You are on page 1of 12

Sample Paper

Food and Beverage Operations Semester III BHMTT
by Ashish M. Dighe Exam conducted on: 15|04|2010

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 1
a. Blanc de Blancs: Champagnes that are made from 100% Chardonnay grapes are called as Blanc de Blanc. (The literal translation is ʻwhite from whiteʼ.) b. Solera: Solera is a process for aging wines particularly sherries, by fractional blending in such a way that the finished product is a mixture of ages, with the average age gradually increasing as the process continues over many years. A solera is literally the set of barrels or other containers used in the process. c. Cuve Close: The cuve close method is also known as the “Charmat” or “Tank” method. Instead of the second fermentation taking place in individual bottles as in the traditional method for making sparkling wines, the second fermentation, which produces the bubbles in a sparkling wines, takes place in large, sealed tanks. The wine is then bottled under pressure so that the bubbles are retained. d. Mulled wine: Heated wine flavored with spices. In Germany it is called Glüwein. e. Sekt: Sekt is the German term for quality sparkling wine. The majority of Sekt produced (around 95%) is made by the Charmat method with the remaining premium Sekt being made according to the méthode traditionnelle. Cheap sparkling wine made with CO2 injection must not be called Sekt, but rather Schaumwein. Sekt labeled as Deutscher Sekt is made exclusively from German grapes, and Sekt b.A. (bestimmter Anbaugebiete, in parallel to Qualitätswein b.A.) only from grapes from one of the 13 quality wine regions in Germany. f. Perlwein: It is semi sparkling wine produced in Germany, It may usually be produced by the cheaper carbonation method. g. Chaptalisation: Sometimes due to poor weather the grapes do not ripen properly resulting in insufficient sugar in the fruit. The addition of concentrated must or sugar to the grape juice before fermentation to achieve the final alcohol content is called chaptalization. h. AOC: (Appellation dʼorigine Controlée) Wines from a particular area with many other restrictions, including grape varieties and vinification methods. This label denotes the highest quality standard in French wines. i. Ale: They are usually top fermented beers. Top Fermentation is carried out at a relatively warm temperature of 15 – 20°C over a relatively short period (three to five days), with a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that rises to the surface of the beer. It produces beers that are dense, full-flavored and long in the mouth. Examples of ales are Porter, Stout, Marzen, Barley wine and Pale ale. j. Lillet: A favorite in France, Lillet is made from white Bordeaux wine, herbs and fruit peel and fortified with Armagnac brandy.

:: Ashish Dighe ::

Page 2 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 2 (A)
1. Remuage: Remuage or riddling is the traditional method used to clear the wine. The bottles are taken to a holed wooden frame called pupûtre. This is made of two rectangular boards hinged together to form an inverted V shape. The ʻremueurʼ manipulates the bottles, turning and tilting each one gradually to encourage the sediment into the neck of the bottle. At the end of this operation the bottles will be almost vertical and the sediment resting on the cap. 2. Degorgement: When required for sale, the bottles still upside down are passed along an automated line and the necks are immersed in a freezing liquid of brine for seven minutes. The sediment is frozen into a pellet of ice which is removed by a process called as ʻdegorgementʼ. The ʻdegorgerʼ removes the crown cap and the pressure of carbon dioxide within the bottle expels the pellet of ice. What is left behind is clear sparkling wine with a pressure of about five to six atmospheres.

Answer No: 2 (B)
Guidelines that can be followed when contemplating wine and food partnerships are as follows: • Most foods can be successfully accompanied by several styles of wine. • White and Rose wines are usually more versatile than red wines. This is an important consideration if one wine is being chosen to accompany the complete meal. • Regional pairings are normally very successful. • The simpler the food the more the wine is likely to shine. • The finer the food the more it is likely to show up inferior wine. • Look at the complete dish and not just the main food component. Identify the principal flavors. Often the sauce will decide the wine. • The weight and body of the wine should match the character and flavor intensity of the food. • Serve light wine with delicate food. • Serve full-bodied wines with full-flavored, assertive foods. • Match dry with dry, rich with rich. • Food flavored with spices go best with aromatic or aggressively brash wines. • With sweets and puddings the food nearly comes off better than the wine. Sweet wines are probably the best bet. • When a particular food is served hot, it requires a more assertive wine than it does when served cold.

:: Ashish Dighe ::

Page 3 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 2 (C)
There are 3 parts to a great cigar: The filler, the binder and the wrapper. 1. Filler: The filler comprises the bulk of the cigar and is made of a blend of leaves to form an inner core. Cigars with long leaves bunched together as filler are called "long filler" cigars. Cigars with short, fragmented leaves bunched together as filler are called "short fillers” cigars. This blend gices the cigar much of its flavor. 2. Binder: The binder holds the filler together and is usually made of a single quality leaf which binds the filler. 3. Wrapper: The wrapper is an exceptionally fine single leaf which must have elasticity, strength and a fine appearance. The wrapper leaf is also classified according to color. i) Double Claro: light Green ii) Claro: light Tan iii) Colorado Claro: Tan iv) Colorado: Brown v) Colorado Maduro: Dark Brown vi) Maduro: Very dark Brown vii) Oscuro: Black

:: Ashish Dighe ::

Page 4 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 3 (A)
Important Information on an Italian Wine Label: 1. Producer: Fattoria Monsanto 2. Name of the wine: Chianti Classico 3. Quality Standard: DOCG (Denominazione dʼorigine Controllata e Garantita) 4. Bottler Information: Estate bottled by Fabrizio Bianchi 5. Vintage: 1990 6. Abv: 13.5% 7. Volume: 3 litres 8. Province: Barberino DʼElsa 9. Riserva: Wine that has been additionally aged

Producer

Wine that has been additionally aged.

Name of the wine Province / Sub Region

Quality Standard

Bottler Information

Volume

Vintage Alcohol content by volume

:: Ashish Dighe ::

Page 5 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 3 (B)
Bordeaux: A Bordeaux wine is any wine that is produced in the Bordeaux region of France. The major reason for the success of winemaking in the Bordeaux region is the excellent environment for growing vines. The geological foundation of the region is limestone, leading to a soil structure that is heavy in calcium. The Gironde estuary dominates the regions along with its tributaries, the Garonne and the Dordogne rivers, and together irrigate the land and provide an Atlantic Climate, also known as an oceanic climate, for the region. The Bordeaux wine region is divided into subregions including Saint-Émilion, Pomerol, Médoc, and Graves. 89% of wine produced in Bordeaux is red (called "claret" in Britain), with notable sweet white wines such as Chateau d'Yquem, dry whites, rosé and sparkling wines (Crémant de Bordeaux) all making up the remainder. Some of the most common grape varieties grown in the Bordeaux are: Black: Caberbet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot and Malbec. White: Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscatel. Some of the first growth wines from this region are: Red wines: • Chateau Lafite-Rothschild (Pauillac) • Chateau Latour (Pauillac) • Chateau Haut Brion (Pessac) • Chateau Mouton-Rotschild (Pauillac) • Chateau Margaux (Margaux) White Wines: • Chateau dʼYquem (Sauternes) Burgundy: Burgundy wine is wine made in the Burgundy region in eastern France, in the valleys and slopes west of the Saône River, a tributary of the Rhône. The most famous wines produced here - those commonly referred to as "Burgundies" - are red wines made from Pinot Noir grapes or white wines made from Chardonnay grapes. The Burgungy regions has various sub-regions namely: Côte d'Auxerre (Chablis), Côte de Nuits, Côte de Beaune, Côte Chalonnaise, Mâconnais and Beaujolais. Burgundy is home to some of the most expensive wines in the world, including those of Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, Domaine Leroy, Henri Jayer, Emmanuel Rouget, Domaine Dugat-Py, Domaine Leflaive and Domaine Armand Rousseau. Some of the quality wines from this region are: Red wines: • Aloxe Corton • Beaune • Pommard • Volnay • Vougeot • Nuits St. Greorge White Wines: • Meursault • Puligny Montrachet
:: Ashish Dighe :: Page 6 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 3 (C)
Bin Card:

Stock Item: Chateaux Mouton Rotschild Date 12/10/2011 4/8/2010 Received 2 2 Balance 5 1

Bin No: RWP12345 Issued 1 (15/10/2011) none Balance 4 3

Bin Cards are used to show the physical stock of each item held in the cellar. The movement of all stock in and out of the cellar is recorded on each appropriate bin card. The bin cards are often used to show the maximum stock and the minimum stock. The minimum stock determines the reordering level, leaving sufficient stock in hand to carry over until new deliveries arrive. The maximum stock indicates how much to reorder and is determined by such considerations as storage space available and turnover of a particular item.

:: Ashish Dighe ::

Page 7 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 4 (A)
The ingredients used in the beer making process are: 1. Water 2. Cereals 3. Yeast and 4. Hops 5. Sugar and 6. Fining Agents Water: Water is the main ingredient for beer. In brewing parlance it is called as liquor. It must be biologically pure and its mineral content assured. It can be softened or hardened. Hard water is ideal for lager whereas soft water is more suitable for heavier beers. Historically, brewers have depended for their supply on local wells where the mineral composition of the water has come through natural resources. Cereals: Cereals are the raw material most commonly used in brewing. Although wheat, rice, sorghum, millet, rye, cassava, rice, maize and even green bananas are still used to produce alcoholic drinks with some resemblance to beer, the mainstay of the brewing industry worldwide is barley. Before it can be used to brew beer, barley has to be made into malt, thereby transforming its starch content into fermentable sugars. After steeping in water, it is left to germinate in a warm environment, then heated in a process called as kilning, which gives a more or less dark color to the malt and likewise to the resulting beer. Hops: The common hop (Humulus lupulus) is a quick-growing plant reaching from 5 to 7 meters in height. It is the cone shaped female flowers that are mainly used in brewing, though British producers use male hops. Small though it may be the hop cone contains a wealth of resins and essential oils; in fact more than 200 aromatic components have been identified. It is these that turn the sugary juices resulting from the brewing process into flavorsome beers. Hops contain several characteristics that brewers desire in beer. Hops contribute a bitterness that balances the sweetness of the malt; they also contribute floral, citrus, and herbal aromas and flavors to beer. Hops have an antibiotic effect that flavors the activity of brewer's yeast over less desirable microorganisms, and hops aids in "head retention", the length of time that a foamy head created by carbonation will last. The acidity of hops acts as a preservative. Yeasts: The most important stage is undoubtedly fermentation, since it is this that dictates the type of beer that will result. There are two main types of fermentation. • Top Fermentation – The older of the two, is effected at 15 – 20°C over a relatively short period (three to five days), with yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that rises to the surface of the beer. It produces beers that are dense, full-flavored and long in the mouth; • Bottom Fermentation – The most widely practiced method nowadays, takes between seven and ten days at lower temperatures (6 – 8°C). The yeasts (Saccharomyces carlsbergensis) remain at the bottom of the fermentation vessel. • There is also a third – ʻspontaneousʼ - fermentation process, employed in Belgium to produce lambic and gueuze beers. It relies on yeasts which occur naturally in the atmosphere in a restricted region to the south of Brussels, Belgium. Sugar: Used basically to facilitate fermentation in the form of priming sugar and is also used to add sweetness to some brown ales and sweet stouts. Fining agents: Finings are used to clarify beer. A variety of fining agents can be used such as albumen, bentonite or isinglass.
:: Ashish Dighe :: Page 8 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 4 (B)
Aperitif means ʻto openʼ or drinks served at the start of a meal or before the meal to stimulate the appetite. Aperitifs can be of the following types. • Bitters: Amer Picon, Campari, Fernet Branca and Byrrh. • Fortified Wines: Sherry and some Port wines. • Aromatized Wines: Vermouth, Dubonnet, Lillet and Suze. • Absinthe and Pastis: Ouzo, Pernod and Ricard Some well known aperitifs wines are as follows: 1. Dubonnet - Modern versions have a wine base flavored with quinine and bitter herbs with additions of mistelle and spirit. This popular aperitif may be blonde (white) or rouge (red). 2. Lillet - A favorite in France, Lillet is made from white Bordeaux wine, herbs and fruit peel and fortified with Armagnac brandy. 3. Suze - Suze is a bright yellow French aperitif flavored with gentian and herbs. It is bitter in flavor with supposedly digestive properties and 4. Vermouth - Vermouths are aromatized wines that have been fortified. The basic wine is of ordinary quality and blended to a set style. Other ingredients include mistelle (unfermented grape juice with the addition of brandy), various flavorings (herbs, roots, bark, flowers and quinine) and sugar as sweetening.

:: Ashish Dighe ::

Page 9 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 4 (C)
Following is the flowchart used to explain the vinification process of white wine:

White Grapes

The making of the white wine encompasses : 1. Using white grapes such as a Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc or Chardonnay.

De-stalking

2. De-stalking - where stalks of all the grapes are removed. 3. Pressing of the grapes - The process involves passing the destalked grapes from an Archimedes press or a pneumatic press. This process squashes the grapes by breaking the skins until all the juice is released. 4. The treatment and fermentation of the must - During this process, the must is usually treated with sulphur dioxide and then cleansed of any remaining skin, pips and other suspended matter. Cultured yeast may be added and the wines are fermented slowly and cooly between temperatures of 15˚C and 20˚C to impart delicacy and fragrance. 5. Maturation - The wine is then left for maturing in casks for a short time.

Pressing

Fermentation

Maturation

Racking

6. Racking - Running the clear wine off its lees or sediment from one cask to another. 7. Fining - A further clarification of wine usually before bottling. A fining agent such as isinglass is added and this attracts the sediment suspended in the wine, causing it to coagulate and fall to the bottom of the container. 8. Filtration - The final clarification before bottling. It removes any remaining suspended matter and leaves the wine healthy and star bright in appearance. 9. Bottling - The clear bright wine is then bottled and ready to be transported to wine cellars for sale.

Fining

Filtration

Bottling

:: Ashish Dighe ::

Page 10 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 5 (A)
Porter – It is a type of ale and is made using the top fermentation process. The Porterʼs name comes from the Porters at Londonʼs Victoria Station. They would frequently mix several styles of beer into one glass and drink large quantities of the mixture. A style was eventually created to approximatethis blend and came to be known as a Porter. Arthur Guinness and Sons was one of the earliest brewer (the first being the Whitbreads of London) to offer a Porter commercially. Later on, they increased the alcohol content of the Porter and the new drink became known as the Stout Porter (which eventually became Stout). The Porter is a good beer for those who want a full flavored, dark beer without the bitterness from the roasted barley that a Stout now possesses. Examples: Anchor Brewing Co.ʼs Anchor Porter, Samuel Smithʼs Taddy Porter, Fuller Smith and Turnerʼs Fullerʼs London Porter Lager - It is a bottom fermented beer that is brewed and stored at low temperatures. It is usually fermented with a yeast namely the Saccharomyces carlsbergensis.There are many types of lager; pale lager is the most widely-consumed and commercially available style of beer in the world; Pilsner, Bock, Dortmunder Export and Märzen are all styles of lager. There are also dark lagers, such as Dunkel and Schwarzbier. Examples: Amstel Light, Heineken, Carlsberg, Tuborg and Kingfisher.

:: Ashish Dighe ::

Page 11 of 12

:: 15|04|2010 ::

:: Food and Beverage Service Operations ::

:: Semester 3 ::

Answer No: 5 (B)
Some prominent champagne shippers are:

Name
Bollinger Charles Hiedsieck Henri Giraud Hiedsieck and Co. Monopole Krug Lanson Laurent-Perrier Moet & Chandon Mumm Piper-Hiedsieck Taittinger Veuve Cliquot Ponsardin

Region
Ay Reims Ay Epernay Reims Reims Tours-sur-Marne Epernay Reims Reims Reims Reims

Founding year
1829 1851 1975 1785 1843 1760 1812 1743 1827 1785 1734 1772

Answer No: 5 (C)
Decantation may be defined as the separation of two immiscible liquids or solids in liquid. This is achieved by carefully pouring a solution from a container in order to leave the sediments in the bottom of the original container. Three main reasons to decant wine are: 1. To separate it from the sediments: Fine old red wines that have spent years maturing in the bottle throw a deposit or a crust which, if allowed to enter the glass would sully the appearance of the wine. This deposit forms as the wine ages and consists of tannins, bitartartrates of calcium, magnesium and coloring matter. It makes the wine cloudy and can cause it to taste of lees. 2. To allow the wine to ʻbreatheʼ and 3. Allow the wine to develop its bouquet.

XXX

:: Ashish Dighe ::

Page 12 of 12