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Cornell University Library

D 570,32 341st.R33
Regimental history. Three hundred and fo

3

1924 027 818 305

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REGIMENTAL

HISTORY
Three Hundred and
Forty-first

Field Artiller}^

Eighty-ninth Division of the National Army

Organized September, Nineteen- Seventeen

Demobilized June, Nineteen-Nineteen
>'h't
'

PRINTED AND BOUND BY

UNION BANK NOTE COMPANY
KANSASCITY. MISSOURI

1,1

COLONEL ROBERT DAVIS

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WAR DEPARTMENT
HEADQUARTERS CENTRAL DEPARTMENT

CHICAGO
Hay tiventy- seventh, Kine teea-uine te en

To the

Officers and Men of the 54l3t Field Artllleiy; ;-

I congratulate you on your excellent record of serrioe in the Great War, - a record which has fulfilled the promise given during your training at Caop Funston, It is an excellent record.

The regiment was organized on the fifth of September, 1917; left Gamp Funston on the second of June, 1918; arrived in England on the seventh of July and in France on the ninth of July, 1918. It trained at Artillery Training Center, Camp de Souge, Bordeaux, and left there for the Toul Sector Septemher tvrelfth. Went into the line near Euv&zin on September seventeenth and was the first American artillery to support there following the St. Mihiel drive. Remained in that general locality, constantly under fire, for nine weeks supporting the 89th, 37th and 28th Divisions. Participated in the Second Array's Metz offensive Hovember eighth to eleventh and moved forward into Germany as part of the Army of Occupation on Hovember twenty-ninth, your colors have been decorated by the Commander-in-Chief, American Expeditionary Force, for participation in the Euvezin Sector and for duty with the advance of the Second Army, v^hich was t^rrainated by the Armistice.

You have made a fine record in a division which comes back with a most excellent record for discipline and
efficiency, and loyal and gallant service. iivislon, is second to none.

.

The record, flj^^tiCC,

^

From the first, I have taken great pride in the Division and the organizations which com)ose it and have followed your career through the war/t't?^ **^ 4^^^«»^*.-^M>^*«*»«7
I take special pleasure in extending to you most sincere congratulations on your splendid record and in wishing you the largest possible measure of success now that you are again in the homo land.

Keep up your interests in a sound policy of national defense and pass on to those about you. and those who come after you, the lessons of the great war. "^ *'*'>{, «-»-<-^ c

/

Sinoerel

Major General, D.

S.

Army.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTY NINTH DIVISION AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES GERMANY

May My dear Colonel-- Davis
:

6,

1919.

It is a pleasure to sF.y a woi-d^now that the regiment is about to leave Gerijany regarding its service in Europe.

The 241st Field Artillery- entered "tha line^'trl'the"' Euvezln sector .northwest of Toul, on Septemher 17, 1918, remaining on dTity until the Armistice - a period of 55 days. It supported successively the 89th, 3Vth. f;nd £8th Divisions, cooperating at all times with the Infantry to the fullest e:xtent. On BoveHiber 10th, it supported the 66th Infantry Brigade in the attaot on Dommartin end LechauSsee which was On the morning of the beginning of the offensive on Metz. the 11th, one battalion had talcen position in the line of and the other batthe in Cantry outposts n'c-ar Harimbois Fme talion v;as ready to move forward with the infantry as it jumped off.
,
,

.

,

The Commanding General, 28th Division, highly comiaended the 164th Field Artillery Brigade,- of v.hioh the regiment is a unit, for its fine support of the activities of the infantry. The men of the 28th Division infantry freely expressed their While on the front confidence in the supporting artillery. the conduct of the men in general was above reproach at all

times and under all .circumstances many revealing unusual ability under added reeponsibilities.
,

The regiment arrived in Germany, December 7, 1918, and hee done well its part during th^ trying period of the The regiment ie composed largely of Colorado men Armistice. and is marked, in a division with, relatively little illiteracy, lor-the superior intelligence and' fine physique of the men. It has been a source of regret that the Artillery did not join the Division earlier, during the period of active operations, It is and could not support it duri^ig the great offensives. beyond a doubt that such support would have been of the best. You have every reason. to^e proud of the fine recora of your regiment-, and' you' are justly entitled to great credit for its efficiency. The Division Couuaander extends his congratulations on the fine record of the 341st Field Artillery, end best wishes for its members on demobilization.

Sir.oerely yours.

Colonel Kobei't Davis, Comjnandmg 341st P. A.

Major General,

U.

S.

A.

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MAJOR GENERAL FRANK

L.

WINN

</

Haadciuartera, 164th P. A. Brigade AltERICAK EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 7 th May 1919

Colonel Rohert Davis, Command 'g 341st P. A.
l!y

Dear Colonel :-

I have your letter of recent date, in which you referred to the organization of a veteran association in your regiment and to the publication of a regimental history.

It aeeras to me that it Is highly important to keep up the associations that have been formed during the great war. Your regiment has made a record for itself of which the members can justly be proud, md there should be opportunities for them to get together and renew old friendships and together go over the old times. Therefore, I believe that the action you are taking is most o omraendab le

The faembers of the regiment know its history because they have made it and, therefore, it is out of place for me to attempt even a brief recital of v/hat it has done. It is a very proud thing to be able to say that no task lias ever been assigned tiiat has not bean fully performed. This can be the boast of the 341st,

All I can ada is my very profound congratulations on the splendid regiment has done, and my bett wishes to each aid every one for a happy and prosperous future. ^^ i /
v7ork the

ETD/hob

EDWARD T. BONUELLY Brigadier General

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GENERAL EDWARD

T.

DONNELLY

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K'f
fr'""/^

^
self-evident,

and

this

knowledge makes

it

even more incumbent upon you

in

your

future lives to so conduct yourselves as to preserve the experience gained, both
in
is

a thing to be despised and avoided; reserving by a clean, law-abiding

your ever present endeavor to avert war and to teach those around you that it life your

privilege

and

ability of again spring to

In addition to the just sense of part ownership in the

arms should our country be threatened. Government, to which

your service
I

is even a greater benefit that has come to us all have sprung up among us, who were but a short time ago utter strangers. These ties you will find must last during all your lives, because you can have no better friend than the man with whom you have fought and sacrificed as you all have done in the past seven months. Men are easily tempered to hardships, and while would condemn a boasting spirit upon the part of any one of you, nevertheless charge that forever you bear in mind the nine solid weeks you were under fire, steadfastly and stubbornly holding an important position, undergoing constant hardships during all that time that were equal to the spurts of fighting occasionally exacted from other shock troops. During the march through the hostile lines into Germany, which was made under exceptional difficulties, and while garrisoning the strange and lonesome towns of our conquered enemy, your conduct has been exemplary and by it you have not only earned the everlasting gratitude of our people at home, but you have brought new honors to this Regiment which you have made and of which you are justly proud. In the name of those of the Regiment who made the Great Sacrifice, and for the sake of the honor of the Regiment and the states which are represented in it, ask that you return to your respective civil vocations a broader and better citizen, faithful to your neighbors, and amendable to the laws of your community; that you exert your new found strength only in defense of the weak, and that you remain ever on the alert to improve all the conditions that may hereafter surround Should the manhood of our country fore\er maintain the high moral and you. physical standards exemplified by you through all your service, the future of the United States as a powerful and peaceful nation is an assured fact. Wherever you go, and whatever you may do, my one and constant prayer will always be, "May God bless you."

entitles you, there

refer to the friendships that

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Co/ Davis' Zfar&weffSf^eech.

!^ffer Co Davis" ^areweff Speech - Ccimp~Upfon,JKV.
f.

Z/Ha.irlaix,

Ura n ce

''M'*^'-

£eviathian at Brest

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Casualties
KILLED
IN ACTIONf

William Biaisdell, Corporal, Headquarters Company. Henry R. Lines, Corporal, Headquarters Company. Jose Trujillo, Private, Headquarters Company.

KILLED BY ACCIDENT
Felix A. Miller, Private, Battery C.

WOUNDED
Phillip C.

IN

ACTION

Kemp,

Eirst Lieutenant, Battery B.

Harold S. Oakes, First Lieutenant, Headquarters Company. John Pyron, Sergeant, Battery C. Ortley N. Wherret, Sergeant, Headquarters Company.
Charles L. Carlson, Corporal, Battery C. Martin J. W'ollenherg, Corporal, Battery C. Fred Engberg, Corporal, Battery C.

August F. Stumme, Mechanic, Headquaiters Company. John E. Walter, Pri\ate, Headquarters Company.

Roy

T. Doiel, Private, Battery B.

James F. Brady, Private, Battery C. Rumsie O. Nichols, Private, Battery C. Ora C. Tripplitt, Private, Battery C.
Walter B. Cramer, Private, Battery C. L. Speer, Private, Battery C. Michael Kehn, Private, Headquarters Company.

Reuben

James N. Spencer,

Jose L. Cortinas, Pri\-ate, Battery C. Private, Battery C.

WOUNDED BY

ACCIDEiNT

Morrison Shaffroth, Captain, Battery E.

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GASSED
John
J.

Boy, Sergeant, Battery A.

Phillip J. Braunstein, Sergeant, Battery A.

Alfred H. Christensen, Sergeant, Battery A.

Charles F.

Ellis,

Corporal, Battery C.

Sidney

J.

Brule, Corporal, Battery C.

Roy

O. Buchanan, Corporal, Battery A.

Patrick Chavez, Corporal, Battery A.

Elmer A. Zuhike, Private, Battery A. Theodore O'Hare, Private, Battery A. James B. McKeen, Private, Battery C. Hans Hanson, Private, Battery C.
Jesse L. Hays, Private, Battery C. Robert H. Burns, Private, Battery C. Clyde A. Harris, Private, Battery A. Henry Lammers, Private, Battery A. Daniel Carrico, Private, Battery C.

^i

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28th Division,

American Expeditionary Forces 8th November, 1918.

Memorandum No.
1
.

10:

The Division Commander, with a feeling of sinceie pride, publishes below a letter of commendation from the Commanding Cenerai, Second Army. It
is

indeed a pleasure to realize that our recent activities ha\e been appreciated,
efforts of all

and that the

who have taken

part in this work have brought additional

credit to the Division.

The
has done

lfc)4th

Field Artillery Brigade,

now attached

as

Di\isional Artillery,

much toward

the success of these operations.

From
To:

:

"Headqliarters Second Army, American Expeditionary Forces France, 5th November, 1918. Commanding Cenerai, Second Ai'm\',

Commanding
(I

General,

28th Division, AmeiTcan

E.xpeciitionary Forces.

hrough Commanding General IV Corps.)

Subject:
1.
I

Recent acti\ity of 28th Di\ision.
desire to inform

you

of

my

gratification at the \igorous
its

and

successful activities of your Di\ision since

entry into line on the

Army. The recent patrols and raids ha\'e resulted making "No Man's Land" our land, and in lowering the morale of the hostile units on your front, as well as in inllicting losses on them and capturing a considerable number of prisoners. Such conduct exemplified the American spirit, and cannot fail to create a feeling of confidence on the pait of our o\\ n troops and of corresponding The 28th Division has shown depression on the part of the enemy.
front of the Second
in
its

ability to execute

pei'form,
clash

promptly the tasks which have been gi\en to it to and its officers and men have exhibited an efficiency and which ai'e highly commendable. R. L. Blllard,
Lieutenant General. United States Army."

Official:

Richard W. Watson,
Major, Adjutant.

W H. Hay, Major General, Commanding.
.

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341st Field Artillery

"IMMEMORIAL"
FIFTY-FIVE
consecutixe days on the F^ront, during the World War,
is

the

fighting record of the 341st Field Artillery.

Under the command
relief

of Colonel

Robert Davis

it,

through consistent and

efficient fighting, established

a repu-

tation for reliability, covering during this period, the

of three di\-isions

in addition to numei^ous infantry regimental reliefs without mishap,

and

firing

more than 87,000 rounds

in

pei'forming

its

many

missions.

Its

missions in the

many

infantry raids were carried out efficiently, so that not once was the I'egiment

criticized for failure to co-operate fully with the infantry.

as harrassing and destructive

fire,

as well as fire
it

executed.

It

held the confidence of the infantry

Other missions, such were well suppoited, as proved oflicially

on

lleeting targets,

by the commendation of the Commander of the 28th Di\ ision, the best e\idence of good work by an artillery unit. After the armistice was signed, the regiment was ordered to join the Army of Occupation of Germany, an army composed of units that had won for themIn these units. General the name of trustworthiness and reliability. Headquarters placed the m.ost confidence, anei knew that they could cope with any situation that might arise. The regiment was most fortunate in haxing as its commander. C'olonel Robert Davis, better known to the men as "Colonel Bob," an oflker to whom his command was loyal, and to which he in turn was likewise loyal. He had the faculty or gift of thoroughly understanding the whims and prejudices, the likes and dislikes, and the problems of his men and officers. He knew men, the most important knowledge that a commanding officer can ha\"e. A \'eteran of the Spanish-American War, he had successfully fought his w'ay up through all

seK'CS

ranks, consequently he
of his

knew what

to expect.

He

belie\-ed that e\'ery last

man

command had common

sense and ability and that they should be used.

were not burdened and irritated by countless petty orders. When he gave an order it was not accompanied by a maze of minor detail. He had confidence that we could supply the details and achieve the desired results. He wanted So long as we stood by him and did the best we knew results and he got them. how, we could count on him standing by us. And he did. The regiment saw- only fifty-three days on the firing line, but it required slightly more than a year to train it for acti\-e ser\'ice, delayed as it was by innuLack of equipment and materiel, more noticeable in artillery merable obstacles. than in infantry units, was the chief obstacle. The total unpreparedness of

We

-10-

the United States was brought forcibly

each time that he had to simulate.
materiel was received
;

home to e\ery artillery Our training progressed

officer

and
as

man
the

as

fast

no faster. Organized on September 5, 1917, at Camp Funston, Kansas, as a unit of the 164th Field Artillery Brigade and of the 89th Division, under the provisions of the Draft Law of May 18, 1917, which provided for the creation of the great National Army, it was commanded by Major Telesphor Gottschalk, and officered by commissioned personnel from the 2nd Battery, 14th Provisional Training Regiment, Fort Riley, Kansas. The organization commanders were: Battery A, Captain Howard R. K. Tompkins: Battery B, Captain George Englehard; Battery C, Captain Harry E. Randel: Battery D, Captain Harvey A. Fancher; Battery E, Captain Habeeb A. Saidy: Battery F, Captain John P. Swift; Headquarters Company, First Lieutenant Theodore Tabbert; Supply Company, Captain Edward N. Wentworth. L'irst Lieutenant Wilbur T. Gullion was
regimental surgeon.

Two
first

days

later,

September

was assigned
service.

to the regiment.

draft called to the colors,

7th, the first increment, 210 men from Colorado, These men were of the first five per cent of the and included only a few who had seen pre\'ious

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(p/ss-s

With the foregoing personnel, commissioned and enlistCLl, a sl<elcton oi'ganwas hastily formed to reeei\'e the second increment of S25 men from Colorado and South Dakota that arrived on September 8th. With the assignment of this increment, the sti'cngth of the I'egiment was sufficient to enable the battery and company commanders to perfect gradually their organizations. Increments received during October and No\'ember brought the regiment to
ization
1

aho\e normal strength.

During the winter, transfers

of

men

to other canton-

ments, and of specially qualified men to other branches of the service, reduced the strength of the regiment to below normal. Replacements were later received
Funston, immediateU' before entraining for o\erseas, at Camp Mills, New York, and in France. The aggregate of men who at different times have been members of the regiment is more than 4,000. During December more than sixty officers from the Second Training Camp
at

Camp

Long

Island,

for Officers

were

assigned

or attached.

From

the original officers and from
o\'erseas

these were selected those

who

e\entuall\'

accompanied the regiment

and were in command when it first w ent into action. Major Telesphor G. Gottschalk was relie\-ed of command on October 21st, and assigned to duty at the Artiller\- School of Fire, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as

/

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an instructor, Lieutenant Colonel Henry B. Clark assuming command. Two weeks later, Lieutenant Colonel Ralph McCoy, an infantry officer, was placed in command. Und,er him the artillery learned all about infantry reviews. On January 1, 1918, Colonel Robert Davis, who had only recently returned from France, where he had seen active service with the first American troops to go to the front, assumed command. This happily ended the changing of regimental commanders, for Colonel Da\is remained with the regiment until it was mustered
out.

was rendered doubly difficult; first by the by their false conception that arose regarding what seemed apparent wide differences between the American and French artillery methods; the false conception was not entirely second, by the lack of erased until the regiment had seen actual service; equipment and materiel.
training of the regiment

The

general lack of experience of the junior officers, and

The
and

first

two months

of training

were devoted to the school of the soldier
training, instruction in the

to military courtesies.

various phases of artillery

With this fundamental commenced.

To aid in the training many substitutes for missing materiel and equipment were improvised. Simulation bore a large part of the training. Wooden guns were built for gun drill. Hobby horses of barrels on stands were used to teach The fire control and signal instruments, the position of the soldier mounted. home-made, gave the specialists their first practical conception of their duties.
The value
issued.

of the foregoing make-shifts

Horses,

a

few

in

number,

were

was proved when the materiel was received in November, although

not until midwinter did the regiment have its full quota. Even then there was a shortage of horse equipage. A battery of 3-inch guns was issued in December.

One Battery Commander Telescope was the only fire control instrument. A few 1914 buzzers and signal flags comprised the signal equipment. Although we would undoubtedly have progressed far more rapidly had more equipment been available, yet by a system devised by the regimental commander, full advantage was taken of the means at hand and important progress was made equally by the
batteries.

was organized in November, under French Military Mission. This school was merged, on December 6th, with the Brigade School of Fire, which continued until a short time before the regiment proceeded overseas. Its value was emphasized to the officers by the ease with which they completed 'the course at Camp de Souge, France.
regimental school of
fire

A

for officers

the supervision of Captain

Monroe

of the

Divisional schools for specialists,

a

brigade school for non-commissioned

ri f

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5'un X)r) fl

^"

ri&ce

officers,

and

a

regimental liaison school,
it

all

aided materially in enabling the
field.

regiment to function as a unit when

took the

Service firing on the Fort Riley, Kansas, range began on April

16th and

continued for

five

weeks, ending with a barrage laid

down

in front of the

trenches

on Carpenter's

Hill, the

accuracy of which was praised by Major General Leonard

Wood,

the division

commander.

Regimental colors were presented to the regiment by the State of Colorado on April 15th. The presentation took place before 14,000 people that filled the Auditorium in Den\'er, Colorado. Colonel Robert Da\is, the regimental commander, received the colors for the regiment. Julius C. Gunter, go\'ernor The Regimental Band, then on a four week's tour of of Colorado, presented it. Colorado in the interest of the Second Liberty Loan, played.
Late
N4ills,

in

May

orders were received to prepare for overseas service.

On June
At Camp

2nd, the regiment entrained for the port of embarkation.

New

^'ork.

awaited sailing orders until June The next day, regimental headquarters. Headquarters Company and the First Battalion sailed
Island,
it

21st,

Long when

New

Yoi'k, the regiment
for

entrained

Boston,

Massachussetts.

-23-

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on the H. M. T. Bohemian, and the Second Battalion on the S. S. Laomedon via Halifax for London, arriving after a slow uneventful voyage on July 7th. Une\'entful except for those on the Bohemian, who for two days watched the other ships of the convoy slowly gain until they all hut disappeared over the horizon, and were only stopped from total desertion by a characteristic message from Colonel Davis to the commander of the convoy. Immediately on debarking the regiment entrained for Southampton, England, where it remained a day in a rest camp, and then sailed for La Harve, France. There, after a 24-hour layover in another rest camp, the regiment entrained for Castalnau de Medoc, near Bordeaux, arriving on July 12th.

On August
France, for the

3rd the regiment entered the artillery school at
final training

Camp

de Souge,

Here all materiel and equipment was issued. The first casualties occurred here on the range from the bursting of a piece, caused by a premature burst due to defective ammunition. The organization, Battery C, sustaining the casualties, was highly commended by the Brigade Commander for the excellent fire discipline displayed by the gun
before going to the front.

crews at the time of the accident.

Delayed by the scarcity of horses, the regiment did not entrain for the front September 14th. It arrived in Toul on September 17th. The next day in support of the 89th Divisional Infantry it went into positions on and in front of the Beney-St. Benoit road, which lay in the center of the but recently reduced The Regimental P. C. was established in Beney, later St. Mihiel salient. removing to Pannes, after the enemy had scored a direct hit on the building occupied by it, killing three and wounding five. Afterwards the P. C. was moved
until

to Essey.

Major Ray C. Rutherford was in command of the First Battalion, and Major Harvey A. Fancher, then captain, commanded the Second Battalion. They remained in command until after the armistice was signed. The organizations while on the front were commanded as follows: Battery A, Captain Tanner; Battery B, Captain Engelhard, later Lieutenant Wallick and Captain Pugh;
Battery C, Captain Vandergrift; Battery D, Lieutenant Kellog; Battery E, Captain Lannigan, then Captain Shafroth, and later Captain Hogan; Battery F, Captain Swift and Lieutenant Jones; Headquarters Company, Captain Danforth; Supply Company, Captain Greable. Captain Kelsey was regimental surgeon; Lieutenant Norman, First Battalion surgeon, and Captain Wilson, Second Captain Randel was regimental adjutant. Lieutenant Battalion surgeon.

Gettenburg was dental surgeon.

On September 22nd and
raid

23rd the regiment participated in
successful.

its

first raid,

a

on Bois Dommartin, which was

Three days

later, it

supported

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the infantry in a general raid of the sector, the infantry taking a

number of

prisoners

and gaining desired information.

That part

of the sector held

by the 42nd Division was taken over by the
in

89th Division on September 30th, resulting
covered by the regiment.

a material increase of the front

On October 9th the 89th Division infantry withdrew, and the sector was taken over by the 37th Division. The reason why the regiment did not follow the 89th Division infantry to the Argonne was the scarcity of horses in the American Expeditionary Forces, and the desire of General Headquarters to keep
artillery in the front line continuously.

A

gas

bombardment

of Bois Bonseil

was carried out on October 14th and

again on the following day.
the request of an aeroplane.
sector

A A

barrage was laid
retaliatory gas
16th.

down in front of Haumont at bombardment along the entire
1

was executed on October

The regiment was attached to the 28th Division on October 8th and remained with that organization until November 29th. A general raid on Marimbois Farm, Bois Dommartin, iVIon Plaisir, by the
infantry on the morning of October 21st was supported by neutralizing and barrage
fire laid

down by

the regiment.

A

battery of 90
raid

of the regiment participated.

The

m.m. guns manned by personnel was successful. Twenty-seven prisoners

were taken and important information secured. The next day the regiment alone supported a raid of the 56th Infantry Brigade on Haumont. The infantry occupied the town. A successful raid on Bois Dommartin on the morning of October 27th was made under our accompanying

on the 28th. A retaliatory gas bombardment of enemy sensitive points day proved successful. An infantry raid on Bois Bonseil on November 2nd, resulting in the capture of forty-four Germans, was supported by neutralizing fire and a box barrage. Artillery fire on November 3rd to simulate an infantry raid on Bois Bonseil had
fire;

also

on the

latter

the desired

effect,

according to reports of prisoners captured

later.

A
2ncl,

raid by the infantry on Bois Bonseil, identical with that of
1

November

wenty-seven prisoners were taken. was supported on November 5th. Raids on November 6th and 8th in the Bois de Cerf in the divisional sector to The mission of the regiment the left were participated in by the regiment. was to prevent re-inforcements from Lachausse and to lay down a smoke screen. An infantry reconnaissance attack on the village of Dommartin, and raids on Bois de Cerf and Bois Bonseil wei^e engaged in on November 9th. Orders were received on November 9th to support a general attack planned The mission was to neutralize hostile machine gun the following morning. fire from the flanks, in addition to putting down standing and rolling barrages to

r^Mm

/•""

cover the advance of the infantry to the Hinclenburg wire

in front of

Bois Bonseil.

The

wire was penetrated at one point, but withdrawal was necessary.

During the night
infantry,

of

November

10th, the First Battalion took

up an advanced

position 600 meters from the enemy's

main

front line in order to support the

orders were received to deliver

which was to acK'ance on Hage\'ille and Mars la Tour. At 9.30 hours, fire at the rate of fifty rounds per piece per hour until 10.55 hours, when all fire would cease. This fire was delivered on enemy sensitive points. Later an order was received to deliver a burst of fire with

maximum
It

rapidity for fifty seconds beginning at 10.59 hours.

was afterwards learned that the regiment's activities during the week, prior to the signing of the armistice on November th, were a part of the de\"elopment of a general attach of the Second American Army on the Briey iron mines, with the eventual object of capturing Metz. The orders recei\-ed for the 11th
1
1

were of the general attack itself. The batteries withdrew from their positions a few days after the armistice and were engaged with the conditioning of the men and horses, and re-outfitting On November 28th orders were preparatory to an expected move forward. The march into Germany began the next received to rejoin the 89th Di\'ision.
morning.

The

route

taken lead through

'W'oel,

Ar\illers,

Warcq, Etain, Spincourt,

Cutry, Longwy, Clemency, the City of Luxembourg, Junglister, Rosport, Bitburg, Badem, to Oberkail. The first lay-over was at Junglister at the end of the seventh
to Rosport, and on Germany, stopping for the night Two days later regimental headquarters and the Second Battalion at Badem. moved to Oberkail, and the First Battalion to Manderscheid. A week later the former moved to Dudeldorf and the latter to Pickliessem and Ordorf. E\entually, regimental headquarters and the Second Battalion wintered at Speicher, the First Battalion Headquarters, and Battery C at Dudeldorf, Battery B at Ordorf, and Battery A at Metterick.

day.

After a rest of one day, the regiment

moved forward

the following day,

December

7th, crossed into

Conditions dui'ing the

first

six

weeks spent

in

This together with the fact that every

member

of the

Germany were not the best. command was thinking of

home, and wanted to go home immediately, creating a feeling of unrest and disGradually as the lines of communication were impro\-ed, supplies for content. The ration improved until the actual the comfort of the men were obtainable. Recreation identical for the first time with that published in the States. issue was kitchens were built. Amusements, minstrels by the soldiers, and movies, halls and were encouraged with success. Athletics were promoted. These improvements and diversions, together with the granting of leaves and the setting of a definite time for sailing for the States, banished the feeling of discontent.

—27^

>&-..

."!4.

'}>'/'

yX'ijr'^ i/

C/^/i(P Jlc/ju iant

Oapioin ^JPanc/ef-

'^\^e<^/mento/yYd(^'s

In SpeJchor

carocJ for our jou/s

^^o/rmc/ towarc/ O^/iiffip^fioirrv

-2S-

'i%M

M

--29-

for the port of embarkation.

January and continued until the time of entraining Service firing under all kinds of weather conditions was had on the range at Nusbaum. During January and February divisional liaison problems were held weekly. Weekly practice marches were on the program. However, none of the training was carried out to the fullest extent on account of the small strength of the batteries, which were depleted by the large guard required, by leaves, by illness, and by constant calls for men for special duty or detached ser\'ice. It was not uncommon for a battery to have only thirty men for duty. It was absolutely impossible for this small number of men to care for the horses and materiel and prepare for the numerous inspections and at the same time go through a training schedule.
in

Training was resumed

Although when the regiment was organized, the men were drawn from only 4, 1919, members of the regiment were from thirty-four states and one foreign country. Following is a list showing the states and the number of men from each: Colorado, 657; Missouri, 190; South Dakota, lti4;
four states, yet on April

New
19;

York, 84;
Iowa, 17;

Illinois,

59;

Wisconsin, 35; Ohio, 29; Nebraska, 24; Louisiana,

Connecticut, 17;
11;

Kansas,
Texas,
5
;

14;
7;

New

Pennsylvania,
Jersey, 6;
Virginia, 4;

Mlichigan, 8;

Indiana, b; Massachusetts,

Oklahoma, North Carolina,
3
;

Mexico, 12; Minnesota, 11; Kentucky, 7; New7;
5
;

N-lississippi, 4;
3
;

West

South Carolina,

4;

Alabama,
1

California, 3

;

Florida,

Washington,

Wyoming

Arizona, N4aine, Tennessee,

each.

One man claimed

Paris, France,

as his residence.

On

April 23rd, the regiment as a unit of the 89th Division was reviewed at

by General Pershing. Here the men recei\'ed compliments from General Pershing and General Donnelly upon the excellent condition of the horses and materiel, which bespoke hard work. Immediately after the review, we commenced turning in equipment and materiel, ending with the final good-bye to the horses. One-half of the regiment entrained at Erdorf for Brest, France, on N4ay 8th, and the other half on the following day. Three days in the box-cars, two days at the embarkation camp at Brest spent in being deloused and undergoing The next day. physical examinations, and we hoarded the S.S. Agamemnon. May 16th, at noon, the ship weighed anchor and the regiment was homeward bound. /Vlthough crowded, conditions were much better than on the trip to The "chow" was not served abundantly, but it was clean. France. On May 24th we sailed up New York Harbor, docking at Hoboken, NewThe next morning found the Regiment at Camp Upton, Long Island, Jersey. New York. Another debusing and the men were ready for segregation into detachments for the various camps -where they were to be discharged. Regimental headquarters was sent to Fort D. A. Russell, Wyoming.
the Aviation Field, at Tre\'es,

-30-

'/r

\^4A'

Headquarters Company
HEAD(^UARTERS
Company, an organization
sergeants,
of

many

officers,

sergeant
clerks,

majoi's, color sergeants,

musicians,

corporals,

cooks,

chauffeurs, orderlies and prhates, ser\es no otkier purpose than to knit

the batteries together and enable the regiment to function as a whole.

The

scope of

its

duties

is

general and \-ague, not specific.

Its

duties do not permit

its working as a unit. Rather they require that it be an organization of indi\-iduals, most o( them specialists, who work more or less indi\idually and ai'c foi'ced to assume varying degrees of responsibility. To build such an organization, Lieutenant Tabbert, the first commanding officer, was gi\'en on September 5th three men from the Regular Ai~my, one a band leader. On September 7th the first recruits were recei\"ed, a few men

assigned, either because of their musical ability or special c^ualifications.

Shortly

afterwards a nondescript

lot

of recruits, fanners, miners, cow-punchci's, clerks,

life, were added. Those were all from Colorado and formed the nucleus of the company. On October 12th fifty-three men from South Dakota were assigned. Three days later twenty-four Missouiians came from the lb4th Depot Brigade. /Ys these men were assigned, they went through

butchers, and bakers in civilian

the usual process of a cold bath,

new

ill-fitting clothing,

medical examination,

and immunization from typhoid and small-pox. The cold bath will always he remembered, for it was really cold and it ideally prepai'ed them for other una\-oidable disagreeable ways of the Army. Without delay a start on the lengthy training schedule, necessary to mold civilians into soldiers capable of filling the specialists' jobs of an artillery regiment w as made. First through the school of the soldier, where the left foot figured so
prominently, these men passed. After they were moi'e or less familiar with foot work, militar\" courtesies, hygiene, the Articles of War, and work in the specialists' Did a man know anything about the telephone, the radio, signalling, details began. It was safe to assume that if he did not show" promise of learning or scout duty^
quickly, he would be weeded out and sent to

some other
hikes,

outfit.

This

training

was

punctuated

by

long

inspections,
is

and physical

inspections, such as onl\- the ingenuity of the

Army Medic

capable.

Along
Telescope.

in

the winter of 1917-18 we

a\-alanche of equipment

—buzzers,
all

flags,

what seemed at that time an telephones, and one Battery Commanders
i-ecei\-ed
all

Text hooks on

military subjects were

times easily a\-ailable.
experts

The

long

wooden

barracks was the scene of

much

acti\ity during the winter

evenings.

Buglers practiced unmolested,

future

radio

monkied with

-31-

//
'/ 4 ^^'l'

''

/ >

zSN<^am9mnori

7/roops

ygamemnorL

Jhadinfi Bagaaqe on

cjygamemnon

OvQr Starboard

l^'Vaifln(j

for

a Bout

Box//i(j onjc^ammnori

•.>.-•:_/ ^

-32-

their buzzers,

and semaphore enthusiasts waved

their sticks around.

At times

there was sufficient activity to drive the "gold-bricks" from their bunks to seek

other places that offered more rest and quietness.

We boasted of a football team. To the men it was apparently invincibleput up a good fight for the regimental championship, it requiring two games for the champions to push it back into second place. The championship game was hard-fought, not entirely bloodless. There was some feeling between the
It

That evening the winning battery endeavored to parade through Headquarter's barracks bearing its silver trophy. The triumphal march was cut suddenly short by physical force and the head of the column turned homeward.
organizations represented.

Along with the routine work there often showed up strong evidence of pleasure and cheer. Probably the outstanding event of good cheer was the Thanksgiving dinner. How many turkeys, how many "G. I.'s" full of salad, mince meat, how many boxes of cigars and cigarettes were provided for that occasion, only Civilians who attended that feast must have carried the mess sergeant knew.

away highly colored ideas of life in the National Army. For two months, during the fall of 1Q17, the company had four horses. E\'ei'y day these four horses were surrounded by the entire personnel, who took turns
Periodical detail, saddling, unsaddling, feeding, and watering. brought the number of horses up to authorized strength. These horses were not all broken. Frequently riding exhibitions would be staged by our cow-punchers. We learned to ride like a soldier without saddle or bridle. Each ride caused a new gait in the marching of the enlisted men, at least until Watering was nearly as pleasant as learning to the blisters had disappeared. The nearest available water was a mile awa\'. Each man would start ride. out to water, leading four or fi\-e horses. Sometimes he returned with that number and sometimes he did not. During the zero weather watering was the It was a typical cold raw wind of Kansas cause of frozen feet, ears and faces.
in

grooming by
finally

issues

men faced as they came back from watering. Immediately began Captain Danforth assumed command on March 11, 1918. the organization of the regimental and two battalion details: no easy task, when it is remembered that there were no precedents and no specific instructions as to
that the

This condition arose because the exact duties of the details while in action. For example, we would of the ever-changing mode of fighting on the front.
learn one formation of the detail going into action, only to be told shortly afterwards that that formation was wrong, and that so-and-so was now the correct formation, as prescribed in the latest circular from Fort Sill. And so it went. Captain Danforth had much to contend with; he fought against us, for us, and with us. We have made a record we can look back upon with pride

-33-

r->-'.

system.

For the maneuvers at Camp Funston, we installed a complete telephone What care was taken in stringing the wires in the approved manner. We built a reel cart which worked at a walk, but not faster. We learned the parallel and the "P-T" method; the difference between sight and site; all about co-ordinates, scouting and route marking.

Our trip to the Atlantic Coast in tourist cars we believed to he a hardship. At that time we didn't know what hardship and discomfort were. Those crowded

•«** -'•ilEsSWSBWI*

Gr<>i-aj-^ct

— y/io unt o

tourist cars, with a kitchen in an e.xpress car ahead, made an outing when compared to our railway journeys in France in the renown troop cars, with each man carrying his own "chow", hard bread and "wooly".

with a forced march,
to the extent that

Eventually we arrived at Castelnau, France, ending our three weeks trip While waiting to enter Camp de Souge, we full pack.
fire

were busy learning the intricacies of the new

control instruments, but not

up a little French and Vin Blanc, the latter causing a few to stray from the straight and narrow path. The six weeks at Camp de Souge taught us more of detail work, the mysteries
failed to pick

we

^.U-

//

//

f. */-•

of the "75 m.m.," and the horrors of gas. The impression after the armistice was that the actual gas was little worse than the measures of prevention. Those gas masks were so comfortable!

One year from the day when most of the company reported for duty, after a forty-kilometer hike through French rain and mud, which left the men and horses exhausted, we first learned the awful possibilities of artillery fire. As we stood shivering in the rain, waiting to go into camp near Beney, word came
that one shell had killed Corporals Blaisdell and Lines and Private Trujillo, and

wounded Lieutenants Kemp and Oakes, Sergeant Wherrett, Nlechanic Stumme and Private Walter, all from our company, except Lieutenant Kemp. This costly lesson taught us the menace of "Jerry's" artillery and thereafter all were wary and escaped without casualties, except Private Keehn, who was nipped in the shoulder by a sharpshooter as he wandered into "No Nlan's Land" carrying a Battery Commanders telescope.

On

the front the

company was

split.

The regimental

detail

was stationed

at Pannes, the First Battalion detail at Beney, then at LaN'larche, and the Second

Battalion detail at Beney and later at

St. Benoit.

maintained and operated the telephone net under all circumstances. If the service was not that of a city, we felt that some one had fallen down. We conducted reglages for our batteries with the planes by our radio. We acted Our men of the liaison detail lived up as observers at the Observation Posts. with the "Doughboys continuously. We drew maps. We were messengers. We did all that a headquarters company is supposed to do, many times more. With the signing of the armistice, details which had been on special duties returned to their detachments. Long days of rest followed with nothing to
laid,
'

We

Germany, exercising the horses and drawing new equipment. The telephone net was maintained, but no longer were the linemen routed out at any time on a minute's notice to repair a break. On November 29th the detachments were consolidated for the march toward the Rhine. A tiring ele\-en days with the cooks, bearing by far the heaviest burden, and we found ourselves in Oberkail, Germany. Resting here long enough
do, except prepare for the long hike into

to install a telephone system,

we mo\'ed

to Dudeldorf, thence to Speicher, leaving

the First Battalion detachment behind. Our duties at Speicher were routine, enli\'ened only by the ser\ice firing

on the Nusbaum range when we laid and maintained the telephone net and acted At the 64th Field Artillery Brigade horse show, held at Bitburg, as range guards. place in the Forgon class, second place w ith our reel cart, and third we won first Later we captured second place at both the in the enlisted men's saddle class. and the Se\'enth Corps horse shows in the enlisted men's saddle 89th Division
1

class.

/i

^,

,'

^x

'''o.,

CPojif&nau

cfoy4'[ea'oc

Go'arac/'o J//e/a

Caiifenau

m

rhe yrenc/z

zljud!c/-ies.

%:

i

7t/iere

//t-p'y7oo,:t"S

Parted

m

~~ . /

;,

-36-

<^>

/A

/-^or/e

yVeara

-yieiJie

w

in

f

'

,

y^
m
'u
f.

'an? 71 lair

oicjhi

and

Gows^H'ot^Ji:

(Germany)

(9<3ni. /{axnclels

eryy?a>?if

^

/

-z^

-37—

'/"/,

Perhaps

it

will excite a little jealousy,

but from pride we are forced to mention

the inspection of the Speicher organizations by General Donnelly,

when

he, at

the conclusion of the inspection, advised the use of Headquarters
the model in preparation for the Corps inspection.

Company

as

We

are

proud that we were members of Headquarters Company, and the
it

record that

made during

its life,

especially

on the

front.

^5;

—38—

6

The Band

THE
filling

341st Field Artillery

Band not only has

the distinction of being the

first

band organized

in the

being one of the best.

89th Division, but also has the reputation of In addition to playing for the regiment at retreat,
it

reviews, and other formations,

was greatly in demand for outside concerts, Kansas and touring Colorado in the interest of the Liberty Loan. 0\erseas it was attached for si.\ weeks to E\acuation Hospital No. 1, near Toul, where its music was heard and enjoyed by many thousand wounded.
engagements
in

many

of the cities in

To Lieutenant Colonel Gottschalk

is

the credit for

its

early organization

attempt was made on September 21st, two weeks after the regiment was organized, when it played for retreat, the "Star-Spangled Banner" being rendered by six men. i\Ir. Faber of the military band stationed at Fort Logan, Colorado, was transferred and appointed band leader. Lee M. Lockhart was assistant band leader. Men of musical ability were sought throughout the regiment and e\'en the di\ision. Colonel Gottschalk would Immediately, if that man proved hear of a man that had once blown a horn. worth while, efforts would be made to effect his transfer. These efforts usually proved successful. At our morning and afternoon rehearsals the Commanding Instiximents were either furnished by the members Officer was invariably present. themsehes or bought by the fund raised among the officers. On October 6th, the first concert was gi\-en in "Y" Hut No. 9 We now numbered twenty. Shortly afterwards from the second contingent, Dick Smith, eventually band leader, John Cameron, Den\'er's well-known drummer, and Gene Stuchberry, helicon, were added. Two weeks after the initial concert, the first trip was taken, a concert being given in the Presbyterian Church at Manhattan, Kansas. Music for the Soldiers-Sailors football game at Kansas City was to have been furnished by us, but the train wreck at Topeka prevented. However, we played for the Funston-Dodge game at Omaha. During February, March, Concerts were April and May, the band was on the road much of the time. given at Mlanhattan, Junction City, Fort Riley, Wichita, Cottonwood Falls,

and rapid

pi'Ogress.

Its first

At Wichita, in three concerts, the Red Cross netted $3,000, During were lost, nominalh'. The strength being o\'er twentyeight, the regulation, the surplus musicians were transferred to batteries and This condition was remedied by the detailed on special duty with the band. and Abilene.
April, fifteen musicians

regulation increasing the strength to forty-nine.

At the request

of the

Colorado Liberty Loan Committee, the band toured

—39—

//,

//

./

Colorado

in the interest of

the Liberty Loan, playing

fifty

concerts throughout

the state and netting more than $5,000 for the regimental fund.

This tour began

on April

1

5th under the charge of Chaplain Griffith with Mr. Weatherwax, later

Lieutenant Weatherwax, then of the Y.
for twenty-five days.

M.

C. A., as ad\'ance agent, and lasted

May

30th, Decoration

Day, was our

last

engagement

in

the United States,

playing at Manhattan.

At Camp Mills, Long Island, New York, the embarkation camp, Lieutenant Weatherwax took charge of the band, Mr. Faber was transferred for duty in the

^^^:j

J^and/^/ai/ma oiT^aso'7/o5pita[JI''o.//oijf.

United States, and Dick Smith promoted to band leader. Tom Weatherwax, afterwards assistant band leader, was assigned here. The trip across was enjoyable, notwithstanding the English "slum", dodging submarines, and wearing cork harness, also "close those port-holes." Leaving La Harve, France, for Castelnau in a downpour of rain, the band was snapped by an enterprising photographer, his pictures appearing in the "Literary Digest" of September 28th, in Lyon & Healy's ad\'ertisement, in November "Popular Mechanics." and also in the movies. While waiting at

—40-

'

L

Castelnau to enter

Camp

de Souge, daily concerts were given, attended equally

by the French and the men of the regiment. Band concerts were the social events of the life there. The "Hell Cats" put in their appearance at Castelnau. A sudden change in their treatment was noticed hy the musicians when they first hit the front on September 17th, but they were game and made the best of it. Leaving Toul on that day after a "bully beef" breakfast, we spent the
night
in

at

Grosrouvers.

There the quartermaster department grabbed us

for

horse details, but only for one day.
Shells;" likewise "hostile fire"

We
itself

rejoined the regiment that night, and

reheai'sals, "The Song of the known. There until detached and sent to the Evacuation Hospital, we musicians were roustabouts and handy men. Whenever any extra men were needed for special work, "grab a bandman" was heard. We laid telephone lines, dug dugouts, filled sand bags, cooked, carried messages, and acted as gas sentries. There was no band. On September 28th we were ordered to Lucy to undergo intensive training, preparatory to being sent to the Evacuation Hospital. We then went to the Hospital, where concerts were given daily until No\-ember 12th for several thousand wounded. Again with the regiment, the hike to Germany was started on November 29th. 1 hrough "No Man's Land" and miles of devasted France, through Lu.xemburg, and finally into Germany the band played the regiment. The monotony of the life in Germany was alle\'iated somewhat by the hand's music. Thousands of little "square-heads" also enjoyed our music. We played for the Seventh Corps Headquarters, at Wittlich, for two weeks, cheered the 89th Division football team on to \'ictory o\'er the 4th Di\ision at Coblenz, and furnished the orchestra and quartette for the 341st Field Artillery Jazz Minstrels, the first show to go on the road in the Army of Occupation.

Beney Woods a new tune was learned without

made

-41-

^l

First Battalion

Events on the Front

''IMMODERATE"
Immediately upon arrival at Toul, after four days on men and horses were tired, detrained and started the thirty-six kilometer march to Beney. Batteries B and C were forced to halt on the road so as to arri\'e and occupy their positions at night. Ammunition was picked up at the large dump near iVIenin la Tour. Ten day's rations were carried. Weather, rainy; roads, fair; health, good. Battery A left Toul at 8.00 hours, arriving at Beney at 21.30 hours; Battery B left at 18.00 hours, arriving at 18.00 hours; Battery C left at 21.00 hours, arriving Battery A occupied a position about one kilometer northwest at 20.00 hours. of Beney on the night of the 18th.
September IS, 191S:
the train from

Camp

de Souge, the batteries, although the

September 19: Bois de

Battery

B

occupied a position near that of A.

Battery C,
in

designated as an anti-tank battery, went into position with three guns

the

Xammes.
All batteries spent the

September 20:
establishing liaison.

day

in

organizing their positions and

Battalion Post

Command

organized and established near

the cross-roads at Beney.

C was relieved as an anti-tank battery and one gun group designated as anti-tank pieces. Battery C took up a position near Battery B. Fire for adjustment and harassing fire was carried out by the batteries during the day. September 22: Double normal barrage fired at 4.15 hours upon call from
September 21:

Battery

from each battery

of the

the infantry. September 23:
infantry raid,

The "H" hour

battalion

participated

in

accompanying

fire

for

an

being 4.00 hours.

September 24: Battalion withdrew after hea\-y enemy shelling and occupied new positions northwest of Boullionville. "Immoderate" Post of Command remained at Beney. Batteries prepared positions and adjusted.
September 25: Battalion paiticipated in preparation for ad\ance. preparation lasted from 23.30 hours until 5.30 hours. September 26: Firing as note above. Positions were improved.
little

This

Very

artillery acti\-ity during the day.

Adjustment and harassing September 27: Very little activity in sector. by batteries, conforming to the divisional scheme of defense. Twenty rounds per gun per day set as the allowance by the corps.
fire

September 2S:

Same

as previous day.

—43—

Jri

'Sermon//

O hsQri^ing

ui yf^^-jSbauvi

Jff/si

Jfarner

September 29:

Same

as previous day.

Group relieved batteries D and E of the 151st Field and Battery E of the 149th Field Artillery. The 42nd Division was withdrawn from the sector. The new positions were near the open space in the Bois de Beney. Post of Command was moved from Beney to the chateau in Lamarche.
September 30:
Artillery

Organization of positions and establishment of communication October 1: system completed. Registration was carried out by the batteries. The echelon was established in the Bois de la Oziere, west of Nonsard.

Demolition fire on Marimbois Farm, 80 rounds each by Batteries October 2: and C were shot. Harassing fire on Damp\itoux by the three batteries for one hour was carried out. Normal activity. Harrassing fire on Materiel Depot, west of October 3: Bois Dommartin. Usual harassing fire; 230 rounds for demolition on Dommartin, October 4: and 275 rounds for demolition on Haumont. Demolition fire; 500 rounds on Haumont. October 5:

A

'

/ f
-44-

//

/
6^

October 6:

Normal barrage
for demolition

fire

at 20.30 hours

on erroneous

signal

Three

hundred rounds
October 7:
October S: October 9:

on Dampvitoux.

Normal harassing fire. Same as previous day.
Harassing
fire as

usual;

also 100 rounds

on Hageville by ro\ing

gun.
October JO:
October II:
Little activity;
fire

for

adjustment only.

fire on Bois de Champs and adjustment for barrages and concentrations. October 12: One hundred rounds harassing fire on Chambley and Hageville; 100 rounds destructive fire on Haumont. October 13: Ninety-five rounds harassing fire on Bois de Champs, and QO rounds of gas on Bois Bonseil. October 14: Harassing fire of 48 rounds on railroad crossing north of Chambley; 200 rounds of gas on Bois Bonseil. October 15: One hundred rounds harassing fire on Hage\ille and railroad crossing north of Chambley. October 16: Three hundred rounds harassing fire on Hindcnburg Line between Damp\'itoux and Lachaussee.

One hundred rounds

harassing

Hage\ille;

=:4^-

ouie /n n I onccjurt'

y/ucncoiyVi/I

Uoni

7f'Qsf 9/ Jotc-yi

—45

'¥%

October 17 steeple in

One hundred, Haumont.
:

fifty-three

rounds of demolition

fire

on church

October 18:
October 19: October 20: October 21:

Little activity.

Usual harassing fire, with 100 rounds on Hageville. Usual harassing fire. One hundred rounds harassing on Bois de Dame and Bois de

Champ.
October 22:

Accompanying

fire

for

infantry on raid on Bois

Successful raid; 27 prisoners taken.
October 23:
fire.

Fire for destruction on

Dommartin. Dampvitoux.

Raid on Haumont by infantry supported by our accompanying
Harassing and interdiction fire on roads in rear of front line. Usual harassing fire on Dampvitoux. November 7 Harassing fire on enemy infantry positions.
:

October 24: October 25:

October 26

to

November

8:

Battalion was ordered to take positions

in front of

Thiacourt,

Farme. The positions were in the front line of the infantry. The batteries were heavily shelled while going into position. Batteries B and C suffered casualties, both in men and in horses. These positions were held for 24 hours under heavy shell-fire. "Immoderate" Post of Command was established in Thiacourt. New system of communication laid. Battalion telephone detail was under machine-gun fire from low-flying
preparatory to an attack on
Plaisir

Mon

enemy plane
to

while repairing telephone
.

lines.

Group was ordered to withdraw and proceed await orders for an attack upon Chambley. November 10: Code for 55th Infantry Brigade is "Crew".
November 9

to St. Benoit

8.41

hours:

Battalion Headquarters ordered through Lieutenant Erickson to be ready to

move, and to notify the commanding officer of the 27th Engineers that the detachment of engineers had reported to "Immolate 1", and to ha\'e Mr. Kuhn hold our Post of Command in Lamarche. 9.28 hours: Message from "Immolate 1" 10.00 hours: to "Colorado 1": "Situation changed, sit tight until further orders." Lieutenant Erickson ordered to send two days rations to headquarters men of "Immolate" immediately. Occupy positions to fire on Haumont position north 10.05 hours: Order given to batteries to occupy prepared of Louisville Farm. 11.55 hours: positions. Normal day and night barrage. Randel reports Keno going forward to Marimbois Farm, northwest of Keno. New station is Synchronized with "Immemorial." 14.20: Operation "X". 14.10 hours: "Right 360.7-248.5, Left order telephoned from "Immemorial" as follows: 359.9-249.13; standing barrage, 'H' hour to plus 36, then jump 350 meters, stand 14.25: Telephoned to batteries as follows: "A: Right 360-490until plus 70." " B: "Right 360.700-248.500, Left 360.490248.740, Left, 360.140-249.060;

-46-

'/

'

y'/O

248.740";

C:

"Right
14.40

360.140-249.060,

Left

359,900-249.300."

All

batteries

"Immolate" reports firing short on Haumont. Batteries checked and found O. K. 14.50 hours: Ammunition reports telephoned to "Immemorial 11". 15.00 hours: The following barrage sent down to the batteries: A: "Right 360.660-248.940, Left 360.400-249.360"; B: "Right
reported O. K.
hours:

360.900-248.500,

Left

360.660-248.940";
Left
Left

C:

"Right
to

360.400-249.3b0,

Left

360.080-249.800."

15.18 hours:

Normal barrage from "Immemorial"
360.900-249.200
360.360-249.600";

as follows:
after

"Right

360.100-249.800,

be

fired

on

signal

"H"
Left

plus 70.

15.30 hours:

Normal barrage

sent to batteries as follows:

A:

"Right 360.660-249.380,
360.660-249.380";
hours:
15.35

B:

"Right 3b0.900 -249.200,

C: "Right 360.360-249.600, Left 360.100-249.800". "Immolate" reports artillery short. 15.39 hours: All batteries ordered to increase range 100 meters. 15.40 hours: Communication to '32" cut. "H" plus 70. 15.48 hours: Randel reports heavy bursts of machine-gun fire from Dampvitoux and left. Heavy shelling to the south of Haumont, apparently from the northeast. Many friendly planes up. Randel is in liaison with the 109th Infantry. Three single white rockets to the left. Can reach Randel through "36" Field Observation Post. Third wave reported going over 16.06 hours: crest in front of Haumont. 15.55 hours: "Immemorial" advised. Randel reports frequent white rockets to the left of Dampvitoux. Very heavy shelling in Dampvitoux. Now supporting the 110th Infantry with headquarters 16.20 hours: Continued shelling of Dampvitoux reported. at Hassavant Farm. White cluster of rockets seen to the left of Dampvitoux. 16.22 hours; Above This order did not come until 20 hours. telephoned to "Immemorial 7". Sergeant Hill and Private Osman instructed to find infantry Post of Command and remain there. 16.55 hours: Co-ordinates of battery positions: A
X-358.330,
Q-330,
Y-244.240, R-240, X-358.320,
Q-320,
Y-244.60, R-360;

B

X-356.440,

D-440,Y-244.830, R-830,
of

X-3 55.760, N-490, 247.160 and the Post
of

X-356.180, D-180,Y-244.650 R-650; C "33" Observation Post is at 356.490Y-246.540, V-540.

Command

is

at 356.500-247.000.

Command

is

at 356,220-244,450.

19.00 hours:

"Immoderate" Post Requested "Immemorial 1"
for use early in the

to return horses to echelon.
19.45 hours:

Ordered horses to be kept here

Normal barrage from 08.78 to 08.82 to 05.88 not nearer morning. than 100 meters from Hindenburg wire. 19.50 hours: Barrage given to the
"Right 360.800-247.800, Left 360.800-248.200"; B: as follows: A: "Right 360.800-248.200, Left 360.640-500;" C: "Right 360.640-248.500, Left 360.500-248.800. 21.30 hours: Advised by "Immolate" there would be a problem 22.00 hours: At "H" hour all batteries will deliver a barrage at 22.00 hours.
batteries

along the

line

360.320-248.930 to 360.750-248.500,
for

lifting at

"H"

plus 20

by 100
line.

meter bounds per minute

a distance of 500 meters.

On

reaching this

/

/
-47—

cease firing and be prepared to deliver a standing barrage on this line at the rate
of

one round per gun per minute from "H" hour to "H" plus 30. 22.07 hours: Transmitted to batteries: A: "Right 360.750-248.500, Left 360.600-248.600"; B: "360,600-248.600, Left 360.460-248.780" ;C: "Right 360.460-248.780, Left 360.320248.930." "H" hour: 22. 15 hours. On above line from "H" to "H" plus 20 lift 50 meters per minute for 500 meters, one round per gun per minute. Stand ready
to deliver barrage

when
of

final line

is

reached.

occupy positions Marimbois Faim; open warfare position." This from "Immemorial 1". Batteries B and C ordered forward. 4.52 hours: Regimental order as follows: "Three batteries to barrage on line, 360.300-249.00, 360.680248.530, ending on line, 361.000-249.600, 361.400-249.120." Order changed to Barrage: place only one battery on barrage as the other two are on the road. "Lift at "H hour plus 1, and progress at the rate of 50 meters per minute until the last line is reached and stand there until "H" plus 30. Rate: "H" to "H" plus two, one round per gun per minute; to "H" plus 4, two rounds per gun per minute; to "H" plus 18, one round per gun per minute; to "H" plus 30, one round per gun every 2 minutes. "H" hour is 5.45 hours." 5.15 hours: Above personally given to "31-1" to fire. 5.16 hours: Second phase; concentrations: C: 359.460-250.900; B: 359.800-250.920. Third phase: keep contact with infantry as it advances on Hageville and fire as desirable. t).48 hours: Lieutenant Lane reports communication established with "32" through Louisville Farm. "Immemorial 1" in. 7.30 hours: "32" telephoned both concentrations under "phase two" in case communication not established with "33" one platoon on each concentration. 7.45 hours: "32" reports agent on way to "Immoderate." 8.00 hours: "32" reports Lieutenant Allen on road with caissons for ammunition. 8.20 hours: Order recei\ed to Instructed to hold limbers at Louisville Farm. 8.21 hours: "32" ordered to fire on Lachaussee at cease firing at 11.00 hours.
November 11:
vicinity

"Move two

batteries forward at once to

in

the

'

;

maximum speed. Armistice will be declared at 11.00 hours. 8.27 "32" reports by runner location of battery hours: Telephoned the above to "33".
8.30 hours at
at cross-roads, 223.100, approximate co-ordinates of right gun, 359.750-246.500,

with Observation Post at Marimbois Farm and Post of Command at 359.800246.500. Any position to the north unapproachable on account of wire on road.

Minimum

range

is

2,500 meters.

8.35 hours:

Captain Pugh reports that the
8.57

battery has l^een caught in a barrage and that his gun flashes are under direct
observation.

Ordered to cease
1"

firing

and withdraw men from the guns.

hours:

"Immemorial

inquired for Brigade Headquarters where the barrage

was

falling.

Ad\'ised o\er and short of Battery C,
firing
in

reports

enemy

"32" reports road

9.03 hours: Captain Tanner Ordered to open on Hage\'ille. 9.10 hours: "33" reports they have rear enfiladed by machine-gun fire.

on infantry.

-4S^

•/

#"^7

withdrawn from guns;
hours:

three wounded; no friendly infantry near them. 9.39 "33" agent reports. 9.55 hours; Harassing fire at rate of 50 rounds per gun per hour until 10.59 hours on sensiti\e points between Chambrey and Dampvitoux and Lachaussee. 9.57 hours: "32" line out. 10.25 hours: "33"
reports
all

battery
;

position,

360.250-246.850.

10.27

hours:

"33-1"

telephones

Ordered to pull out. Infantry reports fire wanted on Bois Bonseil. hours: Ordered to fire on 10.30 Bois Bonseil. 10.38 hours: Message from "Immemorial 1": "All batteries will cease firing at 10.55 hours; open fire at 10.59 to 10.59.50 on Bois Bonseil with a continued violent burst. 10.39: "32" reports mustard. Ordered to withdraw if gas continues. Send all gassed back for treatment. 10.52 hours: "Immemorial 11" advised "Immoderate 1" to have an inspection of all pistols. 10.57 hours: Gas shell falls 300 yards east of Post of Command. 11.00 hours: Cease firing; war over. 11.06: "Immemorial" advised that batteries B and C would ha\'e to be withdrawn on account of gas.
losses that

O. K.

no

he knows of;

reports mustard.

-4 I

'm

i

'

-49-

Battery
''31"

A

September 5, 1917, Battery A was organized. Captain Howard R. K. Tompkins was in command. The other officers were First Lieutenant Harry A. Holman and Second Lieutenants Erwin M. Jones and Ralph G. Bulkley. Before these officers lay the task of making soldiers of the men who were coming from civilian life and knew nothing of militarism.
battery,

ON

During the next six weeks there was a continuous flow of recruits to the all coming from civilian life and therefore sadly in need of the foot-work, which had the limelight in the training schedule.
Battery

A

that

fall

carried off the

first

regimental competition, winning
prestige to the school of the

the baseball championship and securing possession of a trophy cup.

The middle
soldier

of

mounted.

We

November, foot-work had sixteen horses

lost

its

for the entire battery to equitate on.

bridles, hardly a day passed w ithout an exhibition of broncho busting, which a number of times resulted in the horse being victor by a wide margin. On November 28th Captain Tompkins was relie\ed from command and sent to the School of Fire at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Captain Greable assuming command. The latter was relieved on December 9th by Lieutenant Holman, who remained in command until the return of Captain Tompkins on February 23rd. A number of the men were fortunate in securing lea\es for the Thanksgi\ing,

Ridden without saddles or

Christmas,

and

New Years
his

holidays.

Many of the men were for comfort after partaking. Christmas away from home and the presents received from the home folks and the Red Cross were much needed. January, 1918, was the "hoodoo" month, measles and mumps striking Battery A hard and sending more than half of the men to hospitals and isolation camps. The remainder, the healthy, found their work doubled. It was not an
bunk
spending their
first

camp were not made one seek

forgotten, the cooks dri\ ing

The large majority that stayed in away home-sickness by dinners that

unusual sight to see one man leading or rather stri\ing to lead, against the Kansas bleak winds, twelve or sixteen horses to the Kansas River, a mile distant. At each watering, holes had to be cut in the ice.

The middle of April brought the most interesting part of the training schedule. For seven months we had marched and counter-marched, had "stables" practiced on the field pieces and taken examinations on the drill regulations. So after se\en months of this fundamental, tiresome training. It was monotonous.

rm

/;

f\

/

—51 —

&..^

X

''O

"nostess- Jrc

three hundred rounds had never seen a piece

of

fired before,

ammunition was issued for firing. As most it was to them a novelty as well as

of the

men

interesting.

In the service firing actual conditions were followed as nearly as possible, the
officers

and men

feeling at the conclusion well repaid for the

arduous

efforts

of the early training.

for

On June 2nd at 4:30 p. m., after two weeks of preparation, we entrained Camp Mills, Long Island, New York. The journey in all uas pleasant, stops
made
5th,

being
of

at least once a
streets of

march through the
June

were ferried

day for exercise, which usually consisted of a short some city. We arrived at Jersey City on the morning across to Long Island City, and taken to Camp Mills
visit

by

train, reaching there at 6.30

during which time passes to

Island were liberally granted.

by many

transfers,

was

filled to

m. We spent sixteen days in Camp Mills, New York, Brooklyn, Long Island and Coney At Camp Mills the battery, having been reduced war strength by replacements from Camp Upton.
p.

After having been issued more equipment until our barrack bags were packed
to the uttermost,

and undergone a number

of

physical examinations,

we

en-

trained Friday evening, June 21st, for the port of embarkation which, as suspected.

-'

/

'A

'//

/

proved to be Boston, Massac hussetts. Detraining at Boston, we immediately boarded the "Bohemia," each man being given a card entitling him to a hammock and a place at the mess tables. At twelve o'clock sharp, the ship weighed anchor and we were off to take our part in the theatre of the great war. The day was extremely disagreeable, drizzly and raw. Going down the harbor the bay was quite choppy, and as soon as we were out in the open sea we commenced to buck the worst sea of the entire x'oyage. The maiden \'oyage for nearly all, sea legs were unknown, so when we slipped into Halifax thirtysix hour later, the agonies of sea sickness were generally known by expei'ience. At Halifax we laid at anchor for thirty-one hours, waiting for the other ships of the convoy. Here some of the officers went ashore and secured a canteen stock, which was a boon the rest of the trip. Something should be said about the "Bohemia." An English freightei", before being pressed into service as a transport, had been a cattle boat. Conveniences were lacking. When we boarded it, it was filthy. However, alter continued scrubbing and washing it pro\'ed habitable. The mess was in keeping It was in charge of an English negro, whose sole with the condition of the boat. knowledge of cooking was slum. Eortunate for him, our cooks took o\er the

'"m

^
-•il'

f/

mess eventually, so that no longer did our stomachs have to fight the convulsions of sea-sickness and the knowledge of most insanitary cooking. There were nine boats in the convoy, which was lead by an English converted Sub-chasers followed us until we were out of sight of land. Through cruiser. many schools of fish we zigzagged our way along, keeping an anxious eye out for submarines, passing the time away by boxing and wrestling and band concerts, until finally on the horizon we picked up the smoke of the destroyers that were The gun sections to accompany and guard us on the last leg of the voyage. manned the lone piece on the boat fortunately never tested their marksmanship,
being content with listening to the stories of the English gunnei'.

steamed up the Thames River in the early morning of July 7th, docking m. at Tilbury, London. Big posters urging speed in unloading to increase the movement oi supplies and American soldiers abroad, showing the high esteem and confidence of England in the efforts of the United States, covered the docks. A night at Southampton, a night on the old channel side-wheeler, "Monas Queen," and we at La Ha\re, on French soil. Three days latei-, our 5,000 mile journey ended at Castelnau, a small village in the heart of the wine country. At Castelnau, Captain Roscoe W. Tanner was placed in command of the organization, relieving Captain Tompkins, who was assigned to Headquarters. First Lieutenant James A. Fitzgerald was assigned. In our new battery commander, whom we did not know at that time, we found later, by actual experience and personal contact, a leader and a man in every sense of the word. He always endeavored to fulfill successfully the missions given him. At all times he had the interest, welfare and comfort of his men at heart, and never asked a man to do anything or go anywhere that he himself would not do or go. In the face of danger he proved himself cool and revealed ability to think. We stayed at Castelnau for two weeks before entering Camp de Souge. On entering Camp de Souge our training was more systematic and rigorous than ever before. Pieces and caissons and full detail equipment was received. Lieutenant Holman, as executive, organized the gun crews and reliefs and supervised the drill on the French "T^ m.m's." As the "75 m.m." gun drill was distinctly different from that of the American three-inch piece, strenuous efforts were necessary. Lieutenant Fitzgerald was placed in command of the Battery Commander's detail, which was sadly in need of thorough instruction. By careful and patient instruction, he succeeded in bringing the detail up to standard. The results obtained on the front by these two important departments of the battery revealed the wisdom of selecting these two officers for the training. The battery fired l,4b7 rounds on the range, participating in the brigade barrage. The di'ivers at Camp de Souge, previously having learned the nomenclature and fitting of the American harness, found that French harness was to be used
at
'S

We

00

a.

^

/

t.

-54-

which

fact

meant hard work.

First Sergeant

George B. McClellan, who had
the conclusion of the six weeks

held that rank since the organization of the battery, was sent to the Officers'

Training

of training at

Camp at Samur on August 29th. At Camp de Souge, the battery was Camp
de Souge at 9:15
of
p.

completely equipped and ready

for actual service.

We

left

m., September 13th, loading at Bonnau,

four kilometers distant, our train pulling out at

Toul the morning

6:00 a. m. and arrix'ing at September 17th. Unloading immediately we started for the front, filling the caissons and limbers with ammunition enroute, arriving at Essey at two hours the 18th, where we went into camp. The ne.xt morning at 9.1 5 hours, we pulled into our first position in the Bois de Beney, one kilometer north of Beney. We were busy that day, digging gun emplacements and ammunition pits, camouflaging, and establishing communication. Our first echelon was three kilometers to the rear. After moving a number of times the echelon was finally established back of Bouillonville, much to the relief of the dri\ers, who were thoroughly tired bringing up supplies to the battery and moving at the same
time.
l*-^th in adjustment by aeroplane. gun ci'ew relie\-ed Battery C from The machine gun used with the antithe anti-tank gun in the front lines. was put out of action by enemy shell fire without mishap to the tank piece machine gunners. From the start the enemy had our first position located, Our linemen here had their shelling it intermittently without material effect. On September 23rd we fired first experience of repairing wires under shell fire. our first barrage, from 4.15 to 6 hours, covering an infantry raid on Bois Dommartin, which netted twenty-six prisoners. The signal for "cease firing" had Shells just been given when "Heinle" opened up with all calibres up to "210's". burst all around the position, but no casualties resulted. The crews of nearby That night, to our relief, orders were batteries were forced to seek shelter. Passing through Beney under gas fire, we pulled into the received to mo\'e. new position near Bouillonville in a downpour of rain at 2.30 hours. The pieces were immediately laid. Number One selected for minor missions was emplaced some distance from the other pieces to pre\'ent disco\-ery of the position. A kitchen was established near the position, and from that time on until the armistice we did not have to depend upon the echelon for food.

Our

first

shot was fired the morning of the

On

the evening of this

day the

first

section

We

marked enemy bombers,

participated in the big barrage on the morning of September 26th, which the beginning of the Meuse-Argonne drive. As we ceased firing eight
flying low, circled

around the position, dropping small bombs
effect.

and using machine guns, but without

The next

four da\-s the battery

-55-

"^^'^i

'"v^ ^

-

-.

^'im^t^-f

—56—

carried out a

number of small missions, w ith Damp\itoux, Dommartin, Haumont and Marimbois Farm as objectives. The last of September we took up oui- third position, relieving Battery D, 151st Field Artillery, of the 42nd Division. This position in the woods to the south of St. Benoit was prepared for the winter and was occupied until shortly before the armistice. The echelon had left Bouillonville and was now between Nonsard and Vigneulles, where it remained until the march into Germany began. Lieutenant Fitzgerald was transferred on October 5th to a training camp
as an instructor, Lieutenant Phillips being assigned.

From the position in the woods, we fired on Dampvitou.x for adjustment and demolition, Haumont and Dommartin for demolition, and on Bois Dommartin, Bois Bonseii, Marimbois Farm, and de Champ Fontaine with harassing fire. The ranges were long, between 6,000 and 7,300 meters. .Adjustments were made daily, usually by Lieutenant Holman. We were tricked in firing a barrage on October 6th. Our lookout saw a rocket barrage signal set up from the front lines. Immediately the battery answ-erecl and was firing when a number of Lieutenant Holman, calling Battalion "Boche" planes appeared overhead. Headquarters, had his suspicions confii'mcd that the signal was a fake, sent Firing ceased before the planes located the position. up by the "Boche". addition to the before mentioned demolition and harassing fire, the battery In participated in a number of barrages, did counter-battery work, and fired on enemy strong points: trenches, machine gun emplacements and "pill boxes". The afternoon of November 8th, we were ordered to take up a position between Thiaucourt and Jaulny on a hillside, 1,200 meters from the enemy and under direct observation. Going into position that evening, trucks of the 314th Ammunition Train blocked the road where it doubled back up the hill, holding up the column. "Heinie" was shelling the road rather heavily and all that we could do was to stand and take it. Battery C, which was immediately ahead of On reaching the position it was of us, suffered casualties while we did not. found that the second platoon was lost. It did not get into position until the Eight men. Sergeants Boyd, Braunthe next morning, just in time for a gassing. stein and Christensen, Corporals Buchanan and Chavez, and Privates Harris, Fortunately Lammers, O'Hare and Zuhike, were gassed and were evacuated.
vation.

a heavy fog concealed the position all during the day, preventing enemy obserHe was forced to be content with harassing fire. At 18.00 hours we

moved out of that precarious position to St. Benoit. The next morning we pulled in near Louisville Faim and laid the pieces The road was crowded with infantrymen for what proved to be the last firing.
It was evident that an immense forward and all sorts of transpoitation. That moi'ning we laid a barrage for the infantry to be launched. drive was ready

ffoing

-57-

attack on the Hindenburg wire in addition to iiring on

enemy

sensitive points.

minute of firing, the Number Three piece, with Corporal Prost as "Number One", and Pri\-ate Farrar as "Number Two", fired fourteen in

During the

last

twenty-five seconds.

After the armistice, until November 21st, all the men except a gun guard were at the echelon. On that date the pieces were taken back to the echelon and once more was the battery all together. On November 29th we started the march

men had billets, except the second open field. That morning before the men could pull on their shoes, the shoes had to be thawed out. The battery arri\'ed in Badem on December 7th, thence going to Manderscheid, a summer resort in the mountains. On December 14th we moved to Pickliessem, thence to Dudeldorf. Oui' billets in Dudeldorf were good and the conditions not unpleasant considering the circumstances. For Christmas and New Year's dinners we fared on pork, which was a most enjoyable substitute for turkey. On February 25th Battery A took possession of Metterick, remaining
into

Germany.

Every night

of the march, the

night spent near

Warcq

in the

there until departure for the port of embarkation.

After

New

Year's passes were given to Trier, and later to Coblenz, Germany,

enabling almost every

man

in

the battery to see the wonders of the River Rhine.

Following these came passes to Paris and to leave centers in the picturesque and famous Southern France. During the winter we engaged in a number of

maneuvers and

fired

on the range.

Inspections were frequent, the most dreaded,

the corps inspection, being successfully surmounted on April 9th.

The one command
start the journey to

that the battery

is

anxiously awaiting

is

the one that will

an honorable discharge and home.

i^'

—58—

/
/
,/ /'
.,

Battery
"32"

B

WHEN
Back
in

Battery

B

finally

reached that stage
it

could be called a fighting unit,

Battery B", a

name which
life

still

in its development that it had acquired the sobriquet of "Galloping clings and of which the men are proud.

the beginning of our

at

Camp

Funston, when regimental hikes,

maneuvers and reviews were

virtually a daily event, the other batteries

would

fall

out fully an hour before Battery B, in order to be punctual at formations. That is how we acquired our name, a name which we belie\'e we li\'ed up to in e\'ery
sense of the word while on active service.

To be candid, there is one joke on the battei^y which is one of the best, if not the best, in the regiment. The war depaitment had issued a number of The regiment secured two, old "3.2 point" field pieces for training purposes. which were merely tubes mounted on wheels. They were placed in front of
regimental headquarters and were for decorative purposes only.
In the spring,

was scheduled to fire. Our teams drove up to regimental headquarters, hitched on to the "3,2's" and galloped out Colonel to the range, arriving just at the time firing was ordered to commence. For an Davis, in charge of the firing, took just one look as we galloped up. Instead, on instant he looked as if he would ha\'e a number of things to say. second thought, he merely turned to Captain Englehard and said w ith a smile,
during service
firing

from Morris

Hill,

Battery

B

"Take them back."
While at

Camp

Punston guards were made up

of

men from

all

organizations.

Orderlies at regimental headquarters were selected each day from the guard,
soldierly appearance.

being chosen in the usual system, namely, for their neatness, cleanliness and Battery B has the enviable record of furnishing twentyorderlies.
V^
3|S
yf,

one consecutive

-^

>I*

3p

de Souge, France, on the morning of September 14, 1Q18, Arri\-ing in Toul on the afternoon of the 7th, we immediately bound although the men and horses were fatigued, began the memorable detrained, and hike to Pannes, thirty-two kilometers distant. Before noon of the next day,
left

We

Camp

for the front.

1

despite the crowded traffic conditions,

were

in

Pannes.
traffic

It

was on

this

we had passed through Flirey, Essey, and march that we first learned the enormity and
the front
lines.

character of

immediately

in the rear of

Infantry under

full

pack, armoured motors, tanks, artillery, both horse-drawn and motorized, camions, limousines, side-cars and ambulances, formed an apparent endless procession on

the road,

all

retui-ning

from the

front.

Occasionally we would be halted by some

{•JV^i.

^^J

accident that had blocked the road temporal

ily.

French

siege gun,

which had evidently failed to brake, for

Once we came upon a heavy it had run down its

team, killing and injuring both horses and men.

we drew ammunition, filling our caissons and was then dark, and we could distinguish the actual front by the signals and gun flashes. E\eryone was thinking of one thing. When and where will we halt and ha\e that much needed rest. Scouts found a watering place, which we reached at two o'clock in a downpour of rain. Here the horses were watered and feed, and hot "chow" dished out. Lights were forbidden, which handicapped our movements. During the twoSeveral hours out from Toul
It

limbers.

JSti^ /^'

yf(->cfuTii

^Junncrs

Ljiss

on
abandoned on account

hours halt

little real rest

was obtained.

1 hree horses were

of exhaustion.

At daybreak we arrived at Flirey, which was completely in ruins, having been the center of a fierce fight three days previous, when the St. Mihiel salient was reduced by the First American Army. Dead horses along the roadside,
maze
newly made graves, shell holes, large and small, ruined fields and buildings, and of wire entanglements and old trench systems, could be seen from here.

y
-60—

The signs ot a very recent battle were clearly in e\idence. We passed abandoned German batteries, destroyed machine gun nests and hastily dug trenches e\'ery one the scene of that minor fighting which altogether make a battle. The ruins

of

"Gas Hollow" looked even more desolate than

it

really

was

to us plodding

along through French

mud

in a drizzling rain,

nearly exhausted.

last! There we went into park, pitched our "pup" tents, and with visions of a good rest. Our dreams were dissipated the next minute by an order from "Immemorial 1", stating that we must go into position

Pannes, at
in

crawled

at once north of Beney,

which lay about three kilometers north
of

of Pannes.

In

the

execution

the

order,

the

Battery

Lieutenant Kemp, was divided into groups of
report at

Commander detail, under three men each, with orders to

Beney at fifteen-minute intervals. The first group rode to a place near Beney Woods, and met Captain Englehard, then commanding. Lieutenant Kemp was ordered to report to regimental headquarters to get a battle map of the sector. He took the first group, and when within two hundred
meters of the Beney crossroads "Jerry" opened up on our "Kumber One", which was then at the crossroads. It was the fii'st experience of any of Battei'y B under shell-fire. It seemed odd to sec the "Doughboys" Hop whene\'er a shell was apparently coming near. That habit was soon learned, however, without any drill or instruction. The piece was not hit and proceeded on its way to take up its position. The group under Lieutenant Kemp rode on to the Post of Command, arriving just before a "15()m.m." struck the roof of the Post of Command, killing three and wounding fi\'e, wounding Lieutenant Kemp. ^We took to the dugout until the shelling ceased and then returned to the battery
position, reporting the first casualty, the reconnaissance officer.

The pieces were placed into position by Lieutenants \Vea\'er and Osborne without mishap. Lieutenants Wallick and Allen had charge of the combat train, which went into echelon about one kilometer from the battery position at the edge of the woods on a slope which overlooked Beney and the enemy. No one apparently knew just exactly where the front line was, so we did not know that the echelon was in direct obser\-ation of the enemy. The first night
the entire regiment was echeloned there,
all

moving the next night

farther to the

rear on discovering that they were under hostile observation.

Comforts were not expected
for places to sleep.

at

first.

The men made no

effort to scout

around

Blankets spi'ead upon the wet ground sufficed for bunks.
u'ell,

despite the mud and water and the enemy's shelling. was located near the crossing of two unimproved roads It was along these roads that at the southern extremity of the Beney Woods. This fact, together with three the infantry brought up its supplies and reliefs. other batteries within a one-hundred meter radius, made a most desirable

And

the

men
first

slept

Our

position

—61

>?,

objecthe B and E

for the

Germans.

Battery

A

of this
left.

regiment was on our right, and

of the 151st Field Artillery

on the

VVe began making our position permanent.
pieces for protection of the

gun crews.

Ammunition was

in the brush and carefully camouflaged. To ammunition and supplies to be hauled to the position, a corduroy road of whitebarked saplings was built. It made an excellent target, and "Heinie" took advantage of it, adjusting the same day with "210's m.m." His adjustment was too good in our opinion, securing both overs and shorts. Some of the men believe that the adjustment was made by an aeroplane bearing an allied insignia, which hovered suspiciously around all through the adjustment. The next two days we were shelled intermittently by the Germans, playing havoc with our telephone lines, but causing no casualties. On the morning of the fifth day we fired a five-hour barrage under shell-fire. The supply of ammunition at the guns ran low and necessitated carrying the shells from the ammunition dumps to the guns under most difficult conditions. When the order, "Cease firing" was givqn, we were compelled to abandon our position temporarily and seek protection in the thick woods nearby. We changed position that night. Our new position was situated five hundred meters north of the wrecked railroad bridge north of Eouillonville and was ideal. The slope of the hill on which the battery was placed was sufficient to afford a good solid emplacement and at the same time flash defilade. We remained in this position for a week; and from here firing on the morning of September 26th a seven-hour and twenty minute barrage, which marked the beginning of the Argonne offensive. Our infantry made no attack under this barrage. Our third position was situated in the heart of Beney Woods, about two kilometers south of the first position. At this position the platoons were separated about two hundred meters. Undergrowth and trees around the pieces were such that camouflage was hardly necessary. The kitchen was located Dugouts in an old German building five hundred meters in front of the pieces. were constructed: pits were dug for the guns; in fact, everything possible was done to make the position comfortable for the winter for we had information that there was every possibility of our remaining there for a number of months. A sawmill nearby was the convenient source of all lumber used. A railroad was Over built from the kitchen to the trunk line running to Lamarche and Pannes. this branch ammunition and supplies were brought up, saving much time and work. The tallest tree in the woods, not more than five hundred meters distant from the battery, was used as an Observation Post, a platform capable of holding four observers, reached by a built-in ladder, being built in its top. A word about the gun crews. With foresight in the event of casualties,

Trenches were dug beside the stored in dumps nearby improve the roads, to permit

-62—

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€-<iy^.

the
in

the cannoneers, which proved a boon Adjustments with precision were made daily. It was Battery B firing its first problem of demolition from this position which destroyed the church steeple in Dampvitoux.

men were

trained in the duties of

all

forming

reliefs to

serve the pieces.

Our dream of remaining for the winter in this position was dissembled late one afternoon when orders were received to take up a position on the flats overlooking Jaulny, where under shell-fire, we emplaced the guns in a road position, laying on Mon Plaisir. We remained there only one night, returning to the old home.

We sat comfortably here until early in the morning of Ko\ ember th. "Immoderate " about four o'clock that morning was ordered to have his battalion take up position at once in the vicinity of Marimbois Farm. The drive on Chambley was scheduled to be launched that morning and our artillery was booked to go over with the infantry as accompanying artillery. Battery B was ordered to move at once and take up a position near Marimbois. Lieutenant
1 1

1

Wallick, reconnaissance

officer,

with

reconnoiter and find a position.

men from the detail, left immediately to Marimbois Farm could only be reached by

The farm itself mass of shell holes. It was decided that the farm offered no suitThrough the thick fog could be seen the outlines of what appeared able position. to be bushes. About to investigate, attention was attracted by a hoarse cough coming from the direction of the ruined farm buildings. Investigating, an infantry outpost of a lieutenant and private was found. From them it was learned that the bushes were enemy machine gun nests, and that the infantry was one kilometer to the rear. Retracing their steps, they met the battery at the road which branched off to Haumont, under the command of Captain Pugh. Position was taken up near there, two platoons of engineers assisting in digging the emplacements. Fire was opened on Lachaussee. Flashes re\ealed our position to the enemy and in a few minutes we were subjected to both shell and machinegun fire. Under orders from "Immoderate 1" the battery ceased firing and the crews sought the little shelter available, some craw ling under cuK'erts and others dropping in shell holes. For two hours we were subjected to intense fire, many In one instance a big "G. 1. Can' struck within a few having narrow escapes. It was the armistice that was inches of one of the men, but it was a "dud".
crawling through a network of wire strung across the road.

was

literally a

declared at eleven hours that saved

us.

Late in the afternoon, after the fog had lifted, we reconnoitered the position. It was found to be not more than si,\ hundred meters from enemy machine-gun To the enemy our pieces were clearly visible, silhouetted against the nests. No infantry was between our position and the enemy's front lines, horizon.
except a few small outposts.

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Battery
"33"

C

TERY C, 341st Field Artillery, was organized at Camp Funston, Kansas, B/\'I with Captain Harry E. Randel as battery commander, on September
The battery at that time consisted of First Lieutenant James 7, 1917. W. Pugh, Second Lieutenants John W. Rawlings and Mack Davis, and twentyseven enlisted men from Colorado, practically without military training. These men had to undergo the usual cold bath before donning their new uniforms.
This
life.

little

stream of water was the dividing
drill

line

between

civilian

and military

After being given a preliminary training of but two weeks these same

men

and train one hundred twenty-si.x recruits that reported for duty on September 20, 1917. This second increment was composed of men from Colorado only. On October 4th and tith the South Dakota contingent arri\ eel forty-five men. Later the men from Missouri arrived.
helped to

Soon
of

all

time was taken up with
followed

drill

intensive training there
cli'ill,

was plenty
actual firing

of equitation, standing

and other training; during the period gun drill, close
hike to

formation

by

on the range.
first

On

October 29, 1917, the battery took the

Camp Hay

Springs,

a distance of eight miles.

On November 2, 1917, Colonel Nugent inspected the battery, haxing men mount on their wooden horses and examining them to ascertain how much they knew about ai'my rules and regulations. One man was asked by The recruit replied, "Guns, the Colonel, "What are 'the Articles of War'?"
the
pistols,

swords, cannon and

all

of that sort."
all

Besides the regular routine they found time to engage in

kinds of sports.

Captain Randel and Lieutenant Rawlings joining

in w ith

them.

The baseball team was organized and coached by Captain Randel. This team won all of the games, except that played for the regimental championship
with Battery A.

The
it

football

team was

oi'ganized

and coached by Lieutenant Rawlings;

every game and succeeded in winning regimental championship and the After winning the championship the teani played the 314th Signal prize cup. It w as scored on only once. to 0. Battalion a draw game score,

won

The time went
During
iVIay,

rapidly

by and soon the battery started preparation

for the

trip to the port of embarkation.

Captain John L. Vandegrif assumed command and took the battery to Camp K'lills, Long Island, New York, where it remained
1918,

—65

/

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'^,

^2 Cm-

S'uns

at Spj ncourt JurpGd OYVr bu/hQ Sochpf^^^

iWHKIS:

^

»•!*'»

'lit.

"^

I

Qarrt/ing oaf orders -Joorning to

'y^ire

CAampIonJ/arnQS-jring ^/Qom of S>atten/ °Q

"

yi(orPoffheJniQn^jv^eyrc/Jnmg }n S'pr/nonu

/.
/

/

VJl,

•..k:^^

until

June

21, 1918.

On

that day

it

left for

Boston, N-Iassachussetts, to embark

for overseas.

never forget the good coffee served to them by the Red Cross Embarking at Boston, they sailed for Halifax, Nova Scotia, and there met the convoy with which they were to sail. Battery C sailed on the good ship "Bohemia," in first-class army style. The trip was without excitement,
will

The boys

ladies of Boston.

and after fourteen days on board the outfit disembarked at London, England. Here it received its welcome from King George and afterward entrained for Southampton. Southampton for one night; embarkation; an uncomfortable crossing of the Channel; arrival at LaHavre, and a "rest" at that place occupied the next few days. Then the never-to-be-forgotten three days of travel south, cattle style, and the arrival at Castelnau-de-Medoc, Erance. At that place the theory of the "75 m.m.," the duties of the battery commander detail and co-ordination of the various departments of the battery were studied in preparation for the finishing course at Camp de Souge. The time at Castelnau will be remembered as having been pleasantly spent it was a summer vacation in a beautiful country place amongst hospitable, genial people, the kind
;

of people

we were

to fight in defense of later on.

de Souge, the artillery training camp, was to be our last camp of Elere the rough edges were knocked off, and instruction before actual fighting.
the final polish applied;
the "75

Camp

m.m." was mastered and each man learned

he was later to play it against the "Hun". Battery C of the 341st Eield Artillery developed the premier gun crews of the First Battalion, as proved by competitive tests, and on the first day that any batteries were sent

and played

his part as

to the target range. Battery

C

fired the first

shot fired by any battery of the

regiment in Erance. Unfortunately the honor of losing the

first

man

fell

to Battery C.

During

the firing of a practice barrage, while at the range, a

gi-in

burst, killing instantly

Private Eirst Class Eelix A. Miller, and slightly wounding the Chief of Section, Sergeant Clarence C. Crosby. From a brigade order, which cited the work "The battery was firing and the men were wearing gas of the firing battery
:

gun remained at their posts, without removmasks. The squad continued to act in a most cool and collected manner until the ing masks, and barrage was completed. The excellent discipline shown, during the incident, and the men concerned are highly commended for the is most satisfactory, Sergeant Clarence Their names are as follow s qualities they displayed. soldierly
of the exploded
:

C. Crosby, Corporal Sidney J. Brule, Privates Eirst Class Emil C. Baseler and Paul W. E\en, and Pri\'ates James J. Walker and James E. Powers.

The

following day Pri\"ate First Class Miller was laid to rest in a

little

—67—

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^

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//«

graveyard, near Camp de Sougc, his comrades acting as a guard of honor. General Donnelly was present at the grave side.

Soon the training was completed, and final preparations having been made. C was ordered to take its place at the front. September 14, IQIS, saw the day of its departure. Then began the trip to St. Mihiel Sector, in the little French box cars. The boys were in tip-top spirits, and amused themselves by singing and viewing the scenery as the train went bumping on its way. Many Red Cross hospital trains were passed, bearing wounded on their way back from the front, and the men cheered them loudly. Battery C envied them, and was more than ever anxious to get to the front and show what they could do. When the train finally pulled into Toul, on the e\'ening of September 17th, the men were very tired from their long rides, but resolutely started to unload materiel, horses, supplies, rations, etc. Without the loss of a moment's time, horses were hitched to caissons and supply wagons, and then started the steady, hard grind to the front. This was a test of endurance.
Battery

Marching

all

night,

up one

hill,

down

another,

many

times having to put

some caisson or wagon up a steep grade, But that laboring constantly, their grit and stamina were tested to the utmost. spirit which all real Americans possess pre\'ailed, and there was always someone
their shoulders to the wheel to help

fresher than the rest to lend a helping hand.

At Menil-la-Tour the battery stopped for a few hour's rest, then pushed on where it took up position in the foreward part of Bois de Beney, northeast of the battle-scarred village of Beney. This position was an extremely hazardous one and guns were literally placed in front line trenches with the "Doughboys". This was called the "Anti-Tank Position, and orders were For three days, given not to fire, unless attacks were made by enemy tanks. and two nights they enjoyed a real taste of "Doughboy life: exposed to the danger of discovery by enemy "bird men" they were forced to keep constantly under cover. Frequently shelled by the enemy they were compelled to seek Here they labored and slept in the mud and the shelter of their "fox holes." the rain, sometimes going without food for hours, but cheei'fully performing the Sometimes men, tired and weary, slept without being tasks assigned to them. aware of the shell-fire going on near them. For all of these hardships the men were in excellent spirits. Private Odegaard saw many things to excite his imagination and stir his "Fine! blood, and when the enemy opened fire danced around in great glee. I'll have lots of stories to tell the little Odes when get back home." this is great! Just then a shell exploded close by, splashing mud in his face. As he ducked for cover he was heard to say, "Whew! That was a close one. Maybe there won't be any little Odes!"
to the front,
"
"

1

-68—

^^ V

,^

When Battery C was relie\ed and ir.ox'ed back to a new position, at the south edge of Beney Woods, the men were fairly used to conditions and were
They had need to he, for the new position did not prove and there were times when enemy shell-fire became so hot that they had to run for shelter. While at this position the battery distinguished itself by destroying part of and holding up the movement of an enemy train.
acting like veterans.
to be an easy one,

Next the battery moved under shell-fire to a hill abo\"e the \'illage of Having no natural protection from enemy eyes camouflage was used to screen the guns. Within fifty and seventy-five feet of, and to the rear of the guns lay the wreck of the long railroad bridge of Bouillon\'ille. The boys
Bouillonville,

C were not slow in taking acK'antage of the sheltered sleeping quarters aforded by the insicles of the uprights and pillars still standing. Under another part of the bi'idge a headquarters was established, whei'e the officers woi'ked out the firing data. At Bouillonville there was much aerial acti\'ity, scout and bombing planes circling around day and night. The enemy seemed to be particularly an.xious to discover the position, and one night tlropped a large balloon flare from an aeroplane, lighting up the position with wierd ehect. On the night of September 26th Battery C helped to put over the "Million Dollar Barrage" that was fired along the whole fi'ont and was the signal for the general Having attained its advance, around Verdun and in the Argonne borest. ohiject hei'e, the battery again mo\-ed, and took up position in li-ont of Lamarche. Going to this new position, mo\cmcnt was somewhat retarded by seas of mud. K4en sunk into the mud up to their knees. A water cart was temporarily abandoned in the muel. At this position the men enjoyed the gla^l c.\|^erience of ha\"ing dry places Shacks, formerh' the homes of the Germans, to sleep in off the bare ground. were quickly made use of. [3ut to avoid danger fi'om bombai'dments, men were These put to work digging ciug-outs, and when finished mo\cd into them. proved to be comfortable homes. Battery G will ne\cr forget the dark nights It was while here spent here; so dark that all sense of direction became lost. that the combat train bringing up ammunition for the Second Battalion was shelled near Lamarche, resulting in the serious wounding of Pri\-ates Walter B. Gramer and Reuben L. 5peei\ and the killing of se\'eral horses. From this position the nightly barrages, and the daylight sniping and The position was also used as a base of operations for registering were fired. Ha\ing been dri\en out of these woods, "Jerry" the roving gun, "H. E. Ro\'er." had abandoned a complete network of narrow-gauge tracks. To the rear these were used as a means of bring up ammunition and food. The track e.xtended,
of Battery
in

good condition, to our infantry front

lines,

with

many

sidings,

therefore

accurate locations were staked out, and nightly "H, E." mounted on a small

-69-

car would emerge from the

woods and go forward for its evening exercise. Chambley, the railroad center north of Chambley, Xonville and other points beyond reach of the guns farther back would receive their shelling; then before the sound ranging devices of the enemy could get locations on the "Rover", he would hastily retire to safety, much to the disgust of the "Doughboys". The last few days at this position gossip was rife about Austria's quitting, and Germany asking for an armistice. On the evening of November 8th, however, the battery was ordered to change positions and move to the vicinity of Thiaucourt,
preparatory to a possible offensive.
Pulling out from

Beney Woods

into Beney-St. Benoit road,

marched
After

to a

position near Thiaucourt.

the battery This was about twenty-two hours.

tramping along, with many delays, and passing many trucks of an ammunition train stalled on the road, the battery came to a halt, while the scout corporal went ahead in the darkness to find the position staked out during the It was now about one hour, November 9th. afternoon by Lieutenant Patten. While the battery waited, the "Boche" systematically shelled Thiaucourt with "heavies", a distant boom, a whining away overhead in the clouds, then a noise like the clanging of a heavy metallic door in the direction of Thiaucourt. The position located, the battery followed the road down to where it was cut off by a ridge and then swerved to the left on a road running along this ridge, where As the battery swung in, on to this road, there came it was to take up position. the ricketing screech of "17 m.m.," followed by a loud explosion as it burst on the
top of the ridge about
fifty feet

away.

The enemy

followed this up, sweeping
Shells

the ridge and battery position with high explosive and gas.

dropped

all

around, killing one horse, and wounding another so severely that the battery

com-

mander had to shoot it. abdomen and foot, by
position.

a high explosive

Sergeant John Pyron was severely wounded in the breast, shell, while bringing his section into

Private First Class James B.

Corporal Charles L. Carlson was wounded by shell fragment, and McKeon was slightly gassed. After the battery finally got into position the enemy continued to rake the position, forcing the men to lie flat on the ground. They did not have time to dig trenches. On
the 9th
all

that screened

them from the enemy was a heavy

fog

—lucky

for

them.

In the afternoon Corporal Fred Engberg was wounded, his leg being broken

a shell fragment.

On

the evening of

from this place and sent to the the morning of November 1th, it was ordered to take up position at Marimbois Farm. As the battery moved up the road to this place, a French soldier came down the road, with joy written on his face, shouting: "Fini! Fini! Annistice! It was only a short while afterwards, however, that the boys found Armistice!" out that for them the war had just begun.
1

by November 9th Battery C was ordered edge of Dampvitoux Woods. From there, on

-70-

The move towards

iVlarimhois

F^arm

was
the

started at

tour houi-s.

The
detail
ire

commander, the reconnaissance

officer

and

battery

commander

preceded the battery to scout for position.

A

platoon of engineers cleared w

entanglements and other obstructions from the road. The position selected was just in rear of the Farm, and it was occupied while under sniping and

machine-gun
first
fire.

fire.

To Instrument

Sergeant Gunson belongs the credit of laying
to
fire.

the second platoon while exposed
platoon,
assisted

Lieutenant Patten

in

laying the

by the Instrument Sergeant was subjected to the same The second platoon opened fire on Lachaussee at 8.30 houi's, and almost

n

Jo.

nipvitouy..

from

,,*)

owtl'i

f

Wire infroa-t of

i.

!

T

immediately thereafter the battery was caught

in

an enemy barrage of mustard

During this time gas and high explosive shelling, which lasted for two hours. the second platoon, under Lieutenant Manderson, was ordered to retire, its

The first platoon, under guns having become useless due to mustard gas. Lieutenant Rawlings, remained at its posts without cover, until ordered to the The position was prerear by the battalion commander at about ten hours. carious, for there was no infantry between the battery and the enemy. The battery commander was fired upon directly by machine-gun fire when slightly

of the Farm, endeavoring to locate an Observation Post; Private Brady ordered to establish liaison with the infantry was halted and fired upon, and finally driven back from a position between the Farm and Dampvitoux. There were sixty men sent to the first-aid station after firing ceased The following were found to be seriously gassed or wounded at eleven hours. Corporals Charles F. Ellis, Sidney J. Brule and Martin J. Wollenberg, Privates First Class James F. Brady, Rumsie O. Nichols and James N. Spencer, and Privates Robert H. Burns, Daniel Carrico, Jose L. Cortinas, Hans Hanson, Jesse L. Hays and Ora C. Triplett. To Battery C, then, belongs the record of having occupied more positions on the front, of having held positions closer to the front lines three times it was up even with or in advance of the infantry,' and therefore of having seen more action than any other battery in the regiment. The first shot fired in France by the regiment was by this battery, and it is an honor, although regrettable, that it
in

advance

First Class

lost

the

first

man and

sustained the hea\'iest casualties.

-72-

Battery ''C" of the 341st Field Artillery

w
We

E

CAME
And
the

from Colorado, where the mountain peaks are high.

did "Squads East" at Funston on the Kaw",

Where

summer

suns and sand storms would

make you

bleary

c\'e.

And

the winter winds would cut you to the "raw".
at Mills,
lost

We camped

came

'cross the sea,

and trained

Where we

our
to

"Number One Man"
Beney
\\

— damn the luck:

at

Camp

de Souge,

traveled cattle-fashion to Toul on the Meusc,

Then we hiked

oods on just our pluck.

We
I

lived in trenches in

good old "Doughboy" fashion.

We
s'pose

fired

our barrages every night.

we did our kickin' no matter what the I'ation, But they never found us wanting in a fight.

We

We

have occupied positions from the Farm to Thiaucourt, We fooled the warry "Jerry" N\'ith our "Ro\er" had our casualties; they were all the minor sort; We were gassed at Vlarimhois when it was over.

We' ve done what we set out to do, and guarded on the Rhine, And now we re going to lea\'e it bye and bye. We're going to ci'oss the ocean to the tune of "Auld Lang Syne", For our Home, where all the mountain peaks are high.

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J^um

atTerJm

Yerdun. Baffkfield

yerdun Bdf/ef/efd

—74-

V.

Second Battalion

War Diary

"IMMOLATE"
10.00 hours: Post Commander opened; code name, 19, 1918. "Immolate." Officers; Captain Fancher, commanding; Captain Shafroth, adjutant; Lieutenant Milligan, liaison; Lieutenant Shultz, telephone; Lieutenant Allen, radio; Captain Wilson, medical corps. 15.00 hours: Shelled for one and one-half hours by high explosive shells, "150 m-m", at seven minute
intervals.

SEPTEMBER

15.30

hours:

Unknown man wounded by

shell-fire

in

front of

post commanders;

dressed in First Aid Station.

18.00 hours:

Position shelled

for three minutes, six high explosive shells,

one gas shell calibre unknown. "Immolate" barrage commenced. 5.15 hours: Barrage completed. 10.50 hours: Shelled by "150 m-m's," four rounds for five minutes. 16.40 hours: Shelled by "150 m-m's", intermittently. September 21: 10.35 hours: "36 " opened for adjustment; completed in 13.50 hours: Enemy fired three rounds, "105 m-m" in woods five minutes. 16.10 hours: Enemy shelling woods with high explosi\e shells left of Beney. 17.35 hours: Opened harassing fire on Bois de Dommartin. left front of P. C.
September 20: 5.05 hours:
18.20 hours:

"36" ceased
3.07

firing.

Crossroads at post commander shelled.

21.00

hours: Crossroads at P. C. shelled.

23.30 hours: Harassing shrapnel on Beney.

September 22:

hours:

and

gas,

twelve rounds.

6.05 hours:

vation Post Funston.

10.40

calibre fire on Beney, high explosive Communication established with Obserhours: Enemy fire commenced on Bois de Beney,

Heavy

12.50 hours: Enemy fired one four minute intervals, continued to 12.20 hours. Left of P. C. shelled, three 13.50 hours: round on Beney crossroads.

rounds.

15.00

hours:
shelled,

Beney

shelled,

hours:

Beney

five rounds,

eight rounds, "150 m-m's". 15.45 "105 m-m's". 15.55 hours: Beney cross-

16.00 hours: Harassing fire on Beney for two and one-half hours. roads shelled. 16.15 September 23: "Immolate" barrage opened, continued to 6.15 hours. hours: Enemy opened on "34", "35", "36", with "105 m-m's". Two enemy

balloons up.
hours.

16.30 hours:

Harassing

fire

on Beney and vicinity

until

19.25

September 24:
of Beney.

11.45 hours:

Enemy

plane brought down, 1,000 meters north

12.00 hours: Thirty rounds"105"-"155

m-m's"on Beney.

14.40 hours:

"35" adjusted by plane.

14.50 hours: Shelling east of Beney.

15.05 hours:

Beney

shelled until 21.40 hours.

22.00 hours:

"34"

fired thirty-five

rounds on

Domshells

martin; ceased at 22.22 hours. Gas shells on Beney. September 25: 1.00 hour: Three shells on Beney.

2.09 hours:

Three

M

Vm

-

{ /

on Beney.

11,48 houi's:

"35" commenced adjustment,

13,45

hours:

Adjust-

ment completed, relayed on normal barrage. 14,50 hours: "3b' commenced "34" commenced adjustment. adjustment. 16.09: 16.35 hours: All adjustments completed. 23.30 hours: Two rounds on Beney crossroads, 23.30
hours:
All batteries

opened general bombardment.
hours: "Immolate" batteries ceased firing. Rounds "35", 1,386 rounds; "36", 1,391 rounds,, 7.35 hours:
22.25 hours:

September 26:
fired:
'

6,45

34", 1494 rounds:

"35" reports laid on barrage. "Immolate" fired reprisal and adjust on Dommartin. 15.00 hours: Twelve rounds near position. 15.25 hours: Six "105 m-m's" on crossi'oads, adjustment. 17.30 hours: Three rounds, adjustment on Beney.
Shelling

Beney and

vicinity,

September 27:

13.02

hours:

September 2S:
gas shells on "35".

\

.27

hours:

Eight gas shells on

"35".
in

1.53

hours:

Five

2.45
1 1

hours:

Heavy enemy

fire

vicinity,

schrapnel on

crossroads. .45 hours: Nine rounds in vicinity of Beney. 14.10 hours: "105 m-m's", two minute intervals on Beney to 14.25 hours. 15.10 hours: Thirty-si.x rounds, "105 m-m's" on Bois de Beney. hours: Twenty-one 16.00 rounds in vicinity of Beney until 16.25 houi's, 22.00 hours: Reprisal fire on

Beney

Dommartin, Twenty-four rounds.
eight rounds.

22.30 hours:

Reprisal

fire

on Dommartin,

September 20:
21.30 hours:

17.30 hours: Reprisal fire, two hundred rounds on Dommartin. Hea\'y shelling, "150 m-m's" every minute, "210 m-m's" e\'ery

two minutes.
Twenty-four rounds, high explosive, reprisal Twenty-four rounds high explosi\'e reprisal on "35" Dommartin. 7.30 hours: "3b" adjusts on Dommartin. 10.15 hours: "34" adjusts on Dommartin. adjusts on Dommartin. 11.00 hours: 13.00 hours: "36" reports truck train seen moving from Charey to St. Julien. 17.55 hours: Ten rounds fired on machine-gun at point 36-35, harassing. 18.45 hours: Ten rounds i-eprisal opened on Dampvitoux. 22.37 hours: "Immolate" reprisal fire opened on Dampvitoux, one hundred rounds. October 1: 1.10 hours: Reprisal fire on Dampvitoux, one hundred and forty rounds by order of "Immemorial 1.30 hours: Reprisal fire on Depot de Materiel, northwest Dommartin, eighty rounds by ordci- of "Im"35" mission completed. 1.45 hours: 1.51 hours: "3b" mission memorial 1". "34" mission completed, completed. 2.01 hours: 11.10 hours: "Immolate" positions inspected by brigade commander. \\M) hours: "34" commenced adjustment on Dommartin; completed in thii'ty-fi\'e minutes. 14.15 hours: 16.50 hours: Enemy plane turned Fi\e enemy balloons up for two hours. back by "Immolate" machine-gun fire. 17.30 hours: Ten rounds, 400 meters
September 30:
1.00

hours:

on Dommartin.

2.00

hours:

".

1

—76—

4//

front

roads.

Damp\-itoux. 17.45 hours: Fi\-e rounds on cross"34" and "35" test normal barrage, firing one round each. 19.20 hours: Twenty rounds on Marimhois Farm, order of brigade commander.
10.00 hours:
I
1

of

"3b"

direction

October 2: .00 hours: One hundred and sixty rounds fired on Dommai'tin. Funston observing, reported very ef'ective. 11.30 hours: Ten rounds high explosive on Dommartin. Eficcti\-e. 14.00 hours: Sixty-six rounds on Depot de Materiel at Dommartin. lb. 30 hours: Ten rounds harassing in front of "Immolate" batteries. 17.30 hours: Fourteen "150 m-m's" in rear of position. 17.35 hours: Three hundred and fifty rounds on Dampxitoux by "hnmolate."
17.45 hours: Five rounds harassing on crossroads. 23.20 hours: Reprisal, one hundred and sixty high explosi\e shells on Marimbois Farm by "Immolate."

October 3: 8.00 hours: Sixty-two rounds adjusting normal barrage by "Immolate. 8.55 hours: "3b" fired 322 rounds on steeple at Dampvitoux: Seven direct hits, tearing side from steeple. 12.55 hours: "35" fired rounds on steeple at Dampvitoux, scoring two direct hits. 13.27 hours: Eight' 150m-m's" on crossroads, three minute intervals. 14.00 hours: \'inety-six rounds on 20-70 by "34" 15.25 hours: One hundred and thirt>"-fi\"e rounds foi- ePect

%

by "150 m-m's" on "Immolate" positions. 20.00 houi's Fift\- rounds at ten rounds pei- hour on Depot de Materiel by "34". "3b" fired 05 rounds on Bois deBonseil. 21.55 hours: Two hundred I'ounds on Damp\itoux b>- "35".
:

"210 m-m's" and ten "105 m-m's" on Beney. "35" fired 7?^ rounds adjtisting. 13.40 hours: "34" fired 32 rounds adjusting normal barrage. 14.00 hours: "34" fired 302 rounds on Depot de Materiel. 20.00 hours: "3b" fired 540 rounds on Depot de Materiel and 270 rounds on 2.b-7.b; "35" fired 540 rounds on 3.18-7.28 to 3.04-7.40 and
October 4:
1.00 hour:
Fi\-e

Some

incendiary.

0.20 hours:

crossroads 2.05-8.05, harassing
October 5:
1.30 hours:

fire.

Thirteen rounds "105 m-m's" on crossroads. 2.30 houi's: Se\enty rounds on Beney-St. Benoit road, "105m m's" until 5.30 hours, lb. 00 hours "3b" fired lb rounds adjusting normal barrage. 20.20 hours: "Im-

molate" fired barrage unti 20.30 hours: 380 rounds. immediate front. Answered in ten seconds.
October 6:
7.25 hours:

Three star rocket

in

Point 2.7-7.b
Also

fired

on by "35
2.8-7.4.

",

adjusted by plane.
8.15

Good

distribution

reported.

on

point

"105 m-m's" west of Beney, one within four
blanket
roll in half.
lb. 15

feet of

hours: Thirty one of "34's" pieces cutting

houi's:

"Immolate" batteries gassed.
firing

October 7:

5.45 hours:

Intei'mittent

to south

of position until 7.00

hours.

7.45 hours: Six "105

m-m's

"

south of position from direction of Haumont.

Twenty-two rounds of shrapnel fired by "3b" on 2.4-8.4, order of "Immemorial 1". Working party scattered, lb. 20 hours: Sixteen rounds
12.00 hours:

M

'if/

-77-

on dugout
cover.

fired

by "35", order

of battalion

commander.

Working party sought

October S:

6.10 hours:

Twenty-five "105 m-m's" on Beney from direction
1

Mon
five

Plaisir.

10.00 hours: Eight rounds south of Beney.

1

.00 hours:

Twenty-

"105 m-m's" west of Beney, direction

Mon

Plaisir.

14.25

hours:

Ten

"105 m-m'2" west of Beney.

"150 m-m's" on Beney, direction Mon Plaisir. on tower at Dommartin, 36 rounds. 13.10 hours: Ten "105 m-m's" west of Beney. Rapid fire. 16.30 hours: Thirtyfive good adjustment on barrage point, five rounds. 17.00 hours: Seventy-nine "105 m-m's" and "150 m-m's" west of Beney, near batteries, mixed high
October 9:
0.55 hours:

Two

12.00 hours: Thirty-five fair adjustment

explosive and gas.

rounds by "36" on Damp"35" fired four rounds, vitoux, by order "Immemorial 13.30 hours: adjustment on barrage point. 18.20 hours: Seventy-nine "105 m-m's" on battery positions. 21.30 hours: Fifty "105 m-m's" on Beney until 24.00 hours.
October 10:

8.58 hours:

One hundred and
1".

five

October 11:

10.30 hours:
for

Regimental Headquarters orders
"36", five details.

officer

observer

on Dommartin Woods
13.15 hours:

two days.

13.00 hours:

147th
fire.

Infantry reports daylight patrol will go over.

Batteries ordered not to

Patrol reported in code to "Immoderate" by "Immolate 1".
;

15.00

Kimberly reports friendly artillery firing short one officer and private "Immolate" batteries not firing. Reported to "Immemorial." 18.25 hours: Tenative mission on Bois Dommartin ordered by "7". 18.50 hours; Given to batteries. Night very quiet. Captain Swift relieved Captain Shafroth
hours
:

killed.

as adjutant.

October 12:

Weather foggy,

visibility

poor until 10.00 hours.

All batteries

adjusted.

14.00 hours:
killed

Enemy

plane adjusts battery on Beney crossroads.
Sixty per

Infantryman

one hundred meters south of Post Commander.

cent of shells during adjustment were duds.
part of plane's reglage.

Battalion wireless able to read

Fire for effect was over. 17.45 hours: Operation orders received from "Immemorial 7", covering barrage, counter offensive, etc. 20.30

hours: Kimberly advised patrol leaving 4.00 hours and returning at 7.00 hours.

"Immaterial

"

and "Immemorial

"

advised.
foggy,
visibility poor.

October 13:

Weather damp,

All batteries adjusted

"Immoderate" "Immolate" batteries firing. "Immolate 1" ill. 17.30 hours: Funston reports enemy machine-gun Called Kimberly and advised to call for barrage by phone on activity on right. account of poor visibility. 22.45 hours: Kimberly advised patrol will move

on barrage.

Enemy

very quiet during night.

14.20

hours:

reports friendly artillery firing short near

Haumont.

No

-78—

,^/
-

,/'.

through Dois Dommartin, 4.00 to 7.00 hours. Infantry 23.30 hours: Kimherly advised enemy shelling line with gas.
October 14:

reports

all

quiet.

and clear. 0.01 hours: Kimberly reports hea\'y "Immemorial 1" directs reprisal of 120 rounds on Dommartin Woods. Kimberly advised no patrols out. "36" ordered to fire. 0.25 hours: Kentucky orders high explosive shells instead of gas on above target. 1.05 hours: Kimberly advised heavy gas attacks on front lines to left. Enemy artillery active until 3.00 hours. 9.00 hours: Batteries inspected by "Immolate 1". 18.30 hours: Infantry patrols out, 19.00 to 1.00 hours. Imcool

Weather

gas attack.

0.10 hours:

pression of day, quiet.
October 15:
5.15
1.40

hours:
firing
fired.
all

Beney

shelled,

hours:

Enemy

northeast of Bene^'.
11.50 hours: 17.30 hours
:

twenty rounds, calibre unknown. 9.30 hours: "34" and "36"
filing

adjust.
in

"Q's" "90"

Infantry ad\ise reconnaissance patrol

Dommartin Woods

day.

No

during night except barrage,
ad\-ised

ordered
relieved

by "Immemorial." 20.15 hours: Kimberh' by 28th Division. General impression, quiet.
0.35 hours: 0.42 hours:

37th

Di\'ision

Kimberly acK'ised hea\';\' gas attacks on Infantry "Immolate" group fired reprisal of gas. Steady rain. 8.15 hours: "34" adjustment completed. 11.20 hours: "35" completes precision adjustment. 21.30 hours: N4ission from "Immemorial b" to lay rolling barrage from barrage line to enemy wire, ten rounds per gun, sixty per cent gas. 21.45 Mission changed to cover only enemy front lines. 22.15 hours: Enemy shelled Beney, twenty-five rounds, "105 m-m's". General impression: Unusual circulation in town and on roads due to relief. No enemy acti\-ity.
October 16:

on

left front.

October 17: 0.55 hours: Vlilligan reports front lines shelled by enemyReprisal ordered by "Immemorial 1"; ten rounds per gun, sixty per cent gas1.18 hours:

Vlission completed.
15.26 hours:

10.35

hours:

All

batteries adjusted
^'olleys

on base
shrapnel
report

points and barrage.

"Immemorial" orders four
15.38

on

36.1-248.

"36"
fire

completed
ePectixe.

hours.

15.40
1"

hours:

Field
18.25

signal

reports
shelling

Men

seen

carrying

wounded.

hours:

Enemy

Beney.

20.00 hours:

"Immemorial
Visited

as last night.

Batteries notified.
7."

20.10 hours:

directs same mission by "Immemorial 1" and

"Immemorial
"105 m-m's".

General impression, quiet.
0.05

Enemy shelled Beney, "77 m-m's" and Ordered to be prepared to fire on Gennan battery Advise impossible due located at 364.380-249.250: 200 rounds gas. No. 20. 20.50 hours: 13.45 hours: Enemy shell northeast of Beney. to head wind. Enemy shell Beney: se\enteen "150 m-m's", source unknown. During afterand "Immolate 1" inspect echelons. "Immolate 1" noon, "Immaterial
October 18:

to 3.10 hours:

11.55 hours:

"

1

''

iW,!".--'"'^

-79-

f/
"
y
^'
'^%'/SUi'--

//
'^
'^

'

W/.,/'

iW

"

'

"

""

cautions battery
October 10:
7,

commanders on
3.20 hours:

care of horses.

All batteries ordered to adjust

with percussion shrapnel.

by "105 m-m's", number "34" and "35" adjust. 10.00 hours: Carrier pigeon picked up and sent to "Immemorial." 14.30 hours: Three missions received from "Immemorial 1": Sweep railroad west of Dommartin, 352,550-247.450 to 3b2. 680-247. 650 fifty rounds shrapnel from dark until 19.30 hours. At 19.30 hours, fifty rounds gas, and at intervals during night, fifty additional rounds. Given to "34-2". Twenty rounds of shrapnel and high explosive on road forks, 225.219 to 24 hours given to 35-3. Twenty rounds shrapnel and high explosives on Dommartin-Charey road, 20.05 hours: given to "36". 15.55 hours: 12th Infantry advised will have two patrols out from 19. 30 hours to .30 hours; one to Bois Dommartin and the other to Marimbois Farm. Reported in code to "Immemorial 7". 17.28 to 23.55 hours: "34" shooting mission. 17.30 hours: "Immemorial" asks if we are firing barrage. October 20: 0.06 hours: Very quiet. Batteries e.xecuted missions. 7,00

Beney and

vicinity shelled

unknown.

10 to 7.50 hours:

"36" adjusts.

8.50 to 9.50 hours:

:

1

1

1

hours:

Batteries report salvaged shrapnel poor for adjustments.
of

8.55

hours:

"Immemorial" requests number

Reported: 4,898 rounds. Stopped at 11 hours on account of enemy fire, 11.10 to 11.30 hours: Enemy shells on road and railroad to west of Beney, falling short of "34". Mixed calibres. 14.05 1 1.50 hours: Advised ammunition train will police empties at 19.30 hours. hours: Reported missions completed to "Immemorial." 14.06 hours: Batteries fired 200 rounds No. 20 gas on Dampvitoux. Infantry ad\ise friendly artillery
firing short at 361 .5-246,0,

rounds harassing fire since October 1st. "35" requests permission to adjust. 10.00 hours:

endangering their outposts.

19.00 hours:

"Immemorial"

advises infantry patrol leaves our lines at B6-K9.
plotted.

21.33 to 22.30 hours:

Enemy
:

shells

tank mines and pits Beney; twenty-two rounds source

Enemy

Hageville.
October 21:

0.00 to 7.00 hours

Quiet,

to 10.00 hours:

All batteries adjust.

10.00 hours:

no enemy artillery activity. 7.00 Decide to change location

10.40 to Chaplain and regimental gas officer visit. "Boche" artillery adjusts on post commander with two planes. Secured fair adjustment in twenty-two rounds. Fired twelve rounds for effect, but secured no direct hits, shots landing front and rear and on Beney-Pannes road. Battalion wireless station able with use of German code to read enemy's reglage. 12.05 to 15.06 hours: Enemy maintained intermittent fire on post commander. "Immolate 1" and "Immolate 11" visited "Immemorial" post commander. 16.10 20.30 hours. Infantry to 16.45 hours: Enemy again shelled post commander. "Boche" massing in the direction of Dampvitoux. Reported to advises "Immemorial 7," Milligan reported for our information," "Captured Boche
of telephone exchange.

11.40 hours:

patrol.

Killed two, captured one."

21.00 hours:

Allied artillery

opened heavy

Temporary post commander Telephone central changed. established at phone central. All batteries instructed to be particularly watchful
bombardment.
for barrage signal prior to
ceases.

"H"
day

hour.

22.00 hours: Activity of friendly artillery
artillery

General impression:

Enemy

more active than usual; planes
Visibility
is

active

and balloons up
0.01

all

for observation.

best in seven days.

October 22:

hours:

reports both friendly
firing

Heavy artillery firing on right flank. Funston and enemy artillery acti\'e. 1.30 hours: All batteries

Reported mission complete to "Immemorial 1". 2.50 hours: Field Observation Post reports two three-star rockets on front line. 2.51 hours: Called Milligan, who reports no barrage signal from infantry. Fifty rounds per battery ordered by W'entworth on Central 5.15 hours: 10.40 Observation Post's. 5.17 to 5.36 hours: Batteries performing mission. "Hun" plane adjusts on "34". Poor job. Effect was all short. Thirty rounds adjustment and twelve rounds for effect. 14.30 hours: "Boche" fired twentyfour rounds in rear of "36". Some gas. 18.00 hours: Post commander moved from Beney to Pannes. General impression of the clay: Visibility: fair from
missions.
2.35

hours:

10.00

to

16.00

hours;

enemy

aircraft

active,

fi\'e

balloons

up during day;

enemy

artillery activity normal.

October 23:

0.00 to 7.00 hours:

Weather foggy and misty.
9.05 hours:

No

acti\-ity-

"34" reports hostile planes. 9.45 hours: Milligan reports, "Bet\\'een 7.00 and 8.00 hours, allied "75 m-m's" "4" point 361.38-245.88. This point about thirty-five meters east of
7.20 to 9.00 hours: Batteries adjusting.
fell

at

Called "36 ", who reported "3b-4 in Field Obser\ation "35" reports: "Shafroth wounded data checking. 12.55 hours: Bad scalp wound. Not serious." Ambulance while inspecting machine guns. 13.05 houi's: "36" reports enemy ordered and case reported to "Immemorial." shelling left of position; thirty-fi\e rounds in three minutes securing both shorts

Company's outpost."
Post and
all

"

and oxers on machine-gun position, lb. 45 hours: Recei\ed missions for night: "34" on Dampvitou.x-Chambley road and "35" on Bois Bonseil with "36" on Pont Maesti-ict and road south of Lachaussee. 19.00 to 19.38 houi's: "3b" 19.17 hours: Special mission of 120 rounds high e.\plosi\e and "35" filing. and gas on 363.110-248.120 for "30". "3ti" bombed, se\'en bombs striking in 20,02 hours: Funston reports barrage being fired on right. \-icinity of position. Code message to Milligan on artillery 2.04 hours: Romance ad\'ises all quiet. 20.16 hours: "3b-4" reports regiment on right has activity of own batteries. changed barrage signals. Information sought from "Immemorial" and Romance. 2055 hours: Keith reports 1,000 shrapnel and 600 "D" shell to dump tonight. 21.25 hours: 21.00 hours: Missions completed. Enemy bombing rear areas. "Immemorial advises "H" hour for "36" is 5,00 hours notified "3b" in code.

— SI-

""^M

23.50 hours:
cool

Enemy bombing
enemy
0.05

town.

24.00 hours: General impression: Weather,

and dry:
October 24:

aircraft active

day and
until

night.

Major Williams assumes
hours.
5.00

command,
firing forty

relieving

Captain Fancher.
hours

Very quiet

5.00

hours:

"36"

10.40 rounds on K/larimbois Farm to neutralize machine-gun fire. hold Haumont with twenty-five men and two officers," from "Immemorial" in code. 18.55 hours: Received mission from "Immemorial" to co\'er with fifty rounds per battery to depth of 800 meters parallel to railway front, 362.8-247.5 to 362.05-247.5. 19.01 hours: Mission distributed to batteries. 19.40 hours: Batteries ha\e reported missions completed. 24.00 hours: General impression: No visibility; enemy artillery normal; hostile aircraft subnormal.

hours:

"We

Moved

Post

October 25:

Commander from Pannes to Lamarche. 3.00 to 4.00 hours: Heavy enemy artillery

fire

on right

flank.

6.37 to 11.00 hours: Batteries adjust. 12.56 hours: Mission from "Immemorial 6": Forty rounds high explosi\'e on 361.260-248.860 to neutralize battery. Given to "36". 13.05 hours: Flash rangers requested to observ'e by "Immolate 1."
15.00

hours:

18.30 hours:

command.

Battery com/manders call; Kellogg, Hogan and Jones present. "Immolate I" reports to Post Commander Davis. Fancher resumes "Immolate 1" returns. Summary of clay Visix'ility poor; no enemy
:

aerial activity;

hostile artillery fire subnormal.

"36" reports 85 rounds on road leading to Beney. "Immemorial 7": Destructive fire on 362.260-248.730; "34 "and "36" ordered to 362.235-248.790; 362.190-248.715. 11.00 hours: be ready to fire on 218.87-228.7. Aerial observation requested. Major Williams relieved, Captain Fancher assuming command. 12.00 hours: No observation by plane obtainable. 16.27 hours: Counter battery mission: twenty rounds on battery at 361.200-248.960. October 27: 8.00 hours: "Immolate 11" out with "36-1", "35-4", "34-1", on reconnaissance. '^.25 hours: Destructi\e fire ordered on intersection of road and railOctober 26:

2.00 hours

10.30 hours: Mission from

W'-ay at

360.580-249.435.

14.20 hours: Written orders with sketches sent to
1

all

bat-

teries co\ering missions for night.

7.00 hours: Received mission: Seven

wagons at
All

362.7-247.5; ten rounds.
batteries firing. October 2S:

17.30 hours;

"H" hour
Quiet;

is

18.00 hours.

18.01 hours:

19.25 hours:

All batteries ceased firing.

enemy planes \'ery acti\-e 14.55 Time checked at 17.30 hours. 15.10 hours: Received from "Immemorial 7", "Normal barrage ef!ective midnight: If this line is not far enough forward, move 359.600-247.500 to 361. 040-246.910.
0.00 to
15.00 hours:

hours: Mission: Identical with that of 27th.

it

up."

15.30 hours:

New

barrage by phone to batteries.

17.42 hours:

"35"
17.00

reports mission completed;

150 rounds on emplacement 361.830-248.380.

hours:

"Immemorial 7"

in to

check time.

Gives mission

for 29th:

150 rounds

'm

/,

high explosi\'e on salient
infantry front
line

in

railroad tracks at

B

0590.

17.10 hours:

Plan of
"'Im-

forwarded to Walker.

18.00

hours:

Group

firing.

memorial I" in at 18.35 hours. 19.15 hours: Ceased firing on signal (six-star rocket) and by order of "Immemorial." 20.10 hours: Advised Milligan of barrage switch. 20.21 hours: "Immemorial 7" repoits, "Ro\'ing gun on Decauville, 532.70-474.50; 100 rounds of gas and twenty of shrapnel.". 20.45 hours: "3b" completes above mission. 22.36 hours: "Immemoi"ial 7" ad\-ises mission for 29th is cancelled. Ordered to hoard ammunition. No concentrations to be fired for two days: only necessary firing. 23.15 hours: Infantry shelled by enemy. "Immemorial 7' orders 150 rounds reprisal if situation demands. "34" and "35" ordered to put T) rounds each on Bois Bonseil.
All batteries reported laid on new barrage. 0.12 "Boche" have ceased firing on infantry. Patrols scheduled to leave at daylight from all twelve battalions on this front. Object: reconnaissance. 0.32 hours: Funston reports that "Boche" shelling "Doughboys" forty rounds every half hour. 2.10 hours: Swift off duty: Shultr on. 10,55 hours: "Immemorial 6" directs battery in action at 3bl .730-248.940 to be neutralized. 12.27 hours: Report on serviceable horses Headquartei'S Company, 28 Battery D,90; Battery E, 12; Battery F, 108. 12.30 hours: Walker directs two batteries be moved tonight. Their office will ha\'e one sector co\ered. "3ti" can mo\e day after tomorrow-, 12.50 hours: "35" directed to mo\'e, 13,55 hours: Walker in and advises that "G-2" says barrage line is correct and that infantry be notified Battery F will cover Batthat anyone in h'ont of it has to watch out for himself. "34-1" notified of mo\e. tery E's barrage tonight. 14.05 hours: 16.55 hours: "Romance" calls for barrage. Batteries notified; Battery D out of action on hours: "Romance" advises. "Ha\'e situation under control. move. 16.59 17.55 hours: Machine-gun and heavy firing on fi'ont line. Want reprisal." "Romance" advises no let up in "Boche" artillery fire. 18.40 hours: Funston 19.00 hours: "Immemorial 1" advises heavy shelling on Beney-Thiacourt road, and Keith in out at 19.20 hours. 23.00 hours: K'lilligan ad\'ises 250 "Boche"

October 29:
:

0.10 hours:

hours

K4illigan reports

:

:

1

in

Fort Riley.
October 30:

"36" ordered to
9:00 hours:

fire.

Danforth orders two hundred rounds precision Minnenwerfer at 362.5-247.4. 13.45 hours: Balloon observing for "36" fire on on abo\'e mission shot down by "Hun" plane. Zone fire placed on objective. 16,30 hours: "Immemorial" ad\'ises that barrage signal is si.x-star rocket; light
artillery firing short, one-star red rocket.

Eflective at once

of Staff.

All batteries advised.

22.50 hours:
acti\-e.

New
all

line to

by order of Chief "34" and "35" in.
all

23.45 hours:

Artillery

on right flank

Infantry reports

quiet.

October 31:

0.30 hours:

N4illigan ad\'ises
artillery fire

quiet on sector with
sector.

some gas

on right

of his station.

Heavy

on our right

17,00 hours:

'C^://
''^^^^^^>

P7J
-83-

Plan of infantry raid submitted hy Miiligan hy messenger. 17.55 hours: Danforth advises no work on raid. 23.45 hours: Miiligan advises that patrol has returned with no prisoners. No "Boche" were found in Bois Dommartin. General impression: Enemy and friendly planes active; artillery, enemy and friendly abnormal.

November
Bonseil.

2:

4.55 hours:

Batteries firing barrage to east and north of Bois
firing,

6.19

hours:

Cease

firing for thirty

minutes.
recruits.

9.50 hours:
10.00 hours:

"Immemorial "Immemorial

1

1". 6.35 hours: Resume 1" requests copy of training

order for

new

All batteries advised to use long fuses.

"36" reports Battalion of 329th Field Artillery moving in on his right. 15.00 hours: Walker advises not to issue typewritten operation orders as new orders will be out Tuesday. Establish battery Observation Posts as follows: Battery D, woods to left of German trench; Battery E, Haumont; Battery F, old German trench. Louisville Farm to be occupied at night. Visibility and possibility sketches ordered. 17.40 hours: Received mission of three hundred rounds on enemy relief covering roads west and southwest of
11.00 hours:

Hageville.

19.00 to 24.00 hours:
3:

Quiet.

Enemy

planes active during day.
7.20 hours: Miiligan First Battalion

November
moving.
active;

4.30 hours:

Enemy

firing short of "34".

advises infantry being shelled to immediate right.

8.00 hours:

Furnished Garfield with sketches showing barrages, etc. 23.05 hours: Batteries warned to be on strict watch. General impression Quiet planes
:

;

1" orders that all batteries be ready to move within three hours. 2.50 hours: Written orders sent all batteries covering their movements and missions. 4.20 hours: Operation orders over phone from Walker: "Battery '36' one wire from 1092 to 1377, 'H' hour, 5. 10 hours; Four rounds per gun per minute for first ten minutes, then two rounds per minute until further orders. '34' and '35' and one battery from the Third Battalion to advance, but to open at 'H' hour on Bois Bonseil with combing

"Huns" using one-pounders. November 4: 1.45 hours: "Immemorial

from the infantry. Forward positions Marimbois Farm." 4.55 hours: "36" advised 5.00 hoiu's: Advised that ammunition to lift barrage at end of ten minutes. Schw eiger placed in command of battery train station will be at St. Benoit. Ordered to report to Post Commander Fancher by phone. of the Third Battalion. 5.44 hours: Advised "34" to be ready 5.10 hours: All batteries reported firing. Received following message. "To 'Immolate' through 'Immature': to move. Send information regarding infantry to 'Immoderate' through 'Keno'and 'Improve.' 5.46 hours: Warned "35" to be ready to move. 5.55 hours: No signature. "35" reports on red rocket. 5.56 hours: "36" ordered to cease firing by Walker. Jones reports that the Third Battalion never fired a shot. 6.05 hours: Walker
fire.

Continue

until

further

orders

limited between Bois Bonseil and

"

/

/

/

-4.,

.

fy

'

/'W'^/'

28 northeast of Dampvitoux, then two rounds per gun per minute until further orders. 6.15 hours: Milligan advises no news and no signal system used by infantry. 6.25 hours: Vlajor Williams, 342nd Field Artillery, requests news and desires to be advised. 6.35 hours: Captain Wilson ordered to report to
orders
fire

for ten

minutes on crossroads,

to sweep road to Lachaussee at rate of

Post

Commander

Fancher.

6.45

hours:

Dressing station ordered established

from front. Battery D reports two sections on road in rear of position. 7.02 hours: "35" reports limbers in position behind emplacement. 7.14 hours: "Immemorial" directs decrease in rate of fire. "Immemorial" reports ammunition will be deli\'erecl, also Russian mineral oil. 7.26 hours: Milligan reports: "Met resistance on right, heavy shelling and machine-gun fire; objective not reached; under enemy high explosive and gas shell fire." No news from immediate front. Abo\'e reported to "Immemorial." 7.45 hours: Advance on left held up by hea\'y machine-gun fire from crossroads, "36" ordered to place two hundred and fifty rounds there. 8.10 hours: 0198. "36" All batteries ordered to feed gun crews and watch ammunition supply. '1 wo piece. Lieutenants Faus and reports piece of rotating band in Number R. J. y\llen report in charge of combat train of First Battalion. Ordered to hold train along road between Post Commander Fancher and St. Benoit. 8.20 hours: Walker orders Pont de Maestricht covered between crossroads, 5604.
at St. Benoit.

6.50 hours:

No news

Missions given to batteries.

8.40 hours:

Milligan reports reconnaissance patrol

through Bois Dommartin and Marimbois Farm. Party on left held up by wire Me has communication with left forward group by and machine-gun fire. Walker reports still hea\'y machine-gun telephone and runner. 9.04 hours: Ordered Battery and Battery F on crossroads 220.7, fire from left flank. Lachaussee to clean up machine-guns. 9.15 hours: Schweiger reports south of battery of the 1 bird Battalion in St. Benoit. Ordered to turn to left, then at first crossroads to turn to the right, park in woods and await orders, hax'ing agent report to Post Commander Captain Wheeler now in command. 9.20 hours: 9.30 hours: All batteries cautioned to use three guns only, cooling the fourth. K4illigan reports no news. Patrol from Dommartin and Marimbois not yet in. 9.30 hours: "35" Field Observation Post reports crossroads 220.7 under heavy "34" Field Obscr\'ation F^ost I'eports no men \isible in sector. allied artillery fire. Don't know whether it is enemy or Shell fire on Bonseil and hill in rear of it. Large fleet allied planes flying low. 9.45 hours: "34" reports shells friendly.

D

bursting in Lachaussee with machine-gun
Post.

fire

to the east of P^ield Observation

No

\'isible

human
it

activity.

10.00 hours:

Milligan reports right party

ad\'anced to 4256 where

on the extreme left infantry was still in

was forced to withdraw four hundred meters, and that In front of Bois Bonseil the the Bois de Cerf was reached. front of the wire, but had ordered to go through. Patrols to

-S5-

Marimhois Farm and Dampvitoux were unmolested. 10.15 hours: "34" reports a "Heinle" leaving dugout in German lines five hundred meters south of Lachaussee
and running tow ard Lachaussee. Shells falling in Lachaussee. 10.20 hours' Captain 10.20 hours: Wheeler reports for instructions. Code name of battery, "37". Walker directs rate of fire he cut to one round per two minute. 10.28 hours: "35" Milligan has no reports one-star rocket, ninety miles to left of Dampvitoux. "Immemorial 1" says to use the other battalion to the limit. news. 10.45 hours: Two prisoners passed by. 11.02 hours: 10.58 hours: Man>' enemy planes up. "34" reports twelve friendly infantrymen in trenches four hundred meters in 11.12 hours: Cease firing stand fast replenish ammunition. front of them. 11.10 hours: "35" reports one hundred infantrymen leaving Haumont for Bois

Bonseil.

11.00 hours:

Prisoners report that there

is

much

artillery in

Champ

and Bois de Champ; that the line is thinly held by riflemen, but machine guns 11.30 hours: Fifty infantrymen are echeloned all the way back to Champ. 11.31 hours: Walker advises all retreating into Haumont under heavy shell fii'e.
echelons be returned.
11.34 hours:

Hostile

bombing plane

over.

11.45 hours:

"35" Field Observation Post advises shelling heavily in front of Haumont, fifty 1.50 hours: meters from Observation Post. Ordered to close Observation Post. 12.00 hours: Milligan advises Advised ammunition was being sent forward.
1

"Doughboys" retreated and
meters
left

are organizing in

in front.

12.05 hours:
intervals.

at fifteen

minute
of

Haumont with outposts one hundred "35" ordered to move echelon without materiel 12.10 hours: "150 m-m's" falling in dry lake in
12.12

front

post

commander.
fire

hours:

"Immemorial

1"

advises

that

on call from infantry. 12.30 hours: Nlilligan advises that prisoners state Marimbois and Bois Dommartin strongly held. Was in Prisoner said his regiment was on Russian front until ten days ago. Chambley until last night when was rushed to the front line at twenty-three Raid expected on Haumont this afternoon as the "Boche are apparently hours. Party at Bois Bonseil only reached wire. No check on casualties. advancing. 12.45 hours: Milligan reports seventeen "Huns" captured by two artillerymen. Advised unable to shoot at 12.55 hours: Gas, two hundred rounds per battery. daylight; patrol was still out. 13.15 hours: One hundred and thirty-fifth squadron old them that infantry was expecting raid in our called for fugitive target work.
batteries be in readiness to
'

1

"Immaterial 7" advised us not to work. 13.25 hours: Enemy still 13.45 hours: Raid now leaving for Marimbois Farm. shelling neighborhood. No firing. Advised "Immaterial". 13.51 hours: "Immemorial 7" directs us to 14.0b hours: Notified Oakes to warn establish liaison with "37" for the night.
sector.

"Immemorial 1" that our road was under enemy fire. 15.40 hours: Hostile Brigade directs sit and take it. 17.55 hours; planes bombing our front lines. Marimbois now policed up. Lngineers on way to blow up dugouts. 19.06

'/'y

hours:

21.20 hours:

and four-star rockets reported north of Bois Bonseil. will take place on Bois de Cerf; 'H' hour, 5.15 hours" 21,50 hours: Infantry front lines reported gassed from Bois Charey to Haumont. 22.40 hours: N'iilligan reports "Doughboys" still gassed.
three-

Two-

From Danforth, "Raid

November
hours:

5:

5.15

to b.l5

hours:

"34-"

and "35"

firing

on mission.

'5.00

Milligan reports forty-four prisoners taken previous day.

11.30 hours:

"36" reports enemy plane shot
Field Obser\'ation Posts
later,
all

down by

five
it

Americans, falling behind Bois Bonseil.

report that

fell

behind Bois Bonseil.

"3b" reports

allied

plane shot
all

down near Beney.

to

work

reglages

afternoon.

Walker orders that we be prepared Notified Allen and "3b" 15.15 hours: Allied

balloon shot clown by "Huns."

November 0: O.Ob hours: Quiet, light rain. 9.10 hours: Milligan ad\-ises Batteries warned not to fire. in Marimbois and Bois Dommartin. 9.00 hours: Captain Fancher made major; Lieutenants Lannigan and Pugh, 9.10 hours: Milligan captains: Second Lieutenant Shultz, First Lieutenant.
patrols
will advise

when

able to

fire.

13.10 hours:

Infantry ad\'ises
will

all

clear in front.

have smoke shell at dump 13.45 hours: Field for Batteries D and E, per order brigade commander. 14.10 hours: Danforth ad\'ises of Observation Post reports all quiet in front. Cease firing signal will be one white-star rocket, raid on Bois de Cerf at 5. 5 hours. repeated, 00 hours: Advised in code: batteries in turn notified: Barrage lb.
Batteries notified.
13.40 hours:

Keith advises

1

wanted, red

fire

signal rocket;

artillery

short,

six-star

rocket,

lb. 45

hours:

Missions given to

Hogan and

Kellog.

22.00 houis:

"Romance"

advises patrol

going out to Marimbois at 2.00 hours.

Ordered batteries to use Schneider fuse

communication with Swift off; Allen on. 7.08 hours: "Vermin" 5.15 hours: Batteries "34" and "35" firing. 7.10 hours: "Immemorial advises "Veteran 1" oi"dered cease firing at 7.00 hours.
Chicago.
1

with smoke shell. November 7: 0.15 hours:

Ko

" ordered cease firing. Weather foggy rockets not \'isible. 9.30 hours: Infantry "Immemorial" advised. 13.30 hours: "Romance 7" sending out three patrols. 15.00 hours: Battalion barrage changed; left unchanged, advises all clear.
;

right

now

0267.

All

batteries

notified.

19.00

hours:

"Immemorial" warns

that mission
patrol

19.30 hours: Milligan reports that enemy may be expected later. Enemy digging at llb9, 14b7, strong outpost at 08b8, machinefound.
1465.

gun

at

19.50

hours:

Infantry

being shelled.
later.

20.45

hours:

advises that there will be a barrage switch directs to be ready to move at 5.00 hours.

22.50 hours:

Danforth "Immemorial 1"

22.53 hours:

Bront receives message

by wireless from Grand Headquarters Allies to German Headquarters: "Marshall Marshall acknowledges receipt of message Foch accommodates Germany. indicating that delegation would cross our lines between 20.00 and 22.00 hours

^1

near Havdrey." 23.00 hours: All batteries advised to be ready to leave echelons about 5.00 hours. 23.45 hours: "Immemorial 1" advises nothing doing for the
night.

November S: 4 A3 hours: "36-2" reports woods in front of position being shelled by "77 m-m's 6.15 hours: "35" reports six rounds in front of position. 7.05 hours: Ruby "B" reports that indications are that "Boche" hold Haumont. Batteries notified. 7.25 hours: French communique looks like peace. Our troops in Sedan. 9.30 hours: "Immemorial" advises that echelons are to be ready to move at 17.00 hours. 12.50 hours: Danforth advises that barrage will be changed as follows: Present left is now right limit, extending thence to lake. Effective at 13.00 hours. Sectors assigned to batteries. 13.15 hours: Ordered by "Immemorial" to make reconnaissance of region marked by woods west of Xammes, 281.7 and cross-roads, 261.1. Made by Swift, Hogan, Kellog and 19.00 hours: Fire observed in the direction of Rembercourt. 19.20 Jones. hours Code from Milligan as follows: "Patrolling will take place near Marimbois Farm and Eois Dommartin between 22.00 and 1.00 hours tonight. Also from 6.00 hours until you are notified." Forwarded to "Immemorial" with request that all artillery be notified. 21.20 hours: "Immemorial 1" advises that we will not work during the night. Further orders tomorrow. 23.00 hours: Milligan ad\ises combat patrol also out. 23,30 hours: Wireless communication established with "Doughboys". Schweiger advises "Boche" sweeping Beney road to right Mission to "34" and "3 5" as follows: On line Z8-F4 of them with "77 m-m s". to Z7-04; rate, "H" to "H" plus 30, one round per piece per minute; "H" plus 30 to end, one-half round per minute. From "H" to "H" plus 20 use high explosive, thereafter one-half smoke. "H" hour is 5.30 hours. November 9: 0.00 hours: "Boche" shelling St. Benoit and roads nearby. Advised "Immemorial" of "Hun" artillery activity. Advises 0.15 hours: Three large calibre shells near Post Commander. 1.25 activity in rear also. hours: "36" will neutralize machine-gun fire at A 9994, beginning at "H" plus 2.12 15, one round per piece per minute, ceasing fire on signal, one-star rocket. 2.40 hours: Vlilligan hours: Harassing fire by "77 m-m's" on road near "36". "36" ordered reports gun firing from railroad, this side of Dampvitoux at 2473. sixty rounds of gas. Milligan reports gun silenced. 5.30 hours: "34" to fire
'.
:

and "35" open
reports
all

fire,

5.35 hours:

"36" opens

fire.

6.45 hours:

Knife (Wellman)
13.00

clear.

Batteries ceased firing, later resumed firing at one-half round

per minute.
hours:
patrol,

8,03

hours: "34"

reports one piece out; muzzle cracked.

Shultz out to plan communication
13.05

changes.
hours:
in

All battery

commanders,

locating positions in case of move.

N'lilligan reports:

Haumont

nothing to report;

no "Boche" found
a large

at Fort Riley;

Dampvitoux contains

Marimbois Farm; also none number of enemy and guns; Charey

-88-

patrol not in yet.

14.00 hours:
all

"Immemorial"

adx'ises that

battalion

\\ill

not

move

tonight.

Move

horses at front to the rear.

lb. 00

hours:

Ad\-ised

further that the

First Battalion moves tonight; "Immolate" standing fast. Barrage on right increased. 17.00 hours: Now hold Marimbois and Bois Dommartin strongly; machine-guns and trench mortars. 20.30 hours: N'lilligan reports that within one hour, one battalion will occupy and hold Dampvitoux and Dommartin. 23.40 hours: Mission from "Immemorial 7": Barrage from 1872 to 2678 at rate from "H" to "H" plus 2 of two rounds per gun per minute;

plus 2 to "H" plus 54, one round per gun per minute; "H" plus 54, oneround per gun per minute. 23.50 hours: Missions gi\'en to batteries. Cease firing signal is one-star rocket to be reported immediately to "Immemorial." Raining all day.
half

"H"

November 10:
changed.

3.55 hours:

Walker advises that a platoon
at b.OO hours;

of engineers will

report here for Post

Commander Rutherford

also plans

may

be

Munitions officers ad\'ises that we will mo\e and not to open more ammunition bo.xcs, which w ill probably be mo\'ed by truck. Batteries ordered to have echelons ready to move forward. 4.45 hours: W'alkei' advises no change in "Immolates" plans. The f^irst Battalion \\illmo\'e forward, and \\hen in position we will moA'c. Ha\e horses ready, but echelons will not be moved. 5.10 hours: P. C. Rutherford in. 5.30 houi's: "34", "35", and "36" firing. Walker and Randel in. b.30 hours: Plan to assemble along
4.10 hours:
road. Sector to be occupied, Chambley-Mars la Tour. "34" reports gas this side of Haumont. 6.55 hours: Milligan reports barrage behind Dommartin falling short. Wants it lifted from one to two hundred 7. hours Milligan reports all clear. Patrol forced to return. Reported meters. to "Immemorial 7". Batteries ceased firing, checked data and reported. Reported that artillery fire was even short of woods. 7.20 hours: Milligan

Dampvitoux-Chambley
6.40 hours:

1

:

reported
correct.

our barrage O. K. Reported this to
8.10

Lieutenant
batteries.

followed
7.50

it

I'ight

along
Field

and

it

was

hours:

"35"

Obser\-ation

Post reports forty-five "Doughboys" leaAing Haumont.

Very foggy.
will

Marimbois
start

Farm
soon.

invisible.

hours:

K4illigan

reports
also

infantry

again
hours:

Much

infantry

passing

P.

C;

colored
left

engineers.

8.25

"Immoderate" ordered
Directed that

to support attack

on

near Spon\ille.

8.30 hoursin readiness.

we

mo\'e two caissons per gun forward and hold

We now support the 55th, which is to attack along line, Spon\'ille-Mars la Tour. Guns are not to be mo\'ed at present, but batteries must be ready. 9.00 hours: Milligan reports, "Patrol in DampAitoux attacked by skiimish formation of
one hundred and twenty-five "Boche". Patrol killed thi'ee and captured seven. No information from prisoners." 9.20 hours: Field Observation Post "35"
reports four

Geiman

patrols in front of

Haumont.

9.27 hours:

"Immemorial 7"

— S9-

Iv'./.

LAi^rcA aA S'c^uare o/

Mau-MOJ-i-L

/rest

.yzc/r^

of

og'Ji^re

irz

y/ai/morii^

7io "vVc? ur/y-/ a in -t

_

C7eA'A/-?a7'7
2
7-2.

(3.9?

'/Jois

NiPMIg

;/ 4,

-90-

/^^

<

reports situation

now up

in the air:

morning.
to be

All

batteries

ad\-ised

to

he prepared to handle same barrage as this "35" Field lay with morning's data.

Observation Post reports "Doughboys" withdrawing from
it

Haumont

Oixlered

"JunetionCity" reports twenty-four rounds, near Observation Post. No one in front of it. 10.30 hours; "3b" ready to mo\'e. "3b" Field Observation Post reports "can't see more than tw'o hundred meters. 'Huns' shelling K4arimbois, direction and calibre unknown". 11.02 hours; "3t)" ordered to put thirty rounds on railroad, guns at 2ti7.3; thirty rounds at 247.3; thirty rounds at 247.5. 11.05 hours; "35" Relief asked for by "Romance 1." Imbers at old position. 1.35 hours; Prisoners report that there is no intention
also.

withdrawn

10.25 hours;

1

of a retreat

and that the orders are to hold to the end. They expect peace very soon and have rumors that the Kaiser has abdicated. "3b" stopped fire of ro\'ing gun. 11.40 hours; Milligan reports nineteen more prisoners. Captured sergeant confirms roving battery, "105 m-m's", fires from near Damp\"itoux e\ery night and states that there is no other artillery in or near Lachaussec. 12.00 hours; "Immemorial" advises w'e are supporting party which jumps oil at Haumont; other party will attack Dampvitoux. 12.35 houi's; Advised Milligan, Second Battalion here, supposed to be supporting Xammes. He says Battalion will support attack on Damp\'itoux. 12.30 hours; Caissons all full and O. K. Can "Immemorial" orders Milligan to reach 7800 with all guns. 12.40 hours; Haumont. Told him to swing phone line from Marimbois Farm to Haumont. Oi'derecl it to turn 12.55 hours; "3b" Observation Post can't see Damp\'itoux. 15th Infantry Brigade Commander, message to Braidin; line over to Milligan. "Do not move forward until creeping barrage is laid clown in front of >ou by 13.45 hours; Mission for "34" artillery. Sent to "35" Observation Post.
1
"

and "35"; Q375 to 9078. At "H" hour plus 1, Rage; minute until line 0889-0592 is reached
round per gun per minute,
per minute.

lift

and ad\"ance
"

fifty

meters per

"H

to

"H

"

plus 40, hours, one

"H

"

plus 40 to plus 70 hours, one-lourth round per
14.20 hours;

gun

"H"

hour, 2.30 hours.

"3b" ordered to cover with
to "H plus 40 hours, 9994; Field Observation Post "35"
"

radius of fifty meters the following points;

"H" hour

"H"

plus 40 to plus 70 hours, 0188.

14.34 hours;

reports friendly artillery firing short and hitting building they occupy.
foui'

14.42

hundred meters in front of Haumont. Squad of infantry hours; Fire about 14.52 hours; "Immemorial 7" when called changes Jone's target to present.
0198.
14.51

14.47

hours;

"35" Field Obser\'ation Post reports infantry ad\ancing.
"

Randel requests information of infantry. 15.00 hours; Mlilligan reports, from Haumont, that "Doughboys are taking it easy behind the barrage. Later reports heavy barrage on Haumont, apparently from Bois de Dames and Second wa\e 15.19 hours; "34" reports first wa\e not shelled. over Bonseil.
hours;

now

lea\ing.

Several

casualities

observed.

15.20

hours;

New

barrage

now

-91-

^^>

/

'

'

-

,

/-.v"?

effective,

0992 to 098).
fire

15.30 hours:

New

barrage sector sent to batteries,

Milligan reports second wave

now

leaving with rather heavy casualities.

Heavy

machine-gun

Haumont

still

Third wave not yet started. Will stick. being heavily shelled. Reported to "Immemorial. 15.32 hours:

on both

flanks.

"34" observer reports one red-star rocket and one six-star rocket. Increased range two hundred meters on "34" and "35". 15.40 hours: Randel reports from "Junction City" that enemy machine-gun fire from left of Dampvitoux is severe. Third wave has not started. Reported to "Immemorial," now laid

on new barrage. 15.50 hours: "Relax 1" inquires location of his infantry. 15.48 hours: Report from N4illigan: Shelling now easier, third wave is seventyfive

meters in front of Haumont. 15.57 hours: First wave now in wire; second wave, nothing to report; third wave now starting. Heavy machine-gun fire from Dommartin and Dampvitoux; one big gun at Hageville firing effectively.

16.05 hours: Danforth advised we hold Dommartin. Three batteries directed on Lachaussee, fifteen minutes, two rounds per gun per minute. 16.16 hours:

Ammunition
also

No fire east of Dampvitoux ordered Heavy barrage on Haumont, mixed "36" firing, "35" at 1626, "34" at 1627. calibres. 16.38 hours: Fourth wave now one hundred and fifty meters in front of Haumont. 16.44 hours: Hogan
reports requested.
1

6.20 hours

:

no

fire

on Bois Bonseil.

16.22 hours:

reports red rockets from right. advises
these.

we hold Vlont
16.59 hours:

Plaisir,

Ordered not to fire. 16.58 hours: Danforth Dommartin, Bois Bonseil and two points north of

ordered to send echelons to the rear.

Milligan advised to go to Keene. 17.50 hours: Batteries 18.45 hours: "36-1" reports gas attack;

two men ill. Directed to fire barrage only on phone order. 19.00 hours: From "Immemorial": "36", 0970, "34" and "35", 0588-9893. To be fired on regular
signal for barrage.

20.15 hours:

Echelons notified to be ready to

move

at 6.00

hours.

November 11:
to

5.05 hours:

Attack mission
5.45

in three phases,

"34" and "36"

opened on mission. attack on Lachaussee not yet organized. Artillery will receive orders from "Immaterial." Infantry now under light machine-gun fire; practically no enemy artillery fire. Cease fighting. 7.45 hours: German wireless: "Peace terms signed at five a. m. Not official. 8.05 hours: Will retire behind Rhine within thirty-one days." Field Observation Post "36" reports heavy machine-gun and rifle fire north of Haumont. Until 10.55 hours, all batteries firing on machine-guns and roads in
during second phase.
hours:
All

mo\e

batteries

7.20 hours:

Modisette advises that due to delay

in infantry orders,

rear

area.

1059

to

10.59.55

hours:

All

batteries

fired

at

maximum

speed.

11.00 hours: Cease firing

—Armistice.

Battery
"34"

D

BATTERY
all

D's birth and early life was not unlike in most respects to many other similar organizations that sprang into existence as a part of the National Army at the same time. On September 6th, thirty young men,

from Colorado, were assigned to the 341st Field Artillery, and in turn assigned toBatteryD, under command of Captain Harvey A. Fancher. In civilian clothes
of
all

descriptions they were a decidedly unmilitary

lot.

Their new career began.

Herded

to the bath-house they passed under the cold shower, bidding good-bye

and emerged wearing the clothes of a soldier. Although the\" were dressed as soldiers they were not soldiers, as they found out during the next
to their "cits",

two weeks.
In preparation for the assignment of additional recruits to the battery these
thirty were drilled without rest for

two weeks.

Rain, heat, and physical disforty

comforts, which to

them
drill

at that time were \'ery apparent, were disregarded.

The only

relief

from

was

inspections, filling bed-sacks for the

first

During these two weeks the entire regiment, as well as regimental headquarters, was housed in one building. On the arrival of the forty per cent the battery was given a home of its ow n. Battery D began to assume the appearance of a material being. A mess was started, which for the first week feed mostly li\-er, but nevertheless it was a mess. The first sergeant gradually assumed his role of master of the battery's destinies. and as he was well liked and obeyed, results were obtained. The two-week's Shortly there veterans did good work in the initial training of the new men.
per cent and the necessary fatigue duties.
arose

among

the

men

that feeling ever necessary for

all efficient

military organ-

izations

— pride

in their

organization and in themselves.
"grief"

was e\er present. Materiel needed Specialists needed for certain work had to be trained. Apparently all that could be secured was clothing not any too well fitted or too plentiful and food. The rest was a matter of simulation

During the early training period

for training purposes could not be secured.

or make-shift.

Horses, which we didn't think much of Slowly equipment was issued. which we would have been overjoyed in having while on the front, then, but

were

issued.

The

riding of the horses in zero weather without saddles

and often-

times without blankets, and their watering in the Kaw Ri\-er a mile distant, will be subject that the world war veterans will cnjo\' a half century from now.

Thanksgiving and Christmas were occasions

for glorious dinners.

The home

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enormous quantities of food stuffs, much of wliich could not be eaten. of instances whole turkeys were thrown into the gai'bage cans.

Training of the battery progressed slowly but steadily during the winter months. Handicapped by the severity of the season and lack of equipment,
the training schedule was follow'ed to the extent possible, with the result that

when

spring finally

came the organization was ready
drill

for

seiwice firing.

The

cannoneers

who had gun

with the thereometer ten degrees below zero, oft-

times a gale blowing, did not need to be cautioned to execute the commands in double time. "Socks dirty," "Full of holes," "Kon-issue," "Dirty tape," "No clean underwear," and "Shoes worn out" are comments that will never be forgotten. Clothing was short, so when the division inspection w'as held, the men maneu\'ered to put forth the best they had with the foregoing result. The division inspector,
passing
w'itted

elbow, and a secretary to

commander close to his down deficiencies, was eagle-eyed. But a few outhim by changing with men who had already been inspected, poor for good
the line of "pup" tents with the battery
jot

down

"Socks dirty" lead by a large margin. siren, sounding the general fire alarm, was another "pleasure" of our life at Camp Funston. Aroused once at midnight. Battery D was out on the road with blanket i-olls and five days' rations and forage in twenty-three minutes, ready to move. After resting on the road for one hour and a halt we turned in, only to fall out in two hours to go to the range for service firing. During the various epidemics that swept the cantonment Batteiw' D was quarantined. Being quarantined did not cause a cessation in training. It only prohibited our mingling with men from other organizations. It was at this

equipment.

The cantonment

time that our supply sergeant established the battery canteen. During the training period in America a number of good men, especially
qualified,

we were
At
ments,

usually

were transferrcci to special units and for replacements. Consequently below authoiized strength, although men sufficient for two
Mills

batteries were trained.

Camp

we spent

a busy three weeks, equipping

and

drilling replace-

furnishing fatigue details for e\'ery purpose to the

camp commander,

wearing bathing suits at Coney Island, scheming how to buy a drink, and dodging military police on our return sometime before reveille. The trip across. Had it not been for the canteen which was established
with supplies bought at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Battery D would have been a scrawny looking outfit when it debarked at London, England, for the "cockney It was so gruli" was hardly what could be termed appetizing and nourishing. poor and dirty that finalh' the Fourth of July was celebrated by our cooks taking over the galleys and handing out the first real meal of the voyage.

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We saw our first German prisoners as we marched through the streets of Southampton to the rest camp. Subsistence on a piece of cheese, English girls, and another medical inspection, are our memories of this halt. Three clays riding in the renowned French troop cars, with not sufficient room for all to lie down simultaneously, and with equipment hung overhead on wires, continually hitting our heads, we arrived late in the afternoon at St. Helene. We hiked ten kilometers that evening to Castelnau, arriving at ten o'clock, and
were billeted in an old theatre. At Castelnau we secured a good rest, learned to speak a little French, to enjoy French cooking and Vin Blanc and Vin Rouge. The training schedule interrupted by the trip overseas was resumed. Here we learned the agonies of

mask and what a wonderful protection to the eyes the overseas cap is. The swimming hole, one kilometer from town, refreshed us after the long hot days. From Castelnau we hiked to Camp de Souge for the finishing touches. A camp of sand, pines, flies, and range fires were its noticeable features. Our guns went into position the night of September 18th and our initial
the gas
as targets was fired the following night. From that time on the battery was constantly in action until the cessation of hostilities, occupying three positions, all between Beney and St. Benoit. Our first position was on the Beney-St. Benoit road, four hundred meters from the Beney crossroads. When we first occupied it, the vicinity was strewn with abandoned war materiel of all kinds, the Germans ha\'ing been driven back Rifles, machine-guns ready for three days previous in the St. Mihiel drive. action, hand grenades, entrenching tools, clothing, and stores of ammunition Not far was a German battery of "77 m-m's". We saw their lay all around. gunners put to bed with a spade. Three weeks in the road position and we moved toward St. Benoit, placing our guns in the edge of the Bois de Beney, where, profiting by the experience gained in the first position, we soon had comfortable, splinter proof dugouts. Being in the woods the men could circulate during the daytime without fear of enemy observation, which proved a great relief after three weeks of seeking concealment on the road. Our kitchen, located in the woods a short distance to the Flapjacks, whenever rear, was conveniently located for the men to "chow. While occupying flour could be salvaged, was the leader on the hill of fare. this position we were adjusted on by an enemy plane, but fortunately the observation was poor, for the effect was always short, although a few of the "1 50 m-m's"

salvo with the "Boche

"

"

hit fifty

meters

in front.

Our
were well

last position

of the chateau

was in St. Benoit, one platoon being placed in the grounds and the other in the dike. We were setting pretty. The pieces We found plenty of dry shelter placed and excellently camouflaged.

>

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in

the buildings of the

town.

The kitchen was nearby.

In fact, no better

position could be wished for.

An high explosive shell exploded in the muzzle Luckily no casualties resulted, although Number One of the adjoining piece had his rammer-staff cut in two and his canteen smashed by flying fragments. The wheels of the next piece were broken.
One gun blew up
here.

of

Number Three

piece.

On November
the final volley at

1

1th,

maximum

General Donnelly, after watching our gun crews put over speed, complimented the men by saying that he

had never witnessed better work by any battery. While the gun crews naturally saw the most excitement, the dri\ers at the echelon got a good taste of shelling the second day on the front. They were
shell

"chow", when, with the usual whistle, a large calibre "Heinie" men and twelve horses one hundred and fifty meters away. A second later a second exploded, this time closer. The "chow" line broke and scattered. The telephone operator alone stayed to wait for the ne,\t
lined
for evening

up

passed over, killing four

ones.

While in action we learned to know one another. Every last man was found capable of performing his duties, and many times those of more responThere were no court-martials and no reprimands. The work of the sibility. battery commander's detail is worthy of special mention, as is that of the camouflage detail, whose work brought a commendation from the Fourth Army Corps. The treatment accorded by Lieutenant Kellog, battery commander, and the other officers, as well as their behavior, called forth the best that there

was

in

ever

last one.

On
Battery

the day the regiment crossed the Serre River at Rossport into

Germany

D

was the leading battery.

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Battery
"35"

E

CAPTAIN HABEEB A. SAIDY took charge of a group of thirty-one recruits
just the — "follow me."
off

train.

"You are in Battery E, 341st Field Artillery," he said, They followed through a maze of dust, o\er piles of
to a well lighted barrack

lumber,

avoiding ditches and post-holes,

on Infantry
personnel

Boulex'arcl.

That
of Battery

is

how, on the night of September
got
its

6,

1917, the

enlisted

These men, all from Colorado, comprised the first five per cent of the original quotas from Lake, Larimer, Jackson, Moffat, Park and Pitkin counties. They came full of "pep" and enthusiasm, ready for hard work, and they found the hard work in the succeeding two weeks. Foot drill, school of the soldier, school of the squad, with rest periods filled in with talks on military courtesy and discipline, calesthenics, with "shots" in the arm and back, and issues of equipment, filled in the time from reveille to retreat. After two weeks the battery mo\'ed to its own barrack and preparations It arrived September 18th, were made for receiving the "first forty per cent." followed two weeks later by another likely-looking bunch of recruits. By the The Artillery Brigade middle of October the battery w'as filled to war strength. had mo\ed into its own barracks, just completed, and work was under way for
start.

E

many
of

of the various phases of training.

The regiment had

as yet neither

horses nor materiel, so the fertile

mind

Captain Saicly conceived the idea of constructing them of wood. "Change post," and "Prepare to mount. Mount!" were familiar sounds, and the men became quite expert in leaping astride their barrel horses. Battery E has the unique distinction of being, so far as known, the first battery to recei\'e its first

wooden horses. was at this time that the wit of the battery, guarding a partially constructed ammunition storehouse one night, remarked: "This is a hell of an army, riding wooden horses and guarding empty houses with wooden guns." On Sunday morning, January 6th, in a snowstorm and biting wind, the "non-coms." of Battery E had their first gun drill with a "3.2" piece. A few days later the battery began its first real standing gun drill, using the threeinch pieces, four of which had been issued to the regiment. Equitation on Digging trenches for the infantry in Smoky Hill Flats also began. real horses Classes in grooming by detail, nomenclature of the W'as a part of the training. harness, nomenclature of the horse, harnessing by detail, equitation, driving,
equitation on
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-101—

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standing gun

drill

and

special

uork

for the

battery commander's detail,

in

addition to stables, inspections, guard duty, regimental fatigue, hikes, mounted and dismounted, with foot-drill and athletic games at odd times, kept us busy

during the winter and spring.

We said good-bye that w inter to many of our members off for early duty France with other outfits. A. few of these were met later o\er there; some made the supreme sacrifice for their country. On May 1st Battery E fired its first shot. The American three-inch pieces,
in
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Model

of

1904,

were used.

One week
first

later

we stayed

in the field

o\er night,

sleeping in "pup" tents for the

time.

The second half of May meant unusual activity for Battery E. Personal equipment was checked over and over, new supplies were issued; saddles, bridles and other individually mounted equipment were boxed up for shipment. Inspections were many. All the horses were turned oxer to the 92nd Division. Pay day came on June 1st. On Sunday, June 2nd, we left Camp Funston. Three days later we were

'm

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-102

/

in

squad tents at
full

Camp

Mills,

Long

Island,

placed at

strength by replacements from

other places

Vlany of us enjoyed sight-seeing we had heard of and some we hadn't heard

New York. There the Camp Upton. trips of New York, Coney
of!

battery was

Island,

and

A

few, the lucky

ones, invested their surplus funds in fifty-Franc service checks.

Nlore equipment,

more inspections, and the battery was ready to sail. Though there are no official records, we belie\'e we ranked first in sea-sickness. The mess Herbert Hoover could have found no cause to criticise. In the Fourth of July contests, Battery E did well; the most remarkable performance of the day being Pondella's signal victory in the pie-eating contest. He took an early lead and was never headed. The Briton has been thought of by many as lacking a certain sense of humor, but if he is responsible for naming our stopping place in Southampton "rest camp", we assert he has been slandered. We did rest our digestive apparatus, by not eating breakfast, perhaps that was what he had in mind. None will soon forget the "40 Hommes" trip from LaHa\ re to St. Helene.

The outstanding
the
line,

features were the hot coffee served at various stations along

and the stops made now and then along the country-side to enable all who desired to get a more than passing view of the new and varied scenery. On Friday afternoon, July 12th, we detrained and hiked to Castelnau, where Battery E's quarters were the 341st Field Artillery was billeted for three weeks. in the town hall, a large room with dirt floor and open timbers o\erhead. A.n abundance of straw, already stored, was available for our bedsacks. We were comfortable. After a few days' rest the regular routine was resumed. Hikes, foot drill, setting-up exercises, swimming, instruction periods in piece, regimental reviews and band concerts, occupied signalling, the "75 m.m.
"

the greater portion of the time.

From there we marched to Camp de Souge, thirty kilometers. The rolls and equipment were hauled on trucks. The battery occupied two comfortable barracks at Camp de Souge. Warm shower baths, the first we had seen for more than two months, were the most popular place in camp. Cun drill started August 12th; four brand-new "75 m.m." pieces having
been issued to the battery. The daily schedule included stables, harnessing, equitation, standing gun drill, firing data for non-commissioned officers, and
special instruction for the

battery commanders detail.

Special details received

instruction in machine-guns, camouflage, telephones and gas defense.

On
the "75

Friday, August Ibth, Battery

E

had

its first

actual firing practice with

m.m."

pieces

on the range.

From

then, until

September

6th,

we

fired

on

an average of three half-days per week.

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forty minutes.

September 6th the entire 164th Field Artillery Brigade fired a barrage lasting This ended Battery E's range firing. The following week was taken up with pistol practice, equipment inspections, and packing for the front.

After a three-day trip we detrained at Toul, on September IQth. l\\o days hiking and Battery E halted on a hillside near Pannes. All rolls and extra equipment were removed from the carriages, and preparations were made for

going into position.
first

Under cover

of darkness,

in

a steady, soaking rain,

the

seven sections pulled out on to the road.

AJter leaving Pannes, a distance

of

one hundred meters between sections was maintained. The Pannes-Beney road was alive with trucks bringing up ammunition, but the dri\'ers pulled through Beney without mishap and found our position on the road, a short distance to
the north and west of Beney.
laid,

The cannoneers began
explosive
shells

and 802 rounds
caissons.

of high

to dig in. The guns were were unloaded from the limbers

and

After a strenuous night's work in the rain and darkness the
fire.

battery was ready to

The gun crews knew what occupying

a

new

position

meant.
i\
it

gradual slope masked the battery position from the front, but overhead
practically unconcealed.

was

A

fill

in

the road afforded slight protection.

Before long several dugouts had been made.

The

field

range was brought up

and

a kitchen established under camouflage.

All were required to

remain under

cover during the day. Practically all the work had to be done at night. We made our first mo\'e during the nights of October 9th and 10th, after
"Fritz" had secured "overs" and "shorts".

made The woods
dug
iron
pits,

at the first position,

we

built a real battery position.

afforded defilade and partial
spade, were the

by experiences and mistakes It was an ideal position. concealment from enemy planes. We
Profiting

lowered the guns about three
trail

feet.

To

the

left

of the pit, not three

meters from the

ammunition

pits co\'ered

with corrugated

To the right were the dugouts for the gun crews, covered and sand bags. with iron and three layers of sacks. Double-decked bunks were built. A short Between distance to the rear of each piece we built reserve ammunition pits. the platoons, and twenty-five meters to the rear, a two-room dugout was built We were surely setting pretty. for a telephone central and post commander. We were comfortable and only a direct hit could get us. On the right fiank, and less than a half kilometer distance, were a number of wooden buildings built by the Germans, well hidden among the trees. These were used as barracks for the extra gun crew's, officers' quarters, and the kitchen, which served three warm meals every day. We were on a picnic. Inspecting officers said it was the best position they had seen. From this position we registered direct hits on Dommartin church steeple, enemy dugouts, machine-gun nests, and the materiel depots, put o\'er gas attacks,

'MJ
-105

•//

«.

much

and a number of barrages. The last barrage from this on the evening of October 29th. We were under orders to advance to St. Benoit. The four guns were out of action and being pulled from The guns were the pits, when the barrage signal was sent up from the front lines. rushed back into action, relayed and ready to fire. We had no more than heard the reports of guns from neighboring batteries when "Bang!" goes two of Battery We fired the barrage and E's guns, followed closely by the other two guns.
harassing
fire,

position

was

fired

proceeded to

St.

Benoit.

(Jfiurcfi

X)ornmartin

(Jhurefx air

jlornmartin

Here we went into action along the road. The drainage ditch along the road with camouflage nets afforded concealment. A culvert was used for the telephone central. As it was thought only a temporary position little time was
spent that night to
Later,

make

it

home-like.

was found that the position would be occupied indefinitely, the first platoon was moved about five hundred meters to the left rear into the Buildings were found woods; dugouts and ammunition pits were made. near the guns that served as P. C, telephone central, officers' quarters, We were very comfortable when kitchen and barracks for the extra gun crews.
it

when

'^TTT5

J.

the big day

came

— the

day we put over 29 rounds

in

the last minute of the

play: the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh

month

of 1918.

That we may not forget our officers, we will have to remember that the battery was led into action by Lieutenant Frederic R. Lanagan; Lieutenants Raymond P. Hogan and Thomas W. Casey were executives; Lieutenant RoUin D. Chittenden, reconnaissance officer; and Lieutenant George W. Kassler, in charge of the combat train. Lieutenant Lanagan was relieved by Captain Morrison Shafroth on October 1th. Lieutenant Hogan took command when the Captain was injured. Lieutenant Hogan was later promoted to Captain. Lieutenants Frank H. Banks and Will P. Caldwell joined the battery while at St. Benoit. After arriving at Speicher, Germany, Lieutenant Robert L. Shultz was transferred Captain Hogan continued in command. to this organization.
1

It could always be counted upon to At the front Battery E never slept. when called upon. The gun crews and mechanics kept the guns in firstThe drivers and the others kept the class condition despite the mud and rain. The battery commanders detail was on the job all the harness fit and ready. time. One instance of its faithful and efficient work is the fact that on November

deliver

10th

its

telephone

line

was

for several hours the only

lines at

Haumont, and was used by the

infantry as

Private King, of the detail, already experienced in distinguished himself by voluntarily going to the aid of a wounded

one working from the front as by our own observers. dodging enemy shells, further
\\ell

"Doughboy",

administering first-aid and bandaging his wounds.

The gunIt will be interesting to note the firing Battery E did in action. books show that from September 20th, when our first shells went over, until the 1th, we fired a total of 12,758 rounds, an average final "cease firing" on November of more than 240 rounds per day; or, in other words, we fired an average of one round every six minutes day and night during the fifty-three days we were in Our machine-guns turned a few thousand rounds loose at aeroplanes. action. In spite of the rain and mud and hardships, life at the front was not without One of our cannoneers with an original turn of mind was once acting its laughs. Having some difficulty in getting on his aiming post \\ith a new as gunner. deflection, he called out to another cannoneer: "Go, and move the aiming post,
1

so

I

can get on

it."

One morning when The
officer said:

the battery was sending

them on the way with
if

regularity,

the e-xecutive spied a cannoneer near by, sans helmet, sans blouse, sans gas mask.

"Now wouldn't you

be

in a hell of a fix

a gas

shell

should

light right there!"

"Sure, and would n't

we both be

in a hell of a fix!"

November

After the signing of the armistice the guns were left in position until 27th, the gun crews alternating between duty at the guns and hikes

into territory but recently occupied

h\ the "Boche", where mine

fields,

concrete

r
':

L.

At the echelon the men dugouts and other interesting things were inspected. waded about in the mud, cleaning harness and caring for the horses. Varying the monotony, one of the largest dugouts caved in on a dozen men one night.

The morning

after

Thanksgiving

Day

the battery pulled out, starting on the
' '
'

The third day out we crossed the old Hindenburg ine. That afternoon we stopped in Spincourt, where we were fortunate enough to have stoves Here, too, we found a shower bath, with plenty of hot water. in our billets. On the fifth days' march we entered the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg. The next day we passed through the City of Luxemburg and stopped that night in Junglinster, where we rested one day. On December 7th, exactly fi\'e months after we landed in London, we crossed
hike into Germany.
1
'

the Sauer River into Rhineland, Germany.
after a long, hard hike, having pulled

We

pulled into

Badem

that night

up the worst hills we had encountered so far. After one day's rest here we moved on to Oberkail, where we spent six days, later going to Dudeldorf, then to Speicher. Waffles and marmalade and apples were plentiful at first, provided one had "viel marks." The big Christmas dinner at Speicher in Meyer's Hall was the event real plates, knives and forks, tables, a big warm room, all decorated with evergreens. Fresh roast pork and dressing and all the rest of the good eats made us forget we were far from home. A dozen or more of Speicher's "schon Madchens," "dolled" up in their best dresses and newest aprons, served. In January the work for the winter began. A field inspection by the Division Commander took place on the 17th. On the 27th we left for the artillery

range, near Bettingen, for our

first firing

since the armistice.
of caring for the

Practice hikes, foot
horses,

drill

and inspections varied the routine

washing harness and other fatigue duties. Guard details were sent out to various points on the railroad and to the Luxemburg border. A few of the

men

got trips to Aix-les-Baines or Paris.

The

"fiu" struck us about the middle of February,

going to the hospital at Trier.

mourn

the loss
soil.

about half of the battery to pneumonia. We of Schumacher, Bradley, Mittlat and Matson, our first losses on

Four

of

them succumbed

European

After a series of inspections,

firing,

and competitions. Battery

E

as the best battery in the better battalion in the regiment for February,

was rated and given

the right to wear a white background
It

in

two

of the spaces in the division insignia.

has been worth while.

Battery

who were not
the men.

only efficient, but who Perhaps the thing that impressed us most, in our almost endless days of training and at the front, was our officer's unfailing patience with the men, often under the most trying circumstances.

has been fortunate in having officers commanded the respect and admiration of

E

-108-

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Battery
"36"

F
deliver,

BATTERY F, the organization that could always be counted upon to
whether
it

was at inspections, firing, or what not. In the beginning back at Camp Funston we gained that reputation and to the end it was conscientiously maintained. Battery F has never been accused of failing in its missions. Pride in its work has been the chief factor of its success.

At

Camp

Funston an order would be received to build sidewalks around
fix

the barrack, to have the kitchen and mess hall arranged in such and such a manner,

up the stables. Invariably, no matter w hat the character F was one of the first to comply with it. Our "noncoms." apparently had a way of doing things somehow no matter what the difficulties were. It was at Camp Funston that our sahage detail gained valuable experience, and to it is not a little credit for the impro\'ements and conveniences in our barracks and stables at Funston. It also was responsible that we were never "short" on anything.
to build a corral and
of the order was, Battery

We were selected from demonstration problems for the Third Officers' Training We were picked to lay down the barrage over the trenches on Carpenter Hill for General Wood, which was complimented by him for its accuracy. We also achieved four casualties on the

We

were the

first

organization to have service

firing.

the two light artillery regiments at

Camp Funston Camp candidates.

to

fire

Fort Riley range

—one farmer

and three pigs

—caused

by a Ricochetting

shell.

Funston had no outstanding features; it consisted chiefly of drill and fatigue. It was the routine life that e\'ery recruit in the National Army uent through. We took charge of our post and all the government property in view. We halted all persons from a school-boy to the officer of the day. Our Corporal Maas, now a Second Lieutenant, as often happens while on guard, fell The unfortunates who asleep and posted the other reliefs in his dreams only. walked post all night could never quite figure it out how he happened to be sent
life

Our

at

Camp

to a training

camp for officers. Our preliminary training was

all

over on June

1st

"tourists" for

Camp

Mills.

We

sailed

on the

S.

S.

and we entrained in the "Laomedon" from Boston,

Massachussetts, and found that despite the fact of our training as bronco"busters" in the West, chaps and spurs were of little use in riding waves. We ate

"wooley" and "goldfish," and the fishes followed us. The English watch-charm engines met us at London and we were whirled Staying there one across beautiful England to Southampton to the rest camp.

/

-

day,

we boarded an old side-wheeler and crossed the English channel, resting an erect posture.

in

had it "soft" at Castelnau de Medoc, France, the best billet in the quaint French village being ours. It was a magnificient old chateau, at one time the home of a marquis. The grounds, fully ten acres, were enclosed by a stone wall. Immediately behind the chateau was a concrete swimming pool, which afforded us an excellent plunge and at the same time a most necessary bath, a real luxury in France and quite out of the ordinary. The training at Castelnau consisted mostly of long tiresome hikes on the hot "Non-coms." were dusty roads, intended to harden the men for the front. instructed in the French methods and the "T^ mm." piece. On August 4th we entered Camp de Souge and began intensive training on the "75 m.m." piece. The men worked hard, and to the surprise of the French instructors, commenced service firing at the end of the first week, which ended four weeks later with a brigade barrage. On that memorable day, September 14th, we loaded at the rail head, leaving Although the sand and hot days, and started for "somewhere on the front." we were again traveling French style we were fairly comfortable, as we at least had room to stretch out. Arriving at Toul we found that we were to take up a
little

We

position near

Beney

in the old St.

Mihiel sector.

Our

first

active service order was,

"Keep

to the right of the road."

From

Toul to the front the area was most intensely interesting. We saw for the first time what we had read about so often, barbed wire and trenches running in every direction as far as the eye could see, immense stores of munitions, guns, wagons, and hospital equipment abandoned by the recently retreating "Hun" as spoils

At every turn in the road we fully expected to encounter the enemy in seemed that we must be close to Germany. On September 18th we reached Pannes, and received news of the first casualties Not an exactly cheering reception. Passing on, we established of the regiment. our first echelon on the Lamarche road two kilometers from Pannes. Then we Shortly after dusk we loaded all necessary equipment and began to speed up. materiel on the gun sections and set out with dubious minds to occupy our first position, which proved to be the last position also. "No smoking or talking; We did not need to have the orders repeated. gas masks alert" were the orders. The noise of the guns sounded unnecessarily close, we not knowing where we were going. However, we successfully rounded that "Dead Man's Corner", better known as the Beney crossroads, and hurried into position eight hundred meters on the road to St. Benoit. We fired our first barrage at three hours that After four hours of steady firing the infantry began to move back same night.
of war.
full force, for it

with prisoners, a sign of a successful

raid.

y-'

'
'

'

'

"

/'^''y

J.

The very next day we
large ones

received our baptism on the crest near the camouflaged road

of

fire,

"Jerry" throwing some

in front of the position.

Grad-

ually he increased the range, until finally he secured hits directly in front of one platoon. fully expected to be annihilated by the next round, but the next

We

round never came, "Jerry" laying

off for the day.

Battery

F was

lucky again.

an interval of about four hours, we would be entertained by "Fritz" throwing up mud and rocks in front of us. Many shorts, a few overs, and a number mighty close, always kept us in a sort of suspense. We all remember the day that "Heinie" dropped one a "210 mm." at the door of Captain Swift's dugout. Fortunately he was not at home. The two batteries in position to our right were forced to move, but we were able to stick and hand them back. Everything went along smoothly. Our echelon, in a rather conspicious position and subject to enemy fire from several directions, was moved one night to the vicinity of Essey. There dugouts were built for the dri\ers and the resting gun crews, and stables ere.cted for the horses. The dugouts were warm and splinter-proof, but not water-proof. Thanks to the salvage detail, e\-ery dugout had a stove and other conveniences. Sergeant Distler had a first-rate pantry, equipped with a modern safety device, which effectually kept all prowlers and always-hungry individuals at a safe distance. Our first Observation Post was established in a large tree, some five hundred meters from the position. From it we adjusted and identified targets. After a number of barrages we grew bolder, and actually established an Observation Post in the front lines. Our activities then increased. We could conduct our fire more accurately and gained better resujts. All the time the gun position was being improved. Gun-pits with platforms were made, so that the pieces could fire at maximum ele\ation without movement. Camouflage nets were arranged so that when the guns were not firing, the nets could be dropped, making the position absolutely proof against aerial observation. The fore part of October we lost our battery commander. Captain John P. Swift, who had been in command of the organization from the first, he being made battalion adjutant. Lieutenant Jones assumed command. Under him the good work continued. Adjustments were always rapid and precise, and missions were accomplished with amazing rapidity. Day after day and night after night, the men worked on, disregarding the cold and dampness. The firing of a barrage was monotonous. The rumble of the "chow" wagon as it came down the road every evening with the beans and rice was never monotonous. Our breakfast was served from thermos cans brought The midday meal or luncheon consisted most always of up in the evening. salmon or "corn wooly" and bread, with prunes as a dessert. In time a regular routine of duties was established and we were working like
after day, at

Day

-111-

^^
,

om'

Co/noafJooec/O'-'osition

ofBatteru"

i^'jFear^eineiJ

iSTffar/m 6 o is ^cirrrx^
I

'^

WM
-112-

'j],,t

y

C,,pT

Z

/>r /oi7es

Comb^ 3^nr

'J-J(.

Sa.

1

W I'f

tK/f7ce

June

cci

"-^

/<''

'

(/{'i

fi/ '>

<

'S

To 'U

S

'/

/ict/

a4

'-^

/9/y

"*»"

w

/

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<3>iwes

-rc3?4ce

(Dsse\

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a bunch of old-timers. Two days would we labor and fast at the position, and then back to the echelon for a two-day's rest. There we enjoyed the free baths of Sergeant Eby on the mud flat. Cold outside, but not inside, for within the bath-house the salvage detail had placed a "Dutch" traction engine with an enor-

mous capacity

of hot water.

To vary
of

which

all

the monotony, "Jerry" put across a few rounds of sneezing gas, No ill effects other than temporary at the position took snuffs.

physical discomfort followed.

Ammunition was always a source

of

worry.

We

never ran short of

ammunition, however, as the worry always prompted the salvage detail to greater efforts. One night ammunition was low. Corporal Layton in charge of the ammunition headed the salvaging crew. Sufficient ammunition was acquired that night to last a week. Another time Sergeant Chew, searching for white We fuses, found a box near the dugout of the commander of another battery. had white fuses that night.
wire

—not the
He

We

had a

reel cart,

the pride of Lieutenant Wyatt.
artillery.
It

kind that was issued to

Lieutenant Wyatt called the leaders of
a search.
for aid

It was filled with real was reported as "missing." the salvage detail together and instituted

threatened dire things to the taker of the reel cart.
It ga\'e

He

appealed

Finally after days of search

from battalion headquarters. it was found in the possession of a sister battery and was then returned. Thereafter the reel cart was not hid in the wood. It was kept at the position away from foreign salvage details.

him no sympathy, only laughing.

Most barrages were monotonous. But one evening, while firing a problem on an important crossroad, the drone of the motor of a German bomber was heard overhead, followed shortly by twenty of his gifts, landing in more or less proximity to the position. We finished our problem without ceasing fire.
Under
shell-fire
it

often seems that a whole year

is

contained

in

the short

space of fi\e minutes. We can recall that eventful evening when the German "77 m.m.'s " swept up and down the road, dropping ten shells between the gunpits

"Number One"

and the dugouts in the three volleys fired. No casualties, except the piece, which sight was shot away. Battery F was lucky once more.

We all

remember

the ten advances that were

made by

the echelon.

Lieutenant

Clausing would awake us at midnight, give orders to harness and hitch in "double time," and then at the "zero" hour move off for the gun position, only to return
a few hours later tired, cold and hungry.

The only advance was made by
the game.
until
finally

the

echelon to the gun position.
Steadily

This was

all in

11th, at eleven hours,

we gained experience and confidence, we fired our last rounds in

on November

the world war, pouring steel

-114—

f

,

;

.'•

into "Fritz" at the rate of twenty-four rounds per

gun per minute, and then

it

was "Fini

la

Guerre."
Finally

November 29th we w ere, and we were not, we did receive orders to rejoin the 89th Division, and become a part of the Third Army, the Army of Occupation. The first day's hike landed us at Arvillers, tired and stiff. The second night found us more tired and more stiff; that condition steadily growing until the end
the cessation of hostilities to

From

going into Germany.

of the hike.
hitch,

Up at four hours, roll blankets, take on a little "slum", harness and then march until late in the afternoon, arriving at our billets just before or after dark, with an hour's halt at noon for "chow", we took little interest in the scenery. We were in the artillery and the artillery always rides except in war. After eleven days on the road we reached Oherkail, then to Dudeldorf and to Speicher, the last proving to be our winter billet. Inspections and road hikes kept us busy for a number of weeks. Then we were given leaves to France, England, and Italy. Many of the men \'isited Treves and Coblenz, Germany. Athletics were participated in. Lieutenant Schweiger was a member of the 89th Division football team, champions of the American Expeditionary Forces. We fired twice on the range, but cold weather prevented snappy work. Every last man on the roster of Battery F is proud of his organization and the part that he played in its record, from the training days at Camp Funston, with the dappled gray horses, to its missions on the front, and finally to the day that they were "mustered out."

m
—115-

f

c~

y/^M'

/

Eincl lis J^tolps.

Ci

^

s:}st

iaspec-fion Hefore Sailing- (PdmpCMiKs

rr~^

"' \|Ci
-116-

#
J'

The Supply Company
under the plan of military organization is not company, nothing else. We ha\e endeavored to perform efficiently that task with some success, we helie\-e, and although we have been cursed, maligned and everything else in the \ocahulary, we can say without fear of contradiction that the fighting units of the regiment have always secured sufficient supplies to enable them to function properly. Ours has not been the work of interest and glory; rather it has been ai'duous, tiresome
a fighting unit.
It is

THE SUPPLY COMPANY

a supply

and monotonous, with few compensations, except that by our aid the regiment would not have been able to establish the enviable reputation it has.
feeding, clothing, and outfitting in equipage and materiel, keeping equipment up-to-date and serviceable, often under adxerse conditions, and the supplying of fuel and forage as well, for an artillery regiment of fifteen hundred men and some nine hundred odd animals is a job of no mean proportion. It required the best that was in every last man, whether it was a "mule-skinner," stevedore, non-commissioned officer, or officer. It meant hard work and was hard work.
this

The

Ever since that day

at

Camp

Funston w hen General Starbuck, on a tour of
in

inspection to determine the fitness of artillery regiments

the

many

canton-

ments throughout the United
our
rifles

States, passed

down our

lines

endea\oring to inspect
"

with little success, turned to Captain Greable at the conclusion and "Give them 'Present Arms,' if you think they will recognize the command, and Captain Greable, somewhat embarrassed replied, "No, sir. General, don't believe they will. We ha\e ne\er sought parade ground honors. We ha\e been content to let the other organizations, whenever possible, appear without the Supply Company at dismounted inspections and re\iews."
said,
1

Much credit for the initial organization is due to Captain Wentworth's broad knowledge and understanding of men. His kindly personal nature did much, during recruit days at Camp Funston, to instill the spirit of fellowship and accomplishment into the men from Colorado, Nebraska, South Dakota, Kansas and Missouri, w ho were assigned to the company. Coming from civilian life they knew nothing of soldiering, and he steered them through this difficult We were e\en formally introduced to period with patience and rare judgment. That is humorous to us today, but then we appreciated it, the First Sergeant. for few knew the difference between that indi\idual and a kitchen police.
Later on,
in

January,
staff'.

1^18,

brigade commander's

Captain

when Captain Wentworth was transferred to Robert W. Greable assumed command.

-117-

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-"//

'J

^j^^ttevy

(p.

/Ceo.aly ^01- ATS/oect. tore

<^Zy(

Szcpf/ly (pompani/

Ontind

S\)c As 2)i2-iy'' Ziolftyrc./

zF. -'JP'uns/^ojz^-,"

-118—

^

A man

of long military ser\'ice he understooLl the
initiati\-e of
all

game.

Results were his aim.

Giving the

the

men

fair

play and anticipating e\ents, he

made

the
it.

organization ready at

times for whatever task, or obstacle, might confront

Our

life

at

Camp

Funston afforded many pleasantries.

We

were more or
in

less serious in

our work, but never so serious that we failed to discern humor

the work, and ne\'er so busy but what

we could

find time for play

and amusement

now and

then.

lieutenants,

By tact we were usually successful in evading the thirteen second who were attached to the Supply Company for ti'aining and
life.

experience, and despite the strenuous routine they exacted were able to enjoy

The Supply Company
Thanksgi\'ing

carried

off

the

social

honors at

Camp

Funston.

For the first time our mothei's, fathers, and brothers, were our guests. It was then our cooks founded their enviable reputation. Christmas was another red-letter day in our social history. After our wagon train had distributed its share of the Christmas packages to the men of the Division, dinner and dancing in the ban"acks followed. After this came on e\'ery possible occasion dinners and glances for the nurses of the Base Hospital at Fort Rilc\\ whom we had the good fortune The en\y of the other organto corner from the remainder of the regiment. Much as we enjoyed these e\-ents, e\'en more did izations was not concealed. we look forward to the picnics at Paw'nee Flats w hen wc were the guests of the The "Zone", Army City's Palm Garden and Bells Cafe were popular nurses. rendez\'Ous, not to mention Topeka, which held certain attractions for the lucky holders of week-end passes. Enthusiastic participation in athletics and sports ol all kinds was to our and if we did fail to win the Mules, of course, were our long suit liking. baseball championship, we did take Headquarters Company and regimental Battery B into camp. Mention in general orders, by Major-General Wood, for the best four-line team of mules in a competitixc show at Camp Funston was gained by the Supply
our debut
wives, sisters, sweethearts,
;

Day was

Company. The last

of N'lay

We

carefully crated

was a time of work all day long and part of the night. and loaded our materiel for o^'erseas, (materiel which we

never saw again), issued thousands of pieces of clothing to the regiment in addition Finally, on June 3rd, we cleared the camp quartermaster and to other supplies.
entrained for

Camp

Mills,

Long

Island,

New

^'ork.

Supply Company did some more equipping. A job Facilities well done was the reward of the hard labor and long hours entailed. were wholly inadequate for the size of the job. Small wall tents with paulins spread upon the ground were used for the sorting, sizing, and issuing of the

Upon

arrival there the

property from the hugh sacks of supplies, but despite these adxerse conditions

-119-

<.<..

the work was completed
in

—a

quarter-million dollar's worth of property handled

an increditable short time.

New
scarce

^'ork held allurements to the men.
of the nature of our work.

Unfortunately day passes were

because

However,
officer,

after a night

trip

to

Coney

which he reported most enjoyable, we were given the famous "Si.x-to-Si,x' passes and were enabled to see New York with its Broadway, Rockaway Beach and other attractions by night. Lieutenant Tabbert habitually held reveille to count the stragglers as
Island and environs by the

commanding

they came wearily

in.

The

trip overseas

on the

S. S.

"Bohemia
in

"

is

not easily forgotten.

English

characteristics,
ship's hold,

reviewed pro and con

the Supply

Company

section of the

were certainly made

sufficiently clear

and pronounced by the views
July Fourth was an exceptional
in the

of the

men

so that they will long be remembered.

beautiful day.

The day w as calm and
in

clear,

and although we were

submarine

zone, yet with fitting and impressive ceremony our colors were hoisted to the

proud defiance of the enemy London, marked again the beginning of hard work. The other organizations debarked shortly after the steamer Its lot was to unload the baggage and docked, but not the Supply Company. equipment of the regiment. A crude block and tackle was rigged up to lift the barrack bags up from the hold. Operated by hand, we thought that the last barrack bag would never be brought up. At Southampton we smashed the barrack bags again. At LeHarve the task again confronted us, only here we were hindered by countless "Chinks who were supposed to help, but who only succeeded in always being in the way. The barracks bag followed us all the way to Camp de Souge, only to be salvaged. If we had only known those bags were to be salvaged eventually "While waiting at Castelnau to enter the artillery training camp at Camp de Souge we began the work of re-equipping the regiment with animals, materiel, and countless other supplies, which was not finished until well toward the end of the training period, and then only after a large reduction in allowances. Sometimes the equipment was a\ailable at the depot quartermaster, but often it was assembled through our own efforts from the supply bases at Bordeaux. This meant doubled effort.
ship's

mast-head

The

arrival of the transport at Tilbury,

"

On

the eve of our departure for the front the three sections of the

the Regimental, the First Battalion and the Second Battalion

—which were
its

Company
to be

separated at the front, ga\'e a banquet
training period.

commemoration of the end of the Colonel Da\is, the regimental commander, the honored guest
in

of the evening, in a brief, characteristic,
of the entire training,

extemporaneous
its

toast,

made summary
resource-

commending the

organization,

personnel,

trj^

f!:;;:;

-120-

fullness

and

discipline,

realizing individual responsibility
of a supply

and laying stress on the importance of every member and initiative for proper and effective functioning

company
of

unit at the front.
the regimental supply service was established at Pannes.

Headquarters

a place centrally located between the firing batteries and the battalion echelons,
well chosen for the distribution of supplies.

Enemy

observation of the

dump

was impossible save by an aeroplane. Protection from shell-fire was afforded by a bluff. Splinter-proof dugouts, which "Fritz" had only recently evacuated, were very convenient whenever he decided that Pannes should be shelled.

(O/ip _or he

(pourtntari'ioled.

kr<?f>t Sc ene/n Djjc/f/c/orf
'

/-Hn

7/ao rs

%

f

jy**

\y('(o>-e

IZ^e //n'lJerjn j-Jpu-Zc^ r/onc/

Jo^c/naf/n^^ /hon 'J/'omnn-

:I
its

The regimental
Bouillonville,

section

limited

operations

among

the

railheads

at

Essey,

Bernecourt.

the regimental

brought to the escort wagons.

dump at dump and there distributed to the echleons by ration carts and From the echelons the supplies and food were taken to the

Manicourt. Heudicourt and Vigneulles, and Rations, forage and other supplies were Pannes.

Night after night without fail, over roads oftentimes It can be water and rations were delivered to the gun crews. stated with pride that the batteries never missed a meal while on the front through
firing batteries at night.
shell-fire,

under

/

/
-121—

;^l:,:.;^

j,rii;;

<<y

the inability of the Supply

Company
it '11

to function,

fulfilling

Lieutenant Scott's
the "beans"

promise, "if you say 'beans',

be 'beans'."

of occasions by merely asking for emergencies were met by first securing the appro\'al of "G-4", Second Army headquarters, of our requisitions, and then hauling with the faithful "Packard" supplies from quartermaster bases far to the rear. On two occasions supplies were drawn from Is-sur-Tille, a distance of 225 kilometers. While on the front the ordnance detachment had a multitude of jobs, some large and others small. The ammunition dumps were under the supervision of men from this detachment These men were habitually in the vicinity of these dumps and constantly exposed to shell-fire. The rest of the detachment was stationed at Pannes and handled signal and engineering property and ordnance. At night it v>ould take to the batteries, camouflage, timbers, corrugated iron and similar supplies which it had sah'aged during the day. It also replaced disabled

secured

always

And neither were On a number them.

field pieces.

Every man who embarked

proud of our record. Seldom did a court-martial disgrace our ranks. at Boston saw service at the front, and every man lived to return to the States. We were remarkably free from sickness the records
are

We

show

Army
histories.

tact

and stevedore talent always do contribute to supply company's

'A
—122—

-v/wM'

REPORT OF GENERAL JOHN J. PERSHING,
COMMANDER- N-CHIEF AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES
1

U.S.A.

Cabled

to the

Secretary of War, November 20. iciiS.
16,

Corrected January

iqiq.

General Headquarters, American Expeditionary Forces,
No\-ember
20, 1918.

To THE Secretary of War

:

My

Dear Mr. Secretary
I

In response to your request,
of the organization

and operations

fvlay 26, 1917, until the signing of

honor to submit this brief summary American E.xpeditionary Forces from the armistice No\'ember 1, 1918.
ha\'e the

of the

1

Pursuant to

j'our

instructions,

immediately upon

recei\"ing

my

orders,

I

selected a small staff

and proceeded to Europe

in order to

become

familiar with

moment. England and France was only equalled by the readiness of the Commanders in Chief of the veteran armies of the Allies and In consultation with them their staffs to place their experience at our disposal. With French the most effective means of co-operation of effort were considered. and British armies at their ma.ximum strength, and all efforts to dislodge the enemy from his firmly entrenched positions in Belgium and France having failed, it was necessary to plan for an American force adequate to turn the scale in favor of the Taking account of the strength of the Central Powers at that time, the Allies.
conditions at the earliest possible

The wannth

of our reception in

am
-12^-

#;"-^

The

immensity of the problem whicli confronted us eould hardly be overestimated. first requisite being an organization that could give intelligent direction to effort, the formation of a general staff occupied my early attention.

General Staff

A

well organized general staff
is

through which the

Commander

exercises his

functions

essential to a successful

modern army.

However capable our divisions,

our battalions and our companies as such, success would be impossible without throughly co-ordinated endeavor. A general staff broadly organized and trained

war had not hitherto existed in our army. Under the Commander in Chief, must carry out the policy, and direct the details of administration, supply, preparation and operations of the army as a whole, with all special branches and bureaus subject to its control. As models to aid us we had the veteran French General Staff and the experience of the British, who had similarly formed an organization to meet the demands of a great army. By selecting from each the features best adapted to our basic organization, and fortified by our own early experience in the war, the developments of our great general staff system was
for

this staff

completed.

The General

Staff

is

naturally divided into five groups, each w ith

its chief,

an assistant to the Chief of the General Staff. G-1 (General Staff- 1) is in charge of organization and equipment of troops, replacements, tonnage, priority of overseas shipments, the auxiliary welfare associations and cognate subjects; G-2 has censorship, enemy intelligence, gathering and disseminating
is

who

information, preparation of
strategic studies

and

plans,

maps and all similar subjects; G-3 is charged with all movement of troops and the supervision of combat
of supply, construction, trans-

operations;

G-4 co-ordinates important questions
and the evacuation
of the sick

port arrangements for combat, and the operations of the Services of Supply, and
of hospitalization

and Vi-ounded; G-5 supervises

the various schools and has general direction and co-ordination of education and
training.

The first Chief who was succeeded

of Staff
in

was Colonel (now Major General) James G. Harbord,

these officers, to the

May, 1918, by Major General James W. McAndrew. To Deputy Chief of Staff, and to the Assistant Chiefs of Staff,
is

who

as heads of sections aided them, great credit
in

due

for the results obtained,

not only

perfecting the general staff organization,

but

in

applying correct

principles to the multiplicity of problems that have arisen.

Organization and Training
After a thorough consideration of allied organizations,
it

was decided that

J

our combat

cli\'isions

should consist of two infantry brigades of two regiments

each, an artillery brigade of three regiments, a machine

gun

battalion, an engineer

regiment, a trench mortar battery, a signal battalion, and headquarters, trains

and military
3,700
a

police;

that our infantry regiments were to consist of approximately

a headquarters company, a supply company, machine gun company, and three battalions with four companies, each of 250

men

organized as follows:

men

to a battalion.

1 hese

with medical and other units made a total of over
oi-

28,000 men, or practically double the size of a French

Gennan

di\-ision.

Each

corps would normally consist of six divisions, four combat and one depot and one

replacement di\ision, and also two regiments of cavalry, and each army of from
three to five corps. With four divisions fully trained, a corps could take over an American sector, with two divisions in line and two in reser\'e, with the depot and replacement divisions prepared to fill the gaps in the ranks.

Our purpose was
self-reliant infantry

to prepare an integral

American

force

which should be
the tactics of

able to take the offensive in every respect.

Accordingly the development of a
rifle

by thorough

drill in

the use of the

and

in

open warfare was always uppermost.
allowed a division one

The plan
in

of training after ari-i\al in

France

month

for acclimatization

and instruction

in small units

from battalions down, a second month
a
thii-d

quiet trench sectors by battalions, and

month

after
in

complete division

came out of the war of movement.
it

trenches,

when

it

should be trained as a

of instruction

V^ry early a system of schools w'as outlined and started, having the advantage by officers direct from the front. At the great school center at
first

Langres, one of the
of general staff

to be organized

was the

staff school,

where the principles

work

as laid

down

selected officers.

Men

in the

own organization were taught to carefully ranks who had shown qualities of leadership were
in

our

sent to the school of candidates for commissions.

A

school of the line taught
of the different

younger
weapons.

officers the principles of leadership, tactics

and the use
officers

In

the Artillery School at

Saumur young

were taught the

fundamental principles of modern

artillery',

while at Issoudun an immense plant

was

built for training cadets in a\'iation.

These and other schools with their

well-considered curriculums for training in every branch of our organizations

were co-ordinated

and

industrious

in a manner best young men, many

to develop
of

an

efficient

whom had

not before

army out of willing known e\en the

rudiments of military
placed officers and

men

deeply indebted for

Both Marshall Haig and General Retain and we are the opportunities gi\'en to profit by their \-eteran experience.
technique.
at our disposal for instructional purposes,

w^:Mm

American Zone
American Army should take on the western front by the vital questions of communication and supplies. The northern ports of France were crowded by the British Army's shipping and supplies, while the southern ports, though otherwise at our service, had not adequate port facilities for our purposes, and these we should have to

The eventual

place the

was to a

large extent influenced

build.

The already overtaxed railway system behind the active front in northern France would not be available for us as lines of supply, and those leading from the southern ports to northeastern France would be unequal to our needs without much new construction. Practically all warehouses, supply depots and regulating stations must be provided by fresh construction. While France offered us such material as she had to spare after a drain of three years of war, yet there were enormous quantities of material to be brought across the Atlantic.
With such a problem any temporization
or lack of definiteness in

making

plans might cause failure even with victory within our grasp.
viction of our

VIoreover, broad

plans commensurate with our national purpose and resources would bring con-

power to every soldier in the front line, to the nations associated war, and to the enemy. The tonnage for material for necessary construction and for the supply of an army of three and perhaps four million men would require a mammoth program of shipbuilding at home, and miles of dock construction in France, with a correspondingly large project for additional railways and for storage depots.
with us
in the

All these considerations led to the inevitable conclusion that,

to handle and supply the great forces
utilize the

deemed

essential to

southern ports of France, Bordeaux,

La

Pallice,

if we were win the war, we must St. Nazaire and Brest,

and the comparatively unused railway systems leading therefrom to the northeast. Generally speaking, then, this would contemplate the use of our forces against the enemy somewhere in that direction, but the great depots of supply must be centrally located, preferably in the area included by Tours, Bourges and Cha^teaurox, so that our armies could be supplied with equal facility wherever they might be ser\ ing on the western front.

Growth of the Services of Supply
To build up such a system there were talented men in the Regular Army, but more experts were necessary than the army could furnish. Thanks to the patriotic spirit of our people at home, there came from civil life men trained for
every sort of work involved in building and managing an organization that was With such assistance to handle and transport such an army and keep it supplied.
the construction and general development of our plans have kept pace with

t
the growth of the forces, and the Services of Supply
ship and
in the
is

now

able to discharge from

move

45,000 tons daily, besides transporting troops and material necessary
of active operations.

conduct

As all the administrative and supply services, except the Adjutant General's, Inspector General's and Judge Advocate General's Departments, which remain at General Headquarters, have been transferred to the Headquarters of the Services of Supply at Tours, under a Commanding General
to organization,

responsible to the

Commander

in

Chief for supply of the armies.
Officer,

The Chief

Quartermaster, Chief Surgeon, Chief Signal

Chief of Ordnance, Chief

of Air Service, Chief of Chemical Warfare Service

and the General Purchasing

Agent, in

all

that pertains to questions of procurement of supply, the Pro\'OSt

Marshall General in the maintenance of order in general, and the Director General of Transportation in all that affects such matters, and the Chief Engineer in all matters of administration and supply, are subordinate to the Commanding General of the Services of Supply, who, assisted by a staff especially organized for the prupose, is charged with the administrati\e co-oi-dination of all these
services.

The Transportation Department under
of ships

the Services of Supply directs the
functions

operation and maintenance of railways, the operation of terminals, the unloading

and transportation

of material to warehouses or to the front.

Its

make

necessary the most intimate relationship between our organization and that

of the French, with the practical result that our transportation department has

been able to improve materially the operation of railways generally. Constantly laboring under a shortage of rolling stock the transportation department has nevertheless been able by efficient management to meet every emergency. The Engineer Corps is charged with all construction, including light and standard gauge railways and roads. It has planned and constructed the many projects required, the most important of which are the new wharves at Bordeaux and Nantes, and the immense storage depots at La Pallice, Montoir and Gievres, besides innumerable hospitals and barracks in various ports of France. These projects have all been carried on by phases, keeping pace with our needs. The Forestry Service under the Engineers Corps has cut the greater part of the timber and railway ties required. To meet the shortage of supplies from America due to lack of shipping, the representatives of the different supply departments were constantly in search of In order to co-ordinate these purchases available material and supplies in Europe. and to pre\ent competition between our departments, a general purchasing agency was created early in our experience to co-ordinate our purchases and, if possible, induce our Allies to apply the principle among the Allied armies. While there w,'as no" authority for the general use of appropriations, this was met by grouping

'127

the purchasing representatives of the different departments under one control,

charged with the duty of consolidating requisitions and purchases. Our efforts to extend the principle have been signally successful, and all purchases for the
Allied armies are

now on an

equitable and co-operative basis.
efficient

Indeed,

it

may

be said that the work of this bureau has been thoroughly

and

businesslike.

Artillery, Airplanes and Tanks

Our entry into the war found us with few of the auxiliaries necessary for conduct in the modern sense. Among our most important deficiencies in material were artillery, aviation and tanks. In order to meet our requirements we accepted the offer of the French government to provide as rapidly as possible, us with the necessary artillery equipment of 75's, 155 mm. Howitzers and 155 G. P. F. guns from their own factories for 30 divisions. The wisdom of this course is fully demonstrated by the fact that, although we soon began the manufacture of these classes of guns at home, there were no guns of the calibers mentioned manufactured in America on our front at the date the armistice was signed. The only guns of these types produced at home thus far received in
its

France are 109 75
In aviation

mm.

guns.
in the

and here again the French governprogram should be under way. We obtained from the French the necessary planes for training our personnel, and they have provided us with a total of 2,076 pursuit, obser\'ation and bombing planes. The first airplane received from home arrived in May, and altogether we have received 1,379 planes. The first American squadron completely equipped by American production, including airplanes, crossed the German lines on August As to tanks, we were also compelled to rely upon the French. Here, 7, 1918. how'e\er, we were less fortunate, for the reason that the French production could barely meet the requirements of their own armies. It should be fully realized that the French go\ernment has always taken a most liberal attitude, and has been most anxious to gi\e us e\ery possible assistance

we were

same

situation,

ment came

to our aid until our

own

ax'iation

in

meeting our deficiencies

in these as well as in

other respects.
of course,

upon France

for artillery, aviation

and tanks was,

Our dependence due to the fact that

our industries had not been exclusively de\-oted to military production. All credit is due our own manufacturers for their efforts to meet our requirements, as at the time the armistice was signed we w ere able to look forw ard to the early supply of practically all our necessities from oui" own factories.

Welfare of the Troops
The
welfare of the troops touches

my

responsibility as

Commander

in

Chief

-128-

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Indicate

DMsioNs

in

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360
,I««L

,565

SALIENT

to the

mothers and fathers and kindred

of the

men who came
lia\-e

to

France

in

the

impressionable period of youth.

They could not

the privilege accorded

European

soldiers during their periods of lea\'e of \'isiting their families and renewing their home ties. Fully realiring that the standard of conduct that should he established for them must have a permanent influence on their lives

and on the character
JeW'-ish

of their future citizenship, the

Red

Cross, the

Young Men's
the
in

Christian Association, the Knights of Columbus, the Salvation Ai'my, and

Welfare Board, as auxiliaries

in

this
in

work, were encouraged

e\ery

possible way.

1 he fact that our soldiers,

a land of different customs and

keeping with the cause for which due not only to the efforts in their behalf, hut much more to their high ideals, their discipline and their innate sense of self-respect. It should be recoixlecl, howe\'ei'. that the members of these welfare societies ha\'e been untiring in their desire to be of real service to our officers and men. 1 he patriotic de\'otion of these representati\'e men and women has gi\'cn a new significance to the Golden Rule and we owe to them a debt of gi-atitude that can nex'cr be paid.
in

language, have borne themsek'es in a
is

manner

the^" fought,

Combat Operations
During our periods of training in the ti'cnches some of our di\ isions had engaged the enemy in local combats, the most important of which w as Seicheprey by the 2bth Di\-ision on April 2()th, in the Toul sector, but none had participated The 1st Di\ision. which had passed thi^OLigh the preliminary in action as a unit. stages of training, had gone to the trenches for its first period of instixiction at

March 21st, when the German oftensi\"e in Picarcly we had four dixisions with experience in the trenches, all of which were The crisis which this olTensix'c de\"eloped equal to any demands of battle action.
the end of October, anci by

began,

was such that our occupation

of

an American sector had to be postponed.

On March 28th upon as Commander
he might decide.

I

placed at the disposal of Marshal Foch,
in

who had been agreed

Chief of the Allied Armies,
1st

all

of our I'orces, to be used as

was transferred fi'om the Toul As Gei'man superiority in numbers required pi'ompt action, an agreement was reached at the Abbeville conference of the Allied Premiers and Commanders and myself on Ma\' 2nd by which British shipping was to transport ten American di\-isions to the British army area, where they were to be trained and equipped, and additional British shipping was to be pro\-ided for as many di\isions as possible for use
At
his request the

Di\'ision

sector to a position in reserxe at Chaumont-en-\'e\in.

elsewhere.

On

April 2bth the

1st Dix'ision

had gone

into the line in the

Montdidier salient

on the Picardv battle

front.

Tactics had been suddenly re\-olutionized to those of

m

wmMi

/

-

open warclare, and
for the test.

ulii-

men

eonfielent of the results of their ti-aining

were eager

On

the

morning

of

May

2iSth this di\ision

attacked the

eommanding

position in its fi'ont, taking with splendid dash the town of Cantigny other object i\cs w hich were organized, and held steadfastly against \-icious counter-attacks and galling artillery fire. Although local, this bi'illiant action

German
all

and

had an

electrical effect, as

it

battle conditions,

and

also that the

demonstrated enemy's

oui' fighting qualities

ti^oops

under extreme were not altogether in\-ineible.

which began on May 27th, had advanced Pai'is, and the Allies faced a crisis equally Again every available man as grave as that of the I-icardy offensive in Mfaixh. was p^lacecl at Marshal f-och's disposal, and the 3rcl Di\ision, which had just come from its pi'eliminary training area, was hurried to the Marne. Its n:otorizecl machine gun battalion preceded the other units, and successfully held the bridgehead at the Marne opposite Ghateau-Thierry. The 2nd Di\ision. in reser\e near Montdiclicr, was sent by motor trucks and other a\ailable ti'ansport to check the progi'ess of the enemy toward Paris. he elixision attacked and ix^took the town and railroad station at Eouresches and sturdih' held its ground against the enemy's best Gtiarcl eliNisions. Xn the battle of [?elleau Wood which followed our men prox'cd thcii' siiperioi'ity, and gained a sti'ong tactical position with far gi'eater loss to the enem\' than to ourscKes. On July 1st, before the 2nd Dixision was rclie\cd, it capturcel the \illage of \'au.\ with most splendid precision. Meanwhile, oui' I^ectmel Goi'ps, under Nlajor General George W. Read, had been oi'ganized lor the command of our elixisions with the [British which were held back in training areas or assigncel to second line delerscs. bi\'e of the ten cli\'isions were withdrawn from the Biitish area in jtine, three to i'elie\e di\ isions in Lorraine and the 'Vosges, and two to the l^aris area to join the gi'otip of .Amei'ican divisions which stood between the city and any fuither acKancc of the enemy

The Germans' Aisne

offensi\e,

rapidly towards the Ri\er M'arne and

'!

in that dii'cction.
'I

he great June-July tiX)Op mo\'ement from the States was well under way,

and, although these troops were to be gi\en

some preliminaiy
all

ti'aining

before

being put into action,
in the

tb.eii-

\ery presence warranted the use of

the older dixisions

confidence that

were

in

the line east of

we did not lack reserves. Flem.ents of the 42nel Di\ision Rheims against the German offensixe of Jul\- l)th, and

held their ground undinchingly.
of the 28th Di\ision were in

On

the right flank of this offensi\e four companies
face of the ad\-ancing

position in

wa\es

of the

German

infantry.
1 '

1 he

.3rd

Division was holding the south bank of the
is

Marne

from a point

-

kilometers cast of MIezy to Ghierry, w hich

just east ol

Ghateau-

Thierry, w-here a large force of

German

infantry sought to force a passage under

support of powerful

artillery concentrations

single regiment of the 3rd Division

and under cover of smoke screens. A wrote one of the most brilliant pages in our

>

''

A
—130-

**
.X'',

military annals on this occasion
front, while,

It

piT\ented the crossing at certain points on

its

Germans who had gained a footing pressed foi'ward. Oui- men firing in three directions met the German attacks with counter-attack at critical point, and succeeded in throwing two German divisions into complete
on cither
(lank, the

confusion, capturing six hundred prisonei's.

The great foi'ce of the German Chateau-Thierry offensive established the deep iVIarne salient, h.ut the enemy was taking risks and the \'ulnerability of this pocket to attack might be turned to his disadxantage. Seizing the opportunity to support my con\iction, every du'ision with any sort of ti'aining was made a\ailable for use in a counter offensi\-e. The place of honoi' in the thrtist toward Soissons on July l<'"!th was gixen to oui' 1st and 2nd Di\isions, in compan\' with chosen f-rench di\'isions. Without the usual brief warning of a pi'climinary bombardment, the massed French and American ai'tillei'\', (fiMng by the map, laid down its rolling barrage at dawn w bile the infantr\- began its charge. he tactical handling of our troops undei' these trying conelitions was excellent throughout th.e action. 'I he enemy brought up lai'ge ntimbcrs of reseiwcs and made a stubboi'n defense both with machine guns an^l artiilcrw but through fi\e days' fighting the 1st Di\ision continued to aebance until it had gained the heights abo\c Soissons anel eapturcel the \illage of L?ei'::\'-lc-Sec. 1 he ZulI Di\ ision took Beaurepaire farm and VieiT'v in a \ei'\' I'apid ad\ance. and reacheel a position 1 hesc two di\isions captured in front of Tigny at the end of its second day.
I

7.0C0 prisoners and o\ei' ICO pieces of

artillcrx'.
I

On
just

July

b'"''th

the

I^irst

Corps, comman^lcd by Major Ccneral
Louring

luntcr biggett.
h.ekl a sectoi'

consisting of 2Cth y\merican Di\ision anel the lo7tli f-rcnch Dixision.

northwest of Chatteau-Thierry.
b"'th.

th.e

first

stages of the attack on
as a pixot. resting
its

Soissons starting on July
right

the 2bth

I^i\ ision

acteel

on west had been straightened out. On Jub' 20th. this had been accomplished anel the First Corps then became the marching Hank of a much larger pivotal movement which rested its left flank on the hills southwest of Soissons. At the time of the above attack the lixl Di\"ision just east of Chateau- hierry was crossing 1 he attack of the First Corps the Marne in pursuit of th.c retreating enemy. was continued on Jul\- 21st and the enem>- withdrew past the Chateau-ThierryHill 204 just west of ChatteaLi-l hierry, until the battle line to the north1

Soissons road.

The

3rd

Dix'ision

continuing

its

progress took the heights of
in

Mont

St.

Pere and the \illages of CharteAxs and Jaulgonne
artillery fire.

the face of both

machine gun and

On

the 24th. after the

Germans had

fallen

back from Ti'ugny and Fpiede.

our 42nd Di\ision, which had been brought o\'er from the Champagne, relie\ed the 2bth Di\ision. and. fighting its way through the Forest de Fere, o\'erwhelmed
the nests of machine guns in
its

path.

By

the 27th

it

had reached the Ouixq.

:-»::

y-^

'

"'

x^)'^"'

^^

J

whence the 3rd and 4th

Di\-isions were already advancing,

while the French
at other points.

divisions with which \\c weix co-operating were

moving forward

Dnision had made its advance into Roncheres Wood on the 29th, and was relie\-ed for rest by a brigade of the 32nd Division. The 42nd and 32nd Divisions undertook the task of conquering the heights beyond Cierges, the 42nd capturing Sergy and the 32nd capturing Hill 230, both American divisions joining in the rapid pursuit of the enemy to the Vesle, and thus the operation of reducing the salient was finished. On August 3rd the 42nd Di\ision was relieved by the 4th Di\ision at CheryChartreuve, and on August c.th the 32nd Di\'ision was relie\-ed by the 2'Sth Di\-ision. The 4th Division in turn was relieved on August 12th by the 77th Division. The First Corps operated in this region until the 3th of August, when it was transferred to the \icinity of Toul. The Third Corps, in which the 28th, 32nd and 77th Di\isions ser\ed at ^arious times, Major Ceneral Robert L. Bullard commanding, took part in the offensi\'e on the Vesle from August 5th until September Qth, on which date the command passed to the French, and Corps Headquarters was

The

3rd

1

transferred to the region of Verdun.

Battle of
With the reduction
against the St.
of the

St.

Mihiel

centration of our di\isions in our
N'lihiel salient,

Marne salient we could look forward to the conown zone. In \'iew of the forthcoming operation

which had long been planned as our first offensive Army was organized on August 10th under my personal command. While American units had held different di\-isional and corps sectors all along the western front, there had not been up to this time, for obvious reasons, a distinct American sector; but in view ot the important part the American forces were now to play it was necessary to take o\'er a permanent portion of the line. Accordingly on August 30th the line beginning at Port-surSeille, east of the Moselle and extending to the west through St. Mihiel, thence north to a point opposite Verdun, was placed under my command. The American sector was afterward extended across the N4euse to the western edge of the Argonne Forest, and included the 2nd French Colonial Corps which held the point of the salient, and the 17th French Corps which occupied the heights above Verdun.
action on a large scale, the First

The preparation
in front of us

for a

complicated operation against the formidable defenses

included the assembling of di\isions, and of corps and
the elements of a great

army

artillery,

transport, air craft, tanks, ambulances, the location of hospitals, anc4 the

moulding

together of

all

supplied directly by our

own

Services of Supply.

modern army, with its own railheads, The concentration for this

operation, which was to he a surprise, involved the
of approximately 600,000 troops,

movement mostly

at night

and required

for its success the

most careful

attention to every detail.
in gi\ing us assistance in corps and army artillery, we were confident from the start of our superiority o\-er the enemy in guns of all calibers. Our heavy guns were able to reach Nietz and to interfere seriously with German rail movements. The French independent air force was placed under my command, which, together with the British bombing

The French were generous
its

with

personnel, and

squadrons and our own air forces, gave us the largest assembly of a\iation that had ever been engaged in one operation on the western front.

From Les Fparges around the nose of the salient of St. Mihiel to the Moselle River the line was roughly forty miles long and situated on commanding ground, greatly strengthened by artificial defenses. Our First Corps (82nd, 90th, 5th and 2nd Divisions), under command of Major General Hunter Liggett, resting its right on Pont-a-Mousson, with its left joining our Fourth Corps (the S^th, 42nd and 1st Divisions), under Major General Joseph T. Dickman, in line to Xi\'ray, were to swing in toward Vigneulles, on the pi\ot of the Moselle Ri\er, for the initial assault, b^rom Xivray to Mouilly the Second French Colonial Corps was in line in the center, and our Fifth Corps, undei- command of Major General George H. Cameron, with the 26th and 4th U. S. Di\'isions and the 5th French Colonial Division at the western base of the salient .were to attack three difficult hills, Les Fparges, Combres and Amaranthe. Oui" First Corps had in reser\'e the 78th Division, our Fourth Corps the 3rd Division, and our First y\rmy the 35th and 91st Divisions, with the 80th and 33rd Divisions available. It should be understood that our corps organizations ai'c \ery elastic, and that we ha\'e at no time had permanent assignments of divisions to corps. After four hours' artillery preparation the seven American divisions in the front line advanced at 5 a. m., on September 12th, assisted by a limited number of tanks, manned partly by Americans and partly by the French. These divisions, accompanied by groups of wire cutters and others armed with bangalore torpedoes, went through the successive bands of barbed wire that protected the enemy's front line and support trenches in irresistible waves on schedule time, breaking down all defense of an enemy demoralized by the great volume of our artillery fire and our sudden appearance out of the fog. Our First Corps took Thiaucourt, while our Fourth Corps curved back to The Second French Colonial Corps made the the southwest through Nonsard. slight advance required of it on verv' difficult ground, and the Fifth Corps took A rapid march brought reserve its three ridges and repulsed a counter-attack. regiments of a division of the Fifty Corps into Vigneulles in the early morning, where it linked up with pati'ols of our Fourth Corps, closing the salient and forming
1

^
X

r.,j

'-

y

a

new line west of Thiaueourt to Vignculles and beyond Fresnes-en-Woevre. At the cost of only 7,000 casualties, mostly light, we had taken 13,751 prisoners and 443 guns, a great quantity of materiel, released the inhabitants of many \illages from enemy domination and established our lines in a position to threaten Metz. The signal success of the new .American Army in its first o(tensi\'e was of prime importance. The Allies found they had a formidable army to aid them, and the cnemv learned finally that he had one to reckon with.

Meuse-Arconne Offensi\ e

— First

Phase

day after we had taken the St. \'Iihiel salient, much of oui' coi-ps and which had operated at St. Mihiel. and our di\'isions in reser\-e at other points, were already on the mo\'e tow ard the ai'ea back of the line between \\ ith the the Meuse River and the western edge of the Foi'est of Argonne.
the

On

army

artillei'y

exception of
of

St. Mihiel,
still

the old

German

front line

from Switzerland to the east
all

Rheims was

intact.

In the general attack planned

along the

line,

the

operation assigned the American
directed towai'cl

Army

as the hinge of this allied offensi\e

was

th.e im]3ortant railroad communications of the (German armies through Mezieres and Sedan. The enem\' must hold fast to this part of his lines or the withdrawal of his forces w ith four years' accumulation of plants and material would be dangerously imperiled.

The German Army had as yet shown no demoi'alization. and. while the mass of its troops had suffered in morale, its first class dixisions and notably its machine gun detense were exhibiting remaiTable tactical efliciency as well as courage. The German General StafI was fully aware of the consequences of a success on the Ivleuse-Argonne line. Geitain that he would Ad e\erything in his power to oppose us, the action was planned with as much secrecy as possible, an^l was
undertaken with the determination to use
all

our

di\'isions in forcing a decision.

We

expected to di'aw the best

German

dixisions to our front
lest

while the
his line,

enemy was
it

held under gra\'e apprehension

and consume them, our attack should bi'eak

which

was our firm purpose to do.

Our right fiank was protected by the N4euse, while our left embraced the Argonne Forest, whose ravines, hills and elaborate defenses screened by dense thickets had been generally considered impregnable. Our order of battle from right to left was the Third Corps from the Meuse to Malancourt, with the 33rd, 80th and 4th Divisions in line and the 3rd Division as corps reserve; the Fifth Corps fi'om N4alancourt to Vauquois, with the 7Qth, 37th and ^Mst Di\'isions in line and the 32nd Division in corps reserve; and the First Corps, from Vauquois to Vienne-le-Chateau, with the 35th, 28th and 77th Divisions in line and the 92nd

-l.i4-

///

Di\ ision

in

corps reser\e.

The army

rcsei~\'e

consisted of the

1st,

29th and 82nd

Di\isions.

On tlie night of September 25th our ti^oops quietly took the place of the French who think" held the line in this sector, which had long been inacti\"e. In the attack w hich began on the 2(ith we clro\"e through the barbed wii'C entanglements and the sea of shell craters across No Man's Land, mastei'ing all the first line defenses. Continuing on the 27th and 28th, against machine guns and artillery of an increasing number of enemy i'cser\'e divisions, we penetrated to a depth of from three to seven miles and took the village of Montfaucon and its commanding hill, and Fxermont, Gercourt, Cuisy, Septsarges, Malancouit, Koii^y, L'pinonville, Charpcntry, Very and othei' \illages. We had taken 10,000 piisoncrs; we had gained our point of forcing the battle into the open, and were prepared for the enemy's reaction which was bound to come, as he had good roads and ample railroad facilities for bring up his artillei'\' and reser\'es.
In the chill rain of dark nights our engineers had to buiki

new roads

across

spongy, shell torn areas, repair broken roads beyon^l
bridges.

Our gunners, with no thought of sleep, and drag-ropes to bring their guns through the mire in sui^port of the infantry now under the increasing fire of the enemy's ai'tillcry. (3ur attack had taken the enemy by surprise, but, quickly reco\ering himself, he began fierce counter-attacks in strong force, supported by hea\w' bombardments with large quantities of gas. From September 28th until October 4th w e maintained the offensi\'e against patches of woods defended hs snipers and continuous lines of machine guns, and pushed forward our guns and transport, seeing strategical points in preparation for
further attacks.

Land, and build put their shouklei's to wheels

\o Man's

Otmer
Other
di\-isions

L'nits w ith Allies
ft

attached to the Allied armies were doing their part,

was the fortune of our Second Corps, composed of the 27th and 30th t3i\"isions, which had remained with the British, to ha\'e a place of honor in co-0|^eration with the /\ustralian Corps, on September 2'-')th and October 1st, in the assault upon the Hindenburg line, where the St, Qucntin Canal passes through a tunnel under a ridge. The 30th Di\'ision speedily broke through the main line of defense for all its obiecti\"es, while the 27th t^ixision pushed on impetuoush' through the main line until some of its element reached Guoy, In the midst of the maze of trenches and shell craters, and under cross-fire from machine guns, the other In this and m later actions, from elements fought desperateh' against odds.
October t>th to October l^th, our Second Corps captured o\-er b.OOO prisoners and advanced over 13 miles. The spirit and__ aggressiveness of these divisions ha\'e been highly praised by the British Army Commander under whom they ser\-ed.

-135

f/

/

On October 2ncl-Qth our 2nd and 36th Divisions were sent to assist the French an important attack against the old German positions before Rheims. The 2nd Division conquered the complicated defense works on their front against a persistent defense worthy of the grimmest period of trench warfare, and attacked the strongly held wooded hill of Blanc Mont, which they captured in a second assault, sweeping o\er it with consummate dash and skill. This division then
in

repulsed strong counter-attacks before the village and cemetery of St. Etienne, and took the town, forcing the Germans to fall back from before Rheims and

had held since September, 1914. On October 9th the 36th Division relieved the 2nd Division, and, in its first experience under fire, withstood
yield positions they
\"ery se\'ere artillery

bombardment, and rapidly took up the pursuit

of the

enemy

now

retiring

behind the Aisne.

Melse-Argonxe Offensive
The

— Second

Phase

men in this crucial German command threw in more and more first class troops to stop our advance. We made steady headway in the almost impenetrable and strongly held Argonne Forest, for, despite his reinforcements, it was our army
Allied progress elsewhere cheered the efforts of our

contest as the

that was doing the driving. Our aircraft was increasing in skill and numbers and forcing the issue, and our infantry and artillery were improving rapidly with each new experience. The replacements fresh from home were put into exhausted divisions with little time for training, but the;>- had the ach'antage of serving beside men who knew their business and who had almost become veterans oxernight. The enemy had taken every advantage of the terrain, which especially favored the defense, by a prodigal use of machine guns manned by highly trained \'eterans and by using his artillery at short ranges. In the face of such strong frontal positions we should have been unable to accomplish any progress according to previously accepted standards, but had e\'ery confidence in our aggressi\-e tactics and the courage of our troops.
I

On
Corps
of the

tilting to the left followed the

October 4th the attack was renewed all along our fi'ont. The Third BrieuUes-Cunel road; our Fifth Corps took

\'alley of the Aire Rix'er and in the wooded hills Argonne that border the river, used by the enemy with all his art and weapons of defense, the First Corps acKanced for o\er two miles. This sort of fighting continued against an enemy striving to hold e\'ery foot of ground and whose \ery strong counter-attacks challenged us at e\ery point. On the 7th the First Corps captured Chatel-Chehery and continued along the river to Cornay. On the cast of the Meuse sector, one of the two di\isions co-operating with the French captured Consen\oys and the Haumont Woods. On the 9th the First

Gesnes, while along the irregular

B.
-136-

'Ki?
'J

Corps, in

Fle\'ille, and the Fifth Corps ad\'anced open country north of Gesnes. The Third Corps, which had continuous fighting against odds, was working its way through Brieulles and Cunel. On the 10th we had cleared the Argonne Forest of the enemy. The 1st Di\ision, operating successively under the First Corps and under the Fifth Corps hetw een October 4th and October 1th. drove a salient into the enemy's territory extending from the Apremont-Epinonville road to the north of the Cote de Maldah. over a distance of 7 kilometers, against the most powerful opposition. Positions embraced in this area wei"e of \'ital importance to the continuation of the general ad\'ance. Their capture entailed some of the hardest fighting of the campaign. It was now necessary to constitute a Second Arm>'. and on October 10th, the immediate command of the First Army was turned o\-er to Lieutenant General Hunter Liggett. The command of the Second Army, whose divisions occupied a sector in the Woevre, was given to Lieutenant General Robert L. Bullard. who had been commander of the 1st Division and then of the Third Coi'ps. Major General Dickman was transferred to the command of the First Corps, while the Fifth Corps was placed under Vlajor General Charles P. Summerall. who had recently commanded the 1st Di\'ision. Major Genei-al John L. Mines, who had gone rapidly up from regimental to dix'ision commander, was assigned to the Third Corps. These ofTicei"s had been in France from the early da\'s of the Expedition and had learned their lesson in the school of pi'actical wai'fare.
its

progress up the Aire, took

in the rolling

1

against the enemy brought day by day moi'e prisoners, machine gun nests captured in fighting at close quai'ters. On October 18th there was \-ery fierce fighting in the Caures Woods, east of the On the 14th the First Corps took St, Ju\'in. N''euse. and in the Ormont Wood. the Fifth Corps, by hand to hand encounters, entered the formidable Kriemand Later the Fifth hilde line, where the enemy had hoped to check us indefinitely. Corps penetrated further the Ki'iemhilde line, and the Idrst Corps took ChampOur dogged oftensi\e was igneulles and the important town of Grand Pre, wearing down the enemy, who continued desperately to thi^ow his best troops against us. thus weakening his line in front of our Allies and making their acKance

Our constant pressure

m.ostly survivors from

less difficult.

Di\'isiON'S IN
N'leanw'hilc.

Belgium

we

wei'e not only able to

continue the battle, hut our 37th and 91st

Di\isions were hastih' withdrawn from our front and dispatched to help the Detraining in the neighborhood of ^'pres. these L^rench Army in Belgium.
cli\"isions

acKanced by rapid stages to the fighting

line

and were assigned to

adjacent Fi-ench corps. On October 3 1st, in continuation of the Flanders olTensi\'e, On Ko\-ember the^• attacked and methodically broke down all enemy resistance.

,

/,

^

-137

/

/

,/,/'
','^

3rd, the 37th L3)i\ision had completed Hscaut River and firmly established

its

mission

in

driving the

enemy

across the

itself

along the east bank included in the

movement, Ii'oojts of the 91st wood extending across the central part ot the division sector, reached the Scheldt and penetrated into the town of Audenardc. These di\'isions received high commendation from their corps
division zone of action.
a clever flanking
Di\-ision captin'ed Spitaals Bosschen, a difficult

By

commandei'S

for theii'

dash and

enei'gy.

K Iel'se-Argonne Offensi\'e

— Last

Phase

On
le\'el

the 23rd of Octobei', the Thiixl and Fifth Corps ]^ushed northward to the

of Banthe\'ille.

Fi'om this time until

No\ember

1st

no attempt was made to

acKance.

B\ei'y effort was concentrated on the preparation lor the gi'eat attack
E^\'idence of loss of

which was soon to be made.

morale by the enemy ga\"e our
of

men more

confidence and more fortittide in endiiiing the latiguc
fi'om inclement weather.

incessant

elfoi't

and the hardsliips

With comparati\ely well rested divisions the final advance in the MeuseArgonne front was begun on Xo\ember 1st. Our increased artiller\' foixe acquitted itself magnificently in support of the ach'ance, and the enemy broke befoix' the cletei'minecl infantry, which by its pei'sistcnt fighting of the past weeks and the dash of its attack had o\"ei'come his will to I'csist. The Third Corps took Aincreville, Doulcon, and Anclexanne, and the Filth Corps took Lanclreset-St. Ceorges and pressed thi'ough successixe lines of resistance to Bayonxillc, On the 2nd the First Chennery and to the nc^i'th of the Bois dc Bai'ricotirt, Corps joined in the mo\ement, which now became an impetuous onslaught that
could not be sta\-ed.

On

the

3ixl

acK'ance troops were hurried foi'waixl in pursuit,
artillei'y

some by motor

tiTicks, while the

pressed along the country roads close behind.

The

Fdrst Corps reached Authe and Chatillon-sur-Bar, the Fifth Coi'ps, Fosse and Kouart, and the Third C^orps, Halles, penetrating the enem\-'s lines to a depth of twelve miles. Our large caliber guns had adxanced and were skillfulb' brought into position to fire upon th.e important railroad lines at Montmcdy, Longu>'on and Conflans. Our Third Corps crossed the Meuse on the 5th, and the other corps, in full confidence that the clay was theirs, eagerly cleared the way of machine guns as the\' swept northward, maintaining complete co-ordination throughout. On the bth a division of the r^rst Corps reached a point on the Kleuse opposite Sedan, twenty-fi\'e miles from our line of departure, d^he strategical goal which was our highest hope was gained. We had cut the enem\''s main line of communications and nothing but surrender or an armistice could sa\'e his army from complete disaster.

-ns-

F'ifth Corps forced a ci'ossing ot the between Mouzon and [^ouilly, and acl\aneed to the Inor-MoLcon roaei w ith two battalions holding the high g|-ound northwest of Inoi". Farly on the morning of the lltli a detachment of the Fifth Corps erosseel the Meiise at Stenay and occupied that town in conJLinction with elements of the 1 hii'd Corps. Bridges were at once constructed at Pouilly and Stenay. 1 hese di\isions wei'e hea\ily engaged up to the moment of the armistice.
iX'leuse

On

the night ot Ncnemhci^ lUth the

against heavy

enemy

resistance

In

all,

foi'ty-four enem\- divisions

had been used against us

in the

MeuseId,

Argonne
3rd. 4rd,

battle,

[between September 2t)th and Noxx-mbei' bth we took
fi'ont.

050

prisoners and 4b8 ,guns on this
80th, 81st, 82nd, 80th, 00th

Our

divisions engaged were the

1st.

2nd,

nh, 2bth, 28th, 2Qth, 32nd, 33rd, 35th, 37th, 42nd, 77th, 78th, 70th, and 0|st. iVIany of oui' di\isions I'cmained in line for a length of time that I'equii'cd nei'\'es of steel, while othei'S were sent in again after only a few days of rest. The 1st. 5th, 32nLl, 42nd. 77th. 70th antl .SOth .Mthough some of the tlixisions were lighting Dixisions were in the line twice. their first battle, they soon became ec|ual to the best.

Operations Easi of

i\ie

Melse

On
hills

the three da>s pi'cecding No\embci'
forccLl the

10th the 4 bird Coi'ps and the 2nd

Colonial and 17th Fi'cnch C^oi'ps fought a diflicult struggle thi'ough the X Icuse

south of Stena\' and

enemy

into the plain.

Meanwhile m\' plans

for fuither use of the

Amciiean

forces contemplateel

an adxance between the

Xleusc ancl the Moselle
of Bi'iey.

in the Llii'ection of

same time the 2nd Anny should assume
Salins east of the Moselle,

Longw y b\' the 1st .'\mi\\ while at the the ollensi\c towaixl the I'ich ii'on fiebls

These operations weix to be followed by an ollensixe towai'd Chateauthus isolating Metz. Aecoixlingly. attacks on the /Vmeriean front had been or^lered, and that of the 2nd Army was in progi'ess on the morning of No\'ember 11th when instructions were receixed that hostilities o'clock a. m. should cease at
1

1

the line of the Amei4can sector from right to left began at thence across the Moselle to X'andieres and through the Wozvre to Bezon\"au.\ in the foothills of the Meuse, thence along the foothills and through the northern edge of the \Voe\re forests to the Meuse beyond Stenay, thence along

At

this

moment

f^ort-sur-Scille,

the west bank, crossing the ri\"er one kilometer northwest of Inor, thence along the eastern edge of the Bois de Hache, west to northern edge of Autre\ille, thence northwest to Moulins-Mouzon road, along that road to Beilefountaine Fei'me,

thence northwest crossing the Meuse: fi-om there along the west bank of the Meuse to a point near Sedan, w here we connected w ith the French.

I-

,/.

-i.;9-

^
Relations With the Allies
Co-operation

among

the Allies has at

all

times been most cordial.

A

far

greater eflort has been put forth by the allied armies and staffs to assist us than

could have been expected.
aid us in e\ery way. In the

The French government and army have always
towns and hamlets \\here\er our troops have been

stood ready to furnish us with supplies, equipment and transportation and to
stationed, or billeted, the French people have everywhere received
relatives

them more

as

and intimate friends than

as soldiers of a foreign

words are quite inadequate to express our gratitude.
ship betw een the

army. For these things There can be no doubt

that the relations growing out of our associations here assure a permanent friendt\\ o peoples. Although we have not been so intimately associated with the people of Great Britian, yet their troops and ours when thrown together have always warmly fraternized. The reception of those of our forces who have

who ha\e been stationed there has always been enthusiastic. Altogether it has been deeply impressed upon us that the ties of language and blood bring the British and ourselves together completely
passed through England and of those

and

inseparably.

Strength
Europe altogether, including a regiment and some sanitary army and the organizations at Archangel, also including those en route from the States, approximately 2,053,347 men. less our losses. Of this total there are in France ,338, 169 combatant troops. Forty divisions have
There are
in

uints with the Italian

1

arrived, of

which the infantry personnel

of 10 ha\'e

been used as replacements,
18th are:
Killed

leaving 30 divisions

now

in

France, organized into three armies of three corps each.
to

The
of

losses of the
3b, 154;

American army up

November

and died

wounds,

died of disease, 14,811;

deaths unclassified, 2,204; wounded,

179,625;

prisoners, 2,163;
1

missing 11,660.

44,000 prisoners and

,400 guns, howitzers

We have captured altogether about and trench mortars.

Commendation
The duties of the General Staff, as well as those of the army and corps staffs, ha\e been very ably performed. Especially is this true when we consider the new and difficult problems with which they have been confronted. This body of officers, both as individuals and as an organization, have, believe, no superiors
I

in professional abilit\', in efficiency, or in loyalty.

Nothing that we have in Fi'ance better ref"Iects the efficiency and devotion duty of Americans in genci'al than the Services of Supply, w-hose personnel is thoroughly imbued with a patriotic desire to do its full duty. They ha\"e at all
to

—140 —

^^

times fully appreciated their responsibility to the rest of the army, and the results

produced
of

ha\'e

been most gratifying.
is

Our Medical Corps
its

especially entitled to praise for the general effectiveness

work, both

attainments, and splendid
efforts,

and at the front. Embracing men of high professional women deNoteel to their calling and untiring in theii" this department has made a new record for medical and sanitary proficiency.
in hospitals

has more than met

The Quartermaster Depaitment has had a difficult and varied task, but it all demands that ha\e been made upon it. Its management
ha\-e

and its personnel commendation.

been exceptionally

efficient

and

deser\-e e\'ery possible

As to the more technical services, the able personnel of the Ordnance Department in France has spendidly fulfilled its functions both in procurement and in forwarding the immense ciuantities of ordnance required. The officers and men and the young women of the Signal Corps ha\'c perfonnecl their duties with a large conception of the problem and with a de\'oted and patriotic spirit to which the perfection of our communication daily testifies. While the Engineei" Corps has been refei'recl to in another part of this report is should be further stated that their work has recfuired large vision and high professional skill, and great credit is due their personnel for the high efliciency that they ha\ e constantly
maintained.

Our

a\iators ha\'e no equals in daring or in fighting ability, and ha\'e
ill

left

a

remain a bi'illiant page in the annals of While the Tank Corps has had limited oppoitunity its personnel our army. has responded gallantly on e\ery possible occasion and has shown courage of
record of courageous deeds that w
e\"cr

the highest order.

The Adjutant General's Department has been

directed with a systematic

thoroughness and excellence that surpasses any prexious work of its kind. The Inspector Genei'al's Department has risen to the highest standards, and throughout
of

The able personnel has ably assisted commandei's in the enforcement of discipline. the Judge Advocate General's Department has sohed. with judgment and
wisdom, the multitude of
difljcult legal

problems,

many

of

them in\ohing questions
do
justice to the
I

of great international importance.
It

would be impossible
all

in this brief

preliminary report to

personnel of

the dilfei'cnt branches of this organization, which

shall co\'er

in detail in a later report.

The Na\'y in Eui'opean waters has at all times most cordially aided the Army, and it is most gratifying to report that there has ne\-er before been such perfect co-operation betw'een these two branches of the ser\ice.
As
to

Americans

in

Europe not

in

the military

ser\"iccs,

it

is

the greatest

/

/

<

/

pleasure to say that, both

in olTicial and in pri\'ate life, they arc intensely patriotic and ha\e been in\ariabl>' sympathetic and helpful to the Army. Finally. pay th.e supreme tribute to our officers and soldiers of the line. When think of their heroism, their patience under hardship, their unflinching spirit of ollcnsi\e action, am filled with emotion which am unable to express. Their deeds arc immortal and the\- ba\e earned the eternal gratitude of our

and

loyal,

1

1

1

I

counti'v.
I

am, Mr.

Seci-etarA',

Very

respectfully.

JOHN

J.

PERSHING,

General, Car.mander in Chief, American Expeditionary Forces.

Regimental Society
Before we left Germany a meeting was held by representatives from each of the organizations in the regiment tor the purpose of ascertaining the desire of the personnel thereof in regard to the organization of a society, for the purpose of perpetuating the good-fellowship which has always existed in the regiment, and to provide a center and means whereby records may be kept of all members of the regiment, and to arrange periodic meetings or gatherings
to

renew old acquaintances.

It

was the unanimous decision

of the

committee

that such an organization should be established.

While at Gamp Pontanezen, Brest, France, on August 14, 1*518, another meeting was called for the purpose of establishing a regimental society. Each organization of the regiment was I'epi'cscnted a constitution and by-laws were presented and adopted by unanimous \'ote. The following oflicers were elected to hold office until January 1920:
;

1

,

Golonel Robert Davis, President.

Major John

P. Swift, Vice-President.

Gaptain Hai'ry E. Randel. Secretary and Treasurer. First Lieutenant Robert L. Schultz. Historian. Sergcc nt-Major Glement A, Bowie, Senior Member of the Executi\'e Gommittee. First Sergeant John R. Garney, Junior Member of the Executive Gommittee.

Headquarters
first

of the society to be at

Kansas Gity, Missouri, during the

year.

-142-

ROSTER
341st Field Artillery,

American Expeditionary Forces

OFFICERS
Rank
CVjIoncl

Nami:
Rol^ert Davis

Addrrss

New

"^'ork.

New

"I'ork,

148

West 42nJ
Street

Street

Lieutenant -Ct^loncl Lieutenant-Colonel Lieutenant-Colonel

'lelesphor C^ CJottse

L,ea\en\\cir!.h,

Kansas

Major Major Major Major Major Major
Captain Captain Captain Captain Captain Captain Captain Captain Captain Captain Captain Captain
C^aptain
(Captain

Herbert B. Hayden Alvin S, Perkins Herman Beukenia

Norfojl;, N'irginia, 71O

Wcstowcr
i

Harvey

A. f-'ancher

Rav C. Rutl-ierfnrJ Frederick J W'lHian
John P
S\\\\\

Washington, D, C, 00 The Ontariu Lea\'en\\orth. Kansas, M15 Pottowatomie Street WaJdingtMn, New 'I'ork
Kausa'- City
Missouri,
4i-ib

,

Warwick

[-i'

>i.i|e\'ard

Rny

1

j.

Wilson

()gden, Ltah, 220 27th Street

Ccorge L. l^anforth George FnRelhard
Crcable logan Carleton d. Kelsey

Roannke,
Iix'ansti

X'irginia, ?2ii
I

(Church A\eni.'e
100

m,

Mini us
S-,

Robert

W

lunel ion Cil

Kansas,

i

North Adams Street

RavmnnJ

P.

I

Mury\'ille, Miss(;Liri

biwlenc R ..'inagai Louis A MoJMnev
1

Minneapolis, Minnesot;i, i"ii Jackson St reet Denver, Colorado
Cincinnati,
^hio. No (^ "I he Berl. shire ("u8o LaPlala. Missouri, R [. D.. No. 2 Kansas Cit\', Missouri, 2101 l:ast 2rth Street
I

\';in

H, PLirker

lames W. PumH Harry E. Randel Morrison Shafroth Roscoe W. Tanner
I

Kansas City,

iVlissoun, 4111

I

larrjson Street

iMuarJ R. K. Tmm pkin.

Captain Captain Captain Captain Captain First Lieutenant
First Lieutenant

JMhn L \'anLle«rilL Merle R W.ill er Harry A. Llniun
I

I'rwin

M,

jone.s

Cuy

Wallick Ra> L. Burnell Francis R Bridie
P.

Denver, Colorado Fairmont, Minnesota Den\er, Colorado, 122? Sherman Street Washington, D. C, b!4 Ninth Street New ^<-rk. New York, 024 West Fmd Avenue Colorado Springs, Colorado Colon\ Kansas Denver, ColoraJo
.

KansLis

Cit>-,

Missouri, 1227 Benton Bi>LiIe\"ard

Charles

li.

liurgenei

LoN'cland, Colorado
Sc. Louis,

Lieutenant Lieutenant First Lieutenant
Fir?.t
("irst

na\id N. Burruss
Walter
I

Missouri, 14 North Kings High\\a\'
Illinois
1

J.

Baylcss
Case>'

Mullevlown,

hnmas W.

First Lietitenant
r-"irst

(ilenn H. Chafee

Lieutenant

Wm.

(Chaplain
r-"ir\t

Da\is. Charles D. FIdridgc

M

Lieutenant

James

A

.[-"itzgerakl

Wilmette, Illinois, 200 Greenwood A\enue Cripple Creek, Colorado Monte Vista, Colorado Kansas Cit\,', Kansas, 4^b Greeley A\"enue Dell Rapids, South Dakota, R. V. D. No. 3

C^haplain

Shannon A,

Criflnth

Mounc
Kansas

Pleasant, Penns>'l\'ania

Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant l^r-st Lieutenant
["irst
["irst

Archie C. Ciottenber Richard H. Keith
Phillip C.

Minneapolis, Minnesota
Cit^,', K'lissouri, Woodlea Hotel Den\cr, Colorado. ^th Street 7 East Interlaken. Scneea Ciiiinty, New ^ <:irk Neosho. Missouri, 217 La> fayette Street
1 1
1

Kemp

1

James

F. Kellog-

Lieutenant

(^Isar R. l-ane

OFFICERS

(Ci.ntinued)

ENLISTED
Rank
Private
Private Private First Class

N/IEN
Home Address

Name
William H. Ahcrnathy Hip<.)lito Acosca Walter I. Adams Garland Adkins Paul Affortunato Powell Ahrendt Claude Akers
Nicolo Albarella Harry Albcrtsen Frank Alexander

Organization

Private Private Private Private Private

Private Private
Private Sergeant Reg'tl Sergeant-Maji

D. Allen Lawrence H. Allen
t-Iarold

Perryville, Missouri Battery B Old Mexico Battery D Den\-cr, Colorado Battery C Branchland, West Virginie Battery A Farmington. Connecticut Battery C Headciuarcers Co. Akron, Oh Pueblo, Colorado Battery C Bridgeport, Connecticut Battery A .Amsworth, Nebraska Battery B Supply Company Syracuse, Nebraska Headquarters Co. Toledo, Ohio Alexander, Louisiana Battery F

Horseshoer

Ben K. Allensworth Orville AHhands
R<,ss E. Allison

Mechanic
Private First Class Private
Private

Roy H,
Felix

Allison

AlmaRuer
Aloia

Amel

Private
Private
Corpcjral

Michele Altomari Mike Altomore George Alvcy
Ira yXlvin

Private Private First Class Pri\ate Fir^^t Class
Pri\atc

Fred

Amen

Headquarters Co. Boone, Colorado Headquarters Co. No .-ecord Montrose, Colorado Battery F Estelene, Colorado Battery D Old Mexico Battery E New York, New York Battery C West Albany, New ^\ Battery C No record Battery A Caruthersville. Mis,souri Battery B Detroit, Michigan Battery A Sterling. Colorado Battery A
Headquarters Co. Durango, C:<)lorado Brooklyn. New York Battery C Cope, Colorado Battery A Viroqua, Wisconsin Battery A Freeman, Missouri Battery A Peterson, Minnesota Battery A
Battery

:

birst

A\enue

Albert Frwin Amos y\ndcrs Anderson
All-'crt

Private Fir^t Class Private Private First Class

Anderson

Andrew Anderson
Charles R. Anderson Clarence Anderson

Private
Private
Co<
>k

Private First Class Private
Private FirbL Class Corpural Private
Pri\'ate

Conrad Anderson David J. Anderson Joseph Anderson Osear Anderson Ray E. Anderson Richard R. Anderson Samuel B, Anderson
Pasqualc Angeloro Herbert J. Angove

E

Salem, South Dakota

Private
Private Pri\atc Private

Private
Private Private First Class Private Pri\ate

Benjamin Antman John Apodaca Sherman S. Applegate Braulio Aragon Juan de Jesus Aragon
Louis L. Arbogast

Headquarters Co. Mildred, Ci.ilorado Meeker, Colorado Battery D Camp Upton, New York Battei-y C York, Nebraska Battery E Manhattan, Kansas Battery B Supply Company East St, Louis, Illinois Brooklyn, New ^'ork, 75 Withers Street Battery A Supply Company Sioux City, Iowa New York, New York, 47 West uth St. Battery C Old Alburquerque, New Mexico Battery D Supply Company Peru, Nebraska
i

Maynard
Sidney
J.

P. Armstrong Solomon Arnold

Battery C Battery B Battery B Battery F Battery C
Battery A Battery A Battery C Battery C Headquarters Battery Battery Battery Battery

San

jose.

New Mexico

Chama. Colorado Miller, South Dakota Fort Morgan, Colorado Mound City, South Dakota

Sergeant Private First Class
Pri\*ate

Artt

Henry Wm. Artz
Bozhos Asadorian
Ernest F. Ashcraft John Atchison

Med- Detachmt Austin, Colorado Mina, South Dakota
Whitenswille, Massachusetts Fairmont, West Virginia Brooklyn. New York, 710 Fifth

Private

Avenue
Street

Private Private Private

Private
Pri\'ate

Harry Atwood Herman Augustad Gudmund Aukland John I. Aurahan
Albert V. Austermillcr

Co North Adams,

Mass., 131 E.

Mam

D
A C
E

Madison, South Dakota Maltby, South Dakota

White

Plains.

New York

Private

Napoleon, Ohio, 210 Yaeger Street

/

/
—145—

/-

-

FNLISTFD
Rank
Private
Private Private Private
F^rivate

MFN
Battery Battery
Battery

(Continued)
I

Namk
Miinuel Aza

Or( .anizaiion

FjviE Add:*.es3

Fcroy W. Azer
I-rcJ
P;)ul
).

F A
Vl

Iruapuato, Cjuanajuato. Mexico
IF'ler, Pennsyl\-ania

Bachmtinn
i-iackus
I".

PuelMo, C:olorado
S. 21st Street

Fkichus
F^aJer

Ralph
F'rank
F'lrsC

Supply Compan\ Alamosa, Colorado Omaha, Nebraska. 4x10 Battery A
Battery A Battery B Battery \' Battery A Battery B Battery F' Battery D Battery C^ Battery A Battery \^

Private

Private Private Private Private

Class

F>nest R. F^aiLy

Corporal Private Private Private Private Private

John Bailey Arthur V Bailor JohnN. Baker t^clward F. Baldwin John F. Bales
.

Brooklyn, New ^'ork, i6 Park Place Paulding, Missouri Bernie, Missouri
Haswell, C()lorado

North

Platte,

Nebraska

F-Vank

J.

Balint
A. EVillard

Howard

Mechanic
Private Private Mu'^ician First Clas' Private
Pri\ate
T^ir^t

Henr>' Ci Bane^ William M. Barkley Barry A- Barnes Cjcorge J. Barnes luines W, Barnes lames Wm. F^iirnett

Nucla, Colorado Tabernash, Colorado New York, New York, 406 F. 04th Street Fort Morgan, Colorado l^ittleton. Colorado Flattery [Mount Union, Pennsylvania Supply CjiTnpany Denver, Colorado, Cleveland Place Battery D Staten Island, N, Y., 4^^ Riehmont "fer.
Battery

A

["armtngton,

New Mexico
zS

Ivan

}

I

Barrett
I

Co Popular Bluff, Missouri Headguarlers Co Delta, Ohio Route No.
Headciuarters

Class

SerpeanC Private Private
Cf^irporal

Pri\ate I^nvate
Private Private First Class Private Private Private
[-"irst

Barn.w William Paul T. Barrows Sighjorn C Barstad Paul Bartlett Harry L'-, Barton George S, Bartow
l-.mil

Battery Battery Battery

D
B
Fl
>.

Fraser, C-olorado

Denver, Colorado,

31,121

W. tind Avenue

Magnrilia, Minne^nta

Headquarters Ci Durango, Colorado Headquarters Co. Wray, Colorado
Battery A Battery C Battery D Battery F Battery B Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery
St, Ltjuis, Missouri Turton, South Dakota

C-lass

C. Baseler

Rush Bass
Demcti-Ms

Virginia,

Minnesota

L

Bassil

New

Louis Win. Base
Neville Batt

York, N. Y,, 118 Fast ^Gth Street Madison, Wisconsin

Supply Sergeant
Private First Class HorsesFiocr Private Private

William liauman Herbert Ci. BaumhoFi

Med. Detachmt Red Stone, Colorado D Madison, South Dakota

C
B

St. Louis. Missouri, 3501

Victor Street

Scy B.

F-iayless
J.
I

Knob

Lick. Missouri

Beach Beauchesne Arleacher Beaver

James

C

Cottjpaxi, Colorado

Alfred

Corporal

I'rank [^eHr,ut

B A

Stilwell.

Wagoner
Private

Henry

A. Becci:ird

Supply Company

Cjcorge F3cchatoren

D

Rhode NIand (Oklahoma Bru-h, Colorado Nebraska C~ity, Nebraska New 'lork City
Artie Center,

Wagoner Cook
Mechanic
Private
f^nvate
F^'irst

Class

F'lrst

Class

William Beck L..uis H Becker CjCorge Beechcr Fdward F. Beezley Joseph Bclzky
Farl L. Belson

Private f^rsi Class Private Private Private Private

Harry I-. Bender Barton Bennett Charles L. Benson Fdward Hall Benson
Alexander Bergcr William Berger Jacob Berman Fouis P, Bernhardt Kalph Ber-nstein

Lincoln. Nebraska Supply Company Talmage, Missouri Battery B Pueblo, Colorado Battery V> Somerset. Colorado Battery C Fh, Nebraska Battery F^ Flkion, South Dakota Battery D New ^'ork City, New ^'ork

Med, D'jtachm't

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

F^

St- Augustine, I'lorida
St. F^ouis,

B

Missouri,

iSis St. Fouis

Avenue

A
13
V.

Private

Supply Company

Sergeant Private Private Private

Aknin, t>hio Lawrence, New "lork Cripple Creek, Dolorado

New

^'ork,

New

^'ork, 83 Fivington St,

A

Sterling,

Colorado
^".,
i

D

New

^ork, N.

12

Fast

i

ibth Street

-146-

//

ENLJST££D N-ILN
F^A^^H:

(CMntinucJ)

Na,\(E

f'R(.ANlIATH")N

Home Address
r^enver, C^ok^raelo
[-Vjrt

Private

[•\rsx

Class

Cnrporal Private Private Eirst Class Private CMrporal

juJ-nn T, Bertrand Benjamin L. Bcvan John A. Beyer

Med. Detachm'c
Battery E Battery E Battery E Battery D Battery E Battery F Battery D Battery E Battery C Battery C Battery A Battery B Headquarters Co. Battery A Battery C Vetenary Detm'i Battery C Battery D Battery E
Flattery

Colhns, Colorado Brooklyn, New York, 76 Nforth Oxford St,

Edward
Lnuis
Carl
j.
|.

Biel

John Bielcniewicz
Bie\er

South Dakota Hamburg, New "Vork
Suttly,

Salem, South Dakota
State Center, Iowa
Crof)kston, Minnesota

Pnvare
Private Private

Raymond Billman
Bjelland

Corporal

Martin E Bjork Chester C. Black
Albert Blackford Clayton Blackford John H. Blaney Win, D. Blai-sdell Karl A. Blankenhurc Pirl E, Blaylock Paul J. Bleakley Charles M. Blumenthal Robert G. C. Boa Paul Boho

South Minneapolis, Mmn., 4014 4ind Ave.
N4orley, Missouri

Hnrseshoer
Private Private
Pri\'atc
F^irst

F^oward, Colorado

Class

No record Falcon, C^olorado
Oellwcin, Iowa

Corporal
Private

Earner
Private
C:..rporal

Albany, Minnesota Ester. Missouri Ad\ance, Missiiun
r^ori Sloeum. New ^'o^k Chicago, Illinois

Private Private

Carl
E-"irst

J.
I

Boehler
I.

A

Private Private
Private
Private Private

bdmer
Class

{"r^ink S.

Bohn Bohn

Headquarters Co
Battery
(battery

Owings. South Carriluia Conroe. Texas Granei Junction, Colorado
kyons, Col..H-ado Altenhurg, Missouri
Achol, Massachusetts

D
B

Martin R. E P.i.hnenkamp Joseph i: Bol^
Ernest hi Boling John P.
Phillip
.

Battery
liattery Batter>-

C
E

Private Eirst Class Private

Bomeke
Borstner Borsiner

B

FVmm
A

Battery

B

Fort Morgan, Colorado Sedgwick, Colorado Crowley, Louisiana

Wagoner
Private Eirst Class Private Private Elr:^t Class

Joseph

Victor J
j,>|Tn Id.

Supph' CompanN' Aspen. CoUiradi.i Supply Company /\spen, Colorado

Saddler Private First Class Private First Class
f^rivate

Eouis Bm-ir Bornhoft George L Boss

f^nvate C:ook
Rcgt'l Sergeant-Ma jor
Pii\"ate First Class

John Bostnm John H, Bourguignon Andre Bovillion Jacob A, Bowar
Jankin

A No record E r-"ort Mr-rgan. CoK.>rado Supply Company Juleshurg. Colorado Batter>' F Delta, Colorado
Battery Battery

Battery
Batter>

C
A

C

B->\\cn

Clement A, Bowie Luther M. Bowles
[Ronald \V
Farl S

Corporal Private Sergeant Corporal Private
I^ri\ate
r-'irsC

Bowman

l^oyd

Class
Cla.ss

Private First Class

Musician Ihird
F^rivate

Private First Class
F^rivate F^rst Class

Private

Private Private Private Private First Clas^

John J. tioyd George I,. Bo\ le Atigust 1'^ Bo\ sen John L. Bradte>Fdoyd E. Bradle\ Frederick L. Bradshaw James I- Brady George W. Brady Joseph P, Brady Louis H. Brady Thomas S. Brady William G. Brady Frank Branagan Cieorge E. Brandt
.

Battery C Battery C Pueblo, Colorado, Headeiuartcrs Co Eckert, Colorado Headquarters Co. Hilltop. Colorado Battery F Carbondale, Colorado Battery A F4arlan, Indiana Battery A St. [^aul, Minnesota Batter^' D Central City, Colorado

New York, New York Crowley, Louisiana Madison, Wisconsin

Headquarters Co. Ottowa. Ohio
BaCter\-

E

Flat Ri\'er, Missouri

Battery F Conde, South Dakota Headquarters Co. Ignacio. C'.ilorado Battery C Highmore, South Dakota Battery C Ne\\' York City. New York Battery C Highmore, South Dakota Supply Company Leadvillc, Colorado Battery A New York, New ^'ork, 200 E. 04th Street Supply Compan\' LcadN-ille. Colorado
Batter\'

C

New

^"ork,

New

"^"ork,

10 \

andam

Street

Sergeant

Phillip J

Braunstein

SuppK' Compan\ Unadilla. Nebraska Battery A Aberdeen, South Dakota

m
147-

^"-o^

,/

''O

ENLISTl£D

MEN
Battery Battery Battery
Battery Battery

(ConLinucd;

Rank
Private

N'AMIf
l,aurcnt lireaux
r.rnest Bredahl Otto Brewcn Claude R. Brewer David A. Brewer Fdgel N. Brewer Hiiward W. Brian John H. Brierly Benjamin E. Bright Peter J. Brinsky

ORf.ANIZA'lION

A
B F

Private
Private First Class Private
Private

Home Addrhss Camp Nicholls, Louisiana No record
Doe Run, Missouri
Kansas City. Missouri Sterling. Colorado

D
A

Private

Mess Sergeant
Private
I^ri\-ate

Private Corporal Private Corporal Private Private Corporal Sergeant Private First Sergeant Private Private
Pri\'ate

John L. Briscoe Harold D. Brock Orland R. Brocker
Charles A. Brockway Harvey C- Bronimcr John l^ Bront
Bailey F, Brooks Benjamin A. Brooks

Supply Company Aspen, Colorado Divide, Colorado Battery D Gorham, Colorado Battery D LaCrosse, Wisconsin Battery E Supply Company Leadville, Colorado Headquarters Co. Castle Rock. Colorado Med. Detachm't Grand Rapids, Michigan Walden, Colorado Eiattery E Cedaredge, Colorado Battery F Orwigsburg. Penn,, 211 N. Battery B lleadquarters Co, Pueblo, Colorado Caruthersville. Missouri Battery B
Battery B Battery C Battery F Battery C Battery A Battery B Battery D Supply Cnmpany Battery C Battery F
Shattuck,
Rifle,

Wayne

Street

Oklahoma

William J. Brnokshire John H. Brosius Alexander S. Brown
,'\rrhur
l_.

Pueblo, Colorado

Colorado
City. N,
^'.,

New York

236 gth Avenue

Brown

Shre\'eport. Louisiana

Private Private Private Private Fir
t

Fred L P.rM\vn John T. Bn.wn Fawrencc O. Brown
Class

LeClaire, Iowa

Chicago, Illinois Lake Preston, South Dakota
tirooklyn,

Leon

J.

Brown

New York

"irst Class Private Fir Private

Michael Brown Oscar E. Brown

Supply Company
Battery E Battery F Supply Company Battery B Battery E Battery B Battery C Battery D Battery F^ Battery E Headquarters Co. Battery F Headquarters Co. Battery C
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Baltery Battery Battery Battery Battery

Montrose. Colorado Bethany, Missouri

Corporal Sergeant

Ralph O. Brown
Willis A. Willis

Wagoner
Private
Fii "ir'^C

Brown O Brown

Steamboat Springs, CoUjrado Olathe, Colorado Lake Preston, South Dakota
Waterloo.

Class

Ernest E. Brownell

New

'lork

irst Class Private Fii "'irst Class Private Fir

Henry C- Bruce
Joseph Bruckner Sidney J. Brule David N. Brundy Guy Bruner Arthur Brunyee Roy W. Brus Floy t--. Bryant Harold I;. Bryant
1
.

Corporal Sergeant Private Corporal Private

Ordway, Colorado McGregor, Iowa Carpenter, South Dakota Cornish, Colorado Delta, Colorado Laughton, England Hoboken, New Jersey
Olathe, Colorado

Mechanic
Musician Second Cla
Sergeant

Grand Junction, Colorado
Puchio, Colorado Dalton, Nebraska Baragoo, Wisconsin Seanth, Missouri Conway, Missouri

John

L.

Buchanan

Corporal Corpora! Private Private First Class

Roy O, Buchanan Roy Bump Clarence W. Burcham
Joseph O. Burchfield

A

D
C

D
k-

Mechanic
Private

Guy

C.

Burgman

Private
I^nvate Private
f-'i

Erwin M. Burkhead Robert H. Burns
l-:dward Burreil
L

A

C
B B E

Clas

Sergeant Private Private
Private

lames B. Liurr^ws (,je<jrge Burt Albert L. Buskirk Henry C. Butt Harry B. Buttjer

Steamboat Springs, Colorado Cope, Colorado Marion, Iowa Maiden, Missouri Pueblo. Colorado l^ort Morgan, Colorado
Jackson, Michigan

Private Private

f^i

[

Class

John Buych Ray Buzzard

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

C
A E
B
I-'

Grand
Cjalt.

Island,

Nebraska

Iowa

Vir Pazi, Serbia Cedaredge, Colorado

-7
:^. .r^'

EINLISTHD MllN

(CnntinuL-d)

Rank
PrivaLe Private Private

Name
Byers 1 homas J, Byrnes Juhn V. Byrun
J.

Organization
Battery Battery Battery

Walter

D
E
F

Home Address New York New York. New York,
Buffalo,

417 West 35th St

Philadelphia, Penns%'lvania

Saddler Corporal

Clifford F. Caldwell Clifford

E

Cailen

Band Sergeant
Private
F'ir.st

John D. Cameron

C'lass

Roy
Chas

E.

Camp
P. (Campbell

Cor;-X)ral

Alonzo

Saddler Private Private Private Private Private
Private

C,

Campbell
.

Battery E Sunbeam, Colorado Battery A Fort Morgan. Colorado Headquarters Co. Denver, Colorado Vetinary Det m't Waterloo. Iowa Battery C Caruthersville. Missouri Louvieres, Colorado Battery B

I'lrst

Class

Emer\' C. Campbell Walter H. Campbell I.iberato N. Candelaria
C^.harles F-

Med. Detachm't
Battery Battery Battery

Purcell,

Oklahoma

Canner

James
Floyd
C.fivX \

WaRoner
C^.orporal

O Cantrell Wm. Caneo
\.

Corporal Private Wag<iner Color Sergeant

Carlberg Carlson Conrad Carlson
Charles

L

Cidtthard C. Carlson

Johannes Carlson
r-"loyd

Farmington, New Mexico Old Albuquerque, New Mexico D Brooklyn, N. 'l' ir Middagh Street F-" Leon. Iowa Eiattery D Supply Ci'impany Alamosa. Colorado Fivansuin, lltinois Battery E Doland. South Dakota Battery C X'ictor, Colorado Battery Fiaton, Colorado Battery B Supply Company Leadville, Colorado

A

,

f-""

C. Chambers

IleadeiuarLers C^o Swallows. C'olorado

Wagoner
Private First Class
F-'irsl

Sergeant

f^rivate

Corporal
Private

George Wm. Cannon Gus Carnes John R. Carney Ira Lee Carpenter Wm. Iiarl Carpenter
Daniel Carrico

Supply
Battery

Company DeSmet, South Dakota

I^ueblo, Colorado B Supply Company Alamosa, (.olorado Sapinero, Colorado Battery D Denver, Colorado Battery B

Battery
Battery Battery

(-

St

Louis,

Mo

,

2414 N. Spring A\'enue

Wagoner
Private Private
I-"irst

John
Class
Ira

C:arroll

Supply Company Leadville, C-olorado
Larson
F>

f-larvey

L

(

Private

Horseshoer
Private

N. Carter Harvey L. Carver Boyde Casey

A

Fiarks, Missouri Pleasant Hill, Missouri

Battery Battery
liattery

D
A

Meeker. Colorado Brush, Colorado

Luke

J.

Case\'

Cook
Private Private Sergeant

Sergeant

Musician

'I'hird Clu;

Clayton W, Casner Robert E- Casselman Frank A. Catanaeh Theopolis G, Caudel James A, Cavanaugii William J. Center
("lauLle T.

Batter\
Batter\' Flattery
I

A A

New
iM.rt

"^'ork.

New

^'ork

Vied Detachin't

C
A

Private F'""irst Class Corporal Corporal
Private-

Chambers

Roy

F.

Chapman

Co Co Headquarters Co Headc|uarters Co
leadi.|uarLers
\

Icaekiuarters

Morgan, Colorado Douglas, Nebraska Santa Fe, New Mexico Graylin, Colorado Grand Junction, Colorado Greeley, Colorado Wra\', Colorado
Oklarado, Cx)lorado

Lawrence
Patrick

R Chase

Jose T. Cha\'ez

HeadL|uarters Cx^ Tiffeny, Colorado. Park View, New- Mexico Battery C.

Corporal Sergeant
Private I'^rst Class Sergeant Private Sergeant Pri\ate Private Supply Sergeant Private First Class

Lowell

J.

Chavez Shawncr

John E. Chelberg James S. Chew

FaysC. Chmn
Alfred \'I Chnstensen John I,. Christcnsen dheodore H Christenscr Arthur J. ("hris[ianson Cecil Church John P. Clanc^
i-red A.

Battery A Battery C Battery E Battery F Med. Detachm'l:

Dawson,
Paris,

New Mexico

Battery Battery
Batter\'

A

France Loveland, Colorado Muola. Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Willard. Colorado
Chicago,
KFadistin.
Illinois

C

E SuppU' Company
Battery Battery
Battery
F^

Wisconsin

Bancroft, South Dakota

Harrisburg, Illinois

Private

D
F

Lima, Ohio

Private

Clark

Brookhn, N. W. 3107 Richmond Hill

Ciiichester A\'enue,

//

./

ENLISTI'D K4EN

(OintinucJ)

Rank

ENLISTED MEN
F^ANK
Crirporal

(Coiuinued)

Naml: Davis Carl A. Davis Elmer Davis Herhert Davisson
Alfred !

Organization

Home Address
I

Private Private Private Private Private First Class

Howard

F,

Dean

Pn\atc
Musieian Third Class
Pri\-atc

Wafinncr
Private Private

Rohcrt E. Decker Ulner R. Dees Harry DeFoc iNorman j. Deisz John Denisrin Edward Dennis
Charles E. Derhy Joseph E Derr

Private

Mess Sergeant Chief Mechanic
Corporal Private First Class
Pri\'ate First Class

Private First Class

Horseshoer
Private First Class Private Private First Class

George DeTalente George W. Dcvine John r:)ewitt Don DeWitte George F. Dihhie Hcnr>' Dickason Arthur Dickens Thurman Dickerson Lester M, Dickson

M

Paonia, Colorado Battery F Battery E Joplin, Missouri, Furnace Street II 'l"..>ledo, Ohio Battery F Toledo, Ohio Battery D Battery E f-linton, luNva Battery F Paonia, Colorado Battery F Ardmore, Oklahoma Headquarters Co. Pagosa Springs, Colorado Battery E Akron City, Ohio Supply Company Doland, South Dakota Battery E Manzan(.)la, Colorado Battery E Tarr\'all, Colorado Battery E Boulder. Colorado Battery E Leadville, Colorado Pueblo. Colorado Battery B Battcr>' B Twin Falls. Idaho Highmorc, South Dakota Battery C Rich Hill, Missouri Battery E Campo, Colorado Battery D

Bugler Curpnral Private Mess Sergeant Private
Pri\'ate

Stehastian Diehl Harrv J. Dillon

Charles
Jrise|-ih

H

f^iinning

[^iptilcfmo

Jack C Dister Harrv Dix
Carl

M M L3ixon
\V.
I-:

Corporal
Pri\;jtc First Class

FloNd

Dixon

Private Pri\ate First C^lass Private First Class Pri\atc

Mark Di.ckendorf Romeo L L:)oe
John
[;

Doicl

Rov

T, Doiei

Orrin C. Dolan

Private

Corporal
Pri\'ate Pri\-ate Thirst Class

Joseph R. Dole Claude E. Dollar
Carl Donaldson

No record Battery C (^rdwa\'. C^oloradi) Battery B Headquarters Co. 'I'uma, Colorado Telluride, Colorado Battery D Headquarters Co. Wentworth, Colorado McCollin. Co|,,rado Battery A Wilmette, Illinois Battery E \'iett>r, Colorado Battery F Headquarters Co. Jonesburg, Missouri Battery A Hilrose. Colorado Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Miller, South Dakota Battery B Battery E No rea^rd Cortez, Colorado Battery B Cortez, Colorado Battery B Fort Collins, Colorado Battery li Battery A Akron, Colorado
Battery

D

Lafa\ette,

("J

ilorado

James

W

.

Donalds(-in

Corporal

Conk
Pri\'ate

Pri\ate Private

Michael J. Bernard L Claude M. Charles

D.pnoghLie

Doran
Dorrell

M

Dort

Albert ^^

Drda

Headquarters Co Wra>', Colorado Headc]uartcrs Co Wray, Colorado Battery D Chicago, Illinois Battery D Kansas Cit>', Missouri Battery F Rifle, Colorado Battery C Seneca, Kansas Battery E Edwardsville, Illinois
Headeiuartcrs
flattery

Musician Third Class
Private Private Private First Class

Lekmd

L.

Doud

Co

Willard, lc>wa

AKie C:. Douglas James LI Dow ney
John
!:

Doyle
[^raeger

Pnxate
Private Private

Herman W.

Sherman O Dnskell Edward M. l])ruessel
John
\V, DruesscI
.

Private Sergeant Sergeant Private
Private First Class Corporal

Desloge, Missouri Battery Desloge, K'lissouri Battery Clear Lake. South Dakota Battery F Waupaca. Wisconsin Headquarters Co. Wanseon. ^hio Battery li Edwards\'ille, lllimiis Battery E Edwardsville, llhnois
(

A B A

Duna\ent Dunhar Jesse L. Duncan Walter D. Dunivan William E Dunixan
Cecil C.

Batter>-

.-\

Clc\'eland. Mississippi

Leo

E.

Headeiuartei's Co. Montrose, Colorado

Headquarters Co. Rogcrsville. Missouri Battery F Campo, Colorado Battery F Campo, Colorado

-n"i-

<i

ENLIS'I

ED MEN
Battery

fContinued}

Rank
Saddler Band Corporal Srable Sergeant Sergeant Bugler Private First Class
Private Private Private Private First Class First Sergeant
Stable Sergeant Private

Nami;

Organization
'

Howe Address
Pubelo, C'>lorado

Dunlap Harold R. Durand
I-:arl

\\

C

William K. Duranow William E. Duskey Jabez Dyer

Headquarters Co. Littleton, Colorado Battery E Fort Collins, Colorado Headquarters Co Loveland, Colorado Gold Hill, Colorado Battery D
Battery E Battery Battery E Battery B Battery F Battery D Battery Headquarters
F-"
F-""

Roy F Fasley
Everhard Donald H Fbcrsol I->ank K, Fbina Charles H. Eby Walter H. Echols Thomas C Edminster Chas. S Edwards
f'lyde

Tulsa,

Herrick, South

Oklahoma Dakota

Jacksonville, Florida

Pueblo, Colorado
Victor, Colorado

Greenville, Sfiuth Carolina

Arboles, Colorado

Corporal Corporal Corporal Private First Class Corporal Private
Corp<jral

Co

Liberty, Missouri
Tf^jronto,

Thomas Eduards Itmil J. Eggum
John H. Ehrich Harry O. Eiken Philip H. Eitel Joseph O. Eken
I'ranklin

Private

L

Ellurhrock

Mechanic
Private

Corporal
Corpf)ral

Fred C. Ellgen Ray R. Elliott Charles F. Ellis

John A
f-

Ellis
J.

Private First Clas^. Private First Clas^

rancis

[illisun

Private

Wagoner
Corporal Private Private Private First Class Private

Paul V. Elmer Carl F. Elsing Thad Ely F->ed [Ingherg

HiUsboro, Wisconsin B Headquarters Co Kirksville, Missouri Volga, Colorado Battery D Battery C Sac City, Iowa Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Headquarters Co Birmingham, Alabama Battery C Platteville, Colorado Battery B St. Marys, Missouri Westbury, Long Island, N. Y.. Post .Ave Battery F Nucla, Coloradcj Battery F^
Battery

Battery Battery Battery Battery

B A
F

Ohio South Dakota Rrjckham. South Dakoia
Niles.

A

Mansfield, S<>uth

Dakota

Supply Company Boulder, Colorado
Bucklin, Missouri Battery C Ovid, Colorado Battery A Headquarters Co. Olathe, Kansas Pueblo, Colorado Battery D Battery B Perryville, Missouri Supply Company Santa Monica, Caiifrirnia Battery C Micanite, Colorado

Wagoner
Private First Class
Private First Class Private Private
Private First Class

Engelker Ed. English [ritz Erickson Anton B. Ernst Paul J, Eschardies Harold S, Eskilson Wendell R. Esmfjnd Claude W. Evans

John

C

Med. Detachm't Harvey,

Illinois

McKinley Evans
1

Corpora

Cfirporal

Paul Even Peter M. Evenson Walter O. Ewalt

Wm

Battery F Joy Coy, Colorado Battery B Colorado Springs. Colorado Battery C^ Gocxipasture, Cok.)rado Headquarters Co. Virgil, South Dakota Headquarters Co. Hanna City, Illinois

Wagon lt
Private
C'jrpi^ral

Floyde Fagt;
Earl R. Fnir
R.^hcrt R. E-airhanks

Supply Cr>mpany
Battery

C^ak,

Nebraska

C

Toledo, Ohio

Private
C'jok

Private

Robert Falkjn J. Floyd Farmer Fred T, Earner
Binford Farrar

Private First Class Private First Class Private First Class

Oscar R. Farrcll
Carlin E. [-"ehrcnbakcr

Corporal Private
Private Mess Sergeant
First Sergeant

William A. I-ellrws
Orvil F-ikcl

Battery Ei Battery y\ Battery F Battery C Battery A Battery F Headquarters Co. Supply Company Battery
F-""

Cherokee, Oklahuma
Jersey City, Nev.- Jersey' Atchee, Colorado

Sedan, Kansas Boulder, Colorado
Strafford, Missf)uri

Murphysboro,
Toledo, Oh)..

Iliinitis

Crcede, Colorado

Samuel
Albert

W nney W f-isher
I
'
i

F

leadLjuarters Co. Moberly, Missouri

Supply Ciompany Leadville. Col(»rado
L^atterv

LiartMn L, Fisher

D

B(;ulder, Cf)lorado

-152—

LINLIS'FED

MBN
Battery Battery

(Ojntinued)

Rank
Private Private
Private
F-"ir^t

Name
Class

Orcantzation
f'

Home Address
Delta, Colorado

Leander C Fishtr Leo E- Fisher William H. Flaek

C

Private FHrst Cla^:? Private Private Private
Private

Edward

J. Flaherty Louis Flasehe Charles E, Flax Jfjscph J, F'leddcrmann

Wm,

Supply Company Supply Company Battery A Battery B
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

Nepesta, Colorado Auburn. Nebraska Leadville, Colorado DeLieque, Colorado F^ondon, England

Sylvester Fleeman
Jo-^eph S F-"leming John Flowers Fred Fluegel

F F

New

Orleans, Louisiana

Sergeant
Private Private Private
[-"irst

A C
FC

Deer Trail, Colorado Denver, Colorad*.)
Steele, Missouri

Class

Private First Class Corporal Corporal Musician Third Class Private Sergeant Private Private Color Sergeant Private Sergeant Stable Surgeant Private F^rivate First Class
Corpfjral

Timothy \i Foley Roy L. Follett Donald C F""oote James H ["orl-ies
Jay E. Forbes F.isje B, Foree Ferdinand W, F'osmo

D
U.

Salem. South Dakota Kansas City, Missouri
I~ox Park,
F'A'anston,

Wyoming
W\.m^ing

D D
A

Chicago,

Illinois

Headc|uarters Co,

Med. Dctachm't
E^atter\' (I

llilT, Colorado Akron, Colorado Martell, Wisconsin

James C Arch Fox
CVvillc

Friuler

Lancaster, \1issouri
Beattyville,

F

Frakes

Harry Francis Frank P F-'ranenne
Ernest
Ellis E.

M

F"->anklin

F_eroy Free

Battery F-^ Heade|uarters Battery D Battery li Battery A Battery IC Battery
Eiattery
C'
I:
("

Kentucky

Co

Colnrado Herculancum, Missnuri Montrose, C!!olorado Seward, Nebraska
Grecle>',

Many.

F-ouisiana

Freeman

F^eadl.|uarters Co, Rogersville, Missouri

John R. F'reeman
Peter P. Fries

Pueblo, Colorado

Private Private First Class Corporal

West Bend, Wisconsin
DelNorte. Colorado Spearf'ish. South Dakota
Chicago,
Illinois,
S.
I

James R
Russell

F'uller

Battery

T

Fiilmer

Fiattcr\' C,

Private

F^^rcd

1

Cahr

Flattery

1^

Faniline

Ave

Wagoner Wagoner
Private
Private
f-'irst

John Gaines
Class

Charles E. Gallagher Fcto Gallegos

William O. Caller
Get.).

Mechanic Regt'i Supply Sergeant
Private Private First Class Private F-^ir^l Class

F.

Carey

Orla A,
Marr>'

Gams
Cjarr\'

B
S-

Private
Private
F-'irst

Class

Pri\ate
Pri\'ate

Corporal

Mechanic
Private Private
f-'irst

Class

Ciarcman E\'an Geiger John A. Cetz William Gibb Bryant C Gibson William T. Gibson John W- Cioodman John J C^\\ F->ank S, Gilmore Rector Gilmore
eiaii L.

Glenn

SuppK' Ciompan^' Bror.kforc, Illinois Supply Cfimpan\' Leadville. Colorado Battery F^ Pueblo, Colorado Battery Cameron, Texas Battery A Peetz, Colorado Suppis' Compan\' Three Oaks, \hchigan SuppK' Company' Bridgewater, Snuth Dakota Rockford, Illinois Battery C Battery .A Syracuse, Kansas Battery F Urica. Missouri, R. F. D. No Batter>' C Canon City, Colorado
F-^

Batter>

I"

\la\Field,

Kentucky
Illinois

Battery Battery

A
F.

Chicago.

Coh.^rado Springs, Colorado

Headguarurs Cm Ca\our. South Dakota
Battery S Headquarter^ Co, Battery O Battery F" Supply Compan\Battery 1^ Headquarters Co.
Headejuarters

Idaho Springs, Colorado
GraFton. lUinois

Cook
Private First Class

Gilson

Longmont, Colorado
Cripple Creek, Colorado Pueblo. Colorado Cape Girardeau. Missouri

Adolph E. Gintz

Saddler Pri\a:e
[fallal ion

Wm.
Sergeant-Ma jo

\[. (.iipe

Adolph Glueck
tidward Ciockel Joe H, Goddard Nick J. Goeller
Flugh C.
tiolT

Cape Girardeau, Missouri
Clifton,

C-orporal

Co

Colorado

Pn\atc
l^n\-ate h'irst Class

Battery Batcerv

A C

West Bend. Wisconsin
Pueblo, Colorado

\'^

J

ENLISTF-D MIIN
Rank
Private
r-^rst

(Condnu-^-J)
^^ov(E Add.iess
I

Name
Class

Orcanization
Battery Battery

Ci irporal

Musician Sec jnd Cla Corporal
Private First Class Corporal Private Private First Class Pri\ate f-'irst C~lass Pri\ate
PriN'ate

Adolph P Cloldheck Chester N, Cjood John A. Cinodrieh Ralph L. CoMdneh Ralph GmixxJames > (.iorham John J G irman Claude F C}ottbehuelt Leonard Graf George R. Gray
t

C
B

lighmore, South
Illinois

Dakota

Chicago,

Headquarters Co. Kansas City, Missouri CoUbran, Colorado E^attery C
Battery D Marshall, Colorado Headeiuartcrs Co. Hurtjn. South Dakota
Battery
f^

i-'a;nsville, Ohirj

William Cjray
Zane>'

Pri\ate First Class

Cray

Wagoner
Private First Class Private First Class Private First Class
Private Pri\ate First Class

William E. Greahle

Green Norris P. Green Theodnre Li, Green William Green Russell \I (jTcenman
John
J.

Battery C Battery F Battery F Supply C^jmpany Battery A Supply C'i)mpanv Battery A Battery V Battery A Battery F Headciuarters Co.
1^ ^rd

Pueblo, Colorado
Redfield, South

Vermillion, S(juth

Dakota Dakota

Leadville, Colorado

Harrisonville, Missouri

Twin

Trails.

Idahrj.

Bnir)king5, S:>uth

Dakota

W introse,
Sterling,

Colcjrado

Haxtum. Colorado
Jacksonville. Florida

Colorado

Wagoner
Private First Class Sergeant

Lirnest

l_.

Cireer

Amb.
Ei

C:).

No

record

Private F-'irst Class Corporal
Pri\'ate F^irst Class

William B. Creg<5ry Benjamin Grenier Jacob Grosskopf William Grosvenor

Private Pri\ate Sergeant Pri\ate Private F""irst Cla
Private Sergeant

John G. Crusi'th Douglas I. Cjuunthcr John L. Gunn
Robert Gunson Arthur C). Gurncy [.ccnard K. Guthner
William F-. Flaaek Ross S Hackect Paul C, h^a[Tner Martin H Hagemann Joseph A. lagensen Axel G. Haglind
i

Negaunee, Michigan Loveland. Colorado Headquarters ( '.o. I])enver, Colorado Battery E Volga, South Dakota Bat;,tery D F^t, Wayne, Indiana Battery E Brush, Colorado Battery C Eaton, Colcrado Headquarters Co. Akron, Coloradfj Battery B Littleto.n, Colorado

Battery Battery Battery

Clarkton, Missouri

B
E

.

Battery V Ottowa. Ohio Med. Detachm't Otis, Indiana

Ccck
Pn\'ate
Pri\'ate

Private

Private

Private F^rst Class
Postal Sergeant

Private Private
Cnrpriral

Edward E. Hahn Oda A. Halbrook Charles M. Hall James E, Hall
George Hall H. lall Wiihe B. Halliburton {arvey L. Hamilton James R. 1 lamikon Alfred Handel Leroy Hanks Jacob R. Flannah

Battery C Battery li Battery Battery F Battery li Battery A
I-'

"^'onkcrs,

New

^'ork

JerCerson Barracks, Missouri

Evanston.

Illinois

(Chicago, lllinos

Wray, Colorado
r^armington, Missouri, R.

V D. No

Headi-iuarters Co.

Walnut

Grn\'e. Missouri

W
I

Wm
1

Private Private
f'^irst

f~Iass

Battery B Battery C Battery C Battery C Med. Detachm't.

Cardwcll, Vlissouri Wause<jn, OYwo
Pueblo, CoU.-rado

Wardeil. Missouri

Mangum, Oklahoma
.

Wagoner
Private

Sergeant Private First Class Private First Class
C<)rporal

Charles

V Hanneman
.

Private
Private Private Saddler Private

Elmer Hansen Harry E lansen Harry Hansen
1

Wm
I i

Hans Hans{jn
Vern R
lanson
larding larding

Supply Company Harrisville, Missouri Battery A New York, N. ^' 51 i W'. srth Str Headt|uartcrs Co Wolsey, South Dakota Battery A Atwood, Colorado Battery E Goodrich. Colorado Battery C C'oa! Creek, Colorado Supply Com|"^any Oeston, Iowa Battery B "^'uma, Culorado Battery C: Madison, Wisconsin
Heade|uarters Cei Loma, Col(.>rado

Horseshoer
Private

James [" John W.

i

William L. Hare

Battery Battery Battery

1-

Paonia, Colorado Paonia, Colorado Bloomlield, New Mexico

D
A

/

4^

ENLISTED
Rank
Pri\cUe
Eirsi;

MEN
Battery
Flattery

(ConnnucJ)

Namk
Class

Organization

Home

AddR!-:ss

Private Eirst Class Private First Class
Pri\'atc First Class Pri\'ate
[-"irst

C'lass

Pri\atc

Privatc Private
Private Corpnral ScrKLant Pn\'atc Corporal Musician ThirJ Cla^s

Ceorge Hark Walter V> larman August Harms jiihn N Harrington Clyde A Harris John R Harris George A. Harrison
I

C
A A
E

Claudcll, Missouri
Paoli, Ojlorado Haxtuin, Colorado Coldlield. Colorado Hutchinson, Kansas (Colorado Springs, Colorado

t

)

I

Battery Battery Battery Battery

A

Med, Detachm't

1

homas

L. }-larrison

Mustann. Colorai.lo C Supply Company C:harlesion, MissMiin
F-""

ntto

T

Harrold

Roy

O
O

Harshman
1

Hartcr Claude M. Hartson
Clifford
f:arl

Battery Battery Battery

Use, f;olorado
F-^ort

A
E

Morgan, Colorado
C'rcek, Colorad(j

Dove

Med. Detachm't

Harvey

Conk
Private-

Wm. Haskett Clenn Win. Hawkins
Jesse Ml.

Colorado Headquarters Co Bridgewater, South Dakota Headc|uarters Co. [^uehlo, Colorado Med. Detachm't West I'jurlingCon. Iowa
F^asalt,

Corporal
Wafj;oncr

Edgar
Carl

I',

1".

Hawkins Hawley Hayden

Puhclo. Colorado Supply Company Pagosa Springs, ( j

Battery Battery

B C A

FHolcomh. Missouri
ilora^lo

Private
Pri\'ale

F'rederiek

A

i

Jayes

Battery
F-iattcry

Pleasant Hill. Missouri

Private

F-^irst

Class Class Class
Class

Corporal Private First Private Eirst Private Private First Corporal Private First Private Corporal
Pri\ ate

Ha\ s Hedden John L Henernan
Jesse L.

C
C

Caledonia, Mism lun

I-Vank

I-:.

Flattery

Batterv
Flattery

Martin Hcn'crnan
HcmiTiingLr C:iaude V^. \ lendrickson
Idov'd
I

i:d\\ard
(,

ieorge

H Hendnekson Henning
Henry
I

Class

i;i-nc--l
i

B Henry
(-,

South F:)akota South Dakota Fiatter>' Oa g, Colorado Battery C F^cad. South Dakota Supply Compan\' Alamosa. Coloraelo Flattery E .Akron, Colorado
i:)okind.

C C

Hawardcn, Iowa Doland, S .uih Dakota
Miller,

Battery

B E

(arry A,

Fiattcry

D

l^leasant Hill. Niissoun,
[^aonia. Ci
ik

R

F-;

D. No. 4

Mernll

Icnry
I

Mar\'in A.

lensky
lercndeen
[

Bugler Pri\ate Private Stable Sergeant Private First Class Corporal Serjeant
Pri\'ate

John

Wm
N

I

MichaJ
Martin
I

lermann

Hernm
I

Battery FBattery F£ Battery C Battery D Headc|uarters
[^atter\'

iraek

1

IVvely, Miss,,uri
[\iehlo,

Colorado
Illinois

(Kco.la, ,\ii^s,>un

Co Murphyshoro,

C:harles He-^c

homas H leusehkel Chas R Hickman
I

Fiattery

A E

W'ray. Colorado

Carhondale, Colorado

F^cadciuarters

Co Grand

Junctic^n, C(jlorado

iarry

llill

Alhcrt C. Elimcs

Pri\ate

Edward Hinck
Ralph [: Hixson Arnold V,. loch John C Hocker
i

Headc|uarters Co, Pueblo, Colorado F-lcack|uartcrs C"o Mildred, Colorado ["enton, Missouri Flattery E
F-Ifade|uarters Co, Hecia,

Musician Second Class

South Dak(jta

Band Corporal
Pri\'ate Eirst C^lass
Prix;itc

Headquarters
[iattery

Co

F

Isaac J

Hod-cs
\\.

Horscshocr Corporal
Corpi.iral

Arthur
i-rancis

Hodgctts
I

Med. [detachm't F^atter\ E

^'uma, Colorado Rifle, Colorado Davidson, Oklahoma Paonia, Colorado

Indyson Harrison Hodgson

E

Sert^cant

Thomas Hodgson
ticorgc
|-]d\\ard
F^,

Horscshocr
Pri\-atc

Hogarth Hohcnstein

Private Private
f-~irst

l:rncst

li.

Holloway

Louis\'ille. Colorad(.i Battery D Heade|uarters Co Cameo, Colorado Headc|uartcrs Co. Cameo, Colorado Medicine Lodge, Kansas Flattery B Toledo, Ohio, jzS Hamilton Street tiattery D Headquarters Co. Holden\illc, Oklahoma
i

Class

f
I

iharlcs R,

Holman
lok

Med. Detachm't
Battery E Battery B Battery Battery A
Flattery

No

record

Pn\ate
Private

knrv

C

1

Private iMrst Class Pri\ ate [-"ir.-t Class

Ecshc R. hHolland Lawrence P Holtnn Chester V. Hopkins

D
E

Ramscur, Ncjrth Carolina Liberal, Kansas Chicago, Illinois, 3820 N. Springfleki Avt
Millerville, Missouri, R. F, F3.

No

i

.

Bu-lcr

John

C^.

Hopkins

<^rdwaN',

Colorado

/

/
—155-

^'

ENLISTED
Rank
Private First
C")lass

MEN
Battery

(Continued)

NamfWallaee lopkins William More Samuel Horrocks Albert E. Horton
1

ORt.ANlZATION

HoME AdDRESS
Greeley, Colorado
Allenville, Missouri

D

Wagoner
Private First Class Private First Class
Private

Supply Company Leadville, Colorado
Battery B Battery A Ord. Detachm't

Private Corporal Private Private
Private First Class Private

Ralph J. Hotn Robert W. Houlahan Timothy S, Houlihan
Ira

Supply Company
Battery
Batter>'

D
C
Ei

Howe

Merino, Colorado Alamosa, Colorado Chicago, Illinois, 6452 Saugamon Street Woonsocket, South Dakota Flat River. Missouri

lirnest

Columbus Howell N. Hoyt

Battery Battery Battery
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

No

record

D
B B

Private

Horseshoer
Private

Sergeant Corporal Sergeant Private F'irst Class Corporal Private Musician Third Class
Private First C'las Private First Class

Clyde Huddleston Alwyn G. Hughes Richard E- Huberty Arthur M. Hughes Joseph G Hull
Chester A. Hunker

Supply Company Supply Company

McFall, Missouri, R F. D, No, 4 Cambridge, Indiana Pueblo, Colorado Leadville, Colorado Gettysburg. S<juth Dakota

C A

Burnham,
Sterling,

Illinois

Beniamin

F.

Emmett

C.

Hunt Hunt

D
B
F

Grant E, Hunter Frank W. Hurley

B

Colorado Lake City, Colorado Perryville. Missouri Wiggins. Colorado Denver, Colorado

James C. Husa Harry P. Huston
Everett C. Hutehin

Corporal Corporal Private Private Rcg'tl Sergeant-Major

Roe Hutchings Henry K Hutchins Harvey S. Hutton Andrew Hu\ Icr
Ernest F. H\art

Headquarters Co. Chicag(3. Illinois. 2522 S. Hamlin Avenue Headquarters Co. Venango, Nebraska Battery D Cedar Hill, New Mexico Headquarters Co. Berthoud, Colorado Battery D Somerset, Colorado Battery E Akron. Colorado Supply Company Denver, Colorado Headquarters Co. Alamosa, Colorado
Supply
Batter\'

Supply Sergeant Horseshoer
Private Private First Class Private Private First Class
Private

Leo Joseph
Clarence
J.

Inglefield
Ir\'in

Company Boulder, Colorado F Montrose, Colorado

James S Jacobs
Jacobson Harvey L. Jagger Otto E. Jahn Walter C. James Stanislov Jankovsky Peter H. Janous John S. Jeftcrs Edward H. Jeitz
J,

Baiters-

B

T<^ledo,

Ohio

William

Battery Battery

A

Proctor, Colorado

D Lexington, Nebraska Med. Detachm't Sumner. Iowa
Crandon, Wisconsin Julesburg. Colorado Akron. Ohio Estelline, South Dakota Baldwin. Colorado D Gary, South Dakota Dacona, Coloradi.> Elkton, South Dakota Supply Company Erwin, South Dakota Headi-iuarters Co. Esmond, South Dakota Battery A Haxtun, Colorado Buttery F Ouray, Colorado Battery A Clear Lake, South Dakota Battery B Lawson, Colorado Battery E LaPorte, Colorado SuppK Compan>' Pueblo, Colorado Battery B r-"ort Logan, Colorado
Headi,|uarters Co. Schenectady,

Private First Class Private Private Private First Class Private Private
F-'irst

C^lass

James

Jello

Band Sergeant
Private Private
Private

Private Private Private Private
I-'irst

(^lass

Private First Class

Private
Private
Corpfjral

Private
Stable Sergeant

William Vl. Jesie Lazarre Jeunehonime Julius Johannsen Carl A. Johnson Carl A. Johnson Cedric E. Johnson Elias A. Johnson Oscar F Johnson bVans G. Johnson C^eorge A. Johnson Karl E, Johnson Karl G Johnson ( Vscar J. Johnson Phillip R. Johnson
'1

Battery B Battery A Supply Company Battery C Battery A Battery Battery A Headquarters C^o. Battery D

Decator, Mississippi

New

^'ork

SuppK'
BaLlery

Company Pagosa
F
Ciarden

Springs, Colorado
(-ity,

homas K. John^

in

Missouri, R. U. D, No.

f

/ W^ I /
^1.^6-

'

-

y
\

y

ENLISTICD
Rak'k
(.Corporal

MEN

(Continued,

Name
Ross W. Johnson n
Delherc R. Jones } 1. Jones ^^enry G. Jockhcck
r-"orrest

Organization

Home Address

Private Private Private Private

Samuel
I-!ar!

\\. Jose

Mess ScrRcant
Private

\V.

Jones

K4ichael Juiliano

Serjeant
Cnrpiiral

Milo June
Karl

Headquarters Co. Greenland, Colorado Battery B Ovid, Colorado Battery B Cooter, Missouri Battery F Hitchcock, South Dakota Battery A Fleming, Colorado Headquarters Co Philadelphia, Pcnns\lavnii Battery A Newark. New Jersey Battery A lliff, Colorado
Paradox, Colorado Brooklyn, N, ^ -. b^ Freeman Street Supply Company Chicago, Illinois, i it>8 Odgcn A\-enue Battery C Westcliffe, Colorado Battery F Springfield, Missouri Battery B Denver, Colorado Battery A Sterling, Colorado Med Detachm't Grand Junction, Cok^rado Headc|uarters Co. Brookings, South Dakota Battery D Loma, Colorado Headi.|uarters Co. Wetmore, Colorado Chicago, Illinois, i^io W'cntworth ,'\\'enuc [^alter\' D SuppK' Company Auburn. Nebraska Battery VHugh. Colorado. R. D. i^ No. Colorado Springs, Colorado Battery' [^

W

Kadic

l^nvate Private Corporal
Ccirptiral

Stanley Kanjiesky Cieorge Katsantonis

Battery Battery

Y-

C

Battalion SerKeant-Maj Sergeant Private Private Private First Class Private Private First Class Private First Class Corporal Private Private Horseshoer Corporal
Crirporal

)r

Kauble Kauffman Calvert W, Kaylor
Flarry E.

Elmer

E.

Herbert E. Keating George M. Keeney Michael J, Keehn
Sei')p

Keffalos
E. Kelley

Saddler
Pri\-ate First Class

Private Private

D. Kelsey Kemock Jake William H. Kcmpke -larr\' .A Kennedyrank S Kcnn\' WalterKesterson IJoyd Kidwell George W. Kiclhorn Keith F. Killam Robert J, Killgore

William William William William

H, Kelley G. Kelhgar

i

Wm

Supply Company
Battcrv Battery
Batter>'

Berlin,
Otis,

1

A
\-

Nebraska Colorado

I

Supply' C'ompany' Bancroft, South

Dakota

1

I

Collbran, Colorado

A
A

Brush, Colorado

Battcrv Battery
Battery'

San Luis, Colorado
Watcrvillc.

D
E

Maine

Sergeant

Raymond

Killin

Mechanic
Private First Class Private First Class Corporal
!*ri\'ate ['"irst

Charlie B, Killinger

Charles A. Kindred

James A. Kindred
Albert L, King

Class

Private

Corporal Corporal Private Private
Private First Class Private f^rivate First Class
r^rivate

Eindsey King Morns Kirby Ross Kirkland Mellord V. Kitchens

M

k;rirjsl

M

KlostL-rhaus

L Knox Roy Koch Charles C. Koch
\\ illiani

Walter H Koebel Emil "r. Kohls

Sergeant Corporal Private

Anthony

L.

Kolb

Cook
Private Private First Class Private First Class

Arthur Kopp Walter G. Korn .Mbcrl Kosa
Stanley T. Kosinski
J<.hn
.\micl

\k Kotlar Kouba

Wagoner
Private First Class

Mike Kraus Richard W, Krause
.Arthur

Pn \ate

Krouse

Denver, Colorado Battery D Pueblo, Colorado tiattery V Redfield, South Dakota Headquarters Co, Happ>'ville, Colorado Headquarters Co. Yuma. Colorado Battery E Garo, Colorado Battery F Westcliffe, Colorado Battery C K-Iadison, Wisconsin Supply Company Coyvans, Colorado Battery E Hayden, Colorado Battery [[ Toledo, Ohio Battery I^ Calahan, Colorado Supply Compan>' St. Louis, Missouri Headquarters Co. Chicago, Illinois Battery B Chesterfield. Missouri, R- F. D. No. 24 Battery E Woodstock, Illinois Battery' V Sargents, Colorado Battery F Carlin, South Dakota Batter\^ F Glenwood Springs, Colorado Battery- \\ Grand Junction, Colorado Batter^' F Detroit, Michigan, 4Q2 Thirtieth Street Battery C Pueblo. Colorado Battery A Wray, Colorado Supply' Company' .Aft^m. Missouri Wittenberg. Missour Battery' Li Battery' Lovcland. Colorado
\.\

T'NLISTIiD

MBN

(Coniinued)

Rank
f^rivatc

Tpc ANIZATIfjN
Clas'

HoMK

AdDRIv-SS

Pri\atc

\'\r'

C^urporal

Kruh Fdvvard W. Kuki Ralph II. Kullerslran
Alfred
C">nurat(j

Headquarters Co, Molina, Crjiorado Battery F f^jrt Morgan, Colorado Battery F Ouray, Colorado
liattery

Private First C-lass

Private First Class

Labbadia Richard A, Lager

O

Glenwood Springs, Colrirado

Musician Third Class
Private
Pri\'atc
Pri\'atc

Edgar McC. Lair Frank M. Lally
Joseph
v..

Georgetown, Colorado Battery B hieadquarters Co. Redmcsa, Colorado Chicago, Illinois, 7030 Battery B
Battery Ii Battery A Battery A Battery D Battery E Battery F Supply Company Battery B Battery E Battery C Battery D Battery B Battery D
flattery

Wabash Avenue

Larnl?

John C, Lamson
Flenry Lammers Carl Landers

Fort Collins, Colorado McCollin. Colorado

Pri\'ate \-\rst Class

Bemis, South Dakota
Sarcoxie, Missouri

Pri\atc
F^rivatc

Bryce Landess
Clarence Landry Perry C- Lane Melvin Langford

Private

Horscshocr Corporal
Pri\ate
[^rivate First C'lass Pri\'ate

Powe Missouri Crowley. Louisiana Twin Lake, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado

Private First Class Pri\-atc First Class Busier
Pri\-ate

Fred Lank.ford Cluvis G. LaPlant William S Larkin Manus Larsen Norman Larson Hubert J Lary
'I
,

Knob
St

Lick, Missouri, R. F, D.

No.

i

Missouri Fisther, Missouri
[-"rancis.

Jutland, Melleru)^, DenmarkVolga, South Dakota Brush. Colorado

A

Cassel! l^ctbam

F

St CI

Carl

L Laurscn

Sergeant
l^rivate
CJ

jrporal

Arthur R Lav. Alton Law rence LImer \V Lawrtnce

Headquarters Co. y\kron, Ohio Battery F Victor, Colorado Headquarter^ Co. Ness City. Kansas K'ladison, Wisconsin Battery D Winfred, South Dakota Battery D
Battery
[{

Private

James

F~,

Lauson

r-'lat

River, Mis'^ouri

Corporal
f^orpnral C^orporal

Claire H.

Layman

Alvin J
Ei^du in J

Layne

Private

Bugler
Private

Cook
Private Private

La\ ton Ralph Leach CjCwrge H. Leasure Arvil Lee Earl Lee Charles \V Lefforge
f^rank
J.

Leist

Pn%ate
Corporal Private f-"irst Class Private f^ri vatc f^nvate f^rst Class
f^rivate

John W, Leonard
Berte! Lcth
CJscar Levorsen

Carter

Fl

Lewis

LImer L. Lewis Harry A Lcwi^
William R, Lewis Samuel A. Lightle

(^nvate
C( irporal
I^rivate

Henry R Lines
f^aul A. l-iscombe

Private
C^orporal

ManassLs
Archie
J.
'

F. Litch
Little

Sergeant
I^rivate

James

'.

Loar

l^nvace Private I'lrst Class Chief Mechanic Private Private First Class
Cfjok

August Lochmcr George Loftin f'-lmer Nl. Logan Arihur ( Lohmiller
;

Amc IS

r3

l,ong

bVcd L-pez Lord [:)ennis]
1,

Pcrryvillc, Missouri Huntington, West Virginia Headquarters Co. Lcade, Colorado Battery A Advance, Missouri Battery B Piggott, Arkansas Headquarters Co. Platville, Colorado Battery B Flat River, Missouri Battery F Chicago, Illinois Headc|uarters Co. Wray, Colorado Mound City, South Dakota Battery F Essex, Missouri Battery F Battery D Edgehill, Missouri Battery A Sterling, Missouri Battery D Lcsterville, Missouri Crc'ghton, Missouri Battery C Headquarters Co. Salida, Colorado Headcjuarters Co, Kirkwood, Missouri Battery A Sterling, Colorado Battery E 10 N. L^iwn, Kansas C^ity, Missot-iri Battery A Wray. Colorado Battery E Madis(.in, Wisconsin Battery B Crockett, Texas Headc|uarters Co Lake County, Ohio Pueblo, Cokirado. ^o Block Battery C Battery A Bath. South Dakota Battery D Somerset, Colorado Supply Company Hooper. Colorado
1

Battery Battery Battery Battery

A
F

Haxtun, Coloiadu
FIvins, Missouri

E C

1

W

-158-

/^Z-

x^y/

ENLISTFID

MEN
(JR(

iC;L.ntinueJj

Rank

Name-:

.'MZATION

Hon:e Address

Batlalion Scrfrcant-Ma or William Foughcad Private Rijger Lo\e

Wagoner
Private First Clas;,

Ira A, Foveless

Cook
Corpora!
Private
First Ser£;eant

Ceorge (1 Lowe Nelson L Loycl William H. Luby Teofilu Lueern

Headquarters Co. Battery C Supply Company Headquarters Co, Battery B Battery E
Battery
Batler\£^

Pa 4 Texas Sedgsvick, Colorado
F^hiladclphia.
,

i

2

!

Woodland As-cnu

Ctijoper,

FduarJ

j.

Lucky

B

Hannibal. Missouri Clarkton. Missouri Red Cliffe. Colorado Ta<")s, Nesv N'lexico Denser. Colorado

Private Private

Private
Co<
>k

Private Private
Pri\'ate

William LueJtke ErianJ Lund Arthur Lundt;ard Sander j. Lundgren CUto T. Lundquist

Thomas W.
Floyd
L.

l^urvey

Alfred C. Luther

Private Private
Pri\-atc

Wilham
Oennis
Alhcrt

[-,

LuMer Lynch
Lynns

Battery Battery F Headquarters C^( Battery F Battery A Headquarters C-OBactery A Battery \Supply ( "ompany
>

D

h;

Bat cry
I

F

Cday Center. Nebraska Madison. Wisconsin Port Clinton, Ohio t.li.nwood Springs, Colorado F£r\\ in, South Dakota Waukesha, Wisconsin LeRos', Colorado (Tishman. Arkansas .Alamosa, Colorado Duranui C.\< irai^lo
1,

CrirpMral

Private

P Maijs WMl Maa^

I

leadquaiLers

Co

Castle Rock, Colorado
Leadville, Colorado
isa. C j
ih

Heade|uarters Co. Huron, South Dakota

Sergeant

An^ius A. Macd..nald

Sergeant Sergeant
Pri\-ate

Lawrence

C

Macl^nnald

SuppK' SuppK'

Company
C
I

jimpan\' Alanii
:

>lorado
iradi
>

Craham
("diark-s

M
I-:

MacPhcrsnn
\ladm;in

Bauery
Battery
BaLLer\

C

iilman, C<

Li
(.'.

C^olm-iid,, Spnntis,
F
(
'-<>

C^olorado

Pri\ate

F-'irst

Class Class

JMhn Mahon
JnsL-ph C.
Ci irnelaK

lighmore, ^outh l7)akota
oLints Cxirl-

Mechanic
Private
['irst

Mahon
Mahonex-

Head^iuarlers Batters F
Balter\ !

Aknin, Ohio
F^irrecn,
|-;ssex.
C.
,

Ireland

Private First Class Scrgcanl H(
>r^e^h< icr

Jnhn

I^ Mah<.n>'

Mis,,uri

Leiinard R, Maier

Headqu
Headciu Battery
Batter>li

L-rs

( C

:.

Archie Malonc
Charles }L Malone
Class
W'llliam F.

ers

.

Sahda, Colorado t-ladc Park, Colorado

Private Pnx'ate
Pri\ ate

Niangua, N

lissi >uri

l-ir^t

Clifton

Mapes Marehand

D
C
l-

Wentworth, South Dakota
Donalds<"insille, Louisiana

Batters

Pnxate Pn\atc
Private
f'lrst

George
Earl

Adam Markle
Marr Marsh
Marshall W. Marshall

Class

Private
F^n\ ate

W, John F Edward Thomas

Battery Battery
Batter>-

A
(i

Kansas Cits-, \'lissi.iuri hurman, Culoradf.i
1

F^oster,

Missouri
Xlissouri
F_ick, Mis-,ouri

Suppl\-

C'ompanv Cape Girardeau,

Corporal Private [-"irst CHass Corporal Private Private

Mai Martin Perry \\' Martin

Battery C: Battery F
Batter\'
I-""

Knob

Dolores. Colorado
F^rush, Colorad.
I

Ray D. Martin
Alcksind[-a Martinau Juan Martinez Eugene Marxgut Jnhn Mascol Henrx A Massman
lezi

Battery
Batter\-

C
E-I

Pueblo, Colorado
Dodgeville, Wisconsin
Primerc), Colrjrado
Ness- "I'ork,

Baiier>
Battcrx' Batter>-

D
I:

Prnate
Private
(-"irst
F-""irst

N.

^'..

Bronx, 1764

\''yse

Ave

Class
Class

f^

Scranton, F^ennss is'ania

Private Private Private Private Private

Battery
Flattery

A
F' l\

Raymond W, Masterman
Salvatore Mastrocola

Batters

Aurora, South Dakota Paoma, Colorado New 'I'ork, N. 'l'.. 70 Mott

Street

Bugler Pn\-ate
Private

James O. Matkin Arvid Matson John S. Batouch Joseph Mattas
Florentino Mattarazzo

Battery Battery Battery
Batters-

O
E

Bismark, Missouri Sebka, Minnesota
Pueblo, Colc^rado
Saltzer Cits
Pa., B(.x 45, R. F. D. N, ^'.. 401 East 108th Street aterburs-. Conn., 40 Cf'ngress As'enue
.

D
F^

F Battery F
Battery Battery
BattersF^

New
\\

^"ork,

Private

Horscshoer
Private

Louis Maurutis William Maws
Allen V, Maxwell

Aurora, Cob irado

F

Lanhani, \larsland

m

' /'

A

//

liNLISTED

MEN
Battery

(Conimucd)

Rank
Bugler
Private Private

Name
Cecil D,

Or(,an[Zaj ION

Home Address
Sterling,

Maxwell

A

Colorado

Henry C. May Collie C Mayberry
Frank D. McCaffrey

Med. DetachnVt Campbell, Missouri Battery E Doe Run, Missouri
Colorado Springs, Colorado Battery B Battery B Pueblo, Colorado Headciuarters Co. Cripple Creek, Colorado Battery C Collbran, Colorado Battery Leadwood, Missouri

Mechanic
Sergeant
C(.>rpnral

Private
Pri\-atc

I'^irst

Class

McCarey Donald J. MeCartan Sylvester MeCarty
Ernest C.

Madison MeClain
Oscar McClure

D

Wagiincr Horseshocr
Private

Supply Company LeRoy,
Batter\-

Illinois

McCormick Norman C- McCormick
John
S,

Private First Class Corporal
Private

James

L.

McCoy

Battery Battery
I^attery

E A B
E

Hillside,

Colorado
Missouri, 3511

St. Louis,

Evans A\'cnue

Adrian, Missouri

Corporal Private Corporal Private Private Private Private Private Sergeant
Corpc>ral
I^rivate

R, McCutchan Matthew McDonagh Frank McDonald John J. McDonnell Maurice A. McDonnell Oral M, McFadden George H. McFarland William H- McFerson Cornelius C. McGeehan

Hugh

Battery

B

Loveland, Colorado Woodman. Colorado
Newell, South Dakota
Pueblo. Colorado Kirkwood. Missouri

Headquarters Co. Headquarters Co, Battery E Battery C Supply Company Battery D Supply Compan>'
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

Kennett. Missouri
Lorain, Ohio, 2 [27 East 30th Street

Boulder. Colorado
Eeadville, Colorado Wray, Colorado

Byron

F.

McGinnis

Joseph R. Richard

McGowan
McGuirk

A B
F F

Keensburg, Colorado

Wm

Glenwood Springs. Colorado
Pittsfield,

Sergeant Private First Clas^

Wagoner
Private First Class Private

Cook
Private
Fii"st

Class

Frank E. Mclntyre Donald E. McKay Lawrence E. MeKee James E. McKeen James B, McKeon Robert McKinney David Wm. McMilan Douglas H. McMurdo
Clarence L. McNary Patrick McNamara
Lisle

Pennsylvania

E

B C
F

Fort Collins, Colorado Denver, Colorado Chicago, Illinois, 305' W', Gmgress Bucrus, Missouri
-ith

Supply Company Leadville, Colorado
Battery Battery
Battery Battery
Str-.et

Headc|Liarters Co.

Private

Private

Cook
Corporal Private Private Private First Class Private Private Private Private Private Chief Mechanic Corporal

H- Meadows
J.

Lakewood, Ohio Fort Worth, Texas, 012 West C Elizahcthtown, Kentucky Supply Company Worcester. Massachusetts Headquarters Co, Durango. Colorado

D

Street

Clarence A. Medcalf

Mees Albert M. Mehl Oscar C. Mchl William Meiklcham
Otto
Charles H. Meinhard

James W. Mellen James D. Melvin Emil G. Merkle Frank H. Merrell Henry A. Merrell
John M, Merritt Arthur J, Merten

Cook
Chief Mechanic

Corporal Supply Sergeant Corporal
Private First Class

Howard M. Mertz
Thfunas A. Mescrvcy f->ederick R. Mesick O K. Messmore Albert Metschis Chester P. Meyer

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

F"'

Bloomfield, Missouri

F^"

Lane, South Dakota
Volga, South Volga. South

A
E

Dakota Dakota
ClaN' Street

C
C
A

Denver. Colorado, 2712
Detroit, Michigan

Jefferson Barracks, Missouri
F-^ayetteville,

D
E A A

North Carolina

Private

Corporal Private Musician Ihird Class

Harry Meyer
H. Meyer Oscar W. Meyer
Irl

Mechanic

Waterhury, Connecticut, 17S Tudor Street Sterling, Colorado Sterling, Colorado C C^olorado Springs, Colorado F Victor, Colorado C Pueblo, Colorado B Colorado Springs, Colorado C Highmore, South Dakota Battery E Craig, Colorado Battery Brooklyn, N. Y,, 1474 Lincoln Place Battery !' Montrose, Colorado Battery E New York, N. Y.. Bronx, lObo Boone Ave Headquarters Co. Iroquois, South Dakota Battery E Eagle. Colorado
r-"

.

-160—

Wy

ENLISTED
Rank

MEN

(Continued)

%';^

"''<'i

ENLISICD MliN
Rank
Private Private Sergeant Private Private Corporal Private Private Corporal Private Corporal

(Continued)

Name
Geo. A. Kfullcn

Orcanizaiion

Home

AoDRiiSS

John J. Murphy Lee M. Murphy
Michael A. Murphy Oscar C. Murph>' William li. Murphy

Edward J. Murray Homer Murray Omar A. Murray Joseph M. Musso Henry S. Myser
John T. Nagle y\dam C. Nance Chalcn D. Nance Jacob Napper William H. Narey
Fuel A, Nash

Rille, Colorado Battery F Crowley, Louisiana Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Battery C New York, N. Y-, 125' Tenth Avenue Battery A Battery F Rifle, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Battery Battery F New York. N. Y., 8q St. Nicholas Ave Sumner, Illinois Battery E Headquarters Co. Denver, Colorado 022 Bannock Street Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Con Creek, Colorado Battery F

D

Private First Class Private

Private First Private Private Private First Private First Private Private Private Private Private First Private Corporal Private First

Class

Class

Class

Class

Class

Musician Second Class Sergeant
Private Private
Private

Private
Private

Private Private
Private
Private First Class Private First Class Private Fin^t Class

Glenn Nash Harry H. Nathan George A. Naulty Antonio A. Na\-arro Andi Neagos John G. Neish Fdward A, Nelson Frederick W. Nelson Karl G. Nelson Palmer F. Nelson Richard S. Nelson Walter Nelson John Nemargot William W. Nesbitt Peter E. Neuenschwandcr Jacob Ncuhauser Morris Neuman Floyd E. Kewlin
Joseph Nicchia

Battery F Battery A Battery Battery Battery A Battery C Battery Battery F Battery F Battery Battery B Battery E Supply Company Headeiuartcrs Co. Battery B

Neeham, Massachusetts
Whitewater, Missouri Powe, Missouri Brooklyn, N. Y., 401 Georgia A\x-nLie Akron, Colorado Arbyrd, Missouri

D D D

Alma, Kansas Alamosa, Colorado
Philadelphia, Pa., 2563 Sepivia Street

D

Camp

Travis, Texas

Columbus Barracks, Ohio
Leadvillc, Colorado

Oldham, South Dakota Durango, Colorado Georgetown. Colorado Headc|uarters Co. Cashtc^n, Wisconsin Battery C Grand Junction, Colorado Battery B Parker. Colorado Battery F Bridgeport, Connecticut Battery D Riverhead, Long Island, N. Y., Box No. 38 Battery B Garden City, Missouri Battery D New York, N. Y., 13 West 114th Street Battery D New York, N. Y., 800 East 6th Street Woodland, h.wa Battery F Battery F New York, N. ^'., 341 East !4i^th Street
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery
Battery Battery

Clyde L. Nichols

Rumsie O. Nichols
John Nicholson Giovanni Nicodemo Walter F. Nicolai
Anastascias Nicolopoulos

B C

Chicago,

lliinuis, 2034 W. Elk Ciiy. Oklahoma

i

i

1

th Street

Private

D D
F

Klorristfiwn,

Middletown,

New Jersey New York

Private Private

New

Rochelle, N. Y., lO First Street

F

Corporal

Wagoner
Private

Jens Niclson Rudolph Nielsen Pet-jr L. Nielsen

D
F

Supply Company
Battery
Flattery

Private First Class Private

Corporal Private First Class Private

Nolan Patrick W, Nulan Raymond A. Noid Carl M. Nordbcrg Albert J. Nordecn
B.

Guy

D

Battery B Battery B Ord. Detaehm't

Sirpam. Greece Woonsocket, South Dakota Denver, Colorado, 130Q 17th Street Daniels, Wisconsin Brookings, South Dakota Chicago, III, 541C) South Lallin Street
l^olstoy.

South Dakota

Leadville. Colorado

Horseshoer
Private Private First Class Private First Class Private Private

Ernest

M. Nordquist

Lawrence Nordstrom George F. Norelius Everard J. Norman

Supply Company Leadvillc. Colorado Supply Company Aspen, Colorado liattery D New York, N. Y., 23O W. T4th Street Battery C Volunteer, South Dakota
Battery Battery Battery

E

Dexter. Missouri

Guy

O.

Nurmun

A
E

Brush, Colorado
Sil\'.;rton,

August Norrick

Colorado

-162-

ENl-ISTIiD

MEN
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery
liattery

(Continued)

Rank
Private
Private First Class

Name
Charles L. Northcutt

(''rcanization

hloME Address
Steele,

E
E

Missouri

Leonard O. Northness
Ole Nowick

Craig, Colorado

Private First Class

A
F

Sergeant
Private Private First Class Private

Frank M. Nulph
Rudolph Oberme^'cr Walter R. Ohcrndorfer Michael J. O'Brien William H. O'Brien Gustav Ochs Charles J. O'Conncll

Brandt, South Dakota Cameron, Colorado
Jefferson Barracks, Missouri
F"ruhna, Missouri

D
E

A
F E

Private Private First Private Private Private Private Private [-""irst Private Private Private First Saddler Private Corporal Private First Private Private Private

Class

D
A B C

O'Connor Richard O'Connor Austin C. Odegaard
John
J.

Class

Frederick 'W. Odgers
Julian Ofiava

Class

Class

Musician Second Class Corporal Private Private Private Private Private Private First Class Private Corporal First Sergeant Private Corporal Private Private Private Private Private Private
Private

William B. Ogden, Jr. Theodore R. O'Hare Anthony Ohl John O'Keefe John E, O'Leary Arthur C. Olmstead Andrew Olsen John VI. Olsen Sverre O. Olsen Levi W, Olson Clinton W. O'Neal William T. O'Neill

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery
I3attery

York, N. Y.. ^20 W. 52nd Street Barbboo. Wisconsin Menfro, Missouri Canaan, Connecticut Bcmis, South Dakota Chicago, Illinois, 1535 West 03rd Street Sedgwick, South Dakota

New

D
A B A
B

Chama, New Mexico

Lcadwood, Missouri Miami, Florida Revillo. South Dakota Supply Company Julesburg, Colorado
"^'(ink'jrs.

New

'I'ork. I2i

Ncppcrha A\e.

Edward

O'Reilly

Themistocles Orphancdcs Romolo Ortego

Juan F. Ortiz Walter H. Osborne

Howard Osman
Percy F. Ostcrloh

Andrew

J. 0'Sulli\'an

Ernest C. Otten

Thomas P. Owen Edward W. Owens King D. Owens Robert W. Owens Thomas J, Owens
Carl Owings

Battery E Battery II Battery A Headquarters Co, Battery A Headquarters Co. Battery A Ord. Detachm'i Battery A Battery B Battery Battery B Headquarters Co. Headquarters Co. Battery E Heat-kiuarters CoBattery A Headquarters Co.
I-""

Leadville, Colorado

Green County, Wisconsin Iowa } lalia, Mound City, South Dakota Stcnsbetten, Trondhjem, Norway F-ulun, Kansas
Sterling, C'^'luradu

Lcad^

ille,

Colorado

New

York, N. Y,, 316 East Qtrd Street Alliens, Greece, 2,Vasclen,Voulgarogton

Minturn, Colorado

Chimayo,

New Mexico

Wichita. Kansas, 1204 West Douglas Ave. Marshiield, Missouri

Cape Girardeau, Missouri Grand Junction, Colorado

Castle, Colorado Durango, Colorado Med. Detachm't Kansas City, Mo,, 2603 Independence Ave.

New

John C. *_bimek
Jose R. Pachcco

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

B

Diggins, Missouri

B A
F

York, N. Y., iq West looth Street Brooklyn. N. 'l'., 4b4 Prospect Avenue Laurens, South Carolina
\\averl\-,

New

B

Minnesota

Chief Mechanic
Private Private

Howard

A. Packard

Margarito Padilia Theodocio Padilia
Everett B. Palacio

Private Private Private Corporal

Cook
Bugler
Private
First Sergeant

George W. Palmer Herbert E. Palmer John William Palmer Leroy G. Palmer Roy C. Pannebaker Frank Papuc John W. Parish

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

C E
F F

y\rro>a

Hondo,

New Mexico

St. Paul, Vlinnesota

Delta, Colorado

F

C A

D
B

D
B

D

Santa Fe, New Mexico Delta, Colorado Lake County, Waukegan, Illinois Maquoketa, Iowa, Arcade Street Somerset, Colorado Denver, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Johnstown, Colorado.

~ J

/

A
—163

^/^y

IINLISTLID M[-:N

[Continued)

Rank
Musician Third Class
Private
Private First Class

Name:
William W. Parkin Agostino Pasqualoni John J. Patborsek George W. Patterson ]^en^y E. Patterson Archibald Payne Calvin F. Payne Frank W. Pearson Wilbur B. Pearson

Organization
1

Home Address
Cuba, Fulton County,
Vitorchiano,
Illinois

leadLjuarters Co.
[battery

A

Roma.

Italy

Battery

Private Private Sergeant
Private First Class

Glenwood Springs, Colorado, R. C Med. Detachm't Boulder. Colorado
Battery C Battery D Battery F Battery B Battery C Battery B HeadL|uartcrs Co. Battery D Battery F Battery C Battery A Headquarters Co.
Larussell, Missouri

F. D, No.

i

Chicago.

Illinois. '>443

Thomas

Street

Grand Junction. Colorado
Cedarhurst. L. LN-Y., bb Washington St. Pueblo, Colorado

Private

Horseshoer
Private Private

Maynard

I.

Peck
Pellizzi

Headquarters Co- Middlcsburg,

New York

Gennaro A,

Sergeant Corporal
Pri\-ate

Ray

Private First Class Private

Musician Third Class

Wagoner
Mechanic
Private

Mechanic
Private
Private

Musician Third Class
Private

Private Private Corporal
Private First Class Private

F. Pengra Lewis W. Penncll Jim J Pcros Frank'J. Peschke Joseph Peszkin Joe Peterka, Jr. Bernard Peterson Clarence B. Peterson Harry V. Peterson Harvey H. Peterson John Petkus Joseph Pctrailis John H. Petrcscu Brainard F. Petrie Albert P. Petschaucr Virgin Pettigrew Ellis Petty

Brooklyn, New York. 86 Skillman Street Buffalo Gap, South Dakota Fort Scott, Kansas

Van Houton, New Mexico
Pueblo, Colorado
Brookl>'n,
Ida,

New

"^'ork

South Dakota Supply Company DcSmet, South Dakota Cripple Creek, Colorado Battery F Supply Company L-cadville. Colorado Bonilla, South Dakota Battery C

Waukcgan. Illinr.is Battery A Summitt. Illinois, Archer Avenue Battery B Headquarters Co. Indianapolis. Indiana Watertown. N. Y., io8 Charlebois Block Battery B
Supply Coinpan>' Lcadvillc, Colorado

Frederick C. Pfeil Thctidorc J, Pfenning

Sergeant Privaie Private Private First Class Private First Class Private Private
Corprjral

Winnie A Phelps
Jesse Phillips

Phihp Phillips Thtimas Phillips

Frank A. Phillipsen Benjamin Philmus Anthony Piano Warren W, Pickett
Jesse L. I^ierce

Private

Private
Private Private

Private Private

Noel F. Pike Charles H. Pinner William H. Pitt Edgar E. Piciman Michael E. Place

No record Battery B Headquarters Co. Durango. Colorado Osgood, Colorado Battery C Hartford. Connecticut Battery Fowler, Colorado Battery E Brooklyn, N. ^'., 87 Church A\"enue Battery A Brooklyn, New "^'ork, 437 Bedford Avenue Battery li Winfield. New York, Fisk & Woodside Ave. Battery D Haugen, Wisconsin Battery B Brooklyn, N. Y., 1280 Johnson A\'enue Battery A Erie, Pa., ^40 West 7th Street Battery B Winsted, Connecticut, 40 Main Street Battery E Grand Island. Nebraska Battery B Caruthersville, Missouri Battery B Hendersonville, North Carolina Battery D Chicago, Illinois, 5524 S. Aberdeen Street Battery D Headeiuarters Co. Helena. Ohio Headquarters Co. Norristown, Pa., 050 Estes Street

D

1

Sergeant Private I-'irst Class Private First Class Private Private I-"irst Class Private Private
Private
Private

Columbuv C.
Louis Pnllaek

Poissot

Med. Detachm't Omaha, Nebraska Cape Girardeau, Missouri Battery
I-^

MikcPondella

Raymond

A. i^ope

Priinosh Popish

Arvada, Colorado A Supply Company Aspen, Colorad'i
Battery Battery
C-

Battery Battery

E

Denver. Colorado

Marvin Porter
Trliman Porterfield Linus R. Poston

Pueblo, Colorado

A

Bonne Terre, Missouri

Private

F-'irst

Class

James F. Potter Samuel C'. PnUer
Theod.,re D. Poul.-. Charles Powell
I
I

Private First Class

Private
Private

James

I:

Pow

lts

Whitewater, Missouri, R. F. D. No. 2 Excelsior Springs, Missouri Battery II Barabos, Wisconsin Headquarters Co. Grand Junction, Colorado Med, Detachm't hmterprise. Mississippi Battery C Chicago, Illinois, 5 740 S. Turner Avenue
Battery
Vet.

B

Detachm't

ENLISTED
Rank

MEN

(Continued)

./. //

ENLISTED MEN
Rank
Private First Class Private

(Continued)

Name
Rice Luther A. Rice Richards John S. Frank W. Richardson David E. Richart
Car!

Organization
Battery Battery Battery Battery

Home Address
Norfolk, Nebraska Saluda. South Carolina
Monticeilo, Wisconsin

M.

E
F

Private Eirst Class

Supply Sergeant Musician Third Class
Private

Wagoner
Bugler
Private
Pri\'ate

Carl EI. Richman Gerric L. Riclistatter

Harry

S. Ridings Louie E. Rieke

Roy M. Ringo
Oscar D. Roatcap Alva A. Rolzierts David R. Roberts Roy Roberts Hiram G. Robertson James Robertson George W. Robinson

Corporal Musician Second Class Private Musician First Class Private Corporal
Pri\'ate

Craig, Colorado Headquarters Co, Niwot, Colorado Lowden, Iowa Vet. Dctachm't Supply Ojmpany Leadville, Colorado Battery E Rand, Colorado Sterling, Colorado Battery E Battery F Charleston, Missouri Battery F Olathe, Colorado Headc|uarters Co. Crook, Colorado Battery A Peetz:, Colorado Headquarters Co. Crook, Colorado

E E

Mechanic
Private First Class

Harry E. Robinson Sidney O. Robinson
Gii\'

Sergeant Private Private Eirst Class Color Sergeant
Pri\'atc

V. Rogers

Floyd Rogers Leonard B. Rogers August L. Rohling Paul L. Rolwing
Henr^'

Private
Private First Class

Rooms

Sergeant Private Private First Class Private Private First Class Private Pri\'acc First Class Private First Class Private Private Saddler Private Corporal Private Private Private First Class Private First Class
Private

Ropers Rose Martin E. Ross Frederick D. Ross Jake Roten iarry E. Rother Richard Rowe Eloy B. Roybal Joseph Rozman
Ali^ert J.

Clarence

Wm.

Battery F Battery C Battery E Battery E Battery C Battery A Battery B Battery F Headquarters Co. Battery C Battery B Supply Cnmpan\' Battery Supply Company Headquarters Co-

Hillsboro, Illinois

Pueblo, Colorado Bridgeport. Connecticut Knob Lick, Missouri
Marshfield. Missouri
Sterling,

Colorado

Adrian. Missouri
Delta. Colorado Fort Collins, Colorado Charleston, Missouri. R. F. D. No, 3 Chicago. Illinois, 6107 Winthrop A\"enue
Berlin,

Nebraska

D

Boulder, Colorado

Nehawka. Nebraska

I-

Rudolph Ruedlinger Matteo Ruggiero Robert W. Runner
George G. Runis Richard E. Rush Danic! L. Russell Orvillc H, Russell Roy B. Rutherford
Jerry
S-

R^'an

Marion, Iowa Gainsboro, Tennessee Battery A Fleming, Colorado Headquarters Co. Central City, Colorado Battery F San Luis. Colorado Headc|uarters Co. Crested Butte, Colorado Battery A St. Le^uis, Missouri, 1Q12 Victor Street Battery D Brooklyn, N. Y., 153 \''an Brunt Street Battery D Rangcly. Colorado Headquarters Co. Grand Junction, Colorado Battery F Marshheld. Missouri Battery E Canton, Kansas Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Battery E Brush, Cukirado Battery A Merino, Colorado
Batter>-

D

Corporal Private

Charles Sabella Albert J. Saho William R. Saffell

Wagoner
Private
Private

Juan F. Salazar Selmcr A. Sampson

Max

Sandlin
J. Sau\'nla

Private Private
Private First Class Private Private Private

Andrew
Carlyle

Patsy Sbano J. Scanlon Henry Sehaefer Flubert G. Sehafer

Sam

Schattin
J,

Private

William

Schindlcr

Battery Battery B Headquarters Co. Supply Cfimpan^' Battery I~ Battery C Battery 1: Battery Battery [1 Battery D Headquarters Co. Battery E Battery E

D

New

"^'ork,

N, Y.,

nq

Fors>'th Street

Pueblo, Colorado

Bonne Terre, Missouri, R. F. D, No. Primero, Colorado

i

D

Stoughton, Wisconsin, 208 S. L>nn Street Crosstown, Missouri New York, Staten Island, 307 South Ave, New York, N, ^',, 429 E. 5th Street Denver, Colorado, 425 Century Building East St. Louis, III,, 171S Henrietta Avenue Wray, Colorado New York, N, W. zii East loth Street Pcrryvillc, Missouri
i
1

mm
-166-

ENLISTED
Rank
Private

MEN

(Continued)

Name
Hugo H,
J.

Orc.anizatjon
Schlimpcrt

Home Address
Perryville, Missouri

Bugler Corporal Private Corporal Private

Roelf Schlomer

Andrew W. Schmidt
Phillip

Musician Third Class

Band Sergeant
Private
Private First Class Private

Schmidt William H- Schnittgrund Charles D. Schoenherr Fred J. Schroder Bernard A, Schrepfer George Schroedcr

Henry

J.

Schuff

Corporal Private First Class Private Private Private
Citrp'jrai

Ernest A. Schultz Milo \V. Schultz

John M. Schumacher Joseph P. Schumer Eugene R. Schwanbeck Dominick Scial^arrasi

Thomas

Private Private

E. Scobee Fortunate Scf)ddo Alva B. Scott
Basil O. Scott

Battery Battery E Headquarters Co. Battery F Battery A Battery D Headquarters Co. Headquarters Co. Battery E Battery F Battery C Battery Battery E Battery D Battery A Supply Company Battery Battery C Battery F

D

Canistata, South

Dakota

Holyoke, Colorado Alamosa, Colorado ReJfield, South Dakota Black Hawk, Colorado Lake Preston, South Dakota Colorado Springs, Colorado Chicago. Illinois, 5142 Fulton Street
Louisville,

Kentucky

Buffalo,

New York

D

Wessington Springs, South Dakota
Ansonia, Conn., 82 Dwight Street Evanston. Illinois, 1602 Main Street LaCrosse. Wisconsin Kansas City, Mo-, 502 E. Fifth Street Longmont, Colorado Elizabeth, New- Jersey, loS Ocean Street Pleasant Hill, Missouri

D

Waponer
Private Private First Class

Cecil C. Scott
li^arl

E. Scott

Musician Third Class
Private Private First Class Private Private First Class
Private Private First Class

Elmer W. Scott
Vineil E. Scrivner

Benjamin H. Seals David F. Seaman

Coy

B, Searles

Aubrey K. Scars
Lo[-enzo G, Sees Walter Kl. Scitcr William A. Semlcr Samuel J. Senti George E. Sergeant Tony Serna Gustavc A. Scufert

Cook
Private First Class Private First Class

Private
Private First Class Private

Corporal Corporal Musician Second Class
Private First Class Private First Class

Emerv

T. Sevier

Henrv A. Shade
Lorcn Shanlc>'
Clarence P. Sharp

Walter L. Sharp
Carl E. Sharpe

Private Private Private
Private First Class

Supply Company Julesl-iurg, Cjilorado Supply Company' Jule^burg, (Colorado f^uebl.i, Cokirado Battery C Headquarters Co, Littleton, Colorado Headquarters Co. Ecklcy, Colorado Battery F Cripple Creek, Colorado Battery E Vona. Colorado Med. Dctachm't New Brighton, Minnesota Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Battery C Sunbur\', Pennsylvania Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Headquarters Co. Oxford, Colorado Headquarters Co. Burlington, Iowa Supply Company Iriquois. South Dakota Battery D Longmont, Colorado Battcr>' A Northbergen, New Jersey Battery E Walden, Colorado Battery A Amarillo. Colorado Headeiuarters Co. Mansfield, South Dakota Battery D Pueblo, Colorado Battery A Spence, Colordo Headquarters Co, Haxtun, Colorado
"

Benjamin A. Shaw
Clarence R.

Shaw Edward W. Shay
James
P.

Corporal
Reg'tl Supply Sergeant Private First Class

Benjamin

Sheak Shechan
P,

Battery Battery Battery Battery

F

Hartford, Connecticut
Leitchfield,

D
A
F

Kentucky

Spence. Colorado Cleveland, Ohio

Earl L. Sheldnn

Private First Class Sergeant

Elmer E, Sheller Elmer E, Shcpard
William T. Shepherd Clarence J. Shetler Lazelle S. Shoekley William G. Shonsb\'e

Cook
Private First Class
Private Corporal Private Private

Roy

R. Shouse

Supph- Company' Aspen, Colorado Battery C Conde, South Dakota Battery D Briggsdale. Colorado Battery E Den\'er, Colorado Battcr>" F Montrose, Colorado Battery F Olathe, Colorado Battery B Columbia, Missouri, 71 Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Battery D Pueblo, Colorado
Battery Battery Battery

r

Missouri Avenue

Max Shulman
Benjamin F. Shults George I. Shultz

Cook
Corporal

B A
A

Walin, Norgrdolinsh, Russia Shaw, Colorado

Shaw, Colorado

-167-

^1/

ilNLISTED

MEN

(Continued)

Rank
Private
Ccirporal

Name
Harold E- Sigman Delbert Sigwing Henry G. Silhon James H. Simmons Hart^ld T. Simunton E£mil H. Sinnwell George Sirokman

Organization

Home Address
i

Private Private Private

Battery F Bonne Terre. Missouri, R. F. D, No Headquarters Co. Loveland, Colorado Battery A Newark, New Jersey Headquarters Co. East Prairie, Missouri Battery F New York. N. Y., 6io West rzSth Street

Musician Third Class
Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Private
Pri\'ate

G

Mike Skihinski Simon Skolnick
John Slaski
Joseph F. Slater William H. Slater Joe Sliger Fred W. Smalbery

Private Corporal Private Private Private Private First Class Private Private Private Private First Cla^s Band Leader Supply Sergeant Private

Meehanie
Private First Cia^s
Pri\ate
Pri\-ate

Benjamin Smart James F. Smathers Claude W. Smith George A. Smith Harold L, Smith Harvey Smith John Smith John C Smith Junie Smith La\'.Tcnce E, Smith Lloyd E. Smity Ralph R. Smith Russell E. Smith Varnim C, Smith
William Smith
(Chester R.

Sm\ch

Headquarters Co. St. Louis. Missouri, 34iq Missouri Avenue Louisville, Colorado Battery D Battery D St. Paul, Nebraska Batter\' B Brooklyn, N. ^'., zqi Alembra Avenue Battery D Brooklyn. N, Y,, 141 N. Third Street Pueblo, Colorado Battery C Chillicothe, Missouri. 228 Gale Street Battery C Battery D Houston, Missouri Headquarters Co. Lancaster, Wisconsin Battery A Wausua, Wisconsin Battery D Kansas City, Missouri Pitkin, Colorado Battery D Battery C St. Louis. Mo., 840^ North Broadway Battery E Mount Clemens, Mich., 16 Clemens Park Battery D Brighton, Colorado Headquarters Co. Bastrop, Louisiana Vet. Detachm't Omaha, Nebraska Battery D Rutherford, North Carolina Med. Detachm't Council Bluffs, Iowa Headquarters Co. St. Lawrence, South Dakota Battery A Hebron, Nebraska Battery B Richmond, California, 1725 Clifton Avenue Battery C Lucerne. Wisconsin Battery B Miller. South Dakota Battery D Lancaster. Wisconsin
"

Corporal
Private First Class Private

George Sneddon Adelbert L. Snyder Arthur L. Snyder John J, Soffa
Christian Solberg

Mechanic
Private F-"irst Clai.5 Corporal Private Sergeant Private Private
F""irst

Walter A. Solom()n

Joakim
Joseph

J.

S<jlcm

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery
Batter\'
Batter},'

B
F

Sta. Rd.. Harthill Lanarkshire. Scotland

Victor, Colorado

D
C

Jasper, Missouri, R. F, D.

No.

z

Pueblo, Colorado

D
F F

Woonsocket, South Dakota

M, Sondergard

Harry Sonnedccker
Aurelle Sonnier

Batt£r\' Batter\'

Class

Albert R. Sorensfm

C B A B

Oklahoma Dakota Turton, South Daknta
City,

Oklahoma

Hettinger. South

Pueblo. Colorado

Cn^wley. Louisiana
Colfax, Wisconsin

Wagoner
Private First Class

Private
Private

__

Private
Private

Henry Spahnle Oresto Spanvelo Ralph A- Spear Rubin L. Speer James N. Spencer
William C. Spiccr Joe Spinuzzi Julius Staack Roy Stagner Peter A. Stamatis
Clarence

Private Private Private

Private

Sergeant Sergeant

M.

Stanfield

Musician First Class
Private First Class

Joseph A. Stankci David N. Stanley William B, Stansel
Isaac J Stapp ["rank Starginar

Corporal Corporal

Supply Company Battery E Battery C Battery C Battery C Battery C Battery l^ Supply Company Battery D Battery V Headquarters Co. Battery Ei Fleadquarters Co. Battery E Battery Battery C

Walton. Nebraska Pawnee, Colorado Doland. South Dakota Pueblo. Coloradn Asheboro, North Carulina Pueblo. Colorado Pueblo, Colorado
Syracuse, Nebraska

Salem, Missouri

Milwaukee, Wisconsin Bear River. Colorado Pueblo. Colorado
Abilene,

Kansas

D

Inman, Colorado Ward. Colorado Pueblo, Colorado

/

/.

ENLISTED
Rank
Private First Class Private First Class Corporal
Private Private
Private Private Private

MEN
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery
Batter>'

(Continued)

Namb
Ray W,
Staufler

ORGANlZATrON

HoME AddRESS
Haxtun, Colorado Englewood, Colorado Englewood, Colorado New York. N. Y., East 51st Strcec Howberi:, Colorado Telluridc, Colorado
i

A
B
B

Amos

Steck

John A, Stecklein John T. Steed
I^ill

D
E

C, Stellas

David

C

Stemen

D

Roy Stephenson
Isidore Sterling

Mess Sergeant
Private

William P. Stcrrett

Cook
Sergeant Private Corporal Private Private Private Sergeant f^nvate First Clas5

Harry Stettler John R. Stevens Loranza F. Stevens
Lucius P. Stewart William P. Stewart T hiimas M. Stiekne\'
John

V

Stiner
Stolz

Charles Stockham

Martin
F,arl

J

l~rederick

Stoneman

Cnok
Private

G. Stonemetz Otis R, Stoops

Musieian Seeoncl Class
Private Corporal

yVhrahym
Ira

O

Stout

C

Stout

Menr\
Leslie

H
R

Strjinkman
Street

Mess Sergeant
Private Private

tierdgcs Strickland

Battery F Battery B Battery B Battery D Headquarters Battery E Battery E Battery B Battery B Battery li Battery B Battery B Battery D Battery E Battery B Headquarters Headquarters Headquarters Battery A Headquarters
Batter>' Batter\'
F-"

Tupelo, Mississippi
Philadelphia, Pa.. 1515 South Sixth Street Cripple Creek, Colorado

Beaver Dam, Ohio
Co. Bayfield, Colorado

Dawson

Springs,

Kentucky

Gladden, Missouri Pueblo, Colorado
Hartford, Connecticut, Trinit\' College Wessington, South Dakota

Sedgwick, Colorado South Dakota Boulder, Oilorado Wellington, Colnradu Bryan, Ohio Co. Sterling, Colorado Co. Hartville, Missouri Co. Clifton, Colorado Wray, Colorado Co Nashville, Nrirth Carolina
Sturgis,

Sergeant Private Band Sergeant Private

Melvin Strommen Stning David H. Leo Slrohnagcl Struehhcry James

No

record

M

E

Iinglewixid. C<.>lorado

M

\-^

Wagoner
Private Private
Private
I-'irst

Michael Struck J(ihn O. Stuckey

August F.
Class

Stumme

Battery D Seward, Nebraska Headquarters Co. Colorado Springs, C<iloradn Kansas City, Kansas Batters' C Main Street Supply Company' Manhattan. Kansas Headquarters C^o. Vernon, Colorado

m

Daniel R. Sturges
(r^larenee J, Sullivan

Batter*,'

f-i

Pineville, Missouri

Battery

D
B C B

Madison, Se^uth Dakota

Sergeant Corporal
Private Private

John J Sullivan (George H. Sulli\'an

(Uth

F'ld Sig

Bn No

record

Batter\' Batter>'

Hartford. Connecticut, 7Q Cresent Street

William C Sullivan Reuel -I Sunhknv heodoix I- Sundquist Regt. Ordnance Sergeant Nnio \'. Su(Mnela Private First Class Private Francis B. Swallow Private Clifford H. Sweeten Swinney Sergeant Ernest
I I

Montrose, South Dakota Englewood, Colorado Supph' Company' Alamosa, Colorado felluride, Colorado Batter\' D Scranton, Pennsylvania Battery D Wetmore, Colorado [battery F
Batter\'
F^atterN
,\

W

Sterling. Crilfirado

Musician Third Class
Private First Class
Private
F"irst

Class

Horseshoer
Private First Class Corporal Corporal Horseshoer Stable Sergeant
Private Private

j. Tackett William F- Taken Churles L. Tanner Dclhert G. kattershall Charles H Taylor Miii-shiill M. Taylor

CKde

Pagosa Springs. Colorado Brt)okings, South Dakota Batter\ E Steamboat Springs, Colorado Hcaelquarters Co Durango. Colorado
i

-icadeiuarters Co.

Batter\-

A

Battcr>'

B
F

Hartford, Connecticut,

1

b8

Putman

Street

Flattery
F-iatter\'

Willie

G

T^aylor

Winfrcd C. Taylor
\'incent

Batter\'

B F

Durango, Colorado Colorado Springs. Colorado Paonia, Colorado
Gran, Missouri

W,

1Y>nkholT

Battery

C

Private

Milton V. Thelin Oscar A. Thell Peter Thcodoratos

Supply Company Leadville, Colorado Battery B Den\'er, Colorado
Batter},'

D

Dcn\"er, Colorado. \-^'\ Curtis Street

^-^'"'?

r
'y
// yr>

CNLISTED MEN
Rank
Pri\-ate

(Cc.ntinued)

Name
Albert C. Thiel

Or(";anization

Home Address
West Bend, Wisconsin Kansas City. Missouri, 415 Douglas
Carthage, Missouri, R. F. D. No. 4 Julcsburg, Colorado Hartford, Connecticut Hot Sulphur Springs, Colorado Grand Junction, Colorado
St.

Battery Battery Battery

Private
Private

Harry

L.

Thomas

Wagoner
Private

Lester Thomas Charles H. Thompson

A B B

Frank R. Thompson
I'Ved C.

Corporal Private First Class Private First Class Corporal Private Sergeant Corporal Corporal Private First Class

Thompson

Supply Company Battery B Battery D
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

A\'arner C. 'i'hompson

Curtis

M, Thornbury
Tiliey

E B
E
F

Colorado Springs, Colorado

Gus Thurston
Lawrence P.
Ellsworth Tillotson

Oklahoma

City,

Oklahoma
Dakota

Olalhe, Colorado
Gettsi'burg, South

B

Wagoner
Sergeant
Pri\-ate First Class

Lewis Tillotson George L. Tobin Elmer H. Todd William Todd

B Supply Company

E

Supply Company

Gettysburg, South Dakota Leadville, Colorado Craig, Colorado Leadville, Colorado

Private

Sergeant Private Horseshoer Private First Class Private Musician First Class Private
Pri\'atc

James Tod Kenneth W, Toler Arthur J. Tomlinson James S. Toppan John Towslak
Oscar O, Trainor Wille J. IVautwein Octave Trepanier

Maple Hill, Kansas E Med, Dctachm't Richmond. Indiana
Battery Battery B Battery E Battery E Battery C Battery C Headquarters Co. Battery C Battery Head^iuarters Co. Battery B Headquarters Co. Headquarters (Zo. Supply Company

D

Hudson, Wisconsin Denver, Colorado
Chicago, Illinois Aspen, Colorado Grimaldi, Colorado Waterbury, Connecticut Forest Park, Illinois Sarcoxie, Missouri. R. F, D. No.

Edward

F. Iriebes

Ora C. Tripk-tt
Richard Trout
Jose E. Trujillo

3

D

No

record
17,4th Street

Private First Class

Private

Nathan Twersky
John V. Twomey
Ra\'ini>nd L. Tyler

Musician Third Class Band Corporal
Private

Durango, Colorado York. N. Y., 5)S West Julesburg. Colorado

New

Rochester,

New
City,

^"ork

Albert R. Tyson

Nebraska

Nebraska

Private Sergeant Bugler Private Private

Henry Udahl Gustav Ugland
William Uhlig William J. Uldall Pedro Urvino

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

B
E

D
C
E

Huron, South Dakota Conde, South Dakota Kansas City, Mo.. 303 Hawick, Missouri

S. ^^'heeling Street

Pueblo, Colorado, 333 S. First Street

Corporal

Harry Van Alstine
Wilbert Van 1-look Frank Varni Sotcrios Varvichiotes
Eiefterios

Cook
Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private

H. Vassilion

First Class First Class
First Class

Earl G. Vaughn John E. Vearrier Alva D. Verley Bruno Verna

Battery F Supply Company Battery A Battery A Battery E Battery Battery C

Minnesota DeSmet, South Dakota San Francisco, California
N'linneapolis,

Chicago, Illinois Irondale, Missouri, Box No. 27

D D

Battery Battery Battery Battery

Daniel Vcsalo
First Class

B C

Denver, Colorado Virgil, South Dakota Bruce, South Dakota Flat River, Missouri New ^'ork, N. Y., 38^. Second Avenue

Musician First Class

Cook
Private

Sergeant

Cook
Corporal

Claude Vigil David Vinnik George P. Vizerakis Warren H. Voiers Paul G. Voight John Volk William Vollmcr Michael Vol^Mn Lawrence M, Vondy

E Taos, New Mexico Battery B New York, N. 'I".. 41Q Tenth Avenue Battery A Chicago. Illinois Headquarters Co. New Orleans. Louisiana Battery A St. Paul, Minnesota Battery E Chicago. Illinois. 1130 West 23rd Street Headc|uarters Co. Kansas City, Missouri. 2qiz Lawn Ave. Battery B Denver Colo,,, 44S1 N. Washington Ave. Battery F Snyder. Colorado

ENLISTED
Rank

MEN

ENLISTED
Rank
Private Private First Class Private First Class Private Private

MEN

(Continued)

Name
Paul A. Willman Hugh G. Willoughhy Percy K. Wilson Edward H. Whyte Carl j Wickert

Organization
Tjbth Amb Co. Battery F

Home Address

Kansas City, Missouri. 120S Holmes Street Sarcoxie. Missouri, R.F.D. No. i, Box 40 Supply Company Kansas City, Missouri, 1315 F. 41st Street
Battery B Battery E Supply Company Battery B Supply Company Battery F Battery A Headquarters Co.
Chicago, Illinois Fort Collins. Colorado
Lcadville, Colorado

Wagoner
Private First Class

John A. Wicklund
Walter B. Widetich I->ed W. Wiest Tony Wilkoski Barnard O. Williams Cedric D. Williams Mclvin Williams
1
.

Wagoner
Private Private

Brule,

Lawson, Colorado Nebraska
Brooklyn,

New

York, 177 Grand Street

Flaxtun. Colfirado

Musician Second Class
Private First Class Corporal

Albert T. Willis

Sergeant
Private Private First Class Private First Class Corporal Private First Class Private First Class
Private

Arthur

F.

Wilmoth

Clarence H. Wilson Ernest S. Wilson James L. Wilson Henry Winchester

Private First Class

Hubert B, Wing Clyde M. Winn John O. Winn Werner L Wirsing
Selmer E. Wirum Merle H. Wohlhuetcr George Wolf Clarence R- Woife Joseph W. Wolfe Casper T. Wolff Martin Wolfson Martin J. Wollenberg

Mechanic
Private

Sergeant Sergeant Private Private Private Corporal Private First Class Private Private First Class Private Sergeant Corporal
Private

Gunnison, Colorado Supply Company Lake Preston, South Dakota Battery B Colorado Springs. Colorado Battery Silverton. Colorado Battery A Orchard. Colorado Battery B Monument. Colorado Battery C White Rock, Colorado Headquarters Co. Durango, Colorado Headquarters Co. Boulder, Colorado Battery E Fort Morgan, Colorado Med. Detachm't Mansfield, Louisiana Battery F Orchard, Colorado Battery A Lake Preston, South Dakota Battery A Oldham, South Dakota Supply Company' Hetland, South Dakota
f-"

3Tird

Amb. Co.

No

record.

Myron W. Woodburn
William Woodin
Pearl R. Woods Clarence R. Woolford Allen E. Woomert James A, Worthingtfin

Headquarters Co. Odernburg, New York Battery D Madison, Wisconsin Battery B Chicago, Illinois, bzzi S. Park Avenue Battery C Kansas City. Kansas, 2000 N. 12th Street Headquarters Co. Palisade, Colorado Battery D Litchfield, Connecticut Battery A Lucas, iov.a Battery A Bismark, Missouri Battery A Reading, Pennsylvania Battery D Kansas Citv, Missouri
Battery B Headquarters Co. Headquarters Co. Battery B Battery B Battery Battery
St. Jc^seph,

Band Corporal
Private First Class Private Private Private Private First Class Private

Clarence Yeager ITomer Duff Yates

Missouri, 710

S.

Seventh Street

Haswell, Colorado
Ackley, Colorado

Leo A.
Albert

"^'enter

William Young

Dixon,

Illinois

W. Young Floyd S. Young
John H. Y'oung
Fluward G. Zaput Eidward Zeimet

Kansas City, Missouri
Bunker, Missouri
Hotchkiss, Colorado

F F

Private
Private

Edward
Albert

J.

Zeiser

Sergeant Private Private First Class Corporal Private First Class

Leonard A. Zelhaver

M.

Zeller

Mike Zochowski William M, Zoellner
Elmer A. Zuhike

Battery F Harrison, New Jersey Battery A Evanston, Illinois Battery F Chicago, Illinois, b4 5 N. Paulina Street Battery D Pueblo, Colorado Battery A Wilmette, Illinois Battery }' Toledo, Ohio Headquarters Co. Biehle, Missouri Battery A Sterling, Colorado
1

—172-

,/ ^'>

Officers
In the
Rank
Lieutenant- Colonel

Not With Regiment
Address
U. S
L!.

American Expeditionary Forces
Name
Army Army

Major Major
Captain Captain Captain Captain Fir.st Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First LieutenanC First Lieutenant Fir^t Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First LieutenanC First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant r^irst Lieutenant First Lieutenant First Lieutenant Second L eutenant Seeund L eutenant Second L eutenant Second L: eutenant Second L eutenant Second L eutenant Second L eutenant Second L eutenant Second Li eutenant Second Li eutenant Second L eutenant Second Li eutenant Second L eutenant Second L eutenant Second Li eutenant Second Li eutenant Second Li eutenant Second L eutenant Second L eutenant Second Li eutenant Second L eutenant Second L eutenant Second L eutenant

Ralph McCoy Huston L. Whiteside William L. Karnes Wjihur T. Gullion Habeeda A. Saidy
William
XL.

S.

Kansas City, Missouri 52nd and Madison Street Eugene, Oregon Manitou, Colorado
St. Louis,

Prfiser

Missouri

Edward N,

Wentwfirtin

Wilbur C. Bechtold Harold V. H. Boorean George W. Brown Ralph G. Bulkley Chester F, Coleman
Cle\'Lland

Manhattan, Kansas Laketon, South Dakota
Wheeling, West Virginia Denver. Cokirado Lynn, Indiana Fi<")re:.i, Kentuek\'

C
\

[^rost

Herbert I-. lams Leonard litz Arthur L HnuLlI
I

Man insburg.
I

West

X'lr^ginia

Phillip G, Jackson

Julian C. Jossey Prentiss B. Knox

Harold W. LansmR Frank W, Ridenour Beamis S. Rogerson

Kansas 'ImLUm. Ohio l-""lint, Michigan Forsythc, Georgia Terre Haute. Indiana DcsMoincs, loxva
luJson,

Jackson, ''hm MoundsNille, WL--t Virginia

(

Roymond

Sherer

Lexington, Kentucky'
Gleveland, Ohio

Malcolm C, Siclkes Robert O, Smith John G, Tillotson Chester D. Walz
Otto E, Darnell lanild H. Bennett Ary Cla\' Berry
(

Denver, Colorado Minneapolis, Minnesota
Louisville,

Kentucky

Fort Collins, Colorado
Den\-er, Coloradi'

Wilford Burk

Ralph E, Bray Jacob Bulger Frank B. Cain James Y. Clark Walter R. Gleveland Flmcs B Cox Ernest E. Dale [-"rank H, DeLaney Joseph W. Drybread
Albert S. Fenzel

Topeka. Kansas Kansas City. Missouri Monrovia, Indiana White, South Dakota
Madisonville, Kentucky

White Bear Lake, Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Ripley, Mississippi

Greenwood, Nebraska St, l^aul, Minnesota Edinburgh, Indiana MiJdIeton, Ohio
Williams, Indiana

Luther Wilbur Bryant

S,

Ferguson
Fischer

A
'\

Foster

LaCygne, Kansas Boulder, Colorado
St, Louis,

A Rowe

Garesehe

Missouri

Louis E. Grammer Charles S. Hedgewald

rerre Haute, [ndiana

New
New

Robert W. Hemphill Hollis J. Howell
Lester

Alban\', Indiana Norton, Kansas

Tully,

New ^ork

H

Hughes

Springs. Missouri

ffi

fi

^"'J?

OFFICCRS NOT WTIH REGIMENT
Rank
Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second Second
Li eutenant
Li eutenant

(Continued)

Namh;
Karl Jensen Richard J. Jones

Address

Gypsum, Colorado
Fort. Apache, Arizona Georgetown, Kentucky Lima, Ohio Pine Bluff, Arkansas Ankeny, Iowa Holly, Colorado Anderson, Indiana

eutenant eutenant eutenant L eutenant Li eutenant L; eutenant L eutenant Li eutenant Li eutenant L. eutenant L eutenant L eutenant L eutenant L eutenant L eutenant L eutenant L eutenant L: eutenant L eutenant L eutenant Li eutenant Li eutenant Li eutenant L eutenant Li eutenant L eutenant L eutenant L euCennnt

L L L

John C. Juett

Thomas G. Laney Thomas W. Leach Charles W. Likely Lorenzo W. Linville
Horace R. McClure George W. Miller Otto N. Miller Walter R. Nichols Earl A. Pivan Byron C. Potts William S. Rathburn James O. Sampson Frank Sargent

Fort Collins, Colorado
St. Clairsville,

Ohio

Thomas W.
Arthur

Schollenbc

Rex H. Schono\"cr
J. ShawClarence L. Smith Edwin S. Spencer

Denver, Colorado Ottawa, Kansas Denver, Colorado St. Louis, Missouri Holton, Kansas Denver, Colorado Williamsport, Indiana

Kentucky Kansas Duluth, Minnesota
Louisville,

Vermillion,

Luzerne
Stuart

M. Tidd

Tritch Kunneth V. Bergen
S.

Ray B. VanZant Morton Wakeley Sherman D. Watson
Calvin Webster

Webster Grove, Missouri Denver, Colorado St. Paul, Minnesota Parsons, Kansas Omaha, Nebraska Manhattan, Kansas Lincloln, Nebraska
Northfield.

John Whitney
Foster Wilson

Vermont

Rockwell, Iowa

-174—

x'/^^
c.

Enlisted
In the
Rank
Private

Men Not With
Organization
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

Regiment
IToME Address-

American Expeditionary Forces
C
E F

Name
Jose Byta

No

Private

Private Private Private
Private Private Private

Casper H. Ackcrman Jacob A- Ackerman William F. Acrce Jfjseph M. Adair

Record Brush, Colorado
Artas. South,

Dakota

B

Cardwell, Missouri

Dan W. Adams

Tom Adam
Charles C. Ader

F Cory. Colorado Supply Company Union City, Tennessee Battery E Ordway, Colorado Battery C Hersman, Illinois
Battery E Battery D Battery C Battery F Battery E Battery F Battery E Battery E HeadL|uartcrsCo, Battery F Battery F Battery A Battery F Battery B Battery B Battery A Battery B Battery E Battery E
Bernie, Missouri

Private
Pri\-ate

Private Private

Private Private
Private Private

Reg'tm'I Sergeant
Private
Pri\'atc

N'laji r

Ezra Adkins Louis E. Acbi Samuel H, Agncw Frank Ahcc Frank VV. Ahern Ernest C. Ahl William F, Aikin Nick Albany Phillip K. Alexander Roy L. Alexander Martin E. Allbrooks
Clarence Allen David R. Allgicr
Earl M. Allinson John Altamore

No

Record

City, Colorado Bowie, Colorado Salem. South Dakota

Canon

No

Record

Loveland, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Denver, Colorado Bliximfield, Missouri
Pcnsacnla,
Sterling,
l-"lorida

Private

Private Private
F^rivate

Private

Pri\ate First Class

Carl

Wallace f. Amick S. Anderson

Prnate
Pri\'ate Pri\-Gte

Private Private Private Private
Private First Class Private Private Private

Elmer L- y\ndcrson Hclmer y\ndcrson Oscar V. Anderson Otto Anderson
Robert W. Anderson Burl [V Andis

Supph' Company
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

K
F F

Sam .Xridriis Suphcn L. Ankle
/VK.mzo

Aragon

E A A
B

Colorado /\bcrdccn, South Dakota Gary. South Dakota No Record Otis, Colorado Empire, Colorado Loveland, Colorado Salem. South Dakota Lcad\'illc. Colorado Monroe, South Dakota No Record Wetmore. Colorado Steamboat Springs, Colorado Akron, Colorado

Dawson,
Steele,

New Mexico

Elbert E, Arcndall

Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private

William Arney Louis Armstrong Chester P. y\rnold
L'ving G. Arnold

A
F F

Missouri Sepanto, Arkansas Ad\'ance, Missouri
Wiggins, Colorado Steamboat Springs, Colorado

E
.

Charles N. Asher George H. Aubcrt

Chester Awstill
Joe Bacik

Supply Company Ironton, Missouri Headquarters Co. Cope, Colorado Ieadc|uarlcrs Co. No Record
I
.

Abram

B. Bailey

Private
Private Private Private
Private

Purl Baird

Edward M. Baker Osmund Baker
Oscar Bakkc

Battery Battery Battery Battery
Battery Battery Battery

A C B

Pueblo, Colorado

No

Record

Hayti. Missouri

A
E E
E

DeSmet, South Dakota Gypsum, Colorado Sinai, South Dakota
Sugar City, Colorado

Abram

E. Ball

//

m
i/

'CS^
r-r~-

•V

ENLISTED
Rank
Pr

MEN NOT WITH

R.EGIN4ENT

(Continued)

UNLISTED
Rank
PrivaLe Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private PrivaLe Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private
F^rivate

MEN NOT WITH REGIMENT
Organization
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

(Continued)

Name
John Bollinger
Joseph
R(jy

Home Address
Herriad. South Dakota

F

Bombano

D
E

Baumgardner

Alhert G, Bondurant Frederic J. Boness

B A

John Boni

D
E B

Ben

F.

Book

Missouri At wood, Colorado Baldwin, Colorado Dexter Missouri
St. Joseph,

Luis Boreli

John Borstad Harry S. Bossart Joseph P. Bowie

D
B
Colorado Springs, Colorado

D
B

Campo, Colorado
Perryville, Missouri

Edward Boxdorfer
Samuel N. Bradford Ralph A. Branch Clifford F. Bradmirc

Herman W. Breeding Fred Bretenback Ben Brewer William A. Brewer Bennic Brczee
Mike M. Brifey
William R. Brinson
E. Brockman Benny Brookman Mern E. Brooks Bruer A. Brown Edwin J. Brown George C. Brown Henry O. Brown Homer Brown John R. Brown Otis G. Brown Thomas J. Brown

Supply Company Bland, Missouri Battery E Mora, New Mexico Battery C Huron, South Dakota Supply Company Maiden, Missouri Battery B Cardiff, Colorado
Battery B Brewer, Missouri Battery D Rogersville, Missouri Battery A Akron, Colorado Battery C Battery D Coucta, Oklahoma Headquarters Co. Battery C Ell^on. South Dakota Battery F Headquarters Co. Huron, South Dakota Supply Company Bertrand, Missouri Battery E Spieer, Colorado Battery Seymour Missouri Battery D Niangua. Missouri Battery B Monument, Colorado Battery A Headquarters Co. Battery E Battery D Colorado Springs, Colorado Battery B Pueblo, Colorado

Roy

Private

Private
Private Private Private Private Private Private First Class

D

Herbert

S.

Brownlee

Flenry H, Brunner

Corporal
Private

Martin A, Bryan

Corpcral
Private Private Private First Class Private Private Private First Class Private

HoVard Bryant Roy Buchanan
Emil H. Buckenberger Joseph A. Buckholz

Samuel Buckncr

Henry Busing
George A. Bullard

Edward Burden Frank W. Burgcrt
Peter Burrieh

Private
Private Sergeant

Battery A Battery F Durangu, Colorado Battery F Battery E Headquarters Co. Cherrie, Colorado Conde. South Dakota Battery E Headquarters Co. Denver, Colorado Netherland, Colorado Battery D Altamont, South Dakota Battery A Bowie, Colorado Battery F

Private
Private

Private
Private

Norman M. Burke Frank H. Buskirk Percy O. Buterbaugh Lowell H. Buttrick George J. Buzzard

F Ouray, Colorado E Supply Company Nebraska City, Nebraska Colbran, Colorado Battery F Battery F
Battery-

Battery

Mark M. Bvouk
Joseph Caliari

Battery

D
E

Crested Butte, Colorado
Lead\'illc. Cok.irado

Private
Private

Ord Detachni't
Battery

Andrew C. Campbell
Clarence G. Campbell

Orchard. Colorado

Sergeant Corporal

Frank A. Campbell

Headquarters Co Denver, Colorado Battery A Padroni, Colorado

/ ff —177—

f

;J.

ENLISTED
Rank
Corporal
Private

MEN NOT WITH REGIMENT
Organization
Battery Battery Battery Battery

(Continued)

Name
John J- Campbell Leo W. Campbell Walter Campbell
Benecidetto
r^loyd E.

Home Address
Wiggins, Colorado
F~ort Collins,

Supply Company Leadville, Colorado

E

Private Private
Private

Supply Company

Colorado

Camposano

E C C

Chicago,

Illinois

William C. Capper

Supply Company

Bugler
Private Private Private Private

Tapps

Jose Z, Carabojal

Mark C Carey

William I. Garlock Fred H, Carlson Private Lee Carman Reg'mt'l Supply Sergeant Raymond H. Carpenter
Private Private Private Private Private Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Private

Van Carroll Ben A Carter
Jose B. Casias

M. Chambers J. Chambley Charles M. Chase Howard Chase
Orval

Samuel

Med. Detachm't Headquarters Co, Battery D Supply Company Supply Company Battery A Headquarters Co. Headquarters Co. Battery F Battery C Headquarters Co. Headquarters Co.
Battery A Battery F Battery B Battery C Headquarters Co. Battery A Supply Company Battery Battery Battery D Battery Battery Battery Battery A Battery Battery A Battery E Battery Battery E Battery E

Brookings, South Dakota
Rockville. Missouri

Weldona, Colorado

Carbondale, Colorado

Dorotio Chavez
Jose B. Chavez

Colorado Armel, Colorado Durango, Colorado
Littleton,

Tony Chiaro
Earl P. Chilson

Christian Christensen

Private Private
Private Private Private Private First Class
Private

Private Private

Private Private First Sergeant
Private
Private

Jens Christensen Orrin P. Chuman Benjamin E. Clark Edward F. Clark Edward T. Clark Robert S. Clark Frank E. Claus Ray Claus Lester Claynon Otto W. Clayton Earl C- Cleveland John R. Clevlen Allen R. Clinton

Colorado Springs, Colorado Redfield, South Dakota Palisade. Colorado Erwin. South Dakota Auburn, Nebraska
Elkton, South Dakota
Hale, Missouri

D D D D D D

Denver. Colorado Colorado Springs. Colorado Colorado Springs. Colorado Amherst. Colorado

Duncan, Missouri Ordway. Colorado
Popular
Bluff. Missouri

D

Kansas City, Missouri
Essex, Missouri
Sikeston, Missouri

Max

Clodfelter

Private

Jake E. Clolinger

Private
Private Sergeant Private Private Private Private
Private

Frank Blumc Judge Coakley Ralph Coatsworth Edward N. Coleman George H. Coleman Jesse Coleman

Supply Company
Battery F Sillt, Colorado Headquarters Co. Mexico, Missouri
Battery

D

Thomas
Francis

E. Collins
J.

Colwell

Private First Class
Private

Anthony
Phillip E,

F.

Comstock

Conway

Sergeant
Private Private
Private

Private
Private Private

Private

Floyd E. Cooper J. Corcoran Robert L. Corlis Ficjre Cornela Louis P, Cortson John Coss Frank Costa William Coughennur

James

Supply Company Supply Company Battery E Red Cliffe. Colorado Battery A Brush, Colorado Battery E Gunnison, Colorado Battery C Huron, South Dakota Headquarters Co. Silverton. Colorado Battery C Hitchcock, South Dakota Headquarters Co. Parker, Colorado
Battery C Battery F Battery A Battery Battery D

D

Fleming, Colorado Colorado. Springs. Colorado Marshfield, Missouri

m

ENLISTED
Rank

MEN NOT WITH REGIMENT

(Continued)

/

ENLISTIiD

MHN NOT WITH REGIMENT

(Continued)

Rank

/

/

V
^

'O

EWLISTCD
Rank
Private

N'lEN

NOT WITH REGIMENT
Organization
Battery F Battery C Battery Battery D Battery A Battery A Battery B Headquarters Headquarters
F^""

(Continued)

Name
Donald F. Foote Carl B. Forsman

Home Address
Victor, Colorado

Sergeant Private Private Private

Roe Fortner
John B, Fowler Werle E. Frank
Earl Franklin

Pueblo, Colorado Bloomfield, Missouri

Brookings, South Dakota
Elba, Colorado

Mechanic
Private Private Private Private Private Private Private
Private

Carl E. Franson Kelly O. Fratick Albert H. Frazce

Haxtum, Colorado

Co Co
Lake
City, Colorado

Vernon A. Freeman
Jacob Frick

John Frigurski Enerett Frymire
Everett

M. Fulcher

Battery D Battery E Headquarters Battery F Battery A

Salem, South Dakota

Co
Charter Oak, Missouri

Private
Private

Matt Cabns
Frank Gagliardi
Stephen
S.

Private Private

Gall

Private Private Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private
Pri\'ate

Peter J, Gallagher Ernest W. Gallemore Earl E, Galor

Harry A.
Antonio

Gammon
J.

Garcia Lyman B. Garcia Garino George Edward E. Garrett
Forrest D. Gates

Walter L. GaLzkc Gazcwood John
I.

Albert

Gay

Lester K. Gear

Private
Private First Class

Henry R. Gebhardt
Ernest O, Geislcr Charley A. George Ralph E. Gcrber

Private Private
Private
Private Private First Class

Louis D.

Germ

Albert A. Gcrtson

Henry W. Getzm
Chett R. Gibson Edward C. Gibson

Pri\ate Private
Private

Battery B Battery C Battery F Battery E Battery B Battery A Battery B Battery C Battery B Battery C Supply Company Battery B Batccry F Battery E Battery B Battery E Battery A Battery B Battery F Headciuarters Co Battery C Battery A Battery D Battery F
Botter\'

Pueblo, Colorado

Carbondale, Colorado Milner, South Dakota PuLblw, Colorado Winston, Colorado

Rcmah. Cl^lorado

Roek\-aic, Colorado

Tulare, South

Dakota

Bear River, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Steamboat Springs, Colorado Haswell, Colorado Alma, Kansas
Bloomfield, Missouri

Dcn\er, Colorado
Fort Morgan, Colorado Milwaukee, Wisconsin Montrose, Colorado Cripple Creek, Colorado Walden. Colorado Wayne. Nebraska Buena Vista, Colorado

F

Ward

S. Gilbert

Sergeant Private Private

Harry D. Gilderslceve Roy H. Giles

Cook
Private Private Pru'ate Private

W. Gill LeRoy M. tjilmorc
Alfred

Battery Battery Battery Battery

E B
E E

John R.

Gil.snn

Thomas P Girvin Fred W. Goddard Roy D. Goddard
Clarence G. Gocder Joseph H. Goeken Walter P. Goforth
Clear C. Golden
lose B.

Private Private Private

Salem, South Dakota Headquarters Co. Vernon, Colorado Kansas City, Missouri Battery D Headquarters CoHcadquarters Co. Grand Junction, Colorado Holyokc, Colorado Batter>' A Rangely. Colorado Battery D
.

Sergeant Private Private Private Private

Gonzales

Battery F Battery F Battery B Headquarters

Puxico, Missouri
O'Neill,

Nebraska

Co
Micola, Missouri

William F. William
J.

Goodman
Grace

Elmer G. Goodrick

Battery Battery Battery

E A E

Brush, Colorado
Detroit, Michigan

/

/ y/ ry
—181-

ENLIS"["HD MI-:N N(Vr

WITH RHGIMtCNT
Orcanization
Battery C Battery B Battery B Battery A Battery C Battery D Battery D Battery F Battery A Battery C Battery D Battery A Battery D Battery F Battery D Battery A Battery F Battery F Battery B Battery B Battery A Battery D Headquarters Co. Battery B Battery A

(Continued)

Rank
Private Private First Class Private Private Sergeant

Name
Nciah P- Graham Alfred E. Cray

Home Address
Hayti, Missouri
Byers, Colorado Bragg City, Missouri

Frank Gray Avery O. Green
Charles S. GreenHaum Frederic S. Gregory James Greic

Sergeant Private Private
Cfirporal

Laramie. W^-oming Wallace, Idaho Brookings, South Dakota

Amil Grent
Michael Gretch

Haxton, Colorado

Private
Private

Lynn

Griffee

Private Private Private Private
Private Private

James E. Griffith Solomon Grine Nick Groff Samuel B. Groves John Guadagno William G. Guhin Glenn O. GiMn
Charley
Hilario

Raton, New Mexico Crested Butte, Colorado Orchard, Colorado Pueblo. Colorado Aberdeen, South Dakota

Private Private Private Private Private Private
Private Private

M

Griuld

Gomez

Hipoiito Gonzal

Loyd

E.

Selmer

Goodman Granum
P,

Volga. South Dakota

Guy G Grannis
Edward
Greh
Cecil O. Cjreen

Private Private Private
F^rivate

Roger M, Green Robert L. Greer

Henry

A.

Grumkc

Frederick H, GruoLlmann

Private Private Private
Pri^'ate

Dominic Gughilmino
Isodore CiuitereT

Abbott, Colorado Supply Company Lake Preston, South Dako Trull, Colorado Battery E Stanton, Nebraska Vet. Detachm't Supply' Company Nebraska City, Nebraska Battery A Dawson, New Mexico Battery B Headquarters Co- Crested Butte, Colorado Campo. Colorado Battery F Battery C Nepesta, Colorado SuppK' Company Pcnasci"), New Nexieo
Battery Battery Battcrv Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery
Batter>'

\Vm. Rouer Gulliford Louis G. Gunkel
Philip

Private
Private
Private Private

Gunther

Mcgirio Curule
Albert L. Hackett Harley L, Hagerman

D
A
E
F
Colorado
St
Si'^nim^,

Sergeant Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private
Private Private

Lowry Hagerman
Virgil Flaggart

Colorado

Bernard C.

Hagmann

C

Pauk Nebraska Tulare, South Dakota
Penrose, Colorado
Miller,
Littleton,

Guy Hahn
Lester E, Hainline Charles Halbig

D
C
E5

Henry N, Hale
Ralph E. I-lalgerson Fred Halgren

B

South Dakota Colorado
Colorado

Dunk

Hall
I

Murle O.

lalsey

Battery Battery Battery
Batter\'

E A C C
B

Sterling,

F~Cird^villc,

Kentucky

AnthoHN W. Hamilton
William H. Hamlin Ole S. Hammer

Pueblo, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado LaValla, Missouri

Sergeant Private
Private
Private First Class

Anning

S.

Haminond

Frederick iL
I-Iarry S.
I

Hammond

laney

George Hanik
Joe Albert

Private

Hank ins

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

D
A
V

E B
B F

Toronto. South Dakota Lake City, Colorado Guffey, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Sih'er Plume, Colorado Richards, Colorado

-182-

//

A.

y

UNLISTED ME:N NOT WITH REGIMl-NT
Rank
Private Private Private Serpcant Private Private Private Private Private Private Private

(Continued)
\ li".)MF.

Name
Frederick

ORCiANIZATION

ADi:)Rf;ss

W. Hannibal

Chris j. Hansen Ingvald Hanson

Harding Oren Hargis Louis HariR Martin F. Harnagel Oliver Harness
F^aLiI C).

Ira

Edward

Harney Ralph E. Harper George Dana Flarriman
L,

Wagoner
Private Private Private Private

Glen C, Harrington Bain Flarris
tjeorge B. Harris

Battery A Battery A Battery A Headquarters Co. Battery D Battery C Battery B Battery B Battery C Battery A Headquarters Co. Supply Company
Battery Battery

Kimball, Nebraska Akron, Colorado
Arlingtfjn,

Lincoln.

South Dakota Nebraska

Toledo, Missouri
Pueblo, Colorado

Newtonbert, Missouri
Sillwcll,

Indiana

Swallows, Colorado

Rush, Colorado Berwick, Maine Lead\'illc, Colorado

B A

Charles R. Harshbarger

Fleadcjuarters Co.

Alva
I

F,.

Hart
\

Wagoner
Private
Private Private Private
Private

lenry V.

lart

John Hart
Herbert C. Haskins Clark W. Hastings Lewis C, Hatfield

John W. Haug
Zunic L. Haworth Henry G. Hay Walter Hayes Benjamin O. Flayncs

Private Private
Private Private

Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private

Samuel

].

Haynes
lebel

F_J\\arJ 1-Livs

Ikn

I

I.

1

William W, P-lecht George Hec^eh

Roy
I

Llefley
I

lenr\'

Lhn
1

r-rcd

W,
1<
I 1.

Icilncr
1

Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Private Pri\atc Private
Pri\"ate

Osear

lellbcek

Wm.

1

lelm

Arthur Hemmmsihaus Andy Henderson Fred Henni
Allxrl A.
I

lenning

Drue
lohn

G
1

lensLy Icpphergcr
1

Private

Arthur Llerhcrt (\iliMn^ Herendez (iarl John Herman

Private
Private Private
Pri\'ate

Herman A. Hermes George M. Hcssig
Oscar L. Hexom Andy Hieks Thomas A. Hiebler Joseph Higlen Roy Hildreth William M, Hill Jacob Hinigaman John A. Hinternter Nick Hirbish

Private Pri\ate Private
Pri\ate

Battery C Senath, Missouri Supply Company Leadville, Colorado Battery C E^riggsdale, Colorado Headquarters Co. Cjrand Junction Colorado Battery A Merino, Colorado Battery B Colorado Sprinqs, Colorado Battery E Limon, Cl:^loradl Lleadquarters Co. Headquarters Co. \\'uKey, South Dakuta Battery Flandnan, South Dakota Supply Company Supply Company Parma, Missouri Battery D kVascr, Colorado Battery E Montrose, Colorado Battery A Iilkton. South Dakota Battery Li Elkton, South Dakota HeadL|uarttrs Co. Armel, Colorado Battery F Battery E'.lkton, South Dakota Battery L^ E^ueblij, Colorado Battery A layti, Missouri Battery L Battery B Wardell, Missouri Battery B Julesburg, Colorado Battery A Waldona, Colorado Battery C Mieola. Missouri Battery Black Hawk, Colorado Headquarters Co. Griffith, Cr.lorado Battery Ei Battery D Sheridan Lake, Colorado Battery C Battery C Puehio, Colorado Battery D Madison, South Dakota Battery C Kennctt, Missouri Battery F Maneos. Colorado Battery Cardwell, Missouri Headquarters Co. W ra\', Coloraelo
>

D

D

1

D

!•"

HeadL~|uartcrs Co. Eekley. Colorado

Private
Pri\'ate

Private Sergeant

Supply Company Leadville, Colorado Battery B Denver, Colorado Battery D Tabcrnash. Colorado
Battery

Edwin

Niles

\

litehcoek

A

Laramie,

W\oming

— 183

"^^-^^J?

I:NLISTED MliN

NOT WITH REGIMENT
Organization
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery
Batterv'

(Continued)

Rank
Sergeant Private First Class Private Private Sergeant Corporal Private Private Private Private Private Sergeant Private

Name
Samuel Hitchcock

Home Address
Laramie, Wyoming Ouray, Colorado

Matt
Joe
J.

Hitti

A E
F

Fred M. Hobson
Hoffer

Milton C, Hoffman Albert F. Hollenhcck Clarence B. HoUenbeck Francis L. Holt
Charles

E C B B
F

Fort Collins, Colorado Colorado Springs, Colorado Nederland, Colorado

Bartery

Hoon
L.

Marcus

Hoover

Joseph L. Hopkins Everett R. Hopper

Kenneth C. Hornbaker
Bert Florner Charles E, Horning Granville E. Hosfelt Fern G. Hotzel Prince Howard

Cook
Sergeant Private Corporal Private Private Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Sergeant Private Private
Private Private
Private

Sherman H. Howard
Bernard A. Howell Robert Henr\' Huber

Andrew Hughes Roy Hughes
Sylvester Hughk-tt

Arthur E. Hultquist

Aage Humle
Richard A. Hunt Robert L. Hunt Oscar J. Hunch Clyde R. Hyatt

Battery C Battery A Clear Lake, South Dakota Liberal. Kansas Battery F Battery Fort Collins, Colorado Headquarters Co. Battery B Campbell, Missouri Battery E Wallace, Idaho Supply Company Wappello, Missouri Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Battery D Kansas City, Mi>souri Battery F Battery F Newcastle, Wyoming Battery B Perryville, Missouri Battery F Maiden, Missouri Battery B FIcsperus, Colorado Battery C Headquarters Co. Laird, Colorado Battery A Aberdeen, South Dakota Battery A Martz, South Dakota Headquarters Co- Durango, Colorado Headquarters Co. Eaton, Colorado Battery F Montrose, Colorado

D

James E- Hyde

Supply Company
Battery Battery Battery Battery

Herman

A. Ilg

Alex- Irvine

A C

Sterling,

Colorado Coal Creek, Colorado

Guy

L. Ish

D
C

Private Private Private Private Private Private
Private

Other E. Isley

Grand Lake, Colorado Canon City, Colorado

Ross H. Jacobs William L. James
Joe C. Janoski Charles W. January

Meninta Jarrirsma
Rafael Jaurigue

Private Private

Private
Private Private Sergeant

Private Private Private

Private
Private Private Private Private

Robert Jcnner Walter D. Jennings Gustave Jcssen Hermina Jewink Willis L. Johns Algon B. Johnson Earl C. Johnson Maurice O. Johnson Ralph Johnson Ray C. Johnson Seth A. Johnson Sherman Johnston b>ank G. Jones Fred T. Jones

Battery E Battery Battery C Battery E Battery A Battery C Battery B Battery C Battery Headquarters Co.

D

Pueblo, Colorado Freeman, Missouri Padronia, Colorado

D

Fort Lupton, Colorado White, South Dakota

Supply Company Dexter, Missouri Headquarters Co. Collbran, Colorado Battery B Julesburg. Colorado Battery C Sturgis, South Dakota Battery B Eales. South Dakota Battery B Julesburg, Colorado Battery A Arlington, South Dakota Headquarters Co. Gideon, Missouri Battery B Gorman, South Dakota Supply Company Sikeston, Missouri

J7'

Rank

f/

.7

flNLISTI^D

MBN NOT WITH RtlGIMENT
(

fContinued)

Rank
Private Private Coiporal
Pri\'ate
I

Name;
Icrbert
Ci.

)r<;aniza"i ion

Home Addpbss
Oldham, South Dakota

LaJerer

l:lmer T, Lane

lames B. Laney lames C. Lang
["rank
r")laf

Battery Battery Battery
Battery Battery

A B

C

D
C
F

Private Private

Lange

Larson

Private Sergeant

Corporal Private
Private

Lary Paul G, Lalhrop Vir«il F, Lathrop
I'^Jwin P.

Daniel P. Lavin
("harles F.

Lawson

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

E F A E A
C<.^.

Green Bay, Wisconsin Kansas City, Missouri Harried, South Dakota Brush, Colorado Montrose. Colorado

Guymon, Oklahoma E^lkton, South Dakota
Frankcla\', Missouri

Private
f^rivate

Private
Private

Walter W. Lawson Lewis L, Layer Henry S, Layton William B. Leatherman

p-leadeiuarters Cs\

Louvicrs, Colorado
Silver Lake. Mi'^souri

Headquarters Battery E
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

E
F

Private

Private
Private
Private

Ameal LeBouhe Leslie M. LeCron Robert F. LcCrone
Miles
Oliver
I.

D
F

Walden, Colorado Lurton, South Dakota Des Moines, Iowa
Forgan, Oklahoma
Alliance,

Lee
Lefller

D
C

Ohio

Private
Private Private Private Private Private
Private

J.

Pueblo, Colorado

William Lehman Richard O. Leise Thomas H. Lett Truman Leuderback Lrvin Homer Liggue
iLinersiin
\l.

D

F Supply Company

Liley

Private
I^rivate I^rivate

Mart

Lilly

Private First Class

William E. Linafelter Lrnest Alexander Linklatc Harold C^ Linn

Corporal
Private-

Norman

L. Liteh

Band Leader
Private
Private Private Private Private Private Private

Lewis L. Loekett Lee M, Loekhart Samuel M, Logan Joseph Lohman

Roy T, Luhmeycr Gamie Lombardi Benjamin A. Long Marion H. Long
William Loos Alodino Le>pez Alired T. Lovestrand Robert J Lowery (Uto J. Ludwig
lidgar
i

Private Private Private
Private Private Private
Stable Sergeant

Bertrand, Missouri Battery A Crook. Colorado Battery B Flat River. Missouri Battery F Olathc. Colorado Headc|uarters Co. Battery F Alpina. South Dakota Headquarters Co. Castle Rock. Colorado Battery Oacona, Colorado Battery A Sterling, Colorado Battery F Saguache. Colorado Headquarters Co, Rupert, Idaho. Battery B Deer Trail, Ccjiorado Battery E K-lount Carmel. Iowa Battery A Battery B Battery E Obirm, "IT-nnessee Battery C Pueblo, Colorado Battery A Fleming, Colorado Battery C Aguilar, Colorado Battery y\ Stoneham, Colorado

D

Supply Company Grand Rivers, Kentucky
Battery Battery

A
E

I.

Lyman

lames W. L\neh
k^dward
L:.

Supply Company
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

Mlaas

F

Montrose.

Ci:

lorado

Private

lirnest T.

Maddock

B
E
i\

Pueblo, Coloi ado

Private Private Private
f^rivate

Rubl Maestaz
Carl E, Maier

Kansas City, Missouri
Crest clI Butte, Colorado

Private First Class

Private
Private

Jacob Malcncik Joseph Malenski [Tank Mara Leroy E. Mareellus

D
B
A E
F

Supply Company'
Pueblo, Colorado
Liolyokc, Colorado
1 ruen, South

Herman

B. Marcjin

Dakota

Private

["erdinando Marscnalla

rL

{

/

1

/

'

IINIJSTI'D

MHN \0T WITH REGIMENT
Organization
Battery

(Continued)

Rank
Private Private
Private

Name
Henry H. Marsh
Jose D. Vlartine-

Home Address
Tungsten, Colorado Penasco, New Mexico

D

Supply Company
Battery E Headquarters Co. Supply Company Headquarters Co. Battery B Battery C Battery E Battery A Battery C Battery D Battery C Battery E
Batter\

Rosendo Martinez
Edison Mason Hugo H. Mason

Private
Pn\'ate First Class Private

Pn\ate
Private Private
Private

F'irst

Class

Weaver Mason 2ack C. Mason Andrew N. Matheny
John Matthews, Jr. Anton B, Matson Lee H Mattoon
Perry R. Maydeld
Bartlctt MeBride John W. McCain

Pri\'at(j First

Class

Private
Private

Durango. Colorado Popular Bluff. Missouri Durango, Colorado Springfield, Missouri Raymer, Colorado Oak Creek, Colorado Amherst, Colorado Canon Cit\', Colorado Lucerne, Colorado Swallows, Colorado
Ci".)pc,

Private
Private Private First Class Sergeant

Charles E.

McCaminon

A

Colorado Colorado

McCarthy Thomas H. McCarthy
Richard
\.

Battery Battery

D
B

Elkum. South Dakota
Fort
Collin'^,

Serjeant
Pri\'ate

Philip H.

McCary

I"Icadc|uarters Co,

James V McClellan
Arthur 'F N'tcCiintock
Denzil McClure
Earl L. NfcCone Otto J, N'leCorkle Walter J Mc("~(,urt

Private
Private Pri\ate Private Private Private
Pri\'ate

Perry G. McCrary Charley McCulley

Private Private

Private
Private
Private

John L. McDaniel John A McDonald Harry E, McGhee

Battery F Supply Compan>' Mount Carmel, Illinois Battery A Blorimington. Indiana Supply Compan>' Julcshurg, Colorado Headc|uarter^ Co. Eldorado, Kansas Battery B Buffalo. New ^'ork Cimmarron, Colorado Battery F Battery C Caruthers\'i!le, Missouri Supply Company Charleston, Missouri
I

Grand Junction, Colorado Grand Juncticjn, Colorado

Private Sergeant Cnrporal Private Private Private Private Private First Class Private Private Pri\ate Private Private Private Private Private Private Private
Private

Thomas McGirr Thomas McGlnchlin Fred Shaw McGuirc Stanley McHatten
John
F. K'IcHuah
11.

Walter

McKce

Da\'id F. Meivinne>'

Battery h" Battery C \n.>]^u\ Colorado. WessmgCon, South Dakota Battery B Battery F Battery C Sugar Cit\', Colorado Battery E Gypsum, Colorado Hcadeiuartcrs Co, Grand Junction, Colorado Lithium, Missriuri Battery E Headquarters C< Mesa, Colorado
),

Donald McLean Pcler T. McNalley Ralph McQuery
Lester B.

McWade

Joseph Wm, Medley Alexander Meininger Louis G. Meissner Ralph L, Mcllom Donald J, Mcllor
Christ E. Merchcs

Supply Compan\' Supply Compan>' Flutland, South Dakota Battery D Granby, Colorado Batter\ A \''illisca, Iowa Hcadc|Liarters Co, Holgate, Ohio Fort Morgan, Colorado Battery E Battery B Orient, South Dakota Battery A Brandt, South Dakota Russell Gulch, Colorado Batter\- D Supply Company Oldham, S.)uth Dakota
Battery B Battery B Battery A Battery Battery E Battery Headquarters Co Battery C Battery A Supply Company
Sal(

Aron E. Meredith Royal E. Meredith

,

Nehi

Roy

T. Merritt

Anton Mcsojcdec
MeSteek\Clifton A. Metcalfe Edward Mctzler Paul Michel
Jij:>eph

D

Pueblo, Colorado

Private Sergeant Private Sergeant Private

D

Boulder, Colorado

Cassius B. Middlemist
J- Migot August Mihsfeldt

Private
Private

Paul

Franktown, Colorado Hoyt, Colorado Dcn\'er, Colorado Glen Rock, Nebraska

Battery

F

-187—

S"^<1<A^ "^r -"'^$^:

tlNLIST[-:D

MEIN NOT WITti REGIMENT
Organization
Battery C Battery B Battery F Battery B Battery A Battery B Battery C Headquarters Battery Battery F Battery F Battery E Headquarters Battery Battery C Battery B Battery Battery F'Battery F Battery E Battery Battery C Battery C Headquarters Battery A Battery C Battery A Battery C Battery C Battery E Battery A Headquarters

(Continued)

Rank
Private

Name
James C, Milford

Home Address
Kingman, Kansas
St. Louis, Missouri,

Sergeant Private Private
Private
Private Private

Thomas

F. Milford

4800 Fountain Street

George Milicedic Milan Milich

Pueblo, Colorado
Sterling,

Edwin

L. Miller

Colorado

James E. Miller Ralph G. Miller
Alfred Millier

Dorino, Missouri Pueblo, Colorado

Private

Co.
Greeley, Colorado Kansas City, Missouri
Perryville, Missouri Co. Grand Junction, Colorado

Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Bugler Private Private Private Private Private Private
Private

James M. Mitchell Lawrence E. Moad George L- Mobley Felix Monier A. H. Moore George Moore

D

D D

Moore Vurley C. Moore Charles E. Morgan
Victor L.

Caruthersville, Missouri
Philips,

James E. Moriarty Arthur W. Morin
Estace C. Morris

South Dakota

Morter Earl E. Mortimer John H. Moss Harry A, Mott
S.

Wm.

D

Oak Creek, Colorado Hot Sulphur Springs, Colorado
Hitchcock, South Dakota

Paul Mudroch Pete M. Muhvich

Roy M. Mullen
Delno L. Mullin Lloyd J. Mullins James R. Mulvaney John Mungcr
Alvin

Munson

Harry J. Murphy John A. Murphy Abe L. Myers
Stephen E. Myers

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery

E

Co. Grand Junction, Colorado Louisville, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Labatte, Kansas Boone, Colorado Hayti, Missouri Loveland, Colorado Erwin, South Dakota Co. Eckley, Colorado Butler, Missouri

D D
E

Oldham, South Dakota Kremmling, Colorado Norwood, Ohio
Sedgwick, Colorado
Caruthersville, N'lissouri

Private Private

Private
Private Private Private

N. Nation Walter Nea Guy W. Neal Andrew Nealen

Wm.

C
E

C
F

Brush, Colorado

Thomas

Neary George Negomir
J.

D

Albert Nelson

Private Private

Ambers M. Nelson

Anvy Nelson
David W. Nelson Frank H. Nelson
Clarence Ness
lorkcl

Sergeant Sergeant Private Private
Private Private Private Sergeant Private
Private Private

Pueblo, Colorado B Supply Company Oland, South Dakota Supply Company Moorehouse, Missouri Supply Company Lake Preston, South Dakota Battery D Sulphur Springs, Colorado Battery C Lamar, Colorado

Netland

Ray

Nettletun

Otto W. Neurrann,
Forrest A.

Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery Batu-ry

D
F
Jerauld, South

Dakota

Newens

E A A

Fort Collins, Colorado Fort Morgan, Colorado Fort Morgan, Colorado

Ernest L. Newlander Amos B. Newton
Leslie

D D
C
I-"

Denver, Colorado, 245 Josephine Street

Hayward, Missouri
Pueblo, Colorado Montrose, Colorado

D. Newton
L. Nichols

Edgar

Bat cry Battery
L

— 188—

f/

/

ENLISTED
Rank
Private Private Private Private Private
Private

MEN NOT WITH REGIMENT
0R(.ANI2ATI0N
Battery

(Concinued)

Name
William H. Nichols

Home Address
Lcadville, Colorado

B
Naturita, Colorado

Eugene Noble John \\. Nordlunci Martin O. Norris Neil W. Northey Charles B. Norton

Sergeant Private
Private

Herman

C. Nuffcr Frederick W. Nugent

Supply Company,' Battery F Battery C Battery A Battery C Battery E Battery B
Battery B Battery F Battery F Battery E Battery E Supply Compan>' Battery C Battery E Supply Company Battery F Battery B Battery F-^ Battery A Battery A Headi.|uarters Co, Battery E Med. Dclachm't
Battery Battery

Wyatt, Missouri Crook, Colorado Nederland, Colorado Preston. Idaho Florence, Colorado

Frank E. Obrien

Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Sergeant Private Private Private Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private
Private Private

Edwin J. Ohlsen Matt Ollila
Albin Olson David Olson Fred O. Olson Richard N. Olson

Loup

City,

Nebraska

Telluride, Colorado

Salem, South Dakota Montreal, South Dakota
Arlington, South

Dakota

Thomas

E-

O'Mahoney

Leadville. Colorado

Henry P. Oniell Evan Opheim Louis Orazem
Llewellyn C, Osborn

Mound

City, South

Dakota

PuebU), Colorado

Roy M. Osborn
Wesley E. Osborn
Oliver

M. Osmus

George M. Ott

Edward W. Owens
Alejandro PadiUa

Loveland, Colorado Haxtum. Colorado Iroquois, South Dakota Wray, Colorado Denver, Colorado Kansas Cit>', Missouri

A

Cimarron,

New Mexico
Dakota

Private Private
Private

James B. Padrnos James W. PaisleyCharles W. Palmer Thomas B. Palmore
George G. Palmquist Elbert L. Pannebaker
Virgil Papasotir

E

Redfield, S^uth

Private Private Private
Private

Private Private Private Private

Theodore Parmer Edwin Samuel Parmely Bozo Pasko Harvey L. Patch
Leslie Pate

Private
Private Private

Gus

T. Patsantara William Patterson Hans Paulson Earl E. Peak Mikkcl Pederson John Perrier
Jesse S. Pepple Ralph Perl

Corporal
Private Private Private

Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private

Bowman

Peterson

Carl H. Peterson Edward C. Peterson

Harry E. Peterson Harry F. Peterson Henr\ Peterson
Jens Peterson Joseph Peterson
Leslie Pctrie

Supph- Company Moorehouse, Missouri Powe, Missouri Battery F Persimmon, Kentucky Battery B Supply Company Talmape, Nebraska Battery B Oakes, North Dakota Battery D Krcmmling. Colorado Headquarters Q-\~^Battery B Miller, South Dakota Battery E Newcastle, Colorado Battery F Supply Company Franklin, Missouri Battery E Walcott, Colorado Suppls' Company' Pontiac, Illinois Headquarters Co, Hudson, South Dakota Denver, Colorado Battery B Supph" Company Arlington, South Dakota Supply Company,' Grindstone. Colorado Battery F Fleadquarters Co. Columbus, Indiana Supply Company Supply Company Lead\'ille, Colorado Battery B Castle Rock, Colorado Supply Company" Lake Preston. South Dakota Pueblo, Colorado Battery D Battery B Supply Company Arlington. South Dakota Headquarters Co. Sedalia, Colorado Headquarters Co. Yuma, Colorado

ENLISTL'D

MCN NOT WITH REGIM[£NT
Or(;anization
Battery Battery Battery Battery

fContinuccl)

R.WK
Private Private

Na\ib
Emil A, Phillips Frank D. Phillips Louis D. Phillips Fred B. Phinney John H. Pickett Fred l^ Pike

Home Address
Salida,

B
B

Colorado

Private Private
Private

C
B

Pueblo, Colorado
Glendale, South

Dakota

Corporal Private
Pru'ate Private
Pri\-ace

Supply Company Hickman. Kentucky Battery C St- Lawrence, South Dakota
Battery D Battery A Battery F Battery D Battery F Battery C Battery E Battery D Battery A Battery C

Mathcw

L. Pike

Clyde C. Plank Cainmct W. Poe
Charles

Houston, Texas Montrose, Ccjiorado

M.

PoEsoroldo

Private Private

Samuel E. Polk Earl W. Pope
William M. T. Puppitz

Private
Private First Class Private Private Private
Private

Waldo

J.

B. Porter

William O. Potter George E. Powell
Gilbert S. Pratt

Ben
John
Jack

Almi.ius Price
|.

Private
Private

Pridcmore
Prince

W.

Private Private Private

Private
Pri\'ate

Henry Pritzcl Frank M. Pulley Gustav Puntmann Edwin A- Pusey
Chai'lcs

Putnam

Bismark, N'lissouri, Box No, i6 Pueblo, Colorado Seventy Six, Missouri Crawford, Nebraska Anton, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Med. Detaehm't Traverse City, Michigan Pueblo, Cokirado Battery C Battery \l ~\'ount, Missouri Battery B Pueblo, Colorado Battery C Battery C Bucoda, NTissouri Biehle. Missouri Battery E Headquarters Co, St. Paul, Minnesota Battery D
Battery Battery

Private

Sergeant
Private Private Private
Pri\-ate

George W. Quigley Joseph \''inccnt Quigley
Arthur L. Rader Fletcher Y. Rainer
Brodie
J.

F

Montrose, Colorado

F

Manhattan, Kansas

Ranck
S.

Hcnr\' Rankin

Private Private Private Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Private

Bernard

Rankins

Tom
Guy

E. Reaves

F Reber
.

Cecil D.

Reed

Joseph Reed Peter P, Rcindl Frank E Reinhardt

Edw

in

Gusta\a Renando

Clel^en L. Renfroe

Sergeant Private Private
Private Private

Dionisio Reyes John M. Reynolds John J. Rhoades John I. Rhyne Charles C. Rich

Battery C Fruita, Colorado Battery D Pueblo, Colorado Battery E Walnut. Pennsylvania Battery F Essex, Missouri Battery E McBridges, Missouri Battery C Huron, South Dakota Battery F Philips, South Dakota Battery B Colorado Springs, Colorado Battery C Sturgis, South Dakota Battery D Wessington Springs, South Dakota Headquarters Co. Kansas City, Missouri Battery F Wessington Springs, Colorado Battery D Supply Company Parras Coahuila, KTexico Battery F Montrose. Colorado Supply Company Nemaha, Nebraska Battery E Se\'cnty Six, Klissouri
.

Battery

F

Private Private Private

Cook
Private

Private Private
Private

Private

William T. Richards Burt A. Richardson William A. Richi.son George Ricmersehnider Guy Rinehimer William E, Rines Irwin T. Rische Epolito Rivero James H. Roark Wilkes B. Robbe

Fleadquarters Co, Bayfield, Colorado

Headquarters Co. Huron, South Dakota Battery A Brookings, South Dakota Battery A I^attery D \\'ilkcsbarre, Pennsyhani; Battery D
Battery F Battery Battery Battery

D
C

D

Pueblo, Colorado

^yj/"

{

4
-190—

">'/;

i

ENLISTED
Rank

MEN NOT WITH REGIMENT

(Continued

f/

/\

ENLISTED
Rank
Corporal Corporal Private

MEN NOT WITH REGIMENT
Organization

(Concinued)

Name
Joseph E, Sexson Arthur A. Sexton Nathan A. Sharp

Home Address

Cook
Private Sergeant
Private

John Shafter Rashal Shahoon Ross L. Sheely

Ray

Sheffield

Battery E Meeker, Colorado Battery E Denver, Colorado Headquarters Co. Kirk, Colorado Supply Company Aspen, Colorado Battery Battery A Merino, Colorado Battery A Proctor, Colorado

D
B B

Private
Private Private Private Private Private Private

George L. Shelley Dudley E. Sherman

Edward M. Sherrard Garrett W. Sherrill
Richard A. Sheet Joseph C- Shook

Battery Battery Battery Battery

Pueblo, Colorado

Supply Headquarters Co. Wiggins, Colorado
Battery E Headquarters Co. Battery C Supply Company Battery C Battery E Battery Battery E Battery F Battery C Battery B Battery E Battery C Battery B

E Pueblo. Cl:^lorado Deer Trail, Colorado B Company

James M. Strader

Private
Private
Battalion Sergeant Private

Thomas G. Shrech

Ma

Robert E. Shreve orCal H. Shull
Willie Shultz

Private Private

George Sibbach

Durango, Colorado Maiden, Mi5souri Alamosa. Cc)lorado Pueblo, Colorado Ouray. Colorado
Bloomfield, Missouri
Gillett,

Tom

Sideros

D

Private
Private Private

Chester W. Siebert Fred A. Sielert Carl L. Sicver

Arkansas

Private Private
Private First Class Private Private Private Private

Edwin

Silvcrtsen

Bailey, South

Dakota

Wils P. Simmons Martin A. Simonich

George Simson
Carl
J.

Sinclair

Lee M. Sincock

Roy
Juan

E. Siscoe
F. Sisneroz

Private Private Private

Sergeant Private Private Private Private Private Corporal Private

Ernest V. Sjogren Patrick J, Slattery Paul D. Slattery Warren Sloan

Emmett B. Slocum Guy S. Smelser
Paul

R

Smiley

Corporal Private First Class Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private Private

Smith James B. Smith Merial Smith Remmel Smith Walter G. Smith William S. Smith
Cecil R,

William R. Snider George H. Sohn James B. Son Martinus Sorenson William A. Sowa Fred Spanjer Elza Sparks

Henry Spears Joseph W. Spilker Artie W, Spiclman
William A. Spruiell William F. Stac>'

Thomas

St, Claii'c

Supply Company Battery C Headquarters Co, Battery Battery Battery C Battery C Supply Company Headquarters Co. Battery B Battery Battery F Battery C Headquarters Co. Battery F Battery Headquarters Co. Battery A Battery C Battery E Battery C Supply Company Battery A Battery A Supply Company Battery F Battery F Battery F Battery V Battery B

Loveland, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Denver, Colorado Mildred, Kansas

D D

L>'r>ns,

Cr^lorado

Pueblo, Colorado

D

D

Matthews, Missouri Littleton, Colorado Julesburg. Colorado Buchanan, Virginia Montrose, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Bayfield, Colorado Montrose, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Collbran, Colorado Golden Pond, Kentucky

Bonne

Terre, Misscmri Pueblo, Colorado
Lcadvillc, Colorado

Sturgis,

South Dakota Woodland Park, Colorado

Goldiield, Colorado

ENtJSTED
Rank
Private

MEN NOT WITH

REGIK4ENT

(Continued)

Name
Harvey
Stafford

Organization
Headquarters Co. Supply Company Supply Company Headquarters Co. Battery C
Battery

Home Address
Huron, South Dakota
Charleston. Missouri
Yalla, Colorado Hesperus, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Fort Collins, Colorado

P ''ivatc
Pr vate
Pri\ vate

William Stanton

John Stariha

Edmund

Stccklcr

Private Private Private

John Stcfanich John Steffan Samuel G. Steffas
Charles Steiner Martin Steinhauer Wm, H. Stcnnctt Charles O, Stephan Arvil A. Stephens Albert L. Stephens John Stephens John M. Stephens Walter Stephens Ralph Steppe Arthur Stevens Clarence E. Stevens Frank E. Stevens Clyde W. Stewart Leonard L. Stewart

E

Supply Company
Headquarter.s Co. Wray, Colorado

Private
Private Private Private

P rivate
Pr 'ivate
Pri rivate

P rivate
Pr rivate

P -ivate
P 'ivate
Pr rivate

P rivate
Pr rivate
P:rivate

Pr rivate Pr rivate

Dennie A.
Otto Stone

Stiles

Josef B. Stock

P rivate
Pr rivate
Pirivate Pirivate
Pirivate

Edwin

1

1,

Strachen

Pirivate

David L, Strain John C, Strand John R. Street Samuel L. Street
Nofcl Stringer Charles Strobcl

Pr rivate Pr rivate
Pirivate

Private Private
Private Private
Private
Private

Walter C, Strobel Clarence L. Strows

Raymond

F. Stuart

Oliver Stubbs

Wm.

L. Studhaltcr

Private
Private
^rivate

Emil Stuefcn Ole Sueve Clyde Sullivan

Private
^rivate ^rivate

Edward F. Sullivan Edward A. Sulzer Forest Summers
Lloyd S. Sutton Oswald Swanson
Charles F. Swcigart Richard G. Swindler

Battery C Battery C Battery C Battery E Battery F Supply Company Headquarters Co. Battery E Headc|uarters Co. Headquarters Co. Battery Battery F Battery F Battery F Headquarters Co Battery A Headquarters Co. Battery E Battery E Battery Battery E Battery E Headc|uartcrs Co. Battery Battery E Battery E Battery C Battery C Battery F Battery A Battery F Battery C Battery A Battery C Battery A

Hammond,

Indiana Clarkton, Missouri Pueblo, Colorado
Telluride, Colorado

Golden, Colorado
Boise, Idaho

D

Delta, Colorado

Newcastle, Nebraska

Kansas City, Missouri

Yuma,

Ccjlorado

D

Denver, Colorado Northview, Missouri Fort Collins, Colorado Loveland, Colorado Longmont, Colorado Fort Collins, Colorado Fort Collins, Colorado
S\\ int(.>n,

D

Xlissouri

Pueblo, Colorado Rives. Missouri
K-lontrosc,

Colorado

Elkton, South Dakota

Crook, Colorado

^rivate

Private

Supply Company Nebraska City, Nebraska Buffalo, South Dakota Battery F Kansas City, Nlissouri Battery A Pueblo, Cok>rado Battcrv D
Battery Battery Battery

Sergeant Sergeant
Private Private Private

Calvin B. Talbot Richard A. Talbott Arthur Talle\'

E

Indianola,

Iowa

C
F

Pueblo, Colorado
Lazear, Colorado

Dominck

Tar\'alla

Private Private Private Corporal

Ruble F. J'ate Elmer Taylor

Battery Battery

D
E

Pueblo. Colorado
Idalia,

Supply Company Poplar

Missouri Bluff, Missouri

Guy Emos

Taylor

James E. Taylor Bunk B. Templeton

Kimball, Nebraska Battery A Colorado Springs, Colorado Battery B Headquarters Co. Grand Junction, Colorado

cy

/

/
—193-

''/:

CNUSILlD MI:N
Rank
Private Private
Pri\'aLc Priv;itc

N<-)I

with RIlCIMIlNT
( )('(

((":-,niinucd)

NAMt
Lewis Tennis Dewey Terpatra George A. Tculkcr William F. Tculkcr

.ANIZA'I roN
l-^

I

loMi: Addri-.ss

Private

Private Private Private

Private Private
Private Private Private Private

Ben W. Thomas David S. Thomas Gcfir^e [Z. 1 homas Farl "fhomp^on James P. hompson
'I

Madison. South Dakota I") Supply Company Leadville, Oilorado
Battery
li

Battery Battery Battery Battery Baltcry

Conde, South Dak(,>ta
Dudley, Missouri

(i
i-"

I:

Ashtr.n, Illinois
C"i A'

Flcadt|uarters Co, Denver,

Tadi

Supply C'ompany Leadville, Colorado
Battery Battery Battery Battery Battery
V-

Raymond

R,

Thompson

Private Private

William G. Tice James F. Tierney Clarence D. Ticarney Vernic Tines Walter Tinker
F^ugene
F-'rank
I

V
I-'

Oral, South l^akota
Eiasalt, Colorado Los Angeles, California

B

D

itus

Private
Private Private Fir^t Class. Private Private Private

Wesley D. Tompkins
I'onisick

Supply Company Battery A Caruthcrsville, Missouri Battery [^ Parshall, Colorado Battery C Pueblo, Colorado
Battery

Harry

F.

Tottcn

A

Grcenv\'ood, Missouri

Isaac Trainer

Headquarters Co.
Battery C Battery A Headquarters
Hifthmore, Colorado

Mechanic
Corpnral

Joseph Trhovieh Tscbaeher Joseph f Fred Turman Davii.1 W, Turner
I.
I

Gary, South Dakota

.

Co Wray, Colorado

CVdnance Sergeant
Private
Scrfieant

Nelsi

m

l^.

I

Lirner

Puchio, Colorado Battery Supply C'ompany Alamosa, (^.nlorado

C

Guy

L. Utter

Battery
Batter\'

I

Private Private

Lekind B \ anArsdall William N VanI kirn
Jess K.

\\

Denver, Colorado
Pueblo. Colorado

VanMeter
VanVoorhis

Private Private Private

Sanford L. VanSeoy

Battery A Battery B fleadquarters
t^attery

Co

"Y

unia,

(."ok

)rado

Marl

in

Chiirles Vauf^hn

Private First Class Private
Private Private

Otha Vaughn John A. Vaught John Vexlak
Philip
J.

Vcssell

Saddler Private Private
Private Private Private Private
Private
Private

Jriseph L. Viettfine

Desidero Vigil
Elias Vigil

Juan

F. Vigil

Manuel Vigil Manuel A. Vigil
Robert C. Vititoe Lloyd Vostad

Gunnison, ("olorado Supply (Company l{ast Prairie, Missouri Battery F St. Joe, Texas Battery A Kansas City. Missouri Supply Company Aspen, Colorado Battery F Clairville, Missouri Battery I'^ Ouray, Colorado Battery C Supply Company LeaLKillc, Colorado Supply Company Alamosa, Colorado Battery C. Battery C Battery D Battery D
Battery Battery
C^

L

Private Private O-rporal
Private

James Wakefield Chester W. Walberg Cleo Walker Harrv C. Walker
I-:.

D
I-""

Boulder, ("lolorado

Private Private Private Private Private

Opie R. Wallace Carl S. Wallin

Battery Battery D Battery k

Nuela, Colorado Fraser, Colorado Desur, Missouri

Frank

Walsh Joseph F. Walsh 'Ih<,mas V. Walsh Frank (.). Walter
P.

Battery A Battery k Battery I' Battery kl
I

Bemis, South Dakota
Cx'daredgc, Colorado

Red

ClilT,
(

Colorado
'.olorado

Denver,

leadc|uarlers Co. Perryville, fV'Iissouri

—194-

ENIJSTI-D MllN

NOT

WITI

I

RflGlMCNT

(Continued)
FIoME-:

Rank
Private Private

Name Otto Wm, Walter Wm. C. Wallers
Williana E. Walters

Or( .ANIZATION

Address
Colorado

Private
Private
[Private

Thomas M. Walton
Frank H. Watters Floyd Z. Webster

B Rural Retreat, Vinpnia Supply Company Elsenore, K'lissouri
Battery C Battery C Sed-xMck, Colorado Battery E Steamboat Springs, C(jlorado Battery A Hale, Missouri Battery D Keota, Colorado Battery A Cedaredge, Colorado Battery F Battery F White Owl, South Dakota Battery F b4eadQuarters Co. Hayti, Missouri Battery E Headquarters Co, Castle Rock, Colorado Pueblo, Colorado Battery D Kissirnmec, Fdorida Battery B Battery b^ Porta.Keville, Missouri Baitery f" BrookinK'>. South Dakota Battery D Heade|Uarters C.< Bennett, Colorado
<

Battery Battery Battery

C

Fnelereliffe,

D

Cjunnison, Colorado

Private Private Private Private
Private

Ray Weed Hugh F Wells
Jacob Wells Walter W. Wells

Private Private
Private Private Private Private

Ahram
Lewis

LI.

Wclty
WelheralJ

hi,

Wever Roy R, Wheal ley
Albert P,

Private Private Private
Private Private Private

Elmer Wheeler Ernest C. Wheeler lohn Wheeler bVnnk Whelz;il Charles j. W. While Thomas W. White
.1

Private
Pri\'atc

Pnvaie
Private Private Private Private Private
Pri\-aie
[Private

Waller j, Whitmus Frank L Whitney Robert [:. Whittcnl-,erR John H, Wieland Bradley Williams Lawrence Williams James C~. Williamson Louis Williamson

Battery Battery

li

Fort W(*rth, Tcxa-^

D
P,
C

Chested

i^.utte.

Colorado

Baitery

Suppb

'onipany Arlinu;ton

('il>-.

South Dakota

M

P.ynin L. Willis

Private

WilsMn Jess,. F, Wilson John A Wilson Wibon Joseph
1-:

DaMd

M

SerRcanL Private Corporal Private

\ald(>

b"

W

ilson

Mechanic
Private Private

William Wilson Luther W. W inklei^lcLk Walter W. Winters Clarence \l. Wise lames A WoRan

Battery b" Batters D HeadL|uarters Co HeaeL|uartcrs Co. Headquarters Co. Battery E Battery E Battery B Heade^uartcrs Co. Battery F Battery F Battery B
Battcr\'

Bell Cit>', Missouri

Deermfi, Miss,,uri

Grand

Junction, Colorado

Orchard, (Colorado

Marshficld, Missouri

Yellowjackct, Colorado

Romeo, Colorado
Vernon, Colorado Clay City, Illinois

F

Janus

Private Private
Private

W

lib

Wogan W Wolf
1
I

James

Wolfe John Wolfe
1

I,

Private Private Private Private Private Private
Private Private Private

Ben C Wulfuram
Paul

Wood

Battery E Gi"rman, South Dakota Battery B Headquarters Co. Kit Carsi.tn. Colorado Battery /\ Battery F Wessinfilon Springs, South Dakota 'ra^ki Battery E Aspen, (
'•

il(

'bhomys A Wood Wmlield Wood
Gail

Sup[.-ly

Company

Lilbourn, N hssouri

Woods
P.

James
Llenr>

Woodside

Woody

Clarence L. W'orley

Private Private

Leon L. WriRht Rex G. Wykoir John
"^'akosh

Battery B Battery L"" Battery B Battery C Battery C Battery b Battery D

Eckert, Colorado

Ha\

ti,

Missouri

Pueblo, Colorado

Pueblo. Colorado
Me,

Private
Private

Charles F. "\oung Christian F. "^'oung

Supply Compan\- LeaeK Battery E Battery

Colorado

D

f]i^

-^

A
-195

VL.

ENLISTED
Rank
Private
Private

MEN NOT WEFH REGIMENT
Organization
Battery C Supply Company Supply Company Battery E Battery

(Continued^

Name
DcWitt T. ^'oung Lewis F. Young R. ert H. Young Will A. Young Carter B. Yust
Joe Zabukovec

Home Address
Berwind, Colorado Denver, Colorado
Lcadville, Colorado Kremmling, Colorado

Private Sergeant Private
Private

D D

Private Private
Private First Class Private First Class Private

John Zamora
Joseph A. Zeilinger Joseph J. Zerbs Walter O. Ziege Lorenz H. Zieglcr Louis ZimmermajT

Battery Battery C Battery Supply Company Battery D

Pueblo, Colorado

D

Baldwin, Colorado

Private Private Private Private

Emil Zimmerman
John
Joe P. Zunich F. Zw'cber

Nebraska City, Nebraska Central City, Colorado Med. Dctachm't Spencer, South Dakota Supply Company Leadville, Colorado Battery F Artas, South Dakota

Battery Battery

F

B

Redvale, Colorado Huron, South Dakota

—196-

r

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