Syllabus

MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE 
Professor Louis M. Rosenberg, PhD  Fall, 2011   

MDIA‐311   

 

 

 

Film Analysis 

 

 

 

3 credits 

Students engage in the analysis of major feature films as well as those produced by respected independent  studios by utilizing various schools of film criticism.  Additionally, students develop a robust understanding of  the film industry from a myriad points‐of‐view, such as politics, current cultural fascinations, and market  demand.  Lastly, the class will embark on “field trips” to screen various films which are appropriate to the  curriculum and the offerings of current cinema. 

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS
Textbooks & Films  Anatomy of Film  (6th Edition)  Bernard F. Dick  Bedford/St. Martins’    eBooks  Available on website, free of charge  Technology    Daily access to the Internet and email  Ability to perform basic Internet operations necessary to life in the 21st century  Films   See the Films section of this syllabus for  further information.   It should be noted here that students are  required to acquire all of the required films at  their own cost and screen them outside of  class. 

OTHER LEARNING RESOURCES
 
You will be submitting assignments, downloading information, and interacting with me and other  class members online.  See “Technology” section for more information.  Without exception, the two most common traits amongst successful students is that they are  intellectually curious which, in turn, naturally clears away any resistances in which a lesser student  TO  would indulge.  Such resistances come in a variety of forms:  not enough time, past failures, lack of  SUCCEED…  purpose, etc.  Success in the workplace does not happen to lazy, unaffected people; therefore, it is,  without doubt, that the many skills learned in college dictate one’s future successes.     Successful students relentlessly seek out any and all resources that will add strength to that  ONLINE 

MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE Film Analysis Dr. Lou Rosenberg  of 9  Syllabus – Fall, 2011  
which they are currently endeavoring. Successful students are not only willing but eager to learn new skills, such as how to operate  a library’s computer system, how to get the most out of their word processor, etc.     Successful students realize that anything that appears on their transcript “counts” such that  they never put their courses into a hierarchy of importance1.   Successful students possess an innate, healthy competitiveness.   Successful students get the job done.  Period.  o They always meet their deadlines.  o If necessary, they rearrange their schedules in order to devote more time to their  current project.  o They strive to reach the highest level of objectivity so that they can see competing  points of view.  o They always surround themselves with and listen to the advice of those who have  proven track records in the field (i.e. tutors, professors, etc.).   Past failures does not dictate future failures.  In fact, many successful people today were only  mediocre high school students.  And there are those who became wildly successful after they  dropped out of college.  However, never mistake the exceptions as the rule – doing so is catastrophic.    The greatest minds throughout history realize that success is only a byproduct:    

2  

Creativity

SUCCESS
ACADEMIC  RESOURCE  CENTER  CONTACTING 
1

Healthy control of  the ego Healthy relationships  with others Insatiable curiosity

As I have mentioned, it vital to your success that you engage the full resources of the university’s  Academic Resource Center, particularly the Writing Center.  However, you are not limited to these  resources.  Your university’s library holds workshops throughout the semester covering topics such as  research methodology, computer‐ and Internet‐based operations, etc., and you are strongly urged to  participate in those workshops which address a skill(s) you’re lacking.  Although it is yet another time  commitment (usually, an hour or so), participation in these workshops will save you countless hours  of trial‐and‐error during the completion of assignments.  Check your university’s website, our course  website, and your Student Handbook for more information about the academic services provided to  you.    I am available to you both (quickly) after class, via email and “online meetings,” and by appointment.  

                                                            
 Putting courses into a hierarchy of importance is perhaps the greatest cause for failure 

SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE Film Analysis Dr. Lou Rosenberg  of 9  Syllabus – Fall, 2011  
ME  To contact me via email, navigate to the website (lourosenberg.com/edu) and choose LOU >  CONTACT LOU.  And to book an appointment with me, navigate to the website and choose LOU >  BOOK AN APPOINTMENT. 

3  

LEARNING OUTCOMES
1. To increase insight into the art of the director, cinematographer, editor, and music composition  2. To increase insight into the many political, industrial, and cultural factors required in order to go “from  page to screen”  3. To increase the enjoyment of watching films  4. To provide the techniques necessary to properly evaluate films 

TEACHING PROCEDURES & METHODOLOGY
 
During the course of the semester, we will work together in a workshop environment as 

CLASS MEETINGS  we navigate through the world of cinema.  We will use various critical lenses as well as 
our individual reactions to the films to form the foundation for the course. 

THE SCREENING OF  Students will obtain and screen the required films at their own cost and outside of class. THE REQUIRED FILMS   The importance of utilizing the college’s Writing Center cannot be  USE OF THE  overstated.  Students should plan to write at least three drafts of each  COLLEGE’S  essay, and this process should be undertaken with a tutor as it is  ACADEMIC  impossible for one to be his own editor and produce anything of true  RESOURCE FACILITY  quality. 

SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE Film Analysis Dr. Lou Rosenberg  of 9  Syllabus – Fall, 2011  

4  

GRADE DISTRIBUTION
Final Exam 10% Essays 35% Participation  (Incl. Student  Instructives) 35%

Term Exams 20%

 

EVALUATION OF STUDENT PROGRESS
In grading student essays, I usually employ a rubric where each domain (grammar, logic/reason, etc.) is given a  qualitative value.  Because I do not believe in marginalia (writing endlessly in the margins), the rubric serves as  the grading explanation.  However, included in my evaluative process is the expectation that students will make  an appointment with me, or see me after class, should they require further, more detailed analysis of their work.   It is the students’ responsibility to determine when (and if) an appointment with me is necessary.  And students  should never wait to handle any academic issue.  Class participation factors into the class quite heavily, and grades are assigned periodically throughout the  semester which reflect the quality of such participation.  Throughout the semester, each student will meet with me privately to discuss issues of academic standing,  those which are assignment‐ and course‐related, as well as other issues the student might bring to the table.   Life happens!  While every student is graded equally and objectively, I am certainly willing to allow  concessions (such as an extension on a particular assignment) should a student demonstrates just‐ cause.  Having said this, all students are expected to operate at the “college level” at all times.  Nothing  less is acceptable.   

SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE Film Analysis Dr. Lou Rosenberg  of 9  Syllabus – Fall, 2011   Several times throughout the semester, students will sit for a Term Exam.  Normally,  these exams are composed of five short‐answer questions.  In evaluating the Term  Exam, I am most interested in the content of the student’s answer rather than  grammar/syntax issues—that said, chronic issues of such will be reflected in the  grade.    Term Exams may not be made up; however, the lowest score is  dropped.  At the beginning of nearly every class, you will receive a Response Paper, a form on  which you will write one‐or‐two paragraphs concerning the particular day’s  assignment (reading, film, etc.) and/or a major topic of prior lectures.  Thus, the  Response Paper is a true evaluation not only of your performance in the course,  itself, but also your ability to quickly synthesize information to offer a credible,  intelligent response to a question about which you have no prior knowledge.  This,  the skill of “thinking quickly on your feet,” is an enormously important one because it  demonstrates your competitive ability of always being “at the top of your game.”    Response Papers may not be made up; however, the lowest two scores are dropped.  Around the second week of the course, students will be informed of their  “Instructive Groups.”  Student Instructives consist of a group of students who engage  in the research and presentation of an assigned topic.  A separate handout is  available on the website (and is disseminated during the first class meeting of the  semester) concerning Student Instructive; however, the following two points are  worthy of note here.   All Team members receive the same grade for the particular Instructive.   Note that there is a procedure in place for the team to deal with slackers….   Attendance is mandatory by all students in the course during all scheduled  Student Instructives.  o One point is deducted from the student’s final course grade for  each absence of a scheduled Student Instructive.  Students will sit for a Final Exam, which is open‐notebook, and I often allow students  to work in small groups (of no more than two or three).  Please understand that the  Final Exam may not be made up under any circumstances, whatsoever and that it will  cover the full arch of the course.  Unless otherwise instructed, students may use their course notes on all exams  (“Term,” “Midterm,” and “Final”), and I usually allow the exams to be written in  small, quiet groups.  However, students may not use any electronic devices,  (including computers, PDAs, electronic dictionaries, etc.) during any exam because  allowing these amenities would put those without them at a disadvantage.   Therefore, if you take notes on a computer, simply print them out and bring them to  the exam.     Attention ESL Students:  While you are certainly welcome to use ancillary  materials (dictionary, computer, etc.) during the lectures, you may not use  them during any the exams.  As aforementioned, only notebooks are  allowed. 

5  

TERM EXAMS 

RESPONSE  PAPERS 

STUDENT  INSTRUCTIVES 

FINAL  EXAMINATION 

FURTHER  INFORMATION 

SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE Film Analysis Dr. Lou Rosenberg  of 9  Syllabus – Fall, 2011   You must book at least three appointments with me throughout the semester.   CONFERENCING  Credit for each meeting is given only once per month.  One of the meetings is  WITH ME  scheduled to take place during class and it will count as one of the three required  meetings.  See the Assignments section of this syllabus for that schedule. 

6  

ATTENDANCE
It is important that you are present for all of the lectures.  History dictates that grades are reflected in parity  with absences; therefore, more absences or late arrivals will, indeed, compromise your grade. You are  responsible for everything that occurs in your course, whether or not you are present during a particular lecture,  either in‐class or virtual (Internet).  If you find that you must miss a class, it is your responsibility to see a fellow  student to obtain the lecture notes as well as any announcements that were made.  Remember that I may  alter an assignment’s due‐date and/or language, announcing such changes during class.  Of course, these  changes will also be reflected on the website, but such updates may not be immediate. 

 It is important to note that the following assignment types are not eligible for make‐up.  
Therefore, late arrivals and absentees will miss these grading opportunities:     In‐Class Assignments (Response Papers, debates, etc.)   Term Exams   Midterm and Final Exams 

ASSIGNMENT POLICIES
Without exception, all submitted assignments must be typed.  are often drafted/corrected in peer groups.  riddled with grammar, logic, syntax, non‐sequitir issues will not pass.   Students are expected to hand in only essays of final quality.  This is  achieved by working with tutors, showing me drafts of work‐in‐ ESSAYS…  progress, etc.   must conform to the MLA standard.  This includes a Works Cited page  even if the only source used for the particular essay is one of the class  texts.  In other words, if you use it, cite it!  SUBMITTING LATE  Because 30 points are automatically deducted, the highest grade one can  ESSAYS  achieve on an essay submitted late is a 70.  So, be sure to meet your deadlines!  Plagiarism is the use of someone else work/intellectual property without giving  credit.  If I suspect plagiarism, I will require you to engage with me in an oral  PLAGIARISM  defense of the essay.  If after the oral defense I believe that you did, in fact,  plagiarize, you will fail the course.  Generally, I handle plagiarism issues  internally, without involving the administration.  You must meet all of your deadlines!  See “Submitting Late Essays,” above. With  LATE ASSIGNMENTS  the exception of late essays, late assignments are never accepted.   

SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE Film Analysis Dr. Lou Rosenberg  of 9  Syllabus – Fall, 2011   BACKUP COPIES AND  THE ARCHIVING OF  ALL SUBMITTED  ASSIGNMENTS  You are required to backup throughout the course (or, in the case of written  assignments, keep copies of) all of the assignments that you submit and that are  returned to you.  Further, you must have ready access to these backups should  I request them.  Such backups, however, do not in any way (including the  grading or regarding of an assignment) supersede my authority as final arbiter  for the course. 

7  

TECHNOLOGY
Your class website functions as the central hub for the course.  It is where assignments, discussions, scheduling  of appointments, course announcements, communications, booking appointments with me,  etc. coalesce.   Therefore, you must have access to the site on a daily basis as you are responsible for its official content – i.e.  announcements, changes to assignments, class cancellations, etc.  General Technology Requirements:     Technological issues of any kind are not valid excuses for missing deadlines, announcements, etc.2  Those who do not own a computer will have to make daily visits to their university’s computer lab, their  local library, etc.  Time‐management is of the utmost importance – you should never work up to the eleventh hour.  This  is especially important concerning the composition and timely submission of assignments as  technological issues do occur.  You will always have a three day window during which to submit your  online assignments.        Those who are “technologically challenged” are encouraged to visit their university’s computer  lab immediately and work with a lab technician on the basic functions of the Internet and word  processing.  There are also free community courses on the basic operations of the Internet, the  computer and its universal software (word‐processing, browsing the web, etc.).  Ours is a  technological world, and to be the least bit competitive one must have mastery over such  fundamentals as reading/replying/writing emails, uploading files, using a word processor, using  a search engine (such as Google), as well as the ability to interact with a particular website’s  technology (such as submitting forms, etc.).                                                                
2

Again, Technological issues  announcements, etc. 

of any kind are not valid excuses for missing deadlines, 

 Technological issues include, but are not limited to:  Internet connectivity issues (where the student cannot access the Internet due to a disruption of  service, whether or not it is the fault of the student or the service or computer or software that he/she is using); loss of data due to an unforeseen  malfunction of computer hardware or software or transmission (Internet) errors; use of software/hardware that is not compatible with Professor  Rosenberg’s servers; compatibility issues where the student’s assignment cannot be accessed by Professor Rosenberg; email delays of any kind; emails not  received due to spam control software on the student’s computer/email service; Internet page errors of any kind; file size issues where a student’s file is  rejected because it exceeds the maximum upload size; the use of improper software (as outlined herein); etc. 

SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE Film Analysis Dr. Lou Rosenberg  of 9  Syllabus – Fall, 2011  

8  

FILMS
Below, you will find the film roster for your course.  Once again, it is important to note that you are responsible  for screening the films yourself—we will not watch the films in class.  See your course’s website for links to view  them; the cost for a rental is about $2.99 each.  Alternately, you may also purchase them.  FILM
Bride of Frankenstein, The  

RELEASED
1935 

INTERNET MOVIE DATABASE URL
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0026138/ 

Brokeback Mountain 
Bullets Over Broadway  Chicago  Crimes and Misdemeanors 

2005 
1994  2002  1989 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0388795/ 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0109348/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0299658/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097123/ 

Deconstructing Harry  Donnie Darko 
Double Indemnity  Eternal Sunshine of the  Spotless Mind  Gaslight  I Heart Huckabees  Kid, The  One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s  Nest   Rage  Rear Window  

1997  2001 
1944  2004  1944  2004  1921  1975  2009  1954 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0118954/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0246578/ 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0036775/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0338013/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0036855/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0356721/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0012349/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073486/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1234550/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047396/ 

Saw 
Seven Samurai  Singing in the Rain   Way Out West 

2004 
1954  1952  1937 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387564/ 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047478/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045152/  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0029747/ 

   

SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

MASSASOIT COMMUNITY COLLEGE Film Analysis Dr. Lou Rosenberg  of 9  Syllabus – Fall, 2011  

9  

ASSIGNMENTS
Below is a general schedule of assignments.  This schedule will almost certainly change as we progress through  the semester, so be sure to check your course’s website for up‐to‐the‐moment information.   Not to worry!  You will always have plenty of advanced notice concerning any type of change to  the syllabus. 
    Unless otherwise indicated (below), students are not responsible for any of the assignments in the text(s).  All assignments must be completed by their due‐dates.  This includes all readings and film screenings – you must have read the  assigned pages and/or screened the assigned films before it is scheduled.  All essay assignment language is found on your course’s website.  Follow the assigned readings to their logical endings.  You need not continue reading into the next subchapter, chapter, etc. 

 

WEEK OF 
9/11  9/18  9/25  10/2  10/9  10/16  10/23  10/30  11/6  11/13  11/20  11/27  12/4  12/11 
                    

FILMS
Introduction to the Course  Deconstructing Harry  Brokeback Mountain  The Kid  Donnie Darko  Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind  Bullets Over Broadway  I Heart Huckabees  Rage  Rear Window  Saw  The Bride of Frankenstein  Double Indemnity  Gaslight  Way Out West 
ESSAYS 

ASSIGNMENTS
STUDENT INSTRUCTURE  TERM  EXAMS 

 

                         

                         

 
                     

Seven Samurai 
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest   Crimes and Misdemeanors  Chicago  Singing in the Rain  Course Wrap‐Up – Parting Comments, etc. 

SUBJECT TO CHANGE 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful