NATIONAL AND KAPODISTRIAN UNIVERSITY OF AT H E N S FA C U LT Y O F C O M M U N I C AT I O N AND MEDIA STUDIES

Villains, victims and heroes: the  representation of pornography in  contemporary Greek press
Liza Tsaliki and Despina Chronaki

This paper
•Intended as pilot study •Maps the attitudes towards pornography in the  Greek press (i.e in an overtly sexualized everyday  culture, what kind of representations does the Greek  press reserve for pornography?) •Briefly discusses how popular perceptions of porn  have changed over the past few years (online  pornography seen as something other than harmful) •We are particularly interested in depictions of child  internet pornography and the potential demonization  of online culture in Greece.

Our hypothesis: •In a culture where a mainstreaming of  pornography is attested and where sex  clearly sells, pornography, and online  pornography especially, might not be  portrayed by the national press as  something exclusively negative and  condemnable; and that this kind of  intolerance would be associated with  child pornography news stories only.

Questions explored :
•How do the Greek print media present news about pornography,  child pornography, online pornography, sexual harassment, sexual  abuse, sexual tourism and trafficking?

•What kinds of mediated notions of online pornography, especially  of child internet pornography, do they construct? •To what extent does the Greek press fuel an ongoing media panic  related to the use of new technologies by young people, instead of  putting forward the creative and constructive uses of the internet  for the young?

Questions explored :
•Is there a significant difference as to how  pornography stories are covered between the more  serious titles and the scandal‐mongering ones? •When stories break out, what kind of information  regarding victims and perpetrators is provided for the  public? •Does the Greek press have any policy  recommendations to offer on the issue of online  pornography?

Contextualizing online pornography

• History of pornography and efforts to  suppress it inextricably bound up with  rise of new media and the emergence of  democracy • In that respect, it should come as no  surprise that the Internet ‐ the most  democratic of media ‐ would lead to new  calls for censorship

Sheer magnitude of the porn industry New ICTs have opened the floodgates for  the sexual exploitation of women Online pornography changes how  sexuality is articulated within private and  public spaces The porn industry incorporates new  patterns of production and distribution 

Not everyone sees online pornography as necessarily  degrading: For some feminists, cyberspace is installing a new regime  of sexual representation Also from a libertarian feminist perspective: censoring  pornography would constitute breaching of the right to free  speech Least we forget: research into mainstream pornography  and human trafficking does not exclude analysis of  alternative pornographies Internet pornography plays a crucial role in the  formulation of underground sexual selves and relations [e.g. ‘The Art and Politics of Netporn’ (2005) and ‘C’Lick Me’  (2007) conferences in the Netherlands ‐introducing ‘DIY  online eroticism’ ] 

Naturalization of pornography into everyday life

• A trickling‐down of pornography to  mainstream culture => ‘pornification of  culture’ • Changing attitudes towards privacy and  personal exposure amongst the younger  generations, as experienced in the proliferation  of YouTube and MySpace video feeds • Sexualization of contemporary Greek culture  (e.g. TV and radio commercials, reality shows,  street fashion)

Methodology:

The representation of pornography in the Greek  press

• Content analysis of five national dailies: Kathimerini,  Eleftheros Tipos, Ta Nea, Eleftherotipia and Espresso  (pilot study). • Sample population = 247 news stories (every other  month between August 2007 ‐ June 2008. • Collected all articles that mentioned the keywords:  pornography, online pornography, child pornography, as  well as related terms such as sexual harassment,  prostitution, sexual assault, trafficking and sexual  tourism. • 45 variables used in the analysis

Subject Angle 
(weekdays)

40,0% 35,0% 30,0% 25,0% 20,0% 15,0% 13% 10,0% 5,0% 0,0%

36%

33% 31% 27% 27% 20% 16% Kathimerini Eleftherotipia Eleftheros Typos TA NEA Espresso

15% 16%

Subject Angle 
(weekend)
45,0% 40,0% 35,0% 30,0% 25,0% 20,0% 15,0% 10,0% 5,0% 0,0%

44% 33% 22% 20%
25%

20%

22%

25%

22%

22% 11%
Kathimerini Eleftherotipia Eleftheros Typos TA NEA Espresso

Subject Angle Framing 
(weekdays)
70,0% 60,0%

62%

67% 50% 50%

50,0% 40,0% 30,0% 20,0% 10,0% 0,0%

33%

35% 27%
Conflict Human Interest Responsibility attribute Issue of Morality Economic Consequences Neutral

Subject Angle Framing
(weekend)
internet pornography with references to  sexual exploitation/sex tourism online child pornography with references to  sexual harassement/sexual abuse/sexual  … sex tourism sexual exploitation/prostitution/trafficking sexual abuse sexual harassement

100% 38% 100%
Neutral

36%

Economic Consequences Issue of Morality Responsibility attribute Human Interest Conflict

29%
online child pornography internet pornography pornography in general 50%

43% 100%

Subject Angle Relevance 
(weekdays)
100,0% 90,0% 80,0% 70,0% 60,0% 50,0% 40,0% 30,0% 20,0% 10,0% 0,0%

96% 85%

100%

67% 54% 50% 50%

Topic not mentioned Main Topic Topic mentioned in passing

Subject Angle Relevance 
(weekend)
internet pornography with references  to sexual exploitation/sex tourism online child pornography with  references to sexual  … sex tourism sexual  exploitation/prostitution/trafficking sexual abuse sexual harassement online child pornography internet pornography pornography in general 63% 71% 100% 50%

100%

93%

Topic mentioned in passing Main Topic Topic not mentioned

The representation of pornography in the Greek press Personal Data on Perpetrator 
(weekdays)
90,0%

82%
80,0%

74%

75% 66%

70,0%

60,0%

50,0%

NO  NAME RESIDENCE PLACE OF WORK NATIONALITY

40,0%

30,0%

25%

22%

20,0%

10,0%

7%

9%

0,0%

Kathimerini

Eleftherotipia

Eleftheros  Typos

TA NEA

Espresso

Personal Data on Perpetrator 
(weekend)
100,0% 100,0%

90,0%

80,0%

70,0%

67%

63%

67%

60,0%

NO
50,0%

NAME RESIDENCE

40,0%

33% 19% 22% 11%

NATIONALITY

30,0%

20,0%

17%

10,0%

0,0%

Kathimerini

Eleftherotipia

Eleftheros  Typos

TA NEA

Espresso

Journalistic Stance
(weekdays)
70,0%

69%

60,0%

50,0%

45% 40% 39%
Kathimerini Eleftherotipia Eleftheros Typos

40,0%

33%
30,0%

27%
17% 13% 10%

TA NEA Espresso

20,0%

10,0%

0,0% No Neutral Yes, negative in general Yes, positive in general Both negative and  positive

Journalistic Stance
(weekend)
70,0% 60,0% 50,0% 40,0% 30,0% 20,0% 10,0% 0,0% No Neutral Yes,  Yes,  Both  negative  positive  negative  in general in general and  positive
25% 44% 60% 56%

40%
33% 20% 11% 22% 15% 8% 33%

Kathimerini Eleftherotipia Eleftheros Typos TA NEA Espresso

Conclusions‐ emerging trends
• • • • • Pornography (i.e. child pornography; internet pornography)  under‐discussed, under‐represented in the Greek press When talking about ‘pornography’, the Greek press usually  refers to porn as artistic expression Child pornography and online pornography are discussed as  something evil while porn is presented as an alternative way  of expression. Journalists usually take a precautionary position, advising  parental supervision of children’s use of new technologies  (rather than mediation); They also rarely fail to outline the multiple risks associated with  internet surfing ‐no mentioning of constructive uses of online  technologies => print media discourse in Greece reproduces a  stereotypically pessimistic vision of new technologies Journalistic discourse usually involves a surface coverage of  events occurred, academic conferences, new legislation etc;  extensive and in‐depth analysis and research is largely absent.  Similarly, no policy recommendations as to how to deal with  regulatory gaps are offered.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful