2011-12 | ImAGESTuPELO.

COm
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TuPELO, mISSISSIPPI

EVERYDAY ELVIS
Tributes to The King endure

SLOW-COOKED GOODNESS
Restaurants offer barbecue favorites

Plenty of Theatrics
Performing, visual arts entertain and educate

SPONSORED bY ThE COmmuNITY DEVELOPmENT FOuNDATION

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2011-12 EDITION | VOLumE 10
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anniversary issue
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NO PLACE LIKE hOmE
Tupelo’s abundant housing market appeals to diverse population

18 SLOW-COOKED GOODNESS
Barbecue restaurants dish out local flavor

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EVERYDAY ELVIS
Tributes to The King endure

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PLENTY OF ThEATRICS
Performing, visual arts entertain and educate

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bOTTOmLESS WELL OF GENEROSITY
Tupelo supports charities through fundraising, volunteerism

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ChANGE IS GOOD
CDF spurs job creation through industry recruitment, workforce development, small-business support

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TuPELO, mISSISSIPPI
PROOFREADING mANAGER RAven PeTTy CONTENT COORDINATOR JessiCA WALKeR STAFF WRITER Kevin LiTWin COPY EDITOR JiLL WyATT CONTRIbuTING WRITERS BARBARA BiehLeR, CARoL CoWAn, Jennie BRADFoRD CuRLee, JuLiAnnA eDmonDs, CARy esTes, PAuL LADD, Kim mADLom, sPenCeR moheAD, Joe moRRis, KARi QuiLL mEDIA TEChNOLOGY DIRECTOR ChRisTinA CARDen SENIOR GRAPhIC DESIGNERS LAuRA GALLAGheR, JessiCA mAnneR, JAnine mARyLAnD, KRis sexTon, viKKi WiLLiAms GRAPhIC DESIGNERS RAChAeL GeRRinGeR, TAyLoR nunLey mEDIA TEChNOLOGY ANALYSTS BeCCA ARy, ChAnDRA BRADshAW, LAnCe ConzeTT PhOTOGRAPhY DIRECTOR JeFFRey s. oTTo SENIOR PhOTOGRAPhERS JeFF ADKins, BRiAn mcCoRD STAFF PhOTOGRAPhERS ToDD BenneTT, AnTony BoshieR WEb CONTENT mANAGER John hooD WEb PROjECT mANAGER noy FonGnALy WEb DESIGNER II RiChARD sTevens WEb DEVELOPER I yAmeL hALL, neLs noseWoRThy WEb ACCOuNT mANAGER LAuRen euBAnK AD PRODuCTION mANAGER KATie miDDenDoRF AD TRAFFIC ASSISTANTS KRysTin Lemmon, PATRiCiA moisAn I.T. DIRECTOR yAnCey BonD I.T. SuPPORT TEChNICIAN DAnieL CAnTReLL SENIOR ACCOuNTANT LisA oWens ACCOuNTS PAYAbLE COORDINATOR mARiA mcFARLAnD ACCOuNTS RECEIVAbLE COORDINATOR DiAnA GuzmAn OFFICE mANAGER/ACCOuNTS RECEIVAbLE COORDINATOR sheLLy miLLeR INTEGRATED mEDIA mANAGER BRAnDy mADDox SALES SuPPORT COORDINATOR ALex mARKs COLOR ImAGING TEChNICIAN ALison hunTeR ChAIRmAN GReG ThuRmAn PRESIDENT/PubLIShER BoB sChWARTzmAn ExECuTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAy LAnGen SENIOR V.P./SALES ToDD PoTTeR, CARLA ThuRmAn SENIOR V.P./OPERATIONS CAsey hesTeR SENIOR V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPmENT JeFF heeFneR SENIOR V.P./buSINESS DEVELOPmENT sCoTT TemPLeTon V.P./ExTERNAL COmmuNICATIONS TeRee CARuTheRs V.P./CuSTOm PubLIShING Kim hoLmBeRG V.P./VISuAL CONTENT mARK FoResTeR V.P./CONTENT OPERATIONS nATAshA LoRens V.P./SALES ChARLes FiTzGiBBon, heRB hARPeR, JAReK sWeKosKy V.P./TRAVEL PubLIShING susAn ChAPPeLL CONTROLLER ChRis DuDLey CONTENT DIRECTOR/buSINESS PubLICATIONS BiLL mcmeeKin CONTENT DIRECTOR/LIVAbILITY.COm LisA BATTLes CONTENT DIRECTOR/AGRIbuSINESS Jessy yAnCey mARKETING CREATIVE DIRECTOR KeiTh hARRis DISTRIbuTION DIRECTOR GARy smiTh ExECuTIVE SECRETARY KRisTy DunCAn humAN RESOuRCES mANAGER PeGGy BLAKe RECEPTIONIST LinDA BishoP

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d e pa r tm e nt s
10 Almanac 38 biz briefs 40 Chamber Report 41 Economic Profile 42 Image Gallery 48 Local Flavor 50 health & Wellness 56 Arts & Culture 58 Sports & Recreation 60 Education 63 Community Profile 64 Through the Lens

Images Tupelo is published annually by Journal Communications inc. and is distributed through the Community Development Foundation and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by email at info@jnlcom.com. FOR mORE INFORmATION, CONTACT: Community Development Foundation P.o. Box A • Tupelo, ms 38802 Phone: (662) 842-4521 • Fax: (662) 841-0693 www.cdfms.org VISIT Images Tupelo ONLINE AT ImAGESTuPELO.COm ©Copyright 2011 Journal Communications inc., 725 Cool springs Blvd., suite 400, Franklin, Tn 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. no portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. member The Association of magazine media member Custom Content Council

ON ThE COVER Lyric Theatre Photo by Jeff Adkins

all or part of this magazine is printed on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

please recycle this magazine

member Community Development Foundation

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What’s online imagestupelo.com

Photos & Videos
Visually explore Tupelo in our online photo and video galleries

2011-12 | ImAGESTuPELO.COm
®

TuPELO, mISSISSIPPI

Facts
Get the most up-to-date info on cost of living, top employers, schools, population demographics and more

EVERYDAY ELVIS
Tributes to The King endure

SLOW-COOKED GOODNESS
Restaurants offer barbecue favorites

Plenty of Theatrics
Performing, visual arts entertain and educate

SPONSORED bY ThE COmmuNITY DEVELOPmENT FOuNDATION

liVing here
Learn the basics about local neighborhoods, schools and health care providers

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Tupelo in acTion

Don’t just take our word for it – see for yourself how great Tupelo is in our quick videos at imagestupelo.com, highlighting a little bit of everything that Tupelo has to offer.

imagestupelo.com

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Digital Edition
Generosity
BOTTOMLESS WELL OF
TUPELO SUPPORTS CHARITIES THROUGH FUNDRAISING, VOLUNTEERISM
STORY BY JOE MORRIS

n Tupelo, it’s not about getting people to pitch in – it’s about coordinating what is usually an overwhelming response. This is a giving community. Whether it’s for the various activities of Project Hope, the United Way, the Boys & Girls Clubs of North Mississippi or any of literally dozens of other worthwhile organizations, Tupelo’s citizenry is always ready to answer the call. “I think one of the reasons we’ve always been so successful is because we target heart disease and diabetes, which affect so many people directly,” says Bobby Geno, president of Project Hope’s board and also a database manager at Renasant Bank’s Tupelo technology center. “People really do come up alongside us and commit themselves to helping in this ongoing battle.” Project Hope Project Hope works as a community health initiative for Lee County, and hopes to expand its programs through the entire state. It works along with the CREATE Foundation, North Mississippi Health Services Live Well Community Health Initiative, Good Samaritan Health Services Free Clinic and other groups on many annual programs, including the annual Festival of Hope, which features a survivors’ walk, education and counseling opportunities, and
JEFF ADKINS

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Kids play at the Boys & Girls Club Haven Acres.

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Welcome to Tupelo
an inTRoducTion To The aRea’s PeoPle, Places and evenTs

Lyric sings a new song
The new neon marquee has lit up the Lyric Theatre and downtown Tupelo for the first time in more than 40 years. originally built in 1912 by R.F. Goodlett as a venue for live productions, the theater faced threats of demolition in 1984. For more than 20 years, it has undergone major construction projects. The addition of the north Annex in 1993 included setbuilding space, dressing rooms and a rehearsal hall. most recently, patrons have enjoyed more upgraded amenities thanks to grants from the mississippi Arts Commission and the e.R. Carpenter Foundation. everyone wants to visit the place where elvis allegedly planted his first kiss. www.tct.ms

it’s your Pick
A greener alternative to a grocery store, the Tupelo Farmer’s market is open every Tuesday, Thursday and saturday beginning at 6 a.m. from may 9 through oct. 31. The market’s 26 stalls offer locally produced food items ranging from honey and bee products to wool and fibers. shoppers can enjoy live music one saturday each month, and while dog owners are always welcome to bring their pups, the market hosts Dog Days at the market once a year. For more information, visit www.tupelomainstreet.com/ farmers-market.

Bye-Bye Training Wheels
in July 2010, Tupelo set a precedent for the rest of mississippi by passing a law requiring all motorists to allow a 3-foot safeguard when passing cyclists on the road. Taking advantage of Tupelo’s cyclist-friendly streets, members of Bike Walk mississippi supported safe biking and healthy lifestyles during the successful 2011 Bike to Work Day. Cyclists can also ride for charities and prizes in the annual Riding with the King race, part of the Tupelo elvis Festival.

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Almanac

Feeling Festive
Downtown Tupelo gathers the community year round with a host of festivals. highly anticipated is the annual Tupelo elvis Festival featuring a pet parade, beauty pageant and 5K race. Recalling the same era, participants showcase their hot rods each spring during the Blue suede Cruise. movie fans will enjoy movies in the Park in Fairpark by City hall and the Tupelo Film Festival at Lyric Theatre. other major seasonal events, such as the Chili Fest, Wine Downtown and the GumTree Arts Festival also draw crowds to the city’s center.

spread the health
healthWorks!, a children’s health education center created by memorial children’s hospital, is more than an average museum. The center aims to kick-start active lifestyles, motivating children to learn while enjoying parties, field trips and community outreach programs. Today, more than half a million people have experienced its contagious health “edutainment.” several membership options are available, as well as general admission visits.

Bank on it
The headquarters for Bancorpsouth and Renasant Bank, Tupelo is the local banking giant. Founded in 1876, Bancorpsouth takes pride in offering personal service and reliable banking advice to individuals and small to medium-size businesses. Renasant Bank is known for innovation. Among other breakthroughs, it was the first bank in Lee County to introduce a debit card. Renasant Corporation, the parent of Renasant Bank and Renasant insurance, has assets of approximately $3.7 billion.

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Film Festivals

10 best small

Traverse ciTy Michigan asheville North carolina beNd Oregon MuskOgee Oklahoma TupelO Mississippi chaMpaigN-urbaNa illinois greeNsbOrO North carolina TucsON arizona WichiTa kansas saleM Oregon

Tupelo made the list.

10 Best Small Film Festivals
See more Top 10 lists at Livability.com.

Introducing the Livability.com Top 10 Lists New lists every month | Not your average lists | Not your average website

Fast Facts TvA sheds Light on Tupelo
in 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Tupelo and flipped a switch, making it the first city to receive affordable power from the Tennessee valley Authority by way of the Wilson Dam. visitors and residents can observe the original Crosstown arrow sign located in the heart of the city marking the historical event. in fact, residents of the Willis heights neighborhood can donate to improvement projects in the area by purchasing lapel pins for $5 each that replicate the Crosstown arrow sign. n The Tupelo automobile museum, which includes an 1886 Benz and an 1889 Knox Porcupine, is regarded as the official car museum for the state. n each year the Tupelo Buffalo Park and Zoo attracts 140,000 visitors – who can safely view the big beasts by riding aboard a monster Bison Bus. n approximately 80,000 people tour the elvis Presley Birthplace attraction each year.

tupelo at a glance
POPuLATION (2009) Tupelo: 36,337 Lee County: 81,913 LOCATION Tupelo is in northeast mississippi, 90 miles from memphis, Tenn., and 165 miles from Jackson, miss. bEGINNINGS Tupelo was incorporated as a city in 1870, and its development was closely tied to the boom of the railroad industry. FOR mORE INFORmATION Community Development Foundation P.o. Box A Tupelo, ms 38802 Phone: (662) 842-4521 Fax: (662) 841-0693 www.cdfms.org
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What’s online
Take a virtual tour of Tupelo, courtesy of our award-winning photographers, at imagestupelo.com.

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Home
TuPELO’S AbuNDANT hOuSING mARKET APPEALS TO DIVERSE POPuLATION

No Place Like

A swing decorates the front porch of a home in downtown’s Fairpark District.

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sToRy By jENNIE bRADFORD CuRLEE PhoToGRAPhy By jEFF ADKINS

hen Emily Oxford had the chance to purchase her childhood home in the historic Highland Circle neighborhood, she didn’t think twice about it. The mother of two, her experience growing up in Highland Circle was ideal in every way. “Highland Circle is the only place we wanted to live,” says Oxford. “We dreamed of raising our children in this house years before it happened, and I can’t wait for them to experience the wonderful childhood that I was able to enjoy. Highland Circle is where my heart is. It’s home.” Oxford spends her days playing with her children in Highland Circle’s neighborhood park and strolling along the circle’s treelined sidewalks. While this picturesque place satisfies her desire for home, residents of Tupelo can also enjoy the fast-paced, urban lifestyle of downtown living or even the secluded, quiet routine of adults-only developments. While Oxford has chosen to live in one of Tupelo’s oldest neighborhoods, the city offers an array of housing options, urban and suburban, old and new, that appeal to all ages, ensuring that every resident can say “there’s no place like home.” North Tupelo Just as Highland Circle was the first planned subdivision in Tupelo, the Joyner neighborhood is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the community. Tree-lined streets envelop homesteads of both young and old, making the Joyner area a destination of choice for young
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families with children and older adults nearing retirement. In close proximity to Rob Leake City Park, Joyner residents can walk to the city pool, tennis courts and baseball fields. Downtown Tupelo New housing units are plentiful in the Tupelo/Lee County area, but urban redevelopment is a hot theme in downtown housing. Tupelo’s Fairpark District offers accommodations from luxury apartments and brownstones to loft apartments and large family homes. Residents enjoy all the amenities downtown living has to offer, including shops, restaurants and parks, all in walking distance. Mill Village, located adjacent to downtown Tupelo, was built in the 1900s to house cotton mill workers.

A National Register of Historic Places neighborhood, Mill Village is enjoying a revitalization that includes homes, businesses and green spaces. East Tupelo Tupelo residents can walk the paths that Elvis Presley walked in Presley Heights. This east Tupelo neighborhood is in walking distance of Veterans Park, the city’s largest municipal park, with ball fields, a splash park and veterans memorial area. Presley Heights hosts an annual Azalea Festival that features a driving tour of the area’s gorgeous azaleas at their blooming peak. The Elvis Presley Birthplace, located in Presley Heights, attracts thousands of visitors from around the world each year.

West Tupelo For residents with a taste for luxury, Spring Lake is a 1,000acre development with sprawling Southern manors and grand family homes. The neighborhood boasts a recreation center with clubhouse, pool, tennis courts and playground, as well as myriad walking trails. Continuing west, 2004’s Subdivision Development of the Year, The Villages is an 89-acre gated community that caters to those interested in private, adult living. It offers residents a community center complete with fitness room, office center, kitchen, conference room and swimming pool. Community members may also take advantage of the lakes, walking trails and greenbelt areas the development comprises.

From left: Brand-new homes are located downtown in the Fairpark district; honey and the carter family practice football in the spring lake neighborhood; emily oxford and her family live in her childhood home in the historic highland circle neighborhood, Tupelo’s first planned subdivision.

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Slow-

Cooked

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Goodness
bARbECuE RESTAuRANTS DISh OuT LOCAL FLAVOR
sToRy By bARbARA bIEhLER PhoToGRAPhy By jEFF ADKINS

ave a craving for slowcooked barbecue? Tupelo serves up its version of this beloved cuisine at a variety of restaurants around town. Romie’s barbeque Romie’s Barbeque recently moved to a new, more spacious location on Troy Street. Bright colors, exposed-brick walls and neon lights create a fun, inviting atmosphere where you can feast on some of Romie’s signature dishes, like the pulled pork sandwich, sticky rib racks, BBQ nachos or fried green tomatoes. “Our fresh meat and homemade everything is what sets Romie’s BBQ apart from others,” Leeann Lesley of Romie’s Barbeque says. Romie’s makes its own dressings and other side dishes from scratch, and uses three types of beans and plenty of meat in its special house baked beans recipe. Romie’s is open

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Left: half-smoked chicken with baked beans, fried green tomatoes and Texas toast at Romie’s Barbeque Right: musician Weston smith plays for the Romie’s Barbeque crowd.

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Monday through Saturday for lunch and dinner, and has a full bar featuring live events Tuesday through Saturday night. bbQ by jim BBQ by Jim co-owner Barbara Beane says consistency is the secret to success after 19 years in business. BBQ by Jim uses only select meats, like Boston Butts and St. Louis-style ribs, to create its tasty barbecue. Choose from a variety of fresh-cooked meats and vegetables to create your plate lunch, served every

weekday. Bulk or carry-out orders can include pulled pork, smoked half chickens, and whole and half slabs of ribs. BBQ by Jim is open Monday through Saturday at two convenient locations, on Commerce Street and in the Mall at Barnes Crossing. bishop’s bbQ Grill Bishop’s BBQ Grill in Saltillo first served barbecue to its customers in 2008. Take in its “inviting downhome atmosphere” and order a jumbo pulled pork sandwich or the beef brisket plate. Bishop’s also

features unique items hungry diners will enjoy, such as the smoked Angus burger, smoked whole quail plate and gator taters. Bishop’s BBQ Grill is open for lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday. Owner Ronnie Bishop says he will open a second location in Tupelo later this year. Eli’s bbQ Grill At Eli’s BBQ Grill on West Main Street, you can choose from a selection of sandwiches, plates, side dishes and family packs. Try the beef brisket sandwich or smoked

a barbecue plate with ribs, pulled pork, baked beans, cole slaw and a roll at BBQ by Jim Right: customers fill the dining room for lunch at Romie’s Barbeque downtown.

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chicken breast plate with two sides and a slice of thick Texas toast. Specialty items include pig salad with pulled pork, BBQ nachos and smoked BBQ wings. Enjoy lunch or dinner at Eli’s BBQ Grill Monday through Saturday. Papa V’s bbQ and Deli Papa V’s BBQ and Deli has three Tupelo area locations where customers can sample its distinctive food. Each location offers different breakfast, daily and special menus. Two locations – Papa V’s at East Main Street and neighboring Verona – feature tailgating menus with pulled pork, smoked chicken, ribs and other barbecue favorites. Contact each location for hours. magnolia bbQ and Fish Magnolia BBQ and Fish recently opened in east Tupelo. Barbecued ribs, pulled pork, smoked chicken, fish and shrimp are just a few of the items on the menu. While barbecue is a mainstay, owner Dameione Rogers says the specialty of the house is the Big Magnolia burger, loaded with cheese, pickles, onions and much more. Magnolia BBQ and Fish is open for lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday. Crossroads Rib Shack The newest arrival on the Tupelo barbecue scene is Crossroads Rib Shack. The restaurant already has a loyal following for its ribs and barbecue in Corinth, so owners sought out a second location here. The restaurant opened in the new Tupelo Commons retail development off North Gloster Street in fall 2011.

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TuPELO’S TRIbuTE TO ThE KING ENDuRES

elvis
A local flower business advertises that “nothing says love me tender” like its bouquets. “Over the years the people of Tupelo have become more and more proud of the fact that we have this legacy, that our city played an important part in Elvis’ life,” says Debbie Brangenberg of the Downtown Tupelo Main Street Association. Tupelo’s tribute to Elvis began in the late 1950s with

EVERYDAY

sToRy By KIm mADLOm

e may have found a new place to dwell, but Elvis Presley’s presence in his hometown of Tupelo is felt in more places than ever. Elvis Presley Boulevard runs through town, and Presley Heights is a neighborhood of homes and businesses. People relax at Elvis Presley Lake, and Tupelo sports teams call themselves the Hound Dogs.

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visitors take photographs of elvis Presley’s 1976 lincoln mark iv at the Tupelo automobile museum. Right: guitars for sale at Tupelo hardware, where elvis bought his first guitar

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PhoTos By JeFF ADKins

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the establishment of the Elvis Presley Birthplace and Museum, and now includes an Elvis driving tour, a major annual festival and more. Elvis Concert Funded museum The Birthplace and Museum was established when Elvis donated the proceeds from a 1956 concert in his hometown. Since then, the site has added a bronze statue of Elvis as a child, a fountain that illustrates his journey from poverty to international fame, and a chapel. In June 2012, a 10,000-square-foot addition will open, featuring a theater, cafe and reception space, Dick Guyton, executive director, says. “Our charge is to keep this property in the memory

of the little boy Elvis, not the entertainer,” Guyton says. “We honor his humble beginnings and that’s what the fans who visit appreciate. Here you can see that Elvis Presley came from nothing and yet became the most important entertainer in the world.” An Elvis Presley Discovery Driving Tour includes stops at the schools Elvis attended and Tupelo Hardware, where Gladys Presley took her son to buy his first guitar. Other stops include Johnnie’s Drive-in and the Lyric Theatre, both frequented by the young Elvis. Thousands of visitors from around the world flock to Tupelo each June for the Elvis Festival, and in May the Blue Suede Cruise brings car enthusiasts to see antique, classic and hot rod automobiles.

The elvis Presley Birthplace and museum (top left) includes a bronze statue of elvis as a child (right), a fountain that illustrates his journey from poverty to international fame (bottom left), and more.

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sTAFF PhoTos

Downtown main Street guitar sculpture

AnTony BoshieR

Public Art honors the King An artistic tribute to the King can be seen on Main Street, where 15 Elvis-themed guitar sculptures are displayed. The Elaine Dundy and Roy Turner Endowment for the Arts funded the 6-foot metal guitars, which were designed and painted by each of the public schools and unveiled in January 2010. Recently, the second installment of 15 guitar sculptures were added. Brangenberg says the sculptures emphasize an important lesson. “I think understanding that someone like Elvis came from Tupelo builds a lot of pride with children in our schools, and they can see something they participated in on public display,” she says. “It’s a great project.” The endowment was created with a $600,000 donation from Dundy, who came to Tupelo in 1981 to research and write her book, Elvis & Gladys, and was assisted by Tupelo resident Roy Turner. The endowment also installed a new silver screen in the Lyric Theatre, where Elvis is rumored to have had his first kiss in the balcony.

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Art
TuPELO’S PERFORmING AND VISuAL ARTS ENTERTAIN AND EDuCATE

sToRy By PAuL LADD

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rts and education thrive in Tupelo, thanks to cooperation between local arts organizations, schools and the community.

GumTree museum For more than 25 years, the GumTree Museum of Art has reached out with programs that make art accessible to people of all ages. “We try to have many different opportunities to bring the community in and learn about the exhibits we have, and teach a little art history as well,” says Kit Stafford, GumTree’s executive director. One of the museum’s most popular programs is Saturdays at the Museum, in which the Tennessee Valley Authority sponsors a children’s workshop relating to the artist currently on display. “It helps make children comfortable with the museum and learn a little about art,” Stafford says. Other programs include ceramic and pottery classes for adults, summer art camps for children and professional development for school art teachers in the summer. The museum also produces the annual GumTree Festival, a regional, juried fine arts show that has been around for 40 years. The event brings in 85 to 100 area artists each year. Another of GumTree’s outreach programs is the Main Street Guitar Project, which showcases the work
AnTony BoshieR

Left: gumTree museum of art PhoTo CouRTesy oF AmAnDA KoonLABA Right: main street guitar Project sculpture

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of The Twelve schools in The disTricT, four are naTional Blue riBBon schools
learn fun and interesting facts about Tupelo in the By the numbers video at

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“I want them to develop a lifelong love of history.”

of local artists, including students. So far, 15 guitars have been installed around Tupelo and another 15 will soon join them. Community Theater Thrives Tupelo Community Theatre (TCT) stages several events throughout the year that bring live theater up close and personal to area students. Each spring, artists are brought in from all over the world to teach elementary and middle schoolers about theater, says Tom Booth, executive director of TCT. Every July, TCT hosts a youth theater camp, where students are divided into groups and rotate through art, theater and music classes, in addition to learning what it takes to put on a play. By camp’s end, the students have rehearsed and performed a play at the Lyric Theatre. TCT also works with Tupelo’s Junior Auxiliary to take theater into schools within an hour of Tupelo. The joint effort is funded by a grant from actor and Mississippi native Morgan Freeman’s Rock River Foundation. TCT is a participant in the Tupelo Reads program, which encourages everyone in town to read a selected book and attend special community programs relating to it. Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom was chosen as the book for 2011. bringing history to Life At the Oren Dunn City Museum, the past is celebrated with an eye toward the future. The museum has year-round tours and living history exhibits to illustrate life during the early days of Tupelo and the region. Each October, different artisans and presenters turn back the clock to the 1860s and demonstrate 19th-century crafts, including blacksmithing, soap making and butter churning. There are programs for all ages, with a focus on young people. “I want them to develop a lifelong love of history,” says Janice Anthony, the museum’s educational director. “I want to catch them while they’re young. It’s very important.”

JeFF ADKins

From top: students rehearse their roles during theatre camp at the lyric Theatre; Kids make family trees with a genealogist at oren dunn city museum.

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Generosity

Bottomless Well oF

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TuPELO SuPPORTS ChARITIES ThROuGh FuNDRAISING, VOLuNTEERISm
sToRy By jOE mORRIS

n Tupelo, it’s not about getting people to pitch in – it’s about coordinating what is usually an overwhelming response. This is a giving community. Whether it’s for the various activities of Project Hope, the United Way, the Boys & Girls Clubs of North Mississippi or any of literally dozens of other worthwhile organizations, Tupelo’s citizenry is always ready to answer the call. “I think one of the reasons we’ve always been so successful is because we target heart disease and diabetes, which affect so many people directly,” says Bobby Geno, president of Project Hope’s board and also a database manager at Renasant Bank’s Tupelo technology center. “People really do come up alongside us and commit themselves to helping in this ongoing battle.” Project hope Project Hope works as a community health initiative for Lee County, and hopes to expand its programs through the entire state. It works along with the CREATE Foundation, North Mississippi Health Services Live Well Community Health Initiative, Good Samaritan Health Services Free Clinic and other groups on many annual programs, including the annual Festival of Hope, which features a survivors’ walk, education and counseling opportunities, and
JeFF ADKins

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Kids play at the Boys & girls club haven acres.

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sTAFF PhoTo JeFF ADKins JeFF ADKins

sTAFF PhoTo

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“We live in a great community with a rich history of giving back.”

other family-friendly activities. Project Hope also doles out serious grant money: $72,000 in 2009. And all that is possible thanks to ongoing, solid and reliable community support, Geno says. “We have a lot of team competitions each year, and our teams are absolutely the best at finding ways to generate income and get people involved,” Geno says. “Bake sales, T-shirt sales, you name it … there’s something going every week. Our ongoing goal is to hit $100,000 in fundraising; we’ve done it a couple of times, and we’re working towards making that happen every year.” united Way The sluggish economy has been a challenge for the United Way of Northeast Mississippi, but it’s being overcome, says Melinda Tidwell, executive director. “We live in a great community with a rich history of giving back,” Tidwell says. “When we began, it was a way for everyone at every income level to help others. It still is that way for us here, and so even in a bad economy we can meet our goals. People who are working are giving; we’ve had a lot to overcome, but people here are so very generous, and we continue to pick up new companies who want to take part in what we do.” Link Centre Tupelo also benefits from the Link Centre, a cultural service center that is home to literally dozens of organizations offering a wide variety of services. The Girl Scouts, El Centro/Campo Brillante,
Top left: Festival of hope middle left and right: children listen during a book presentation by Julianne goodwin of the Rotary club of Tupelo; Tupelo symphony orchestra’s steinway piano at the link centre

Sisters Network and many, many more are at the Link Centre, along with community favorites like the Tupelo Symphony Orchestra. Sanctuary hospice house On a quieter but equally important note, The Sanctuary Hospice House makes sure that

terminally ill residents get the quality care and comfort they deserve as they near life’s end. The nonprofit organization provides a full range of medical services and psychological and emotional support. It has been chosen as a National Medicare Hospice Demonstration Project.

Building Tupelo and Lee County Since 1941

2020 McCullough Blvd. Tupelo, MS 38801 (662) 842-3240 www.jescoinc.net

The Largest Industrial Contractor in the South

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CHANGe
iS Good
to advanced manufacturing, as demonstrated by its recruitment of Toyota Motor Manufacturing Mississippi. Fall 2011 marks the start of production for Toyota, where the Corolla will be assembled. With more than 900 team members already hard at work at the Blue Springs facility, Toyota’s $800 million investment will crest at 2,000 employees. Toyota suppliers like Auto Parts Manufacturing Mississippi, located in the Harry A. Martin North Lee Industrial

CDF SPuRS jOb CREATION ThROuGh INDuSTRY RECRuITmENT, WORKFORCE DEVELOPmENT, SmALL-buSINESS SuPPORT

sToRy By jENNIE bRADFORD CuRLEE

n an economic climate where change is the only certainty, Tupelo’s Community Development Foundation (CDF) is embracing this new standard, charging forward with its mission to create new and better jobs for Tupelo/Lee County. Throughout its rich 63-year history, CDF has spearheaded the region’s transition from an agrarian society to one with a manufacturing focus. And today, the economic development group is helping move Tupelo/Lee County into a knowledgebased economy, ensuring that future generations will enjoy the same prosperity that has made this community a hub for business and industry throughout the years. “The past successes of CDF have given Tupelo/Lee County a very favorable business climate and quality of life,” says Dr. David Irwin, 2011-2012 CDF chairman. “But CDF does not rest on its laurels. We are constantly seeking new ways to adapt to the global economy, and this is evidenced in the way we recruit new business and engage our existing industry.” CDF embraced the region’s move
Right: Toyota motor manufacturing mississippi Left: community development Foundation PhoTo By JeFF ADKins

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Complex, are also ramping up hiring to meet Toyota’s needs. Training Tomorrow’s Workforce Today Through a partnership with Itawamba Community College (ICC), CDF’s workforce development program has enabled more than 12,000 employees to upgrade their job skills through training offered as part of the CDF/ICC consortium. The program offers specialized courses, at greatly discounted rates,

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dr. david irwin, a cardiologist at cardiology associates of north mississippi, is the cdF chairman.

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allowing local industries to provide cost-effective training to their employees. CDF is also helping train employees of the future through such programs as the Tek2Go Manufacturing Camp. Held each June, the camp is designed to help inspire the next generation of inventors, engineers, entrepreneurs and manufacturers, and is a technical, hands-on experience to introduce students to 21st-century manufacturing technology and basic entrepreneurial skills. Growing businesses and Ideas CDF is also helping usher in the knowledge-based economy for the area’s small businesses through the Renasant Center for IDEAs, Tupelo/ Lee County’s regional business incubator. The incubator helps businesses of all shapes and sizes develop a plan for entrepreneurial success. Hyperion Technology Group, located inside the Renasant Center for IDEAs, is a technologybased company meeting the needs of its customers through innovative technological means. Geoff Carter, president of Hyperion Technology Group, has utilized the business incubator to grow his business, which now employs 11 full-time and five part-time personnel. “The CDF and Renasant Center for IDEAs has been an extremely valuable partner, helping Hyperion get off to a running start,” says Carter. “The flexible and economical space is only part of the benefits made available to us by this relationship, but it is the ‘behind-thescenes’ benefits like entrepreneurial training classes and introductions to local, state and national business and government leaders that really helped us get started.” As the economy continues to evolve and present new challenges, CDF will seek out diverse ways to create more and better jobs for the people of the region. Just as change is guaranteed, so is the fact that CDF is a constant, driving force, keeping Tupelo/Lee County on a path for success.

Residential

SOLD
Property Management

Commercial

INC/REALTORS®

TRI
www.TRIrealestate.net
Since 1952

842-8283

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Business

Biz Briefs
Businesses – BoTh laRge and small – ThaT helP deFine TuPelo’s economic climaTe

scorecard
buSINESS AT A GLANCE

$1 billion
Annual retail sales

$29 million
Retail sales per capita

$93.5 million
Annual hotel and food sales

3,627
Total number of firms
source: u.s. Census QuickFacts

TuPELO YOuNG PROFESSIONALS Biz: Networking organization Buzz: Representing Tupelo’s ambitious and committed young professionals, TYP has fostered a sense of community and forged connections since 2006. Memberships are free. The organization hosts events the third Thursday of every month. www.typs.biz 38
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mID-SOuTh NuRSERY & GARDEN CENTER Biz: Garden supply company Buzz: The family-owned Mid-South Nursery has been nurturing myriad greenery for more than 50 years. Known for quality Fraser Firs and other Christmas trees, its popular shop features Christian Ulbricht nutcrackers and other collectible holiday decorations. www.msnla.org/mid_south_ nursery_christmas_shop.htm uNIVERSAL ASSET mANAGEmENT INC. Biz: Aviation Buzz: This commercial aviation asset management, aircraft recycling and component sales company located an aircraft disassembly facility at the Tupelo Regional Airport in early 2011. Headquartered in Memphis, Tenn., UAM is an industry leader in aircraft recycling and reusable inventory. www.uaminc.com KAY’S KREATIONS Biz: Bridal and formal attire shop Buzz: The largest bridal and formal boutique in north Mississippi, Kay’s Kreations recently celebrated its 25th anniversary. Brides can choose from more than 1,000 gowns, and Kay’s Kreations also has attire for the rest of the bridal party and guests. Kay’s schedules showroom fittings and also accepts measurements submitted online. www.Kays-Kreations.net mIDNITE POTTERY Biz: Pottery Buzz: Family-owned and operated, Midnite Pottery opened in 1997 as a small business inside an old horse barn in Eggville, Miss., and later moved to Tupelo. Customers can stop in and create their own clay pottery or purchase goods made by the owners, Dean Webb and Jennifer Hankins, at prices ranging from $10 to $65. www.midnitepottery.com

Business

chamber report
PRogRam suPPoRTs chamBeR, PRomoTes local Businesses

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n a world of coupons and Groupons and a dozen deals of the day, the Tupelo Chamber of Commerce is cutting through the discount clutter with a program designed specifically for members of the chamber’s Community Development Foundation.

Through the ChamberAdvantage affinity program, CDF businesses offer discounts and promotions that are available only to members of other CDF businesses. more than 150 companies in Tupelo and throughout Lee County currently participate in the program,

providing CDF members with special offers on an array of products and services. There are standard restaurant and retail discounts as well as savings on adoption services, auto repair, legal advice and assisted-living facilities. “This free service encourages CDF members to do business with other CDF members,” Tupelo Chamber of Commerce vice president Tommy Green says. “it’s just another great benefit of being a member of CDF.”

Exclusive Deals for members
CDF members can offer any type of discount they wish, but it must be exclusive to other CDF members. These discounts are publicized on the CDF website, with contact information for each business as well as a link to the company website. Businesses that take part in the program are given window stickers that identify them as participating partners. Any interested employee of a participating business receives a tag that can be attached to their key ring. All they have to do is show the tag at the CDF business to be given the special discount. most offers consist of a simple percentage discount off the purchase amount. Contests have been held, with prizes awarded to the person who visited the most CDF businesses in a single week, as well as to the person who spent the most at a single business. “you really can save a lot of money, and you’re doing business with CDF members,” Green says. “it makes employees of different member businesses aware of other businesses that are also members of the Chamber of Commerce. it’s a very beneficial program.” – Cary Estes

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ECONOmIC PROFILE
buSINESS CLImATE
As one of the most rapidly developing micropolitan areas in the state, Tupelo/Lee County has consistently ranked in the top 10 for population growth, new business development and personal income generation. The primary economic sector is manufacturing, which employs more than 25 percent of the county’s workforce.

INCOmE

$26,515
Per capita income

17% 8%

Bachelor’s degree

TAx STRuCTuRE

$53,926
average annual household expenditure

master’s degree

0.25%
city sales and use Tax

ECONOmIC RESOuRCES
community development Foundation P.o. Box A, 38804 (662) 842-4521 (800) 523-3463 www.cdfms.org Tupelo chamber of commerce P.o. Box A, 38802 (662) 842-4521 (800) 523-3463 www.tupelochamber.com

7.25%
county sales Tax

TRANSPORTATION
Tupelo Regional airport 2704 W. Jackson st., 38801 (662) 841-6570 flytupelo.com

7%
state sales Tax

7.25%
Total sales Tax

11.2%
Workers Who carpool

mAjOR EmPLOYERS
north mississippi health services 6,500 employees lane Furniture industries 1,678 employees cooper Tire and Rubber co. 1,625 employees Tupelo Public school district 1,200 employees mTd Products 1,050 employees Jesco, inc. 1,000 employees Wal-mart/sam’s club 979 employees lee county schools 931 employees Bancorpsouth 800 employees h.m. Richards 670 employees

0.4%
Workers Taking Public Transportation

1.3%
Workers Who Walk to Work

GOVERNmENT OFFICES
Tupelo city hall 71 e. Troy st., 38804 (662) 841-6513 www.tupeloms.gov Public Works department 604 Crossover Rd., 38801 (662) 841-6457 department of Planning and community development 71 e. Troy st., 38804 (662) 841-6510 lee county government P.o. Box 1785, 38802 (662) 841-9110

1.9%
Working From home

WORKFORCE

74%

White-collar Jobs

26% 27%

Blue-collar Jobs

EDuCATION

associate degree

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image Gallery

What’s online
Visit imagestupelo.com to see more award-winning photography highlighting the places and people in Tupelo.

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The sun sets over the Natchez Trace Parkway. Photo by Jeff Adkins

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Peppers grow outside the clubhouse at the Tupelo Country Club. Photos by Jeff Adkins

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A child plays in a fountain in the Fairpark District.

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Sand volleyball at Ballard Park Photo by Antony Boshier

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Local Flavor

From sweet to savory
TuPelo dineRs enJoy an aRRay oF delicious ResTauRanTs, eaTeRies and BaKeRies

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t’s not hard to fill your belly in Tupelo, as the city is home to plenty of tasty dining options. From upscale establishments to casual eateries, complete with sweet shops sure to satisfy even the strongest sweet tooth, Tupelo is a foodie’s paradise.

Fine dining
offering a refined dining experience, Park heights is open for dinner beginning at 5 p.m. monday through saturday. Diners can choose from a broad selection of entrees, such as Chilean sea bass and pan-seared escolar. The restaurant offers two private dining rooms that can accommodate up to 90 guests, with rooftop seating available from march through october. in addition, Park heights provides catering services for a variety of events, including weddings and corporate or social gatherings.

meat-and-threes and BarBecue
open seven days a week, Romie’s Grocery is famous for its homemade plate lunches.

AnTony BoshieR

From left: Pan-seared escolar from Park heights restaurant; cupcakes on display at sweet Treats Bakery; dining at vanelli’s

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Customers may choose from three meats and 12 vegetables, with a variety of daily specials available. Permanent menu items include sandwiches, burgers and salads. For dinner, guests can enjoy an entirely different experience, with menu choices such as steak and fresh fish. in addition, catering is available, and the restaurant hosts special events such as crawfish boils and live musical acts on Thursday, Friday and saturday nights.

At Creative Cakes & supplies, customers can buy freshly baked goods or purchase supplies to make their own. Creative Cakes is a combination retail decorating supply store and bakery that specializes in custom orders.

JeFF ADKins

sTAFF PhoTo

Goodies such as petits fours, cream cheese mints, chess squares, brownies, cupcakes, fudge-covered tea cakes and a variety of other cookies are available. – Jessica Walker

dessert
offering cakes, cake balls, gourmet cupcakes and cookies, sweet Treats Bakery specializes in tempting Tupelo’s taste buds. Cupcake options change weekly, with flavorful choices including chocolate toffee, strawberry cream cheese and lemon raspberry making appearances on the menu, and staples such as chocolate and vanilla available consistently. Guests can also enjoy a variety of cookie options, as both classics and new favorites – like coconut pecan – are provided. The Bakery – formerly known as the Dutch Pastry shoppe – satisfies sugar cravings with its cinnamon rolls, crème pies, cupcakes and cookies. savory dishes are available as well, such as casseroles and lasagna.

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North mississippi medical Center

PhoTo By JeFF adKins

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health & Wellness

getting Better soon
neW PaTienT ToWeR BRings even moRe imPRovemenT To Region’s PRemieR hosPiTal
ocated in Tupelo, north mississippi medical Center serves a 24-county region, is the largest hospital in mississippi and the largest rural hospital in the u.s. The 650-bed facility’s comprehensive care, provided by a staff of 450 doctors and 6,000plus employees, includes a cancer center, heart institute, surgical services, diagnostic imaging, emergency department, behavioral health, women and children’s services, and more. improving the health of the region’s residents is the goal; continuous refinement of strategic plans and processes is the method that keeps north mississippi medical Center on the cutting edge of health care, and has earned the hospital multiple awards of excellence.

L

neonatal icu, da Vinci surgical system among adVances
Tangible results of nmmC’s drive to provide everimproving, patient-centered care include the recent

expansion of its neonatal intensive Care unit and the addition of the da vinci robotic surgery system. And more is soon to come. opened in 2009, the neonatal iCu sits atop nmmC’s Women’s hospital as a whole new second floor. it accommodates 34 newborns, with the flexibility to accommodate 50, plus space for 18 premature or critically ill newborns and facilities for family members. in another part of the nmmC campus, the operating room now boasts the high-tech da vinci surgical system, which provides a less invasive alternative to open surgery and laparoscopy. The innovative da vinci robot requires only a small incision and gives doctors a 3-D, zoomable view of the surgical area. it is used for a variety of procedures, including prostatectomies, kidney surgery, hysterectomies and some cancer treatments.

expansion to add 250 rooms
Coming soon is the hospital’s most ambitious

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Treating Digestive Diseases for Patients in North Mississippi
Colon Cancer Screening Heartburn/GERD Irritable Bowel Syndrome Crohn’s Disease/Ulcerative Colitis Hepatitis and Liver Diseases Pancreas and Biliary Diseases Nutrition Clinical Research Stephen T. Amann, M.D. John B. Averette, M.D. Barney J. Guyton, M.D. Roger L. Huey, M.D. Noel K. Hunt, M.D. C. Allen Justice, M.D. Samuel C. Pace, M.D. John O. Phillips, M.D. Carah W. Edgeworth, CFNP W. Carl Kellum Jr., M.D. 1952-2006
589 Garfield St., Ste. 201 • Tupelo, MS 38801 • (662) 680-5565 • Toll-free: (877) 942-7876

Digestive HealtH specialists p.a.
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health & Wellness

improvement project to date: a $55 million expansion and renovation of patient rooms. The West Bed Tower Project will add 250 new rooms that will be 50 percent larger than the old rooms. And not only will the rooms be bigger, they’ll be better as well. each room will be outfitted with an ADA-accessible toilet and shower, non-slip flooring, bedside table, closet and recliner. Patients will have bedside control of everything – from the television and temperature to the lights and window blinds. Window views also will be expanded. “All in all, the new rooms will provide quite a nice experience for patients,” says Bruce Ridgway, vice president of facility management and construction. nursing staff will gain efficiency from identical placement of light switches and equipment, as well as in-room desks and sinks and linen cabinets that are accessible from both outside and inside rooms. A brand-new, five-story tower to be built adjacent to the existing West Tower; the target date for its completion is october 2012. All patient care then will be moved to the new tower while the existing tower is demolished and rebuilt to match, with completion of the second tower targeted for 2013. A wide corridor will connect the two structures. – Carol Cowan

The neonatal icu at nmmc can accommodate 50 newborns and 18 premature or critically ill newborns, and has facilities for family members as well.

JeFF ADKins

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Sanders Clinic
for Women
GynecoloGy InferTIlITy rouTIne & HIGH rISk obSTeTrIcS

C.K. White, M.D. Johnny F. Miles, M.D. Mark A. Ray, M.D. Clay B. Hudson, M.D. Kristen Y. Turner, M.D. Cassie B. Hill, M.D.

1041 S. Madison St. • Tupelo, MS 38801 (662) 844-8754 • www.tupeloclinicforwomen.com

Seniors Loving Life!
Urology P rofessional a ssociation &

Paul B. Farabaugh, M.D. C. Stephen Farmer II, M.D. Jonathan R. Kalish, M.D. Wm. Hughes Milam, M.D. J. Timothy Posey, M.D. Kristopher W. Whitehead, M.D. Sally Morgan, CUNP Lauri McKell, CUNP Katrina Watkins, FNP-C 830 S. Gloster St. • East Tower • Fourth Floor Tupelo, MS 38801 • (662) 377-7100 The Continence Center: (662) 377-7279 www.urologypa.com

Assisted Living

(662) 840-6163

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health & Wellness
General InvaSIve CardIOlOGy:
W.B. Calhoun, M.D., FACC W. Steve Carroll, M.D., FACC J. Murray Estess, Jr., M.D., FACC Jack B. Foster, Jr., M.D., FACC Douglas L. Hill, M.D., FACC David H. Irwin, Jr., M.D., FACC James C. Johnson, M.D., FACC Nelson K. Little, M.D., FACC Francisco J. Sierra, M.D., FACC

InTervenTIOnal CardIOlOGy:
Joseph Curtis Adams, M.D., FACC Barry D. Bertolet, M.D., FACC Benjamin D. Blossom, M.D., FACC Amit K. Gupta, M.D., FACC W. Hampton Jones, III, M.D. Roger A. Williams, M.D., FACC

eleCTrOphySIOlOGy:
Karl J. Crossen, M.D., FACC Keith A. Kyker, M.D., FACC Jame E. Stone, Jr., M.D., FACC

Tupelo: 499 Gloster Creek Village • Suite A-2 • Tupelo, MS 38801 • 662-620-6800 For appointments, call: 662-620-6801 or toll-free 866-620-6800 Columbus: 2459 5th St. N. • Columbus, MS 39705 For appointments, call: 662-327-3092 Starkville: 801 Stark Rd. • Starkville, MS 39759 For appointments, call: 662-324-1475 Oxford: 2892 S. Lamar Blvd. • Oxford, MS 38655 For appointments, call: 662-234-7441
©2011 Cardiology Associates of North Mississippi. All rights reserved.

nurSe praCTITIOnerS:
Kitt Bailey, ACNP Chris M. Bell, ACNP Janet Bethay, FNP-BC Wanda Ikeda, ACNP Katie McDuffie, FNP-BC

CardIOvaSCular rISk ManaGeMenT:
Todd Sandroni, Pharm. D.

Nephrology & hyperteNsioN
AssociAtes Ltd.
Thomas D. Wooldridge, M.D. J. Martin Lee Jr., M.D. Tzonko V. Milev, M.D. Kenneth M. Kellum, M.D. Morris R. Hamilton, M.D. Christopher D. Miller, M.D. Marcus L. Britton, M.D. Son Lam, M.D. Patricia McKnight, CFNP Harminder K. Atwal, ACNP-BC
1542 Medical Park Cir. Tupelo, MS 38801 (662) 844-4711 1790 Barron St. Oxford, MS 38655 (662) 236-2900

toll-free (866) 344-4711
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sTAFF PhoTo

Tupelo national Battlefield

tupelo’s culture thrives
discoveR culTuRal aTTRacTions in TuPelo

T

upelo may be best known as the birthplace of elvis Presley, but did you know Tupelo also offers a wide variety of cultural experiences to visitors? Tupelo features a distinctive blend of interesting historical sites, museums, cultural centers, and musical and theatrical venues that everyone can enjoy. hop in the car and discover some of the interesting attractions around the Tupelo area.

tupelo’s ciVil War BattleFields
see where Confederate forces led by Gen. nathan Bedford

Forrest scored a significant victory over union troops at Brices Crossroads national Battlefield, just 15 miles north of Tupelo near Baldwyn. The Brices Crossroad’s visitors and interpretive Center allows guests to learn more about the conflict through informative exhibits and recovered artifacts from the battlefield. Located nearby is the Tupelo national Battlefield, where Confederate troops under Forrest were defeated a short time later in the Battle of Tupelo. This battlefield is the last place Forrest’s famous cavalry troops would fight union forces during the Civil War.

tupelo’s museums
With 120,000 square feet of exhibition space, the Tupelo Automobile museum is one of the biggest car museums in north America. A widely diverse collection of autos, from the 1886 Benz to the 1976 Lincoln mark iv that elvis Presley gave to a Denver police captain, are on display here. Learn about Tupelo’s history through exhibits and artifacts at the oren Dunn City museum. The facility houses permanent displays illustrating early european settlement, mississippi statehood and the Civil War. Love art and historical architecture? visit the GumTree

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Arts & Culture
museum of Art, located in a downtown Beaux Arts building listed on the national Register of historic Places. The GumTree hosts high-quality art exhibitions, workshops, lectures and many more events for the public.

celeBrating mississippi artists
To view works by dozens of mississippi artists, look no further than 122 main street in downtown Tupelo, the location of the new Caron | Prince Art Gallery. named for its owners, Kim Caron and Ashley Prince, the gallery showcases established and emerging artists creating all types of works, from oil and acrylic paintings and photography to pottery and handmade jewelry.

tupelo’s cultural centers, music Venues and theaters
Tupelo’s Link Centre is a unique complex that is home to various nonprofit organizations and cultural groups, including the Tupelo symphony orchestra. The Tupelo symphony presents a variety of concerts october through April, with performances by guest soloists, accomplished musicians and other performers. The symphony also brings classical music to kids participating in various cultural programs held at the Link Centre. seating a maximum of nearly 13,000 people, the Bancorpsouth Arena hosts concerts, circuses, comedy shows and conventions throughout the year. Tupelo Community Theatre, housed in a historical downtown movie theater known as the Lyric, features a variety of regularseason performances and special events. Performing a number of full-length productions, including The Nutcracker and Don Quixote, from september through march, the Tupelo Ballet also sponsors the performances of guest artists and other professional companies throughout the year. – Barbara Biehler

sTAFF PhoTo

Everything. Right where you need it.®
Located in the heart of historic downtown Tupelo, The Hilton Garden Inn is the first choice for comfortable accommodations, memorable meals and successful events.

Also Featuring:

Hotel Facilities
Full-service Great American Grill® restaurant Indoor pool and whirlpool 24-hour fitness center and Stay Fit Kit® Complimentary newspaper Pavilion Pantry convenience market Fully equipped business center Complimentary HSIA throughout hotel Banquet and meeting space

Guest Room Features
Microwave, mini-refrigerator and coffee brewer Large work desk with Herman Miller Mirra® ergonomic desk chair Remote printing to the business center Phillips® 26” inch HD flat-screen television Innovative MP3 compatible clock/radio Hairdryer, iron and ironing board Two telephones with voice mail and data ports

Hilton Garden Inn Tupelo 363 E. Main St. • Tupelo, MS 38804 (662) 718-5500 • Fax: (662) 718-5550 • www.tupelo.hgi.com

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Natchez Trace Parkway
PhoTos By JeFF ADKins

Tupelo Country Club

ballard Park

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sports & Recreation

reconnect With nature
ouTdooR RecReaTion oPTions include Fishing, camPing, golF

T

upelo is the ideal place for outdoor recreation, from simple outings to more significant connections with nature.

Fishing
The diversity and number of fishing spots in northeast mississippi make Tupelo a fisherman’s paradise. some of the more popular spots include enid Reservoir, Pickwick Lake, Lake Lamar Bruce, the Tombigbee waterway, Trace state Park and, of course, elvis Presley Lake. The region is known for its crappie, smallmouth and largemouth bass, catfish and bream fishing.

Lake and Campground and Tombigbee state Park are great locations for primitive and processed-site camping, cabin rental and all kinds of outdoor activity. scenic, affordable Rv hookups can be found at Barnes Crossing, natchez Trace Rv Park and certain sites in Tombigbee state Park.

Ballard park
For a full range of activity, check out Ballard Park. Ballard Park sportsplex has 153 acres of space dedicated to baseball, soccer and football, plus a lot of other recreation amenities. There is also a 3-acre lake, amphitheater, skate park, disc golf course and more. – Spencer Mohead

golF
Lush greens and sculpted fairways await visitors to Tupelo’s various golf courses. The historic Bel Air public course offers nine holes, while members can enjoy the 72-par Tupelo Country Club, ranked as one of the best tracts in mississippi. The challenging natchez Trace and Bermudagrass Big oaks 18-hole courses can be found in nearby saltillo.

natchez trace
Based on animal trails and the ancient pathways of mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee’s first residents, the natchez Trace Parkway is a vibrant cable to the roots of America. The 444-mile parkway, headquartered in Tupelo, is open to biking, hiking, horseback riding and considerate drivers. Along the trace sightseers will find prehistoric mounds, civil war battlegrounds and nearpristine wildlife.

camping
one benefit of being almost smack-dab in the middle of the natchez Trace is the number of great campsites that serve Tupelo. Trace state Park, elvis Presley

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education

Forward thinking
TuPelo conTinues To imPRove iTs educaTion sysTems

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upelo makes quality education a priority by offering a well-rounded education system that puts students ahead of the curve.

tupelo school district
The Tupelo Public school District has a tangible list of accolades, which attests to its educational excellence. Four of the 12 schools in the district are national Blue Ribbon schools, and the district’s ACT scores are above national average. students are taught by the best, with 106 national Board-Certified Teachers on staff. An initiative was kick-started in the school district in order to reallocate monies for paper-based expenses towards the purchase of Apple macBook laptop computers for student use. After completing training, each student is allowed to use the computer both on and off campus. starting with the 2010-2011 school year, every student in the district from grades six through 12 will have a laptop of his or her own. Additionally, the district invests in its students future with the Lee County/marchbanks helping hand Tuition Guarantee Program, which ensures that high school graduates from Baldwyn, mooreville, nettleton, shannon, saltillo and Tupelo will receive two full years of tuition-free assistance to itawamba Community College.
PhoTos By JeFF ADKins

Left: Tool and dye instructor Barry emison working at itawamba community college.; Right: university of mississippi-Tupelo

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uniVersity oF mississippi-tupelo
higher education institutions in Tupelo are doing their best to keep education both affordable and convenient. The university of mississippi-Tupelo offers several undergraduate curriculums, in addition to a master’s degree in education and an online master’s degree in business administration. student enrollment is on the rise, with approximately 650 to 750 students populating this campus branch. The Advanced education Center, a spacious building offering 120 courses each semester, is housed on the campus. The center caters to some 1,000 students who want to earn college credit while maintaining full-time employment or other commitments.

icc, mississippi uniVersity For Women
Two other educational facilities can be found on the university of mississippi-Tupelo Advanced education site. itawamba Community College and the mississippi university for Women further enhance Tupelo’s reputation for academic quality. iCC offers a low-cost, two-year education with strong scholarship and financial aid programs. Approximately 80 percent of students receive some sort of scholarship or financial aid. iCC’s curriculum includes more than 30 early-career programs. A branch of mississippi university for Women provides students with the opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the um-Tupelo campus. – Julianna Edmonds

Tupelo ChrisTian preparaTory sChool

Christ first. Academics second to none.

Now
• • • • •
5440 Endville Rd., Belden

MORE ever than
Leadership you can trust Effective discipline standards Academic excellence Innovative teaching NOT test prepping An equal opportunity to be a part of various sports

662-844-8604

www.tcps.net

Tupelo Christian Preparatory School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin in any of its policies or programs.

1289 N. Gloster • Suite A • Tupelo, MS 38804

advertisers
(662) 680-9355 • www.crye-leike.com
AvonLea Assisted Living www.avonlea-community.com BancorpSouth www.bancorpsouth.com Cardiology Associates of North Mississippi www.nmhs.net Century 21 Sue Gardner Realty www.suegardnerrealty.com Coldwell Banker Tommy Morgan Inc. Realtors www.tmhomes.com Community Development Foundation www.cdfms.org Cooper Tire www.coopertire.com Crye-Leike Realtors http://normacother.crye-leike.com DB’s Floral Designs N’ More Digestive Health Specialists www.tupelogi.com Downtown Tupelo Main Street Association www.tupelomainstreet.com Express Employment Professionals www.expresspros.com Hilton Garden Inn – Tupelo www.tupelo.hgi.com Itawamba Community College www.iccms.edu Jesco Inc. www.jescoinc.net Kellum Dental Clinic www.kellumdental.com MLM Clothiers www.mlmclothiers.com NEW Customer Service Companies Inc. www.newcorp.com Nephrology & Hypertension Associates LTD North Mississippi Medical Center www.nmhs.net OB-GYN Associates PA www.obgynassociatespa.com Philips Day-Brite www.daybrite.com Renasant Bank www.renasantbank.com Sanders Clinic for Women www.tupeloclinicforwomen.com The McCarty Company www.mccartycompany.com The Woman’s Clinic of Tupelo www.womansclinicoftupelo.com TRI Inc. Realtors www.trirealestate.net Tupelo Auto Museum www.tupeloauto.com Tupelo Christian Preparatory School www.tcps.net Tupelo Convention & Visitors Bureau www.tupelo.net Tupelo Smiles www.tupelosmiles.com Urology Professional Association & Continence Center www.urologypa.com Wal-Mart Supercenter www.walmart.com

visit our

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COmmuNITY PROFILE
SNAPShOT
Tupelo combines small-town charm with urban accessibility. The relatively low cost of living here makes the city attractive to newcomers. Tupelo has a thriving arts and cultural community and is home to a symphony and ballet. The city’s close proximity to professional sporting events and major universities adds to its appeal.

COST OF LIVING

marITal sTaTus:

$45,372
median household income

52%
married

CLImATE

$588
median Rent for a Two-bedroom apartment

48%
single

91°
July high Temperature

eThnICITy:

hOuSEhOLD INFORmATION
age:

66%
White

31

°

January low Temperature

56

37
median Resident age

30%
Black

annual Rain Fall (vs. national average annual Rain Fall of 37”)

30%
19 and under

2%
hispanic

TImE zONE
Central

45%
20-54

2%
other

LAND AREA

TRANSPORTATION

51.1
square miles

25%
55 and over

15 minutes

median Travel Time to Work

This secTion is sPonsoRed By

B’s Floral Designs N’ More D
Specializing in meeting your needs
• Fresh Silk Arrangements • Gift Baskets • Weddings, Free Consultation • Funeral Arrangements • Collegiate Items Serving Tupelo and Surrounding Areas Open Mon.-Tue. & Thu.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Wed. & Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Danny Brown, Owner/Designer

Da Del ily iver y

• Willow Tree Angels • Candles, Candle Warmers, Aroma Tea • Pottery, Plants, Gifts, Balloons and More

388 Mobile St. • Saltillo, MS 38866 • (662) 869-3620 Fax: (662) 896-3621 • E-mail us at: dbsfloraldesignsnmore@yahoo.com

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Ad Index
54 AvonLeA Assisted Living 2 BAncorpsouth 55 cArdioLogy AssociAtes of north Mississippi c3 century 21 sue gArdner reALty 7 coLdweLL BAnker toMMy MorgAn inc. reALtors 6 coMMunity deveLopMent foundAtion 9 cooper tire 62 crye-Leike reALtors 63 dB’s fLorAL designs n’ More 52 digestive heALth speciALists 28 downtown tupeLo MAin street AssociAtion 37 express eMpLoyMent professionALs 57 hiLton gArden inn – tupeLo 4 itAwAMBA coMMunity coLLege 33 Jesco inc. 21 keLLuM dentAL cLinic 49 MLM cLothiers 40 new custoMer service coMpAnies inc. 55 nephroLogy & hypertension AssociAtes Ltd c4 north Mississippi MedicAL center 52 oB-gyn AssociAtes pA 25 phiLips dAy-Brite c2 renAsAnt BAnk

Ad Index (cont.)
54 sAnders cLinic for woMen 28 the MccArty coMpAny 51 the woMAn’s cLinic of tupeLo 37 tri inc. reALtors c3 tupeLo Auto MuseuM 61 tupeLo christiAn prepArAtory schooL 39 tupeLo convention & visitors BureAu 53 tupeLo sMiLes 54 uroLogy professionAL AssociAtion & continence center c3 wAL-MArt supercenter

Through the Lens

get the story Behind the photo
now that you’ve experienced tupelo through our photos, see it through the eyes of our photographers. visit throughthelensjci.com to view our exclusive photographers’ blog documenting what all went in to capturing those perfect moments.

From our photo Blog: tupelo
i don’t make a habit of taking strangers to my hotel room. But when Bill J. Brooks arrived in Tupelo, miss., in street clothes, he needed a place to change. so, i made an exception and let him into my room to transform himself into The King of Rock and Roll. Brooks, a professional entertainer who impersonates elvis, Johnny Cash, Roy orbison, Conway Twitty and many other music legends, drove in from his home in mantachie, miss. When he made his way back down to the lobby to meet me, he was wearing his most expensive hand-tailored elvis suit, complete with red scarf, sunglasses and guitar. From that point on, heads were turning as we made our way around downtown shooting photos for Images Tupelo.
PosTeD By JeFF ADKins

more online
See more favorite photos and read the stories behind the shots at throughthelensjci.com.

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Over 100 classic automobiles from the 1880s-1990s!

it’s all in the Details … Century 21
sue Gardner realty
1720 McCullough Blvd. tupelo, Ms 38801

Hours: Open Seven Days a Week Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sun. 12 p.m.-5 p.m. 1 Otis Blvd. Tupelo, MS 38804 (662) 842-4242 www.tupeloauto.com Closed: New Year’s Day, Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day

(662) 842-7878
www.sueGardnerrealty.com

Sue Gardner Realty

2270 W. Main St. (662) 844-4011 3929 N. Gloster St. (662) 840-8401 Sam’s Club 3833 N. Gloster St. (662) 840-6459 TUPELO, MS www.wal-mart.com

(662) 842-7878

©2011 Century 21 Real Estate LLC. CENTURY 21® is a trademark licensed to Century 21 Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is independently owned and operated. C21Ad72

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ImAGES TuPELO • 2011-12 EDITION | VOLumE 10