled the Gerald W. Lynch Theater for a program that included performances by the Carnegie Hill Children’s Orchestra of Haydn’s Toy Symphony and “The Great Gate of Kiev” from Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Tchaikovsky’s Concerto for Violin, played by 12-year-old soloist Sirena Huang, brought the house down. Concerts By Children, the brainchild of John Jay Artist-In-Residence Caroline Stoessinger, is aimed at building new audiences and educating families to weave the legacy of great music into their lives. “Concerts By Children is a testament to the power of music as a shared language in a city filled with different dialects, ethnicities and cultures,” said Stoessinger. “The concerts celebrate the city’s youngest performers, drawn from all cultures, playing the masterpieces of past generations for all audiences. More than simply child performers, the musicians are a credit to their art and a treat for audiences of all ages to hear.” Huang has performed in concerts sponsored by former U.S. Secretary of State Madeline Albright, King Abdullah of Jordan, former President Vaclav Havel of the Czech Republic and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Elie Wiesel. The large audience on February 3 included Professor James Cohen of the Department of Public Management, who attended along with Christopher, a boy he mentors in the Big Brother Program. “Before the concert began, Chris was fidgety, but, as soon as the children on stage began playing, he was riveted to the music,” said Cohen. “For me, it was inspiring to see such a wonderfully diverse group of young people playing classical music, with such evident skill.”

Attendees at the 18th annual Malcolm/King Breakfast enjoy a conversational moment during the festivities on February 22. From left to right: Kewaulay Kamara, Department of African American Studies; author and playwright David Lamb; NY1 news anchor Dominic Carter; Dean of Graduate Studies Jannette Domingo; Gregory Bryant, director of the Liberty Partnership Program; student honoree Conrad Phillips.

“We can achieve anything if we really believe in it and are willing to work hard,” said Carter. “Don’t listen to the nay-sayers. We don’t have the right to ever do less than our best.” Proceeds from the Malcolm/King breakfast are used to support a leadership scholarship for John Jay students who demonstrate

outstanding academic achievement and success in African American studies. This year’s award was presented to Conrad Phillips, a Dean’s List student with a 3.6 GPA, who last year joined John Jay faculty members and representatives of the media and law enforcement as a panelist at the “Stop Snitching” symposium.

Student-Driven Effort Raises Funds to Aid Bangladesh Cyclone Victims
When Cyclone Sidr slammed ashore in Bangladesh on November 15, packing 150-mph winds and torrential rains, it did more than carve a swath of destruction that left thousands dead and hundreds of thousands homeless. It triggered a student-run relief effort at John Jay that in very short order raised nearly $4,500 and earned the official recognition of the Bangladeshi government. President Jeremy Travis paid tribute on February 7 to the members of the Bangladesh club and other student organizations, at a reception in his office that was attended by the Asian nation’s Consul General to the United States, Mohammed Shamsul Haque. The students’ fundraising effort, Travis said, is another example of “building a reflexive communal reaction to come together in times of need.” Syeda Begum, who described herself as “just a regular student here,” explained that people she worked with at the U.S. State Department had encouraged her to get involved in the Bangladesh relief effort. She enlisted the aid of Professor Mabel Gomes in the Department of Public Management. Soon after, the student African American Club, Haitian Club and Muslim Students Association also came on board. “John Jay really came through to help us,” said Begum. People were first asked to donate time to the relief effort, Begum said. Requests for donations of money came later. Gomes, who saw first-hand the extent of cyclone-related devastation in Bangladesh, said the money raised at John Jay would go directly

Joined by Professor Mabel Gomes (second from left) and student representatives, President Travis presents a check to Bangladesh Consul General Mohammed Shamsul Haque, to be put toward relief efforts in the cyclone-stricken nation.

to where the needs are greatest. She said of the students’ efforts, “If you can transcend boundaries of race, religion and nationality, you can have an impact on the world.” The Bangladeshi consul general said he felt “very privileged, personally and professionally,” to be on hand for the salute to the students. “I feel very proud that we’re not alone in our plight, that we have friends like you around the world,” said Haque. “I’ll let our people know that there’s

a community at John Jay College that cares about them.” Haque, who said the money raised by John Jay students would go toward building one of several multipurpose cyclone shelters, opened the door to building a partnership between Bangladeshi institutions and John Jay, and invited Travis to visit his country. “We want to benefit from values like yours, and institutions like yours,” Haque said.

FACULTY / STAFF NOTES
PEER REVIEW
HOWARD PFLANZER (Speech, Theatre and Media Studies) has been awarded a Playwriting Residency to work on a new project, beginning in June 2008, by the Fundacion Valparaiso in Mojacar, Spain. IRA TITUNIK (Sciences) recently won the Markle Award for the Forensic Scientist of the Year 2007. The award was presented by the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Sciences at the University of New Haven. STEPHEN HANDELMAN (Center on Media, Crime and Justice) delivered a lecture to the Cleveland Council on World Affairs on February 19, on the “Russian Mafia and Transnational Organized Crime in the New Russia.” THOMAS KUBIC (Sciences) and PETER DIACZUK (Center on Modern Forensic Practice) traveled to Kigali, Rwanda, in January to evaluate evidence on behalf of defense counsel representing individuals accused of crimes before the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). reentry partnerships and reentry courts around the country. ITAI SNEH (History) has had his latest book, The Future Almost Arrived: How Jimmy Carter Failed to Change U.S. Foreign Policy, published by Peter Lang Publishers. MICHAEL AMAN (Speech, Theatre, and Media Studies) and KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) have co-authored an article titled “Psychopathic Elements in the Film Goodfellas,” which will appear as the lead article in the May/June issue of Community Corrections Report on Law and Corrections Practice, published by the Civic Research Institute. In the article, they stress the importance of criminal justice professors teaching elements of psychopathy to criminal justice professionals, using film as a learning tool, not just entertainment.

Violin prodigy Sirena Huang captivates the audience with her performance of Tschaikovsky’s Concerto for Violin.

@ John Jay is published by the Department of Institutional Advancement John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Avenue, New York, NY 10019 www.jjay.cuny.edu Editor Peter Dodenhoff Graphic Design Gary Zaragovitch Submissions should be faxed or e-mailed to: Office of Communications fax: (212) 237-8642 e-mail: pdodenhoff@jjay.cuny.edu

PRESENTING…
KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) addressed the Osborne Association on February 12 on “Child Abuse and Domestic Violence,” as part of a seminar series sponsored by OASIS (the Outcome and Assessment Information Set), a branch of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

BETWEEN THE COVERS
JEREMY TRAVIS (President) had his article, “Reflections on the Reentry Movement,” published in the December 2007 issue of Federal Sentencing Reporter. The article looks back at the first 10 years following Attorney General Janet Reno’s call for proposals to create new

educating for justice

@John Jay
Worth Noting
March 10 9:15 AM High-Tech Surveillance Societies and Our Privacy
Presented by the Center for Cybercrime Studies Jeff Jonas, Chief Scientist, Entity Analytic Solutions Room 630, Haaren Hall

News and Events of Interest to the College Community March 5, 2008

Best-Selling Author Gives John Jay $1M for New Crime Scene Academy
Patricia Cornwell, the best-selling crime writer, has donated $1 million to John Jay College to establish a Crime Scene Academy that will become the first and only international center for crime scene training for professionals, students and interested members of the general public. Cornwell’s numerous fiction and nonfiction works have been published in dozens of countries and languages, and have earned her widespread acclaim for her meticulous research and insistence on detailed accuracy, especially in forensic medicine and law enforcement procedures. “I’ve always respected and admired law enforcement professionals, and am intimately aware of the dangers and difficulties of their jobs,” she said. “Police, forensic scientists and pathologists, and so many others have been unfailingly generous in sharing their expertise with me. Now it is my privilege to give something back. The greatest gift is knowledge, and there’s no better place to get it than John Jay College.” John Jay presented Cornwell with an honorary doctorate of letters at the May 2007 commencement ceremony, citing her “commitment to the principles of academic Crime writer Patricia Cornwell, the recipient of an honorary doctorate excellence and understanding for all.” from John Jay in 2007. Her $1-million gift to the College will establish a The Crime Scene Academy will comprise pioneering Crime Scene Academy. five central components: A Cornwell Fellowship Program in crime include a series of weeklong symposiums for scene decision-making, through which law senior law enforcement executives to promote enforcement professionals from across the better understanding of the management of a country will be recruited and brought to John criminal case from the crime scene through the Jay to learn the latest advances in crime scene investigative and adjudicative processes. Police investigation and set the standards necessary executives will interact with John Jay faculty for modernizing the practice. Over time, it is experts in forensic science, psychology, law and envisioned that this network of Cornwell Fellows police science. will create a national cohort that will assume Law Enforcement and Crime Scene leadership roles in the evolution of the forensic Laboratory Training Modules, to provide science community. college-level instruction in state-of-the-art crime A Police Leadership Program, which will scene investigation techniques. In conjunction

Cornwell: “My Privilege to Give Something Back” to Policing
with these modules, the Crime Scene Academy will develop a train-the-trainers program supplemented by online training. A Post-Baccalaureate Forensic Science Certificate Program, an intensive 10-week summer certificate program that will give students with undergraduate degrees in the natural sciences the comprehensive training in forensic science and criminalistics they need to compete for jobs in forensic laboratories. K-12 Teacher Programs/Continuing Education Public Programs, a series of training sessions for teachers, middleschool students and the general public. The program for teachers will incorporate into its curriculum materials developed by the John Jay Department of Sciences for an established weeklong training session for K-12 science teachers. President Jeremy Travis said in accepting the gift: “Patricia Cornwell, who is noted for her realistic portrayal of forensic investigations and law enforcement, has been educating millions of devoted fans about forensic science and medicine through her best-selling crime novels for more than 15 years. This makes her the perfect partner for John Jay College, which has long been recognized as the premier center for forensic study in the United States. This generous gift will allow us to address the critical need to enhance the quality of crime scene analysis around the country. It will also further realize our mission of providing students with the latest innovations in modern forensics and their applications in crime scene investigations and analysis. The Crime Scene Academy will serve a national constituency of law enforcement personnel.” A national search will be conducted for a director of the new Crime Scene Academy.

March 14 8:30 AM McCabe Fellowship Breakfast
Guest speaker: New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn Auxiliary Gymnasium

March 21 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM Prisoner Reentry Institute Occasional Series on Reentry Research
Transitional Jobs for Formerly Incarcerated Individuals Dan Bloom MDRC Room 630, Haaren Hall

March 27 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Graduate Lecture Series
The Physical Evidence Record and Alternate Sources of Information in Criminal Investigations Professor Peter DeForest Science Department Multi-Purpose Room, North Hall

Mark Your Calendar March 14 is the application deadline for top 2008 commencement awards.
For details, contact Mary Nampiaparapil, director of scholarships. (646) 557-4516. mnampiaparampil@jjay.cuny.edu.

Hoop Dreams Come True as John Jay Wins CUNY Title
The New York Giants are no longer the only underdog champions in town. The John Jay Bloodhounds on February 22 capped a Cinderella run through the CUNY Athletic Conference postseason tournament with a stirring 68-54 victory over York College to capture the College’s firstever men’s basketball championship. The top-seeded and heavily favored York team had beaten John Jay handily during the regular season, and took the court for the finals as the conference’s two-time defending champion. The Bloodhounds, meanwhile, began the tournament as the sixth seed with a 10-15 regular-season record, but proceeded to knock off the College of Staten Island (CSI) and New York City College of Technology en route to the championship game. It was the team’s first appearance in the finals since 1990, and the players made the most of it. “I thought we were supposed to be the underdog in this game,” said President Jeremy Travis. “Apparently someone forgot to tell our players.” The Bloodhounds’ wounded warrior, senior forward Hakeem Kased, won the tournament’s Most Valuable Player award for his 13-point performance in the finals and 23-point outburst in the quarterfinals against CSI, as well as his constant on-the-court leadership. “This means everything,” said Kased, the team captain, who was in tears after the final buzzer sounded and his team’s championship became official. “This is for four years of hard work, for all the running. This is for all the student-athletes who have too much on their plates. I knew that if we played consistently in this tournament, no one could stop us.” Kased’s own plate is kept full with athletics, academics and a full-time job with the New York City Transit Authority, where he works the overnight shift as a track maintainer. He missed the entire 2006-2007 season with a knee injury, and played much of this season with a variety of ailments, including an injured back. His teammate Vaughn Mason, a junior forward, led the Bloodhounds with 14 points in the championship game before fouling out. Both Mason and Kased were named to the alltournament team. “It’s a tremendous compliment to see these young men who believed in the coaches and themselves, day in and day out, to get to this point and get out there and do it on the court,” said third-year head coach Charles Jackson. The men’s basketball team next moves on to its first-ever appearance in the NCAA Division III post-season tournament, against an opponent yet to be determined.

Hometown Hero
Chris Jaeger, a sophomore forward for the Bloodhounds, was featured in the February 11 sports section of USA Today, in an article focusing on his experience with the U.S. Army in Iraq for 12 months in 2004 and 2005. Jaeger compared heroics on the basketball

The John Jay men’s basketball team, led by tournament Most Valuable Player Hakeem Kased (left), celebrate at center court after dominating York College 68-54 on February 22 to capture the CUNY Athletic Conference championship — the team’s first conference title ever.

court with heroics under fire, saying: “In sports, a good athlete has good instincts. Same with being a good soldier. You want to be someone you can count on. You don’t have to sit there and think about what to do.” His experience in Iraq, he said, gave him a

deeper appreciation for basketball, which he was unable to play in the extreme conditions of the war zone. “Basketball was always where I could forget all my problems,” he said. “That was the one thing you could do to relieve your stress over there and you didn’t have that option.”

Breakfast Salutes Those Whose Future Honors the Past
Braving a blast of inclement wintry weather, attendees at the 18th annual Malcolm/King Breakfast on February 22 heard speaker after speaker exhort them to never lose sight of the importance of education and doing one’s best. The breakfast, named for slain civil rights activists Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., drew an enthusiastic group of faculty, staff and students to the College gymnasium. The 2008 event honored playwright and novelist David Lamb, whose first novel Do Platanos Go Wit Collard Greens? achieved critical and commercial success with its exploration of relations between blacks and Latinos. He also wrote the plays Platanos and Collard Greens and From Auction Block to Hip Hop. Richard James Ferris, a senior major in government at John Jay, followed Lamb to the podium, addressing most of his remarks to fellow students in the crowd. “If we truly want to honor the memory of Martin and Malcolm,” Ferris said, “we should pursue education. We must make sure that tomorrow belongs to us.” The morning’s keynote speaker, awardwinning reporter and commentator Dominic Carter of the NY1 news channel, said with a smile that he felt upstaged by Ferris’s brief remarks. “I should’ve spoken before you — you delivered the keynote address,” he said to Ferris. “You have an outstanding future.” Like Ferris before him, Carter addressed his comments largely to the students who were present. Asking them to stand up and be recognized, roughly half the audience rose to its feet, including about a dozen high school students. “This is what it’s all about,” Carter observed. “This is what Dr. King and Malcolm X ultimately gave their lives for.” Carter grew up in a Bronx housing project, where he was raised by a grandmother he described as having “a PhD in loving me.” He called himself a “proud product” of affirmative action, noting, “without that opportunity, I would not be standing here today.”

Children’s Concert Launches Mozart Academy Program
The formal debut of the Mozart Academy at John Jay College took place on Sunday, February 3 with a program presented by the academy’s Concerts By Children division. Hundreds of enthusiastic families filled the Gerald W. Lynch Theater for a program that included performances by the Carnegie Hill Children’s Orchestra of Haydn’s Toy Symphony and “The Great Gate of Kiev” from Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. Tchaikovsky’s Concerto for Violin, played by 12-year-old soloist Sirena Huang, brought the house down. Concerts By Children, the brainchild of John Jay Artist-In-Residence Caroline Stoessinger, is aimed at building new audiences and educating families to weave the legacy of great music into their lives. “Concerts By Children is a testament to the power of music as a shared language in a city filled with different dialects, ethnicities and cultures,” said Stoessinger. “The concerts celebrate the city’s youngest performers, drawn from all cultures, playing the masterpieces of past generations for all audiences. More than simply child performers, the musicians are a credit to their art and a treat for audiences of all ages to hear.” Huang has performed in concerts sponsored by former U.S. Secretary of State Madeline Albright, King Abdullah of Jordan, former President Vaclav Havel of the Czech Republic and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Elie Wiesel. The large audience on February 3 included Professor James Cohen of the Department of Public Management, who attended along with Christopher, a boy he mentors in the Big Brother Program. “Before the concert began, Chris was fidgety, but, as soon as the children on stage began playing, he was riveted to the music,” said Cohen. “For me, it was inspiring to see such a wonderfully diverse group of young people playing classical music, with such evident skill.”

Attendees at the 18th annual Malcolm/King Breakfast enjoy a conversational moment during the festivities on February 22. From left to right: Kewaulay Kamara, Department of African American Studies; author and playwright David Lamb; NY1 news anchor Dominic Carter; Dean of Graduate Studies Jannette Domingo; Gregory Bryant, director of the Liberty Partnership Program; student honoree Conrad Phillips.

“We can achieve anything if we really believe in it and are willing to work hard,” said Carter. “Don’t listen to the nay-sayers. We don’t have the right to ever do less than our best.” Proceeds from the Malcolm/King breakfast are used to support a leadership scholarship for John Jay students who demonstrate

outstanding academic achievement and success in African American studies. This year’s award was presented to Conrad Phillips, a Dean’s List student with a 3.6 GPA, who last year joined John Jay faculty members and representatives of the media and law enforcement as a panelist at the “Stop Snitching” symposium.

Student-Driven Effort Raises Funds to Aid Bangladesh Cyclone Victims
When Cyclone Sidr slammed ashore in Bangladesh on November 15, packing 150-mph winds and torrential rains, it did more than carve a swath of destruction that left thousands dead and hundreds of thousands homeless. It triggered a student-run relief effort at John Jay that in very short order raised nearly $4,500 and earned the official recognition of the Bangladeshi government. President Jeremy Travis paid tribute on February 7 to the members of the Bangladesh club and other student organizations, at a reception in his office that was attended by the Asian nation’s Consul General to the United States, Mohammed Shamsul Haque. The students’ fundraising effort, Travis said, is another example of “building a reflexive communal reaction to come together in times of need.” Syeda Begum, who described herself as “just a regular student here,” explained that people she worked with at the U.S. State Department had encouraged her to get involved in the Bangladesh relief effort. She enlisted the aid of Professor Mabel Gomes in the Department of Public Management. Soon after, the student African American Club, Haitian Club and Muslim Students Association also came on board. “John Jay really came through to help us,” said Begum. People were first asked to donate time to the relief effort, Begum said. Requests for donations of money came later. Gomes, who saw first-hand the extent of cyclone-related devastation in Bangladesh, said the money raised at John Jay would go directly

Joined by Professor Mabel Gomes (second from left) and student representatives, President Travis presents a check to Bangladesh Consul General Mohammed Shamsul Haque, to be put toward relief efforts in the cyclone-stricken nation.

to where the needs are greatest. She said of the students’ efforts, “If you can transcend boundaries of race, religion and nationality, you can have an impact on the world.” The Bangladeshi consul general said he felt “very privileged, personally and professionally,” to be on hand for the salute to the students. “I feel very proud that we’re not alone in our plight, that we have friends like you around the world,” said Haque. “I’ll let our people know that there’s

a community at John Jay College that cares about them.” Haque, who said the money raised by John Jay students would go toward building one of several multipurpose cyclone shelters, opened the door to building a partnership between Bangladeshi institutions and John Jay, and invited Travis to visit his country. “We want to benefit from values like yours, and institutions like yours,” Haque said.

FACULTY / STAFF NOTES
PEER REVIEW
HOWARD PFLANZER (Speech, Theatre and Media Studies) has been awarded a Playwriting Residency to work on a new project, beginning in June 2008, by the Fundacion Valparaiso in Mojacar, Spain. IRA TITUNIK (Sciences) recently won the Markle Award for the Forensic Scientist of the Year 2007. The award was presented by the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Sciences at the University of New Haven. STEPHEN HANDELMAN (Center on Media, Crime and Justice) delivered a lecture to the Cleveland Council on World Affairs on February 19, on the “Russian Mafia and Transnational Organized Crime in the New Russia.” THOMAS KUBIC (Sciences) and PETER DIACZUK (Center on Modern Forensic Practice) traveled to Kigali, Rwanda, in January to evaluate evidence on behalf of defense counsel representing individuals accused of crimes before the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). reentry partnerships and reentry courts around the country. ITAI SNEH (History) has had his latest book, The Future Almost Arrived: How Jimmy Carter Failed to Change U.S. Foreign Policy, published by Peter Lang Publishers. MICHAEL AMAN (Speech, Theatre, and Media Studies) and KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) have co-authored an article titled “Psychopathic Elements in the Film Goodfellas,” which will appear as the lead article in the May/June issue of Community Corrections Report on Law and Corrections Practice, published by the Civic Research Institute. In the article, they stress the importance of criminal justice professors teaching elements of psychopathy to criminal justice professionals, using film as a learning tool, not just entertainment.

Violin prodigy Sirena Huang captivates the audience with her performance of Tschaikovsky’s Concerto for Violin.

@ John Jay is published by the Department of Institutional Advancement John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Avenue, New York, NY 10019 www.jjay.cuny.edu Editor Peter Dodenhoff Graphic Design Gary Zaragovitch Submissions should be faxed or e-mailed to: Office of Communications fax: (212) 237-8642 e-mail: pdodenhoff@jjay.cuny.edu

PRESENTING…
KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) addressed the Osborne Association on February 12 on “Child Abuse and Domestic Violence,” as part of a seminar series sponsored by OASIS (the Outcome and Assessment Information Set), a branch of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

BETWEEN THE COVERS
JEREMY TRAVIS (President) had his article, “Reflections on the Reentry Movement,” published in the December 2007 issue of Federal Sentencing Reporter. The article looks back at the first 10 years following Attorney General Janet Reno’s call for proposals to create new

educating for justice

@John Jay
Worth Noting
February 22 9:00 AM 18th Annual Malcolm/King Breakfast
Gymnasium Guest speaker: Dominic Carter, NY1 RSVP to 212-237-8764

News and Events of Interest to the College Community February 13, 2008

Dollars for Scholars
More than $200,000 in scholarship funds is waiting to be claimed by qualified John Jay students, and the College is launching a major Web-driven effort to ensure that funds and students come together smoothly. In early February, the College unveiled the latest component of its newly redesigned Web site, focusing on the array of scholarship options available to students. With an application deadline of February 28 drawing near for many of the scholarships for the spring 2008 semester, the hope is that increasing numbers of students will take advantage of these opportunities. “Merit scholarship is grant money and you do not have to pay it back,” observed Mary Nampiaparampil, the director of scholarship services. “It is given in recognition of your academic achievement and public service.” She noted that there are scholarships for freshmen, sophomores, upper-division and graduate students, as well as ones specifically for women, international students, research-oriented students and more. The Web site includes downloadable application forms in PDF format that students can print, fill out and submit. The forms themselves have been streamlined, so that a single form now covers more than 30 scholarships. “We have a brand new focus on scholarships at the College, and are encouraging as many qualified students as possible to apply,” said Vice President for Enrollment Management Richard Saulnier, who oversees the scholarship services office. “We have no shortage of highly qualified students — and we always want more — but for

With Deadline Looming, Thousands in Scholarship Aid Await Students

February 27 6:00 PM Lloyd Sealy Lecture

Policing America’s Cities in the 21st Century: Challenges and Triumphs in New York City and New Orleans Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly, New York City Police Department Superintendent Warren J. Riley, New Orleans Police Department Gerald W. Lynch Theater Lobby

February 28 9:00 AM Stop and Frisk Conference
Presented by the Center on Race, Crime and Justice and the Office for Advancement of Research Gerald W. Lynch Theater Lobby

Thousands of dollars in scholarship aid — along with a streamlined application process — await qualified students.

March 1 9:00 AM Law Day

Presented by the Pre-Law Institute Gymnasium and various locations

March 3 3:30 PM Spring Faculty/Staff Meeting and Service Recognition Reception
Gerald W. Lynch Theater & Theater Lobby

some reason some scholarship opportunities have gone underutilized in the past.” “We’re trying to ensure that institutional scholarship funds are being spent for the purposes for which they were intended,” added Saulnier. Most undergraduate and graduate scholarships have February 28 deadlines. Nampiaparampil urged students to consult the list of available scholarships online at www.jjay.cuny. edu/340.php, or visit the Office of Scholarship

Services in Room 4113N. Most scholarship applications require essays and/or letters of recommendation, she noted, urging students to seek any needed help from the Writing Center or faculty members who know them well. “President Travis wants more emphasis on recruiting, recognizing and rewarding highly qualified students, and that’s exactly what we’re trying to do. The reorganization of scholarship services and the overhaul of the Web site is all part of that,” Saulnier noted.

March 14 8:30 AM McCabe Fellowship Breakfast
Guest speaker: New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn Auxiliary Gymnasium

Faculty to Lead Groundbreaking Study-Abroad Programs This Summer
“And what did you do on your Santo Domingo or in Moroccan summer vacation?” homes. For roughly 60 John Jay students, All students will be required to the answer to that oft-posed attend a pre-departure orientation, question will soon involve earning and to share their experiences college credits in exotic locales, as with the broader John Jay College part of a series of intensive study community upon their return, abroad programs this coming June. Lewandoski said. The three inaugural faculty-led “Congratulations in advance study abroad programs are: to the students who will have the “Urban Cultural Spaces in Puerto unparalleled opportunity to travel Rico,” taught by Professor Alma with John Jay professors to study Mora (Foreign Languages), meeting these interesting topics in such in San Juan, PR. interesting parts of the world,” said John Jay students will have a chance to study abroad in San Juan, PR, or one of two other “Caribbean Criminology,” taught locales this summer in four-week, credit-bearing courses. President Jeremy Travis. by Professors David Brotherton Application dates for the (Sociology) and Luis Barrios (Puerto Rican/Latin program to the next. Students will stay in three courses vary. For more information, American Studies), meeting in Santo Domingo, apartments at the University of Puerto Rico, contact Lewandoski at 212-484-1339, e-mail Dominican Republic. dormitories at the Autonomous University of klewandoski@jjay.cuny.edu. “Gender, Culture, Community and Violence,” taught by Professor Chitra Raghavan (Psychology), meeting in Rabat, Morocco. Ken Lewandoski, the Director of International in an impressive number of print and online John Jay continues to maintain a high media Studies and Programs, noted that while John Jay publications. The College’s centers and institutes profile nationwide, with a new survey showing students have had study-abroad opportunities in were also mentioned in many media outlets that the College’s faculty, administration, the past through other CUNY campuses, this will Media visibility, while nationwide, varied students and alumni were quoted or mentioned be the first time they can earn John Jay College by region, with most of the press attention in more than 1,089 stories appearing in print and academic credits in programs led by John Jay concentrated in the Middle Atlantic region (New dedicated Internet news sites in 2007. faculty. The programs qualify under the Study/ York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania) and the An appraisal of the media placements using Travel Opportunities for CUNY Students (STOCS) South Atlantic. The New York Daily News (10 the PRTrak database estimated the value of the program, which will allow participating students percent) and The New York Times (6 percent) media visibility to be equivalent to roughly $3 to receive $750 to $1,500 in financial aid. (The gave the College the most media attention. million in paid advertising. deadline for STOCS applications is March 14.) The Communications Office is eager to Although the College arranges appearances “We want these programs to be academically promote faculty members’ expertise as well as on television and radio programs for many rigorous — not travel abroad, but study students’ accomplishments. Faculty who would faculty members, the survey does not include abroad,” Lewandoski added. “They are all like to provide expert commentary to the media broadcast news reports, as the College does not designed to enhance a student’s chosen course or who have information to share about their subscribe to broadcast monitoring services. of study.” The four-week programs will include scholarly activity should contact Chris Godek All 19 academic departments received classroom lectures and discussions, field trips and (212-237-8628, cgodek@jjay.cuny.edu) or Doreen press attention. While some garnered more presentations by local persons of interest. Vinas (212-237-8645, dvinas@jjay.cuny.edu). than others, John Jay’s faculty were quoted Living arrangements will vary from one

College Pushes Sign-Ups for CUNY Alert Net
President Jeremy Travis is encouraging John Jay students, faculty and staff to participate in CUNY Alert, a new university-wide emergency notification system that will soon go online following an initial signup period. CUNY Alert will enable the University’s campuses to provide alerts and timely information in emergencies, such as severeweather scenarios, fires and bomb threats, civil disturbances, major road closings and threats to personal safety. Participation is elective in the secure, Web-based alert system, which will provide messages ranging from specific instructions to general warnings, depending on the severity of a given incident. By signing up online at www.cuny.edu/alert, participants can choose how they wish to receive voice or text notifications: cell phone, home phone, e-mail or IM, or any combination of these. The Web page provides step-by-step instructions for signing up, and the process takes less than two minutes. “The College is committed to making sure we do all we can to ensure the safety of all members of the College community,” Travis said. “CUNY Alert will help us achieve this goal.”

$3 Million in Free Publicity

Two Thumbs Up. . .

English Professor’s Work Makes “Year’s Best” Lists
Professor John Matteson of the English department knew he had a hit on his hands when his book Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father was published last year by W.W. Norton. After all, the initial reviews lavished the book with such praise as “engrossing,” “elegantly written” and “a deftly rendered and highly recommended portrait.” Further evidence of the book’s significance and merit came in early January, with the news that Eden’s Outcasts had been named as one of the best books of 2007 by both the Christian Science Monitor and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Eden’s Outcasts chronicles the relationship between the celebrated author of Little Women and her father, Bronson Alcott, who is described as a self-taught farm boy turned idealist and philosopher. In its review last August, the Monitor praised Matteson for telling “the tale of a most unusual American life.” “Particularly for those unfamiliar with the Alcott story,” the Monitor’s reviewer wrote, “this is a journey of much interest.” The Post-Dispatch was no less effusive in its applause for Eden’s Outcasts, describing it as “impossible to put down” as it unfolds its tale of “two fascinating main characters.” The book century utopian communities,” he recalled, “and Bronson Alcott, who founded the Fruitlands community, was one of the first I explored. At the same time, I wanted to write about an important father-daughter pair, because I am a dad myself. Before I knew it, the book began to take on a life of its own.” Other biographers have examined the lives of Louisa May Alcott and her father individually. Eden’s Outcasts, Matteson noted, is the first book to look at their lives jointly. A paperback edition of the book is due out later this year. Matteson will also be serving as a consultant and on-air commentator for a forthcoming PBS documentary on Louisa May Alcott. Matteson, who has taught literature and legal writing at John Jay since 1997, holds a PhD in English from Columbia University and a law degree from Harvard Law School. Based on the success of Eden’s Outcasts, he recently signed a contract with W.W. Norton to write a second biography. The new work will focus on Margaret Fuller, the pioneering women’s right activist, gender theorist and journalist. He hopes to have the book out in time for the Fuller bicentennial in 2010.

English professor John Matteson (center) is joined by his department colleagues Margaret Tabb and Elisabeth Gitter at a Book & Author presentation on November 12 where they discussed his critically acclaimed biography Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father. The book was recently named as one of 2007’s best by two major newspapers.

includes numerous portraits of father, daughter and other Alcott family members, which the newspaper characterized as “one of the volume’s chief pleasures.” Matteson, who called the critical praise for his

book “very gratifying,” said that telling the story of Bronson and Louisa May Alcott began to take shape for him as two areas of interest — one scholarly and one personal — converged. “I thought about writing a book on 19th

New Effort Seeks to Ease Path to Bachelor’s Degrees for Police
New York City police officers will soon be returning to our classrooms in significant numbers, thanks to a new initiative that will make it easier for them to obtain their bachelor’s degrees at John Jay. The new program, due to begin in the summer of 2008, will allow officers to complete their degrees by earning 30 credits at the College, finish at least 50 percent of their major at John Jay and earn 120 credits including prior academic experience and NYPD training. Until now, NYPD officers seeking to obtain their bachelor’s degree from the College often had to complete added course requirements that left them with close to 200 credits before graduating. “President Travis saw a need for more police officers at John Jay, and the faculty liked the idea of having veteran officers, with their work and life experience, in their classes,” said William Devine, director of the College’s NYC Police Leadership Certificate Program, a 12-credit sequence that channels roughly 750 officers through John Jay each year. “Further investigation pointed up the excess-credit impediment, and steps were taken to remedy the situation.” “The administration is behind this, the faculty are behind this, and the Police Commissioner is behind this,” Devine continued. Travis and Vice President for Enrollment Management Richard Saulnier met with Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly, who personally endorsed and promoted the idea. The program, which is being handled by the Division of Enrollment Management in conjunction with the Counseling Department, offers a personal touch for interested officers. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions will evaluate officers’ credits and determine eligibility for the program. Officers then meet one-onone with a dedicated academic advisor who will develop a personal academic profile for them and assist them in completing their degrees within 120 credits. “The personal touch is very important,” Devine added, “because each student is different.” Active or retired NYPD members who are in the program will be able to complete their degrees in as few as six semesters. More than 100 officers attended one of three recent workshops on the program and are now in the pipeline to enroll for the summer or fall semesters. Additional workshops will be scheduled and interested officers should e-mail nypd@jjay.cuny.edu for more information. Officers can also call Katie Pzeniczna in the Division of Enrollment Management at 212-237-8874.

Looking for Clues

Hands Across the Border
Led by John Jay’s Center for International Human Rights, police officials from six European nations gathered at the College on December 13 and 14 for the first of three workshops as part of the project “Policing Across Borders: Strengthening the Role of Law Enforcement in Global Governance.” The workshop, “Strengthening Cooperation in the Fight against Terrorism: Legislation, Institutions, and Proposals,” brought together officials from Greece, Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Romania, and Turkey, along with academics and representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. The workshop was co-sponsored by the Greek Center for Security Studies and the Institute for Central-Eastern Europe and the Balkans of the University of Bologna. Funding for the three-year “Policing Across Borders” project was provided by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. The next workshop in the series, focusing on human trafficking and migrant smuggling, will take place at John Jay on May 2 and 3.
It’s not every day that the National Institute of Justice and the FBI sponsor a Trace Evidence Symposium — the session held in Clearwater, FL, in August was the first in more than a decade. Still, members of the John Jay Department of Sciences were out in force, as forensic scientists and trace-evidence specialists from around the world gathered to share expertise and present research. Professor Peter R. DeForest (above right) was a moderator and presenter in both the evidence recognition and recovery workshop and the general session on education and research, where he was joined by Professor Thomas A. Kubic (above left). Kubic also presented a paper on laboratory report writing. Other faculty members at the symposium were Professor Nicholas Petraco, who presented on the debris generated by the collapse of the World Trade Center towers; and Peter Diaczuk, director of forensic science training for the Center for Modern Forensic Practice, who was a panelist in the evidence recognition and recovery workshop and presented on firearm evidence and shooting scene reconstruction.

FACULTY / STAFF NOTES
PRESENTING…
BENJAMIN LAPIDUS (Art, Music and Philosophy) will perform in concert on April 5 at the East Midwood Jewish Center in Brooklyn to celebrate the release of his newest CD, Herencia Judia. Lapidus is an acknowledged master of the guitar, the six-string Cuban tres and the 10-string Puerto Rican cuatro. His new CD is inspired by the musical traditions of the Spanish Caribbean and Jewish liturgical music.
@ John Jay is published by the Department of Institutional Advancement John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Avenue, New York, NY 10019 www.jjay.cuny.edu Editor Peter Dodenhoff Graphic Design Gary Zaragovitch Submissions should be faxed or e-mailed to: Office of Communications fax: (212) 237-8642 e-mail: pdodenhoff@jjay.cuny.edu

ABBY STEIN (Interdisciplinary Studies) was invited by the Indian Academy of Forensic Medicine to present her critically acclaimed book Prologue to Violence: Child Abuse, Dissociation and Crime (The Analytic Press, 2007) at an international conference in Mumbai, India in February. ITAI SNEH (History) delivered a paper titled “From Vietnam to Carter: Attempts to Reverse Realpolitik” at a conference on peace studies at the London School of Economics on February 2. EFFIE PAPATZIKOU COCHRAN (English) kept up a busy schedule during her yearlong sabbatical in 2007, including pressing ahead with her video research project involving nonverbal cues and communication in parole board hearings. She co-presented a paper — “What Legal Writers Should Know: A Syntactic Analysis of a Legal Brief” — at the biennial conference of the International Association of Forensic Linguists

in Seattle, WA. She also taught a seminar on “Sector Analysis: X-Word Grammar” for the University of Catania in Ragusa, Sicily.

BETWEEN THE COVERS
KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration/Interdisciplinary Studies) authored an article titled “Detention in a Japanese Jail for Ten Days in 1998,” which will appear in the May/June 2008 issue of American Jails magazine. In the article, she explores the work of Setsuo Miyazawa from Aoyama Gakuin University in Japan and the reflections of genbatsuka, or increased severity of punishment that is written into Japanese criminal justice policy, from the point of view of one American incarcerated in a Japanese prison. JANICE BOCKMEYER (Government) published her chapter “Building the Global City — The Immigrant Experience of Urban Revitalization,” in the book Governing Cities in a Global Era: Urban

Innovation, Competition, and Democratic Reform (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). The book, edited by Robin Hambleton and Jill Simone Gross, represents the work of scholars from 11 countries on urban challenges facing city residents, leaders and managers in all continents. ITAI SNEH (History) published a review of Richard Parker’s biography John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics on the Web sites H-1960s and H-Net Reviews. JAMES DOYLE (Center on Modern Forensic Practice) and JENNIFER DYSART (Psychology) have co-authored, with Elizabeth Loftus, the 4th edition of Eyewitness Testimony: Civil and Criminal (LexisNexis, 2008). The book provides courtroom-ready trial techniques and the latest psychological research concerning a wide variety of issues pertaining to eyewitness testimony. Loftus, the lead author, is a distinguished professor at the University of California-Irvine.

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Worth Noting
An exhibition of photographs by Stephen Shames, part of the annual movingWALLS series.

News and Events of Interest to the College Community January 23, 2008

February 4 6:00 PM Opening Reception for Dads

“Thanks a Million (and a Half)!”
John Jay College is due to receive more than $1.5 million in federal funds to support a wide range of criminal justice research initiatives. The funds, in the form of grants and Congressional earmarks, will support efforts examining emergency response to large-scale disasters, gang violence and crime prevention, sex offender management, domestic violence, undergraduate science education and public safety leadership. “The Congressional earmarks will insure that national visibility is given to the landmark work of the Center for Crime Prevention and Control and the Regenhard Center for Emergency Response. Furthermore, federal funding of John Jay’s programs helps to insure that John Jay maintains its criminal justice leadership position,” said a jubilant President Jeremy Travis. “Our faculty are recognized world over for their expertise and these funds attest to their scholarship.” The funded programs include: ¶ A $330,000 grant from the Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, for the project “Real-Time DecisionMaking for Public Safety Executives.” Led by Ellen Scrivner, Director of the John Jay Leadership Academy, the program will focus on the realworld practice of preparedness leadership and decision-making among public safety leaders. ¶ A $305,500 Congressional earmark, sponsored and led by Representative Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), to support the award-winning work of the College’s Center for Crime Prevention and Control, directed by Professor David Kennedy. The funds will allow the Center to develop and disseminate crime-reduction strategies through hands-on fieldwork, research and unique partnerships with communities, the police and other law enforcement professionals in cities throughout the United States. ¶ A $296,656 grant from the National Institute of Justice for the project “Sex Offender

Faculty Research Efforts Get a Major Infusion of Federal Funds

6th Floor Gallery Space, Haaren Hall

February 22 9:30 AM 18th Annual Malcolm/King Breakfast
Call (212) 237-8764 for details Gymnasium

February 27 5:30 PM Lloyd Sealy Lecture

Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly, New York City Police Department Gerald W. Lynch Theater Lobby

February 28 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Stop and Frisk Conference
Sponsored by the Center on Race, Crime and Justice, the Office for Advancement of Research, and the New York Civil Liberties Union Gerald W. Lynch Theater Lobby

The work of Professors David Kennedy (above left) and Glenn Corbett will be aided by recent Congressional earmarks.

March 1 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM Law Day
Presented by the Pre-Law Institute Gymnasium and various locations

WELCOME, SPRING 2008 FRESHMEN!

Management, Treatment and Civil Commitment: An Evidence-Based Analysis Aimed at Reducing Sexual Violence.” Professors Elizabeth Jeglic and Cynthia Mercado of the psychology department will lead the effort to examine the program management, treatment and recidivism of sexual offenders in New Jersey. ¶ A $265,883 grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the project “Can Family-Based Prevention of Conduct Problems Prevent IPV Development?” Led by psychology professor Miriam Ehrensaft, the initiative will explore whether intimate partner violence (IPV) in high-risk children can be prevented via early, family-focused intervention. ¶ A $206,424 grant from the Department of Education for the Comprehensive Program Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) Invitational Priority A. Science professor Anthony Carpi will lead the project to develop a

curriculum and supporting content for teaching the process of science to undergraduates. ¶ A $178,600 earmark, sponsored and led by Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY) with the backing of the state’s Congressional delegation — prominently Senator Charles Schumer (DNY) — to support the creation of the Christian Regenhard Center for Emergency Response Studies. The Center, directed by Glenn Corbett, professor of public management, will provide an integrated and comprehensive approach to the study of emergency response to large-scale disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center.

Kudos for Employees who Provide an “Extra Ingredient”
Twenty-one employees who are “making a difference at a critical time in John Jay’s history” were honored December 20 as the first winners of the Bravo! Employee Recognition Awards. Robert Pignatello, Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration, pointed out that the Bravo! Program will recognize new and creative ideas, innovative problem-solving and superior customer service, and will include the outstanding employee of the year honors that are bestowed at commencement. “It’s all part of our ongoing effort to turn John Jay into a more employee-centered organization,” he said. Dean of Human Resources Donald Gray, emcee of the first Bravo! awards presentation, noted, “After 19 years at John Jay, I couldn’t have hoped for a more qualified, more deserving inaugural group of honorees.” President Jeremy Travis observed that everywhere he travels throughout the United States, “People know of John Jay, and it’s because of the work we do here — and a lot of work goes into making this institution one of quality, day after day, year after year, and even decade after decade.” With the new awards, Travis said, “We are recognizing the ‘extra ingredient’ that goes into institutional transformation.” The College’s vice presidents were called to the podium in alphabetical order to introduce the employees in their units who were to receive the Bravo! awards. The winners were: Academic Affairs Azinia Brooks Sandrine Dikambi Darryl Westcott-Marshall Student Development Malaine Clarke Christine Givens Dana Trimboli Institutional Advancement Juan Taveras Gary Zaragovitch President’s Office Elizabeth McCabe Finance and Administration George Correa Mario Alex DeLeon Joseph Laub Yenny Rodriguez Suzette Sancho Kevin Silva Enrollment Management Sean Julie Nilsa Lam Cheuk Lee Sylvia Crespo-Lopez Jo-Alejandra Lugo Peggy Roth

New Dean of Students Takes the Reins
SUNY-Old Westbury’s loss is John Jay’s gain Wayne Edwards, former Dean of Students at the State University campus on Long Island, was recently named as John Jay’s new Dean of Students. He began the new position officially in early January. President Jeremy Travis noted that Edwards is “an experienced student services professional who will bring great strength and creativity to his new post. His arrival represents a great day for our students and a new chapter in strengthening and revitalizing student services at John Jay.” At Old Westbury, Edwards supervised residential life, judicial affairs, career services, counseling services, the Student Union, interfaith services and student activities. He was a faculty member in the Department of American/Media Studies, teaching such courses as popular music in U.S. culture, the politics of the media, and culture, communication and society. Edwards also has extensive experience in the music and publishing industries, as senior director at Mercury Records, as director of media relations for the Lee Solters public relations firm, and as editor in chief of Black Sounds magazine. He holds two master’s degrees and is currently completing his PhD in sociology at the CUNY Graduate School. The deanship at John Jay was filled on an interim basis by Arnold Osansky, who was praised by Travis for his “exemplary service” in taking on an “important assignment at a critical time in the history of the College.” Osansky is now the Director of Outreach Programs. In this new position, he will oversee the College’s outreach efforts to high schools, community colleges and professional organizations in order to advance our recruitment of more diverse and better prepared students.

The inaugural recipients of the Bravo! Employee Recognition Awards, joined by President Travis, flash an enthusiastic “thumbs-up” after they were honored on December 20.

As Campaign Heats Up, Poll Finds Crime Issues Still Matter to Voters
With the 2008 Presidential election campaign beginning to shift into high gear, Americans have a piece of advice for candidates: elected officials should spend less time talking about terrorism and more time discussing specific strategies for preventing crime. The advice came in a recent national survey conducted by the College’s Center on Media, Crime and Justice, which was released in conjunction with the third annual Harry Frank Guggenheim Symposium, held at John Jay on December 3-4. The survey found that registered voters view crime as an issue on a par with the economy and health care. The finding that people are still worried about crime and ways to address it “isn’t a surprise at all,” said President Jeremy Travis. “If you’ve watched the presidential debates over the past few months, you’re hard-pressed to hear a discourse on crime,” Travis said. “You hear a lot about security and terrorism — incredibly important issues, to be sure — but not about crime. This poll indicates that candidates need to discuss crime, its causes and potential ways to address it, because voters are ready to listen.” According to the poll, which was conducted for the center by the Global Strategy Group, 53 percent of American voters agreed strongly with the view that crime is a very serious problem. Sixty-four percent said they believed there is more crime in America than one year ago. Fortythree percent said they wanted the media to focus more attention on crime prevention and less on crimes committed, and 36 percent felt that elected officials are not talking enough about preventing crime. Asked to identify the primary causes of crime, 33 percent of those surveyed pointed to drugs and alcohol, 17 percent said poverty, and 6 percent cited illegal immigration. When it came to possible ways of reducing crime in the United States, survey respondents called for putting more police on the streets (24 percent), tougher sentencing (24 percent), stricter gun laws (18 percent) and violence prevention programs for youths (18 percent). Other strategies that were identified included job training programs for prisoners and parolees (16 percent), more mental health and drug treatment programs (14 percent), preventing illegal immigration (11 percent) and removing criminal penalties for possession of certain drugs (11 percent). The 1,000 registered voters who were polled included a mix of city dwellers, suburbanites and rural residents. One-third said they had completed college and/or graduate school. The poll was made possible through grants from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Open Society Institute.

When the Issue Is DNA Training, the Answer Is “John Jay”
A certain hamburger-restaurant chain proclaims itself to have served “billions and billions.” The John Jay College Office of Continuing and Professional Studies is quietly making its mark by serving 560 — and counting — with a cutting-edge package of DNA training aimed at police, prosecutors, defense attorneys and others throughout New York State. The training initiative is part of a $2-million contract awarded to the office by the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS), of which $1 million was passed along to the New York City Police Department and the remainder used by John Jay for statewide DNA training. “The DCJS set a goal of training 400 law enforcement officers by the end of 2007,” said Dean of Continuing and Professional Studies Judith Kornberg. “We did 560.” The training was led by Herb Johnson of the John Jay Criminal Justice Center, Peter Diaczuk of the Center for Modern Forensic Practice and Marilyn Simpson of the New York-New Jersey Regional Community Policing Institute, which is based at John Jay. On December 13, President Jeremy Travis saluted the trainers and Dean Kornberg with a reception in his office. “Logistically, this has been absolutely the biggest project to date by the Office of Continuing and Professional Studies,” Kornberg said. “Our trainers covered the state from Niagara in the west to Suffolk in the east, from Plattsburgh in the north to Westchester in the south, and many other points in between.” Kornberg said the prosecutors’ training component has been subcontracted to the New York State Prosecutorial Training Institute in Albany, and that her office hopes to develop a training curriculum for defense attorneys sometime this spring. Additional training will focus on nurses, coroners and, Kornberg hopes, crime scene technicians. “This solidifies John Jay’s reputation as the place to come for DNA training in the Northeast,” she said. On January 15, the state DNA advisory subcommittee, which regulates and monitors public DNA labs in New York, met at John Jay in a symposium on the use of “familial matching” search techniques in the state’s DNA data bank. The Webcast session was open to the College community.

Behind Closed Doors

President Travis and Special Agent Harry Kern, chief of the FBI’s Behavioral Science Unit, cut the ribbon December 11 to open the expanded “FBI Room” in North Hall, which houses hundreds of closed-case files available to John Jay graduate students in forensic psychology as part of an educational and research partnership between the College and the FBI. Above right, at the ribbon-cutting, students wait to receive certificates for completion of the educational component of the program.

Muchas, Muchas Gracias
Interim Dean of Undergraduate Studies Jose Luis Morin presents an award to Rossana Rosado, Publisher and CEO of the newspaper El Diario/La Prensa, at the annual Latino/a Breakfast on November 30. Rosado, the event’s keynote speaker, surprised attendees with her announcement of a new Prisoner Reentry Fellowship, beginning in the Spring of 2008. Open to undergraduates with at least 30 credits and a GPA of 2.5 or higher, the Fellowship will award $1,000 and give the selected student the opportunity to work with the College’s Prisoner Reentry Institute on issues related to people returning home from prison and jail. Applications for the competitive fellowship must include two essays and a letter of recommendation. For complete details on how to apply and application deadlines, contact the Office of Scholarship Services in the Division of Enrollment Management.

QUESTIONS? PROBLEMS? THE ONE-STOP CENTER IN NORTH HALL HAS ANSWERS.

FACULTY / STAFF NOTES
BETWEEN THE COVERS
MICHAEL BLITZ (Interdisciplinary Studies) had his newest book, Johnny Depp: A Biography, published by Greenwood Press. This is Blitz’s second biography since 2006 in Greenwood’s Young Adult series. ADINA SCHWARTZ (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) published her “Commentary on Nichols R.G., Defending the Scientific Foundations of the Firearms and Tool Mark Identification Discipline: Responding to Recent Challenges, J. Forens. Sci. 2007 May; 52(3): 586-94” in the November 2007 issue of the Journal of Forensic Sciences. In recent months, Schwartz has taught Continuing Legal Education sessions on challenging firearms and tool mark identification for the North Carolina Bar Association, the Juvenile Defender Leadership Summit, the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association, the Los Angeles Public Defender Forensic Science Conference and the National Seminar for Federal Defenders. KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) authored an article titled “To Shame or Not to Shame: Lessons from ‘Quiz Show,’” which will appear in the March/April 2008 issue of Community Corrections Report on Law and Corrections Practice. In the article, she makes a case for not shaming those being held in correctional facilities. its reputation in the world of scholarship,” Levine said in a statement issued jointly with JANE BOWERS, the Interim Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. Association on “Cultural Diversity and Competence” on November 27. She spoke about the importance of overcoming prejudice and promoting diversity in correctional counseling. HOWARD PFLANZER (Speech, Theatre and Media Studies) held a reading of his play Jersey Nights at the Living Theatre in Manhattan on January 14.

PEER REVIEW
JEREMY TRAVIS (President) recently received the 2007 Research Award from the International Corrections and Prison Association, an Edinburgh, Scotland-based professional organization. The award cited Travis for “the significant body of work that you have done in the field of corrections and, in particular, for your recent seminal research on prisoner reentry.”

PRESENTING…
YI HE, ANTHONY CARPI, PETER DEFOREST and NICHOLAS PETRACO (Sciences) were featured presenters and panelists at the 46th Eastern Analytical Symposium & Exposition, “Opening Up the World of Analysis,” held in November in Somerset, NJ. Also participating in the symposium was PETER DIACZUK, the director of forensic science training for John Jay’s Center for Modern Forensic Practice. KIMORA (Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration) addressed the Osborne

ON BOARD
@ John Jay is published by the Department of Institutional Advancement John Jay College of Criminal Justice 899 Tenth Avenue, New York, NY 10019 www.jjay.cuny.edu Editor Peter Dodenhoff Graphic Design Gary Zaragovitch Submissions should be faxed or e-mailed to: Office of Communications fax: (212) 237-8642 e-mail: pdodenhoff@jjay.cuny.edu

GABRIELLE SALFATI (Psychology) was appointed as Associate to Dean of Research JAMES LEVINE. In this role, she will be assisting Levine while he is serving in the dual capacities of Dean and Interim Chair of the Department of Law, Police Science and Criminal Justice Administration. With the addition of Salfati to the Office for the Advancement of Research, “the College will continue its ambitious drive to further enhance its research agenda and increase

JANE KATZ (Physical Education and Athletics), above, recently won seven gold medals competing in swim events at the 2007 Maccabiah Games in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

educating for justice