First Program Year CAPER

The CPMP First Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report includes Narrative Responses to CAPER questions that CDBG, HOME, HOPWA, and ESG grantees must respond to each year in order to be compliant with the Consolidated Planning Regulations. The Executive Summary narratives are optional. The grantee must submit an updated Financial Summary Report (PR26).

GENERAL
Executive Summary
This module is optional but encouraged. If you choose to complete it, provide a brief overview that includes major initiatives and highlights that were proposed and executed throughout the first year. Program Year 1 CAPER Executive Summary response: The amount of 2010 funding from the three HUD programs for the Morris County Consortium was $3,718,299 with program income of $95,287. Application requests approximated $4,127,000. A total of 41 activities were determined by the Community Development Revenue Sharing (CDRS) Advisory Committee to meet overall county needs and local and national objectives. Of the total available for 2010 activities (exclusive of program administration), 98% was used for activities that benefited low/moderate income persons.

General Questions
1. Assessment of the one-year goals and objectives: a. Describe the accomplishments in attaining the goals and objectives for the reporting period. One hundred percent of funds were used for activities that benefited low/moderate income persons. During the reporting period, the following percentages were achieved of the corresponding cumulative goals: 29% of Public Facilities 75% of Senior Centers 22% of Water/Sewer Improvements 200% of Street Improvements 100% of Health Facilities 50% of Public Services 50% of Senior Services 33% of Handicapped Services 33% of Youth Services 200% of Battered and Abused Spouses Programs 27% of Child Care Services 50% of Rental Housing Subsidies 25% of Rehab; Single-Unit Residential

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300% of Public Housing Modernization 100% of Production of New Rental Units 67% of Production of New Owner Units 100% of Homeownership Assistance b. Provide a breakdown of the CPD formula grant funds spent on grant activities for each goal and objective. Please refer to project worksheets and “Housing and Community Development Activities” table found in the TABLES section. c. If applicable, explain why progress was not made towards meeting the goals and objectives. N/A 2. Describe the manner in which the recipient would change its program as a result of its experiences. N/A 3. Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing: a. Provide a summary of impediments to fair housing choice. b. Identify actions taken to overcome effects of impediments identified. IMPEDIMENT: The lack of affordable housing, particularly for low- and middleincome households, seniors, people with disabilities, single head of households, and young adults. Accomplishments: Members of the Fair Housing Committee continue to support the Housing Alliance, under the umbrella of the United Way of Morris County, whose mission is to promote policy change, increase public knowledge, and develop innovative solutions to affordable housing through advocacy and its annual bus tour. The tour showcases affordable housing achievements as a way to demonstrate to local officials how attractive and unobtrusive affordable housing can be. Proposed Action: It is recommended that the Housing Partnership continue to update annually, and distribute the “Morris County Apartment Resource Guide” and the “Morris County Income Restricted Senior Housing Guide.” Proposed Action: Continue participation in the Housing Alliance, identifying new ways to provide affordable housing beyond construction, e.g. increased tenant based rental assistance, advocating for increased project based rental assistance. Proposed Action: Continue participation in Morris County Foreclosure Taskforce. IMPEDIMENT: The greatest need of non-homeless special needs populations includes accessible/adaptable housing for persons with physical challenges, severe mental illness and the developmentally disabled, victims of domestic violence, veterans, people transitioning out of homeless shelters and the frail elderly. Proposed Action: The Committee will continue to support its members who serve populations with special needs, and partner with the Housing Alliance and the Human Services Advisory Committee to increase the awareness of the need for affordable housing for all. Staff will urge all local housing authorities to apply for Mainstream Program funds and Housing Choice Vouchers for non-elderly special needs individuals, to serve the housing needs of the special needs population better.

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Proposed Action: Encourage all housing developers to implement Universal Design in the design, construction and rehab of their housing units. IMPEDIMENT: United Way of Northern New Jersey identified the lack of housing accessible to affordable transportation to get to jobs and services as an important housing choice issue, particularly for senior citizens, people with physical disabilities and mental illness, low-income families and any other resident who does not have ready access to their own automobile. Accomplishments: In United Way published “Introducing ALICE: Asset Limited Income Constrained and Employed,” which emphasized the restrictions imposed upon low income households when constrained by poorly performing vehicles, lack of vehicles and unreliable mass transportation. Proposed Action: Recommend The United Way update A.L.I.C.E. annually. Analyzing and implementing proven new transportation solutions (especially vehicle and driver sharing models, and models which increase collaboration and coordination among agencies and overall cost effectiveness) that will benefit the most needy residents and make best use of available funds and other resources. Advocating for new or increased funding sources for existing and new community transportation solutions. Reinforce the need for transportation services

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IMPEDIMENT: Due to the backlash from Sub prime lending practices and the subsequent foreclosure crisis, banks have tightened their lending guidelines to the point where obtaining a standard fixed mortgage is very difficult. This further impedes the process of acquiring affordable housing for those who may have been viable candidates. Proposed Action: Emphasis must be placed upon a mandatory counseling process for all potential homebuyers. This can aid in a candidate setting goals in terms of savings, obtaining good credit and a knowledge of how to eliminate credit obstacles toward home ownership. IMPEDIMENT: The US Department of Housing and Urban Development reported that 64 discrimination cases had been filed pursuant to the Fair Housing Act (Title 8) in New Jersey from 2004-2010. The breakdown of protected classes includes Disability (24), Family Status (11), National Origin (9), Race/Gender (19) and Sex (1). 26 cases have been dismissed for No Cause. Proposed Action: The Fair Housing Committee will continue monitoring bias crime data from various sources: U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, the New Jersey Division on Civil Rights and the Morris County’s Prosecutors Office. Proposed Action: The Fair Housing Committee will advocate state and federal agencies to simplify the complaint filing process, which, at this time is prohibitively onerous. Proposed Action: The Division will continue participation in the Fair Housing Committee and support its efforts e.g., Tenants’ Rights forum, production of public service announcements on various issues of fair housing.

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Accomplishments: The Committee has sponsored or supported the following events: A breakfast honoring landlords, renter tester training, a cable presentation on fair housing and the annual essay contest where local high school students write about anti-discrimination. Annually, during Fair Housing Month, an informational mailing regarding fair housing is sent out to Morris County municipalities. IMPEDIMENT: The New Jersey Division on Civil Rights reported that from 20052007 there have been 557 housing complaints from the Morris County area. County specific information is not generally available.1 Accomplishments: The Human Relations Commission’s website continues to provide links to federal and state agencies to allow people to file discrimination complaints. Other links and housing resources are also available on this site. Proposed Action: The Committee should monitor number and type of complaints filed and ease of filing a complaint. IMPEDIMENT: Public policy, while overtly beneficial, can present barriers to affordable housing, such as: Insufficient Federal and State resources for affordable housing initiatives and related support services, such as programs and resources to build housing, provide rental assistance, permanent supportive house and tax credits for homebuyers. Zoning ordinances that are restrictive rather than flexible such as those with provisions for bulk or use requirements, density constraints, or age restrictions on developments. Diminishing developable land: The County is largely built out with the only remaining developable land consisting of non conforming lots and environmentally constrained land. Proposed Action: The Division and Committee should continue to advance the affordable housing agenda with the county’s freeholders and state representatives. Proposed Action: The Division of Community Development will continue working with the Housing Alliance to advocate for affordable housing and to promote innovative land use, e.g. elder cottages, adaptive re-use, redevelopment and green design. The New Jersey Highlands Act restricts development within the delineated Highlands Protection Area. With the diminishment of available land, the cost of remaining land will rise, affecting existing and future stock of affordable housing. The New Jersey State Development and Redevelopment Plan, has had influence over land use through its designation of all areas in New Jersey as 1 of 5 different Planning Areas each with associated growth expectations. Implications for development constraints indicate an increase in costs for affordable housing. Development approval process, e.g. state and regional agencies, county and municipal planning boards, utility authorities and soil conservation districts.
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State of New Jersey, Dept. of Law & Safety, Division on Civil Rights

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Impact fees associated with new development e.g., roads, sewer, water and other public facilities, result in the costs being passed along to the new homeowners and renters. NIMBYism against affordable housing proposals. Accomplishments: Beginning in 2005, the Housing Alliance has conducted tours of affordable housing sites in the county, for local officials for the purpose of demystifying the stigma of affordable housing. Proposed Action: In an effort to ameliorate negative effects of public policies that serve as barriers to affordable housing the Committee and Division will maintain their participation in the dialogue around policy-related barriers. In addition, they will collaborate with housing providers to propose innovative housing schemes such as mixed use, rehabilitation or redevelopment and green design. IMPEDIMENT: The Economic Downturn has resulted in a surge of “newly needy” whose housing circumstances are threatened and a drying up of resources available to assist households. ACTION: The Division has advocated for more funding going towards Tenant Based Rental Assistance vouchers versus first time homebuyer assistance as the latter has been undersubscribed due to difficulty obtaining mortgages and the need for rental assistance. 4. Leveraging Resources a. Identify progress in obtaining “other” public and private resources to address needs. Typically, other resources from private and non Federal public sources made available to meet the needs identified in the Consolidated Plan include state and municipal funds, County grant-in-aid, weatherization funds, private foundations, private donations, volunteer labor and private loans from lending institutions. The Federal funds, in most cases, complemented other resources rather than leveraged these funds. Currently, the funding climate is anemic, at best, with nearly all providers scrambling for alternate sources as their usual sources wither. b. How Federal resources from HUD leveraged other public and private resources. The Emergency Shelter Grant Program and the HOME Program require matching funds. All applicants to these programs must identify the match in the applications for funding from the Division of Community Development. All matching sources are verified prior to commitment of any funds. The Jurisdiction has not committed any funds specifically to provide a monetary match to any activity but may provide the match for Emergency Shelter activities through local grant-in-aid to homeless service providers. Sponsors of HOME activities are responsible for providing their match. Specific matching requirements were met as follows:

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HOME: Sources of match were provided by activities requiring match - the total value of which will meet or exceed 25% of the total HOME award, with the exception of program administration activities, which do not require match. Sources included donation of volunteer labor and monetary contribution. See “HOME Match Report” for details. ESG: Each recipient has identified a source of match equal to the grant award: MCDHS/OTA: Homeless Solutions: Interfaith Council: JBWS $29,905 Social Services for Homeless (SSH) $29,826 Foundations $29,952 In-Kind Donations $10,000 (Volunteer hours)

c. How matching requirements were satisfied. Community Development Block Grant funds are leveraged at an average 70/30% ratio with municipal, state and private funds to meet long and short-term objectives. Technical assistance was provided to the subgrantees in securing other public and private resources to address needs.

Managing the Process
1. Describe actions taken during the last year to ensure compliance with program and comprehensive planning requirements. Program Year 1 CAPER Managing the Process response: The lead agency for overseeing the development of the plan is the Morris County Division of Community Development. It is the same agency primarily responsible for administering the programs covered by the consolidated plan. Actions taken during the year to enhance coordination between public and private housing, health, and social service agencies included: * Collaboration with nonprofits, municipalities, county and state government representatives, and the general public to encourage further development of affordable housing; * Enhanced the working relationship with the Morris County Department of Human Services and special needs, homeless and housing providers; provided technical assistance as requested. * Maintained dialogue with all five Public Housing Authorities; * Maintained membership on the Housing Committee of the Morris County Human Relations Commission to further fair housing; * Continued participation on the Housing Alliance of Morris County * Enhanced technology accessibility by way of website * Continued attendance at HUD sponsored or supported educational forums; and * Monitored CDBG, HOME and ESG programs and complied with timeliness.

Citizen Participation
1. Provide a summary of citizen comments.

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A Public Hearing was held in April 2010 to discuss the Proposed 2010 Annual Action Plan; no members of the public commented. A record of the Hearing is available at the office of Community Development. A Public Hearing had also been held in November 2009 to discuss prior year program performance as well as Community Development and Consolidated Plan needs for the 2010 program year; no members of the public or of the press attended. No comments were submitted. Four thank you letters were received: one from a homeowner rehab client and three from the private sector expressing gratitude to Pat Reid for assistance with liens. All correspondence was handled in a timely manner. 2. The performance report provided to citizens must identify the Federal funds made available for furthering the objectives of the Consolidated Plan. For each formula grant program, the grantee shall identify the total amount of funds available (including estimated program income), the total amount of funds committed during the reporting period, the total amount expended during the reporting period, and the geographic distribution and location of expenditures. Jurisdictions are encouraged to include maps in describing the geographic distribution and location of investment (including areas of minority concentration). Funds Committed and Geographic Distribution:

STATEMENT OF RESOURCES JULY 1, 2010 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2011 CDBG Unexpended funds at end of previous reporting period Entitlement Grant from HUD Program Income Total funds available for use during reporting period Less Total Expenditures (all program years) Unexpended Balance 6/30/11 LOCCS Balance @ 6/30/11 2,637,330 2,453,876 92,787 5,183,993 1,197,404 3,986,589 3,986,589 HOME 1,984,774 1,164,740 2,500 3,152,014 452,070 2,699,944 2,699,944 ESG 44,714 99,683 0 144,397 91,746 52,651 52,651 TOTAL 4,666,818
$3,718,299

95,287 8,480,404 1,741,220 6,739,184 6,739,184

FUNDS COMMITTED JULY 1, 2010 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2011 PROGRAM AMOUNT CDBG 2,453,876 HOME 214,448 ESG 99,683 TOTAL 2,768,007

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CDBG – Countywide programs exclude Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills and Town of Dover The “Statement of Resources” table identifies the Federal resources made available to the jurisdiction for furthering the objectives of the Consolidated Plan. Further detail regarding the investment of these funds is included in the “Project Worksheets” section. During Program Year 2010, expenditures in the Community Development Block Grant program were made in 16 municipalities; and HOME funds were expended in 8 municipalities. The expenditures included locations of minority concentration in Boonton, Dover, Madison, Mine Hill, Morristown, Randolph, Borough of Rockaway, Roxbury, Victory Gardens and Wharton. ESG funds were invested in 3 shelters and one county agency serving the homeless population county-wide. Further information on expenditures during the Program Year 2010 can be found in the Housing and Community Development Activities table found in the “TABLES” section. Maps reflecting ethnic and minority concentrations and geographic distribution of expenditures are included in Figure A – Geographic Distribution.

Institutional Structure
1. Describe actions taken during the last year to overcome gaps in institutional structures and enhance coordination. Program Year 1 CAPER Institutional Structure response: 1. The staff at Community Development worked to strengthen the institutional structure in the following ways: * Continued to collaborate with nonprofits, municipalities, county and state government representatives, and the general public to encourage further development of affordable housing; * Maintained membership on the Housing Committee of the Morris County Human Relations Commission to further fair housing; * Enhanced the working relationship with the Morris County Department of Human Services, special need, homeless and housing providers; provided technical assistance as requested;and * Continued participation on the Morris County Housing Alliance. In addition, significant analysis and “re-tooling” of institutional operations have occurred since Spring of 2009. Some of the goals and accomplishments include: * Gaining greater participation from municipalities on the Community Development Revenue Sharing Advisory Committee (CDRS); * Maintaining broad countywide participation through regular outreach to municipalities. * Enabling more in-depth review opportunities, of grant applications, by CDRS members; * Disallowing any opportunity for a conflict of interest at any point during the application process; * Providing pre-application meeting serving as orientation and post application survey providing process feedback; and * Posting By-Laws, Ground Rules, Application review criteria, minutes, award recommendations etc., on website.

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Monitoring
1. Describe how and the frequency with which you monitored your activities. All program activities administered by the Morris County Division of Community Development are monitored as follows: * Planning - Proposed activities are reviewed for eligibility under statutory and regulatory requirements and for their ability to meet an identified need in the County's Consolidated Plan. * Implementation - Advise HOME subgrantees of required Resale & Recapture Guidelines, Affirmative Marketing and MBE/WBE outreach. - HOME’s first time homebuyers are contacted each year to assure their continued residence at house acquired with federal funds. Fiscal monitoring of activities includes the review and approval of activity budgets, compliance with executed Grant Agreements and the subsequent review and approval of vouchers. Staff attend meetings with contractors for construction and rehabilitation activities to assure their compliance with HUD requirements and inspections are conducted as work progresses. Site visits are made to social service providers on an annual basis to review program activity and fiscal and regulatory compliance. Activity files are maintained with the necessary documentation. Staff visits facilities funded through Community Development Block Grant to ensure continued compliance with the national objective and applicable program requirements. * Close-out - All activity files are reviewed to assure that the activity meets the objectives and strategies of the Consolidated Plan and the proposed accomplishments and that all pertinent and mandated documentation are included. * Long-Term Compliance - Staff establishes annual income verification procedures as well as develops an on-site monitoring schedule for HOME rental activities as required. This monitoring enables staff to ensure compliance with the following: - Period of affordability - Income of tenants and source documentation - Amount of rent charged - Housing quality standards of facility See #2. On-Site Monitoring Compliance for more details. Each activity is filed separately under a general Compliance/Monitoring File. 2. Describe the results of your monitoring including any improvements. ON-SITE MONITORING COMPLIANCE We currently have 16 non-profit agencies that have utilized HOME funds to develop 27 rental properties. The 35 properties include 17 group homes for special needs populations with a capacity for 92 people, 1 senior congregate project with a total capacity of 19 residents, 2 transitional housing sites which can accommodate a total of 21 households, 1 permanent supportive housing location for 15 households, 7 senior citizen rental buildings with a combined capacity of 404 senior households, 2 family rental sites accommodating 3 households, 3 special needs apartment sites with 21 total units and 3 single room occupancy sites servicing 22 residents. These

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same sixteen agencies act in the capacity of owner/rental agent which includes records of eligible leasing and maintenance of the property to suitable standards.

Annually, our office sends out a Rental Compliance form to complete a desk review of the site for our files. The desk review covers: • current income guidelines • rent charged and • utility allowance, if applicable. Site visits are scheduled according to compliance with number of units in the property. • 20% of the HOME assisted units are monitored for compliance • tenant files are checked for income documentation and verification methods • common areas, as well as tenant spaces, are physically inspected for Housing Quality Standards. • site visits are scheduled as follows: • Every year – 26 or more units, (4 locations) • Every two years – 5 to 25 units, (6 locations) • Every three years – 1 to 4 units, (17 locations). For Program Year 2010, 14 site visits were conducted. These included 6 group homes for special needs populations, 7 senior housing complexes and 1 transitional housing shelter. All were found to be in compliance for both income verification and housing quality standards. All inspection forms and reports are maintained in files in Community Development office. On-site inspection and monitoring are conducted in compliance with 24 CFR 92.504.

3. Self Evaluation a. Describe the effect programs have in solving neighborhood and community problems. Programs comply with national objectives and thus contribute to rectifying community problems e.g., providing social gathering places for seniors, children and youth, enabling adults to work by providing child care as well as services for special needs, promoting home ownership and preservation of affordable housing. b. Describe progress in meeting priority needs and specific objectives and help make community’s vision of the future a reality. Progress made in meeting priority needs can be ascertained by referring to the “Housing and Community Development Activities” table or the response under question #1, listing percentages accomplished. c. Describe how you provided decent housing and a suitable living environment and expanded economic opportunity principally for low and moderate-income persons. HOME funds were applied toward First Time Homebuyer Gap Financing Program, IDA savings program, Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) program, construction of affordable for-sale and rental units and renovating senior citizen rental units. CDBG funds were used to run the county’s homeowner rehab program.

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d. Indicate any activities falling behind schedule. CDBG activities that fell behind were, typically, those that were relying on NJ Department of Environmental Protection approval. These activities, requiring additional time for completion, applied for an extension. There is one delayed HOME activity; a detailed construction schedule, funding plan and other information has been provided to HUD-Newark. e. Describe how activities and strategies made an impact on identified needs. The “Housing and Community Development Activities” table and the “Housing Needs Table” depict the degree to which activities made an impact on identified needs. f. • • • • • • • • Identify indicators that would best describe the results. Status of waiting lists for senior and child care services Status of waiting lists for senior and special needs housing Number of rental and for-sale units constructed Number of First Time Homebuyers closing on houses Linear feet of water mains, sewers or sidewalks Parks and Recreation Centers open for operation Individuals enrolled in TBRA program; number successfully finding permanent housing Firehouses functioning safely and efficiently

g. Identify barriers that had a negative impact on fulfilling the strategies and overall vision. • Diminished federal, state, local and philanthropic funds • Regulatory barriers e.g., Highlands Preservation Act h. Identify whether major goals are on target and discuss reasons for those that are not on target. Major goals are on target. i. Identify any adjustments or improvements to strategies and activities that might meet your needs more effectively. N/A

Lead-based Paint
1. Describe actions taken during the last year to evaluate and reduce lead-based paint hazards. Program Year 1 CAPER Lead-based Paint response: Community Development staff eliminated lead-based paint hazards, when found, in assisted housing units and worked with municipal health officers to reduce hazards. The Division of Community Development has implemented the lead-based paint regulations requirements in the programs it administers. Specifically, it has helped develop and present educational presentations on lead-based paint hazards to students of the Step-by-Step Program for first time homebuyers. It also conducts visual assessments prior to the sale of a house to a first time homebuyer and provides educational material to first time homebuyers published by the US EPA entitled "Reducing Lead Hazards When Remodeling Your Home."

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Finally, the Division has contracted with a lead assessment firm, which conducts risk assessments on housing units prior to rehab work being undertaken. The same firm ascertains clearance upon project completion. This will continue in the coming year.

HOUSING
Housing Needs
*Please also refer to the Housing Needs Table in the Needs.xls workbook.

1. Describe Actions taken during the last year to foster and maintain affordable housing. Program Year 1 CAPER Housing Needs response: • • • • • • • County’s Homeowner Rehab Program County’s First Time Homebuyer Gap Financing Program Collaborated with Housing Partnership on an IDA Program Collaborated with Morris County Housing Authority on TBRA Program Providing technical assistance to prospective subgrantees on the subject of acquiring, rehabilitating or constructing affordable housing Participation in the Housing Alliance of Morris County Funded HOME construction and rehabilitation activities

Specific Housing Objectives
1. Evaluate progress in meeting specific objective of providing affordable housing, including the number of extremely low-income, low-income, and moderateincome renter and owner households comparing actual accomplishments with proposed goals during the reporting period. Morris County Consortia funding for the Program Year 2010 HOME program was $1,164,740. The following eligible activities were determined by the CDRS committee to best meet overall county needs and local objectives: • Administrative costs for a Homebuyer Education Program which reaches over 200 income eligible households annually; • Additional funds for the construction of 10 rental units for formerly homeless or domestic abuse households. • Acquisition and rehab of 2 bedroom townhouse, benefitting 2 individuals with special needs; • Acquire and rehab 4 1-br rental units for formerly homeless or domestic abuse households • Gut rehab single family for-sale residence. • Scattered site housing repairs at 4 locations, rentals, serving 31 individuals with special needs

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• Funds from the HOME Program will be used for downpayment assistance for income eligible first time homebuyers; and • Funds will be used for Individual Development Accounts (IDA), complementing the existing downpayment assistance for income eligible first time homebuyer. • Funds will be used for a Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA), providing 10 vouchers of rental assistance, and the administration thereof. Please refer to “Housing Needs Table” for greater detail. 2. Evaluate progress in providing affordable housing that meets the Section 215 definition of affordable housing for rental and owner households comparing actual accomplishments with proposed goals during the reporting period. As depicted in the “Housing Needs Table,” • 45% of elderly households, extremely low income, rental activities have been achieved; • 20% of small related households, extremely low income, with any housing problem, rental activities have been achieved; • 25% of small related households, very low income, with any housing problem, rental activities have been achieved; • 10% of small related households, very low income, with any housing problem, forsale activities have been achieved; • 8% of small related households, low income, with any housing problem, owner activities have been achieved. 3. Describe efforts to address “worst-case” housing needs and housing needs of persons with disabilities. Efforts to address “worst-case” housing needs and housing needs of persons with disabilities include: • Repaired major system failures, of income eligible homeowners – County’s Homeowner Rehabilitation Program • Funded rehabilitation of homes for people with special needs • Funded acquisition and rehab of 2 family house for people with special needs • Very active with membership of Fair Housing Committee in increasing awareness of need for accessible housing; working with individual who is physically challenged and expert on design standards. • Funded TBRA program

Public Housing Strategy
1. Describe actions taken during the last year to improve public housing and resident initiatives. Program Year 1 CAPER Public Housing Strategy response: • Assisted public housing authorities with improvements and resident initiatives, as requested (funded replacement of doors at Boonton Housing Authority); and • Maintained dialogue with all five Public Housing Authorities (Boonton, Dover, Madison, Morristown, Morris County). The County continued its outreach efforts to residents of public housing as well as households assisted by public housing and those participating in Family Self-Sufficiency Programs (Family Self-Sufficiency Program Coordinating Committee). Information has

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been sent to all Housing Authority offices in Morris County detailing the Homebuyer Assistance program. Any applicant seeking Homebuyer Assistance is required to complete the Homebuyer Education Program, Step-by-Step, offered by the Housing Partnership.

Barriers to Affordable Housing
1. Describe actions taken during the last year to eliminate barriers to affordable housing. Program Year 1 CAPER Barriers to Affordable Housing response: • Continued exploring partnering possibilities to address the obstacles of inadequate federal dollars available through HUD programs and drying up of state and private funds; • Continued to advocate for affordable housing; • Continued to collaborate with nonprofits, municipalities, county and state government representatives, and the general public to encourage further development of affordable housing; and • Continued participation on a countywide focused Housing Alliance committee.

HOME/ American Dream Down Payment Initiative (ADDI)
1. Assessment of Relationship of HOME Funds to Goals and Objectives a. Evaluate progress made toward meeting goals for providing affordable housing using HOME funds, including the number and types of households served. The intent of the HOME program is to: • Provide decent affordable housing to lower income families, • Expand the capacity of non profit housing providers, • Strengthen the ability of state and local governments to provide housing • Leverage private-sector participation. Morris County Consortia funding for the Program Year 2010 HOME program was $1,164,740. Please refer to the “Housing Needs Table” for percentages achieved. 2. HOME Match Report a. Use HOME Match Report HUD-40107-A to report on match contributions for the period covered by the Consolidated Plan program year. HOME Match Report – See page 31. 3. HOME MBE and WBE Report a. Use Part III of HUD Form 40107 to report contracts and subcontracts with Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and Women’s Business Enterprises (WBEs). HOME MBE and WBE Report – See page 32 4. Assessments a. Detail results of on-site inspections of rental housing.

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On-site inspections of rental housing were performed according to Housing Quality Standards. For detailed breakdown, please refer to the “Monitoring” section, #2. b. Describe the HOME jurisdiction’s affirmative marketing actions. All grantees are required to submit with their grant agreement a copy of their affirmative marketing plan, which must comply with 24 CFR 92.351. The plan is contained in the file and marketing publication is noted, clipped and filed as well. c. Describe outreach to minority and women owned businesses. Morris County Community Development maintains a list of minority and womenowned businesses, which it updates as additional businesses are identified. The Division encourages HOME subgrantees to utilize this list when soliciting bids and proposals.

HOMELESS
Homeless Needs
*Please also refer to the Homeless Needs Table in the Needs.xls workbook.

1. Identify actions taken to address needs of homeless persons. The Jurisdiction undertook the following activities to address the needs of people who are homeless, through PY 2010 ESG and CDBG programs: • Morris County Office of Temporary Assistance - homeless prevention assistance for 100 extremely low- and low-income people • Homeless Solutions, Inc. – funding was provided for nights of shelter and weekend staff for families, benefitting 38 people • Interfaith Council for Homeless Families – provided case management for families in Permanent Supportive Housing, benefitting 105 individuals • Jersey Battered Women's Shelter – Funding was provided for 200 nights of shelter for 3 abused spouses and their children and for a counselor in the Children's Program, benefiting 48 individuals. Local hospitals Local hospitals Discharge planners on medical units of the local hospitals call the area shelters for bed availability when a homeless patient is ready for discharge. Homeless individuals have been discharged to shelters, such as Homeless Solutions, Inc. with nursing follow-up care provided on-site at the shelter. Shelters do require that a person is able to care for physical needs such as eating, bathing, ambulating, and complying with a prescription. Through a partnership between Jersey Battered Women’s Service (JBWS) and Morristown Memorial Hospital (MMH), patients identified as domestic violence victims will be referred to JBWS for appropriate services, including shelter. The Office of Temporary Assistance (OTA) may assist with placements for homeless patients requiring a level of care that cannot be provided in a shelter.

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Discharge planners on psychiatric units of the local hospitals call the Mental Health Association of Morris County (MHAMC) for placement and services for psychiatric patients who are homeless and ready for discharge. The MHA will meet with the individual on the unit whenever possible and then arrange a Safe Haven bed at Homeless Solutions, Inc., a motel placement through OTA, or some other housing arrangement. Local hospitals can also utilize the OTA 24-hour emergency homeless hotline for housing assistance after hours. State psychiatric hospitals New Jersey has a policy prohibiting discharge from state psychiatric hospitals to shelters and/or to the streets. Patients who are ready for discharge are referred to the county Integrated Case Management Service (ICMS) prior to discharge. The MHAMC contracts for ICMS in Morris County and operates the service as a consortium with two community mental health centers - St. Clare’s and NewBridge Services. ICMS clients receive 18 months of post-discharge case management services. If an ICMS client becomes homeless the case manager refers the individual to the MHA Homeless Outreach Services for a Safe Haven bed if necessary. County and local jails Individuals who are incarcerated, homeless, and have a psychiatric illness come to the attention of the county-funded forensic liaison to the jail. The jail’s social worker and substance abuse counselor, county probation officers, and the Morris County Drug Court will also refer homeless individuals to the area shelters such as Homeless Solutions, Inc., and the Market St. Mission. Every effort is made to coordinate time of discharge with the receiving agency. JBWS has established linkages with correctional facilities to provide services for Morris County women who are victims of domestic violence while they are incarcerated and offer placement upon release. Prisons Homeless Solutions, Inc. has an agreement with the Administrative Office of the NJ Courts to accept Intensive Supervision Program (ISP) participants. ISP is an alternative to jail for non-violent offenders. Homeless men and women enter the shelter with 24/7 supervision and are expected to find employment, link with treatment, pay fines and eventually secure housing. Aging out youth DYFS provides discharge planning for 18 year olds leaving the care of DYFS. Roots and Wings provides housing and case management support for youth who have aged-out of the foster care system. Currently Roots & Wings has 7 eligible youth in this program and is looking to expand. The county’s Acute Care Systems Review Committee, which includes representatives of the mental health system and the jail, reviews systems problems related to individuals who cross systems. The Mental Health/ Criminal Justice Task Force is actively forging a stronger partnership between systems. The county has a cross systems review committee comprised of homeless service providers, hospital Emergency room staff, representatives from the department of corrections, and professionals specializing in substance abuse. This review committee will identify gaps in services for homeless substance abusers, e.g., • Improved service access for individuals with legal involvement

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Bilingual (Spanish) clinical and case management Low cost medications and medical treatment

The Cross Systems Review Committee goals: 1) Harm reduction services Housing First/provide opportunities to provide housing first or other model; 2) Identify gaps in training for life skills which lead to self-sufficiency. Provide training and close gaps; 3) Support efforts of Step off the Street Outreach, expand case management for substance abuse population Disaster Planning and Emergency preparedness for the homeless population: Creates a housing and health plan for homeless people during a disaster. 2. Identify actions to help homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing and independent living. The County's Homeless Plan which was developed by Department of Human Services, the Division of Community Development in conjunction with the needs and concerns outlined in the Continuum of Care system, addressed the obvious need for more permanent supportive housing as well as affordable rental units in order to eliminate chronic homelessness. The Division as been funding, on a regular basis, a non profit to provide permanent supportive housing to people who are homeless, using ESG funds. It has also dedicated HOME funds to provide 10 vouchers to providers serving homeless households ready to transition from homelessness to permanent housing. 3. Identify new Federal resources obtained from Homeless SuperNOFA. The jurisdiction continues to support the applications of Supportive Housing (SHP) and Shelter plus Care (S+C) Programs for funding consideration through the HUD SuperNOFA application process. For these funds, the Division of Human Services has taken the lead role by developing the Exhibit I portion of the application. The Emergency Shelter Grant program funds are managed by Community Development. Homeless Shelters and service providers apply to the CDBG program for funding for eligible activities serving the homeless.

Specific Homeless Prevention Elements
1. Identify actions taken to prevent homelessness. Program Year 1 CAPER Specific Housing Prevention Elements response: Within the county’s homeless plan the prevention component identifies services that prevent people from becoming homeless by reducing risk factors and enhancing protective factors. Risk factors such as mental illness, alcohol and drug use, cooccurring disorders, physical health problems, domestic violence, and criminal justice system involvement are addressed in the inventory section. Protective factors include the following: addressing minority status, poverty, the lack of affordable housing, the need for supportive services in housing, discharge planning, and education and advocacy. In addition, ESG funding is used in a homeless prevention program which provides qualifying households with monetary assistance such as back rent and mortgage payments, utility fees, or security deposits.

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Emergency Shelter Grants (ESG)
1. Identify actions to address emergency shelter and transitional housing needs of homeless individuals and families (including significant subpopulations such as those living on the streets). ESG funds were used for operating costs for two emergency shelters, a shelter for battered/abused women and their children and a shelter for families. These shelters house those people on the street some of whom may have dual diagnoses. Another family shelter also received ESG funding for case management in their permanent supportive housing program. 2. Assessment of Relationship of ESG Funds to Goals and Objectives a. Evaluate progress made in using ESG funds to address homeless and homeless prevention needs, goals, and specific objectives established in the Consolidated Plan. The needs and goals identified in our consolidated plan with regard to the homeless and homeless prevention are consistent with the ESG funding allocations. b. Detail how ESG projects are related to implementation of comprehensive homeless planning strategy, including the number and types of individuals and persons in households served with ESG funds. The ESG projects relate to our comprehensive planning strategy identified in our consolidated plan as well as the county homeless plan and the narrative portion of the Continuum of Care. All three identify the need for suitable shelters for individuals and families including identifiable sub-populations, supportive services enabling the homeless individual to move up the continuum and prevention dollars to prevent households from becoming homeless. 3. Matching Resources a. Provide specific sources and amounts of new funding used to meet match as required by 42 USC 11375(a)(1), including cash resources, grants, and staff salaries, as well as in-kind contributions such as the value of a building or lease, donated materials, or volunteer time. Please see the accompanying chart labeled “Financial Status Report” beginning on page 34. 4. State Method of Distribution a. States must describe their method of distribution and how it rated and selected its local government agencies and private nonprofit organizations acting as subrecipients. N/A 5. Activity and Beneficiary Data a. Completion of attached Emergency Shelter Grant Program Performance Chart or other reports showing ESG expenditures by type of activity. Also describe any problems in collecting, reporting, and evaluating the reliability of this information. Activity and beneficiary data is included in the “Financial Status Report” beginning on page 34. b. Homeless Discharge Coordination i. As part of the government developing and implementing a homeless discharge coordination policy, ESG homeless prevention funds may be

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used to assist very-low income individuals and families at risk of becoming homeless after being released from publicly funded institutions such as health care facilities, foster care or other youth facilities, or corrections institutions or programs. We have addressed discharge planning extensively in the continuum of care narrative for those persons released from correctional facilities, foster care, and health care facilities, especially mental health care. c. Explain how your government is instituting a homeless discharge coordination policy, and how ESG homeless prevention funds are being used in this effort. Our local government has not instituted a homeless discharge coordination policy and we have not looked into using homeless prevention funds in this effort.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
Community Development
*Please also refer to the Community Development Table in the Needs.xls workbook.

1. Assessment of Relationship of CDBG Funds to Goals and Objectives a. Assess use of CDBG funds in relation to the priorities, needs, goals, and specific objectives in the Consolidated Plan, particularly the highest priority activities. Response: Please refer to Project tables. b. Evaluate progress made toward meeting goals for providing affordable housing using CDBG funds, including the number and types of households served. Response: Please refer to Project tables. c. Indicate the extent to which CDBG funds were used for activities that benefited extremely low-income, low-income, and moderate-income persons. Response: Please refer to Project tables. 2. Changes in Program Objectives a. Identify the nature of and the reasons for any changes in program objectives and how the jurisdiction would change its program as a result of its experiences. There are no changes in program objectives. 3. Assessment of Efforts in Carrying Out Planned Actions a. Indicate how grantee pursued all resources indicated in the Consolidated Plan. Grantee has been advocating partnerships, as organizations are struggling to obtain other funding sources. b. Indicate how grantee provided certifications of consistency in a fair and impartial manner. Grantee provides certifications of consistency in a fair and impartial manner based on the development of solid relationships with organizations so that players are known quantities.

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Requests made for Certificates of Consistency to the Consolidated Plan included: • Continuum of Care: Supportive Housing Program and Shelter+Care o NJ Department of Community Affairs (3) o Homeless Solutions, Inc (3) o Mental Health Association of Morris County o Jersey Battered Women Services • Housing Partnership of Morris County, Inc. • Public Housing Authorities Boonton Dover Madison (2) Morris County (3) c. Indicate how grantee did not hinder Consolidated Plan implementation by action or willful inaction. Grantee supported Consolidated Plan implementation through education of its grantees and review committees. 4. For Funds Not Used for National Objectives a. Indicate how use of CDBG funds did not meet national objectives. b. Indicate how did not comply with overall benefit certification. N/A 5. Anti-displacement and Relocation – for activities that involve acquisition, rehabilitation or demolition of occupied real property a. Describe steps actually taken to minimize the amount of displacement resulting from the CDBG-assisted activities. b. Describe steps taken to identify households, businesses, farms or nonprofit organizations who occupied properties subject to the Uniform Relocation Act or Section 104(d) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, and whether or not they were displaced, and the nature of their needs and preferences. c. Describe steps taken to ensure the timely issuance of information notices to displaced households, businesses, farms, or nonprofit organizations. N/A 6. Low/Mod Job Activities – for economic development activities undertaken where jobs were made available but not taken by low- or moderate-income persons a. Describe actions taken by grantee and businesses to ensure first consideration was or will be given to low/mod persons. b. List by job title of all the permanent jobs created/retained and those that were made available to low/mod persons. c. If any of jobs claimed as being available to low/mod persons require special skill, work experience, or education, provide a description of steps being taken or that will be taken to provide such skills, experience, or education. See Section 3 Summary Report, starting on page 27 for both HOME and CDBG reporting. 7. Low/Mod Limited Clientele Activities – for activities not falling within one of the categories of presumed limited clientele low and moderate income benefit a. Describe how the nature, location, or other information demonstrates the activities benefit a limited clientele at least 51% of whom are low- and moderate-income.

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One hundred percent (85%) of CDBG funds benefit low/moderate income people. 8. Program income received a. Detail the amount of program income reported that was returned to each individual revolving fund, e.g., housing rehabilitation, economic development, or other type of revolving fund. CDBG had Program Income of $92,787. b. Detail the amount repaid on each float-funded activity. N/A c. Detail all other loan repayments broken down by the categories of housing rehabilitation, economic development, or other. N/A d. Detail the amount of income received from the sale of property by parcel. N/A 9. Prior period adjustments – where reimbursement was made this reporting period for expenditures (made in previous reporting periods) that have been disallowed, provide the following information: a. The activity name and number as shown in IDIS; b. The program year(s) in which the expenditure(s) for the disallowed activity(ies) was reported; c. The amount returned to line-of-credit or program account; and d. Total amount to be reimbursed and the time period over which the reimbursement is to be made, if the reimbursement is made with multi-year payments. N/A 10. Loans and other receivables a. List the principal balance for each float-funded activity outstanding as of the end of the reporting period and the date(s) by which the funds are expected to be received. b. List the total number of other loans outstanding and the principal balance owed as of the end of the reporting period. c. List separately the total number of outstanding loans that are deferred or forgivable, the principal balance owed as of the end of the reporting period, and the terms of the deferral or forgiveness. d. Detail the total number and amount of loans made with CDBG funds that have gone into default and for which the balance was forgiven or written off during the reporting period. e. Provide a List of the parcels of property owned by the grantee or its subrecipients that have been acquired or improved using CDBG funds and that are available for sale as of the end of the reporting period. N/A 11. Lump sum agreements a. Provide the name of the financial institution. b. Provide the date the funds were deposited. c. Provide the date the use of funds commenced. d. Provide the percentage of funds disbursed within 180 days of deposit in the institution. N/A 12. Housing Rehabilitation – for each type of rehabilitation program for which projects/units were reported as completed during the program year

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a. Identify the type of program and number of projects/units completed for each program. Number of units completed – 32 units were served by the County’s Homeowner Rehab Program; 501 units were served by Hope House’s “Operation Fix-It.” b. Provide the total CDBG funds involved in the program. Total CDBG funds involved - $567,091 c. Detail other public and private funds involved in the project. Other public and private funds involved - $48,542 were proposed 13. Neighborhood Revitalization Strategies – for grantees that have HUD-approved neighborhood revitalization strategies a. Describe progress against benchmarks for the program year. For grantees with Federally-designated EZs or ECs that received HUD approval for a neighborhood revitalization strategy, reports that are required as part of the EZ/EC process shall suffice for purposes of reporting progress. Program Year 1 CAPER Community Development response: N/A

Antipoverty Strategy
1. Describe actions taken during the last year to reduce the number of persons living below the poverty level. Program Year 1 CAPER Antipoverty Strategy response: This Division does not administer antipoverty programs directly. However, programs serve low income individuals and households, many of whom are receiving unemployment insurance, food stamps, Medicaid and Temporary Assistance for Families in Need.

NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS
Non-homeless Special Needs
*Please also refer to the Non-homeless Special Needs Table in the Needs.xls workbook.

1. Identify actions taken to address special needs of persons that are not homeless but require supportive housing, (including persons with HIV/AIDS and their families). Program Year 1 CAPER Non-homeless Special Needs response: This jurisdiction provided continued assistance to supportive housing agencies, especially for persons with disabilities (mental, physical and developmental) and the frail elderly. It also continued assistance for supportive services and facilities. The Jurisdiction undertook the following activities to address the needs of the nonhomeless special needs population: * Employment Horizons – Culinary Arts Trainer * Epoch – Childcare Scholarships * United Cerebral Palsy – Respite Care for Caregivers * VFW Post #2519 – Handicapped Accessible Toilet Facility

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Specific HOPWA Objectives
*Please also refer to the HOPWA Table in the Needs.xls workbook.

1. Overall Assessment of Relationship of HOPWA Funds to Goals and Objectives Grantees should demonstrate through the CAPER and related IDIS reports the progress they are making at accomplishing identified goals and objectives with HOPWA funding. Grantees should demonstrate: a. That progress is being made toward meeting the HOPWA goal for providing affordable housing using HOPWA funds and other resources for persons with HIV/AIDS and their families through a comprehensive community plan; b. That community-wide HIV/AIDS housing strategies are meeting HUD’s national goal of increasing the availability of decent, safe, and affordable housing for low-income persons living with HIV/AIDS; c. That community partnerships between State and local governments and community-based non-profits are creating models and innovative strategies to serve the housing and related supportive service needs of persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families; d. That through community-wide strategies Federal, State, local, and other resources are matched with HOPWA funding to create comprehensive housing strategies; e. That community strategies produce and support actual units of housing for persons living with HIV/AIDS; and finally, f. That community strategies identify and supply related supportive services in conjunction with housing to ensure the needs of persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families are met. 2. This should be accomplished by providing an executive summary (1-5 pages) that includes: a. Grantee Narrative i. Grantee and Community Overview (1) A brief description of your organization, the area of service, the name of each project sponsor and a broad overview of the range/type of housing activities and related services (2) How grant management oversight of project sponsor activities is conducted and how project sponsors are selected (3) A description of the local jurisdiction, its need, and the estimated number of persons living with HIV/AIDS (4) A brief description of the planning and public consultations involved in the use of HOPWA funds including reference to any appropriate planning document or advisory body (5) What other resources were used in conjunction with HOPWA funded activities, including cash resources and in-kind contributions, such as the value of services or materials provided by volunteers or by other individuals or organizations (6) Collaborative efforts with related programs including coordination and planning with clients, advocates, Ryan White CARE Act planning bodies, AIDS Drug Assistance Programs, homeless assistance programs, or other efforts that assist persons living with HIV/AIDS and their families. ii. Project Accomplishment Overview

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(1) A brief summary of all housing activities broken down by three types: emergency or short-term rent, mortgage or utility payments to prevent homelessness; rental assistance; facility based housing, including development cost, operating cost for those facilities and community residences (2) The number of units of housing which have been created through acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction since 1993 with any HOPWA funds (3) A brief description of any unique supportive service or other service delivery models or efforts (4) Any other accomplishments recognized in your community due to the use of HOPWA funds, including any projects in developmental stages that are not operational. iii. Barriers or Trends Overview (1) Describe any barriers encountered, actions in response to barriers, and recommendations for program improvement (2) Trends you expect your community to face in meeting the needs of persons with HIV/AIDS, and (3) Any other information you feel may be important as you look at providing services to persons with HIV/AIDS in the next 5-10 years b. Accomplishment Data i. Completion of CAPER Performance Chart 1 of Actual Performance in the provision of housing (Table II-1 to be submitted with CAPER). ii. Completion of CAPER Performance Chart 2 of Comparison to Planned Housing Actions (Table II-2 to be submitted with CAPER). Program Year 1 CAPER Specific HOPWA Objectives response: PJ does not administer HOPWA.

OTHER NARRATIVE
Include any CAPER information that was not covered by narratives in any other section. Program Year 1 CAPER Other Narrative response: In 2006, the County of Morris received $297,000 through the Economic Development Initiative, to demolish a four story office building, owned by the county, for the long term purpose of redevelopment. As of the end of PY 2010, the demolition preparations had begun.

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