FRAMEWORK PROGRAMME 7

,
THEME 3, OBJECTIVE 1.6 ICT – INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

COORDINATING ACTION

FP7-ICT-2009-5

D1.1 - STORYLINES OF FOUR DIFFERENT SHOWCASES FOR MEDIA PRODUCTION
STATUS: VERSION: FINAL, SAVED: 07 MAY 2012

The four different showcases will be developed to represent innovative uses of Future Internet in Smart Cities. They include pilot projects, ideas, experiments and proposals related to Smart Cities, Future Internet and Living Labs. This report presents how storylines of for four different showcases are developed and also illustrates storylines of each showcase. Storylines are visualized in the WP4

ABOUT FIREBALL The over-all objective of the FIREBALL project is to coordinate and align methodologies and approaches in the domains of Future Internet (FI) research and experimentation testbeds and user driven open innovation towards successful innovation in smart city environments. In doing so, and in covering the whole FI research and innovation value chain driven by smart cities being the users of the FI, FIREBALL aims to establish effective forms of cooperation across the FI innovation value chain, creating synergies and cooperation practices among different research and innovation communities related to the FI. www.fireball4smartcities.eu

ATTRIBUTES OF THIS OBJECT
Project Type Project name Project ID Deliverable Deliverable name Work package Object type Object title Version Status Responsible org. Creators Coordinating Action FIREBALL FP7-ICT-2009-5 D1.1 (M20) Storylines of Showcases WP1, Task 1.1

Submitted Approved date Approved by

1.0 Final University of Oulu (UOulu) Esa Posio, UOulu (editor) Anna Kivilehto (IBBT) Veli-Pekka Niitamo (CKIR) Alvaro Oliveira (Alfamicro) Joana Fernandes (Lisboa E-Nova) Ger Baron (AIM) Adrian Slatcher (MCC) Jean Barroca (Alfamicro) 22.12.2011 Jean-Pierre Euzen, EC Project Officer

STORYLINES OF SHOWCASES
STATUS:FINAL. VERSION:1.0, SAVED: 07 MAY 2012

Dissemination

SECT.
1   2  
1.1   1.2   2.1   2.2   2.3   2.4   2.5   2.6  

CONTENT
INTRODUCTION
OBJECTIVE AND CONTEXT OVERVIEW

PAGE
3   4   4   4   5   5   6   7  

3   4  

CREATING A STORYLINE

SHOWCASE OBJECTIVES
STORYLINE KEY FEATURES STORYBOARD SCRIPT STORYLINE SKETCH SHOWCASE PRODUCTION WORKFLOW

3   4   5   6   7   8  

THE STORYLINE OF THE HELSINKI SHOWCASE THE STORYLINE OF THE BARCELONA SHOWCASE THE STORYLINE OF AMSTERDAM AND LISBON SHOWCASES THE STORYLINE OF THE MANCHESTER SHOWCASE CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES

8   18   31   46   52   52  

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1

INTRODUCTION
The four different identified showcases will be developed to represent innovative uses of Future Internet in Smart Cities. This report presents how storylines of for four different showcases are developed and also illustrates storylines of each showcase. As Director Campolargo in his presentation on January 2012 states Smart Cities framework is on the frontline in Horizon 2020 and on open innovation environment. This document supports how to put the Future Internet Technologies “in context” and to take advantage of the new EU policy approach, with tighter integration between Research, innovation and regional deployment1.

1.1

OBJECTIVE AND CONTEXT

The over-all objective of the FIREBALL project is to coordinate and align methodologies and approaches in the domains of Future Internet (FI) research and experimentation test beds and user driven open innovation towards successful innovation in smart city environments. In doing so, and in covering the whole FI research and innovation value chain driven by smart cities being the users of the FI, FIREBALL aims to establish effective forms of cooperation across the FI innovation value chain, creating synergies and cooperation practices among different research and innovation communities related to the FI. Identification of the common assets (e.g. facilities, methods, communities) that can be made available by different constituencies related to Future Internet open innovation is essential for potential future showcases that are developed by Smart Cities. The common assets include technical infrastructures, test-beds, know-how, technologies and applications, methodologies and tools, and user communities. Showcases will be developed representing innovative uses of Future Internet in Smart Cities. The showcase candidates will be collected from the cities represented in the FIREBALL consortium. The 4 showcases identified includes pilot projects, assets, ideas, experiments and proposals related to Smart Cities, Future also Internet and the Living Labs domains. These will be combined in the FIREBALL Showcases that will gather, analyze integrate and distribute also relevant case studies, trends, news updates and industry and academic highlights. These showcases will be supported by user-generated content, desktop research and other monitoring activities. The showcases descriptions will be created in the format of storylines to be presented in this document and visualized in the FIREBALL work package 4. GA of FIREBALL project has agreed that the 2 first showcases will be collected from the cities represented in the FIREBALL consortium. Those are Helsinki and Barcelona. The 4 showcases elicit the future needs of cities from the perspective of user driven open innovation and create requirements and demand for common assets (resources).
1

http://www.slideshare.net/openlivinglabs/mcam-eurocities-25-january-2012-final, referred on 23.4.2012

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The decision for the remaining two showcases will be based common assets available and learning from Helsinki and Barcelona showcases. Review comments will be taken in account in planning of coming showcases.

1.2

OVERVIEW

This document describes how storylines are developed. Needed process is illustrated with workflows and scripts. The aim of this document is also to describe the methodology implemented to create the Showcases.

2

CREATING A STORYLINE

A storyline is like a script for actors in a movie. A storyline functions as a guide to what you wish to accomplish during a session, or several sessions. Many times certain parts will be edited, left out, or just changed to help movie go along. Look at the storyline you want to create, based on the type of assets you want to be involved. Establish a basic plan, and begin to flesh it out by adding what you know has to be accomplished based on showcase objectives. 2.1 SHOWCASE OBJECTIVES Decide the topic of the showcase based on assets available or given thematic landscape. - Success cases, Technologies/Platforms, Policies, Business models, Urban planning, infrastructures, eHealth, Wellbeing, Smart energy, education etc. Define what to show (director influence needed) - Service in use (operator). Show devices, etc, Interviews (Citizens, technologist, policy makers, opinion makers), Practical developments. Impact (Quality of life), Personal emotional stories, Something more? Think about future of the showcase topic (service etc) - What can be done better – how FI looks like for this particular topic, gaps What the citizen would like to have, Technology trends, Future? Plan Awareness dissemination - Go beyond the existing – Future Internet scope – users involved, Link to the showcase Web 2.0 platforms, Create competitions for young people (Schools), Stimulate contents creations for users/Citizens, Agree in which event showcases will be presented 2.2
STORYLINE KEY FEATURES

In order to follow the showcase objectives, key features of storyline have to be identified. In each of these features, the main issues are that the storyline should address a common vision for the showcase and the values it should disseminate were reached. The key features could be following as are in Helsinki showcase:
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-­‐ Services -­‐ Organizations -­‐ People -­‐ Future -­‐ Having reached a common base about the objectives and vision of the showcase, the following step is to establish a first draft of the timeline of the storyline, in order to have the necessary inputs to prepare and deploy the logistics needed. 2.3 STORYBOARD Storyboard describes the timeline and skeleton of showcase. Storyboard can be used as a visual representation of showcase script. It helps in visualization of the storyline. Storyboard of Amsterdam/Lisbon Smart Energy City video showcase as an example. Objective: present Amsterdam’s and Lisbon’s context for dealing with smart energy, as similar cities, with similar challenges, common guidelines and complementary projects in the energy efficiency area through the use of ICT and the widening of the smart city concept. *Images and estimated time are only for guidance in order to identify the main topics.
1  -­‐  Presentation       Time     Content  
Introduction Fireball Showcases for SMART Cities Innovation Lisbon’s and Amsterdam’s joint goal to have a smart energy city – the common bases (Covenant of Mayors initiative and the goals)
 

  Images  /graphic  design  
Generic images of Amsterdam and Lisbon nowadays (images from pre existent municipal videos) Similar projects among Amsterdam and Lisbon, the Apollon project, etc
 

The  talking  head  is  still  to  be   decided  

1,5  min  

2  -­‐  Working  towards  a  smart  energy  city PEOPLE  
Interview with Graça Fonseca, Lisbon’s Municipal Councillor for Innovation, Administrative modernity and decentralization Images: videos of the process (available at

    Picture  etc.  here    

1  min  

The Participatory Budget Initiative

http://lisboaparticipa.cm-­‐ lisboa.pt/pages/orcamentoparticipativo.php),  
the lisboaparticipa,pt website platform for the initiative, the meetings, participants statements.

INFRA  STRUCTURE     Picture                

  1  min  
Smart work centers Interview with a SWC user. Images: SWC in day use Interview with Miguel Águas, Lisboa E-Nova’s Director Images: the open data platform, the applications available, public lighting projects, Baixa Pombalina solar map, electric vehicles network. (some images are available and probably some will have to be captured)

1  min  

Open data

2.4

SCRIPT

A film script with the objective to clearly present the different themes and important aspects of the video was written to be narrated during the showcase.
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The film script must have the following characteristics: Introduction Headings -­‐ Master scene headings which includes o o o Narrative -­‐ -­‐ -­‐ Action Characters and settings Sounds Overall Timing Scene location Filming location

Dialogue -­‐ -­‐ 2.5 The speech The name of the speaker

STORYLINE SKETCH Here is shown one example of Helsinki storyline sketch. Sketch shows one phase of storyline development.

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2.6

SHOWCASE PRODUCTION WORKFLOW This workflow shows basic principle of creating a storyline for showcase. Workflow is dependent on the case and objective.

Showcase  Team  

Showcase   Objectives  and   key  features  

Services  and   Interviews   Planning  

Story  Boards  

Script  Writing  

Logistics  and   Schedule  

Showcase     Production  

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3

THE STORYLINE OF THE HELSINKI SHOWCASE
The Helsinki showcase description has been created in the format of storyline and has been visualized in the WP4 into the DVD format. Video is available in FIREBALL web page http://vimeo.com/16425674. FIREBALL, Helsinki Smart City Show Case Introduction for Innovation strategy of Helsinki smart city region. COLLABORATION: THE ONLY FEASIBLE HELSINKI METROPOLITAN AREA WAY FORWARD FOR THE

To succeed in a competitive world Finland and the Helsinki Metropolitan Area must be able to create new innovations and exploit them more effectively. The first innovation strategy for the Helsinki Region shows the way forward for collaboration that will more efficiently harness the huge innovation potential of the metropolitan area. Regionally, nationally and internationally there is a pressing need for collaboration to generate added value. The future competitive strength of the Helsinki Region and its appeal as a strategic partner for the world’s other leading knowledge hubs will depend on the Region’s record of effective collaboration. THE HELSINKI REGION WILL DETERMINE THE COMPETITIVENESS OF THE WHOLE OF FINLAND The public policy of developing Finland’s other regions has diverted too much attention away from the Helsinki Region in recent years. Revenue transfers and the continuing debate on relocating various public functions away from the Finnish capital indicate that the Helsinki Metropolitan Area has not been the focus of national policymaking. Radical new partnerships, not least between the Helsinki Metropolitan Area and the State, will be needed to restore the leading national and international status of the Helsinki Region. National innovation policy must acknowledge the principle that the future competitiveness of Finland can be based only on pre-eminence, specialisation and reinforcement of strengths. As the leading national expertise cluster, the Helsinki Region remains the strategic core of Finland’s international competitiveness A four-pillar strategy for Innovation: I. Improving the international appeal of research and expertise II. Reinforcing knowledge-based clusters and creating common development platforms III. Reform and innovations in public services IV. Support for innovative activities

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High educational standards, a fi rm grounding in science and technology and a long track record of cooperation between the private and public sectors have laid the foundations for developing innovative products and services in the Helsinki Region. As open environments for development, learning and interaction, development platforms reinforce strategically important areas of expertise and competitiveness in the Helsinki Region. Designing, implementing and developing such platforms is an excellent objective for the common business development policy of the cities. IV. Support for innovative activities DEVELOPMENT BUILDING PLATFORMS AT THE CORE OF FUTURE CLUSTER

Helsinki Region seeks to become an internationally interesting and commercially competitive, versatile development platform based on cutting-edge expertise with a unique competence profi le. This platform will foster the development and exploitation of innovative products, services and operating formats. By combining the powerful expertise clusters of the Region, these world class development platforms may also increase the appeal of the Helsinki Metropolitan Area to foreign investors. The Helsinki Metropolitan Area must build its future competitive edge not only on its own areas of expertise, but also on the strengths of Finland as a whole. The Helsinki Region has both a unique opportunity and a national duty to evolve into an international attractive innovation environment that will ensure that the entire expertise portfolio of Finland is displayed and marketed. Action proposal for Living Labs: A national Living Lab Finland Forum should be established to serve as an open idea platform and co-ordinating body between all of the various living labs in Finland. The cities should convene a high level enterprise-led steering group to direct the further evolution of existing development platforms and collaboration between them, to supervise implementation of projects at the planning stage, and to design entirely new platforms for the Helsinki Region. The development platform is still a fairly new and therefore little known operating format. Open and interactive follow-up work will be needed to confirm the common objectives, functions and evolutionary requirements of development platforms both in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area and nationally. Mutual synergy and interaction between various areas of expertise and development platforms must also be enhanced by combining projects into dynamic packages using the structures that have arisen in the work of centres of expertise. National funding of research and innovation must allow for the evolutionary needs and prospects of the Helsinki Metropolitan Area as a nationally and internationally important development platform environment. The conventional format for project financing will be unsuitable establishing and maintaining development platforms in practice.
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Living labs Development Some living labs or pilot communities are already operating in the Helsinki Region, and their status as future environments or “real life laboratories” for research, development and learning has yet to be confirmed. Collaboration between various living labs should also be increased. Noteworthy examples of current living labs include Helsinki Virtual Village in the city’s Arabianranta district (part of the European Union IntelCities programme seeking to reinforce the information society), the joint New media culture centre of MCult and HIIT, and the Maunula project focusing on local community development. Future living labs in the Helsinki Region include the Suurpelto initiative in Espoo, the Kolmiosairaala hospital project in the Meilahti district of Helsinki, and the Well Life Center in Espoo co-ordinated by Laurea University of Applied Sciences, which forms a living lab in combination with the senior citizens’ centre in the Kustaankartano district of Helsinki. The cluster project for digital content and services in Pasila also includes a living lab. The Dimes association – Digital Media Service Innovations Finland Dimes is an association founded by Nokia, TietoEnator, TeliaSonera, Elisa, Finnet and the Finnish Broadcasting Company – YLE to promote the conversion of Finnish technological expertise into services and successful business operations combining expertise in the Oulu, Tampere and Helsinki region. “Dimes offers a way of finding, developing and testing service innovations. We are constantly on the lookout for signs of market upheaval and focusing development projects on exploiting the opportunities that these provide. Broadly based collaboration ensures that due consideration is given to regional strengths and our sights remain focused on international competitiveness,” explains Dr Yrjö Neuvo, Senior Vice President and Technology Advisor, Nokia Plc. Forum Virium coordinating Helsinki Region Living Labs Forum Virium Helsinki is a business-based and –driven cluster of actors whose mission is to promote the development of digital services. It is also an impartial test bed for ideas and actors, collecting large companies and growth companies, leading development projects and opening connections to international markets. The cluster actors closely participates in real test environments in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area and designs Lansi-Pasila and Forum Virium Center to be built there. The aim is to create better services and increasing business on the basis of solid competence. CASES from the Helsinki Metropolitan Area Helsinki Energy
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Eco-efficient computer hall (Helsinki Energy) The computer hall situated in a cave under Uspenski Cathedral is cooled by district cooling, and the heat generated by the computers is piped as district heating to buildings in Helsinki – the heat generated by the full computer hall is sufficient for heating 500 single family houses. The aim of the joint project of Academica and Helsingin Energia is the world's most eco-efficient computer hall. Eco-efficient city energy by co-generation (District heating, district cooling in Helsinki) Smart Energy Solutions in Kalasatama distrikt Helen, ABB and Nokia Siemens Networks create smart energy solutions for Kalasatama project in Helsinki. Future energy solutions in Kalasatama will be based on individual services and options available for customers. The information system solutions supporting these services make possible a breakthrough in smart grids as we move on into an energy-efficient society. Housing construction will start this year. Future aspirations in the project: Developing a service platform “energy internet”, with info on energy consumption, sensors, end user service on consumer profiles, consumer/producer models, eMobility, security etc. Interview: Juha Sipilä, Project Manager for Eco-Efficient Computer Hall as well as Kalasatama Smart grids-projects, Helsinki Energy Arabianranta Arabianranta district is a home for 10,000 people, a workplace for 5,000 and a campus for 6,000 students and know-how professionals and a hub for creative industries Arabianranta is a home to 300 enterprises and 4,000 employees. Common features for this district are innovation, courage and communal spirit. Arabianranta district has formed a “laboratory” for housing and since the year 2007 there has been made testing for services and products called Helsinki Living Lab together with the residents. Besides the local information network, one of the most important services for the residents is the housing association’s own web site, which is being updated by a named moderator from each association. Arabianranta’s virtual village, Helsinki Virtual Village, was founded already in the beginning of 21st century and has functioned as the number one brand for this web site ever since. Loppukiri 2.0 Loppukiri is a new kind of housing arrangement for aging citizens based on neighborly and self-help developed by the Active Seniors Association. The Loppukiri community consists of the residents of the building organized in working groups that take care of different activities: a week’s working shift comes for each group of approximately ten persons about once in six weeks. The community is a true living lab environment where ideas are developed, implemented and tested collaboratively. For example, working in collaboration with the architects and construction company, residents played an important part in designing their own flats and common areas with solutions appropriate for their needs. The aim of the community is to share their experiences and encourage and help others to build on similar projects.

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Loppukiri 2.0 – as lead user community on co-design by elderly for better and more sustainable living. ADC Services company idea with house moderators… Interview Kari Halinen, CEO of Art and Design City Helsinki Oy, Venue: Arabianranta district, ADC, Loppukiri house, Arabiankatu 19, Helsinki Well Life Center Caring TV Laurea University of Applied Sciences, as a Service Design with and for Elderly People, by LAUREA University of Applied Sciences. The increasing number of elderly people and decreasing number of employees challenge us to seek for new solutions in the field of health care and social welfare. Also the changing structures of welfare organizations and service processes demand new approaches in order to respond to future challenges. CaringTV aims to design virtual, interactive service concept with and for elderly people in order to support the wellbeing and the quality of life in the elderly. In this article the concept of quality of life will be defined and described as a client driven method based on the findings of two research projects; Coping at Home and Home. They, in turn, are based on the development of the Caring TV – concept at the Well Life Center Laurea University of Applied Sciences. Background and R&D&I of CaringTV - Principal Lecturer , PhD Paula Lehto - Bachelor student, Socionom Elina Koivula - Master of Health Care Student, RN Sara Asteljoki - Bachelor student, ICT Ville Nieminen Discussion with Elderly people in CaringTV -Bachelor student, Socionom Elina Koivula Fishing Stories - Discussion with Disabled persons worker Liisa Helenius Active Life Village Active Life Village is a unique centre of welfare competence with the goal of promoting the creation and commercialisation of competitive innovations together with users. The non-profit-making Active Life Village Oy functions as a catalyst for welfare service innovations, and provides companies with an inspirational environment, development activities and business support. Innohub, and Voluntary 00560

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Innohub, the Espoo, Finland – Royal Philips Electronics and VTT owned an InnoHub in the city of Espoo, close to Helsinki. Aim to generate innovative ideas and translate these into profitable businesses. Focus areas for the InnoHub are health, life-style and well-being. The centre is a melting pot of people from different backgrounds and experiences, who work closely together in an inspiring and real-life setting that includes a hospital room, a nurse’s station as well as a home environment. Interviews: Lauri Repokari & Rob Kommeren (on Active Life Village, Innohub), Screeshots: Aalto University “Campus”.

Forum Virium Helsinki Forum Virium Helsinki coordinated pilot Helsinki Region Infoshare-project. Thedatabases now opened up by the Helsinki Region Infoshare project have so far been available only to the cities’ management and staff. The databases will be available through a new portal. The project encourages application developers to utilize the databases to build, for example, new web applications. The project will be implemented over the next 2.5 years. A test version of the portal will be launched in the beginning of 2011, and by the end of 2012 the portal will include a broad range of public databases. Stadi.TV marks the beginning of a new content production model wherein city residents and professionals can collaborate on programmes together. Stadi.TV a New Media Channel for the City project aims to produce a multichannel audiovisual service that will share memorable stories about different places in Helsinki. The service is available through the internet, mobile telephones and Welho cable television. The objective of the project is to find a functional equilibrium between media content produced by professionals, semiprofessionals and amateurs. Training is an important aspect of this project. Additional research topics include the copyrights of user-generated programme content, participatory media and interactivity. The project starts in 2010 and is planned to continue for three years. City Loyalty Card (combining transport services with other services in the city), one of Helsinki Smart City-projects at Forum Virium Helsinki. Interviews: Pekka Koponen, Development Director, Forum Virium Helsinki Jarmo Eskelinen, CEO Forum Virium Helsinki jarmo.eskelinen@forumvirium.fi, pekka.koponen@forumvirium.fi Helsinki Region Transport Demand responsive public traffic (Metropol-project) Demand responsive public traffic (joint research project Helsinki Region Transport, TEKES, TKK, Ministry of Transport and Communications, duration 2007-2010).

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The project aims to investigate whether demand responsive-based transport service is possible to carry out in the metropolitan area, so that 1) journey can be ordered in real time (just shortly before the intended travel time) 2) Passengers receive service that is competitive with now offered by private vehicles and 3) service system is economically and technologically feasible. In addition, the project will develop IT-solutions, which form a basis for feasible functional applications. Piloting an automatic and real time demand responsive public transport 2011-2014 Future projects and pilots for Helsinki Region transport -Travel card and new information system -Mobile services (upcode, real time info) -Automatic metro built in the “old infrastructure” piloting a new platform Vuosaari(July) -Bus traffic developed together with the citizens (HSL social media project) Culture tram of HSL combines the opportunity to stimulate public transport users' daily life, promote cultural awareness and to provide the known and unknown artist/developers a forum for show case their work. In addition to artistic and cultural values it is possible to test different technical applications for example passenger information related to the development of technical solutions, where the actual field trial would otherwise be difficult. There is a direct link with the Culture tram wirth HSL's development of basic services. Interview: Ville Lehmuskoski, Planning Director at HSL. Interview to take place in front of the "culture tram" (“Kulttuuriratikka”) built for the Helsinki Design Capital 2012 (in traffic in October 2010). Varma/Process Vision building, Smart office Smart office solution on excisting building and extending to mobility of creative individuals. Home-Office smart metering concept showing how SMEs provide lead market piloting cross border,,references to ISA, Plugwise, Kyab/Luleå etc. Interview: Simo Makkonen, CEO Process Vision Save energy-project Helsinki Schools at Malmi on pupils making change. The city of Helsinki owns about 1200 public buildings including 200 schools, 350 kindergardens, 7 hospitals, office buildings and libraries. For several decades the city of Helsinki has done a great effort to save energy and to achieve better energy efficiency in the buildings. The Helsinki pilot for the SAVE ENERGY project consists of two schools, owned by the municipality, which represent different levels of required activities and investments. Interviews: in

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Asko Kippo, Metropolia telling the overall story and interviews of few students and either a cook or a science teacher. References to 4 other cities, serious games and first meetings at Lisbon schools, also Helsinki plan to scale-up developments to other schools. Airport / Technopolis site on RFid LL SME centric LL for RFID solutions and big local plans. Airport Cluster Finland Showroom RFID Lab Finland Showroom (www.rfidlab.fi) Interviews: CEO of Technopolis Will Caldwell or Mikko Punakivi Mikko Punakivi D. Tech., Programme Director, Centre of Expertise for Logistics Future Learning Finland The high quality of Finnish education has been duly noted around the word. Now the Future Learning Finland project led by Finpro is making the famous Finnish educational competence widely available on international markets. CKIR-workshop in Helsinki (Aalto University) The Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research (CKIR) of Aalto School of Economics organizes the workshop on INNOVATING FOR TRANSFORMATION in collaboration with the Finnish Innovation Fund (Sitra) and the Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy (TEM). The workshop engages thoughtful practitioners and leading scholars into a discussion on the phenomenon: Renewal through Collective Entrepreneurial Action in the context of innovation networks, companies, public sector, public-private partnerships and academia. The conference provides an opportunity to elaborate the benefits of open, demand and user-driven innovation paradigm for the value creation in the arenas and forums of human life. Competitiveness Strategy for the Metropolitan Area There are two priorities in the competitiveness strategy: 1) Building good quality of life as well as a pleasant and secure living environment (diversified and sufficient well-being services to its residents, High-quality living conditions meeting the residents’ needs, an ecologically sustained community structure and a transport system based on efficient public transport services are the prerequisites for a competitive metropolitan area) 2) T3 –strategy of the Greater Helsinki Metropolitan area Espoo's T3 strategy plans Otaniemi (research) will be integrated into the neighboring Keilaniemi (business) and Tapiola districs creating a unique
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campus that combines research, art and business. Innovation strategy pursued by the Greater Helsinki metropolitan area can be summed up by “T3”, which symbolizes the alliance of science (Tiede), art (Taide) and the economy (Talous), a concept strongly promoted by the Aalto University Examples: T3, Kalasatama, Helsingin energia, smart transport... 3) Strengthening user-driven innovation environments and developing public procurement (Actors in the public sector, too, pay more attention to the needs of the customers and citizens when developing their services. Demand- and user-driven innovation activities are dynamically emerging to figure side by side the conventional supply-based (eg. technology based) development work. It is important that innovation and development environments exist for innovation activities based on the users’ needs in which novel or existing services and products can be developed and tested. The brainstorming, development and piloting take place together with the suppliers, developers and end-users. The cities can contribute, more actively than today, to the advancement of services and markets by opening public service markets and allocating their procurements so as to support the development and take-up of innovations.) Examples: supporting the regional thematic Regional thematic innovation environments: innovation environments:

• Digital services: Forum Virium (Helsinki) • Well-being and health care services: Active Life Village (Espoo) • Logistics: RFID Lab Finland and Anturikeskus Sensor Center (Vantaa) The cities encourage the advancement of demand- and user-driven innovation activities in regional and thematic development environments. With their own public procurements, the cities create encouraging markets and support the common innovation processes of both the users and the developers (PreCoproject). Helsinki- Green Challenges, Covenant of Mayors, Green Digital Charter Local, Regional and International contributed to the Showcase filming: Pekka Sauri, Deputy Mayor, City of Helsinki Eero Holstila, Director of Economic Development, City of Helsinki Markku Markkula, Aalto University, Committee of Regions Member, rapporteur of Digital Agenda Tuija Hirvikoski, Director, Laurea University of Applied Sciences Seija Kulkki, Director, Center for Innovation and Research (CKIR), Aalto University Mikko Kosonen, President, Finnish Innovation Fund (SITRA) Petri Peltonen, Director General, Innovation Department, Ministry of Employment and the Economy
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Representatives

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Partners

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Ikujiro Nonaka, Professor Emeritus, Hitoshubashi University; Visiting Professor, CKIR, Aalto University School of Economic

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THE STORYLINE OF THE BARCELONA SHOWCASE
This storyline aims at reflecting the work done in the city of Barcelona to become a Smart City, including its own conceptualisation and followed by several city examples. These examples have served for the creation of a video showcase, visualised in the WP4 of this project. Smart City concept The conceptualisation of the Smart City is on the crest of the wave regarding innovation in cities. The Smart City concept has been lately introduced in cities as a strategic tool to encompass modern urban production factors in a common framework and, specifically, to highlight the importance of ICTs to foster the competitive profile of a city. But, what is a Smart City? The label of the Smart City is still a blurry concept. Some definitions have appeared in the past. Just to mention some, in 2000 the paper “The Vision of a Smart City”1 expounded that the vision of “smart cities” is the urban centre of the future, made safe, secure environmentally green, and efficient because all structures – whether for power, water, transportation, etc. – are designed, constructed and maintained making use of advanced, integrated materials, sensors, electronics, and networks which are interfaced with computerized systems comprised of databases, tracking, and decision-making algorithms. More recently, the working paper “Smart Cities in Europe”2 offers another approximation to the idea explaining that any city can be defined as “smart” when investments in human and social capital and traditional (transport) and modern (ICT) communication infrastructure fuel sustainable economic growth and a high quality of life, with a wise management of natural resources, through participatory governance. In the city of Barcelona, we believe that a Smart City could be defined as a hightech intensive and advanced city that connects people, information and city elements using new technologies in order to obtain the following benefits: Increase quality of life Having more competitive and innovative business Make management and maintenance easier and cheaper Having a more sustainable greener city

The Barcelona Model
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“The Vision of a Smart City”, Robert E. Hall (Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA), 2nd International Life Extension Technology Workshop, Paris, 28th September 2000 "Smart cities in Europe", Andrea Caragliu (Politecnico di Milano), Chiara del Bo (Università degli Studi di Milano) and Peter Nijkamp (VU University), Research Memorandum 2009-48

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The main outputs of the Smart City model in Barcelona are Smart Services. Services of different nature and for different purposes that will include municipal advanced public services targeted to citizens and business, services for citizens made by citizens and business, and new city management tools. These services should serve as a boost for cooperation between the Council, civil stratum and the professional arena. To accomplish the aforementioned objective, the Barcelona Smart City model foundations lay on three pillars, namely: Ubiquitous infrastructures Information Human Capital

Nevertheless, the city’s main investments in modern ICT infrastructure are devoted to cover the aforementioned areas, as it will be further exemplified in the next chapters.

Ubiquitous infrastructures The city needs to be equipped with advanced infrastructures to evolve the Smart City concept from pure theory to reality, providing citizens and enterprises with a powerful platform to connect city elements and let them interact effortlessly with each other and with their administration through electronic means. Stable sturdy infrastructures, from optical fibre networks covering the city acting as a backbone to the installation of sensors, are the key for the development of intelligent solutions in cities.

Information Information is the raw material to fuel innovation factories. Information coming from daily activity in the city is an invaluable asset that needs to be collected and interpreted, creating a Smart City information space that acts as the basis to deliver smart tailored services and a better city management. Several sources have been identified being the following the most important ones to construct the concept of the Smart City: Information coming from the city: - Sensors and city elements - Open Data = Public Sector Information Information coming from the citizens: - Digital footprint - Social media - Crowd Sourcing -

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Human capital Actors actively participating in the daily activity of the city are the ones that really could make a city smarter. The implementation of the Smart City is not only a concern of public administration but also it should involve population, innovation centres, companies and entrepreneurs.
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Faculties and society are knowledge producers, while companies and entrepreneurs generate new business opportunities. Moreover, public administration can generate growing environments that should push a growing, sustainable and progressive dynamic. In this sense, cooperation between these actors seems to be the key for the development of a suitable environment for talent development. To sum up, a Smart City should be able to “activate” smart ideas generation itself in an open environment, may it be through, for instance, fostering clusters or developing proper living labs directly involving citizens in the co-creation process of products or services. Smart Services. Cases from the Barcelona Smart City video showcase As stated before, the main output of the Smart City model in Barcelona are Smart Services for the citizenship and smart tools to better manage the city. Those advanced services can be grouped according to its target and producer: Internal Government services: services aimed at making public workers tasks easier and giving useful information to city managers that can help taking better management decisions and evaluate policies. Services that would boost the cooperation between the several stratums of public workers in order to acquire efficiency and efficacy. Government to Citizen/Business services: services aimed at making the citizens daily life easier and more comfortable, offering more and better services, offering updated information in a proactive way and fostering citizens’ participation in the city management daily life. Citizen to Citizen services: tailored services created by citizens for the citizens, including also the professional arena, boosting cooperation between the several elements of civil life. Services based often on public open data representing the real social innovation and the real openness of a city. Several representative examples of the three aforementioned areas have been carefully selected for the video showcase released in WP4. In the next paragraphs there is an enumeration of all the cases appearing on the video accompanied by a short explanation of the outstanding characteristics that have made them worthy of showing. SMART GOVERNANCE Citizen’s attention: municipal kiosks Citizen’s attention is one of the central axes in taking the administration closer to the citizens. In this sense, one of the most outstanding initiatives has been the installation of self-service kiosks (called Punt BCN) to allow administrative procedures with the Citizen Council and to access information about the municipal services of the city.

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The 8 most demanded procedures (city map, agenda, registry - direct printing of cense documents - , treasury – fine and tax payments – or library searches) can be performed directly in the kiosk. The devices are equipped with ID and eID reader, digital certificates reader, printer and credit card reader. The foreseen 45 kiosks will be installed in several municipal facilities, such as libraries, malls, civic centres or citizens’ attention offices like the one appearing in the video. Its installation will end in early 2011. Interviewees: - Emili Rubió, Director of Attention to the Citizen, Barcelona City Council. - Ignasi Lamarca, Director, Focus on Emotions Internal eGovernment: maps and indicators goal-oriented management, strategic

The goal-oriented management project is one of the key internal projects of the Council aimed at visualizing the results at different levels of executive organization. This observation allows a better responsibility dissection in the obtained results. This project directly implies the establishment of objectives for each management unit and monthly goals for several indicators that show the consecution degree. The goal-oriented management project has meant a 180º change in the management of the city of Barcelona, allowing a better comprehension of the overall functioning of the city at managers’ level and an improvement in the efficiency and efficacy of public workers. Interviewee: - Juan José López, IT-PMO, Barcelona City Council The Open Data project The project of public datum opening of the Barcelona City Council consists in making available, for everybody, the information that the council possesses in digital formats, standardized and open following a clear structure that allows its understanding, facilitating, at the same time, the access to these informative resources in order to foster their reuse. They are resources of information that the society has the right to use, whether to brief themselves or for creating new services, increasing the social value and perhaps, also the commercial value. Five types of data will be offered: territory, population, management and procedure indicators, urban environment and documental datum. The project will be implanted in two phases, during 2011 the service will start off with the creation of the Open Data portal that will be disposable with the first services the next month of February. Afterwards it will be consolidated and it will broaden. From 2012 the phase of enlargement and consolidation of the services will start with more informative resources and the progressive study of new resources to be opened. An interview to an entrepreneur talking about the Open Data initiative is offered in the video.
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Interviewees: - Lluís Sanz, Cartography and Corporate Information Director, Barcelona City Council - David Comas, Nexus Geografics The Barcelona 3D project Barcelona 3D is an initiative to visualize the city of Barcelona in a three dimensional perspective, based on the 2D geographical information system (GIS) from the Council, lead jointly by Barcelona Media Innovation Center and the Barcelona City Council. This new project was born from the necessity of evolving the current systems betting for the introduction of a third dimension to bidimensional cartography with a two-fold objective: to unify territorial information structuring it spatially and to improve understanding of the city through ultimate visual tools. GIS the the the

The Barcelona 3D model is of great value for companies devoted to urban planning or municipal services, since they will have at their disposal not only the visualization of a land plot but also all the information linked to that plot. Interviewees: - Lluís Sanz, Cartography and Corporate Information Director, Barcelona City Council - Vicente López, Vicepresident, Barcelona Media Innovation Center INFRASTRUCTURES The 22@ innovation district 22@Barcelona1 project transforms two hundred hectares of industrial land of the Poblenou district into an innovative district offering modern spaces for the strategic concentration of intensive knowledge-based activities. This initiative is also a project of urban refurbishment and a new model of city providing a response to the challenges posed by the knowledge-based society. When the 22@ Barcelona plan was approved, the infrastructure network in the Poblenou industrial area was clearly insufficient. For this reason, a new Special Infrastructure Plan was created in order to allow urban improvements on 37 kilometers of streets in the 22@Barcelona district with highly competitive utility infrastructures.
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The new Infrastructure Plan calls for an investment of more than 180 million euros and allows for the implementation of a modern network of energy, telecommunications, district heating and pneumatic refuse and waste collection systems. The design of these new networks gives priority to energy efficiency and responsible management of natural resources. The Special Infrastructure Plan is run by the 22@Barcelona municipal company, which coordinates the different utility companies participating in the process. These new set of infrastructures provide an sturdy platform on which utility companies can consider the creation of new advanced services and, thus, new business models, like the case of Districlima, the centralized heat/cold water generation system, which is explained on the video. Interviewees: - Ramon Sagarra, Infrastructures Manager, 22@ Barcelona City Council - David Serrano, Managing Director, Districlima SA Corporate Fiber Optical Network Late in the 80s, the Barcelona City Council decided to construct a corporate fibre optical network to connect the main municipal buildings, using pre-existent channelling such as subway tunnels or the sewer system. Up to 2010, the network connects 144 buildings and has a total length of 325 km offering connection speeds between 100Mbps and 1Gbps. It also proves to be a sturdy infrastructure to foster the municipal telecom projects deployment since it acts as the perfect backbone on which to deploy the actual wireless telecommunication projects. Later on the new millennium, the Council started the construction of a corporate dark fibre network aimed at fostering competitiveness and opening the market for advanced services. This new network is mainly concentrated in the 22@ innovation district and is now being extended to other business agglomeration areas such as Sagrera or Zona Franca. WiFi mesh network The municipal WiFi mesh network adds capillarity to the municipal fibre optical network by providing wireless connection to those municipal services and employees working at street level. Nowadays, it has 479 nodes that support 20 services, among others: police PDAs, parking meters, traffic light control or surveillance cameras. This WiFi mesh network is until now covering 30% of the city. Sensors network Barcelona has also started to deploy a concept platform in order to better define the specifications for the city sensors networks and information and management systems. This network’s main aim is to manage a multivendor multipurpose sensors network configured to be used by several providers. A pilot has already been done in the 22@ technological district testing critical areas such as: car parking, traffic flow, pollution, noise and lighting.
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The company Abertis Telecom has collaborated with the Council in the definition and implementation of the network and talk about their experience in the video. Interviewees: - Mariano Lamarca, Network Manager, Barcelona City Council - Raül Gonzàlez, Strategic Marketing Manager, Abertis Telecom Public WiFi network Barcelona WiFi1 is a free of charge service that allows the Barcelona citizens to connect to the Internet through WiFi Access Points, or hotspots, located in various municipal amenities, such as civic centres or parks like the one appearing in the video. The service lets its users carry out simple browsing on the Internet enabling access to content through a browser. It also allows public access to City Council information and online processing. The Barcelona WiFi Service is provided with the aim of encouraging city access to the Internet and helping the public incorporate technology into their daily lives. The company BT Global Services has collaborated with the Council in the definition and implementation of the service and talk about their experience in the video. Interviewees: - Francisco Rodríguez, Telecommunications Director, Barcelona City Council - Eduard Laffitte, Mediterranean Area Director, BT Global Services SMART LIVING New technologies use by the Guàrdia Urbana police The Guàrdia Urbana city police agents, who carry out their activities in the street, do an important job for citizens. Furthermore, their activities have a direct impact in the Council internal systems. This is the reason why optimizing their street jobs allows to speed up the Council’s internal processes. It also reduces management time and offers the possibility to provide a better service to citizens. Two related projects are presented in the video. PDAs use by the municipal police The introduction of workstations (PDAs) that will ease the policemen’s activities in the city is aimed at improving the efficiency and the service level of the Guàrdia Urbana. The main reason to carry out this project was to improve the response capacity of the Guàrdia Urbana when finding any incidence on the street. This collective required faster and error free actuations as well as access to more information, such as situation of vehicles, City Council documentation, licenses, sanctions or
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http://www.bcn.cat/barcelonawifi/
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the property register. These requirements meant that a more efficient and adaptable treatment circuit was needed. Thus, the PDAs provide more security to the street-level actuations of the police force and open a portal to communicate with other information systems, such as the Department of Motor Vehicles or other security forces like the Fire Brigade. New incidents and communication tool in vehicles The City Council started in December 2010 the installation in of a new incidents and communication management system for the municipal police and firemen, which will available in up to 110 vehicles. The system allows actuation alerts to be received directly at vehicles, access information for the services and direct communication with the Emergency Common Room, where municipal police, firemen and regional police work hand by hand. The benefits of this new tool are: time and resources saving, computerization of the tasks assignation and consult and management of incidents directly from the equipment on the street. With this new system, patrols are now transformed into mobile work stations. Interviewees: - Juan José Vilanova, Intendent Major, Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona - Xavier García, Caporal, Guàrdia Urbana de Barcelona Intelligent environment solutions Urban environment needs to be considered a key factor to become a Smart City. Building a future for Barcelona implies not only making it competitive, managing it with an innovative, agile and efficient administration but also caring for the environment, increasing the citizens’ quality of life and making its day-to-day management more sustainable. Examples of small intelligent solutions can be found in all environmental spheres. In energy management, examples include energy saving street lights or the dozens of solar energy installations, from the huge solar panel in the Fòrum to the many smaller installations in schools. In urban green spaces, new types of grass have been identified that require less water and can adapt better to climate change. In public spaces, examples are noise reduction surfacing or waste collection containers designed especially for Barcelona and that are adapted for people with disabilities. In water cycle, examples are complete system water recirculation in fountain or managing system storm tank regulation designed for Barcelona that meant the end of the overflows in the city. A special visit to one of these tanks can be seen in the video. Interviewees: - Román Llagostera, Water Cycle Services Director, Barcelona City Council SMART ECONOMY
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The 22@ innovation district: the 22@Network The 22@ innovation district in Barcelona, is a real implementation of the Triple Helix concept: companies, innovation centres, faculties and citizens living there have the opportunity to interact among them. The 22@Network association1, currently made up of 101 companies, is dedicated to the success of district 22@Barcelona, the district of innovation. This means facilitating the integration of companies and institutions that are set up here, as well as that of their employees, and explore the relations between them and the Poblenou neighbourhood with its rich social fabric. Formed on the 29th of July 2004, the Association of 22@Barcelona Companies and Institutions is an initiative of civil society to actively participate in the process of developing and consolidating district 22@ as a dynamic area, that is both transformational and in the technological vanguard. Interviewee: - Josep Maria Vilà, 22@Network President Barcelona Activa Barcelona Activa2 promotes quality and future oriented employment and businesses through several activity lines included in its Action Plan: entrepreneurship, businesses, human capital, employment, Cibernàrium and innovation promotion. Created in 1986, this municipal company was born as a business incubator with 16 projects installed. Today, Barcelona Activa has become a local and international reference in the support for entrepreneurs, innovation, professional improvement and creation of employment. Barcelona Activa offers responses to the more than 100,000 participants who annually come to its premises, coaching more than 1,000 new projects a year, with more than 115 companies installed in its Business Incubator and Technology Park, more than 30,000 participants have received attention in Porta 22, around 50,000 participants have entered the world of new technologies in the Cybernarium, while more than 1,000 unemployed have been contracted to learn a trade while working. Barcelona Nord Technology Park Barcelona Nord Technology Park is an innovation cluster in the north of the city, an urban technology park of 10,000m2 that has a large concentration of companies managed by Barcelona Activa. It offers advanced services of support for innovation, consolidation and growth of businesses, and technological skills acquisition and diffusion:
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http://www.22network.net/ http://www.barcelonactiva.cat/

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Business Centre of technology-based companies: spaces prepared to accommodate small innovative companies. It is host to 46 technological companies. Platform of business services: Logistics and business services of added value, available for the companies located in the Park as well as for other innovative companies of the city.

Deneb SA is a company specialized on GIS and Mobility applications that has recently landed in Barcelona Nord Technology Park and explains its experience in the video. Interviewees: - Yolanda Pérez, Barcelona Nord Technology Park, Barcelona City Council - Guido Gómez, Joint Director, Deneb SA Urban Lab One of the aims of the 22@Barcelona municipal company is to consolidate the role of Barcelona as an innovative city. In this framework, a specific line of action is to foster the use of the city as an urban laboratory with the 22@Urban Lab project1, set up in the 22@Barcelona district as a testing ground for innovative solutions for companies seeking to implement tests in any field: urban planning, education, mobility, etc. The aim of this project is to provide companies that are developing innovative projects and that are in the pre-commercialisation stage with the possibility of testing them in the district through pilot trials. Since the start of the 22@Urban Lab project in 2008, more than 20 innovative initiatives have been run in the 22@Barcelona district in various fields. The following is a brief description of the pilots appearing in the video: Implementation of 12 outdoor public street lighting points Eco Digital with LED technology in the 22@ district (6 on either side of the street). The lighting points will be fitted with presence, vibration, temperature, humidity, sound and pollution sensors, GSM aerials, Wifi Mesh access point and webcam for video surveillance functions. Implementation of 2 charging points for electric cars and management and analysis of the system from a centralised control point in Barcelona City Council.

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Interviewee: - Josep Miquel Piqué, CEO 22@Barcelona & Strategic Sectors Director, Barcelona City Council Metropolitan Strategic Plan Promoted by the Barcelona Town Council, the Strategic Metropolitan Plan of Barcelona (PEMB)2 is a private non-profit association that brings
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together the 36 municipalities that make up the Metropolitan Area of Barcelona (MAB). The PEMB was created to identify and promote support strategies for the economic and social development of the MAB. As a result, the association's main tasks involve analysing and identifying potential in traditional and emerging activities, and anticipating problems and providing their solutions ahead of time. Thus, the Strategic Metropolitan Plan of Barcelona is an instrument designed to: anticipate future challenges, provide the necessary changes to meet such challenges, promote the participation of all the agents involved, enable a consensus among differing interests and prioritise decisions. Given the diversity of the institutions and administrations that make it up, the PEMB is a neutral body that serves as a forum for the comparison and contrast of information, the debate of criteria and the study of alternatives, until agreements are reached regarding the different policies to be promoted. The essential foundation of the PEMB's work method comprises the consensus, shared leadership and cooperation of all the participating agents in the design of the strategies to be pursued. Interviewee: - Francesc Santacana, General Coordinator, Strategic Metropolitan Plan of Barcelona SMART PEOPLE Cibernàrium The Cibernàrium1, whose main offices are placed in the MediaTic building at the heart of the 22@ innovation district, is one of the most popular municipal training centres in Barcelona. Its main offices offer more than 1200 m2 of innovative facilities. Other training points are also located in Barcelona Nord Technology Park and throughout the network of public libraries. Cibernàrium is also the program of digital literacy of the Barcelona City Council. It offers training for professionals and enterprises, and it also offers learning initiatives for non-trained focused on all the citizenry. Thus, Cibernàrium us the meeting point of Barcelona for all those people interested in learning how to use technological tools, acquire the needed professional competences in knowledge society and keep abreast of the latest technological solutions or learn how to get started in the use of the Internet tools. Interviewee: - Jordi Roca, Cibernàrium Director, Barcelona City Council Citilab Cornellà
1 http://www.cibernarium.cat (not available in English)

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Citilab Cornellà1 is a center for social and digital innovation in Cornellà de Llobregat, Barcelona. It exploits and spreads the digital impact on creative thinking, design and innovation emerging from digital culture. Citilab is a mix between a training center, a research center and an incubator for business and social initiatives. This project started with the idea that digital technologies, specifically Internet, are a way of innovation much more focused on citizens. Their methods of work are basically design thinking and user-centered creation. In Citilab, the Internet is considered a way to innovate more collaboratively integrating the citizen in the core process. Interviewees: - Artur Serra, Research and Innovation Director, Citilab Cornellà - Francisco Javier Iglesias, i2cat Foundation Researcher, Musiclab Citilab Cornellà - Raymond Rothwell, Seniorlab Teacher, Citilab Cornellà SMART MOBILITY Intelligent transport solutions: augmented reality apps TMB2 is the metropolitan authority for the development of public transport guaranteeing the mobility of the Barcelona citizens. In order to keep updated with the latest technological trends and, thus, aimed at providing services for citizens through the tools that they use, several mobile phone apps are being developed. In the video the TMB Virtual is presented, which is an augmented-reality application for iPhone and Android aimed at making access to the city's public transport easier. Via mobile a citizen can locate all of the closest bus stops, metro stations, trams and trains, and if turning in circle, which direction and at what distance they are located. If the mobile is held in the horizontal position, the arrows will lead you to the selected spot. Interviewee: - Jordi Guitart, TMB (Transports Metropolitans de Barcelona) Intelligent transport solutions: Smartphone apps Barcelona has a mobility plan which goals can be summarized on achieving a safer, more efficient, equitable and sustainable mobility. To attain these goals is basic to promote the use of public transport and nonmotorized modes (this is bicycles and walking). With this intention some tools have been developed to bring over the citizens the information about mobility. That’s the case of some applications for smartphones as ibicing, TMB virtual and Transit.
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Ibicing provides information about the bicing service, which is the public bicycle system of Barcelona. This application has a menu that allows you to consult the availability of all stations from your current location (number bicycles available and the free parquing spots). You also can create a list of your favorite stations, and visualize them in a map with an interactive navigation, and with links to information of interest. Transit is a new application that allows the user to consult the state of traffic in real time and see the live images of traffic cameras. There is a map in colors indicating the level of service of the main streets of the city (this is if they are congested or not), another map with the cameras location and a service of alerts that informs of all kind of incidents that may affect the traffic, as accidents or works on the street. Interviewee: - Beatriz Huarte, Mobility Department Engineer, Barcelona City Council Barcelona, hub of innovation for the electric vehicle Electric mobility is a route for innovation and competitiveness on a global scale. Its implementation means that, in the medium and long term, we will all benefit: it contributes to reducing pollution emissions, improves air quality and reduces noise pollution, and it drives industrial development and transformation. In addition, in an global context, where the search and the development of electric mobility solutions has become fundamental, cities emerge as potential test environments to extend these new technologies. The urban setting thus becomes a key environment for industrial activity whose nucleus and motivation for expansion is electric mobility. The Metropolitan Area of Barcelona constitutes one of the European centres in the automotive industry, holding 20% of the industry within the Spanish state. Supporting the development of electric mobility solutions is a key element for the global competitiveness of the automotive sector of Barcelona, as well as contributing to improving environmental sustainability and the quality of life in our city. Live1 (Logistics for Implementation of Electric Vehicles) is a public-private platform that was conceived with the aim of giving support to and promoting the development of electric mobility in the city and metropolitan area of Barcelona. The development partners of this project are Barcelona City Council, via the areas of Environment, Mobility and Economic Promotion; the Government of Catalonia, via the Catalan Energy Institute; and the companies ENDESA and SEAT. Thanks to the LIVE initiative, the Barcelona City Council has started the installation of up to 119 charging points all around the city in cooperation with the company MobecPoint. Interviewees: - Lluís Gómez, Strategic Sectors Director, Barcelona City Council
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Jordi Ventura, Commercial Director, MobecPoint

Other representatives that contributed to the video showcase: Ramón García-Bragado, Deputy Mayor for Housing, Urbanism and Internal Administration, Barcelona City Council Jordi William Carnes, Deputy Mayor for Treasure and Economic Promotion, Barcelona City Council Andreu Puig, City Manager, Barcelona City Council Joan Mas, Business Manager, Barcelona Digital Technology Centre Esteve Almirall, Professor, ESADE Business School1 Miquel Oliver, Vice-Rector for Quality Assurance and Institutional Strategy, Pompeu Fabra University2

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THE STORYLINE OF AMSTERDAM AND LISBON SHOWCASES
“The Smart Energy City” – Amsterdam and Lisbon example Smart City – the holistic approach Vision: Cities will stay the center of prosperity and innovation. The percentage of people living in a city will continue to grow. Currently almost 50% of the world’s population are living in cities and in the western world this percentage has already reached 80%3. There is a strong correlation between higher standards of living and the percentage of people living in a city. Cities have always been the place where innovation has happened: in the field of Health Care, Education, Leisure and even in the field of Religion. A recent book named Triumph of the City written by Edward L. Glaeser gives a whole list of reasons why this will was and will be the case4. Since most of the people live in a city and most economic activity can be found there as well, the city and its inhabitants has a big role to solve social challenges. Cities are in that perspective the solution for healthcare issues, the aging society in the west or the rapidly growing one in the third world, the need for economic growth to support a growing world population, and the need for more knowledge. What is a Smart City? In essence the starting point is pretty simple: use available information as good as possible. This sounds very logical and it is. The big difference between now and earlier is tremendous though. The amount (and quality) of information and the possibilities to make use of data has increased the last years exponential. Where 30 years ago a personal computer was a scarcity, nowadays everybody has one and 25% of all people in the Netherlands use a smart phone.
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http://www.esade.edu/ http://www.upf.edu/ Data from The Guardian, https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=tY7GTuivONTNuoceJKe-qTg#
Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier, Edward L. Glaeser , 2011 Coordinating Action FIREBALL FP7-ICT-2009-5 www.fireball4smartcities.eu

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Bottom-line: There is more information generated then we scan store nowadays and we can access it anytime and everywhere. This gives great opportunities to improve our way of living: improve our HealthCare system, our Education sector, our Transports sector and get less traffic on the road, and ultimately take the chance to foster the whole governmental system to become more energy efficient. Cities become more resilient and can coop with the growing needs of people. It is not easy to give a proper definition of a Smart City, but the one given by Nijkamp c.s. in 2009 has most components in it: “We believe a city to be smart when investments in human and social capital and traditional (transport) and modern (ICT) communication infrastructure fuel sustainable economic growth and a high quality of life, with a wise management of natural resources, through participatory governance.”1 It seems to be missing the user centric part we pointed out earlier. In the end it is all about people, so the following definition is proposed: “We believe a city to be smart when citizens and visitors have the opportunity to make smarter choices. Investments in human and social capital and traditional (transport) and modern (ICT) communication infrastructure thereby fuel sustainable economic growth and a high quality of life, with a wise management of natural resources, through participatory governance.” The pillars for a smart city Cities face new challenges. The traditional work forms and organizations are no longer the most effective, its’ essential to join efforts and resources to take the most out of the existing data and information systems as we are entering the era of social inclusion through social and digital innovation. Within these challenges, both Amsterdam’s and Lisbon’s smart city concepts assume the same fundamental pillars:

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People;   Infra-­‐structure,  and   Information  and  Intelligence.    

Being both the Capitals’ of relatively small countries, Lisbon with 550.000 inhabitants and Amsterdam with 740.000 inhabitants, both city’s deal with a fluctuating population of 2 million people and increasing social and economic needs.

a. People  
The most important part of the city is the people that live in a city.
1

, Smart Cities in Europe, Andrea Caragliu, Chiara Del Bo, Peter Nijkamp, 2009

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We live in a changing society; new technologies give us the opportunity to organize ourselves in different ways. We used to organize ourselves in small geographical units for things as education, healthcare and the production of food. Then came the era where we started to organize ourselves more in groups, with strong influences of religion, unions or other organisations. In the 70 and 80 this “individualism” was the key word for society and after that we came into the 21st century: the century of communities. Everybody is part of several communities and can switch when needed. There are communities for healthcare, education, but even for finance matters: the first peer to peer banks have been launched. The high point of these communities is the easiness how information can be shared in many different ways.

b. Infrastructure   Cities   have   a   tremendous   infrastructure   of   roads,   buildings,   sewer   systems   and   more.     This   is   the   static   part   of   the   city:   bricks   and   asphalt.       Energy   and   Connectivity   are   the   more   dynamic   part   of   a   city,   providing   the   infrastructure   for   products   such   as   lightning,   vehicles,   cell   phones   and   everything  else  that  moves.       The  development  of  new  advanced  infrastructures  enables  us   to  generate  and  use  information  in  a  very  intensive  way.    The   combination   of   smart   energy-­‐networks   with   broadband   connectivity,  mobile  and  fibre,  is  an  excellent  starting  point  for   innovation.       c. Information  and  intelligence  
In 2008 we have reached the point when the quantity of digital information produced surpassed the storing capacity. Nevertheless, the amount of data created grows every day. This gives us more insight in all types of activities. Where supercomputing was used for Mathematics, Physics and Life Sciences nowadays human behaviour is part of this as well. Complex sets of data can be used to make things more efficient: e.g. by compressing data, or based on analysis from data-streams. A very tangible example of the use of complex dynamic data is dynamic traffic management, where car drivers get real-time information on the best routes according to infrastructures, circulation, etc. The handling and analysis of data is thereby a third key element in Smart Cities.

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The smart energy city – Amsterdam and Lisbon example Recent years have brought into the political realm the question of sustainable development. How humans activities are responsible for world’s climate evolution (revolution) and how new strategies have to be designed and put into action to attenuate and reach new balance between economy and ecology. This is the main core of the Covenant of Mayors initiative, a challenge that both cities have embraced in 2009, aiming to contribute and reach the common goal to meet and exceed the European Union 20% CO2 reduction objective by 2020 at the local level. This common goal is the motor for the local definition of strategies and setting of targets. Lisbon set the Local Energy and Environmental Strategy, a document that establishes targets for energy efficiency and energy consumption reduction, by 2013 (baseline 2002), in a robust attempt to set goals to be reached by the same local government that set them. The main targets are to:

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Reduce  the  city’s  primary  energy  consumption  by  8.9%;     Reduce  the  city’s  water  consumption  by  7,8%;   Increase  water  reuse  for  non-­‐potable  uses  up  to  3.1  m3/hab.year     Reduce  the  consumption  of  materials/goods  by  10%   Increase  in  the  percentage  of  selective  material  recycling  by  29%  

In Amsterdam’s Metropolitan Area climate goals with challenging deadlines were set in cooperation with the local grid operator Alliander. The targets are:

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40%  CO2  reduction  in  2025  from  1990  baseline;   20%  energy  reduction  in  2025  from  1990  baseline;   Municipal  organization  CO2  neutral  before  2015;   15.000  electric  vehicles  in  2015.    

These strong commitments in the energy field are further enhanced by the clear need to evolve to a more dynamic energy supply/demand system, a process where both cities are putting much effort towards the transition into smart energy grids. The City of Amsterdam and the grid operator Alliander together recognized these challenges and opportunities and initiated a program to have substantial impact on the energy transition need. The program focuses on four areas (sustainable living, working, mobility and public space), corresponding with the largest CO2 sources (which can be customized for other cities), all enabled by intelligent technologies like smart meter or smart grid technology. In Lisbon, the national grid operator EDP is developing R&D projects focused on smart grids operationalization, much on the grid bio directionality, adequacy to renewables and their increasing role in the total energy production system and the system’s integration with the electrical vehicle charging platform.

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The integration of the electrical vehicle into the city’s mobility system is another challenge both cities are facing, focusing efforts on the deployment of an electric vehicles charging network and supporting platform that interacts with users and allows the grid maximum exploitation potential. In Lisbon the electrical mobility project is based on the MOBI.E network. This platform is available all over Portugal, is accessible to all users, and will allow an optimal exploitation of the electric grid, as in a near future it will allow grid managers to control the electric vehicles charging process, transferring consumption from peak to low demand periods. The platform is open to any electricity provider and the payment is based in the common public transportation card, Lisboa Viva. Besides the innovative payment system, MOBI.E allows users, among other services, to know the location of each charging point, its status in terms of occupancy, select charging locations and define plan routes according to this network. In Amsterdam there are several new ways to challenge the issues on mobility; there is a very ambitious EV programme, just like in Lisbon, including the focus on Smart Grid development and demand response systems enabling peak shaving and other services. But there is also the realization that only EV will not be the issue to solve the mobility problem and takes this as an opportunity to focus on new ways of transport. Or possible solutions as car sharing, resulting to a situation nowadays that most inhabitants of Amsterdam state that the possession of a car is not mandatory, but the availability of a vehicle is. Transportation in own vehicles is now getting more and more to mobility challenges, where real time information about traffic and (electric) vehicle sharing are leading to a total concept op mobility. Very bottom-up driven and leading to Smart Traffic Solutions. Buildings energy consumption and the key role played by users is also one of the issues being jointly addressed by Lisbon and Amsterdam. Within the Apollon project, both cities, together with other partners, have actively engaged end users into change their behaviour towards energy use, focusing on the adoption of more energy efficient actions. This is a project dedicated to leveraging current experiences and on-going investments to supplement cross-border pilots with best-of-class methods for setting up, developing and operating sustainable networks of Living Labs. In Lisbon and Amsterdam several households were equipped with smart meters to access the home’s total electrical consumption in real time and dynamically promote changes in dwellers behaviour towards the adoption of more energy efficient actions. This is to be achieved using the living labs methodology where users share experience, supported by the technical experts and having access to the most up to date technologies. The installation of smart meters and active engagement of users with information and dissemination campaigns will promote users behaviour change and allow the definition and presentation of categorized energy demand profiles per typologies of users/households. The experience is running in parallel and the results will be comparable in order to define categorized energy demand profiles that will enable the creation of new business models, promoting SMEs innovation and market reach in the ICT enhanced energy efficiency domain. Bering in mind these compromises both cities defined action plans based on distinct projects that base their set of action in the smart energy concept pillars and cover a wide range of areas dealing with energy in the urban environment, where end-users are the ones that will ultimately have to make the energy transition change, driven by two complementary paths:

1. application   of   innovative   technology   results   in   a   technology   push   to   sustainable   behaviour  ;     2. stimulation   of   behavioural   change   creates   a   demand   pull   for   more   sustainable   technology.    
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This paper will describe the projects in course as case studies, where the goal, the political commitment, the results and replication potential are analysed. Within the people’s participation pillar the Lisbon Participatory Budget initiative is presented, a highly success governance model that is in force for three years now and has assisted to the exponential increase in the number of participants. Regarding Infrastructure, Amsterdam’s Smart Work centres project is detailed. This is in fact one of the projects Lisbon is eager to learn on, as the Amsterdam SWC quality assuring experience revealed to be the strong point that allowed the wide spread of these structures all over the Netherlands. Still on this area, Lisbon’s Open Data project was set in 2011 and is now assuming a crucial asset in the innovative approach to entrepreneurial based open innovation business models in the energy sector and several other areas. The information and Intelligence pillar is the one that glues all of this together and somehow closes the loop that should exist between users, information, feedback and innovative developments that meet users’ needs. Amsterdam’s Smart Living and Climate-street projects are innovative approaches to end-user’s interaction with the energy demand system that have successful proven results based on users empowerment and engagement regarding energy use. The goal of this presentation is to report on successful existing projects implemented towards the creation of a city’s ICT deployment strategy in the energy field, from which lessons can be learned at all levels, including which challenges to embrace and upon which assure rigorous and valuable execution. From the political statements, to global governance models and technological challenges evolved in the creation of innovative, economic viable infrastructure concepts that are scalable to have impact in the city’s energy profile. Working towards a smart energy city People Participatory Budgeting Lisbon has a strong tradition in the participatory decision making processes and much has been learned through European research projects. The most visible initiative is the Participatory Budgeting, which allows the population to decide the activities in which the municipality should invest 5 million euros of its yearly budget. Implemented in 2008, Lisbon was the first European city to organize the Participatory Budgeting, a new governing model, not only about listening to the population but to give the population the power to decide on a significant part of the investment that will be made in Lisbon. With the Participatory Budgeting the Lisbon citizens have the power to propose projects, analyse the candidacies and vote for the projects they believe comply with the city’s needs. The total budget in this participation model is 5 million euros, 5% of the Municipality’s total annual budget for investments. The projects are analysed and put into the population evaluation, being the Municipality responsible to the implementation of the most voted projects up to this amount.

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Figure – Communication poster of the participatory budget initiative In 2010 the complete process involved in the participatory budgeting was accomplished after three years when, due to administrative issues, the process was simplified. In 2010 the principles letter of the process was approved, maintaining the simplified procedure and including further participation means, in person and online. The final project’s evaluation was also enhanced through the periodical report of data on the state of implementation of the winning projects. The fact that the principles letter is not a closed framework, but rather an open methodology that foresees the yearly evaluation of the methodological procedure and consequent redefinition according to the expertise gained from the previous editions, prints users ownership to the process, enhancing its credibility. The principles letter defines a five stages cycle: 1st stage (January to March): last year’s edition evaluation, preparation of the new cycle proceedings, project’s evaluation criteria and definition of the budget to allocate; 2nd stage (April to June): public presentation of the participatory budgeting process, wide consults for project presentation through the online platform and other communication means; 3rd (July to September): technical analysis of the projects and presentation for public voting; 4th (October): project voting process; 5th stage (November-December): projects public presentation, integration of the winning projects in the annual activity plan and overall budget. From the yearly analysis some organizational guidelines were reinforced and other redefined. The guidelines reinforced mainly dealt with:

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participants   eligibility,   not   exclusively   focused   on   residents   but   open   to   all   people   related  to  Lisbon,  as  workers  and  students;   projects  voting  process,  exclusively  online,  having  the  Municipality  made  available   in  person  voting  sections  with  technical  assistance;   the  participants  registration  process  which  occurs  online  with  web  register;   the  communication  strategy  adopted.    
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From the evaluation process and users feedback, the following actions were implemented:

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previous  meetings  with  the  local  stakeholders,  partners  in  the  process;     a  dedicated  user  friendly  website  was  created;   the  projects  presentation  period  was  enlarged  for  two  months;     8  Participatory  Assemblies  were  organized  for  projects  definition  and  discussion;     the   technical   criteria   adopted   for   projects   evaluation   by   the   Municipality   services   were  improved;     a   “guidelines   manual”   was   develop   to   guarantee   a   more   independent   evaluation   process  by  the  Municipality  services;     a  complaints  period  was  imposed.  All  the  complains  were  evaluated  and  considered   in  the  final  projects  list  decision;     4  thematic  sessions  were  organized;   a  Participatory  Budget  bus  was  created.  The  bus  was  equipped  with  computers  that   presented  the  proposals  and  allowed  the  citizen  to  vote  in  their  favourite  projects.   In  2010  the  bus  was  visited  by  1199  citizens.  

In three years the number of citizens participating in the Participatory Budget has rose from 1000 people in 2008 to 11.500 in 2010. A participant characterization identifies the average age of the online participants, between 26 and 45, and the participants at the participatory assemblies mainly over 65 years old. By gender the participation is very balanced and concerning scholar degree the analysis reveals that the majority of the online participants have university education degree and the participants at the assemblies the basic educational degree. Most of the participants are employed and inhabits in Lisbon. The number and variety of proposals substantially increased from 580 in 2008 to 927 in 2010, being available in a wide spectrum of action both in terms of geographical dispersion and technical intervention areas. Public and green spaces are the areas that received the higher number of proposals, followed by traffic infra-structures, traffic and mobility. Energy projects, namely investments in sustainable refurbishment of public buildings and micro-generation systems through renewable energy technologies were one of categories that received a high level of proposals. In 2011/2012 the process develops itself with more tools, opening the on-line participation model with the development of Lisbon’s participation portal and the link to a new set of Web2.0 tools that aim at motivating and facilitate citizens’ active participation in the city’s governance model. A pilot project exclusively open to schools, named the Scholar Participatory Budgeting was successfully launched in 2011 and is expected to continue in the following years, in a clear engagement process focused on youngers needs. Infrastructure Smart work centers

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Around 2007, as part of the Connected Urban Development program, where Amsterdam participated together with Seoul and San Francisco, supported by Cisco, Amsterdam started to develop a smart work-strategy for the region. Main goal: move bits rather than molecules and avoid traffic congestion.

Figure – Amsterdam’s distributions of Smart Working Centres The idea of the concept is very simple: together with business partners an idea was deployed to create locations where people could work, whenever they wanted to. At the start it was clear that the location should be very attractive for people to work so all types of services-providers where included in the program, varying from day care for children to banks and restaurants. In 2008 the first Smart Working centre was deployed in Almere, a satellite of Amsterdam. The idea was to pick a location where people normally would go into traffic jams and now give them the choice to sit down and work first. The city of Amsterdam was one of the first clients supporting the Smart Working Centre as a launching customer for the first year. Cisco donated two telepresence sets so people from Almere could contact their colleagues in Amsterdam. A local entrepreneur was running the Smart Working Centre. The evaluation after one year wasn’t very joyful: the experiment didn’t succeed. After the first months the “smart workers” declined in numbers to a level that it was not feasible anymore to keep the Smart Working centre open. After a very intense evaluation the following lessons where defined:

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A   Smart   Working   Centre   should   be   easily   accessible   by   public   transports,   strongly   motivating  users  to  leave  their  cars  at  home;     Quality  and  assistance  are  keys  to  success.  This  means  that  there  always  need  to  be   someone  at  the  SWC  who  can  help  whenever  things  need  to  be  arranged;   The   use   of   telepresence   also   implies   a   mind   and   technology   change   in   organizations;   The  right  business  model  is  hard  to  find.   The   SWC   has   to   work   as   a   “replacement   office”,  rather  than  just  as  a  costly  extra  facility  for  managers.  

Based on the learning’s of this first Smart Working centre, entrepreneurs start to find new business models for the concept. Within a year several new initiatives deployed and the foundation Double U was created, coming up with a quality label for Smart Working centres that guaranteed the quality and reliability of the SWC. Nowadays the Netherlands have over 110 SWC’s with thousands of users, which all have a certificate of the Double U foundation, thereby guaranteeing a proper services level.

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All types of companies started to develop new services for SWC, some related to booking systems, other to connectivity and video presence but also in different types of services like consultancy to accompany the institution on the changes that have to be made at the administrative level when SWC are integrated in the institutions’ everyday life. Open data Lisbon’s open data project was initiated in 2009. This data availability programme is set in two stages: static data, updated in a regular basis, and real time data. The project aims to present common assets, namely public data that hasn’t been made available dealing with administrative processes and public information related to the city’s liveability. Beyond the usual data about existing restaurants, pharmacies, parking parks, the Open Data project includes also operative data such as energy consumption of all municipality buildings, water consumption, waste collection, etc., mainly based in raw data. Lisbon’s Open data Hub is an API that acts as the bridge for Lisbon’s Municipality information systems. This integration hub is based on standard “web services” technology, a universally used solution that facilitates the integration of different systems and applications, being the data available in XML format. Lisbon Municipality applications resources will be available in a normalized way, through an easy to access and established communication channel. This is a fundamental asset in the city’s governance policy, focused on the citizen’s active participation in the decision process and the city’s development strategy. It’s intent to stimulate innovation, entrepreneurship and foster the appearance of crowdsourcing phenomena in which the problems resolution participation process is enhanced as well as in the effort to improve the city’s services and infrastructures.

Figure – Lisbon’s Municipality Open Data configuration system The overall goal of this open data initiative is to deploy user’s interaction with real data, promoting business opportunities in the development of software functionalities and new business models based on Lisbon’s reality and experience. Aiming to set the example and to initiate a transparency process on what is the Municipality’s performance in terms of resources consumption, the first sets of static data on public systems and buildings will be available for consultancy and further development. On static data:
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Public   Buildings:   the   National   Electricity   Utility   monitors   medium   voltage   supplied   buildings,   making   available   the   real   data   consumptions   every   15   minutes.   Lisbon’s   Municipality   buildings   ran   from   theatres,   service   buildings,   swimming   pools   and   other   public   installations   where   the   analysis   of   this   demand   profile   allows   the   identification   of   energy   efficiency   measures   that   can   be   adopted   to   improve   the   installation’s   energy   performance.   The   goal   is,   working   with   the   available   consumption   profiles   define   specific   consumption   patterns   upon   which   other   installations   can   more   easily   identify   the   opportunities   in   energy   efficiency.   This   data   availability   is   a   clear   impulse   to   the   energy   market   that   will   access   privilege   information   upon   which   can   develop   new   business   models   and   dynamically   approach   new   clients   presenting   new   functionalities   and   applications   that   may   facilitate   the   building’s   manager   action;   Public  Lighting:  Lisbon’s  public  lighting  system  comprehends  streetlamps,  traffic   lights   and   publicity   structures.   The   city’s   strategy   towards   energy   efficiency   in   this   area   foresees   intervention   projects   with   streetlights   and   traffic   lights.   Streetlights   new   LED   technology   is   being   evaluated   in   order   to   assess   the   quality   of   light   and   monitor   improvements   in   energy   efficiency.   In   parallel   a   replacement  programme  is  under  way  to  replace   1625  conventional  ballasts  by   electronic  ones  with  flux  reduction  capability  in  selected  periods  of  the  night.  In   traffic  lights  a  progressive  replacement  of  conventional  lights  for  LED  ones  is  in   force;     The   projects   are   test   beds   for   technology   experimentation   and   further   evaluation   of   the   replication   potential   applied   to   each.   The   availability   of   this   data  to  the  professional  public  allow  SME’s  to  develop  and  proactively  propose   the  adoption  of  innovative  public  light  management  systems  based  on  real  time   data,   experienced   on   the   field   both   in   terms   quality   of   lighting   and   security   related  issues.  The  methodology  adopted  fosters  SME’s  active  participation  for   presenting   and   testing   innovative   solutions   and   relies   on   end   user’s   feedback   for  evaluation  and  engagement  in  the  final  decision  process;     Solar   energy:   Lisbon   is   the   sunniest   capital   in   Europe   and   is   for   the   first   time   assessing   the   potential   to   install   solar   technologies   in   existing   buildings,   in   a   clear  strategy  to  redefine  urban  planning  policies  and  foster  the  deployment  of   the  most  solar  profitable  areas  in  terms  of  Lisbon’  s  built  patrimony.  The  result   of   this   evaluation   for   Lisbon’s   Baixa   Pombalina   area   is   already   available.   This   information   is   available   enabling   end   users   to   access   their   roof’s   potential   to   receive   solar   systems   and   the   solar   market   stakeholders   to   approach   the   best   investment   opportunities   and   define   new   partnership   models   with   the   end   user;     Mobility:   Several   projects   are   being   developed   in   this   area,   regarding   public   transports,   new   management   solutions   and   new   energy   sourced   vehicles.   Portugal   is   implementing   the   first   countrywide   EV   charging   network,   which   includes  more  than  1300  charging  points  across  the  Country  (MOBI.E  project),   with  Lisbon  having  the  most  prominent  position  in  it  with  687  charging  points.   The   first   set   of   electric   vehicle   charging   stations   was   launched   in   2010   and   currently   more   than   56   charging   points   are   operating   within   Lisbon   and   it’s   expected  that  the  remaining  631  are  installed  until  the  end  of  2011.  Within  its   basics  service,  Lisbon  and  other  cities  charging  points  are  interconnected    on  a   unique   platform   MOBI.E   all   over   the   country   with   multiple   interfaces   (web,   iphone,   android),   which   presents   the   location   and   status   of   each   charging   point   (occupation   and   existing   pre-­‐reservations),   distances   between   points,  
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translated   into   real   time   distance   according   to   traffic   and   battery   needs.   The   project’s   goal   is   to   further   develop   and   implement   innovative   functionalities   that   mobilize   the   electric   vehicle   charging   points   as   crucial   infra   structures   in   Lisbon’s   sustainable   mobility   strategy.   Users   will   be   called   to   identify   and   test   new  functionalities  along  with  the  universities  and  SMEs,  in  a  user  involvement   strategy   that   relies   on   active   cooperation   between   different   actors.   Nevertheless,  electric  vehicle  owners  are  not  the  ones  to  exclusively  involve  in   the   project.   The   user   involvement   strategy   will   go   beyond   the   early   adopters,   focusing   also   on   laggards   in   order   to   motivate   their   participation   and   engage   them   in   the   development   of   services   that   may   attract   and   persuade   them   to   adopt  electric  vehicles.      
The next step in the Open data project is to be able to provide real time data to the user. This project will be launched briefly with installation presenting electricity real time consumption data in service buildings and residential dwellings. Information and Intelligence Smart Energy in the residential environment The involvement of citizens depends on where they are and what they do. There is a difference when people are at work or at home. This is the reasons why Amsterdam Smart City has made a differentiation between four focus areas: Living, Working, Mobility and Public Space. This is due to the different user perspectives and the different types of stakeholders the city wants to involve in the project. In each of the running projects user’s behaviour towards energy use is one of the focus areas. Involving energy end users (citizens) is essential for Amsterdam Smart City, as the tested technologies are useless without the acceptance and experience of energy end users. Furthermore, the stimulation of behavioural change fosters a demand pull for the market to invest and develop more sustainable technology. For the Amsterdam Geuzenveld, a Smart Living project, an ‘open innovation’ method was used to obtain reactions and answers from the inhabitants of Amsterdam on how to overcome the barriers for customers to become energy producers. In 2010 we started the Geuzenveld-pilot, with 450 households in one of the most vivid neighbourhoods in Amsterdam, with several ages, cultures and educational levels. The main goals were to promote user involvement and test the right methodologies to engage users. The lessons learned are a valuable asset to companies and governments, for example combined with the role out of Smart Energy Meters. For the pilots in Amsterdam Smart City we defined three things we wanted to do, also for this project:

1. Reduce  the  use  of  Energy;   2. Involve   users,   at   the   short   and   long   term,   creating   the   same   conditions   and   monitoring  the  results;   3. Make  a  value  case     a. people:  what  is  acceptable,  when  do  people  act?   b. process:  delivering  the  innovation:  how,  by  who?   c. technology:  can  it  be  scaled?   d. cooperation:  what  project  partners  are  essential?  In  what  role?  
Results:

1.  Reduce  the  use  of  Energy    The   results   of   the   project   after   6   months   indicated   a   6%   savings.   There   is   the   assumption  that  a  higher  rate  can  be  reached  after  a  year.  The  baseline  is  not  100%  
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clear,   since   Smart   Meters   were   installed   with   a   bit   of   delay   due   through   some   technical  challenges.     2. Involve  users   The   city   district   and   housing   agencies   tried   to   adopt   a   co-­‐creation   methodology   with   the   Geuzenveld   neighbourhood   inhabitants   by   working   in   cooperation   with   the   Favela   Fabric   agency.   Quickly   they   understood   that   energy   issues   were   not   at   the   realm   of   citizens   concerns.   Further   in   the   project   a   new   methodology   was   adopted,  focused  on  elementary  schools.  The  work  with  students  was  a  successful   approach  to  involve  whole  families  in  the  awareness  raising  process.     3. Value  Case   a. people:  what  is  acceptable,  when  do  people  act   i. People  do  not  like  being  told  what  to  do.  They  rather  be  the  ones   with  the  initiative;   ii. Energy  is  not  tangible  enough  to  understand,  it  has  to  be  translated   into  more  tangible  things;   iii. Involve  schools  and  children  when  possible  –  schools  are  a  natural   learning  environment  and  are  very  well  organized.     b. process:  delivering  the  innovation:  how,  by  who?   i. Ownerships  is  very  difficult,  but  ambitions  are  there;   ii. This   is   not   a   strict   system.   Integration   and   co-­‐creation   should   be   flexible.  This  is  hard  for  infrastructural  parties;   c. technology:  can  it  be  scaled?   i. Not  with  this  intensity,  the  investments  are  too  high  when  related   to   real   savings.   When   scaled   up   the   market   deployment   element   will  have  an  important  role;   d. cooperation:  what  project  partners  are  essential?  In  what  role?   i. Housing   agencies,   grid   operators,   energy   agencies   and   organizations  that  work  on  or  to  the  neighbourhood  and  know  how   to   attract,   work   and   engage   “people”   on   adopting   more   energy   efficient  behaviours.    
Smart Energy in a commercial environment The Climate-street project, a smart public space project, focused on ‘open innovation’ method to obtain reactions and answers from the inhabitants of Amsterdam on how to overcome the barriers for customers to become energy producers. In 2009 we started the Climate- street pilot, with 140 shops owners in a popular shopping street, aiming with this location to give a high visibility to the project and present new solutions and technologies to the citizens in the real environment. The climate street project can be considered as one of the most complex stakeholders projects executed in the Amsterdam Smart City program. To create a complete concept of a smart shopping street, there are on the one hand several suppliers that play an important role and one the other hand the “clients’, who are very complex as well. Some of the stakeholders even have a double role, like the waste company who is a supplier for collecting waste and a client for garbage cans or electric vehicles. The project counted with 140 shop owners and the ASC organization invited several (>10) companies to demonstrate their energy-saving solutions oriented to shops and also energy efficiency solutions oriented to the public.
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Like all Amsterdam Smart City projects the results were assessed envisioning the three important pillars: are users involved, is there a value case and most important: do we save energy? For the climate street lessons and results are:

1. Reduce  the  use  of  Energy   i. There  is  a  big  difference  per  shop  tipology.  Restaurants  save  more   compared  to  bookshops  e.g.  differences  vary  between  5  to  25%;   ii. In  public  space  there  is  over  30%  saving  potential;   iii. In   waste   collecting   there   is   a   20%   saving   potential   by   using   smart   logistics.     2. Involve  users   i.  Shop  owners  are  a  very  different  group  to  work  with,  with  specific   needs;   ii. Working  with  existing  organizations,  that  aggregate  shop  owner  as   memberships  is  a  successful  experience;     iii. Working   with   ambassadors   and   early   adopters   was   a   very   successful   approach,   40   of   the   140   shops   were   willing   to   act   as   ambassadors  for  other  shops  and  collaborate  intensively;   iv. Design  is  key,  ugly  appliances  are  not  adopted.     3.   Value  Case   i. People:  what  is  acceptable,  when  do  people  act?   • Make  insights  visible,  give  financial  advantage  immediately;   • Do  not  send  consultants,  work  with  peers;   • Initial  investments  are  hard  for  shop  owners;   ii. Process:   delivering   the   innovation:   how,   by   who?                •   Ownership   is   very   complex   in   environments   where   nobody  is  responsible  for  a  collective  strategy;   • Role  of  the  government  can  be  to  organize  this;     iii. Technology:  can  it  be  scaled?   • Organizing  a  test  bed  is  a  great  way  to  design,  develop  and   demonstrate   new   technologies.   The   scaling   up   of   the   business  models  base  on  the  success  of  the  initiative;       • Sometimes   the   business   models   need   to   change.   E.g.   for   lightning:   LED   lights   represent   a   big   investment   but   the   reduced   energy   consumption   allows   economically   interesting   pay   back   periods.   Led   Leasing   companies   started   to   develop   propositions   to   support   the   initial   investment  and  have  a  success  rate  for  the  pay  back  rent.     iv. Cooperation:  what  project  partners  are  essential?  In  what  role?   • Shop  owners  and  their  organizations;   • A   neutral   project   management   organization   with   great   stakeholder  skills.    

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Conclusions and lessons learned Smart. Smarter. Smartest. In almost every city in the world business, knowledge institutions and government are working on “Smart Solutions” to increase the quality of life and solve societal issues. Lisbon and Amsterdam both seem to be very advanced in this perspective, but they also work in a very organized way, where the sharing of results is key. Energy, Mobility and Open Data have a strong focus in the both cities. Energy transition and transparency of government are both themes that are very relevant to other cities. Every Smart City is different. Having its own characteristics and challenges, but there are also a lot of similarities. The challenges around transition to EV, increase awareness around Energy Efficient and opening up governmental data are not exclusively relevant to Lisbon and Amsterdam, but also to other cities in the world. Amsterdam and Lisbon both have a long tradition in travelling around the world and trade with almost all nationalities. Living Lab methodology seems to have taken a dominant position when it comes to innovation and in the public domain as well. The involvement of “people” is a key asset in all the projects and enables the active partners to steer in time when needed. From the experiences reported, three important lessons learned within the last years of “Smart City” development can be systematized:

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People   are   central   in   a   Smart   City.   When   you   success   in   increasing   users   engagement   in   the   city   living,   products   quality   develop   and   increases   faster,   services   and   products   are   deployed   faster   and   the   feed-­‐back   from   users   makes   is   smarted   the   adoption   and   integration   of   new   functionalities   in   the   society.   The   energy   efficiency   projects   happening   in   Lisbon   are   a   good   example.   The   Smart   Working  Center  in  Amsterdam  is  an  example  on  how  things  can  go  wrong  (initially)   when  users  are  the  central  piece.   Themes   where   cities   are   working   are   very   comparable   and   collaboration   in   organization   such   as   the   European   Network   of   Living   Labs   (APOLLON,   Fireball),   Eurocities   and   others   help   cities   becoming   effective   in   focusing   their   efforts   and   resources  in  valid  methodologies,  thus  fostering  the  Smart  City  development.   The   city   government   role   in   the   field   of   stakeholders’   organization   and   cooperation   fostering,  including  knowledge  institutions  and  companies  is  crucial  for  the  success   of  these  initiatives.  Stakeholders’  management  is  not  only  on  the  consumer  side  of   things,  but  also  on  the  investment  side  and  ecosystem  for  potential  solutions.  

What we have learned from the cases above is that cooperation among cities, share of experiences, valid methodologies and projects is becoming more and more important, and assumes especial relevance in deployment of smart cities. A model where leading cities can assist other cities on stakeholder management and governance is very relevant. Where peers can exchange knowledge and build new experiences based on each other shoulders allows increasing the level of quality and innovation of projects, fostering the market to be ambitious and present new ideas and concepts that can be competitive and truly promote connectivity among systems, people and cities. Lisbon and Amsterdam did take up this glove and their results are shared all over the world.

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6

THE STORYLINE OF THE MANCHESTER SHOWCASE
State of the art of Smart Cities; “A cook book how to become a smart city”- Manchester example Background The FIREBALL project has undergone a process of bringing together Future Internet, Living Labs and Smart Cities communities. The phrase “Smart Cities” is, as Dave Carter, Head of Manchester Digital Development Agency, has said “is a contested space.” For the cities represented by the Eurocities Knowledge Society Forum and engaged in “smart cities” projects (see D3.1) the role of the city in not just accepting the definition of “smart cities” provided by technology provider, is crucial. As Jarmo Eskelien from Forum-Virium in Helsinki makes clear “a city is an organism, not a machine.” With the 4th showcase there was a need to place the storyline of a particular city’s development towards a smart city (in this case Manchester) in the context of the public and private sector agendas that are being undertaken. From the European Level to the Local Level Policy initiatives such as the Digital Agenda for Europe are vital in encouraging policy-makers to engage with new technology solutions on a strategic level. It is becoming clear, as smart technologies offer sustainable growth solutions in a difficult economic climate, that investment in infrastructure and a strategic approach to digital at a regional and municipality are vital to ensure our European cities are drivers of the local economy. By focussing on the Digital Agenda for Europe, and the adoption of a Local Digital Agenda at a city level, cities can both learn from each other, and retain competitive advantage. For businesses, particularly those “footloose” multinationals, the digital infrastructure necessary for the “smart city” is becoming as key to their decision-making on location, as transport infrastructure and knowledge resources (such as universities). If we take a city who is new to exploring the opportunities of becoming a “smart city” two things become clear. Firstly, that many cities have developed, even if haphazardly, a commitment to becoming “smarter” over a long period of time, perhaps twent years or more; and secondly, that there are many good examples out there whose experience can be translated elsewhere. That is why the policy agenda, along with political buy-in, is so critical to developing the smart city. Yet, there are limits to what public policy makers and city administrations can do on their own. In particular, they are constrained when it comes to innovation, however much they would like to innovate, but having to ensure that the city itself works. As Pekka Sauri, deputy mayor of Helsinki has said, “we would like to innovate, but we have to ensure that the city continues to function.”

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Except in “green field” developments such as are being built as “new cities” in Dubai, China and elsewhere, the likelihood is that a city infrastructure has many different partners, uses a wide range of existing, and emerging technology platforms, and cannot be easily “reverse engineered” to create the city as a “machine.” Even large vendors pushing “smart city” solutions for such things as traffic management and smart grids, are beginning to understand that their solution has to exist alongside other systems in the city – and the key thing is for city contracts to enable interoperability between different systems. Furthermore, “innovation” in a city is taking place not just (or not at all) in the Universities, “testbeds” and “incubators” but at a grass-roots level. This local level of engagement is critical for a number of reasons, not least because the next generation of innovators are likely to be working in a networked way, coming together for specific projects, or clustering in digital spaces online, and hybrid work-live spaces (such as Manchester’s Madlab). How then to reflect that and to illustrate this via a specific example?

MANCHESTER: SMART CITY Manchester is undergoing another period of transformation. Over the last 15 years, the city centre has been transformed with new office blocks and apartments, as well as signature cultural buildings such as URBIS and the Bridgewater Hall. However, the world economic crisis, and cutbacks in government spending in the UK, have hit the northern cities particularly hard. But the city thrives on its innovation, and across both the public and private sectors, the cities strengths in innovation, cooperation and collaboration – as well as the mixed economy of the city-region – mean that Manchester has shown a resilience during the down turn. It is this innovative spirit that is now defining our plans for the future. We have some high aspirations and some difficult problems. Our pledge – in Manchester: A Certain Future – to reduce Carbon emissions by 41% by 2020 is particularly challenging. The need to equip our residents so they can access the jobs of the future remains an ongoing challenge. The city’s infrastructure still requires considerable investment, such as our expanding tram network, and plans to develop Next Generation broadband. In addition, there are governance challenges, as the city is one of 10 local authorities that form the Manchester city-region, and working across these new authorities, requires new structures and new ways of working. Despite all of this we remain optimistic about the future and one reason for that is because of the vibrancy of the city and its various communities. Whether its digital hackers or community activists or new artists, poets and musicians, we see a “grass roots” excitement about the city – which flows from the cities bars and cafes, and leads to new businesses and, as importantly, new business models. Manchester as a Smart City will never be a top-down or corporate, but its large companies and its public bodies are important players nonetheless. In some ways Manchester is a “small city” where everyone knows each other, attends each others events, and supports each others initiatives – bringing business people, technologists, artists and creatives, public officials and academics together in a way that is rarely found elsewhere.
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Recently examples include a “speed dating” event where everyone in the room had to speak to a person from one of several categories including web developers, creatives and scientists; and a very successful “smart city innovation boardroom” where a range of invited guests – running from IBM to the community organisation Gorton Monastery – were part of a vivid discussion on how Manchester could become a smart city. Yet despite the smart city being about “people” we shouldn’t ignore the physical places where they meet. With Media City opening in Salford and the BBC moving there; with the large work and studio space provided by the refashioned Sharp Project in East Manchester; and with community spaces such as Madlab (Manchester Digital Laboratory) and FABLab (The UK’s first fabrication laboratory) there are key places and destinations where innovators meet and work. The “coming together” of digital innovators happens on a regular basis in the city – through all kinds of business and technology events – but also through the once a year “industry awards” the Big Chip Awards, run by Manchester Digital, the city’s independent trade association. We very much want to look at how we can maximise the city’s strengths but also be honest about our weaknesses – that the sheer diversity of different voices and the “freelance first” model that is being chosen by many of the city’s young creatives, means that we are sometimes lacking in the entrepreneurial experience to develop technologies further, and bring them to market, particularly in the digital and environmental technology spaces. The Manchester example should identify some key Future Internet issues or technologies and look at how the city is adapting to use these – whether its new programming languages and methodologies, rapid application technologies like 3D printing, adaption of new technologies (such as Wimax) in new and innovative ways; or exploration of green technologies such as sensor networks and energy monitors. Implementing the Smart Cities vision in Manchester The local vision for developing as a ‘smart city’ is based on creating citizencentric, user-driven approaches to the co-creation and co-production of Future Internet-enabled services. This involves three main elements: a) An explicit statement of the local commitment to, and experience of, citizen engagement in defining both the vision and the implementation for all of the elements that need to make up the ‘building blocks’ of the ‘smart city’, particularly openness, inclusiveness and sustainability; b) Practical demonstration through local pilot projects of how those principles are put into practice, especially in terms of usability, interoperability, flexibility, security and reliability, and the creation of a genuinely collaborative network to develop this practice, both locally and in collaboration with European partners; c) Setting out the foundations of how ideas developed locally could form the basis for longer term planning and delivery of the Local Digital Agenda to make the work that is generated by this more inclusive and sustainable

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The work on the Roadmap is developing some initial benchmarks for mapping and evaluating progress towards this end, providing the starting point for developing ‘smart citizens in smart cities’ applications that would, in turn, enable the vision to be put into practice, in ways which maximise local benefit and drive more inclusive and sustainable economic growth. These benchmarks include: • Local leadership support at the highest level both for the development of the vision and for local initiatives and pilot projects to implement it; • Establishing the momentum required to support the creation of a ‘critical mass’ of citizen, user and developer engagement; • Buy-in from key partners and stakeholders from within the user communities and citizen networks; • Accessible applications and user groups which are seen as attractive, and even “fun”, to be involved in by users; • Future Internet technologies that are increasingly available and accessible, e.g. location based applications, wearable systems and where ‘networked objects meet web-centric systems’; • Identifiable progress towards co-production which begins to demonstrate results in service transformation. The challenge now is to link this into the immediate priorities for the Manchester city region, in areas such as economic growth, social inclusion, improved wellbeing and sustainable development, while, at the same time, providing a platform for longer term thinking and action. One important part of this challenge is creating a specific vision and objectives for the concept of “Smart Citizens in Smart Cities” and the following is the first attempt to do this: Smart Cities will have smart citizens at their heart, enabling them to have the capacity and confidence to use state-of-the-art future internet technologies to transform the way they live and work and their quality of life. Future internetenabled smart citizens will collaborate in new and dynamic ways, co-owning new ways of planning and delivering services and co-producing services both for themselves and for those that they live with, care for and work with. Smart citizens in smart cities will be part of new cross-border collaborations across Europe and globally, using future-internet technologies to create new economic and social opportunities for working and for living. Smart cities will enable smart citizens to make their environments greener, cleaner and healthier as well as more open and inclusive. Smart citizens in smart cities will ensure that smart cities are more democratic, resilient and attractive, using future internet-enabled services to generate and celebrate creativity, innovation and diversity. Manchester as a Future Internet enabled ‘Smart City’ The experience gained through the delivery of local projects over the past five years has enabled the MDDA and its partners to re-evaluate and re-focus their work around the idea that citizen engagement, ‘smart citizens’, needs to be at the centre of Manchester’s proposed “Local Digital Agenda”, creating a virtuous circle whereby: a) digital inclusion generates skills and aspirations across all sections of society and re-engages people in all aspects of civic life, and; b) digital industries generate new employment opportunities and pathways into these through skill development with local people and the institutions that support this, particularly schools and colleges, and;

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c) digital innovation is the engine of this growth, with new next generation open access digital infrastructures and services, such as smart energy and smart health/wellbeing, underpinning this and enabling more sustainable growth while supporting greater community engagement which, in turn, supports digital inclusion, especially through Manchester Living Lab initiatives. The key to realising this, as a ‘Smart City’ strategy for the city region, is to sustain the momentum of work done to date through: • city leadership (continuing support from the main decision makers at the highest level); • investment in new digital infrastructures and services (even in spite of the economic crisis, where new and more innovative approaches and business models will be needed more than ever); • exemplar projects and activities which really stimulate interest and engagement (two examples in Manchester currently would be the Manchester Digital Lab, MadLab, and the Future Everything Festival). The Future Internet enabled ‘Smart City’ is about the transformation of urban living through the imaginative use of digital technologies and ensuring that this can make a significant contribution to sustainable economic growth both immediately and in the longer term. At the same time these technologies also provide opportunities to transform the lives of local residents and the neighbourhoods where they live. This is why the focus on tackling the digital divide and promoting digital inclusion is continuing to be seen as a priority, highlighting the need to ensure that citizens have the capacity, skills and motivation to take advantage of these technologies and that there is a real commitment to focus not only on the transformation of public services in terms of ‘business process’ but also on co-production, the direct and active engagement of users in the design, delivery and, where needed, the ownership of services. Some of the policies, as outlined above, are in place to facilitate and support the transformation process of Manchester into a ‘Smart City’, but there is still much to be done to ensure that the opportunities that the Future Internet can provide to a city region such as Manchester are fully exploited. There are a number of specific lessons that can learnt from the Manchester’s experience which will be used to inform future strategies and the proposed Local Digital Agenda for Manchester in particular: • Firstly the need to develop digitally enabled services that are based on the social, cultural and economic needs of the neighbourhoods, requiring a combination of detailed local research and real efforts to consult with and engage local people as an essential prerequisite for capturing user needs and involving users in the design and delivery of new services, the start of the co-production process; • Secondly that the stakeholders in the project, especially the public sector, need to demonstrate a long term commitment to community engagement and capacity building and invest as much in the development of people’s skills, confidence and aspirations as in the technology being deployed; • Thirdly the need to have an ongoing evaluation strategy that not only has the ability to identify weaknesses, and even failures, but also has the role of communicating these results directly into the strategic decision making
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process so that the project can adapt and evolve as quickly and effectively as possible, backed up by effective project management resources;

Fourthly the need to develop real exemplars that push the boundaries of what people know and their expectations, so that people’s imaginations are stimulated and horizons widened and that this is communicated with all the power that Future Internet enabled communications can bring, making use of all the capabilities that the most effective social media and social networking can offer.  

 
Showcasing Manchester The aim of this storyline is to identify the building blocks towards a smart city, specifically how city leaders, and other key partners need to be involved in order to make a “smart city” a reality. It uses Manchester as an example but should integrate with examples of more advanced smart cities around Europe. Manchester, in many ways, is a dynamic digital city,that for various reasons – to do with its political and administrative make-up, and the nature of local, regional and national policies in the UK, is not as far forward as it would like to be. The many positives of the city’s digital development (the massive changes that have taken place over the last 20 years, haulting and reversing industrial decline; the city’s vibrant digital communities; the importance of Manchester as a regional capital; cooperation between different public bodies and the private sector and universities) are matched with some challenges (Manchester is one of ten boroughs in the city region; there are few large corporate head offices here – and probably none in the digital sector (e.g. IBM, CISCO etc are based here but their UK HQ is elsewhere); a changing political landscape; weakness of UK regional governance; the city’s continued legacy in poor health and education and employment prospects) mean that we look to European cities like Amsterdam for inspiration on the “how to” as well as the “what.” Any development of Manchester as a “Smart city” is therefore a collaborative approach with the private sector, universities and wider public bodies (including the BBC) vitally important to this partnership. These different voices are reflected in the Smart City symposium we undertook in 2011 which is featured here: http://www.smart-ip.eu/2011/08/manchester-smart-city/ The film should include the Manchester example as one “model” of the “Roadmap” a city needs to take towards a smart city including: companies, public bodies etc. Existing footage such as the outcomes of that day, and promotional videos for such projects as SAVE ENERGY can be utilised to show concrete examples of the city’s portfolio. Filming in Manchester should concentrate on understanding the dynamic nature of the “innovation ecology” of the city and the role that is played by policy makers within this. Actual Filming Schedule for Manchester

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1. Interview with Dave Carter, Head of Manchester Digital Development Agency – key topics: Smart Cities Portfolio; Manchester’s Local Digital Agenda 2. Interview with Paul Spensley, technology officer at MDDA – key topics: bottom up broadband; wireless sensor network; free Wifi 3. Visit to Manchester Town Hall. Iconic building in the centre of the city built in the 19th century so challenging to “retrofit” or make energy efficient. However it’s a multi-purpose space, heavily used by the public. We’ve provided Wifi in public spaces and in councillor sections. Filming should take place up the clock tower where we have installed Wifi transmission capability to distribute fast broadband wirelessly across city 4. Key city scenes: Piccadilly Gardens, only public park in centre of Manchester; Albert Square; outside town hall; and the Northern Quarter – film “The Wifi Tree” set up as an “intervention” in an urban space. 5. Visit Madlab – innovation space for Manchester’s digital and innovator community. Interview Hwa Young Jung and Dave Mee who set up Madlab; and Julian Tait from Open Data Manchester and FutureEverything festival. 7 CONCLUSIONS Based on the Helsinki Showcase can be said that video is a powerful way of communication with a wide spectrum of different approaches to be implemented in order to have, with the same materials, several products that can reach a broad range of different publics and audiences. The working methodology that was implemented, as well as the final product that results from all this efforts, has an important nature of small videos to people and to the citizen communities. As important as the final result and quality of the video, is the dissemination strategy that lies behind it.

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REFERENCES
[1] D4.3 FIREBALL Showcases (Alvaro Oliveira) [ 2 ] Helsinki Smart City Show Case ; Introduction for Innovation strategy of Helsinki smart city region (Anna Kivilehto, Veli-Pekka Niitamo) [3] The Storyline for the Barcelona Showcase (Júlia López i Ventura) [ 4 ] Lisbon & Amsterdam Smart Energy Showcase (Joana Fernandes, Ger Baron) [ 5 ] GREEN PAPER; Creating an inclusive and sustainable knowledge society: A Local Digital Agenda for Manchester (Dave Carter)

Framework programme 7 Challenge 1

Page: 52 (52)

Coordinating Action FIREBALL FP7-ICT-2009-5 www.fireball4smartcities.eu

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