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To TAX RATES, Pg.

4A
To CRANBERRY FEST, Pg. 8A
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
I Waterfowl hunters
will take to the lakes,
rivers and marshes
this weekend.
Pg. 13A
Duck season
to open Saturday
VOL. 126, NO. 27
$1.25
Section A
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011
VILAS COUNTY
NEWS-REVIEW
EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521 (715) 479-4421 www.vcnewsreview.com
YESTERYEAR A midwest steam boat group gathered for an
outing on the Eagle River Chain last week. --STAFF PHOTO
Following a drop in equal-
ized property values for the
second straight year, tax rates
on bills that were payable in
2011 increased significantly
in many municipalities here, a
new report shows.
Wisconsin Department of
Revenue (DOR) figures show
that in 19 towns and cities
here, property tax rates rose
an average of 6.3% on bills
mailed in December 2010.
The rate of increase ranged
from highs of 12.8% in Three
Lakes and 12.5% in Sugar
Camp to lows of minus 1% in
Phelps and 1.5% in St. Ger-
main.
The towns of Three Lakes
and Sugar Camp saw the
greatest percent of increase
due to the school district pass-
ing a referendum to exceed
the revenue limit in the fall of
2009. The levy and tax rate
increase didnt show up until
the 2010 tax bills that were
payable in 2011.
Last year, Three Lakes and
Sugar Camp were on the low
end, with tax rate increases of
1.8% and 1.5%, respectively.
Last year, near-double-digit
tax rate increases were seen
in towns such as Lincoln,
Washington, Conover, Plum
Lake, Cloverland, St. Germain
and Land O Lakes all part
of the Northland Pines School
District which passed a refer-
endum to exceed the revenue
limit in the previous year.
This year, Lincoln, Wash-
ington, Conover, Cloverland,
Plum Lake and Land O Lakes
all saw increases in the 4.0%
to 4.8% range. St. Germain
saw its equalized tax rate
increase slightly at 1.5%.
The equalized tax rate
increase wasnt surprising, as
the state released equalized
Property tax rates increase
in most municipalities here
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
Tax Rate Comparison
2010 taxes paid in 2011
These are effective (with levy credits) full value, equalized tax
rates. Rates are paid on every $1,000 of market value property.
Local assessed rates, which are not comparable, will differ from
equalized rates.
Tax on
2009 2010 % of $150,000 home
tax rate tax rate change
(Fair market value)
Manitowish Waters............7.14 7.75 + 8.5% $ 1,162
Boulder Junction ...............7.25 7.83 + 8.0% 1,174
Presque Isle ......................7.51 8.07 + 7.4% 1,210
Winchester ........................7.92 8.55 + 7.9% 1,282
Lincoln...............................8.51 8.90 + 4.5% 1,335
Washington .......................8.75 9.16 + 4.6% 1,374
Plum Lake .........................8.80 9.16 + 4.0% 1,374
Conover.............................8.78 9.21 + 4.8% 1,381
Cloverland.........................8.83 9.23 + 4.5% 1,384
St. Germain.......................9.11 9.25 + 1.5% 1,387
Land O Lakes...................9.44 9.88 + 4.6% 1,482
Sugar Camp......................8.92 10.07 + 12.8% 1,510
Three Lakes ......................9.12 10.26 + 12.5% 1,539
Lac du Flambeau ..............9.55 10.45 + 9.4% 1,567
Phelps .............................10.58 10.47 - 1.0% 1,570
Arbor Vitae ......................10.40 10.93 + 5.0% 1,639
Hiles ................................13.08 13.72 + 4.8% 2,058
Eagle River......................14.42 15.52 + 7.6% 2,328
Rhinelander .....................19.06 20.76 + 8.9% 3,114
SCENIC Surveys have
repeatedly shown that resi-
dents and vactioners alike
are drawn to Wisconsins
North Woods for scenic
beauty, which includes
wildlife.
Top: An osprey heads sky-
ward after grabbing a fish,
the water still flying.
Right: Contorted on a tree
trunk, an albino gray squir-
rel checks out the intruding
photographer.
Below: A red-tailed hawk
hunts from its perch.
--Staff Photos
By KURT KRUEGER
A draft ordinance on imple-
menting Wisconsins new con-
cealed carry legislation in the
city of Eagle River was dis-
cussed at the City Council
meeting last week.
Police Chief Mark Vander
Bloomen told the council that
anyone with a license to carry
a concealed weapon under the
new state legislation, which
takes effect in about six
weeks, will be able to carry a
firearm in a public place
unless there are restrictions
in place.
As a municipality, you can
have an ordinance prohibiting
concealed carry in public
buildings such as city hall,
courthouse, library and air-
port and any business open to
the public where it is prohibit-
ed by signs, he explained.
Meanwhile, Vander Bloom-
en told the council that con-
trary to a long-held belief, the
discharge of firearms within
city limits was actually legal
except for a short period in
November.
There is a common mis-
conception that presently the
ordinance prohibits the dis-
charge of a firearm within the
city limits . . . is simply not the
case, said Vander Bloomen.
The way the ordinance is
written, the only time you
cannot discharge a firearm in
the city is during deer season,
with three days tacked onto
City Council works
on draft ordinance
for concealed carry
___________
BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT
___________
While the 32nd annual
Cranberry Fest is still 10
days away, preparations are
being finalized and marsh
tours are filling quickly,
according to chamber offi-
cials.
Cranberry Fest is a fun-
filled family event for all ages
with lots of activities to
enjoy, said Kim Emerson,
events coordinator for the
Eagle River Area Chamber of
Commerce & Visitors Center.
This years Cranberry Fest
is set for Saturday and Sun-
day, Oct. 1-2, at the Vilas
County Fairgrounds in Eagle
River. The festival grounds
will be open from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Sunday.
The popular marsh and
winery tours will start Thurs-
day, Sept. 29, and will go
through Sunday, Oct. 2. Tours
are $7 for adults and $5 for
children 12 and younger.
Join us for a tour of a
cranberry marsh and the
Cranberry Fest nears;
tours to start Sept. 29
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
To CONCEALED, Pg. 3A
2A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
NEWS
WARM THE
CHILDREN
2010 Program
Raises $55,000
Clothed 550 children
2010 Program
Annual Salute
recognizes the sacrifices
of firefighters, EMS and
law enforcement
Annual Salute
Northwoods
Relay For Life
Major sponsor
News-Review Team
raised $2,300
Event raised over
$70,000 for American
Cancer Society
Northwoods
Relay For Life
TO EMERGENCY PERSONNEL 2010 TO EMERGENCY PERSONNEL 2010
A SPECIAL PUBLICATION
OF THE VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW ANDTHE THREE LAKES NEWS
Award-winning
community event
coverage
AMSOIL World
Championship
Snowmobile Derby
Klondike Days
Cranberry Fest
Award-winning
community event
coverage
Wed like to commend our staff and our readers
for helping make the Vilas County News-Review
Best in the Nation
COMMUNITY SERVICE
Best in the Nation
COMMUNITY SERVICE
GROWING UP This early September photo shows faded spots
on a whitetail fawn, but theyll disappear by the end of September
as a new coat grows to help with the cooler days of autumn. Friday
is the first day of fall. --Staff Photo By KURT KRUEGER
WEATHER
CORNER
Note: Precipitation amounts are recorded at 8 a.m. for the previous 24 hours.
ONE YEAR AGO
LAST YEAR
COMPARISON
FOREST
CONDITIONS
LAST SEVEN DAYS
STREAMS
AND LAKES
OUTLOOK
(PORTIONS OF THE WEATHER CORNER ARE THROUGH THE COURTESY OF
KEVIN BREWSTER, EAGLE RIVER and NEWSWATCH 12 METEOROLOGIST.)
Wednesday will be windy and cooler with showers, with a
high of 50 and a low of 45. Thursday there will be lake-effect
rain showers, with a high of 50 and a low of 38. Friday a few
showers are still possible, with a high of 57 and a low of 39.
The forecast for Saturday is partly cloudy and warmer, with a
high of 61 and a low of 36.
Lakes, streams, rivers and marshes will be busy this week-
end with the start of the waterfowl hunting season in north-
ern Wisconsin. Muskie anglers also hit the lakes in the fall in
search of trophy fish using suckers as bait.
Days precipitation recorded since July 1, 2011, 37 days;
2010, 41 days.
Average high of past 30 days, 2011, 72; 2010, 69. Average
low of past 30 days, 2011, 47; 2010, 48.
The average daily high at this time last year for the next sev-
en days was 64, while the average overnight low was 40.
There was rain on five days measuring 2.82 inches.
Hi Lo Prec.
Wed., Sept. 14........54 40 .03R
Thurs., Sept. 15......54 33 .02R
Fri., Sept. 16 ...........59 29 None
Sat., Sept. 17..........64 30 None
Sun., Sept. 18.........61 40 None
Mon., Sept. 19 ........65 50 .46R
Tues., Sept. 20........66 38 None
Hi Lo Prec.
Tues., Sept. 14........62 38 None
Wed., Sept. 15........52 35 None
Thurs., Sept. 16......57 40 2.82R
Fri., Sept. 17 ...........56 44 Tr.R
Sat., Sept. 18..........59 42 .06R
Sun., Sept. 19.........58 33 None
Mon., Sept. 20 ........69 38 None
The fall color change is just starting across the North Woods,
with some trees turning shades of red, orange and yellow. The
best color of the autumn season will likely appear the last
week of September and first week of October.
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 3A
NEWS
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SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAILS
A 40-page analysis of a Safe
Route to Schools plan for the
Northland Pines campus on
Pleasure Island Road has defi-
ciencies, city administrator
Joe Laux told the Eagle River
City Council last week.
The analysis was designed
to look at safety issues con-
cerning people traveling to
and from the Northland Pines
schools on the citys north
side.
School and city officials
want to improve the safety for
people traveling in vehicles, on
bikes or walking to and from
the schools.
The consulting engineer
seems to be suggesting signifi-
cant capital expense be borne
by the city taxpayers, includ-
ing repairing the state high-
way bridge over the Eagle Riv-
er, said Laux. I am not in
agreement with this analysis
and will be attending a future
meeting to express the capital
and operational costs for this
project.
Laux said his main issue is
who is responsible for the pro-
ject and the lack of the Wis-
consin Department of Trans-
portation (DOT) in the analy-
sis.
The DOT built the bridge
and Highway 45, noted Laux.
Another safety concern is
Pleasure Island Road, accord-
ing to Chief Vander Bloomen,
even though it is a one-way
road north to the elementary
school, middle school and high
school.
We constantly have prob-
lems with people going the
wrong way, especially with the
sales lot on the corner of
Highway 45 and Pleasure
Island, he observed. Painting
a white line and saying its a
bike lane is not safe at all.
Laux indicated the road
needs a major upgrade and
probably should have been
completed when the new high
school was completed several
years ago.
If a site plan would have
come to us, (but) the district
never approached us. We were
not part of the building refer-
endum, Laux lamented.
Its a could have, should
have, would have and they
didnt, Vander Bloomen
added.
There should be a jurisdic-
tional transfer (of Pleasure
Island Road) to the school dis-
trict, Laux suggested. Then
they can do whatever they
want to.
Vander Bloomen, who is
also on the Northland Pines
school board, suggested I will
talk to Joe on how much the
city would pay the district to
take it over.
Golf course report
Alderwoman Carol Hen-
dricks, who chairs the city Golf
Course Advisory Committee,
provided a verbal report to the
council on the lack of recom-
mendations from the subtask
force she asked to be formed.
Im in a quandary, Hen-
dricks started out saying. I
requested the task force to
study various setups for
administration and that was
not done.
Last May, when Hendricks
asked to form the task force,
she indicated it was to
increase revenues to con-
tribute more for budget relief
for taxpayers. In July, Hen-
dricks stated it (the task
force) was not going in the
direction I wanted it to.
Meanwhile, Councilman
Jerry Burkett chaired the task
force for two meetings, then
resigned.
Hendricks suggested a
meeting of the city council
devoted to the golf course,
with part of it in closed ses-
sion, because the council has
no understanding of the
underlying problems. She did
not reveal what the underly-
ing problems were.
Set it up, said Burkett. I
resigned as chairman. I was
not comfortable in my posi-
tion. If it (the task force) was
appointed by the city council
and the mayor appointed me
as chairman, I would make a
report. There were comments
about the task force that
needs to be taken up by the
council and committee. I
talked around, and our course
is outperforming all of them. If
were going to make recom-
mendations that affect peo-
ples lives, we need an expert.
Other business
In other business, the
council:
accepted the recommen-
dations of the Plan Commis-
sion to eliminate the number
of dogs and cats a residence
may have in the city limits;
approved the purchase of
a Toro fairway mower for
$33,905 for the golf course;
changed an ordinance to
allow electronic message signs
to include freestanding signs.
Safe route plan
has deficiencies,
advises Laux
___________
BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT
___________
FROM PAGE 1A
either side of it.
He said the old ordinance
was designed to keep people
from hunting deer in the city
during the gun deer season in
November.
Obviously, this was not
what was intended, but rather
it is to be all year long, he
went on to say.
Vander Bloomen and city
attorney Steve Garbowicz gave
this scenario in a memo:
Presently, you could bow hunt
or gun hunt from a tree stand
in your backyard at the inter-
section of Third and Spruce
streets if you want to anytime
of the year, except during the
state firearm deer season.
New ordinance
With the old ordinance out-
dated and the new concealed
carry legislation to take effect
just around the corner, the City
Council looked at a first draft
of a firearm ordinance for the
city last week.
It would prohibit the dis-
charge of firearms includ-
ing black-powder rifles, pistols
and shotguns within the
city limits at any time during
the year.
The ordinance also would
require the transport of any
firearm within the corporate
limits in a vehicle to be unload-
ed and completely enclosed
within a carrying case, unless
the person lawfully possesses a
license to carry a concealed
weapon as defined and autho-
rized under Wisconsin law.
The draft ordinance also
states that concealed carry and
openly displayed weapons
would not be allowed inside a
public building or place of busi-
ness where a prominently dis-
played sign lawfully prohibits
the carrying of an openly dis-
played or concealed weapon in
accordance with state and fed-
eral law.
The ordinance would allow
exceptions for law enforcement
officers and removal of wildlife
hazards at the airport as
authorized and permitted by
government authorities.
An exception also would be
made for throwing or shooting
any object, arrow, stone, snow-
ball or other missile or projec-
tile for the purpose of whitetail
deer abatement by the city and
for legitimate organized sport-
ing events.
About the law
Wisconsin became the 49th
state to legalize the carrying of
concealed weapons when Gov.
Scott Walker signed a bill in
July removing the states ban.
The law goes into effect Nov 1.
Gun supporters said legaliz-
ing concealed carry in Wiscon-
sin has been long overdue,
while opponents argued that it
won't curb crime and will put
more guns on the street.
Under Wisconsins law, peo-
ple who obtain a permit and go
through training will be
allowed to carry concealed
weapons in most public build-
ings, unless a sign is posted
saying they are not permitted.
With the legalization in
Wisconsin, Illinois is now the
only state that doesnt allow
concealed carry.
VILAS COUNTY
NEWS-REVIEW
Published weekly by
Eagle River Publications, Inc.
Eagle River, WI 54521
www.vilascountynewsreview.com
Consolidation of the Vilas County News,
the Eagle River Review and
The Three Lakes News
Publication #659480
Member of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association
and the National Newspaper Association
Entered as periodical mail matter at
the post office, Eagle River, WI 54521,
under act of March 3, 1879. Subscription
price in Wisconsin, Vilas and Oneida coun-
ties only, is $50.00 per year, all of Wiscon-
sin except for Vilas and Oneida counties,
$57.00 per year. Out of Wisconsin, $68.00
per year. Subscription payable in advance.
Published every Wednesday.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes,
form 3579, to Vilas County News-Review,
Inc., P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521,
phone 715-479-4421, fax 715-479-6242.
Concealed: new law to take effect Nov. 1
DERBY REUNION The grass drag
races were the highlight of this years
11th annual World Championship Vin-
tage Snowmobile Show and Reunion
Friday and Saturday at the Eagle Riv-
er Derby Track. Participants took vin-
tage sleds, such as the Scorpions
seen at left, and lined up for one drag
race after another on the grass-cov-
ered racing oval (above). One racer
almost toppled over on his Polaris
(below) after punching the throttle a lit-
tle too hard on the green light.
--Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW
4A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
NEWS OBITUARIES
Gaffney-Busha Funeral Home
Alpha Crematory & Chapel
Tom & Joe Busha, Barry Wallis, Funeral Directors 715-479-4777
www.gaffney-busha.com
Locally owned and operated since 1908
VILAS COUNTYS ONLY CREMATORY
Traditional Services Prearrangements Cremation Monuments
TRAIL FUNDRAISER The Sportsmens Chalet held its 15th
annual pig roast Aug. 27, raising $3,440 each for two area
snowmobile clubs. Taking part in the check presentation were,
from left, Rich Polaski, president of the St. Germain Bo-Boen
Club; Chalet owners Gary and Laurel Frank; and Jim Haigh,
president of the Lake Tomahawk Sno-Fleas Club.
--Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
Tax rates: FROM PAGE 1A
values in August that dropped
for the second straight year
in sharp contrast to years of
double-digit increases caused
by both inflation and a con-
struction boom.
Officials said there is des-
tined to be another tax rate
increase next year after the
recently announced decline in
equalized property values for
the third year in a row.
The annual mid-August
report from the DOR showed
equalized property values
dropped 2.8% in Vilas and 5%
in Oneida the figures that
will be used for the December
2011 tax bills payable in 2012.
Some municipalities took
bigger property-value hits
than others. In the Northland
Pines School District, valua-
tion dropped 9.2% in Wash-
ington, 8.8% in Eagle River
and 7.4% in Cloverland
which is likely to equate to a
larger increase in the tax rate
next year. In Three Lakes,
property values dropped less
at 2.1%, while Sugar Camp
increased 3.5%.
DOR officials said anytime
government spending rises at
a faster rate than property
values (the tax base), the
equalized tax rates will
increase.
Stephanie Marquis, com-
munications director for the
DOR, said the tax rate is sim-
ply the total levies set by var-
ious taxing districts divided
by the equalized valuation.
State officials also said
that, generally, it is the rela-
tionship between levy increas-
es and the amount of new con-
struction that dictates
whether property tax bills
rise or fall.
The amount of new con-
struction in 2009 (part of the
2010 tax base) plummeted
from previous years, totaling
$32 million in Vilas and $33
million in Oneida. In Vilas,
the number was $51.5 million
in 2008 and Oneida showed
$59 million in new construc-
tion in 2008.
Local tax bills
Officials say equalized val-
ues and equalized tax rates
are only useful for comparing
general tax base health and
spending habits between
municipalities.
The equalized values are
used by the taxing jurisdic-
tions (school districts, coun-
ties, towns, cities and techni-
cal colleges) to apportion their
tax levies among municipali-
ties.
The tax rate is the rate
necessary to raise sufficient
money from the property tax
to meet the levy, said the
DOR Guide for Property Own-
ers. The tax rate is deter-
mined by dividing the total
assessment of a district into
the levy. It is often expressed
in terms of dollars per thou-
sand.
When equalized values
change in a municipality at a
higher or lower rate than the
average, it can change the
percentage of county or school
district taxes that are appor-
tioned to the municipality.
Whether its an increase or
decrease, the distribution of
that change is determined by
the local assessment rolls,
according to the DOR guide.
Todays tax rate increases
are historically low, however,
due to state revenue limits on
school districts and munici-
palities. Schools are limited to
a 3.8% levy increase unless
the limit is exceeded by voter
approval at referendum. In
2011, municipal and county
levy increases were limited to
the lesser of 3% above the pri-
or years levy or the percent-
age of growth in new con-
struction. Technical college
tax levies are subject to a rate
limit of $1.50 per $1,000 of
equalized (estimated fair mar-
ket value).
State officials point out
that the DOR certifies equal-
ized values for each munici-
pality every year by class of
property, but they dont set
values on individual proper-
ties.
While the DOR dictates
what the total value of resi-
dential properties is in a
town, your local municipal
assessor determines the prop-
erty value and then reports
the values to our agency, said
Marquis.
The most confusing part for
property owners is between
equalized values and assessed
values. Officials say compar-
isons between municipalities
can only be made using equal-
ized values and equalized tax
rates, which are based on fair
market values.
ANTIQUES WANTED
PAYING CASH
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
Crocks, jugs, earthenware bowls & pitchers;
art pottery, Roseville, Hull, etc.; cookie jars;
hand-decorated china; glassware before
WWII; patchwork quilts & fancywork; Orien-
tal rugs; picture frames; clocks, watches &
fobs; jewelry; oil lamps; elec. lamps w/glass
shades; old advertising items, signs,
posters, containers, boxes, mixing bowls,
etc., especially from Eagle River; coin-oper-
ated machines, slots, peanut, etc.; shot-
guns, rifles & handguns; hunting knives;
wooden duck & fish decoys; old tackle box-
es & lures; rods, reels & creels; glass min-
now traps; old tools; toys of all kinds, trains,
trucks, tractors, tin wind-ups, games, dolls,
etc.; enamelware, especially bright colors;
old photos of interiors & outdoor activities;
all magazines before WWII; postcards (pre-
1920); coin & stamp collections; old wood
carvings of animals, etc. Check with me
before you sell.
Call Jim at (715) 479-1459
4946
Donald T. Don Bain of
Kenosha, a Three Lakes sum-
mer resident, died Friday, Aug.
26, 2011, at his home. He was
86.
Mr. Bain was born Dec. 11,
1924, to Clarence and Esther
(nee Larsen) Bain. He married
Margaret Mary Peggy
Karnes Aug. 21, 1948.
He was a World War II vet-
eran, having served in the U.S.
Army for three years of active
service from 1943 to 1946, fol-
lowed by three years of reserve
service.
He was an active member of
the Kenosha Jaycees and the
Kenosha Noon Lions Club,
serving in multiple official
positions for the club. He
received the Melvin Jones Fel-
lowship in 1994 and the Birch-
Sturm Fellowship in 2007.
Mr. Bain joined his father in
the Donald T. Bain Plastering
Co. in 1946. He opened his own
real estate office in 1969.
He was a longtime member
of St. Thomas Aquinas Parish,
where he served as president of
the Home and School Associa-
tion and the Church Council.
In recent years, he was a mem-
ber of St. Mary Catholic
Church.
In addition to his wife, sur-
vivors include eight children,
Donnalee (Don) Mohr, Jeanine
(Steven) Wolf, D. Thomas
(Cathy Klaus), Michael (Lisa),
Patricia (Jay) Johnson, Ralph
(Libby Lacey), Maggi and Kelly
(Maureen Cramer); 12 grand-
children; and six great-grand-
children.
He was preceded in death by
his parents; an infant brother,
Roger; his parents-in-law,
Ralph and Margaret Karnes; a
grandson, Riley Moyer Bain;
and his brother-in-law, Ralph
Karnes.
A Mass of Christian Burial
was held Aug. 31 at St. Mary
Catholic Church. Entombment
followed at All Saints Ceme-
tery with military honors.
Donald T. Don Bain
Alan F. Blask, age 75, of
Ministry Eagle River, Wis.,
died on Tuesday, Sept. 13,
2011, at Eagle River Memorial
Hospital.
He was born on Feb. 2, 1936.
Alan was a graduate of the
University of Houston. He was
employed in space aeronautics
as an engineer for NASA in
Houston, Texas.
Mr. Blask is survived by a
special friend, Kathy Thomp-
son of Cinnaminson, N.J.;
friend, Annie Jordan of New
Jersey; and friends, Cyndy,
Thomas and Don Bernard,
both of Eagle River.
No services will be held at
this time.
Gaffney-Busha Funeral
Home is in charge of the
arrangements.
PAID OBITUARY
Alan F. Blask
6364
Marvin J. Erickson of Sug-
ar Camp died Monday, Sept.
19, 2011, at Aspirus Wausau
Hospital. He was 76.
He was born July 15, 1935,
in a farmhouse in Parish
township, the son of Frank
and Blanche (nee Gunther)
Erickson.
Mr. Erickson was raised
and attended schools in Union
Grove. He was married to Avis
Gregersen in Burlington.
He was a farmer who
owned and worked on his own
farm in Kenosha county. He
moved to Elton in 1983 and
then to Eagle River in 1989.
His survivors include one
daughter, Dawn (Kevin) Bow-
man of Sugar Camp; one son,
Daniel (Karen) Erickson of
Eagle River; one sister, Enola
(Darrel) Hay of Union Grove;
five grandchildren; and eight
great-grandchildren.
A memorial gathering will
be held Saturday, Sept. 24, at
3 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran
Church in Eagle River.
Marvin J. Erickson
Thomas J. Haen, age 69, of
Land O Lakes, Wis., and
Ponte Vedra, Fla., died Tues-
day, Sept. 13, 2011, at his resi-
dence in Land O Lakes.
He was born March 7, 1942,
in Manitowoc, to the late
Alfred and Marion (nee Wis-
kerchen) Haen and married
Diane C. Opgenorth on June
12, 1965, at St. Frances Cabri-
ni Catholic Church in West
Bend.
He attended Holy Angels
Catholic School before gradu-
ating from West Bend High
School with the class of 1960.
He then attended and gradu-
ated from UW-Whitewater.
Toms love of aviation was
realized at a young age while
working with his father at the
West Bend Airport. On his
16th birthday he took his first
solo flight. Upon his gradua-
tion from UW-Whitewater, he
was hired by Northwest Air-
lines as a pilot. He worked for
Northwest for 36 years, retir-
ing in 2002.
Tom and Diane enjoyed
spending their winters in
Florida and their summers in
Land O Lakes, where he
maintained a hangar and
could enjoy his aircraft.
Tom is survived by his wife
of 46 years, Diane; three chil-
dren, Patricia (Eric) Nelson of
Long Grove, Ill., Catherine
(Perry) Gould of Fox Point,
Wis., and Robert (Anna) Haen
of Jacksonville, Fla.; and eight
grandchildren: Jack and Lau-
ren Nelson, Alex and Ryan
Gould and Will, Cat, Thomas
and Claire Haen.
He is further survived by
five siblings, Marlene (John)
Kreilkamp of West Bend,
Dana (Jerry) George of
Phoenix, Ariz., Chris (Scott)
Scheuer of Raleigh, N.C., John
(Jackie) Haen of Winnipeg,
Manitoba, Canada, and Annie
(Steve) Straus of Cincinnati,
Ohio; his sister-in-law, Sue
Opgenorth of Land O Lakes;
his brother-in-law, Al Krahn of
Richland Center, Wis.; and
nieces, nephews, and other
relatives and friends.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Alfred and
Marion Haen; a brother-in-
law, Tom Opgenorth; and a sis-
ter-in-law, Janet Krahn.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be held on Thursday, Sept.
22, 2011, at 11 a.m. at St.
Frances Cabrini Catholic
Church in West Bend, with
the Rev. Nathan Reesman pre-
siding. Burial will follow in
Washington County Memorial
Park. Visitation will be Thurs-
day, at the church only from
10 until 10:45 a.m.
Memorials to Dr. Kate
Home Hospice, P.O. Box 770,
Woodruff, WI 54568, are ap-
preciated.
Schmidt Funeral Home in
West Bend is serving the fami-
ly. Online guestbook and condo-
lences are available at
www.schmidtfuneralhome.com.
PAID OBITUARY
Thomas J. Haen
6365
Ruth A. Kazlauskas (nee
Simutis), age 84, beloved wife of
the late Edward; loving mother
of Anne Casperson, Paul (Tina)
and John Kazlauskas, the late
Therese and baby Mary; proud
grandmother of Julie Richard-
son, Mary Casperson, Michael
Kazlauskas, Christine Lauda-
dio and Katherine Kazlauskas;
great-grandmother of Emma
Richardson, and Logan and Eli
Laudadio; dear daughter of the
late Leonard and Angela
Simutis; dear sister of the late
Leonard, John and Raymond
Simutis; fond sister-in-law of
Marcella and Lynda Simutis
and the late Zita Simutis; lov-
ing aunt of three nieces and
seven nephews.
Fourth degree member of
the Knights of Lithuania,
Chicago Council 36; member
of Sisters of St. Casimir Auxil-
iary, Chicago; Muskellunge
Lake Association, Eagle River,
Wis.; Melody Maids volunteer
at Northwoods Area Health-
care Centers; member of
SERVE, Kalmar Senior Cen-
ter, Eagle River.
Visitation was Friday, Sept.
16, 2011, at Gaffney-Busha
Funeral Home in Eagle River.
Further services will be held
in Naperville, Ill.
PAID OBITUARY
Ruth A. Kazlauskas
Thomas E. Koerner of
Phelps, formerly of Milwau-
kee, died Monday, Sept. 12,
2011, at his home. He was 69.
Mr. Koerner was born April
1, 1942, in Milwaukee, the son
of John and Dorothy Koerner.
He retired from the Mil-
waukee Police Department
with the rank of sergeant and
was a member of the Phelps
Lions Club.
Mr. Koerner served in the
U.S. Air Force during the Viet-
nam War.
Survivors include his wife
of 44 years, Mary; two daugh-
ters, Debbie Campobello of
Carpentersville, Ill., and Julia
(A.J.) LeRay of Greenfield; one
son, Michael (Susan) Koerner
of Brookfield; and four grand-
children.
A memorial service was
held Sept. 16 at St. Marys
Catholic Church in Phelps. A
memorial will be established
in his name.
Thomas E. Koerner
Louis Lou
Majewski of
Three Lakes
died Friday,
Sept. 2, 2011.
He was 56.
Mr. Majew-
ski was born
May 9, 1955,
and served in
the U.S. Navy
during the Vietnam War.
He was preceded in death by
his father, Lawerance; and two
brothers, Phillip and Steven.
His survivors include his
wife of 35 years, Lynn; two
daughters, Lynette of Eagle
River and Alisa (Jade) Ropans-
ki of Three Lakes; one son,
William of Green Bay; his
mother, Gloria Walton of Three
Lakes; two sisters; two broth-
ers; and four grandchildren.
A memorial service will be
held Monday, Sept. 26, at 4:30
p.m. at Faith Lutheran
Church, located on Highway
45 in Three Lakes. The Rev.
Barb Girod will officiate.
Louis Lou Majewski
MAJEWSKI
Donald J. Don Schneider
of Lake Forest, Ill., and Three
Lakes died Tuesday, Sept. 6,
2011. He was 77.
Mr. Schneider graduated
from St. George High School
in Evanston, Ill., and Lake
Forest College. After college
he joined the U.S. Navy and
served on the naval ship,
Grand Canyon, stationed out
of Fall River, Mass.
In partnership with his
brother, he ran a full-service
auto repair and gas station in
Wilmette, Ill., for more than
40 years.
He was a member of St.
Patrick Church in Lake Forest
and attended services at St.
Theresa Catholic Church in
Three Lakes when he and his
wife summered at their lake
home on Big Lake.
Mr. Schneider was a mem-
ber of the Three Lakes Lions
Club and the Mens Senior
Golf League. He enjoyed
woodworking and stained-
glass artistry.
His survivors include his
wife, Marilyn Mickey; two
sons, Michael (Karen) Schaul
and Thomas Schaul; two
daughters, Donna (Joseph)
Gattuso and Linda Schmitz;
and 10 grandchildren.
A memorial service will be
held Tuesday, Sept. 27, at 11
a.m. at St. Theresa Catholic
Church in Three Lakes with
the Rev. William Horath offici-
ating. Visitation will be for
one hour prior to the service.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als may be made to the Three
Lakes Lions Foundation or
the National Kidney Founda-
tion, 215 W. Illinois St., Suite
1c, Chicago, IL 60654.
Donald J. Don Schneider
Lydia Vaclavik of Arbor
Vitae died Sunday, Sept. 11,
2011, at Seasons of Life Hos-
pice Home in Woodruff. She
was 90.
She was born Aug. 7, 1921,
in Prague, Czechoslovakia,
the daughter of Ludwig and
Claudia (nee Volochovskaja)
Herbst.
After defecting in 1948, she
and her husband, Stanley,
move to New York, N.Y., then
to Berwyn, Ill., and then
retired to Arbor Vitae in 1986.
Mrs. Vaclavik was
employed as an accountant
during her lifetime and was
fluent in six different lan-
guages. She was a member of
Holy Family Catholic Church
in Woodruff.
She was preceded in death
by her husband in 2008.
A funeral service was held
Sept. 19 at Holy Family
Church in Woodruff with the
Rev. James Hoffman presid-
ing. Burial was in St. Patrick
Cemetery.
Lydia Vaclavik
Richard Dick Wilson of
Sugar Camp died Monday,
Sept. 19, 2011, at Ministry
Saint Marys Hospital in
Rhinelander. He was 78.
Survivors include his wife,
Shirley.
A funeral service is pend-
ing with Gaffney-Busha
Funeral Home in Eagle River.
A complete obituary will
appear in next weeks news-
paper.
Richard Dick Wilson
The Wisconsin veterans
and surviving spouses proper-
ty tax credit program pro-
vides a refundable property
tax credit for the primary in-
state residence via the state
income tax form as certified
by the Wisconsin Department
of Veterans Affairs (VA),
according to Oneida County
veterans service office.
Eligible veterans for the
tax credit include those who
served on active duty under
honorable conditions in the
U.S. Armed Forces; were a res-
ident of Wisconsin at the time
of entry into active service or
had been a resident of Wis-
consin for any consecutive
five-year period after entry
into that service; are current-
ly a resident of Wisconsin for
purposes of receiving veter-
ans benefits; and have either
a VA service-connected dis-
ability rating of 100% or a VA
service-connected disability
rating paid at 100% due to
individual unemployability
(IU).
Eligible veterans and sur-
viving spouses are still
required to pay the property
taxes on their primary resi-
dence, according to Walters.
The credit is claimed on the
Wisconsin income tax form
the year after property taxes
are paid. Filing a state
income tax return is required
to receive this credit.
For more information, con-
tact the Oneida County Veter-
ans Service Office at (715)
369-6127.
Property tax credit available
for some veterans, widows
6363
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 5A
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Sun., Sept. 25 (10:30 a.m.)
2959 Cty. G, Pelican Lake, WI (Oneida Co.)
Vilas County Sheriff
A total of 312 complaints
were entered by Vilas County
Sheriff s Department dis-
patchers last week.
In addition to those with
sufficient detail to report be-
low, a review shows at least six
vehicle accidents, eight vehi-
cle/deer accidents, one aban-
doned vehicle, three requests
for agency assistance, two ani-
mal problems, three attempts
to locate, two burglaries, 15
burglar alarms, 11 requests
for citizen assistance, five
reports of criminal damage to
property, one fire, one report of
found property, one report of
fraud, two reports of harass-
ment, five reports of haz-
ardous conditions, one hit-
and-run, two juvenile prob-
lems/runaways, one report of
lost property, three reports of
suspicious circumstances, 10
thefts, one report of threats,
seven traffic violations, one
trespassing complaint, two
vacation checks, two weapons
offenses, three welfare checks
and five 911 hang ups.
At least 27 calls were re-
ferred to the Eagle River
Police Department, and there
were at least 20 informational
or procedural entries.
In the past week, at least 14
people were booked at the Vilas
County Jail, including one for
operating after revocation, sev-
en for operating while intoxi-
cated, one for resisting arrest,
one for bail jumping, one for
theft, one on an outstanding
warrant, one for battery and
one for probation violation.
During the week, the in-
mate population ranged from
83 to 97. As of Sept. 19, there
were 87 inmates.
Tuesday, Sept. 13
- 11:15 a.m. - A one-vehicle
accident was reported on Lit-
tle Mamie Lane in St. Ger-
main, involving Jodi A.
Bohnen of St. Germain.
- 8:20 p.m. - A vehicle/deer
accident was reported on
Highway 47 near Country
Lane in Arbor Vitae, involving
Robert D. Rasmussen of
Menomonee.
Eagle River Police
Among the calls received
by Vilas County dispatchers
were at least 27 calls for the
Eagle River Police. These in-
cluded three vehicle/deer acci-
dents, one hit-and-run, three
vehicle accidents, one burglar
alarm, three animal problems,
one report of criminal damage
to property, one disturbance,
one fire, one report of fraud,
one report of harassment, one
juvenile problem, one theft,
two reports of hazardous con-
ditions, one traffic violation
and one welfare check. Two
people were taken into cus-
tody and booked into the Vilas
County Jail.
Three Lakes Police
This police department re-
ported one 911 hang up, one
vehicle accident, two burglar
alarms, one disturbance, one
report of fraud, two reports of
harassment, two reports of
roadway hazards, one request
for police services, two reports
of suspicious circumstances,
and five traffic stops.
VAN HITS TREE In a one-vehicle collision last Thursday after-
noon, the driver of a van struck a tree on Silver Lake Road, just
east of Silver Lake Beach, which in turn took down a power line.
Members of the Eagle River Area Fire Department wedged blocks
under the vehicle to keep it stable on the unlevel ground.
--Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW
Five Lac du Flambeau men
charged with multiple counts
of uttering a forgery and mis-
demeanor theft made their
initial appearances in Vilas
County Circuit Court last
week.
According to the criminal
complaint, the men collected a
variety of metals in Lac du
Flambeau and then sold the
steel, copper, brass and alu-
minum to Scharf Automotive
in the town of Lincoln.
The men allegedly changed
the weight of the product on
the scale slips provided by the
scale attendant and then
received an inflated payout at
the Scharf Automotive office
with a total theft in excess
of $10,000 for the defendants
dating back to May of 2011.
In the case, Michael Schu-
man, 22, was charged with 15
felony counts of forgery and
15 counts of misdemeanor
theft between March 31 and
July 8.
Raymond L. LaBarge Sr.,
41, was charged with 11
felony counts of uttering a
forgery and 11 counts of mis-
demeanor theft. His prelimi-
nary hearing was set for Oct.
6 at 11:30 a.m. and his $1,000
signature bond was contin-
ued.
Joseph Mitchell, 19, was
charged with five counts of
uttering a forgery and five
counts of misdemeanor theft
between June 27 and July 13.
His preliminary hearing was
set for Sept. 28 at 2:30 p.m.
and his $2,000 signature bond
was continued.
Scott A. Smith Jr., 18, was
charged with four counts of
felony burglary and four
counts of misdemeanor theft
from July 11 to July 20. His
preliminary hearing is set for
Oct. 6 at 11 a.m.
Nicholas L. Zortman, 18,
was charge with two counts of
uttering a forgery and two
counts of misdemeanor theft
from incidents on July 18 and
19. His preliminary hearing is
set for Nov. 9 at 10 a.m. and
his $1,000 signature bond was
continued.
In other felony cases, Todd
A. Koster, 49, of Pleasant
Prairie, charged with fifth
offense operating a vehicle
while intoxicated and operat-
ing while intoxicated causing
injury Nov. 11, 2010, had a
status conference adjourned
until Oct. 17 at 10 a.m., when
the results of a blood test will
be available.
According to the criminal
complaint, Koster allegedly
had passed out behind the
steering wheel of his vehicle
in a lane of traffic on Highway
45 five miles north of Eagle
River. Eagle River Police Offi-
cer Christine Dobbs, who was
off duty and on her way home
from a shift, stopped to assist
at the scene about 11:34 p.m.
Koster apparently woke up
and backed his vehicle into
her vehicle. Dobbs sustained
injury to her hand in the inci-
dent.
Koster also is charged with
operating a vehicle with a pro-
hibited alcohol concentration
and operating with a prohibit-
ed alcohol concentration caus-
ing injury. His preliminary
blood alcohol concentration
was .188%. He also was cited
for unsafe backing and
improper parking on a road-
way.
Lindsey J. Doede, 24, of
Eagle River, charged with two
counts of burglary of a build-
ing, had a preliminary hear-
ing set for Oct. 6 at 2 p.m.
Doede allegedly broke into
two residences on Adams
Road in Eagle River in Octo-
ber 2010.
Patricia A. Harper, 41, of
Rhinelander, charged with
two counts of uttering a
forgery, had an initial appear-
ance adjourned to Oct. 10 at
10 a.m. Harper allegedly
forged checks at Nicolet Cred-
it Union in Eagle River March
23 and 26 for $2,910 and
$9,980. She is free on a $1,000
signature bond.
Andrew C. Oettinger, 20, of
Eagle River, charged with four
counts of burglary of a build-
ing or dwelling, party to a
crime, had a preliminary
hearing set for Nov. 10 at 2
p.m. Oettinger allegedly broke
into residences in the town of
Washington and Lincoln in
December of 2010.
Benjamin J. Rizzo, 24, of St.
Germain, and Mark Zdanow-
ski, 37, of Sayner, both
charged with theft of move-
able property, party to a
crime, had a initial appear-
ance adjourned to Oct. 10 at
10 a.m. Rizzo and Zdanowski
allegedly took two snowmo-
biles without the owners con-
sent from the Sayner Pub
parking lot in the town of
Plum Lake Feb. 13. The sleds
were later located on the trail
behind Vinchis Hillside Inn.
The two men also are
charged with misdemeanor
theft, party to a crime, and
two counts of operating a
motor vehicle without the
owners consent. Both are free
on $2,500 signature bonds.
Dean A. Perry, 30, of Eagle
River, charged with two
counts of uttering a forgery,
had a preliminary hearing set
for Oct. 13 at 11:30 a.m. Perry
allegedly took two checks
written for $460 and $367
from his former employer and
attempted to cash them at the
Energy Mart in Conover on
June 29 and 30. A $2,000 sig-
nature bond was continued.
Vilas County Court report
Five men charged for forging
inflated weight on scale slips
Two people were seriously
injured when a motorcycle
they were riding apparently
hit a deer on Highway 45 on
Eagle Rivers north side last
Friday night, according to
authorities.
Charles Van Skyhawk, 56,
of Eagle River, and Julie
Kieliszewski, 48, of Stevens
Point, were injured in the
crash and transported by
ambulance to Ministry Eagle
River Memorial Hospital.
Both were later transferred
via helicopter to another hos-
pital due to their injuries,
according to a spokesperson
at the Vilas County Sheriff s
Department.
Authorities said Van Sky-
hawk was driving the motor-
cycle northbound on Highway
45 about 8:13 p.m. when the
cycle hit a deer crossing the
road just south of the High-
way G intersection. Kielis-
zewski was a passenger on
the motorcycle. Both were
ejected from the motorcycle,
according to the sheriff s
department.
Two injured when cycle
hits deer on Highway 45
The real estate transactions
listed below are being published
at the request of many of our
readers. The information is public
record and reflects an index of
each weeks transactions.
Property transactions exceed-
ing $10,000 recorded at the Vilas
County Courthouse the past
week and the transfer fee (at $3
per $1,000):
Sept. 12, 2011
William Kuran to Mary Palo et
al and Carol Tomlanovich et al,
prt SWSE in 27-40-10, $59.70
Steven T. Fleming and wife to
Susan M. Coatney 2010 Trust, prt
NE NE in 21-43-8, gov lot 2, $780
Donald M. Rose and wife to
James M. Rose and wife, prt SW
NE in 17-41-11, gov lot 4, $435
Craig Schmidt et al, Ryan
Mootz et al, Kelly Wallace et al,
Diann Lange et al and Teresa
Vullings et al to Ryan Mootz et al,
Kelly Wallace et al and Jay
Schmidt et al, prt SWNW in 13-
43-7; prt NWSWin 13-43-7, gov
lot 6, $181.20
BMO Harris Bank to Jeremiah
Harris, prt SE NE in 22-42-10,
$31.50
William J. Hintz, Pers. Rep.,
and Estate of Robert W. Duensing
to Robert P. Marsh and wife, prt
NE NE in 9-41-8, gov lot 1; prt
NWNE in 9-41-8, gov lot 2, $654
Glenn S. Bulat to James B.
Dummer Trust, prt SE SWin 23-
42-5, gov lot 7, $159
Sept. 14, 2011
US Bank Trustee to Kenneth
T. Wickman Revocable Trust, lot
29 of plat 370 in West Shore
Acres, $180
Gerald E. Schroeder to Joseph
Huelskamp, lot 1, blk 3 of plat 260
in Racine Community Beach,
$42.90
Sept. 15, 2011
Roger E. Hedberg Jr. and wife
to Nicholas P. Guehlstorf and wife
et al and Erik J. Phelps and wife
et al, prt NE SWin 13-40-4, $300
Joel J. Deckert and Carol A.
Somers, POA, to Nathaniel R.
Petreman, prt SE NE in 30-43-6,
gov lot 4, $410.40
Gieringer Revocable Living
Trust to Thomas W. Jens and wife,
prt NE SE in 25-41-5, gov lot 5,
$2,055
Sept. 16, 2011
Rebecca M. Felsheim, Trustee,
and Lund Trust 11/16/94 to Mark
D. Bennett and wife, lots 20, 21,
190 and 191 of plat 161 in
Kehteamaug Lodge, $1,200
Scott Everett Buss and wife to
Steven M. Beckett and wife, prt
SE NWin 21-41-10, $555
Buddy J. Slizewski to James C.
Skonberg, prt SWSE, prt SE SW
in 32-40-11, $210
BMO Harris Bank to Duck
Lake 121 LLC, lot 121 of plat 851
in Wild Eagle Lodge Condomini-
um, $405
Ronald K. Puetz to Rybarczyk
Trust 6/11/10, prt SWSE in 35-
40-8, gov lot 5, $495
REAL ESTATE
TRANSACTIONS
6A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
Notice of Annual Meeting and Budget Hearing
(Section 120.08(1) )
(Section 65.90(4) )
Notice is hereby given to the qualified electors of the Northland Pines School District that the annu-
al meeting for the transaction of business and budget hearing of the said district will be held at the
high school Large Group Instruction Room on the 26th day of September 2011, at 6:00 p.m. The
summary of the budget is printed below. Detailed copies of the budget are available for inspection
in the Districts office at 1800 Pleasure Island Rd., Eagle River, Wis.
Dated this 8th day of September 2011.
John Sarama, District Clerk
1757
Owners showing Saturday, Sept. 24, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
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football contest
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LIFESTYLE
BUICK CLUB The Buick Club of America-
Michigan Chapter included Eagle River in its fall
tour of the Upper Peninsula. Roger Tyyska of
Ontonagon, Mich., stands behind a 1940 Super
Buick. It was one of 40 Buicks parked behind the
old depot to take in the museum as well as the
Derby Track. The club started its tour, named
The Lure of the Land of Hiawatha, at St. Ignace
and will end it at Lake or the Clouds, both in
Michigan. --Photo By Ken Anderson
State officials said that the
smoke that moved across many
regions of Wisconsin several
days last week was from a
wildfire burning in northern
Minnesota.
The Wisconsin Department
of Natural Resources (DNR)
and Department of Health Ser-
vices (DHS) received numerous
calls from local health depart-
ments and citizens in large por-
tions of Wisconsin about heavy
smoke odors, ash and concerns
about smoke inhalation.
The smoke was from the
Pagami Creek Fire, which was
burning about 15 miles east of
Ely, Minn., in the Boundary
Waters Canoe Area Wilder-
ness. As of Monday, officials
said the fire has burned about
100,000 acres and is 19% con-
tained. The fire started Aug. 18
from a lightning strike.
The smoke was carried
across northern Wisconsin and
other parts of the state due to
strong northwest winds last
week.
The DHS, DNR and local
health departments monitored
data coming in hourly as well
as meteorological conditions to
see how the smoke might
impact Wisconsin residents.
In healthy people, the DHS
said symptoms of smoke expo-
sure usually include irritation
of eyes, nose and throat, or
breathing discomfort and more
severe symptoms may include
chest tightness, wheezing,
shortness of breath and cough-
ing. Smoke exposure, even from
temporary peaks in fine parti-
cles, can aggravate chronic
lung or cardiovascular disease.
Depending on concentra-
tions and an individuals sensi-
tivity to smoke, the DHS said
actions to take include remain-
ing indoors with the doors and
windows closed, using a high-
efficiency particulate air filter
on air conditioners, reducing
other sources of indoor air pol-
lution such as smoking
cigarettes and leaving the area
if an individual has particular
sensitivity.
State officials said people
should continue to follow all
precautions and instructions
given by local health and gov-
ernmental departments should
a northwest wind bring more
smoke to Wisconsin.
Smoke in this area last week
caused by Minnesota wildfire
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
NOTICE OF BOARD OF REVIEW
TOWN OF CLOVERLAND
SEPT. 29, 2011 4-6 P.M.
The town of Cloverland will hold the Board of Review on
Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011, from 4 to 6 p.m. The assessor will be at
the town hall prior to the board, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., to answer
any questions and have the assessment roll available to the public.
Objection forms are available from the clerk, and must be complet-
ed prior to appearing before the Board, at (715) 479-2392.
Millie Ritzer, Clerk 1783
The Government Account-
ability Board (GAB) reaf-
firmed at a recent meeting the
practice allowed by state law
for recall committees to sub-
mit petition pages that contain
a single signature and are also
circulated by the signer.
The board also recognized
that a recall petition could be
printed from the website of a
recall committee with the
signers address pre-populat-
ed.
The GAB received a num-
ber of inquiries about single-
signature recall petitions as
well as making recall petitions
available on a website to be
printed out and then circulat-
ed. The board found that state
law does not contain any pro-
hibition on these practices,
which were followed in the
recent recall elections.
In the recent state Senate
recalls, the board received
many single-signature peti-
tions from committees work-
ing to recall members of both
parties, said Kevin J.
Kennedy, director and general
counsel of the GAB. People
downloaded them from the
Internet, filled them out and
signed them, and turned them
in to the recall committees,
which filed them along with
other recall petitions.
The GAB does not accept
recall petitions directly from
individuals. They must be col-
lected by the recall committees
and offered for filing at the
same time within the 60-day
time period as required by
state law.
GAB gives OK
to one-signature
recall petitions
Helicopter crews will begin
the annual patrolling of Ameri-
can Transmission Co. (ATC)
electric transmission lines this
week to look for damage, right-
of-way encroachments and veg-
etation issues.
ATC contracted the services
of Chemair Helicopters of Jef-
ferson. Crews will patrol the
transmission system in Bell
206B Jet Ranger helicopters.
Weather permitting, crews will
follow the general timeline
below to inspect lines within
the ATC service area: mid-
September, early October,
northern and central Wiscon-
sin; late September, early Octo-
ber, the Upper Peninsula (UP)
of Michigan; late September,
early October, southern and
central Wisconsin; and Novem-
ber, the Madison area.
ATC conducts helicopter
patrols two or three times a
year to detect potential prob-
lems that can be corrected to
avoid unplanned power out-
ages.
Many of ATCs 9,440 miles
of transmission lines are locat-
ed in relatively remote areas of
Wisconsin and the UP, and it is
difficult and time-consuming
for crews to reach these areas
by vehicle or on foot.
Aerial inspections allow
crews to reach secluded or diffi-
cult-to-reach lines and identify
potential problems such as
damaged lines or insulators, or
tree limbs that could fall, dam-
age equipment and cause pow-
er outages.
Crews will inspect the lines
by flying approximately 10 feet
above the wires, and they will
avoid flying over livestock
where possible. The schedule
may vary due to weather and
the need to work around the
gun deer hunting season in
late November.
Helicopter crews to patrol
ATC transmission lines
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American Red Cross

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 7A
2011 SEASONAL FLU SHOT SCHEDULE
VILAS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT
The Vilas County Health Department will be conducting flu clinics as follows:
Thursday, Conover Community Center 9-10 a.m.
Sept. 29 Land O Lakes Fire Barn 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Monday, Arbor Vitae Community Center 11 a.m. - noon
Oct. 3 Sayner, Shepherd of the Lakes Church 1:15-2 p.m.
Tuesday, St. Germain Community Center 10-11 a.m.
Oct. 4 Boulder Junction Community Center 1-2 p.m.
Wednesday, Kalmar Senior Center, Eagle River 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Oct. 5 Phelps Senior Center 1:15-2 p.m.
Thursday, Lac du Flambeau Town Hall 11-11:45 a.m.
Oct. 6
Tuesday, Presque Isle Community Center 10-11 a.m.
Oct. 18 Winchester Town Hall 11:15 a.m. - noon
Manitowish Waters Community Center 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Derby Track Senior Fair, Eagle River 9-11 a.m.
Oct. 19
The cost of the flu shot is $20.00 payable in cash or check.
We will bill Medicare Part B, Medicaid and some Medicare replacements.
Pneumonia shots are available for those people 65 years of age and older.
There are some restrictions. Please call us for more information.
All clinics are subject to vaccine delivery.
Any clinic cancellations will be announced on the radio.
Call the Vilas County Public Health Department
at (715) 479-3656 with any questions.
9231
NEWS
The U.S. Forest Service will
waive fees at hundreds of
recreation sites across the
country Saturday, Sept. 24, in
recognition of National Public
Lands Day.
The service has more than
60 project sites for initiatives
across the country participat-
ing in this hands-on, national
volunteer effort to improve
Americas lands.
Local U.S. Forest Service
activities may range from
building and maintaining
trails, cleaning waterways
and pulling invasive weeds to
sprucing up campgrounds.
Public Lands Day provides
a great opportunity for people
from all walks of life to get out
and enjoy our beautiful
forests and grasslands, said
U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom
Tidwell. In many parts of the
country, late September is the
perfect time to view amazing
fall colors as you get out and
enjoy the woods.
This years theme supports
President Obamas Americas
Great Outdoors (AGO) initia-
tive as well as first lady
Michelle Obamas Lets Move
Outside program. AGO helps
to raise awareness about the
challenges natural resources
face today and the benefits
public lands offer Americans.
Lets Move Outside promotes
regular outdoor activity to
help youths maintain a
healthy weight, boost immu-
nity and lower stress.
The annual National Pub-
lic Lands Day coordinated by
the National Environmental
Education Foundation with
the support of the Forest Ser-
vice and other federal agen-
cies, focuses on educating the
public about the importance
of natural resources and the
need for shared stewardship
on the land.
The mission of the U.S.
Forest Service is to sustain
the health, diversity and pro-
ductivity of the nations
forests and grasslands to
meet the needs of present
and future generations.
Recreational activities on
forest lands contribute $14.5
billion annually to the U.S.
economy. The agency man-
ages 193 million acres of
public land, provides assis-
tance to state and private
landowners, and maintains
the largest forestry research
organization in the world.
U.S. Forest Service waives
fees on Public Lands Day
BOULDER JUNCTION
The Vilas County Sheriff s
Department is seeking infor-
mation relating to an appar-
ent hit-and-run accident that
injured a man in Boulder
Junction Sunday night,
according to a sheriff s depart-
ment press release.
At approximately 9:15 p.m.
Sept. 18, deputies responded
to a report of an accident with
injuries on Highway M just
north of Boulder Junction.
The pedestrian, James Beste,
54, of Colgate was injured in
the accident.
The vehicle involved in the
accident was unidentified,
according to the sheriff s
department.
Beste was transported to
Howard Young Medical Cen-
ter in Woodruff and was sub-
sequently transferred to
Wausau Hospital Center,
where he is currently being
treated for head injuries,
according to the press
release.
Anyone having information
relating to the accident should
call the sheriff s office at 1-
(800) 472-7290 or the WeTip
Hotline at 1-(800) 782-7463.
The incident remains
under investigation by the
Vilas County Sheriff s Depart-
ment.
Man injured in apparent hit-and-run
The Vilas County Public
Health Department has con-
firmed that a dead blue jay
found in Vilas County Aug. 29
has tested positive for West
Nile virus.
This is the second bird test-
ing positive for West Nile virus
in Vilas County since surveil-
lance for the mosquito-trans-
mitted virus began May 1.
The positive bird means
that residents of Vilas County
need to be more vigilant in
their personal protective mea-
sures to prevent mosquito
bites, said Gina Egan, Vilas
County health officer and pub-
lic health director.
West Nile virus is spread to
humans through the bite of an
infected mosquito, according to
Egan, who said mosquitoes get
the virus by feeding on infected
birds.
Vilas County residents
should be aware of West Nile
virus and take some simple
steps to protect themselves
against mosquito bites, Egan
said. The West Nile virus
seems to be here to stay, so the
best way to avoid the disease is
to reduce exposure to and elim-
inate breeding grounds for
mosquitoes.
The Vilas County Health
Department recommends the
following:
Limit time spent outside
at dawn and dusk, when
mosquitoes are most active.
Apply insect repellent to
clothing as well as exposed
skin since mosquitoes may bite
through clothing.
Make sure window and
door screens are in good repair
to prevent mosquito entry.
Properly dispose of items
that hold water, such as tin
cans, plastic containers, ceram-
ic pots or discarded tires.
Clean roof gutters and
downspouts for proper
drainage.
Turn over wheelbarrows,
wading pools, boats and canoes
when not in use.
Change the water in bird-
baths and pet dishes at least
every three days.
Clean and chlorinate
swimming pools, outdoor
saunas, and hot tubs; drain
water from pool covers.
Trim tall grass, weeds,
and vines since mosquitoes use
these areas to rest during hot
daylight hours.
Landscape to prevent
water from pooling in low-lying
areas.
Egan noted that the majori-
ty of people (80%) who are
infected with West Nile virus
do not get sick.
Those who do become ill
usually experience mild symp-
toms such as fever, headache or
rash, she said.
Less than 1% of people
infected with the virus get seri-
ously ill, according to Egan.
Older adults (age 50 and
older) and those with compro-
mised immune systems are at
greater risk of developing
severe disease, she said.
The Department of Health
Services has monitored the
spread of West Nile virus since
2001 among wild birds, horses,
mosquitoes and people. In
2010, there were two human
cases of West Nile virus in Wis-
consin.
Blue jay found tests positive for West Nile
BUILDING STEAM The Upper Mississippi Steamboat Group
was in Eagle River last week for a gathering headquartered at
Chanticleer Inn. The third annual outing attracted seven steam
boats from Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and Illinois. The group
toured the Eagle Chain each day and visited area restaurants.
--Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
___________
BY NEWS-REVIEW STAFF
___________
CASH PAID
FOR YOUR
GOLD & SILVER
Coins Jewelry Dental Gold Bullion
Best Western Derby Inn
EAGLE RIVER, WIS.
Friday, Sept. 30
5 to 9 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 1
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 2
10 a.m. to noon
Oneida County Plan-
ning & Zoning Committee
Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2
p.m., Oneida County Court-
house. Agenda: Shoreland
protection ordinance revi-
sions, rezoning petition.
Eagle River Common
Council Wednesday, Sept.
21, 6 p.m., City Hall. Agenda:
Golf course operational
expenses, grievance policy.
Vilas County Board of
Supervisors County-Tribal
Concerns Committee
Thursday, Sept. 22, 9 a.m.,
highway department office.
Agenda: Juvenile intake pro-
gram update, Highway D in
downtown Lac du Flambeau.
Vilas County Snowmo-
bile Trail Safety Commit-
tee Thursday, Sept. 22, 1
p.m., courthouse. Agenda:
Department of Natural
Resources enforcement re-
port, county coordinator
report.
GOVERNMENT MEETINGS
8A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
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with computers, must be self-motivated, dependable
and have good communication skills. Automotive
background preferred, but not required.
Benefits that are available include: competitive
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health, dental, life and disability insurance.
Please stop in for an application or drop off
a rsum to Micki Nelson, Service Manager,
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NEWS
FROM PAGE 1A
Three Lakes Winery, famous
for its cranberry wines, said
Emerson.
Reservations are requested
and tours leave from the
Eagle River Area Chamber of
Commerce & Visitors Center
at 201 N. Railroad St. in
Eagle River. To learn more
about scheduled tour times or
to make a reservation, call
the chamber at 1-(800) 359-
6315 or (715) 479-6400.
Cranberry Fest features
more than 300 arts and crafts
vendors at the fairgrounds
who will showcase home-cre-
ated items made by the sell-
ers themselves and what a
variety of items.
There is something for
everyone, said Emerson.
Other activities will
include frest cranberry sales,
cranberry food items for sale,
entertainment and Cranberry
Fitness Weekend events.
Fresh premium, high-
quality, hand-sorted select
cranberries will be available
for you to purchase and take
home to create your own
wonderful cranberry-flavored
foods, said Emerson.
Cranberries will be on sale
at the Vilas County Fair-
grounds on Highway 70 West
and in downtown Eagle Riv-
er, next to the Holiday gas
station at the corner of Rail-
road Street and Highway 70,
and at the visitors center.
At the festival grounds,
cranberries will be made into
an array of food and drink
items such as juice, soda,
beer, meatballs, fritters, pies,
breads, chutney and more.
A pancake breakfast will
be served on festival grounds
in the large food tent from 7
to 10 a.m.
People can start their day
with a choice of regular or
cranberry pancakes, pork
sausage and a drink, said
Emerson.
Fest visitors also can sup-
port the Make-A-Wish Foun-
dation by trying a slice of the
Worlds Largest Cranberry
Cheesecake, more than 100
feet in length.
All proceeds will assist in
granting wishes for children
who have life-threatening ill-
nesses in our area, said
Emerson.
The Ministry Health Care
Cranberry Fitness Weekend
will include a bike tour, a fit-
ness walk and a fitness run.
For more information on how
to participate in the fitness
weekend, call the Eagle River
chamber of commerce for a
registration form at 1-(800)
359-6315 or (715) 479-6400.
After visiting the festivi-
ties on the festival grounds,
Emerson said people can
enjoy other activities located
in downtown Eagle River and
at the Eagle River Snowmo-
bile Derby Track.
Activities downtown (Sat-
urday only) include: a book
fair at Olson Memorial
Library, an antiques market,
a farmers market, fresh cran-
berry sales, Lake Country
Weaver and Fiber Artists
show and sale, hot food and
beverages, musical entertain-
ment, and a luncheon at First
Congregational United
Church of Christ.
Activities at the Derby
Track include the Cranberry
Fest Market Place featuring
craft items, flea market items
and more.
A free shuttle bus will be
available Saturday from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to take
visitors throughout Eagle
River to all the different
activities. Shuttle buses will
run approximately every 20
minutes. Free parking is
available at the Eagle River
Derby Track.
Other Cranberry Fest
activities are planned Satur-
day, Oct. 1.
The Nordmarka Cross
Country Ski Club will hold
its 24th annual spaghetti din-
ner fundraiser in conjunction
with Cranberry Fest.
The dinner will take place
Saturday from 4:30 to 8 p.m.
at Eagle River Inn & Resort.
Everyone is welcome to
attend.
North Woods visitors and
residents alike also are wel-
come to join First National
Bank at its annual Cranberry
Fest Dance Saturday evening.
The popular 12-piece Old
Lager Orchestra will perform
big-band sounds, waltzes and
polkas at Boondockers
Lounge at Wild Eagle
Lodge.Sponsored by First
National Bank of Eagle River,
the free event will feature
music and dancing starting
at 8 p.m.Complimentary hors
doeuvres will be served.
For a complete schedule of
activities and for more infor-
mation, contact the Eagle
River Chamber of Commerce
& Visitors Center at 1-(800)
359-6315 or (715) 479-6400
and ask for the Cranberry
Country Crier, Marsh and
Winery Tour information or
the Ministry Health Care
Cranberry Fitness Weekend
brochure.
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BUYING SCRAP METAL
Buying Copper, Brass,
Aluminum & Aluminum Cans
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We accept ferrous & non-ferrous materials.
Call for prices. (715) 479-8597
870 Hwy. 17 South, Eagle River Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Also
paying for
old cars and
trucks.
Cranberry Fest:more than 300 crafters expected
MEMORIAL RIDE The Red Knights Firefighters Motor-
cyle Club, Wisconsin Chapter 5, Vilas and Oneida counties,
hosted its third annual ride to raise money for the Wiscon-
sin State Firefighters Memorial, honoring those firefighters
who lost their lives in the line of duty. The ride started at the
Eagle River Area Fire Department (above and right) last Fri-
day and ended at the St. Germain Fire Department follow-
ing a tour of Vilas County. Eagle River Assistant Fire Chief
Jim Bonson (below) joined the ride.
--Staff Photos By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
Fishing with
the Guides
By
George Langley
SERVICE
OF:
EAGLE
SPORTS
EAGLE RIVER
GUIDES ASSOCIATION /
OUTDOORS
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS 9A
FROST WAS covering a mix of
green and brown ferns as we
opened the 2011 ruffed grouse
season just after dawn last Satur-
day, the scribbler following the
nose of his 1-year-old black Lab
named Gracie.
After an unproductive first stop
on a system of trails, I decided to
head for a young aspen cutting in
the Chequamegon-Nicolet Nation-
al Forest to beat the brush along
various swamp and pine planta-
tion edges.
Some of the ferns were chest-
high and they often hid a tangle
of fallen trees that made for great
tripping material. Theres nothing
easy about going cross country in
mid-September, but then, thats
often where you find the birds
even if you cant always see them
on the flush.
Two hours and what seemed
like several miles into the walk,
we finally flushed a grouse. I
managed to get one shot off before
losing sight of it in the heavy cov-
er. Gracie won some praise after
showing up with the wounded
bird moments later, and we were
suddenly on the board for another
season. The youngster has appar-
ently lost nothing from her grand
first season.
We followed long stretches of
edge where the aspen met marsh-
es and potholes, and some of the
steep slopes looked mighty
promising. But there were no
more birds until we broke out of
the aspen and into an old planta-
tion that harbored scattered, tow-
ering pines. A bird flushed from
the ferns and dropped seconds lat-
er to a blast from the 20-gauge.
As we worked up that
aspen/pine edge, little did we
know some magic was about to
occur. Another grouse flushed and
the sounds of others getting up
were really distracting, though I
managed to get a piece of it. Grace
ran it down. It looked like nothing
more than a wing hit.
There was a nice covey of
young grouse there, maybe
five or six more, and we
turned in another direction.
The decision was to let them
grow and hopefully to avoid
shooting the hen for she is
next years hope. Im sure well
make it back there in October.
With a 43% increase in spring
drumming activity, the Depart-
ment of Natural Resources says
the population cycle didnt peak in
2009 and is still headed upward.
Our opening morning find was
encouraging. If most successful
broods are holding seven or eight
birds, the numbers will grow.
Gracie and I finished the day
with three grouse and we shot a
couple more Sunday for what
turned out to be a great opener. I
never expect much in the heavy
foliage of September, which is
basically for getting in shape and
finding pockets of birds for later
outings.
Another piece of good news is
that the young aspen was already
holding decent numbers of wood-
cock, which must be local birds
because its too early for the fall
migration. The long-beaked tim-
berdoodle is a favorite among
many grouse hunters, adding
additional action for the dog, the
shotgun and the frying pan.
The credit for todays success in
maintaining habitat for the ruffed
grouse and American woodcock
goes to hunters and public forest
managers who understand the
importance of diversity in man-
agement, including clear-cutting
and the regeneration of young for-
est types.
It is just one of the conserva-
tion success stories we will cele-
brate this Saturday, Sept. 24, dur-
ing National Hunting and Fishing
Day. The truth be told, it is
hunters and anglers who provide
the necessary funding for man-
agement, habitat work and
enforcement of state game laws.
Millions of dollars in revenue is
raised each year through excise
taxes that hunters and anglers
pay every time they purchase cer-
tain equipment. And thats just
part of the story, for hunters and
anglers are the driving force
behind the success of conservation
groups such as Ducks Unlimited,
Ruffed Grouse Society, Trout
Unlimited and Muskies Inc.
If you fish and hunt, please
take a close look at the two-page
spread in this weeks paper for
National Hunting and Fishing
Day. Look at the diversity of busi-
ness owners who support these
conservation-based outdoor sports.
Thank them for the support and
patronize them when you can.
Katie, the mostly retired Lab
that will turn 14 in November,
was begging to go along. She
plowed Gracie out of the way and
moved in close as I was putting on
my boots, whining and just hoping
Id say the magic truck word to
her. What spirit! It looks like Ill
be planning a short outing on a
cool October day for her.
The best of the grouse hunt is
still to come as the foliage withers
and the leaves eventually fall. We
are still weeks away from disper-
sal of the grouse broods, which is
when the hunting action really
heats up.
Somebody asked me the other
day if the grouse numbers were
high enough to warrant buying a
small-game license this year. Of
course, I said yes and spoke of all
the good signs, but the answer
would have been the same even
at the bottom of the population
cycle.
Its all about the chase, the
camaraderie of the hunt and
the bond between man and
dog. If the focus is right,
theres no such thing as a bad
grouse season.
Cover didnt keep Gracie from finding birds
In the
Outdoors
By
Kurt Krueger
Young Gracie appeared unhappy about sitting still when there were plenty
more grouse to chase opening day. --Photo By The Author
The top-placing teams in the 35th annual Pauls Pro-Am gathered
for a group photo Sunday. The anglers included: front row from left,
Phil Schweik and John Sparbel, first; Ryan Bock and Tim Rutzen
Jr., second; back row, Mike Otto and Mike Baldewicz, third; tourna-
ment coordinator Paul Riedel Jr.; and Jarod Adamovich and Jere-
my Barber, fourth. --STAFF PHOTO
The 2009 champions of
Pauls Memorial Pro-Am
Musky Classic returned to the
winners circle Sunday after
catching three muskies on the
Eagle River Chain of Lakes
last weekend.
Phil Schweik of Mosinee
and John Sparbel of Wausau
doubled on Saturday and
boated one more fish on Sun-
day to win the $4,800 first-
place prize.
We caught a 40 and 38
1
/4
on Saturday within the last 20
minutes of fishing and fol-
lowed that up with a 42
1
/4 on
Sunday, said Schweik. The
42
1
/4 also was the big fish win-
ner on Sunday.
All three fish came out of
Yellow Birch Lake, with the
fishermen throwing Bull-
dawgs in deep water.
We had a lot of action
throughout the day. It was
really a good day, said Spar-
bel. We saw 14 fish, hooked
12 and boated four.
The two anglers have
fished in Pauls Pro-Am for
the past four years, taking the
championship twice and plac-
ing seventh in 2008.
We know the Eagle River
Chain pretty well, fishing the
Professional Musky Tourna-
ment Trail and ProMac tour-
nament circuits each year,
said Schweik. We like to fish
close to the tournament head-
quarters on Duck Lake,
because he gives that much
more casting time than those
guys running all the way to
Catfish and Cranberry lakes.
Tournament coordinator
Paul Riedel Jr. said there were
some pretty decent fishing con-
ditions, with sunny skies turn-
ing to mostly cloudy on Satur-
day, but a cold front moved in
on Sunday. But the anglers still
did well, according to Riedel.
The 61 teams were still
able to register 27 fish on Sat-
urday, but only nine came in on
Sunday. That also is the short-
er fishing day, said Riedel.
Those are some pretty good
fishermen out there. They
know how to catch muskies.
Placing second was the
team of Ryan Bock of Three
Lakes and Tim Rutzen Jr. of
Weston. They were the only
other team to catch three fish.
They won $2,400 for their
three fish. They caught fish of
35
1
/4 and 36
1
/2 inches on Sat-
urday and a 36
1
/2-incher on
Sunday. Two of the fish came
on the river and the third was
caught on Otter Lake.
Five teams doubled on Sat-
urday and had a good chance
at the title on Sunday. Third-
place through eighth-place
teams all doubled, making for
a very close tournament,
according to Riedel.
Third place and $2,000
Schweik and Sparbel return
to winners circle in Pro-Am
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
To PRO-AM, Pg. 12A
Fall weather conditions have improved fishing
action in the North Woods. With water temperatures
around 60 degrees, fish are starting their fall feeding
patterns. This is a great time to get out on our area
lakes for some of the best fishing of the season!
Walleye fishing has been very good and will contin-
ue that way through the fall. The walleyes have
moved out to deeper water to feed on minnows. To find
these fish, anglers need to do a little searching on
deeper lakes. Look for big schools of baitfish and min-
nows on your locator and work these areas with a jig
and minnow. Anglers can narrow their search to 15 to
30 feet of water to find these baitfish schools. On shal-
lower lakes, such as those on the Eagle River Chain,
the walleyes will be moving into the deep holes and
can be very easy targets with a jig and minnow.
Muskie fishing also is improving. These fish can be
hard to find one day and then seem like they are
everywhere the next day. Anglers will find some of
these fish chasing schools of baitfish in deep water
just like the walleyes. These fish can be targeted with
deep diving crankbaits and Bulldawg-style lures.
Muskies will also be in the weeds and on deep weed
edges laying in ambush mode. These fish can be tar-
geted with many different techniques, but large buck-
tails, spinnerbaits, and jerkbaits tend to be the best
producers. Live suckers on quick-set rigs are always
very effective for these shallower muskies.
Bass action has slowed down on some lakes. Small-
mouths are still hitting on crayfish imitations, but
starting the annual switch to minnows. Try some
Rapalas or other minnow imitation lures also. Large-
mouth bass are still hitting well in the weeds, with
plastics and spinnerbaits working very well.
Panfish action has been decent for most species.
Perch are schooling in deep water, and the best bait
has been fathead minnows. Anglers also will find
some perch up in the weeds. Crappie fishing has been
good in these same weedy areas, and small minnows
always work best. Bluegills can be found suspended in
deeper water.
Fishing action should remain very good overall this
week as water temperatures continue to drop. Get out
and enjoy some beautiful fall weather in the North
Woods and catch some fish while doing so!
Good luck and good fishin.
Walleyes moving deeper
as water temps start drop
10A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
SALES, SERVICE, RENTALS
Polaris Ranger
& ATV
CAN-AM ATV
Open Daily
1651 Hwy. 45 North
Eagle River, WI 54521
(715) 479-2200
Northern Waters
Angling & Archery
160 Hwy. 45
Conover, WI 54519
(715) 477-2224
* Live Bait
* Wisconsin Licenses
* Fishing Supplies
* Archery Equipment
* Indoor 3-D & Video Archery Range
NEWS-REVIEW
EAGLE RIVER PUBLICATIONS, INC.
P.O. Box 1929
Eagle River, WI 54521
Ph.: (715) 479-4421
Fax: (715) 479-6242
VILAS COUNTY
The Three Lakes News
PUBLISHED AT
425 W. MILL ST.
EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521
By Eagle River Publications, Inc.
Check us out on the Web!
www.vilascountynewsreview.com
Tadpoles
Outdoor Gear
Irish Setter, Rocky & Muck Boots
Camo Clothing
Blackpowder, Ammo & Scopes
SHIMANO PRO SHOP
Best price on live bait muskie suckers
809 E. Wall St., Eagle River
(715) 479-6441
20%OFF
Camo Carpet!
Vilas Village Mall
Highway 45 North
Eagle River
(715) 479-4416
Roundys
Open 7 Days a Week
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Highway 70
St. Germain, WI 54558
(715) 479-4930
PRIME CHOICE
MEAT MARKET
(715) 479-4456
Your Hometown
Old-Fashioned
Butcher Shop
1144 Hwy. 45 S, Eagle River
Big Game & Venison
Processing
Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.;
Sun. 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
TERRY MANEY
P.O. Box 102
Three Lakes, WI 54562
Phone: (715) 546-2337
Email: tmaney@frontier.com
www.maneyconstruction.com
Hunting Facts
The contributions, in the form of excise taxes paid on sporting firearms, ammunition and archery equipment, benefit every state and have generated approx-
imately $5.6 billion for wildlife conservation since 1939. The contribution for 2009 is a record nearly $336 million, according to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife
Service, which recently announced the Wildlife Restoration apportionment.
An average hunter spends $1,638 every year on the sport.
Teenage girls are the fastest growing market in sport shooting.
According to research, 72% more women are hunting with firearms today than just five years ago. And 50% more women are now target shooting.
Americans hunt 228 million days per year.
More than 38 million Americans hunt and fish.
Hunters and anglers support more jobs nationwide than the number of people employed by Walmart.
Through license sales and excise taxes on equipment, hunters and anglers pay for most fish and wildlife conservation programs.
Hunters and shooters have paid more than $5 billion in excise taxes since 1939.
More Americans hunt and shoot than play golf.
Firearms are involved in less than 1% of all accidental fatalities. More Americans are killed in accidents involving vending machines than guns.
Hunting gear sales are growing faster than all other sporting goods categories.
Americans annually buy 1.1 billion shotshells.
Nonresident hunting license, tag, stamp and permit sales have risen 41.2% since 1993.
Top-selling sporting goods: 1.) exercise equipment; 2.) golf gear; 3.) hunting gear
Sources: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS);
National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation; National Shooting Sports Foundation.
A part of BMO Financial Group
Eagle River
(715) 479-6461
St. Germain
(715) 479-4800
Three Lakes
(715) 546-3393
934 Hwy. 17 South
Eagle River
(715) 479-9772
NORTH STATES
UTILITY
CONTRACTORS,
INC.
Available at
NELSONS
606 E. Wall St.
Eagle River, Wis.
(715) 479-4496
MENS & WOMENS
Lumber
Building
Materials
Getting It Together
For You Since 1887
North Railroad St.
Eagle River
(715) 479-6408
OUTPOST BAIT
& TACKLE
636 Hwy. 45 North
P.O. Box 99
Conover, WI 54519
715-479-9984
Cell: 715-891-2882
E-mail: outpostbait@newnorth.net
Website: outpostbait.com
Lakes Dental
Services
Dr.William Martineau
Three Lakes, Wis.
(715) 546-2101
Gentle, Quality
Dental Care
THREE LAKES
SHELL
WE HAVE MINNOWS!
Hwy. 45, Three Lakes, Wis.
Bill Scheurer 715.546.2277
See all the listings
on the MLS
www.3LakesRealEstate.com
(715) 546-8295 (877) 507-6337
NORTHERN LAKES LLC
Three Lakes
Downtown
Three Lakes
Compliments of
715-546-2002
wild eagle
corner store
1970 Hwy. 45, Eagle River
(corner of Chain O Lakes Rd.)
(715) 479-4688
HOURS: 6 A.M. TO 11 P.M. DAILY
CONVENIENCE STORE
& MORE!
Bait - Tackle - Gas - Groceries - Spirits
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
M-F 11-7 Sat. 9-5, Sun. 11-3
Indoor Range
Paintball Field
Video Archery
Outdoor 3-D Course
Full Archery Pro Shop
(715) 479-5838
7045 Hwy. 70 E St. Germain
W.R. OLDERMAN
PLUMBING
PLUMB-BOB
MP 227763
Over 20 Yrs. Experience
GUARANTEED
WORK INSURED
Conover
(715) 479-8777
715.479.8511
100 W. Pine St.
(On the corner of Railroad St. & Hwy. 70)
Eagle River, Wis.
2121 Lincoln St., Rhinelander, Wis.
(715) 362-8550
Remington Blinds
Federal & Winchester Ammo
Buckmaster Archery Targets
Rocky Thermal Apparel
Cmere Deer Attractant
Selection of Hunting &
Apparel Accessories
SAFARI WORLD
Artistry in Taxidermy
7036 Hwy. 45
Three Lakes, WI 54562
(715) 546-2270
Serving
Sportsmen
for Over
30 Years
EAGLE SPORTS
salutes
hunters & anglers,
Americas true
conservationists!
Wall St., Eagle River
(715) 479-8804
www.eaglesports.com
Hunting Headquarters for over 60 years
105 S. Brown
(715) 362-5800
1-(800) 236-MELS
Hunters and Anglers
Generating $100,000 for Conservation
Every 30 Minutes!
Learn more at www.nhfday.org
With birdwatchers, hikers, moun-
tain bikers, canoeists, snorkelers,
backpackers, ATV riders, photogra-
phers and other recreationists, lots
of Americans love wildlife and wild
places.
Hunters and anglers love them, too
and together they do more than
all the others for conservation.
How?
Hunters and anglers provide lead-
ership in many ways, but the sim-
plest answer is . . . cash. And lots
of it!
Today there are 34 million hunters
and anglers in the U.S. By pur-
chasing hunting and fishing licens-
es, and paying special taxes on
firearms and ammunition, bows
and arrows, and rods and reels,
hunters, anglers and shooters gen-
erate $100,000 every 30 minutes!
This annual total, $1.75 billion,
pays for the vast majority of the
conservation work of fish and
wildlife agencies in every state.
These public agencies serve the
citizens of their state by overseeing
all fish and wildlife, both hunted
species like deer and non-hunted
species like robins, as well as all
aquatic and terrestrial habitats.
In this way, hunters and anglers
benefit all Americans who love
wildlife and wild places. In fact,
among the many groups of people
recreating in the great outdoors,
nobody does more for conservation
than hunters and anglers!
How Hunting and Angling Help Wildlife and Wild Places
2230 N. Stevens St.
Rhinelander
(across from Menards)
Hours:
Mon.-Fri. 8-6; Sat. 8-4
(715) 365-7722 (888) 311-1534
www.shoedersmarine.com
sales@shoedersmarine.com
3816 Shawnee Lane
Rhinelander, WI 54501
715-362-5554
Jon Annis
965 Hwy. 45 South
(1 mile south of Eagle River)
Eagle River, WI 54521
(715) 891-1646
A-1
TAXIDERMY
Over 35 Years
Experience
Eagle River Office:
715-479-4491
Toll free: 1-877-365-4800
Federally Insured by NCUA
Youre gonna like our
Attitude of
Excellence!
www.ripco.org
Serving the North Woods for 35 Years
A great place to shop,
a great place to be.
OPEN 24 HOURS
715-479-6411
www.trigs.com
Eagle River Minocqua Rhinelander Wausau
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 11A
Americas Propane Company
1659 Hwy. 45 North
Eagle River, Wis.
715-479-4353
1-800-321-7944
Driveways To Highways
8075 Hwy. D, Eagle River
715-479-7488
LIVE BAIT & TACKLE
ARCHERY GUNS AMMO
BLACK POWDER SUPPLIES
The Tackle Box,
LLC
Downtown Land O Lakes, Wis.
715-547-3434
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8-5;
Sat. 7-5; Sun. 7-2
Jokin Joes
BAIT N
TACKLE
1674 Superior St.
Three Lakes
715-546-3776
Gary Simac
MPRS 3141
715-479-6786
1130 Tyson Road
Eagle River
FLOOR COVERING
CENTER
Highway 70 West
Eagle River
715-479-4480
E
a
g
le
ANDERSON
INSURANCE
SERVING
YOU SINCE
1932
PERSONAL COMMERCIAL
HEALTH LIFE
715-479-7431
1025 E. Wall, Eagle River
Musky
Hunter

MAGAZINE
P.O. Box 340
7978 Hwy. 70 East
St. Germain, WI 54558
Phone 715-477-2178
Fax 715-477-8858
www.muskyhunter.com
CUSTOM HOMES OVER 25 YEARS
SERVING
NORTHERN
WISCONSIN
Ray Blicharz Chris Blicharz
(715) 546-3176 (715) 546-2883
Blicharz Builders, Inc.
Masonry Ceramics Carpentry
CUSTOM CERAMIC BATHS
& FIREPLACES
P.O. Box 373 Three Lakes, WI 54562
THE CAR SHOP
224 S. 7th St.
Eagle River,
WI 54521
715-477-6200
Specializing in Fish Mountings
Catch-and-Release Reproductions
Rick Lax
Taxidermist
For the sportsman
seeking the best quality.
5455 Hwy. 45
Conover, WI 54519
715-547-3710
www.laxreproductions.com
LAX REPRODUCTIONS
Preserving your memories for a lifetime.
www.WildlifeExpressionsLtd.com
715-479-2034
ATTENTION
BEAR HUNTERS!
Visit our new wildlife showroom
804 E.Wall St.
Eagle River,
WI 54521
JIM BEENKEN TAXIDERMY
L
T
D
PAULS RENT-ALL
RENTAL, LLC
Tools and Equipment for every need
Commercial & Residential
186 Hwy. 70
St. Germain, Wis.
(2 doors south of Dutch Door Restaurant)
715-479-5841
2 LOCATIONS
TO SERVE YOU
ST. GERMAIN
715-479-5930
BOULDER JUNCTION
715-385-2300
Since 1917
We Deliver the Boating Dream!
(715) 546-3351 1-888-546-3351
always open at
www.watercraftsales.com
Sales Service Rentals
Come in and see
the finest in fishing boats
Located on Island Lake on the Three Lakes Chain
3 miles north of Jct. Hwys. 32 & 45 on Hwy. X
Eagle River,
St. Germain,
Phelps & Three Lakes
Rogers Control, Inc.
Heating - Ventilation - Electrical
Air-Conditioning - Refrigeration
1029 E. Wall, Eagle River
715-479-6919
www.carrier.com
BOONES BUILDING SUPPLY
Quality Materials
at
Competitive Prices
Free Delivery 40-Mile Radius
Free Estimates
Hours:
Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.;
Sat. 8 a.m. to noon
3800 Shangrila Rd., Eagle River
1-888-592-0820 Ph. 715-479-4679
Mats Reel Repair
(715) 571-7544
1930 Pinewood Dr.
Eagle River, WI 54521
15 Years Experience
Servicing all makes and models,
new and old.
Large parts inventory
and fast turnaround.
Website: matsreelrepair.com
Three Lakes Foods
USDA Choice Meats Bakery
Propane Exchange Deli
Livestock Feed Video
1593 Hwy. 32
Three Lakes, WI 54562
(715) 546-3354
RICK NEIS
MP 7548
CRED. 225915
YOUR FAMILY-OWNED HOMETOWN
BUSINESS SINCE 1970
3883 Hwy. 70 East
Eagle River, WI 54521
(715) 479-7012 Fax: (715) 479-7013
PLUMBING
Virtually every species of wildlife, from songbirds and chipmunks to bald eagles and whooping cranes, benefit from the programs supported
and financed by hunters and anglers. This year, on NATIONAL HUNTING AND FISHING DAY, SATURDAY, SEPT. 24, join
with Americas First Environmentalists in supporting conservation.
A Great Tradition,
Source of Pride Since 1972
In the 1960s, hunters and anglers
embraced the eras heightened
environmental awareness, but were
discouraged that many people didnt
understand the role that sportsmen
played and continue to play in
the conservation movement.
In 1972, with urging from the National Shooting Sports Foun-
dation, Congress unanimously authorized National Hunting
and Fishing Day on the fourth Saturday of every September.
On May 2, 1972, President Richard M. Nixon signed the first
proclamation of the annual celebration.
Today, National Hunting and Fishing Day remains a great pro-
motion for outdoor sports and conservation as well as a
source of pride for hunters and anglers nationwide.
National Hunting
and Fishing Day
How a Good Idea Became a Great Tradition
Over 100 years ago, hunters and anglers were the earliest and most vocal supporters of conservation and scientific wildlife management.
They were the first to recognize that rapid development and unregulated uses of wildlife were threatening the future of many species.
Led by fellow sportsman President Theodore Roosevelt, these early conservationists called for the first laws restricting the commercial
slaughter of wildlife. They urged sustainable use of fish and game, created hunting and fishing licenses, and lobbied for taxes on sporting equip-
ment to provide funds for state conservation agencies. These actions were the foundation of the North American wildlife conservation model, a
science-based, user-pay system that would foster the most dramatic conservation successes of all time.
Populations of white-tailed deer, elk, antelope, wild turkey, wood ducks and many other species began to recover from decades of unregu-
lated exploitation.
During the next half-century, in addition to the funds they contributed for conservation and their diligent watch over the returning health of
Americas outdoors, sportsmen worked countless hours to protect and improve millions of acres of vital habitat lands and waters for the use
and enjoyment of everyone.
In the 1960s, hunters and anglers embraced the eras heightened environmental awareness but were discouraged that many people didnt
understand the crucial role that sportsmen had played and continue to play in the conservation movement.
The first to suggest an official day of thanks to sportsmen was Ira Joffe, owner of Joffes Gun Shop in Upper Darby, Pa. In 1970, Pennsyl-
vania Gov. Raymond Shafer adopted Joffes idea and created Outdoor Sportsmans Day in the state.
With determined prompting from the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the concept soon emerged on the floor of the U.S. Senate. In
June 1971, Sen. Thomas McIntyre, N.H., introduced Joint Resolution 117 authorizing National Hunting and Fishing Day on the fourth Saturday
of every September. Rep. Bob Sikes, Fla., introduced an identical measure in the House. In early 1972, Congress unanimously passed both bills.
On May 2, 1972, President Nixon signed the first proclamation of National Hunting and Fishing Day, writing, I urge all citizens to join with
outdoor sportsmen in the wise use of our natural resources and in insuring their proper management for the benefit of future generations.
By late summer, all 50 governors and over 600 mayors had joined in by proclaiming state and local versions of National Hunting and Fish-
ing Day. The response was dramatic.
National, regional, state and local organizations staged some 3,000 open house hunting- and fishing-related events everywhere from
shooting ranges to suburban frog ponds, providing an estimated 4 million Americans with a chance to experience, understand and appreciate
traditional outdoor sports.
Over the years, National Hunting and Fishing Day boasted many more public relations successes, assisted by celebrities who volunteered
to help spotlight the conservation accomplishments of sportsmen and -women. Honorary chairs have included George Bush, Tom Seaver, Hank
Williams Jr., Arnold Palmer, Terry Bradshaw, George Brett, Robert Urich, Ward Burton, Louise Mandrell, Travis Tritt, Tracy Byrd, Jeff Foxworthy
and many other sports and entertainment figures.
National Hunting and Fishing Day, celebrated the fourth Saturday of every September, remains the most effective grassroots efforts ever
undertaken to promote the outdoor sports and conservation.
MILLER BEER
OF THE NORTHWOODS, INC.
Eagle River
NORTHERN GLASS
CO., INC.
721 E. Wall St., Eagle River
(715) 479-9106
Your Complete Glass Service Center
Commercial Residential
Auto
Serving the Northwoods Since 1958
www.northernglasscompany.com
HUNTING & FISHING
TALES WELCOME HERE
Bucktale Inn
~ Nightly Specials
~ Dinner Menu
SANDWICHES
PIZZA SEAFOOD
FRIDAY FISH MENU
Open Tues.-Sat. at 4 p.m.
9035 Hwy. H, Eagle River
(2 miles on Hwy. 70 west of Eagle River)
(715) 479-7182
FAST FACTS
Funding from hunters
helped America restore:
Whitetail Deer
1900: Only 500,000 left
Now: Over 30 million
Wild Turkey
1900: Only 100,000 left
Now: Over 7 million
Funding from anglers
heps manage Americas 3..5 million
miles of rivers, 40.8 million acres of
lakes, 34,400 square miles of estuar-
ies, 58,000 miles of ocean shoreline
and 277 million acres of wetlands.
Nobbes
North
OPEN
24 HRS.
FOR GAS
Groceries Beer Diesel
Live Bait 50:1 Mix
Outboard Motor Rentals
Located 5 miles east of
Eagle River on Hwy. 70
Open daily from 6:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.
12A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
OUTDOORS
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8399
Wisconsin CCW (Concealed Carry) Classes
Wisconsin Certified Firearms
Concealed Carry Instruction
Phone: 715-869-3374
Firearms Protection Agency
Local Instructors
Sept. 10, 17 & 24 classes
(sponsored by Sunshine For Humanity, Inc., safety through education)
This class DOES QUALIFY for the Wis. CCW Permit.
Outdoors
Calendar
Compiled by the Wisconsin DNR
dnr.wi.gov
09/24/11 Duck season opens in the Northern Zone
through Nov. 22.
Woodcock season opens through Nov. 7.
09/30/11 Trout season closes on inland waters and
on rivers flowing into Lake Superior from their mouths to the first
impassable permanent barrier.
Lake trout season on Lake Superior closes.
10/1-
10/9/11 Special deer hunt open to people with disabilities who have a disabled
hunting permit.
10/8-
10/9/11 Youth deer hunt. Youth hunters ages 12 to 15 who have successfully
completed a hunter education program and possess a gun deer hunt-
ing license may participate in this hunt.
10/11/11 Black bear season closes.
10/13-
10/16/11 Antlerless deer hunt (gun and archery) in CWD management units.
10/15/11 Pheasant season opens at noon; runs through Dec. 31.
Raccoon gun and trapping for state residents open through Feb. 15,
2012.
Red and gray fox hunting and trapping opens through Feb. 15, 2012.
Coyote trapping season opens through Feb. 15.
Period 1 hunting and trapping season for bobcat north of Highway 64
through Dec. 25.
Muskrat season in the northern zone opens through Feb. 29, 2012.
Mink season in the northern zone opens through Feb. 29, 2012.
Fisher trapping season opens in various zones through Dec. 31.
10/29/11 Nonresident raccoon season opens through Feb. 15, 2012.
Rod Whitehead of Phelps shows his new line of
Easy Pluck C/P plucking machines for chickens
and pheasants. The new model reinvents his
popular duck plucker. --Photo By Sharon Gifford
Along with his original
Easy Pluck duck plucker, Rod
Whitehead of Phelps now
markets the Easy Pluck C/P
for chickens and pheasants.
Both units are mounted on
55-gallon plastic barrels to
contain the feathers, which
are caught in a large garbage
bag. Whitehead is able to keep
the price of the pluckers low
by propelling them with inex-
pensive drill motors.
Whitehead came up with
the pluckers idea a few sum-
mers ago, during his early
retirement. Whitehead had
worked as a millwright/indus-
trial maintenance technician
at nuclear plants.
The Easy Pluck units are
shipped all over the world.
The first duck plucker went to
Labrador, Canada, while the
first prototype chicken pluck-
er was donated and shipped to
a couple in Nicaragua. He has
sent plunkers as far as Aus-
tralia and New Zealand.
Whitehead sells exclusively
over the Internet and advertis-
es in three national magazines:
Backyard Poultry/Chickens/
Wildfowl, Ducks Unlimited and
The New Zealand Hunter.
Ive been told that Im the
best customer by the Phelps
Post Office, with my largest
one-day shipping bill coming to
a little over $300, said White-
head. Most people are quite
surprised to find out the large
plastic 55-gallon drums can be
shipped through the U.S. Postal
Service, and for a minimal fee.
Whitehead said he received
a first-hand testimonial about
his invention from a UPS
driver recently.
You should have seen the
smile on my face after a UPS
driver reported to me that he
and his father had plucked 80
chickens in a little over four
hours with the Easy Pluck
C/P, he said.
The pluckers can be viewed
on Whiteheads website at
pluckwitheasypluck.com.
Phelps man now marketing
new chicken/pheasant plucker
Pro-Am
FROM PAGE 9A
went to Mike Baldewicz of
Franklin and Mike Otto of
Neosho. They caught one fish
each day measuring 39
1
/2
inches and 38
3
/4 inches.
Jared Adamovich and Jere-
my Barber, both of Eagle Riv-
er, finished fourth. They won
$1,600. Fifth place and $1,200
went to the team of David
Kroening of Pewaukee and
Jim Lueck of Milwaukee.
The team of Brian Bain of
Auburndale and Jason Barot-
ka of Phillips placed sixth and
won $600. Jeff Pizaaz of Lake
Tomahawk and Mark Lijews-
ki of Minocqua won $320 for
seventh place. In eighth place
was the team of Al Schroeder
of Eagle River and Dave
Schroeder of Grant Park, Ill.
They won $240.
The ninth- and 10th-place
teams each had one fish.
Ninth place went to Gary
Luedtke of Greenleaf and Bill
Vierkandt of Phelps. They
won $200. Tenth place and
$160 went to Jim Carlson of
Jackson and Tim Carlson of
Eagle River. The Carlsons
also won the big-fish award
on Saturday for their 40
1
/2-
inch fish. They won an extra
$570. Schweik and Sparbel
also won $570 for the big fish
on Sunday as they boated the
42
1
/4-incher.
We didnt see a lot of big
fish in the tournament this
year, said Riedel. We usually
see a fish in the 44- to 46-inch
range. There were a lot more in
the 36 to 39 range this year.
The tournament was head-
quartered at Hiawatha Hide-
Away on Duck Lake, formerly
owned by the Riedel family.
This was the 35th annual Pro-
Am. The tournament was open
to 150 two-person teams, but
entries fell to less than half,
due to the poor economy this
year. Last year, 79 teams
fished in the tournament.
The Pro-Am is a memorial
tournament in memory of
Paul Riedel Sr., who died Nov.
24, 1994, at the age of 58
while vacationing in Ft.
Myers, Fla. Riedel was the
originator of the tournament
and the owner of the former
Hiawatha Supper Club.
Whitetails Unlimited
(WTU) will sponsor the Land
O Lakes area banquet Satur-
day, Oct. 29, at 5:30 p.m. at
Gateway Lodge, located at
4103 Highway B in Land O
Lakes.
The event will feature a
buffet dinner, auction and
prizes. There will be an array
of products, including
firearms, outfitter packages,
hunting and outdoor-related
equipment, artwork and col-
lectibles only available at
WTU events. Proceeds from
this fundraising event will
benefit projects that uphold
WTUs mission.
Social hour will begin at
5:30 p.m., with dinner set for
7 p.m. Tickets are $45 each,
$30 for a spouse or $30 for
juniors 15 and younger. The
deadline for purchasing tick-
ets is Saturday, Oct. 22. Tick-
ets will not be available at the
door.
To order tickets locally, call
Mike and Regina Trollan at
(715) 545-2114 during the
evening, contact WTU
National Headquarters at 1-
(800) 274-5471 or visit white-
tailsunlimited.com.
Founded in 1982, WTU is a
national nonprofit conserva-
tion organization. The groups
mission is to raise funds in
support of education, habitat
enhancement and acquisi-
tion, and the preservation of
the hunting tradition for the
benefit of white-tailed deer
and other wildlife.
WTU sets banquet
at Gateway Lodge
in Land O Lakes
CATCH A DREAM Tristen Crain, 14, of Missouri shot this
240-pound black bear last Friday in a Catch a Dream Hunt orga-
nized by DNR warden Pat Novesky. Crain, who has a lung dis-
ease, was assisted by houndsmen Eric Adamovich, Jeff Reeves
and Dan Klessig. His dad, Greg Crain, also joined the hunt.
--Contributed Photo
BIG BRUIN Adam Adamovich of Appleton and formerly of
Eagle River, shot this 346-pound bear on Sunday morning with
the help of hounds. --Contributed Photo
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 13A
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State fish hatcheries are
producing bumper crops of
fish for stocking this fall, lead-
ing state stocking trucks to
deliver additional walleye and
muskie to dozens of Wisconsin
lakes and streams this
September and October.
The fingerling production
at the warm-water hatcheries
has been very good this year
and thats going to translate
into great news for anglers
down the road, said Dave
Giehtbrock, statewide fish
production manager for the
Department of Natural
Resources (DNR).
Weve produced large fin-
gerling muskie and walleye
above our intended goals, and
were stocking nearly every
site at full quota.
Some stocking has already
occurred and more is on tap.
Tables showing how many
fish were planned for stocking
are now available online on
the DNRs fish stocking Web
page at dnr.wi.gov.
Giehtbrock said that cool
spring temperatures helped
production of muskie and
walleye by keeping the water
quality in the ponds at opti-
mal levels, boosting survival.
As a result, there were extra
fish available to be stocked
out at smaller sizes more
than 3 million walleye were
stocked out in late June
and there are surplus fish
available to be stocked at the
larger size.
Most of the fish stocked or
soon to be stocked are known
as large fingerlings, and
range in size from 5 to 9 inches,
depending on the species. They
were produced from eggs col-
lected from the wild this spring
or from hatchery stocks this
fall by DNR fish crews, were
hatched at DNR hatcheries
and raised at those facilities for
the intervening months.
How long before those fish
are big enough to be legally
kept by anglers depends again
on the species and the regula-
tions on the particular water
body, Giehtbrock said. The
splake being stocked in Lake
Superior will likely only need
a year or so to reach the 15-
inch minimum length limit,
while it will likely be eight to
10 years before the muskie
reach the 40-inch minimum
size limit set to go into effect
in spring 2012 on most state
waters.
The extra muskie and wall-
eye are stocked in waters
where biologists have request-
ed stocking. A formula is used
that distributes the fish equi-
tably among water bodies and
makes sure the carrying
capacity of the water receiv-
ing the fish is not exceeded.
The vast majority of Wis-
consins lakes and rivers sup-
port naturally reproducing
populations. Research has
shown that stocking in these
waters can hurt native fish
populations, but stocking
remains an important man-
agement tool for some waters.
DNR stocks fish to re-
establish formerly self-sus-
taining populations, to pro-
vide research data on the
effectiveness of stocking and
other related practices, and to
expand fishing opportunities
for Wisconsins anglers.
It was an excellent year
with excellent conditions
overall, and hatchery staff
made the most of the situa-
tion to produce large numbers
of healthy, high-quality fish
for stocking, Giehtbrock said.
Walleye, muskie being stocked
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FIRST CAST Gary Kowalke caught this 44-
inch muskie on his first cast last Thursday, Sept.
15, at about 2 p.m. on an area lake during a
company fishing outing. --Contributed Photo
Hunters looking forward to
the opening of Wisconsins
2011 duck season in the
northern duck zone this Sat-
urday, Sept. 24, should find
good numbers of ducks,
according to state wildlife offi-
cials.
The duck hunt in the north-
ern zone opens at 9 a.m. Sept.
24 and continues through
Nov. 22. Aside from opening
day, hunting hours begin 30
minutes before sunrise.
Hunters looking to go out of
area for waterfowl can head to
the new Mississippi River
zone, which was requested by
duck hunters. It also opens
Sept. 24 and runs through
Oct. 2, followed by a 12-day
split (closure), reopening Oct.
15 and running until Dec. 4.
The southern zone duck
season opens at 9 a.m. Oct. 1
through Oct. 9, and then clos-
es and reopens Oct. 15
through Dec. 4.
State Department of Natu-
ral Resources (DNR) water-
fowl experts predict good duck
hunting this fall.
Wisconsin waterfowlers
have potential for a good hunt-
ing season, said Kent Van
Horn, migratory game bird
ecologist for the DNR. Conti-
nental breeding surveys that
have been ongoing for 56 years
reported record-high numbers
of ducks this spring.
Van Horn said even with
excellent early season indica-
tions, local conditions and
scouting will be the most
important factors when pur-
suing ducks this fall.
Many of the ducks har-
vested in Wisconsin come
from birds that breed in the
states wetlands. The four
most abundant ducks in Wis-
consins fall hunting harvest
are mallards, wood ducks,
green-winged teal, and blue-
winged teal, Van Horn said.
The daily bag limit is six
ducks in total not to include
more than four mallards of
which only one may be a hen,
three wood ducks, one black
duck, two redheads, two
scaup, two pintail, and one
canvasback. The daily bag
limit for mergansers is five
and to include no more than
two hooded mergansers. The
daily bag limit for coot is 15.
As always, hunters who do
the early legwork scouting
for good wetland conditions
and observing what areas
birds are using will be the
ones having a good hunt, said
Van Horn Hunter survey
data in Wisconsin show that
duck hunters who scouted
three or more times harvested
an average of 14.7 ducks,
while those who did not scout
harvested an average of 4.8
ducks per season.
Licenses and HIP
Licenses and stamps
required for waterfowl hunt-
ing include a Wisconsin small
game license, a Wisconsin
waterfowl stamp and a federal
migratory bird stamp. The
$15 federal stamp can be pur-
chased at a U.S. post office.
Hunters will also have the
option of purchasing the fed-
eral stamp privilege at license
vendors for an additional
$2.50 surcharge. The pur-
chase will be noted on their
license. The stamp itself will
arrive weeks later in the mail.
State licenses, permits and
stamps are also available
through Wisconsins Online
Licensing Center.
Waterfowl and other migra-
tory bird hunters must also
register each year with the
federal Harvest Information
Program (HIP) which places
them on a list of hunters that
may receive a mailing asking
them to provide a summary of
their waterfowl harvest.
HIP registration is free and
should occur at the time
hunters purchases their
licenses or state waterfowl
stamps.
Duck season opens Saturday
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
The 2011 duck season will open
in Wisconsin this Saturday at 9
a.m., with most waterfowlers
going after mallards.
--STAFF PHOTO
Turkey hunters are
reminded that this falls wild
turkey hunting season will
see a big change in turkey
harvest registration proce-
dures.
The previous system, which
required hunters to transport
their turkey to a local regis-
tration station, is being
replaced by more convenient
phone-in and online registra-
tion options.
Hunters will be able to reg-
ister their turkey remotely
through the Department of
Natural Resources (DNR)
website or via the phone-in
Harvest Registration Hotline.
In-person registration sta-
tions will not be available.
All harvested turkeys must
be registered using one of the
following two methods:
Call the DNRs Harvest
Registration Hotline at 1-
(888) HUNT-WIS (486-8947).
This phone-in system will
accept touch-tone entries
only.
Visit the online Harvest
Registration System (Note:
link will become active once
season opens) via the DNR
website.
Hunters will be asked to
record a harvest registration
confirmation number on their
hunting permit at the end of
the call or online session.
Hunters will still have until 5
p.m. on the day after harvest
to register their turkey.
Part of the registration pro-
cess will involve determining
the age (adult or juvenile) and
the sex (gobbler or hen) of the
harvested turkey. In the field,
hunters can refer to page 18 of
the 2011 Wisconsin Small
Game Hunting Regulations
booklet for a graphic guiding
them through the aging and
sexing process. The same
graphic, as well as a full-color
identification guide, can by
found on the turkey registra-
tion page of the DNR website.
Turkey registration changes this fall
www.WildlifeExpressionsLtd.com 715-479-2034
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SPORTS
14A VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011
After losing two starters to
early injuries from an already
sparse lineup, the Three Lakes
Bluejays football team lost 40-8
to Lena-St. Thomas Aquinas
last Friday night.
Right from the first prac-
tice, we knew that numbers
would be a huge issue for the
team, said Three Lakes coach
Brian Fritz. Every week we
have a different challenge relat-
ing to numbers on the field.
In pregame warm-ups, Blue-
jays starting guard Hunter
Raatz went down with a neck
injury. Then, in the first quar-
ter, starting fullback/safety
Patrick Levandoski sprained
his foot.
Right from the first play we
knew it would be a long night,
said Fritz.
On the kickoff, Trenten Ste-
fonek, who was playing with a
sprained foot and ankle, kicked
the bottom of the tee and sent
the ball only 25 yards.
This is very unusual for
Trenten, said Fritz. Hes a
very good kicker and we can
usually count on his kicks to be
around the goal line.
Lena returned the kick for
an immediate touchdown and
the tone of the game was set. At
one point, there were so many
Three Lakes injuries that
offensive tackle Jake Schneider
had to take a series at quarter-
back.
Throughout the game, it
seemed whenever a Bluejay
player found success, it was
marred by injury shortly after.
Levandoski was having a
great game before he went
down, said Fritz. So were
Trenten Stefonek, Riley Lieb-
scher, Ben Wales, Brent
LaDuke and Anthony Briggs,
the backup fullback we brought
in to play line.
LaDuke got back into the
game in the second half and he
hit Wales for a 30-yard touch-
down pass in the fourth quarter.
LaDukes play and our
wide-receiver production have
been bright spots both in this
last game and in the season,
said Fritz. The greatest con-
cern, when you have to pass the
ball, is your quarterback mak-
ing bad decisions. LaDuke
made very few bad decisions.
Wide-receiver play by both
Wales and Liebscher has been
promising this season, added
the coach. LaDuke finished
with 150 yards passing and 50
yards rushing. Wales tallied 60
yards receiving.
I cant emphasize how
much effort the young men give
every single night, said Fritz.
The Jays are scheduled to
travel to White Lake to face
Elcho-White Lake Friday, Sept.
23, at 7 p.m.
Bluejays battle thru injuries in loss The Eagle River Area
Jaycees will host an NFL
Punt, Pass & Kick competi-
tion this Sunday, Sept. 25, at
1 p.m. at the Northland
Pines High School football
field.
The competition, which
allows youths to showcase
their talents in punting,
passing and kicking, with
scores based on distance and
accuracy, will be free of
charge and open to boys and
girls ages 6-15.
Age classification is as of
Dec. 31, 2011.
The top finishers from
each of 10 age groups at the
local competition will
advance to a Sectional com-
petition. The winners at the
Sectional will have their
scores compared with other
Sectional champions. The top
four from the pool of Section-
al champions advance to the
Green Bay Packers team
championship.
Age-group champions at
this level will be declared
NFL Punt, Pass & Kick team
champions. The top four fin-
ishers in the boys and girls
divisions within each age
bracket from the pool of all
team champions will qualify
for the national finals at an
NFL playoff game in January.
For competition informa-
tion, call Jed Lechleitner at
(715) 891-7633. Entry forms
are available online at NFLy-
outhfootball.com or from
12:15 until 1 p.m. on the day
of the event.
Punt, pass and kick set
in Eagle River Sunday
The Three Lakes Lady Jays
finished 10th among Division 3
teams running at Saturdays
55th annual Smiley Cross-
County Invitational hosted by
Wausau East High School.
Fifty-eight schools from
across the state gathered at the
American Legion Golf Course
in Wausau for the event, and
188 runners toed the line as
the gun sounded for the Divi-
sion 2 and 3 race.
Natalie Miller of Three
Lakes got a solid start and con-
tinued to improve her position
throughout the race, saying her
goal was to keep Auburndales
top runner, Danica Harrison,
within her sights.
Miller held on to earn a
medal, finishing fourth in Divi-
sion 3, and eighth overall. She
ran a personal best time of 15
minutes, 51 seconds. Toma-
hawks Rachel Sudbury was
the overall champion, finishing
in 15 minutes flat. Harrison
took Division 3, crossing the
line in 15:31.
Even though this is only
her second year of cross-coun-
try, Natalie does an exceptional
job of controlling her pace,
said Three Lakes coach Laurie
Levandoski. This is especially
important to do at Smiley due
to the caliber of competition
running.
Caitlin Vreeland-Griffin was
the second Three Lakes runner
to cross the line, finishing 39th
with a time of 18:41, followed
by Indi Yeager, who was 49th in
18:38. Teammate Sonya West-
fall finished 66th in 19:20, fol-
lowed by Jena Miles, who was
70th in 19:26. Peyton Radaj
finished in 84th place in 20:56.
We knew going into this
race that the level of competi-
tion at the Smiley would be a
great opportunity for improv-
ing race times due to the cal-
iber of athletes participating,
said Levandoski. I was very
proud of the girls and the level
of effort they put into their per-
formances. All of them ran
their personal best times at
Smiley.
The coach added that the
Bluejays knew they would face
strong competition from sever-
al of their sectional rivals,
including Edgar, Auburndale
and Marathon.
Smiley is the perfect time
for many schools to measure
themselves against other
teams and individuals they
will see later in the season as
they vie for the opportunity to
advance, she said.
The Bluejays will host the
Three Lakes Invite Thursday,
Sept. 22, in Sugar Camp at
4:30 p.m.
Miller medals in Smiley
as Jays place tenth
The Northland Pines
Eagles missed several scoring
opportunities in the first half
against Hurley and lost the
nonconference football game
35-20 at Eagle River last Fri-
day night.
After Hurley attempted an
onside kick to open the game,
the Eagles drove straight
down the field and scored on a
16-yard run from Johnny
Schwenn. Rich Mork kicked
the PAT to give Pines the ear-
ly 7-0 lead.
After Hurley had a three
and out, Pines took over and
dropped a wide open pass on
third down in Midget territo-
ry. Hurley took advantage of
the Eagles missed opportuni-
ty on their next possession
and drove the field, scoring on
a 20-yard touchdown pass.
On the Eagles next posses-
sion, Schwenn broke free
around the left side and
scored on a 49-yard touch-
down run. Morks PAT gave
Pines a 14-7 lead. The
Midgets then gave up the ball
on a fumble at their own 19-
yard line, but an interception
at the goal line stopped the
Eagles drive.
Pines Lucas Ferber then
intercepted the ball at the 45-
yard line and the Eagles drove
to the 18, but a dropped pass
in the end zone on fourth
down gave the ball back to
Hurley.
The Midgets drove down
field and scored on a 26-yard
run with 1:17 left in the half.
The PAT failed and the Eagles
maintained a 14-13 lead.
The Eagles Austin Ramesh
returned the ball to the 49,
but the drive stalled when
quarterback Cooper Kerner
was sacked at the Midgets 38-
yard line. Pines went into
halftime with a 14-13 lead as
Hurley intercepted the ball at
the 2-yard line with two sec-
onds remaining in the half.
We came out and played
solid football against a very
good opponent, said Pines
coach Jason Foster. We had
several opportunities in the
first half to build a bigger
lead, but were unable to capi-
talize inside of their 25-yard
line three separate times.
Hurley scored on its first
drive of the second half, get-
ting a 20-yard touchdown run.
The PAT run gave the
Midgets a 21-14 lead. Neither
team scored again until the
Midgets found the end zone on
a 4-yard touchdown run with
7:07 left in the fourth quarter
to make it 27-14.
Ramesh brought the Eagles
back with an 8-yard touch-
down run with 3:46 remaining
in the game to make it 27-20,
but an onside kick by Pines
was recovered by Hurley.
The Midgets put the game
away with a 60-yard touch-
down run in the final minutes
to make the final 35-20.
Our kids never gave up
and battled until the final
whistle, said Foster. Offen-
sively, we rushed the ball pret-
ty well, but did not execute
our passing game as well as
we had the previous two
weeks. We definitely dropped
and misplayed some passes
that we usually complete.
Ramesh finished the game
with 133 yards on 25 carries,
while Schwenn had 11 carries
for 93 yards. Mork had four
carries for 39 yards.
Defensively, we did some
things really well, but had a
few too many mental break-
downs to shut down Hurleys
powerful running attack, said
Foster.
Linebacker Ferber led
Pines with four solo tackles,
eight assists and one intercep-
tion; Alex Kornely had six solo
tackles and five assists; Brian
Kubacki had two solo tackles,
eight assists and one sack;
Ramesh had four solo tackles
and three assists; and Mork
had four solo tackles and one
assist.
I was proud of our effort
and believe we can really
build off of some of the posi-
tives from this game as the
season moves along, said Fos-
ter.
The Eagles, 3-2 overall and
1-1 in the WestPAC confer-
ence, will host Ironwood,
Mich., in the annual Home-
coming game this Friday,
Sept. 23, starting at 7 p.m.
Eagles miss opportunities in first half,
fall to Hurley 35-20 in nonleague game
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
Northland Pines junior running back Johnny Schwenn (No. 22) got
through the blocks of his line and raced down the sidelines for a 49-
yard touchdown run in the first quarter against Hurley last Friday
night. --Staff Photos By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
Northland Pines senior wide receiver Rich Mork
attempted to catch this pass from quarterback
Cooper Kerner in the end zone, but Hurleys Tim
Schmidtke broke up the near touchdown.
Wisconsin Public Television (WPT) will continue a
long tradition of broadcasting University of Wisconsin
Badger mens hockey games this fall with a schedule
of 13 games to be aired on The Wisconsin Channel.
This years schedule will feature two games broad-
cast live on the statewide network, along with 11
tape-delayed broadcasts of hockey action.
This seasons schedule begins with the tape-delayed
broadcast of the Friday, Oct. 7 home-opening contest
against Northern Michigan University at 10 p.m. The
second game of the series will be broadcast live at 7
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8. Also in the first month of the
season, The Wisconsin Channel one of WPTs digi-
tal stations will broadcast 10 p.m. tape-delayed cov-
erage of games against the University of North Dako-
ta Oct. 21 and 22 and the University of Nebraska-
Omaha Oct. 28 and 29.
The Wisconsin Channel is a Digital TV service of
Wisconsin Public Television (WPT) that is available
over-the-air and on many cable TV systems through-
out Wisconsin. Viewers should consult local TV list-
ings, wpt.org or their cable provider for more informa-
tion on how they can receive the Wisconsin Channel
in their region.
This seasons WPT mens hockey announcing team
will again include play-by-play from Robb Vogel. Color
commentators Ron Vincent and Theran Welsh will
appear on alternating games.
WPT is a service of the Educational Communica-
tions Board and University of Wisconsin-Extension.
The WPT network includes WHA-TV, Madison;
WPNE-TV, Green Bay; WHRM-TV, Wausau; WLEF-
TV, Park Falls; WHLA- TV, La Crosse; and WHWC-TV,
Menomonie-Eau Claire. Go Badgers!
Badger hockey fans
can view 13 games
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 15A
17 North Service
& Repair
4425 Hwy. 17 North, Eagle River (715) 479-6779
HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7 A.M. TO 5 P.M. CLOSED SAT. & SUN.
SPORTS
The Three Lakes Bluejays
boys soccer team lost 6-0 in
Phillips Monday in a Northern
Lights Conference game before
losing to the same team 3-2 the
next night in a nonconference
game.
The Jays controlled the
game for the first 26 minutes,
but missed three good scoring
opportunities due to missed
shots, according to Three Lakes
coach Jack Wales.
The Jays should have been
up 3-0, instead they were tied
0-0, said Wales.
Scoring started for the Log-
gers when Three Lakes had a
defensive miss on a ball that
shouldve been cleared. Then,
just before halftime, Phillips
tallied three more goals in a
two-minute stretch, widening
their lead to 4-0.
We couldnt recover, said
Wales. That was our fourth
game in three days and I think
it took a toll on the players.
The next night the Bluejays
came out hard and kept the
pressure on the Loggers
defense throughout the game.
Phillips scored their lone
goal of the first half on a penal-
ty kick, while Jordan Wales of
Three Lakes scored for the tie
at the half from an assist by
Fritz Campbell.
The second half saw Phillips
scoring on a direct kick outside
the box area at the 19:06 mark.
Cory Satterfield netted one for
the Jays assisted by Hunter
Mathison at 17:53.
The Jays played the Loggers
even the rest of the way until
the 1:09 mark on the clock,
when Phillips put up a long
shot on goal that just went
under the crossbar, giving
them the win.
Although we lost the game
3-2, it was a good game for us
as a team, said Wales. After
the game the night before, the
team talked a lot about charac-
ter and I think that we grew as
a team.
The Bluejays were sched-
uled for a game in Ironwood,
Mich., Tuesday, Sept. 20, at
4:30 p.m. Three Lakes will host
Phillips Thursday, Sept. 22, at
5 p.m. before hosting Bayfield-
Washburn Saturday, Sept. 24,
at 6 p.m.
Jays fall to Loggers
in two soccer games
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
NORTHLAND PINES
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Results of 9/17/11
SCORE BY QUARTERS
Sixth-graders 0-8-0-0 8
Lakeland 0-8-14-0 22
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First quarter: Clint Curtis, touch-
down-saving tackle; Syrus Langley,
tackle.
Second quarter: Zack Ciran, first
down; Cody Jantzen, fumble recov-
ery and PAT; Aaron Ewert, 17-yard
run; Mikey Alfonso, touchdown.
Third quarter: Bryce Lederer, 9-
yard kick return.
Fourth quarter: Trent Fessenbeck-
er, tackle for 10-yard loss; Zack Ciran,
17-yard run; Aaron Ewert first down.
Statistical leaders: Offensive line:
Jake Arnold, Nick Cato, Nick Justice;
defense: Cree Korich, Chase Kazda,
Silas Beattie.
Results of 9/15/11
SCORE BY QUARTERS
7th- & 8th-graders 0-0-6-6 12
Arbor Vitae/Woodruff 0-0-6-12 18
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First quarter: Jason Schwenn, run
for 25-yard gain.
Second quarter: Leo Calix pass to
Chris Sawalski for 10-yard gain,
Jason Schwenn run for 15-yard gain,
Jason Schwenn run for 18-yard gain.
Third quarter: Judd Klotz run for
16-yard gain; Jason Schwenn run for
12-yard gain; Leo Calix pass to Jason
Schwenn for 6-yard gain, 12-yard
run, touchdown; Conor Riley inter-
ception for 16-yard gain.
Fourth quarter: Jason Schwenn
85-yard punt return run for touch-
down.
Statistical leaders: Leo Calix, 8
tackles; Judd Klotz, 7 tackles; Dillon
Gagliano, Chris Sawalski, Conor
Riley and George Jackson, 4 tackles
each.
Results of 9/17/11
SCORE BY QUARTERS
Eagle River Blue 0-7-7-0 14
Eagle River Black 0-6-0-0 6
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
Second quarter: Silas Savage, 6
pts.; Aiden Lifschutz, 1 pt.; Pierce
Wursema 6 pts.; Kevin John, quarter-
back sack.
Third quarter: Silas Savage, 6 pts.;
Aiden Lifschutz, 1 pt.
Fourth quarter: Riley McGee, fum-
ble recovery.
Statistical leaders: Tackles, Mason
Birchbauer 10, Haskel Parker, Aiden
Lifschutz, Bradley Stephens and
Logan Hissom, 4 each.
Running yards: Pierce Wursema
90, Silas Savage 88, Foster Hakes 46,
Dane Gleason 44, Riley McGee 32,
Aiden Lifschutz 22, Ty Springer 12,
Ryan Walker 6.
Results of 9/17/11
SCORE BY QUARTERS
5th-graders 0-0-0-8 8
Lakeland 16-7-6-0 29
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First quarter: Brian Eades, 5-yard
run; Tyler Young, 3-yard run.
Second quarter: Patrick Heck,
fumble recovery; Ryan Peterson, 6-
yard run; Tyler Young, 4-yard run.
Third quarter: Patrick Heck, fum-
ble recovery; Tyler Young, 5-yard
run.
Fourth quarter: Ryan Peterson, 15-
yard touchdown run; Tucker Witt-
kopf, 2-point kick.
The Eagles Leif Offerdahl (No. 10) went for the
steal against a Lakeland midfielder during last
Tuesdays game against the T-Birds at Eagle
River. --Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW
The Northland Pines boys
soccer team defeated Lake-
land 3-0 and Antigo 5-1 in
Great Northern Conference
(GNC) play last week.
The wins put the Eagles, 4-
2, into second place behind
undefeated Mosinee, 6-0, in
league standings..
Alex Camp got the Eagles
on the scoreboard with a
penalty kick goal at the 33-
minute mark against Lake-
land last Tuesday. Fellow
defender Scott Moline gave
the Eagles a 2-0 lead five min-
utes later with a tremendous
50-yard direct kick.
The arch-rival T-birds did
not quit in the second half as
they worked hard to get back
in the game. But as the game
went on, the Eagles gained
control of the possession, and
iced the game with nine min-
utes remaining. Trevor
Laszczkowski slotted the ball
to Matt Meyer who hit the
one-touch shot past Lakeland
keeper Wren Umlauf.
I thought the guys played
a good game today and started
to relax a bit, which helped us
control the game, said Pines
coach Larry Favorite. The
entire team played well defen-
sively, especially the back five
of Camp, Moline, Greg Cham-
berlain, Steven Vogel and
keeper Evan Hartwig. Lake-
land had some shots, but none
were taken inside the 18-yard
box.
Hartwig had nine saves for
the Eagles.
On Thursday, the Eagles
hosted Antigo, who is still
winless in the GNC. Meyer got
the Eagles on the board just
three minutes in to get Pines
started.
A Jacob Bozic goal, followed
by a pair from Laszczkowski,
gave Pines the 4-0 halftime
lead.
A Mitch Moline crossing
pass to a Chris Paez goal in
the second half rounded out
the scoring for the Eagles,
who upped their overall
record to 10-3-1.
This week, the Eagles trav-
el to GNC foe Rhinelander, 3-
3 in GNC, Thursday, Sept. 22,
for a 5 p.m. contest. This Sat-
urday, Sept. 24, the Eagles
will host a double duel, play-
ing Iron Mountain, Mich., at
10 a.m. and Ashland at 1:30
p.m.
Eagles move into second
with two GNC victories
A group of Pines and Lakeland players went up for the ball after
a corner kick from the Eagles was aired out in front of the goal.
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CONFERENCE
BOYS SOCCER
STANDINGS
School W L
MOSINEE ....................................6 0
NORTHLAND PINES.................4 2
RHINELANDER..........................3 3
LAKELAND.................................3 3
MEDFORD...................................2 4
ANTIGO.......................................0 5
The Sugar Camp pool
league will hold a meeting
Wednesday, Sept. 21, at
Klingens Idlewilde Bar &
Campsite in Sugar Camp.
The meeting is set to begin
at 7 p.m. Those with a team
should send at least one rep-
resentative to the meeting.
Pool league
sets meeting
The Northland Pines girls
cross-country team took 13th
place in Division 2 at the Smi-
ley Cross-Country Invitation-
al hosted by Wausau East
High School.
On the boys side, there
arent enough runners to com-
prise a team. Top individual
finishers for the Pines boys
included Devin Sauvola, 10th
place in 17 minutes, 31 sec-
onds; Walker Nelson, 56th in
18:59; Jeromy Skibinski, 70th
in 20:23; Tyler Staege, 74th in
20:39 and Christian Svetnic-
ka, 79th in 21:20.
Emilie Robins continues to
put forth good individual
times for the girls, finishing
23rd at the invite in 16:52.
Other top finishers included
Taylor Neis, 56th in 17:59;
Kylie Rhode, 63rd in 18:09;
Callie Sanborn, 65th in 18:10;
Jordan Welnetz, 88th in 19:50
and Sara Schaetz, 92nd in
20:59.
I challenged the team this
week to run their best race of
the year, and we did, said
Pines coach Don Czarapata
Jr. Every single runner had
their best time of the year.
After a hard week of prac-
tice, Czarapata said the team
stepped up its focus and
intensity, while commitment
and attendance have both
improved.
Our next step is to contin-
ue the focus and keep work-
ing hard all the way to the
end of the season, said
Czarapata. We have four
more meets before the State
Championship. After that,
well need to continue doing
the right thing training
during the off-season.
Northland Pines will travel
to Sugar Camp for the Three
Lakes Invitational Thursday,
Sept. 22, at 4:30 p.m.
Eagles compete
in Smiley Invite
at Wausau East
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
After a 3-1 loss to Good-
man in volleyball last Thurs-
day, the Three Lakes Lady
Jays competed in the Menom-
inee Invite Saturday, defeat-
ing Lena but losing to Bondu-
el and Menominee.
The Bluejays are strug-
gling with keeping serves
inbounds, which was a con-
tributing factor in the loss to
Goodman, according to Three
Lakes coach Roni Anderson.
That is the key thing right
now that I see that is hurting
us as a whole, she said.
At the Menominee Invite,
the Lady Jays won all three
games against Lena, but still
had some serving issues. The
girls had more than 13 kills
between them and a couple of
strong blocks.
Lena was a tough team,
but their No. 1 player got hurt
during our game and I think
this was the key for us, said
Anderson. We could really
focus on the players who
replaced their No. 1 player
and thats what we did.
Three Lakes lost close
games to the Indians. The
girls played hard, but serving
accuracy hurt them in the
end.
Weve been averaging
about six points in a row, said
Anderson. For us to be com-
petive, we really need to
increase that every time we
get the ball.
Serving was also an issue
against Bonduel at the invita-
tional, against whom Three
Lakes lost all three games.
Bonduel has really good,
strong girls and they like to
block, said Anderson. The
Three Lakes girls just could
not stop this.
The Lady Jays were sched-
uled to travel to Elcho Tues-
day, Sept. 20. Three Lakes
will travel to Pembine Thurs-
day, Sept. 22, at 6 p.m. before
traveling to play in a tourna-
ment in Phillips Saturday,
Sept. 24.
Lady Jays get
win over Lena
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
16A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
INDOOR WEATHER FORECAST
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WEEK 3 DEADLINE: FRIDAY, SEPT. 23, AT NOON
This years contest is the same as in 2010. Simply circle the winner of each game list-
ed. Game 1 has added importance. See Game of the Week notes. Each game represents
one point. A perfect score is 16 points. Be sure to fill in the Tiebreaker section. For any game
ending in a tie, or if a game is delayed, postponed or rescheduled for any reason, the point
will be thrown out. See rules below.
You must be at least 8 years old to enter. To enter, clip along the dotted line, then place
game entry in the container at the co-sponsors retail outlet. Entrants must list name, address
and phone number clearly . . . information must be legible. Illegible entries will be thrown
out. Decisions of the Contest Judge (News-Review) are final.
Deposit your entry forms at the participating businesses listed below, or at the
Vilas County News-Review office. Deadline is noon Friday unless otherwise stated.
Before the Game
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FOOTBALL CONTEST OFFICIAL RULES
DEADLINE: NOON
DROP ENTRIES AT TRIGS SERVICE COUNTER.
FORTHE SEASON: SPECIAL
$
250 PRIZE
All 17 weekly winners, plus all other players during the season (with valid entries)
who have perfect scores (16 out of 16) will be entered into a Playoff Contest. This
will be a one-time Bowl Game/Playoff Game Contest. The winner of the Playoff will
get a $250 gift certificate good at any (winners choice) full-season contest co-
sponsor.
How to Play
For each of the 16 games listed at left,
circle the team you are picking to win.
Game of the Week
You must correctly pick the winner of
Game No. 1 to proceed in the con-
test. If you miss Game 1, you cannot
win the weekly contest, unless all
entrants miss Game 1.
1. The object is to pick the winner of 16 games. Games will include
professional and college games played Friday, Saturday or Sun-
day. The weekly winner will be the entrant with the most points
16 being the most possible. The weekly winner must have the
Game of the Week correct. If there is a tie, it goes to Tiebreaker I,
the total points scored by both teams in the weeks designated
game. If that fails to determine a winner, the judges will go to
Tiebreaker 2, total offensive yardage from scrimmage in the des-
ignated game. If there is still as tie, a drawing at the News-Review,
Eagle River, will be used.
2. No points are awarded on tie games, or in case any game is not
played for any reason during the scheduled week. Should the
News-Review make an error listing a game/games, those games
will be thrown out, not counted.
3. Entering the Football Contest constitutes permission by the
entrant for his or her name and photograph to be used for news
and reasonable promotion purposes at no charge.
4. Employees of this newspaper and their immediate families are
ineligible to participate. No entries will be accepted after the post-
ed deadline.
5. Any inquiry about a protest of weekly results must be made by
noon on the Friday following the announcement of the winner. The
decision of the Contest Administrator is final.
6. No purchase is necessary. Facsimile game entry forms will be
accepted. Enter contest by dropping entry forms into the Contest
Container at participating co-sponsors, or by faxing to 715-479-
6242.
7. Weekly deadline for entry will be noon Friday, except when noted
otherwise on the weekly entry form.
8. Neither this newspaper nor any co-sponsor will be responsible for
illegible entry forms or those lost, stolen or damaged in any way.
9. Limit: one entry per person per week. Each entry must represent
the original work of one entrant; group entries, systems or other
attempts to enter multiple entries will be disqualified. Filling out
extra forms and putting your friends or relatives names on them
violates this rule. Any such entries are destroyed prior to grading.

Please cut along dotted line


TIEBREAKER 1 Total points scored (both
teams) in Game of the Week
TIEBREAKER 2 Total offensive yards
(both teams) in game.
Deposit your entry at these sponsors
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_______________________
Winning Score ________________
________________
Week 3
Games of Sept. 24 & 25
Game of the Week
Green Bay at Chicago
2 Pittsburgh at Indianapolis
3 New England at Buffalo
4 San Francisco at Cincinnati
5 Denver at Tennessee
6 Detroit at Minnesota
7 N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia
8 Jacksonville at Carolina
9 Kansas City at San Diego
10 N.Y. Jets at Oakland
11 Arizona at Seattle
12 Atlanta at Tampa Bay
13 Arkansas at Alabama
14 LSU at W. Virginia
15 Notre Dame at Pittsburgh
16 Missouri at Oklahoma
CIRCLE THE WINNING TEAM
Name______________________________
Address ___________________________
City _______________________________
State, ZIP __________________________
Day Ph. ( ______ ) __________________
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1
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TUESDAY NIGHT LADIES
T&M Lanes
Results of 9/6/11
Team results: All in the Family Hair
Care 5, Tackle Box 2; T&MLanes 7, Land
O Lakes Pharmacy 0; Team 5 4, Team 6 3.
High team game: Team 6 735.
High team series: T&MLanes 2064.
High games: Yvette Garrison 170,
Amy Froemming 169, Jan Imse 161,
Renee Horst 160, Linda Sparks 157.
High series: Amy Froemming 487,
Linda Sparks 434, Becky Rohrman 422,
Karen Koskelin 421, Renee Horst 417.
Split conversion: Nancy Wig-
glesworth 5-10.
Results of 9/13/11
Team results: Bents Camp 2, Land O
Lakes Pharmacy 5; All in the Family Hair
Care 2, Sparo Coin 5; Tackle Box 0, T&M
Lanes 7.
High team game: T&MLanes 741.
High team series: T&MLanes 2140.
High games: Yvette Garrison 184, Kyha
Buell 183, Amy Froemming 169, Charlene
Bukoweicki and Ronee Horst 168.
High series: Kyha Buell 477, Amy
Froemming 475, Yvette Garrison 464,
Karen Koskelin 435, Ronee Horst 429.
STANDINGS W L
T&MLANES ...........................14 0
SPARO COIN............................8 6
ALL IN THE FAMILY ..............7 7
BENTS CAMP..........................6 8
LOL PHARMACY .....................5 9
TACKLE BOX ...........................2 12
WEDNESDAY
GOODFELLOWSHIP
T&MLanes
Results of 9/14/11
Team results: Rusty Nail 4, Lannys
Fireside 3; Northern Exposure bye;
Ramesh Motorsports 5, Great Lakes
Stone 2.
High team game: Northern Exposure
824.
High team series: Northern Expo-
sure 2382.
High games: Josh Horst 200, Ron
Buell Jr. 196, Doug Horstman 191, Mike
Froemming 188, Gunk Buel Sr. 187.
High series: Jason Wehrmeyer 538,
Mike Froemming 528, Doug Horstman
494, Ron Buell Jr. and Mike Bukoweicki
481.
STANDINGS W L
RUSTY NAIL ...........................11 3
RAMESH MOTORSPORTS ....10 4
NORTHERN EXPOSURE.........9 5
GREAT LAKES STONE............6 8
LANNYS FIRESIDE.................6 8
THURSDAY NITE
MENS LEAGUE
T&M Lanes
Results of 9/15/11
Team results: Northern Exposure 0,
FMNFloral 7; Northern Carpets 4, Black
Bear Industries 3.
High team game: Black Bear Indus-
tries 795.
High team series: FMN Floral 2265.
High games: Craig Mansfield 226,
Dale Grosso 181, Chad Hosey 179, Rick
Schacht 178, Gary Goral 176.
High series: Dale Grosso 519, Rick
Schacht 516, Gary Goral 514, Bob Bick-
ler 499, Craig Mansfield 498
STANDINGS W L
NORTHERN CARPETS.............9 5
FMN FLORAL...........................9 5
BLACK BEAR INDUSTRIES ..8 6
NORTHERN EXPOSURE........2 12
THURSDAY SENIORS
Eagle Lanes
Results of 9/15/11
High games, women: Karen Grace
219, Sara Klein 165, Doris Marquard
150.
High games, men: Earl Newton 203,
Jim Grace 180, John Klein 170, Frank
Borkowicz 150.
LADIES NIGHT OUT
Eagle Lanes
Results of 9/14/11
Team results: Harrys Market 3,
Twelve Pines 4; Darrells Dummies 3,
Pauls Pump-N-Pantry 4; Boones Build-
ing Supply 5, Rockettes 2.
High team game: Twelve Pines 926.
High team series: Boones Building
Supply 2638.
High games: Sue Sodeberg 192,
Lynne Behrendt 180, Susie Erickson
179, Bonnie St. Louis 178.
High series: Lynne Behrendt 512,
Susie Erickson 488, Sue Sodeberg 466,
Sue Ingram 461.
STANDINGS W L
BOONES BUILDING SUPPLY....5 2
PAULS PUMP-N-PANTRY.............4 3
TWELVE PINES...........................4 3
HARRYS MARKET.....................3 4
DARRELLS DUMMIES ..............3 4
ROCKETTES................................2 5
High series, women: Karen Grace
487, Sara Klein 440, Doris Marquard
420.
High series, men: Earl Newton 521,
Jim Grace 496, John Klein 470, Frank
Borkowicz 400.
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 17A
SPORTS
Boys Soccer
Thurs., Aug. 25 at Peshtigo 4:30 PM
Thurs., Sept. 1 Iron Mountain 6 PM
Tues., Sept. 6 at Phillips 5 PM
Thurs., Sept. 8 Phelps 6 PM
Sat., Sept. 10 at Wausau Newman Tourn. 9 AM
Thurs., Sept. 15 Bayfield/Washburn 5 PM
Tues., Sept. 20 at Ironwood - LL Wright 4:30 PM
Thurs., Sept. 22 Phillips 5 PM
Tues., Sept. 27 at Phelps 5 PM
Tues., Oct. 4 Ironwood - LL Wright 5 PM
Thurs., Oct. 6 at Bayfield/Washburn 4:30 PM
Sat., Oct. 8 Regional TBA
Tues., Oct. 11 Regional TBA
Thurs., Oct. 13 Regional TBA
Thurs., Oct. 20 Sectional TBA
Sat., Oct. 22 Sectional TBA
Girls Volleyball
Sat., Aug. 27 at Prentice Invite 9:45 AM
Tues., Aug. 30 Coleman 6 PM
Thurs., Sept. 1 at NP Triangular w/Houghton 5 PM
Thurs., Sept. 15 Goodman 6 PM
Sat., Sept. 17 at Menominee Invite 10:30 AM
Tues., Sept. 20 at Elcho 6 PM
Thurs., Sept. 22 at Pembine 6 PM
Sat., Sept. 24 at Phillips Tournament TBA
Tues., Sept. 27 Crandon 6 PM
Thurs., Sept. 29 Wabeno 6 PM
Tues., Oct. 4 Phelps 6 PM
Thurs., Oct. 6 at Florence 6 PM
Tues., Oct. 11 at Laona 6 PM
Thurs., Oct. 13 at White Lake 6 PM
Tues., Oct. 18 Regional TBA
Fri., Oct. 21 Regional TBA
Sat., Oct. 22 Regional TBA
Thurs., Oct. 27 Sectional TBA
Sat., Oct. 29 Sectional TBA
THIS AD PAID FOR BY THE FOLLOWING BUSINESSES:
Phelps Knights
Volleyball
Thurs., Aug. 25 at Goodman Tourn. 4 PM
Tues., Aug. 30 Gresham 6 PM
Thurs., Sept. 1 at Butternut 6 PM
Tues., Sept. 6 at Wakefield 6 PM
Thurs., Sept. 8 at Watersmeet 4:45 PM
Thurs., Sept. 15 at Laona 6 PM
Fri., Sept. 16 Watersmeet 6 PM
Tues., Sept. 20 Crandon 6 PM
Thurs., Sept. 22 Florence 6 PM
Sat., Sept. 24 at Phillips Tourn. 8:15 AM
Tues., Sept. 27 Elcho 6 PM
Thurs., Sept. 29 at Pembine 6 PM
Tues., Oct. 4 at Three Lakes 6 PM
Thurs., Oct. 6 Wabeno 6 PM
Tues., Oct. 11 at White Lake 6 PM
Thurs., Oct. 13 Goodman 6 PM
Tues., Oct. 18 WIAA Regional 7 PM
Soccer
Thurs., Aug. 25 at Kingsford 5 PM
Tues., Aug. 30 Gresham 4 PM
Thurs., Sept. 8 at Three Lakes 6 PM
Sat., Sept. 10 Pines JV Noon
Tues., Sept. 13 at Bayfield/Washburn 5 PM
Thurs., Sept. 15 Ironwood 4:30 PM
Sat., Sept. 17 at Lakeland JV 1 PM
Tues., Sept. 20 Phillips 4:30 PM
Tues., Sept. 27 Three Lakes 5 PM
Thurs., Sept. 29 Bayfield/Washburn 4:30 PM
Tues., Oct. 4 at Phillips 5 PM
Thurs., Oct. 6 at Ironwood 4 PM
Tues., Oct. 11 WIAA TBD
Varsity Football
Fri., Aug. 26 at West Iron County 6:30 PM
Fri., Sept. 2 Menomonee Indians 7 PM
Fri., Sept. 9 North. Elite Pred. 7 PM
Fri., Sept. 16 Lena/STAA 7 PM
Fri., Sept. 23 at Elcho/White Lake 7 PM
Fri., Sept. 30 at Laona/Wabeno 7 PM
Fri., Oct. 7 Crandon 7 PM
Fri., Oct. 14 at Florence 7 PM
Cross Country
Sat., Aug. 27 at Rhinelander Invitational 10 AM
Thurs., Sept. 1 at Marathon Invitational 4:30 PM
Thurs., Sept. 8 at Phillips Invite 4 PM
Sat., Sept. 17 at Smiley Invite Wausau East 8:30 AM
Thurs., Sept. 22 Three Lakes Invitational 4 PM
Thurs., Sept. 29 at Athens Invitational 4:30 PM
Mon., Oct. 3 at Northland Pines 4 PM
Sat., Oct. 8 at Tomahawk Invite 10 AM
Tues., Oct. 11 at North. Lakes Conf. Meet 4 PM
Fri., Oct. 21 Sectional TBA
Sat., Oct. 29 State at Wisconsin Rapids TBA
Northland Pines Eagles Three Lakes Bluejays
Varsity Football
Fri., Aug. 26 Calumet 7 PM
Fri., Sept. 2 at Bessemer 7 PM
Fri., Sept. 9 at Hancock 6 PM
Fri., Sept. 16 Hurley 7 PM
Fri., Sept. 23 Ironwood
(Homecoming) 7 PM
Fri., Sept. 30 at Houghton Central 6 PM
Fri., Oct. 7 at West Iron County 6:30 PM
Fri., Oct. 14 LAnse 7 PM
Cross Country
Sat., Aug. 27 at Rhinelander TBD
Tues., Aug. 30 at Mosinee 4:15 PM
Thurs., Sept. 8 at Phillips TBD
Sat., Sept. 10 at Mellen Noon
Sat., Sept. 17 at Wausau East 8:30 AM
Thurs., Sept. 22 at Three Lakes 4 PM
Mon., Oct. 3 Invitational vs.
Three Lakes, Florence,
Rhinelander 4 PM
Sat., Oct. 15 at Rhinelander
vs. Antigo, Lakeland,
Medford Area, Mosinee,
Tomahawk, Rhinelander 10 AM
Girls Volleyball
Thurs., Aug. 25 at Crandon 5:30 PM
Tues., Aug. 30 Hurley, Bessemer 5 PM
Thurs., Sept. 1 Three Lakes, Houghton 5 PM
Tues., Sept. 6 Mosinee 7 PM
Thurs., Sept. 8 Park Falls 5:30 PM
Sat., Sept. 10 at Ashland 10 AM
Tues., Sept. 13 at Antigo 7 PM
Sat., Sept. 17 at Antigo Tourn. 10 AM
Tues., Sept. 20 Medford Area 5:30 PM
Sat., Sept. 24 NP Tournament 10 AM
Tues., Sept. 27 Rhinelander 5:30 PM
Thurs., Sept. 29 at West Iron County 5:15 PM
Tues., Oct. 4 Lakeland 5:30 PM
Tues., Oct. 11 at Tomahawk 5:30 PM
Sat., Oct. 15 at Ashland Tourn. (JV) TBD
Sat., Oct. 15 at Antigo Conf. Tourn. 10 AM
Tues., Oct. 18 Regionals TBD
SUPPORT SCHOOL SPORTS Become a sponsor. Call the News-Review (715) 479-4421
2011 Fall High School Sports Schedule
Boys Soccer
Thurs., Aug. 25 at Antigo 5 PM
Sat., Aug. 27 NP Double Dual vs.
Merrill, Kingsford 10 AM
Tues., Aug. 30 Rhinelander 5 PM
Thurs., Sept. 1 Medford Area 5 PM
Thurs., Sept. 8 at Mosinee 5 PM
Sat., Sept. 10 at Hayward 2 PM
Tues., Sept. 13 Lakeland 5 PM
Thurs., Sept. 15 Antigo 5 PM
Thurs., Sept. 22 at Rhinelander 5 PM
Sat., Sept. 24 NP Double Dual vs.
Ashland, Iron Mountain 10 AM
Thurs., Sept. 29 at Medford Area 4:30 PM
Tues., Oct. 4 Mosinee 4:30 PM
Thurs., Oct. 6 at Lakeland 7 PM
Tues., Oct. 11 Regionals TBD
WalkAbout Paddle & Apparel
M&I Bank
Eagle River St. Germain Three Lakes
Boones Building Supply
Ramesh Motorsports
Nelsons Ace Hardware
First National Bank
Eagle River Phelps St. Germain Three Lakes
Parsons of Eagle River
Anderson Insurance
Independent Insurance Agent
Leifs Cafe
Vilas County News-Review
&
The Three Lakes News
Trigs
HALL OF FAMERS The International Snow-
mobile Hall of Fame in Eagle River inducted its
newest members into the hall Saturday evening.
They included, from left, Les Pinz of Isle, Minn.,
Wayne Davis of Plymouth, Minn., and Bill Man-
son of Rockford, Mich. Inductee Gordy Radtke of
Wausau, was unable to attend the ceremony.
--Contributed Photo
The Northland Pines vol-
leyball team faced four Great
Northern Conference (GNC)
opponents last week, includ-
ing three in a conference tour-
nament at Antigo Saturday.
The Eagles opened the
week with a 3-0 loss at Antigo
last Tuesday. Pines lost 14-25,
16-25 and 23-25.
We played timid and tenta-
tive in the first two games and
then, after we realized we
could compete with them, we
came alive and at one point
led the third game 22-18, said
Pines coach Margo Rogers
Anderson. We made a few
unforced errors and ended up
losing 23-25, but overall the
final game was a positive con-
fidence builder for the girls.
Carly Bohnen led the
Eagles with nine kills. Paige
Healy had five service aces
and Nicole Sullivan finished
with seven solo blocks.
Northland Pines then
returned to Antigo Saturday
for the conference tourna-
ment, playing Tomahawk,
Lakeland and Medford. In the
next conference tournament
Oct. 15 at Tomahawk, Pines
will face Antigo, Rhinelander
and Mosinee.
In the first round Saturday,
the Eagles fell to GNC
favorite Tomahawk 3-0. The
game scores were 6-25, 8-25
and 10-25.
Tomahawk has a great
program and those girls have
been playing volleyball
together for years, said
Rogers Anderson. We made
quite a few unforced errors
that helped them beat us
handily, but the fact is, our
team needs to continue to get
better at serve receive and
defense so we can handle a
quick offense like that.
The coach said Pines will
continue to improve, but it
will take time.
We have the athletes to be
able to compete with a team
like Tomahawk, she said. We
need to continue to polish our
fundamentals and gain confi-
dence so we can eventually be a
force to reckon with in this con-
ference. Unfortunately, that
doesnt happen overnight.
Lakeland defeated North-
land Pines 3-0 in the second
round, winning 8-25, 11-15
and 18-25.
Once again, it took two
games to warm up. We can
beat some of these teams, but
we just dont have the confi-
dence yet, said Rogers Ander-
son. I say yet because I know
its going to happen. Our girls
are working too hard and
have too many moments of
brilliance to not come out on
top at some point.
In the final round, the
Eagles fell to Medford 3-1.
Pines lost 15-15 and 19-25
before bating the Raiders 25-
23 in game three. Medford
bounced back to take the
fourth game 13-25.
We stayed with them for
the first two games and then
it all came together in the
third. Our intensity and fire
on the court was truly fun to
watch, said Rogers Anderson.
We continue to work on com-
munication and energy in
practice. When our girls have
confidence and are communi-
cating on the court, we can
really play volleyball.
On the day, Sullivan led
Pines with 13 solo blocks,
Abby Alft had eight service
aces and Bohnen finished
with 12 kills.
The Eagles were scheduled
to host Medford on Tuesday of
this week during Homecom-
ing week and will host a tour-
nament this Saturday, Sept.
24, starting at 10 a.m. in the
field house. Teams in the tour-
nament include Crandon,
Coleman, Wabeno, Wausau-
kee, Menominee Indian,
LAnse, Mich., and Onton-
agon, Mich.
_____________
If youre trying to achieve,
there will be roadblocks. Ive
had them; everybody has had
them. But obstacles dont
have to stop you. If you run
into a wall, dont turn around
and give up. Figure out how to
climb it, go through it, or work
around it.
Michael Jordan
Eagles battle GNC opponents;
to host tournament this Saturday
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
Gary
Ridderbusch
N-R Editor
Paula
Hendrickson
Tailgater
Painless
Pete
Dentist
Larry
Snedden
Youth Coach
Rich
Javenkoski
Sports Analyst
Bruce
Weber
Big B Grocer
PROBABLE
WINNERS
PREDICTED
HERE IN THE
EAGLE LINE
Overall Record 22-12 25-9 25-9 26-8 26-8 23-11
Winningest Percentage .647 .735 .735 .764 .764 .657
Last Weeks Tally 12-5 14-3 15-2 14-3 14-3 13-4
Green Bay
at Chicago Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay Green Bay
New England
at Buffalo New England New England New England New England New England New England
Jacksonville
at Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina Carolina
Denver at
Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee Tennessee
N.Y. Giants at
Philadelphia N.Y. Giants Philadelphia Philadelphia N.Y. Giants Philadelphia Philadelphia
Houston at
New Orleans New Orleans New Orleans New Orleans New Orleans New Orleans Houston
Detroit at
Minnesota Detroit Detroit Detroit Detroit Detroit Detroit
Miami at
Cleveland Cleveland Miami Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland
San Francisco
at Cincinnati Cincinnati San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco San Francisco Cincinnati
N.Y. Jets
at Oakland N.Y. Jets N.Y. Jets N.Y. Jets N.Y. Jets N.Y. Jets N.Y. Jets
Baltimore
at St. Louis Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore Baltimore
Kansas City
at San Diego San Diego San Diego San Diego San Diego San Diego San Diego
Atlanta at
Tampa Bay Tampa Bay Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Tampa Bay Tampa Bay
Arizona
at Seattle Seattle Arizona Arizona Arizona Arizona Arizona
Pittsburgh at
Indianapolis Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh
Washington
at Dallas Washington Dallas Dallas Washington Washington Dallas
COLLEGE
Wisconsin at
South Dakota Wisconsin Wisconsin Wisconsin Wisconsin Wisconsin Wisconsin
Stop the Spread of Invasive Aquatic Plants
Become a volunteer lake monitor. (715) 365-8984
The Eagle River Dart
League will hold a meeting
Monday, Sept. 26, at 7:30 p.m.
at Club Denoyer.
At least one member from
each team is required to
attend the meeting.
For more information, con-
tact Tammy at (715) 477-
2494.
_____________
Winners never quit and
quitters never win.
Vince Lombardi
Dart league sets meeting
WEEK TWO WINNER Barb Rehm of Wild Eagle Corner
Store presented $100 to Vilas County News-Review Football
Contest week two winner, Jerry Stadler, of Eagle River.
--Staff Photo By JASON McCREA
Scene from the past
on the Eagle Chain
It was a scene out of the early 1900s, a steamboat taking
sightseers for a tour on the Eagle River Chain of Lakes. The
Upper Mississippi Steamboat Group had its third annual
outing in the Eagle River area, bringing some nostalgia to
the Chain of Lakes last week.
--Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
To MAINES, Pg. 19A To ROONEY, Pg. 19A
EDITORIALOPINION/COMMENTARY
18A VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011
PRINTED
ON
RECYCLED
PAPER
SINCE 1985
Andy
Rooney
Eagle River Vindicator Established 1886
Eagle River Review 1890 ~ Vilas County News 1892
VILAS
COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW
M
EMBER
Published weekly by Eagle River Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1929, 425 W. Mill Street at
Eagle River, Wisconsin 54521 e-mail: erpub@nnex.net www.vcnewsreview.com
Member of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association and the National Newspaper Association
Publisher KURT KRUEGER
Editor GARY RIDDERBUSCH
Assistant Editor ANTHONY DREW
Lifestyle Editor MARIANNE ASHTON
Production Manager JEAN DREW
Assistant Production Manager ELIZABETH BLEICHER
Photo Technician SHARINAADAMS
Copy Editor/Lead Typesetter JEAN DEDITZ
Proofreader JEAN FITZPATRICK
Circulation Manager ELIZABETH SCHMIDT
Accounting Manager TERRY POSTO
Advertising Consultants MARY JO ADAMOVICH
DIANE GLEASON
MARCIA HEYER
MADELINE MATHISEN
JASON MCCREA
Our readers, communities
share credit for national honor
The Vilas County News-Review and its sister
publication in Oneida County, The Three Lakes
News, have been named first in the nation in the
Community Service Award category of the
National Newspaper Associations (NNA) Better
Newspaper Contest for 2011.
It is regarded by many as the highest honor
the NNA can bestow on a newspaper that pro-
fesses to be a community newspaper, but the
credit has to be shared. We couldnt win such an
honor without the support of our readers and
advertisers, and our award-winning coverage is
made possible by dynamic community events.
Generous readers donated $55,000 last year
to the Warm The Children program, clothing 550
children in preparation of winter. Community
leaders organized some of the most interesting
and well-attended special events in Wisconsin,
including the AMSOIL World Championship
Snowmobile Derby, Klondike Days, Northwoods
Relay For Life and Cranberry Fest.
While our advertisers benefit from the infor-
mative ads they place in our publications, their
support helps us accomplish award-winning cov-
erage of local government, community events,
school news, high school sports, the arts, the
great outdoors and breaking news. We invite all
businesses that recognize the importance of com-
munity to become part of this partnership.
One of those projects is the annual Salute to
Emergency Personnel special edition, which rec-
ognizes more than 700 firefighters, EMTs and
law enforcement officers for their life-saving con-
tributions to society. It was part of the News-
Reviews entry for the national award.
Our subscribers do more than keep up on
current news, upcoming events, local govern-
ment, sports, outdoors and public sentiment on
the issues. Their support gives us the circulation
to be a meaningful advertising tool, and that is
the revenue that makes us financially viable. No
newspaper, or any media outlet for that matter,
can defend freedom of speech and keep govern-
ment in check if they arent successful.
There are a lot of outlets people can use to
promote a business or service. The good news is
that many business owners recognize that a com-
munity newspaper, such as the News-Review,
provides many residual benefits. Most alternative
outlets dont deliver the news, promote and cover
community events or publish pictures of your
children and grandchildren.
A community newspaper does all that and a
lot more. They are a government watchdog and a
third-party source for verifying that public notices
are published correctly. They create a historical
record with every issue. A community newspaper
represents the public and its only power is pro-
vided by the citizens who support it.
Though honored to be recognized and
extremely proud of our small but talented staff,
the credit is not all ours to take. The volume and
quality of our work is a direct reflection of the
communities we serve cities and towns that
thrive on a volunteer spirit that is second to none.
Weve always believed, and now NNA judges
have confirmed, that the News-Review is one of
the best community newspapers in America!
Behind the editorial we
Members of the Vilas County News-Review
editorial board include Publisher Kurt Krueger,
Editor Gary Ridderbusch and Assistant Editor
Anthony Drew.
Our View
OUR REPUBLIC is as
much endangered today by the
indifference of millions of peo-
ple, inheritors of the traditions
and opportunities of this
greatest of all nations, to their
own duties and responsibili-
ties, as it is by the activities of
the open and secret enemies of
American institutions.
This is Constitution Week,
Sept. 17-23. Half of our citizens
do not take the trouble to vote.
Most of the remainder consider
their duty to their country dis-
charged when they have cast
their ballot and go about their
business during the intervals
between political campaigns,
giving little or no thoughts to
the national welfare.
Elements antagonistic to
American institutions are not
so indifferent or so idle. They
are ceaselessly at work, in the
open and under cover. They
are never off the job of under-
mining the faith of the people
in their country, in spreading
unrest, in arousing discontent,
envy and hatred those pas-
sions out of which violent revo-
lutions are fashioned.
It is human nature to take
an inheritance for granted, to
accept it as a matter of course,
to deem it unnecessary to
defend that which others have
fought for that it might be ours.
And so, with many voices
raised in criticism of American
institutions, American tradi-
tions and American ideals, few
think it worthwhile to call
attention to the incalculable
value of these institutions, tra-
ditions and ideals.
How is a new generation to
learn that there is anything
worthwhile in them? To fight
for ones country when its life is
threatened by violence is noble
and heroic; to stand up for it in
peace time is a virtue quite as
necessary. And unless there be
such virtue in citizenship, our
traditions will be forgotten, our
ideals neglected and our insti-
tutions will crumble.
So, what are some of the
things the Constitution should
mean to you? Heres a list.
It establishes a stable and
responsible government. It
makes you a citizen of the
United States, if native born.
It gives you citizenship, if for-
eign born, on complying with
liberal naturalization laws.
It allows you a voice in the
government through the offi-
cials whom you help to elect.
It guarantees you life, liber-
ty and the pursuit of happi-
ness. It defends your rights
even against the government
itself. It makes you equal with
all men before the law.
It confirms your religious
freedom, and liberty of con-
science. It accords you free,
lawful speech. It guarantees
you together with all people
the right of peaceful assembly.
It permits you to petition the
government to right your
wrongs. It guards your proper-
ty rights.
It prohibits the government
from taking your property
without due process of law. It
lets you hold any office in the
nation for which you are quali-
fied. It enables you to become
a citizen of any state. It
insures your right of trial by
jury of your fellow men.
It grants you the right of
habeas corpus.
It assures you a speedy tri-
al. It permits your having
counsel for defense. It prevents
your being tried again if once
acquitted. It lends you the
power of government to com-
pel witnesses to appear in
your behalf. It relieves you
from compulsion to testify
against yourself. It forbids
excessive bail.
It forbids excessive fines or
cruel punishment. It protects
you from slavery in any form.
It sanctions your bearing arms
for the protection of your life
and home. It secures your
home from search except by
lawful warrant. And, it guar-
antees you that the legal obli-
gation of contracts shall not be
impaired.
* * *
Two quick observations
from the sports world. One: In
Major League Baseball (think
Milwaukee Brewers), why
cant they make a batting
glove that doesnt need to be
rewrapped by the batter after
every pitch?
Two: Maybe theres a rea-
son American fans find it hard
to get excited about profession-
al tennis superstars. It isnt
easy to be a sportswriter, a
tennis announcer or a print
media proofreader.
At the recent U.S. Open,
here are the names of a few
mens players: Janko Tipsare-
vic, Alexandr Dolgopolov,
Sergiy Stakhovsky, Somdev
Devvarman, Andreas Silje-
strom and Nenad Zimonjic.
Check out these profession-
al womens game competitors.
Theres Mariya Koryttseva,
Tatiana Poutchek, Magdalena
Rybarikova, Kateryna Bon-
darenko, Francesca Schiavone,
Silvia Solar-Espinosa and
Akgul Amanmuradova.
Theres also Svetlana
Kuznetsova, Jarmila Gajdoso-
va, Caroline Wozniacki, Katari-
na Srebotnik, Alla Kudryavtse-
va, Ekaterina Makarova, Zhang
Shuai, Agnieszka Radwanska
and Tarmarine Tanasugarn.
My guess is they are not
from America!
Our Constitution is a citizens responsibility
YOU STRIKE A match,
touch it carefully to neatly
arranged tinder and soon you
have a fire to last the ages.
Put together a bundle of
cattails, a half-dozen decoys,
a cool autumn morning, add a
touch of 12-year-old mixed
with a 20-gauge shotgun, and
before you know it you have a
duck hunter fever burning in
the breast of a boy.
Long before I reached the
age of 12, I knew that more
than anything in the world, I
wanted to be a duck hunter.
From the first time I brushed
toddler fingers over the
breast feathers of a mallard
my dad brought home from
the hunt, I knew ducks were
special.
It seemed like I would nev-
er be old enough to hunt, but
finally, almost a month after
my 12th birthday, opening
day of duck season rolled
around. My dad and I pad-
dled our canoe to the large
bog island in the center of
Rice Lake where members of
the Long or Maines families
had already sat in duck
blinds for over 30 years
before that October 1961
afternoon when I took my
place in the mystical fraterni-
ty of duck hunters.
In a year when duck num-
bers were down, the bag limit
was just two ducks. It could
have been 200 as far as my
shooting was concerned. I
proved to be an excellent
practitioner of shooting holes
in the atmosphere, but not so
excellent at hitting the ducks
flying through that atmo-
sphere.
We took home two mal-
lards that day, and I claimed
one of them fell to my shot,
even though I knew in my
heart it was my dads 12-
gauge that brought it down.
It didnt matter. I was hope-
lessly addicted to duck hunt-
ing. Fifty years later and I
still am.
During those first two
years of my duck hunting
career, Dad and I could and
did get up virtually every
weekday morning at 4:30 to
head out duck hunting.
We could hunt until 7:30,
after which we would head
home, I would do a quick
A new fire has been kindled
OLD FRIENDS may be
the best friends, but new
friends you dont know very
well are good, too. Theyre
not only good, but they can
be less trouble than old
friends. You know how it is
with old friends.
New friends, by which I
mean friends with whom you
have no serious relationship,
make life pleasant. These
people are passing-on-the-
street friends, elevator
friends, small-business
friends like the girl at the
checkout counter. It would
take a week for me to count
all the minor friends I have
and then Id forget quite a
few until I saw them again.
So would you.
From day to day these
acquaintances are important
to how I feel about the whole
world. If all I did was read
about people in the newspa-
per or watch them on televi-
sion, Id always be depressed.
Coming in contact every day
with good people who are
minor friends renews my
faith in mankind, a faith that
was destroyed the previous
evening watching television
news, where most of the peo-
ple were bad, sad or dead.
You gain and lose these
friends all the time. I lost
two this week when the man
and woman who run the dry
cleaners where Ive been
going for seven years, sold
the business and moved to
Florida. Ill never see them
again and Im sorry, because
it was always a pleasure to
leave a piece of clothing with
them or pick one up. They
did their job, I paid them, we
smiled, exchanged a few
words and I left. Taking a
freshly cleaned and pressed
suit from the cleaners whose
proprietors are minor friends
is one of lifes small plea-
sures.
The beauty of friends you
dont know well is that you
have no obligation to them
except to be pleasant, and
they have none to you. You
dont worry that their mother
is dying of cancer because
They dont disagree,
fight or borrow money
People Make the Difference
By Byron McNutt
Trails
& Tales
By
Will Maines
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 19A
OP-ED/READER OPINION
change of clothes and Dad
would drive me uptown to
school.
There were mornings of
spectacular sunrises, mornings
of fog so thick you couldnt see
a foot past your nose, mornings
when ice skimmed half an inch
thick across most of Rice Lake
and mornings when rain or
snow pelted us unrelentingly.
I loved all of them. I killed
all of an honest three ducks
that first season. I may have
been the poorest shot among
all the boys in town, but there
was no other who could match
my missionary zeal for duck
hunting.
We spent a lot of mornings
in a blind of cattails and bal-
sam boughs, Dad watching
south, me north. What a won-
derful sound it was to hear the
slash of wind through pinions
of duck wings as they swept
past us with a sound like jet
engines roaring.
Believe me, when Dad said,
Keep your head down, dont
move, and then, those most
magical words, Shoot em, I
got down, didnt move and
shot. Boy, oh boy, did I shoot. I
didnt hit much, but those few
times I did, you could not
imagine the joy I felt, the
swelling of pride in my chest.
I have learned much about
ducks and duck hunting in 50
years. You might even say I
have become fairly proficient
at the game, though not nearly
as proficient as I would have
myself believe. No duck hunter
ever is.
But I have learned much,
and last weekend I found
myself sitting in a duck blind
again with a soon-to-be 13-
year-old for the opening morn-
ing of the youth duck hunt.
Nate and I set up shop in a
blind from which I had one of
my best-ever Wisconsin duck
season openers when I was 13,
the details of which are still
crystal-clear in my mind.
Im hoping last Saturday
will be the same kind of day for
Nate. His dad, Paul, and broth-
er, Nick, were in another blind
about 200 yards south of us.
Nate reminded me of myself
at the same age, wide-eyed
and eager for the ducks to fly.
When I told him to stay
down, he stayed down. When I
told him to not move, he didnt
move much anyway. When I
told him to shoot em, he shot
at them. Unfortunately, much
like me at that age, he was
very proficient at shooting
holes in the atmosphere but
not so much in the ducks.
We both got pretty excited
when four Canada geese start-
ed bearing down on us from
the north, but we could only
watch as they veered south
directly over Nick and Paul.
They could only watch as the
honkers wafted over 100 yards
up, tantalizingly close but still
much too far to take a crack at.
We broke for lunch late in
the morning, then returned by
four in the afternoon. Nate
and I tried another blind, and
again he got some good shoot-
ing. Once again he opened up
some wonderful holes in the
ozone layer but spared all the
ducks.
Still, we had a great time.
We watched an eagle soaring
overhead for much of the
afternoon, talked a lot of duck
hunting and jointly decided
duck hunting might be the
best job in the world.
Though no ducks were
harmed in the telling of this
tale so far, I would be remiss
if I failed to add that Sunday
afternoon Nate connected on
a fine crossing shot to down
the first duck of his career, a
pretty wood duck.
The only bad thing is that
I had a previous commitment
and couldnt be there to be a
part of it. Hopefully there
will be an encore the next
time we share a blind.
In the meantime, a new
fire has been kindled, one Im
sure will remain burning for
a lifetime in the heart of a
new duck hunter.
Maines
FROM PAGE 18A
thats not something they
talk to you about. It doesnt
matter to you that theyre
having trouble paying the
rent and they wouldnt dream
of mentioning it to you. You
dont burden minor friends
with major problems. Each of
these friends is different and
each contributes to your day
in a different way. They make
the world seem civilized.
Freddy is the doorman in
front of a building I go in all
the time and my relationship
with him is different than my
relationship with the dry
cleaning people. They didnt
care about sports events.
With them, the talk was
mostly about the weather or
how often the streets were
dug up in New York. With
Freddy, all we ever talk about
is sports.
How do you think the
Giants looked the other
night? he asked me recently.
OK, I replied.
I dont have real conversa-
tions with Freddy. Anything
we have to say gets said as I
move past him. We have our
meeting of the minds and
then we both proceed to the
next event in our lives. Its
pleasant, its not taxing and
it doesnt cost either of us
anything.
I often take a taxi. There
are 11,000 cabs in New York
City, so the chance of getting
the same one twice, even if
you take a couple of hundred
cab rides a year, is slight.
Nonetheless, there are sever-
al cab drivers Ive had half a
dozen times. Were friends.
They may steal or cheat, but
I only know their good side
and I like it that way.
Last time I had you, you
were going to the airport. You
were making a speech in
Cleveland.
I had all but forgotten
Cleveland, but that cab driver,
who in all likelihood has never
been to Cleveland, hadnt for-
gotten. We are minor friends.
Minor friends seldom dis-
agree. They never fight. They
dont borrow money, have
each other over for dinner
Saturday night, or argue over
whether the current presi-
dent is the worst or the best
president the United States
ever had. Ive never
exchanged a discouraging
word with my minor friends
and, if they were all I ever
had to deal with, the sky
would not be cloudy all day.
(Write to Andy Rooney at
Tribune Media Services, 2225
Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buf-
falo, NY 14207 or email
aarooney5@yahoo.com)
Rooney
FROM PAGE 18A
Dear Editor:
I just had to respond to
the Sept. 7 issues letter from
Peter Moline of Afterglow
Resort.
When we purchased the
Derby Track from the Lions
in 1985, Peters dad, Bert,
was the first one of the busi-
nesspeople to come to the
track office to welcome us to
Eagle River and thank us for
purchasing the race and
ensuring the continuation of
the Derby tradition. Like the
Lions, he recognized the val-
ue of the Derby event and
the tourism dollars it
brought to our area in the
winter season.
But how times have
changed. Now I hear that
silent sports and legal
motorized activity cannot co-
exist. Berts son, Peter, tells
us that if all-terrain vehicles
(ATVs) are allowed to come
past his property, he will
have to close the snowmobile
route on his land. Where is
the neighborly thought in
this kind of threat? Where is
the concern for fellow busi-
nesses or his community that
survives on snowmobile dol-
lars during the long winter?
To close a snowmobile
trail just a few months
before the start of the season
can be devastating to the
many businesses that
depend on year-round activi-
ty. Plus, the cost and time
required by the snowmobile
clubs to reroute a new trail is
considerable.
I have all the respect in
the world for silent-sports
people, however, I just can-
not believe that a few limited
ATV trails and the continued
use of snowmobiles in Vilas
County will cause Peter any
loss of business.
Thank goodness Peters
dad recognized the value in
the snowmobile traffic and
business that snowmobiles
could attract. I wish Peter
could learn from his dads
business philosophy, and
that his silent-sport cus-
tomers would consider shar-
ing our beautiful North
Woods with those who enjoy
different forms of outdoor
activity.
Can we just please give
this new sports venue
ATVing a chance? It has
worked well in other areas
and has proved to be a
tourism asset. Like snowmo-
bilers, the ATV enthusiast
travels and supports gas sta-
tions, restaurants and lodg-
ing stops over a broad
expanse.
Maybe a lot of people dont
know it, but todays ATV is
quieter than any other vehi-
cle on the road, and their
four-stroke engines are envi-
ronmentally friendly.
Lets keep the North
Woods what it should be a
getaway destination for ev-
eryone and, hopefully, a
more healthy economical
region, too. Lets not close
any snowmobile trails and
lets give the ATVs a chance
to see if it will work with the
silent-sport people, the sum-
mer visitors and the resi-
dents, and if it will, indeed,
create new business opportu-
nities in Vilas County.
If everyone would just quit
fighting, get together to talk
and work it out so everyone
can be satisfied. Without suc-
cessful businesses, there will
be no facilities and services
for visitors and residents to
enjoy in our North Woods.
Richard Decker
Eagle River
Silent-sports backers, ATVs
can share North Woods
Dear Editor:
Susan Samuelson ex-
pressed in her letter to the
editor what seems so obvious
Eagle River should do its
best to present the area as
welcoming, relaxed, vacation
ready all that it truly is. It
also seems the right time for
Eagle River to make its
entrance the same.
Entering at the highways
45/70 stoplight from the south
is nondescript at best, down-
right unattractive at worst.
With three vacant corners,
maybe now is the time to take
action? An eye-catching Wel-
come to Eagle River sign?
Some pine trees? North
Woods-style directional signs
that being white, arrow
shaped? Maybe a sign adver-
tising upcoming events in the
area? Something to note
youve arrived at a destina-
tion, the place you want to be
to unwind and have fun.
Door County has done a job
beyond compare to accomplish
this feat: a uniform theme, no
billboards, a warm inviting
atmosphere. Arriving there,
you truly feel transformed to
a wonderful, relaxing place.
Eagle River could do more to
suggest the same with just a
bit of innovation.
I join with Susan in asking
the Vilas County board to
invite ideas, think creatively.
Lets bring beauty and a sense
of where I want to be to
vacationers and locals alike.
Susan Murphy
Green Bay
Eagle River could do more
to welcome its visitors
Dear Editor:
Im one of a large number of
Vilas County landowners and
voters who do not want county
highways opened to all-terrain
vehicle (ATV) route traffic, and
who do not want county lands
opened to ATV trails. Consider
the following brief points:
Concerns about ATV routes
and trails There is
widespread feeling that ATV
routes on county roads and
ATV trails on county lands can
do great harm to the quality of
life of residents, to traffic safe-
ty, and to the longstanding vig-
orous, profitable appeal of Vilas
County to annual visitors,
vacationers and outdoor sports
enthusiasts. I have just one
respectful suggestion and
request for Vilas County super-
visors regarding ATV routes
and trails.
Discover what constituents
and landowners want; create an
ordinance Im hoping that
the Vilas County Board will dis-
cover what Vilas County voters
and landowners collectively
want, and then enact an ordi-
nance governing ATV routes
and trails in Vilas County that
is consistent with the will of the
voters and landowners.
Heres some information,
contained in a set of binders in
the county clerks office, that
may shed light on what people
feel about ATV routes and
trails right now (as of mid-
September 2011) form let-
ters signed by ATV proponents,
293 individual names; individ-
ual letters written by ATV pro-
ponents, none; form letters
signed by persons not wanting
ATV routes or trails, 28 indi-
vidual names; individual let-
ters written by persons not
wanting ATV routes or trails,
73 individual names; and peti-
tions signed by persons (voters
and landowners) not wanting
ATV routes or trails, 550-plus
individual names.
The responses listed above
indicate there is widespread
concern throughout Vilas
County about the use of ATVs
on county roads and lands.
County committees soon will
hear proposals from towns for
the use of county highways as
ATV routes. The county board
of supervisors then will have to
decide whether or not to begin
to open county roads to ATV
traffic.
I hope the county board will
find out what voters and
landowners want collectively
before deciding. I hope the
county board will consider the
year 2004 referendum reveal-
ing significant opposition to
ATV routes and trails.
If the county board feels that
they need to know what people
believe right now, in 2011, Im
hoping they authorize a new
county referendum on ATV
routes and trails before decid-
ing.
Alan Drum
Presque Isle
Constituents dont want ATV routes
Dear Editor:
Collective bargaining be-
tween the airlines, pilots, flight
attendants and passengers
unions, long before 9/11/01,
included proposals to harden
the cockpits of airliners as
Israels EL AL had done to pre-
vent hijackers from gaining
access to cockpit.
The airlines thought this to
be cost-prohibitive and ineffec-
tive. History has taught us oth-
erwise. Now we have hardened
cockpits.
Perhaps collective bargain-
ing has merit.
Doug Kaltenbach
St. Germain
Collective bargaining
might have merit
Compiled by
Jean Fitzpatrick
VOICES
VOICES
Louise Krus, 60
Assistant bookkeeper
Eagle River
We go by boat out on the
Chain of Lakes and I love
when you get to see all the
reflections of the leaves in
the water.
Larry Price, 58
Operations director
Elkhorn/Land O Lakes
We take Highway B from
Land O Lakes to Presque
Isle that is my favorite
stretch of road on Earth. We
go by car or sometimes we
bike.
Todd Pogorzelski, 47
Company vice president
New Berlin
I love to come for Cran-
berry Fest and we go boat-
ing on Catfish Lake on the
Chain to see the fall col-
ors.
FROM ACROSS THE
HEADWATERS REGION
Question: What is your favorite Colorama tour?
20A WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
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READER OPINION
Dear Editor:
Concerning our last election
for Senate, Id like to share a
few observations.
This was the second election
in Vilas County where we
erected campaign signs for our
candidate. The sheriffs elec-
tion was the first. We have
lived in small towns and in
larger cities, and even have
been full-time RVers for a cou-
ple of years.
Weve been around and have
talked to many kinds of folks.
However, this is the only place
weve experienced our signs
being run over, stolen or just
picked out of the ground and
thrown into the nearby woods.
We find this to be so childish,
not to mention showing a
small-town mentality (igno-
rance). We really cant believe
the nerve of some people!
Bottom line: If your opinion
is different, please stop by for a
cup of coffee and sit down and
discuss your views. Wed be
glad to enlighten you!
Besides, those signs are private
property and damaging them is
an act of violence which should
put someone in jail. Next time,
well be sure to put up some
hunting cameras.
Jim Holperins attack on
Kim Simac was deplorable. I
dont know if Im more disgust-
ed with him or those who put
stock in his ads hook, line
and sinker.
First of all, if you dont make
a whole lot of money, you dont
owe state taxes. If you dont
owe taxes, and you dont pay,
are you guilty of something?
Shame on you who believed his
nonsense.
Also, regarding paying prop-
erty taxes, Ive been told we can
delay those up to three years
(with interest and penalty). So,
if Im a small-business owner
and need to decide which bills
to delay (to keep my credit
score high, which banks look at
to approve lines of credit for
businesses to make payroll),
why not delay my property tax-
es?
Bottom line: The Simacs
property taxes were paid.
Shame on you if you believed
Jims nonsense. And shame on
you if you voted for Jim
Holperin, who will always be
on the public dole, never know-
ing underemployment or
unemployment.
Because he always gets a
paycheck (hey, he is the one
who didnt get a paycheck for
three weeks when he went to
Illinois). Funny how he could
afford that. I do not know any-
one today who could take three
weeks off without pay, do you?
Hell always receive a paycheck
from the Wisconsin taxpayers,
no matter what. And here hes
the one pointing a finger at his
opponent. Shame on him, and
shame on those who couldnt
see past his preposterous
claims.
I felt Jim was accusing
many of us of just getting by.
Doing things legally, because of
the economy, is not shameful,
its resourceful.
Jim, you will never feel the
pain of your constituents. Your
attack ads were abominable.
But as you said in the last
debate, Thats politics! Well,
November 2012 is coming soon
and will give us time to educate
the voters on who to vote for
next. Not someone like you who
represents the unions. Not
someone like you who is
entrenched in politics.
We need someone like us. I
hope Kim Simac runs against
you again.
Kathy Mitchell
Conover
Shame on those who voted for Holperin
Dear Editor:
The Department of Natural
Resources (DNR) firmly sup-
ports the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service (USFWS) in delisting
the wolf in the upper Great
Lakes states. Wisconsin has
exceeded its delisting goal
eight times over and must have
flexibility to manage problem
wolves if any support for
wolves by the public is to con-
tinue.
While the department is
committed to long-term conser-
vation of wolves in Wisconsin,
it is critical that we be allowed
to manage wildlife populations
within our borders. Wisconsin
has approximately 800 wolves;
this is the most wolves ever
counted in the state. Wolf num-
bers far exceed the federal
delisting recovery goal of 100
wolves for both Wisconsin and
Michigan, and are causing real
problems.
It is time for management of
wolves in Wisconsin to be
turned over to us. The same is
true for Minnesota and Michi-
gan. For this to happen, the
wolf must first be removed
(delisted) from endangered or
threatened status under the
Endangered Species Act.
We support the USFWS in
its current attempt to delist,
but we also strongly disagree
with its conclusion that a new-
ly discovered and separate
species of wolf exists in the
Western Great Lakes. Wiscon-
sins wolves are the same
species that was listed in 1978,
and are most closely associated
with the gray wolf.
Recent genetic analyses
refute the existence of Eastern
wolves as a separate species.
Wisconsins wolves are of
mixed genetics, but they are
physically indistinguishable,
readily interbreed, and occupy
the same range.
Wolves in Wisconsin act and
behave as a single population
and must be managed as a sin-
gle population. Accordingly, our
message to the USFWS is clear
and strong: Dont muddy the
waters with this indefensible
two-population concept. We
need a solid, defensible, delist-
ing proposal, and we need it
now.
Minnesota, Michigan, the
U.S. Sportsmens Alliance, the
Wisconsin Wildlife Federation,
Defenders of Wildlife, Timber
Wolf Alliance, and the Natural
Resources Defense Council,
prominent scientists actively
working with wolf genetics,
and other organizations and
government agencies support
Wisconsins position: Wisconsin
has a gray wolf population that
has successfully recovered.
The public grows weary of
the delays and government
inaction. They need to know
that their state DNR is push-
ing hard to get this done. The
ball is in the USFWSs court,
again. It needs to make the
right decisions and to publish
an effective delisting rule that
will withstand challenges from
those opposed to the delisting
of wolves.
I will not stop pushing on
this issue until we have delist-
ing of wolves and relief for Wis-
consin residents who are seri-
ously struggling with our
unchecked and unmanaged
growing wolf population. Thats
a promise.
Cathy Stepp
Secretary
Wisconsin DNR
DNR supports delisting the wolf
Letter to the Editor:
The all-terrain vehicle
(ATV) issue in Phelps has
brought the town to a cross-
roads regarding its future.
What direction does the town
want to take?
It can take a small-town
approach practiced by towns in
Door County, which are similar
to Phelps, or attempt to become
a wide-open-style mini Hay-
ward. The property owners/res-
idents are the ones who have to
answer this question. (The
answer cannot and should not
be driven by any special or sin-
gle-issue group.)
I do not want to preach to
the choir, but here is an
approach. The first step is to
get a 10-year long-range plan
(LRP) started with a diversi-
fied group of townspeople. The
group should be appointed by
the board, be impartial and be
given a year to come up with a
well-thought-out 10-year plan.
The members of the LRP
will need to look and think
futuristic and not be motivated
by instant or short-term solu-
tions to current economic
issues being felt countrywide.
The goals, strategies, tactics,
who is going to do what, and
the cost should all be part of
the plan.
The plan should be present-
ed to the board first and then in
an open forum to the town. If
the town approves the plan, the
board should implement it.
Putting together a strategic
LRP for Phelps will be a diffi-
cult task and require a great
deal of thought and input. The
end result however will provide
a direction for the town, resi-
dents and local business,
encourage new business and
hopefully provide a path
toward an economic future.
A key point residents
and/or property owners must
drive the towns direction. They
pay a major portion of the prop-
erty taxes.
Earl Sherman
Phelps
Town of Phelps needs long-range plan
Mid-Wisconsin Bank was
recently presented with the
2010 Wisconsin Small Business
Administration (SBA) Volume
Lender Award, bank officials
announced last week.
Wisconsin SBA District
Director Eric Ness presented
the award to business relation-
ship manager Charlie Paulson,
loan review manager Lynn
Paul, credit analyst Melissa
Dettmering and chief credit
officer of Mid-Wisconsin Bank
Bob Taubenheim.
I want to congratulate Mid-
Wisconsin Banks success in
using the SBA loan program to
help small businesses start,
grow, and create jobs in central
Wisconsin, said Ness.
The U.S. SBA was created in
1953 as an independent agency
of the federal government to aid,
counsel and protect the interests
of small-business concerns, to
preserve free competitive enter-
prise and to maintain the over-
all economy of the nation.
Information about the
SBAs programs and services
is available at SBAs website
at sba.gov and Wisconsins
SBA website at sba.gov/wi.
With a large footprint in
northern and central Wisconsin
that includes 13 branch loca-
tions, including Eagle River,
Mid-Wisconsin Bank is a $490
million independent communi-
ty bank serving numerous com-
munities throughout central
Wisconsin.
Mid-Wisconsin Bank receives lender award
BEAUTIFUL BIRD They dont get the atten-
tion of the more glamorous bald eagle, but the
osprey has unique markings and a beauty all its
own. --Staff Photo By KURT KRUEGER
_____________
The bond of our common
humanity is stronger than the
divisiveness of our fears and
prejudices. God gives us the
capacity for choice. We can
choose to alleviate suffering.
We can choose to work togeth-
er for peace. We can make
these changes and we must.
Jimmy Carter
To FRIEDEL-HUNT, Pg. 2B
Reflections
By Mary Friedel-Hunt
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011
NEWS-REVIEW
Section B
VILAS COUNTY
www.vcnewsreview.com
(715) 479-4421
Lifestyle
EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521
The Pro Arte String Quar-
tet, ensemble-in-residence at
UW-Madison, will perform
Thursday, Sept. 29, at 7 p.m.
at Three Lakes Center for the
Arts in the Northwoods
(TLCAN), located at 1760
Superior St. in Three Lakes.
The string quartet pro-
motes a balance of old and
new repertoire. It seeks to
broaden the audience for
string chamber music through
a full schedule of concerts,
tours, recordings and broad-
casts, forging a connection
with audiences of diverse
backgrounds.
The quartet also honors its
past as the first ensemble-in-
residence at a major Ameri-
can university, serving UW-
Madison with full appoint-
ments, combining perfor-
mance, education, and service
to the state.
This performance is made
possible by TLCAN. Arrange-
ments for the event were
made through the UW-Madi-
son Arts Outreach Program.
Tickets are available for
$12 at the door or call (715)
546-2299. Visit tlcfa.org for
more information about the
event.
Quartet to perform
at Center for the Arts
Three free volunteer-guided
bike tours will be available to
discover the colors of the North
Woods and explore the Wilder-
ness Lakes Trails system Sun-
day, Sept. 25, during Colorama
Weekend in Land O Lakes.
The rides for every ability
level will include a 37.2-mile
ride around the Sylvania
Wilderness for the more expe-
rienced rider at 8 a.m.; and a
14.6-mile ride around Duck
Lake and an 8.8-mile family
ride around Little Portage
Lake will begin at 9 a.m.
Maps will be available for
self-guided tours. All rides will
begin at the Land O Lakes
town pavilion in Memorial
Park, located off Highway B on
Chippewa Road behind the
Land O Lakes Historical Soci-
ety Museum.
Representatives of Wilder-
ness Lakes Trails will be at the
pavilion from 7:45 to 10 a.m. to
explain ride options and dis-
cuss trail expansion plans.
Ample parking and rest rooms
will be available.
To register for the bike
tours, visit wildlakes.org or
call (847) 302-4982.
Other Colorama events slat-
ed Saturday, Sept. 24, will
include a scarecrow contest
among local businesses, family
activities and Back to the
Fifties dance, an apple pie-
baking contest, raffles and
Sundays fall Colorama Dinner
at St. Alberts Catholic Church
in Land O Lakes.
For more Colorama details,
visit landolakes-wi.org.
Trail group to offer bike tours
this Sunday in Land O Lakes
The Sno-Eagles Inc. snow-
mobile club will hold a brat
and bake sale Saturday, Sept.
24, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at
Trigs in Eagle River.
Individuals may donate
baked goods and can take
them to the sale at 9 a.m.
Organizers recommend
early attendance for the best
selection of baked goods and a
return visit later in the day
for lunch.
The money from the
fundraiser will be used for
trail grooming this winter.
The Sno-Eagles groom 103
miles of trail in and around
Eagle River.
For more information, visit
sno-eagles.org. New to the site
this year are photos of club
events and activities. The
monthly newsletter also can
be found there along with
membership applications.
Sno-Eagles to hold fundraiser
Northland Pines senior
Elle Tryczak took a chance
when she left the country for
10 months last September.
Tryczak had applied for
the Rotary Youth Exchange
program and, after going
through the application and
interview process, she was
selected and was able to go
to Spain, the country she
had picked as her first
choice.
Although Tryczak had
taken Spanish in school, she
felt nervous about going to a
country where this would be
the primary language.
Her first and second host
families had little to no
knowledge of the English
language, however, Tryczak
said she had a lot of help
from the friends she made.
She felt it was a great
experience and soon found
herself much more fluent in
the language.
During her time there,
she was able to take numer-
ous trips throughout Spain
and visited cities such as
Barcelona and Madrid.
Some of the places she trav-
eled to outside of Spain
included London and Portu-
gal and she stated that it
was very easy and inexpen-
sive to travel in Europe.
Her Spanish friends com-
mented on the fact that she
had seen more of their coun-
try than they had.
While there, Tryczak
attended classes in a private
Catholic school with approx-
imately 40 students in her
class in a city the size of
Madison.
I was really happy to be
in a smaller school, she
said. It was easier to meet
and make friends; it was
like the North Woods.
Her school days consisted
of two long days from 8:30
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. with the
rest of the weeks school
days ending at 1 p.m.
Day-to-day life was so
wonderful, more easygoing,
Tryczak stated. Where I
stayed in Spain was a
fortress city and I would sit
with my friends on a 2,000-
year-old wall, she mused.
A friend Tryczak had
made at Conserve School
during her freshman year
had inspired her to apply for
the youth exchange pro-
gram. Her friend, who had
gone to Argentina, raved
about how wonderful it was.
This was not a trip, said
Tryczak. It was so much
more. The first week was a
bit overwhelming, but once
my language got better and
I made friends, it all got bet-
ter.
Tryczak said she is happy
to be back at Northland
Pines and she loves her
friends and her high school
experience here.
Youth Exchange began
during the 1920s as an effort
between a handful of clubs
in Europe. These European
exchanges continued until
World War II and resumed
in 1946.
The reciprocal long-term
academic exchange grew in
popularity during the 1950s
and became the primary
type of Rotary Youth
Exchange.
In 1972, the Rotary Inter-
national board of directors
agreed to recommend Youth
Exchange to clubs world-
wide as a worthwhile inter-
national activity.
Today, more than 8,000
Youth Exchange students
travel abroad each year to
live and study in about 80
countries.
Each participating club
assumes a number of
responsibilities in connection
with both inbound and out-
bound students which are
shared between the clubs
president and the Youth
Exchange committee.
Before the students par-
Student finds experience of a lifetime
in Rotary Youth Exchange program
___________
BY MARIANNE ASHTON
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
___________
Rotary Youth Exchange participant Elle
Tryczak of Northland Pines saw many sites in
Europe during her time in Spain, including the
coast of Portugal. --Contributed Photo
The husband-and-wife
team of Beverly Linnihan and
Paul Moye of Sugar Camp
recently earned a combined
nine gold medals and one sil-
ver in Wisconsin Senior
Olympics events in Manitowoc
and Wauwautosa.
Linnihan, 73, took gold in
the 200- and 500-yard free-
style, 100-yard Individual
Medley, 50- and 100-yard
backstroke swimming events.
She also won gold competing
in a 20-mile triathlon event.
Moye, also 73, gold-medaled
in the 50-, 100- and 200-yard
backstroke events for swim-
ming, adding a silver in the
triathlon.
Linnihan not only took gold
in the 100-yard backstroke;
she also beat all the men in
her age division. But this is
only the most recent achieve-
ment for a competitor who has
seen success on the national
stage.
Beverly took second in the
nation in San Francisco Bay at
the 2009 Senior Olympics
triathlon, said Moye. She got
cancer after that, and has
recovered after many radia-
tion treatments and surgery.
Shes coming back with a
vengeance.
Linnihan ran 10-minute
miles in the 2009 triathlon
and said her ultimate goal is
to reach that time again.
I think its doable, said
Linnihan, whose swimming
times have improved since she
competed nationally at anoth-
er Senior Olympics event in
Houston, Texas. Its because
Im recovering from cancer. Im
Sugar Camp couple earn 10 medals
at Wisconsin Senior Olympics events
Days are shorter now. I went to a friends home for
dinner and, before we knew it, darkness had crept into
the yard where we sat talking. It was surprising, as it
always is. The summer months flew by and fall is mak-
ing its glorious entrance. The leaves on our maple tree
will soon become brilliant red and grace the entire block
with their beauty. The summer heat and humidity is
making a welcomed exit. And soon we will be shoveling
snow here in Wisconsin.
It is a time of transition, a reminder that change is a
part of life and that nothing is forever. Everything
transforms. Trees produce millions of leaves that even-
tually change, die, drop to the Earth and nourish the
next seasons leaves. Clouds drop rain to the Earth.
That water nurtures crops and all of nature flourishes
including our bodies as we drink water essential to our
lives. Rocks become sand which is transformed into
glass for our windows, dishes, elegant pieces of art and
more. Plants and minerals become food for our bodies
and paints for our artwork. Everything is in transition
all the time. Many of the cells of our own bodies die on a
regular basis as new cells take their place.
Perhaps the most important transformation is that
which takes place between our own ears. No, not our
brain cells, though our brains do produce new neurons
as we now know. I am talking about our values, ideas,
commitments to growth and more. Growth is critical to
our lives, but growing means letting go of selfishness
and fear. Consider what our planet would be like if we
all gave up selfishness and fear.
We would no longer see greed in the corporate and
other worlds. We would see an end to wars of all kinds.
Addiction to and use of illegal drugs including alcohol
would disappear. Guns, which those in Wisconsin can
Transformation
To ROTARY, Pg. 2B
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
Beverly Linnihan and her husband, Paul Moye,
recently earned a combined 10 medals at a Wis-
consin Senior Olympics event in the Milwaukee
area. --Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW
To OLYMPIANS, Pg. 3B
2B WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
now carry in public, would be
unnecessary because fear
would disappear. Many dis-
eases would disappear also as
our environment became
cleaner with selfishness oblit-
erated. No one would go hun-
gry. No child would run away
from home. The list is so
long. Just ponder how much
of the negative on our planet
would disappear as people
became less selfish and less
fearful.
For many people, life is
just about them. No matter
what happens, they can turn
it into something about them-
selves. But we are all part of
the community of mankind.
Reaching out to others with
generosity and compassion
transforms the world commu-
nity. When I reach out to
someone with compassion or
assistance of some kind, that
person in turn reaches out to
someone else. This goes on
and on and we never know
how far-reaching our actions
are. The pebble in water.
I am no Pollyanna. I
understand that humans are
selfish and fearful. But if
each of us, over time, trans-
forms as much of that as pos-
sible, the world will trans-
form. Peace will grow.
Mary Friedel-Hunt, MA
LCSW, is a freelance writer
and psychotherapist in the
Madison area. She can be
reached at
mfriedelhunt@charter.net or
P.O. Box 1036, Spring Green,
WI 53588.
LIFESTYLE
Sayner
Express
We are glad to be part of such a wonderful community.
~ OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ~
Groceries Beer Liquor Ice Lottery
DOWNTOWN SAYNER ON HWY. 155 (715) 542-2024
Congratulations, Maya,
on setting a goal
and achieving it!
Your friends and family at
Call Ted Gregg at our
St. Germain Office (715) 617-7590
for your real estate needs.
Way to go, Maya! Way to go, Maya!
We are proud of your
impressive achievements.
Keep up the good work!
RICHELLE & TIM KRUSE 715-891-1830
Congrats,
Tim & Richelle
OF THE NORTH
Maya ~
May todays success be
the beginning of tomorrows
achievements!
It was a dream come true
for Maya Lovdal, 13, of St.
Germain. After riding six
days a week and taking jump-
ing lessons twice a week for
years, Lovdal realized her
goal of qualifying to ride in
the annual National Pony
Finals at Kentucky Horse
Park in Lexington, Ky.
A veteran competitor, Lov-
dal started riding competi-
tively at 6 years old, when her
family moved to the area from
Milwaukee. She rides in the
PineRidge Equestrian Center
in Eagle River, where she
trains with Jayme Nelson and
helps exercise the younger
ponies.
Started in 1959 as a chal-
lenge from the British
National Pony Society to
American pony riders, Nation-
al Pony Finals have been an
annual event in the United
States since 1967. Today the
U.S. Equestrian Pony Finals
are the most prestigious and
celebrated events of their
kind in the United States.
I read about Pony Finals
on the Internet. I didnt think
I could get there because of
the high level of riding
required, said Lovdal.
In order to qualify for Pony
Finals, a rider needs to win a
grand champion award by
being the high-point winner
in a pony hunter class at U.S.
Equestrian Federation
(USEF)-qualified A show.
Lovdal participated in sev-
eral USEF A shows this sea-
son and, with her strong win-
ning record, knew in July she
was headed to the Pony
Finals. She was one of only
two riders at the finals from
the state of Wisconsin
Lovdals event, the Hunter
Pony, is a three-phase compe-
tition judging the ponys con-
firmation (body shape and
proportion), its way of moving
under saddle and its fence-
jumping ability.
This seven-day champi-
onship event hosts more than
600 young riders and their
talented mounts, as well as
trainers, family members and
interested spectators.
There were 130 riders in
Lovdals hunter competition
and, when all the points were
tallied, she ranked 40th over-
all.
I felt good about that!
said Lovdal. At one point, she
was ranked fifth in the over-
fences portion of the event.
She also received one of the
24 sportsmanship awards giv-
en during Pony Finals this
year.
Along with her parents,
Rick and Margaret Lovdal,
Nelson accompanied Maya to
the Kentucky Finals.
Maya is a totally serious
competitor, he said. I was so
impressed that she cared for
and tacked up her own pony
and didnt use a groom.
In addition to riding her
pony, Lovdal was asked to
exercise additional ponies for
a training facility in Milwau-
kee.
St. Germain youth competes
at national event in Kentucky
___________
BY SUE OMDAHL
SPECIAL TO THE NEWS-REVIEW
___________
Maya Lovdal of St. Germain was one of only two
riders from Wisconsin to compete in the Nation-
al Pony Finals at Kentucky Horse Park in Lexing-
ton. --Courtesy Shawn McMillen Photography
Friedel-Hunt: FROM PAGE 1B
Rotary
FROM PAGE 1B
ticipate in their exchange,
they are sometimes shy
and do not know how to
communicate well with
other adults. When they
return, they communicate
well with everyone and
show a maturity level way
beyond their years. They
appreciate more the things
that they have and can
adapt to any situation that
may arise, said Eagle Riv-
er Rotary Youth Exchange
committee member Val
Dreger.
The students we select
to represent our Rotary
Club have always repre-
sented the club, city of
Eagle River, state of Wis-
consin and the United
States very well and have
been a great ambassador,
Dreger added.
I keep thinking about
where I was last year and
Im kind of jealous of
myself, Tryczak said while
reflecting on the experi-
ence.
I dont think anyone my
age could have this experi-
ence otherwise and I plan
on doing this a couple of
times while Im in college,
she added.
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 3B
getting stronger.
Standing on the podium four
times in Houston this June,
Linnihan was among the top
10 in every event she competed
in except one.
She and Moye said they
have no intention of slowing
down in the coming years and
expressed enthusiasm about
senior sports.
First of all, its fun, said
Linnihan. And second, its a
wonderful fitness program. The
camaraderie is amazing. I
encourage people over 60 to
aim at activities they enjoyed
when younger.
Moye credited his wife for
his drive to compete and
achieve medals in the Senior
Olympics.
If someone wouldve told
me a year and a half ago that
Id be getting medals in Senior
Olympics swimming events, I
wouldve thought that person
was crazy, said Moye. Beverly
inspired me to do this.
Moye started competing last
year, while Linnihan has taken
part in the program since the
age 65.
The couple regularly train
at the YMCA of the North-
woods facility in Eagle River.
They also travel to the
Rhinelander YMCA to swim.
The National Senior Games
is a nonprofit member of the
U.S. Olympic Committee dedi-
cated to motivating senior men
and women to lead a healthy
lifestyle through the senior
games movement. For more
information, visit nsga.com.
Living History Encounter Presents
Fur Trade Era from 1600-1840.
Raffle Drawing will take
place at 3 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 1 ~ 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Behind the Rocking W Stables in Eagle River.
Sponsored by the
Forest County
Potawatomi Foundation
For more information, call Bill Kroll at 715.479.5034.
F
r
e
e
E
v
e
n
t
!
Join us as we bring the past to life . . .
Just as Dorothy in The
Wizard of Oz tapped her
ruby slippers together
while repeating, Theres
no place like home, Julie
Stefonik exudes that same
longing when she returns
to teach kindergarten in
the same classroom where
she learned her ABCs
many years ago.
Born and raised in Sug-
ar Camp, Stefonik earned
her early childhood degree
from UW-Stout, then
attended UW-River Falls
to earn her certification to
teach through sixth grade.
She is in her fifth year
of teaching kindergarten
at Sugar Camp Elemen-
tary School.
Stefonik admittedly
began mental prepara-
tions in July for the new
school year.
I start to get my teach-
er brain back, she stated.
Though students did
not report to school until
Sept. 1, Stefonik began
classroom preparations
two weeks earlier. Now
her days begin at 7:30
a.m. and often end more
than 10 hours later.
She must meet state
standards appropriate for
kindergarten, complete
continuing education
classes and renew her
teaching license periodi-
cally. Stefonik will finish
her masters degree in
educational technology
this fall.
Kindergarten is more
academic than when I
attended school. Many
kids are learning how to
read, write and to add and
subtract. Free play, being
crucial to child develop-
ment, is allowed each day
and gives me time to
watch the kids interact,
Stefonik explained.
Among the skills she
teaches her young charges
are phonics and blends,
music and dance, and skip
counting.
The most important
thing I want the kids to
learn is kindness, but my
main goal is to create a
love of learning. That
should stay with them for-
ever. I want them to enter
first grade next fall excit-
ed to learn. If they dont
enjoy learning, school is a
struggle, she admitted.
When asked how par-
ents can help, Stefonik
replied, Be aware of what
your child is doing. Look
through the notebook sent
home each night. At the
beginning of the year, par-
ents can help by develop-
ing routines. Make sure
your child gets to bed ear-
ly and has breakfast.
Though separating
from him or her is some-
times difficult, its easier
on the child when parents
leave rather than linger at
school in the morning. It
encourages indepen-
dence, she added.
These kids are awe-
some. I greet them every
morning acknowledg-
ing and checking in with
them. This is the best job
in the world. I love the
community and my co-
workers. Theres no other
job Id rather have, Ste-
fonik confirmed.
More than ABCs
Sugar Camp Elementary School kindergarten teacher
Julie Stefonik has made it her goal to teach children a
love of learning and considers her job to be the best in
the world. --Photo By Sonia Dionne
___________
BY SONIA DIONNE
FEATURE WRITER
___________
Jim Croker of Eagle River
began his love affair with the
Vilas County Fair 50 years ago
in his youth, when he exhibit-
ed many projects as a member
of the 4-H Club.
For his continued dedication
to the fair, Croker was recently
presented an award commem-
orating 50 years of service to
the event for which he served
as board president for more
than 30 years.
After his years in the 4-H
Club, he followed in the foot-
steps of his father and uncle
and was nominated to the
Vilas County Fair board of
directors in September of 1961.
Croker was elected vice
president in 1968 and later
became board president, serv-
ing from 1969-87 and again
from 1993-2009. He continues
to serve as a board member
today, while Dale Ayers has
taken the reins as board presi-
dent.
Although the fair has lost
its 4-H interest, Croker said he
doesnt worry about the event
losing any popularity.
Were still holding on, he
said. We always have a pretty
good turnout at the fair. Fairs
as a general rule will be popu-
lar. It gives people a chance to
get together.
The 50-year veteran of the
county fair said hes seen some
changes over the years.
There are a lot more rules
and regulations than we had
back in the 60s, he said. We
were also busier back then
because we did all the work
ourselves.
Croker said there arent as
many people raising chickens,
pigs and calves to take to the
fair. But he added some of the
other exhibits have grown in
popularity, saying the fair sim-
ply needs to change to continue
its draw.
Weve got to get more into
what people are doing now, he
said. Weve got good art
exhibits and our beer and wine
exhibit has really grown. There
are quite a few people making
their own home brews.
Among his accomplish-
ments, Croker was instrumen-
tal in getting three-year board
terms installed, and stagger-
ing the terms so the entire
board wasnt up for election
each year.
He spearheaded the project
to have the flagpole installed
and dedicated in 1993, the year
of the county centennial. Cro-
ker also sold advertising and
readied the fair book for publi-
cation.
In addition to planning and
promotion, Croker performed a
number of electrical duties at
the fair, including outlet instal-
lation and rewiring the entire
exhibit building.
He was never afraid of
hard work or accepting new
challenges, said Vilas County
Fair President Dale Ayers.
From helping with the fair
judging to any of the fair build-
ing projects, large or small, he
was always there to jump right
in.
Over the years, Croker has
also given his time to the Lin-
coln Town Board as a supervi-
sor and to the National Rifle
Association as a hunter safety
instructor, teaching hundreds
of children safe gun handling
practices. Croker said he
enjoys hunting and shooting
with all of his grandchildren.
Croker awarded for 50 years
serving the Vilas County Fair
Vilas County Fair Board President Dale Ayers
(right) recently awarded a plaque to Jim Croker
of Eagle River honoring his 50 years of service
to the fair. --Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW
LIFESTYLE
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
Olympians: FROM PAGE 1B
A live one-man performance
of Sermon on the Mount will
be performed by Frank Run-
yeon Wednesday, Sept. 28, at 7
p.m. at St. Peter the Fisher-
man parish, located at 5001
Highway G in Eagle River.
The performance will be fol-
lowed by Hollywood vs. Faith:
The Three Other Beatitudes.
Runyeon has starred in
more than 1,000 television
shows over the past 20 years,
including As the World Turns
opposite Meg Ryan, as well as
L.A. Law, Falcon Crest,
Melrose Place, General Hos-
pital and Santa Barbara.
He is a graduate of Prince-
ton University with a degree
in religion. He also studied at
Yale Divinity School and
received his masters, with
honors, from General Theolog-
ical Seminary.
Runyeon translates and
adapts biblical texts for perfor-
mances as one-man dramas.
He currently lives in Los
Angeles, Calif., with his wife,
Annie, and their three chil-
dren.
All are welcome to attend
the family-friendly presenta-
tion. A freewill offering will be
taken.
For more information, call
the parish office at (715) 479-
8704.
Sermon on the Mount performance
scheduled at St. Peter the Fisherman
The Oneida County Sher-
iffs Departments Drug Abuse
Resistance Education (DARE)
program will sponsor the Glen
Gerard Magic Show for two
performances.
The shows will be Friday,
Sept. 23, at 7 p.m. in the James
Williams Middle School audi-
torium in Rhinelander and
Saturday, Sept. 24, at 2 p.m. in
the Lakeland Union High
School auditorium in Minoc-
qua. Popcorn and cotton candy
will be available at this family-
oriented event.
Advance tickets may be pur-
chased locally from any DARE
officer for $6 per person. Tick-
ets will be available at the door
for $7. Glen Gerard Magic Pro-
ductions of Germantown also
will conduct ticket sales by
telephone solicitation.
Event proceeds will benefit
the local DARE program, with
funds staying in the communi-
ty. To purchase event tickets or
for additional information, con-
tact Deputy Jim Adams at
(715) 361-5132.
Shows to benefit
DARE program
The Sugar Camp snowmo-
bile club will sponsor a commu-
nity blood drive Tuesday, Sept.
27, from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Sug-
ar Camp Community Center.
To schedule a donation
appointment, call Mary at
(715) 272-1142 or visit
save3lives.org. Walk-in donors
will be welcome.
Blood drive slated
in Sugar Camp
The U.P. Thunder Riders
Snowmobile Club will hold an
open swap meet Saturday,
Sept. 24, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
next to Headwaters Polaris in
downtown Watersmeet, Mich.
Individuals or businesses
are welcome and spaces are
available to recycle, sell or
trade snowmobiles, parts,
clothing or anything related
to snowmobiling. To reserve a
space, call 1-(906) 358-9959.
Snowmobile club
plans swap meet
4B WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
Vilas County Commission on Aging Programs
Vilas County Commission on Aging
Help when you need it most.
479-3625 or 1-800-374-1123
330 Court Street
Eagle River, WI 54521
Each year Medicare beneficiaries need to check
their prescription drug coverage to assure they have
the best possible coverage. This year, beginning
October 15 and ending December 7, individuals
have the opportunity to choose a new plan.
There is no cost to switch plans, but there may be
much higher costs for your prescriptions if you
dont check your current coverage. Be sure to avoid
unexpected:
Dont forget your annual
Medicare Part D checkup!
Make your appointment today
A photo ID law was recently passed
by the Wisconsin State Legislature.
Beginning with the February 2012 Pri-
mary Election, anyone wishing to cast a
vote will be required to show an accept-
able photo ID. Several forms of informa-
tion regarding the law and its imple-
mentation are available.
Information documents include
changes in the law, acceptable IDs, get-
ting a free photo ID, absentee voting,
hospitalized voters and provisional bal-
lots. Free information can be obtained
from the following:
The Government Accountability
Board website: http://gab.wi.gov or
call 1-866-VOTE-WIS or contact the
G.A.B. Help Desk at 608-261-2028 or
TTY 1-800-947-3529.
The Vilas County Commission on Aging,
330 Court Street, Eagle River, WI 54521,
715-479-3625, www.vilas.wi.us/coa/
The Commission on Aging is working
with Senior Clubs in the county to iden-
tify people who require current voter
photo identification and to provide
transportation to acquire such an ID.
New voter photo ID law
Site Location Days Contact Phone
Boulder Beer Bar Boulder Junction Mon./Wed./Thur. Carol Young 479-8771
Fibber's St. Germain Mon./Wed./Fri. Verdelle Mauthe 542-2951
Kalmar Sr. Center Eagle River Mon.-Fri. Penny LaFata 479-2633
Lac du Flambeau Lac du Flambeau Mon.-Fri. Sharon Bigjohn 588-4385
Wellness Center
Phelps Sr. Center Phelps Mon./Wed./Fri. Sandy Mutter 545-3983
Stateline Restaurant Land O' Lakes Tue./Thur./Fri. Kathy Niesen 547-6071
Vilas County Senior Dining Sites
Health care fraud drives up costs for
everyone in the health care system and
endangers Medicares ability to serve
present and future gen-
erations.
The Vilas County
Commission on Aging
Elderly Benefit Specialist
program works with
Medicare beneficiaries
who believe they have
been victims of Medicare
fraud. The number of
reports always increases
during more difficult
economic times. Scam-
mers are skilled professionals and in
most cases the victim does not even real-
ize they are giving out their personal
information to a thief until they hang
up. These thieves count on their vic-
tims embarrassment at having been so
naive to fall for the scam that they dont
tell anyone.
Vilas County is recruiting volunteers
to expand the Wisconsin Senior Medi-
care Patrol (SMP) program
in our county. The pro-
gram's purpose is to educate
older adults receiving Medi-
care and Medicaid benefits
to prevent, detect, and report
health care fraud. SMP pro-
grams nationwide recruit
volunteers in the effort to
empower older adults to
protect themselves from
fraud, and are funded by the
United States Administra-
tion on Aging. Details on the Wisconsin
SMP program are available at www.wis-
consinsmp.org.
For more information or to volunteer
for the program, contact Judy Steinke
at (800) 488-2596, ext. 342 or
jsteinke@cwag.org.
Older adults fight back
against Medicare fraud
Director
Joe Fortmann, 479-3626
Benefit Specialist Program
Connie Gengle, 479-3628
Pamme Williams, 479-3630
Caregiver Support/
Friendly Visitor
Amie Rein, 479-3725
Chore/Alzheimers
Programs
Penny LaFata, 479-3726
Nutrition/Escort Program
Sue Richmond, 479-3625
Monthly premium increases
Changes to the list of covered prescription drugs
Higher co-pays or deductibles
New quantity limits
Some of the current Part D Plans may no longer provide coverage in Wisconsin
in 2012
Call to schedule an appointment. The Vilas County Benefit Specialists, assisted
by generous volunteers will compare the cost of your individual prescription drugs
on the various Medicare Part D drug plans to help you decide what is best for you.
They will also provide a comparison to SeniorCare, Wisconsins popular prescription
drug plan.
Call the Vilas County Commission on Aging helpline at 715-479-3727. Leave your
contact information. Someone will return your call to schedule an appointment.
We look forward to seeing you after October 15.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION!
If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, this is the time of year you need
to make decisions on whether you want to:
1. return to original Medicare,
2. purchase a Medicare supplement policy to pay Medicare out-of-
pocket expenses
3. choose a different Medicare Advantage plan, or
4. choose different prescription drug coverage.
Volunteer home-delivered
meal drivers needed
in Eagle River area
For approximately 45 shut-in elderly
in the Eagle River area, the Commission
on Aging Home Delivered Meal pro-
gram is more than just a meal. Accord-
ing to Sue Richmond, Nutrition Coordi-
nator, the drivers are not just providing a
meal, but a service. They check on the
recipients to make sure they are OK and
are a link to the outside world.
Volunteer drivers are not paid for their
time, but do receive mileage reimburse-
ment. Richmond stated, Our drivers are
invaluable to us. I wish we could pay
them because they are worth far more
than the mileage reimbursement we are
able to give them. We could not operate
this program without our dedicated vol-
unteers.
The Kalmar Senior Center sends out
meals five days a week and has three
routes. It takes a volunteer about one and
one-half hours to do a route.
We are in need of a volunteer to deliv-
er meals at least two days a week. One
perk is the delicious meal waiting for the
driver when they return to the Kalmar
Center after completing their route. For
more information, please contact Sue
Richmond at (715) 479-3625.
Aging and disability resource center
of the Northwoods application complete
Following more than two years of
development, a completed application
to begin operation of the ADRC of the
Northwoods on January 1, 2012, has
been submitted to the State of Wiscon-
sin for review and approval. The
review process is expected to take
approximately 60 days and may
involve submission of additional mate-
rial to satisfy the requirements for cre-
ating an aging and disability resource
center.
Delegates from each of seven juris-
dictions completed work in late July on
the application. An Implementation
Team will be responsible for respond-
ing to questions posed by the review
committee. During the transition peri-
od between now and when the new
board is fully constituted, a work plan
with key tasks and time lines has been
created to guide the work of this group.
Efforts to recruit board members from
member jurisdictions as well as citizen
volunteers will begin as soon as the
Implementation Team completes its
work with the state review panel.
In recognition of the need for
ongoing education about the North-
woods region and how it will operate,
all planning group members have
agreed to share the newly created orga-
nizational overview with local commit-
tees and boards. Comments and feed-
back will be solicited and then forward-
ed to the Implementation Team.
The ADRC of the Northwoods
looks forward to serving the region!
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 5B
Available Sept. 17-Oct. 8 approx.
WINE SALES
& WINE
TASTING
Coming soon
2
ND
Annual Fundraising Reception
Thursday, Oct. 6
6:45 p.m. Hors doeuvres, 7:15 p.m. Reception
At the Arbor Vitae Town Hall
10675 Big Arbor Vitae Dr.
FREE ADMISSION
Limited Seating. For reservations and more information, call:
715.358.6700 or email: newdawnpregnancycenter@gmail.com
LIFESTYLE
The Vilas County Commis-
sion on Aging has announced
the formation of the Aging
and Disability Resource Cen-
ter (ADRC) of the North-
woods, a new organization
that will serve county resi-
dents and tribal members
within Vilas, Oneida, Forest
and Taylor counties starting
in 2012.
ADRC satellite locations
throughout the region will
serve as the primary source of
information, assistance and
access to community
resources for older people and
adults with disabilities, as
well as their families.
According to the commis-
sion, the government board
for the ADRC is required to
allow people who will use
ADRC services to have a voice
in the direction of the organi-
zation.
The organization is cur-
rently accepting applications
from citizens to serve on the
board to represent ADRC
clients in one of the following
consumer categories: Adults
60 and older; or Adults with a
disability (physical, develop-
mental, mental-health issues
or substance-use disorders).
Applicants to the board can
be an individual from one of
these categories or a family
member, guardian or other
advocate.
Selections for citizen mem-
bers on the board will be
made to achieve appropriate
representation from the vari-
ous ADRC consumer cate-
gories, as well as geographic
location in the ADRCs region.
Deadline to submit an
application is Wednesday, Oct.
19, by 4 p.m.
For more information and a
complete application packet
with details, contact Vilas
County Commission on Aging
at (715) 479-3626.
Community members sought
to serve on ADRC board
Cub Scout Pack 601 in
Eagle River will hold its Fall
Recruitment Night Monday,
Sept. 26, from 5:30 to 6:30
p.m. at Northland Pines Mid-
dle School.
Boys in first through fifth
grades who are interested in
joining Cub Scouts should
take a parent or guardian to
the commons area during that
time.
The cost to join Cub Scouts
is $7.50 and can be paid via
cash or check. Make checks
payable to Samoset Council.
Anyone interested in join-
ing Cub Scouts who cannot
make the recruitment night
can call Jennifer Uhrine at
(715) 477-2996.
Cub Scouts set sign-up Sept. 26
CLASS OF 71 The Eagle River Union High School Class of
1971 celebrated its 40th reunion at Eagle River Inn Sept. 10. Those
attending included, front row, from left, Mark Yeager, Mike Shields,
Barb Dean, Frank Sarkauskas, Cynthia (Dion) Nygard, Orin Sayn-
er, Beth (Danielson) Carter, Julie (Tomlinson) Yeager and Jim Pow-
ell; second row, Mary (Mietus) Hart, Mary (Kuran) Palo, Pam
(Rogers) Tomlanovich, Laurel (Funk) Anderson, Sue (Claringbole)
Diehl, Eddie Carter, Linda (Richter) Baccus and Dana Kuehl; third
row, Bill Baccus, Gail (Shelton) Butzin, Bill Kuran, Joe Petruzates,
Barb (Brooker) Cashman, Sam Tijan, John Connolly, Joe Dunow,
Sue Wranik, Ken Liesegang, Julee (Chuckel) Davis; fourth row,
Janis (Croker) Prell, John Ebann, Dave Parish, Todd Budde, Ken
Adamovich, Bill Fricke, Calla (Brown) Albaugh; and back row, Dar-
rell Slizewski, Gary Valkenaar, Ron Pockat, Carl Creedy, Dale Alli-
son, Chuck Rasmussen, Ron Bloom, Linda Ball, Barb (Burzinski)
Yeomans. --Photo By Tim Gaffney
Minocquas 47th Beef-A-
Rama will be held Friday and
Saturday, Sept. 23-24.
The weekend will kick off
Friday with a street dance.
Live music will be provided by
The Lizardz from 6:30 to 10
p.m. on Milwaukee Street.
Saturdays events will
begin at 8:15 a.m. with the
Lakeland Rotarys Rump
Roast Run and will include a
Calf Mile for children followed
by 5-kilometer and 10-kilome-
ter run/walks. Winners will be
awarded beef roasts and cow-
bells. To participate, register
online at rumproastrun.com.
The celebration of beef will
continue as teams dressed in
themed costumes compete in
the storefront cook-off with
the winner to be determined
by celebrity judges.
Other activities will include
a beef-eating contest at 11:30
a.m., a parade of roasts at
2:45 p.m., an arts and crafts
show beginning at 9 a.m. and
childrens activities.
The Minocqua Lions Club
corn roast and beer tent will
open at 11 a.m. shortly fol-
lowed by early beef sandwich
sales at the chamber of com-
merces tent at noon. Roasts
will be sliced and served on
buns by an assembly line of
volunteers at 3 p.m.
Musical performances in
Torpy Park Saturday will
include Nate Stiegler from 9
to 11 a.m.; Krazy Chester
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and
Tuck Pence will play from 11
a.m. to 2 p.m. on Chicago
Street, followed by Jimmy D.
and Danny Lincoln from 2:30
to 6 p.m.
Chicago Tribute Anthology,
a seven-piece horn band, will
perform from 2 p.m. to close in
Torpy Park.
For a complete schedule of
events, visit beef-a-rama.com.
Minocqua to hold annual beef event
Prince of Peace Lutheran
Church will collect new and
gently used winter coats for
local distribution to those in
need this fall.
Coats can be dropped off at
the church, located at 3030
Highway 70 W. in Eagle River.
Church office hours are Mon-
days through Thursdays from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Coats will be distributed to
adults and children Friday,
Oct. 21, from 4 to 6 p.m. and
Saturday, Oct. 22, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Church to collect
coat donations
A fundraiser for Damon
Liebscher, who was diagnosed
with brain cancer, will be held
Saturday, Oct. 8, at 10 a.m. at
Trigs grocery store in Eagle
River.
Funds raised from the sale
of brats and baked goods at
the benefit will help offset the
cost of Liebschers continuing
cancer treatments.
Hes been going for treat-
ments for a while now and
bills are adding up, said
Tonya Blotnicki. We would
appreciate all the support we
can get.
For more information, con-
tact Blotnicki at (715) 891-
0540.
Cancer benefit
set for Liebscher
Trees For Tomorrow has
announced the fall schedule
for its Adult Skill Builder
weekend workshops.
The weekend of Oct. 28-30
will include three topics
snowshoe weaving, yoga and
quilting.
During the snowshoe and
rocking-chair weaving work-
shop, Trees For Tomorrow staff
will guide participants step-
by-step through each phase of
the weaving process with a
choice of snowshoe style or
rocking chair.
The fee for this course is
$275 per person and will
include materials, instruction,
lodging and meals.
A weekend of yoga with
Ellen Crow Vodicka will be
offered. Vodicka will guide par-
ticipants in exploring simple
techniques to relax and rejuve-
nate during the yoga weekend
workshop.
Participants may begin or
deepen their yoga practice
which will include basic pos-
tures, breathing practice, guid-
ed meditation and creative
movement.
The workshop fee is $200
per person and will include
instruction, lodging and meals.
Local quilt shop owner
Karen Kuphal will lead a Mys-
tery Quilt Retreat creating
Bound for a Blue Ribbon, a
mystery queen or lap quilt.
Kuphal also will assist par-
ticipants with their own proj-
ects.
The workshop fee is $200
per person and will include
instruction, lodging and meals.
An additional $10 pattern fee
will be due at the workshop.
According to Trees For
Tomorrow, the workshops are
designed for adults interested
in learning a new skill that
either utilizes natural
resources or provides an
avenue to explore the out-
doors.
To receive additional infor-
mation or to register, call Trees
For Tomorrow at (715) 479-
6456, e-mail learning@treesfor
tomorrow.com or visit treesfor-
tomorrow..com.
Trees For Tomorrow to offer
Skill Builder weekend workshops
Little Pine Cones Lodge in Eagle River and Lit-
tle Acorns Lodge in St. Germain recently held
Trike-A-Thons, raising more than $1,900 for St.
Jude Childrens Research Hospital. Fundraisers
help provide funds for St. Jude to continue pro-
viding care to families without health insurance.
--Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW
Little Pine Cones Lodge in
Eagle River and Little Acorns
Lodge in St. Germain raised a
combined $1,913 at two recent
Trike-A-Thon fundraisers for
St. Jude Childrens Research
Hospital.
Youths at the two day-care
centers, sponsored by friends,
relatives, neighbors and local
businesses, rode their tricycles
and bicycles for part of the day
to help raise money for St.
Jude, a pediatric cancer
research center.
The daily operating cost of
the hospital is $1.7 million, and
public donations from around
the world provide more than
70% of its funding.
The grand total for Little
Pine Cones Lodge Aug. 10 was
$1,055, while Little Acorns
raised $858 Aug. 11.
Fundraisers like the Trike-
A-Thon help provide the funds
that St. Jude needs in order to
ensure families never have to
pay for treatment that isnt
covered by insurance, and that
no child is denied because of a
familys inability to pay.
To organize a Trike-A-Thon,
call 1-(800) 626-BIKE (2453) or
visit stjude.org/trike.
Local Head Start learning centers
raise $1,913 for childrens hospital
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
6B WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
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(Vol. 126, No. 27)
Dated Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011
was mailed at the Post Office
at Eagle River, WI 54521
on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2011.
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Beauty Resort in Eagle River will hold a community blood drive
Wednesday, Sept. 28, from 3 to 7 p.m. Wendy Budde was one of
the blood donors at a community blood drive held at Beauty Resort
earlier this year. --Staff Photo By MADELINE MATHISEN
A community blood drive
will be held Wednesday, Sept.
28, from 3 to 7 p.m. at Beauty
Resort, located at 201 W. Pine
St. in Eagle River.
All blood donors will receive
a 10% discount off of any prod-
uct purchased during the blood
drive.
According to Julie Pichler of
Northwoods Community Blood
Center, 100% of the blood is
used in five North Woods hos-
pitals including Ministry Eagle
River Memorial Hospital.
To schedule a donation
appointment, call Tiffany at
(715) 479-1111 or visit
save3lives.org. Walk-in donors
will be welcome.
Beauty Resort blood drive set
Jim Morley of Three Lakes
and Winter Park, Fla., will
draw on his global experi-
ences in a presentation,
Attempts at Neighborly Love:
Sharing Lessons Learned and
in Progress, Wednesday, Sept.
28, at 7 p.m. at Many Ways of
Peace, located at 217 S. Main
St. in downtown Eagle River.
Morley is on the staff of
World Neighbors, a volunteer
coordinator for Churches for
Middle East Peace, and is co-
chairman of the multidenomi-
national Chapel in the Pines
outside of Three Lakes.
Morley said his recent trip
to Israel and the West Bank
led him into action on the
grassroots level to try to make
a difference for peace.
Morley is a writer and his
wife, Vicki, is an artist. They
have two daughters and are
grandparents of three boys.
For more information, call
(715) 480-4697 or visit
manywaysofpeace.org.
Many Ways of Peace to feature
global peace presentation Sept. 28
Vicki Potrykus, registered
yoga teacher, will offer free
yoga classes for new students
throughout the month of Octo-
ber.
The classes will be held
Tuesdays from 4 to 5 p.m. at
Prince of Peace Lutheran
Church in Eagle River Oct. 4,
11, 18 and 25.
This class will be very gen-
tle, according to Potrykus. It
will be for anyone new to yoga,
seniors or those who have
health challenges.
Many of the exercises can
be done while sitting in a chair.
Modifications will be taught so
that students of all levels and
abilities will feel welcome and
comfortable, said Potrykus.
Students who have taken
the class in the past have
reported increased flexibility,
better sleep and relief from
symptoms of arthritis, cancer,
multiple sclerosis and other
health challenges, she added.
A freewill donation will be
taken for various charities. The
theme will be Helping Your-
self, Helping the World.
Potrykus also offers a more
advanced class Tuesdays at
Prince of Peace church from
5:15 to 6:30 p.m. This four-
week session is $36.
She will teach in Three
Lakes at the Reiter Center
Mondays, Oct. 3, 10, 17 and 31,
from 4:30 to 5:45 p.m. The cost
is $36.
Scholarships are available
for high school students and
others with financial need.
Attendees should wear
loose, comfortable clothing.
Mats and other optional props
will be available for use.
Registration is recommend-
ed since space is limited. Work-
shops and private instruction
also are available.
For more information, con-
tact Potrykus at (715) 891-
2002.
Potrykus to offer free yoga classes
BINGO Held every Mon. including holidays
at Kalmar Community Center, Eagle River.
Early Birds at 6 p.m., regular at 7 p.m. Sand-
wiches, snacks and beverages available for
purchase. Open to the public. (715) 479-2633.
BADGER BRIDGE Meets every Mon. from
1 to 4 p.m. at Boondockers Lounge at Wild
Eagle Lodge in Eagle River. Reservations not
required. Partner provided if needed. A social
and learning game, players may request help
at any time. All skill levels welcome. Call (715)
362-8933.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE Meets in the lower
level of First Congregational United Church of
Christ, Eagle River, Thurs. at 6:30 p.m.; Mon.
at 1 p.m. Call (715) 479-8767 (days) or 479-
8783.
MAHJONGG American mahjongg is
played Mon. at 10 a.m. at the Eagle River
Golf Course clubhouse. Reservations not
required. New players welcome. For more
info, e-mail molly@mollya.com.
NORTHWOODS CHILDRENS MUSEUM
Hands-on educational exhibits and programs.
Fun for all ages. Prime ages 1-10. Call (715)
479-4623 or visit www.northwoodschildrens-
museum.com.
NORTHWOODS SINGERS Meets Tues.,
6:30 p.m. at First Congregational United
Church of Christ, 105 N. 1st St., Eagle River.
New singers welcome. Call Barb Nehring,
(715) 547-3333.
OUTDOOR WOMENS GROUP Activities
are held the first Sun. of each month. Call
Norma Yaeger, (715) 477-1984.
SCRAPBOOK CLUB Meets the last Tues.
of each month. Call Cathy, (715) 479-3164.
WATER AEROBICS Classes at Lake For-
est Resort every Tues. and Thurs. from 8:30-
9:30 a.m. Call (715) 479-3251.
WOODCARVERS Northwoods Wood-
carvers meet every Wed. at 1 p.m. at Kalmar
Center in Eagle River. All are welcome. Call
John Modjewski, (715) 479-6093.
YMCA The YMCA Pines Fitness Center is
open for adults and youths grade six and old-
er Mon.-Thurs., 5:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri., 5:30
a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., 7 a.m.-1 p.m.; and Sun.,
noon-4 p.m. Monthly, weekly and daily mem-
berships available. Call (715) 479-9500.
COMMUNITY DINNERS Northwoods
SHARE offers free community dinners the
first and third Tues. of each month at Lincoln
Town Hall in Eagle River. Doors open at 4
p.m., dinner at 5:30 p.m. Call Donna Goed-
daeus, (715) 479-8244.
FIRST AID/CPR CLASSES The American
Red Cross offers various first aid, CPR and
AED classes in Rhinelander. Call (715) 362-
5456.
GED PREPARATION Classes are avail-
able at Nicolet Learning Center, First Congre-
gational UCC, Eagle River, Tues. from 2-6
p.m. and Thurs. from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Call (715)
365-4455 or 1-(800) 544-3039.
AL-ANON Meets Wed. from 6:30-8 p.m. in
the main-floor solarium at Eagle River Memo-
rial Hospital. Call (715) 628-0023.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Closed
meetings in Eagle River Mon. and Fri. at 7:30
p.m., First Congregational UCC. ; closed step
meetings every Sun., 2 p.m., Land O Lakes
Town Hall (rear entrance). Turning Point
Group meetings every Tues., 7:30 p.m., Com-
munity Church annex, Hwy. K; 7:30 p.m. St.
Theresa Church in Three Lakes; and 10 a.m.
Sat. at Holy Family Church in Woodruff.
Closed meetings are held at St. Germain
Community United Church of Christ every
Thurs. at 7 p.m. and in the Newbold Town Hall
every Wed. Call (715) 367-7920 or (715) 479-
8475. Web site: www.northwoodsaa.org.
BOOK CLUB Olson Library Book Club
meets the first Thurs. of each month (except
July, Aug. and Dec.) from 7-8:30 p.m. Call
(715) 479-8070.
BOY SCOUTS Boy Scout Troop 601
meets every Tues. in Eagle River at 6 p.m.
Call Kay Tulppo, (715) 479-7409.
CELEBRATE RECOVERY

Presented by
Birchwood Community Church. Meets every
Thurs. at 6 p.m. at 115 Division St., Eagle
River. (715) 891-1946.
CHRISTIAN COALITION Meets the last
Tues. of each month at 7 p.m. at Donnas
Cafe in Eagle River. Call Jeff Hyslop, (715)
479-4066.
CHRONIC HEALTH CONDITIONS SUP-
PORT GROUP Sponsored by the Vilas
County Commission on Aging, meets the
second Tues. of each month at 1:30 p.m. at
the Kalmar Center in Eagle River.
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP Meets the
first Wed. of each month from 10 to 11 a.m. in
the lower level of the Land O Lakes library.
Call Mery Krause at (906) 544-2554.
DOLL CLUB The Enchanted Doll Club
meets the third Sat. of each month at 1 p.m.
at Olson Memorial Library in Eagle River. Call
Judy Wainwright, (715) 479-7132.
EAGLE RIVER GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
Meets the fourth Thurs. of each month at 7
p.m. in the Northland Pines High School library
in Eagle River. Call Sharon Rogers, (715) 889-
3157.
EASY EAGLES Meets every other Tues. at
11:30 a.m. at Riverstone Restaurant & Tav-
ern in Eagle River. Call Charlie Eggers, (715)
479-1799.
EAGLE RIVER AMERICAN LEGION Post
114 holds its regular meeting the first Mon. of
each month at 6 p.m. in Eagle River. Call (715)
479-3983 or (715) 477-0581.
EAGLE RIVER CHAPTER OF THE ORDER
OF THE EASTERN STAR Meets the first
Tues. of every month at 7:30 p.m., 610 E.
Division St., Eagle River. Call (715) 479-
8646.
EAGLE RIVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Meets the last Mon. of each month at 1 p.m.
at 519 Sheridan St., Eagle River. Call (715)
479-2396.
EAGLE RIVER MASONIC LODGE Meets
at 7 p.m. the second Tues. of each month at
610 E. Division St., Eagle River. Call (715)
479-8646.
EAGLE RIVER VFW AND AUXILIARY
Joint meeting the fourth Thurs. of the month at
6:30 p.m. at 624 W. Pine St., Eagle River.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Meets every
Wed. at 7 p.m. at Lac Vieux Desert Transfer
Station Road in Watersmeet, Mich.
GRIEF SUPPORT A Time to Mourn, a
free support group open to any adult who has
suffered a loss. Meets the second Thurs. of
each month from 1-2:30 p.m. at Lakeland
Senior Center in Woodruff. Call Connie
DeBels, bereavement coordinator for Dr. Kate
Hospice, at (715) 356-8805.
GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP Side By Side,
a free grief support group open to everyone,
meets the third Thurs. of each month at 1
p.m. at St. Peters Catholic Church in Eagle
River. Call (715) 479-8704.
HUMANE SOCIETY OF VILAS COUNTY
Meets the first Tues. of each month at 7 p.m.
at the Vilas County Animal Shelter.
JAYCEES The Eagle River Area Jaycees
meets the second Tues. of each month at
6:30 p.m. Call Michelle at (715) 617-6384 or
Cheryl at (715) 617-0265.
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS Knights of
Columbus meets the first Wed. of each month
at 7 p.m. in Eagle River. Call (715) 479-4476.
KNITTING CLUB Northwoods Knitters and
Purlers meet at 12:30 p.m. the fourth Mon. of
each month at Woodruff Town Hall. Call Carol
Clauser, (715) 453-8055.
LAKELAND ART LEAGUE New members
and visitors welcome. Call Arlene, (715) 272-
1168.
LIONS CLUB The Eagle River Lions Club
meets at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth
Wed. of each month. Call (715) 479-2666.
LIONS CLUB The Three Lakes Lions Club
meets at 6:30 p.m. the first and third Mon. of
each month at Oneida Village Inn. Call (715)
546-3493.
MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP
Meets the fourth Tues. of each month at 1
p.m. at Medical Arts Building on Hospital
Road, Eagle River. Diane Bluthardt, facilita-
tor. Call (715) 362-7779 or (715) 479-3625.
MILITARY SUPPORT GROUP All Things
Military meets the second Mon. of each
month at 7 p.m. at Olson Memorial Library in
Eagle River. Family members and friends of
military personnel are welcome to attend.
Call Scott Jensen, (715) 479-3631.
MOTHERS OF PRESCHOOLERS Meets
from 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth
Wed. of each month at Prince of Peace
Lutheran Church in Eagle River. To register,
call Lisann Snedden, (715) 479-1946.
MUSIC BOOSTERS The Northland Pines
Music Boosters meet the second Thurs. of
each month during the school year. Call Bran-
don Bautz at (715) 479-4473, ext. 0802.
MUSKIES INC. The Headwaters Chapter
of Muskies Inc. meets the first Wed. of most
months at Eagle River Inn & Resort. Call to
confirm. Business meeting at 7 p.m., guest
speaker at 8 p.m. Nonmembers welcome. No
charge. Call Scott at (715) 891-6133.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA) Keep It
Simple meetings are held every Thurs. at 6
p.m. at First Congregational United Church of
Christ,105 N. 1st St., the corner of 1st and
Division streets, Eagle River. (866) 310-9077.
NEW-YOU-CLUB Meets at 8:45 a.m.
Thurs. at Headwaters State Bank in Land O
Lakes. Call Elsie Conant, (715) 547-6015.
NORTHWOODS ASSOCIATION FOR THE
EDUCATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN
Training sessions are held the third Mon. of
each month from 6-8:30 p.m. Sessions will be
credited toward continuing-education hours
for child-care providers. Call 1-(800) 470-5833
or (715) 479-0337.
NORTHWOODS NEEDLEWORKERS
Meet the second Wed. of each month from 10
a.m.-4 p.m. at Cloverland Town Hall. Call (715)
479-7850, (715) 477-2579 or (715) 545-2664.
QUILTERS Cranberry Country Quilters
Inc. meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Mon. of each
month at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in
Eagle River. New members welcome. Call
(715) 479-4302.
QUILTERS Eagle River Kreative Quilters
meet the second and fourth Mon. of each
month at Olson Memorial Library in Eagle
River.
ROTARY CLUB The Eagle River Rotary
Club meets every Mon. at noon at Eagle Riv-
er Inn. Visiting Rotarians are welcome.
THREE LAKES CENTER FOR THE ARTS IN
THE NORTHWOODS Meets Tues. at 8
a.m. at the arts center. Call Marie Moore,
(715) 546-2299.
THREE LAKES GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
Meets the fourth Mon. of each month at
Demmer Library at 1 p.m. Call Nancy Brewster,
(715) 546-3391.
TOASTMASTERS Northwoods Toastmas-
ters meet the second Thurs. of each month at
7 p.m. at Olson Memorial Library in Eagle
River. Call Mike, (715) 479-8681.
TOPS WI 87 Meets Thurs. at Eagle River
City Hall. Weigh-in from 5-5:25 p.m., meeting
follows. All are welcome. Call (715) 477-2193.
TRI-COUNTY COUNCIL ON DOMESTIC
VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT Sup-
port groups for domestic violence and sexual
assault meet weekly. Call (715) 479-2912,
(715) 362-6841 or 1-(800) 236-1222.
VFW MEETING Eagle River Post 8637
meets the fourth Thurs. of each month. Joint
meeting with Auxiliary at 6:30 p.m.; regular
meeting at 7 p.m. Call (715) 479-8810.
VILAS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS
Meets the second Thurs. of each month at 6
p.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church,
Eagle River. Call Shirley Egan, (715) 479-
8820.
VILAS FOOD PANTRY Food pantry is
open Wed. from 8:30-10 a.m. and the first and
third Tues. of each month from 3:30-5:15 p.m.
at 1542 Hwy. 45 N., at the north end of the
Kalmar Senior Center in Eagle River. Call
Pam at (715) 479-3388 or Jerry at (715) 477-
1165.
WRITERS GROUP The Writers Voice
writers group meets the second and fourth
Wed. of each month from 6 to 8 p.m. at Olson
Memorial Library in Eagle River. Call Karin at
(715) 479-5232.
WEIGHT WATCHERS Meetings are held
Tues. at 5:30 p.m in Eagle River. Call 1-(800)
651-6000.
ACT NOW Open to physically challenged
people in wheelchairs. Call Alvin Weso, (715)
478-5120.
ADVANCE HEALTH-CARE PLANNING
WORKSHOPS Meets first and third Fri. of
each month at Medical Arts Building, 150
Hospital Rd., Eagle River. For reservations
and/or information, call (715) 479-0375.
ALZHEIMERS SUPPORT GROUP Held
at Lillian Kerr Nursing Care & Rehabilitation
Center in Phelps. Call Laura Javenkowski,
(715) 545-2589.
NORTHWOODS ALZHEIMERS SUPPORT
GROUP Meets at 1:30 p.m. the first Thurs.
of each month at One Penny Place in
Woodruff. Call Joan Hauer, (715) 892-0053
or (715) 356-6540.
CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Meets the
second Thurs. of each month at 10 a.m. at
James Beck Cancer Center at Ministry Saint
Marys Hospital in Rhinelander. Call (715)
361-2027.
DAYBREAK ADULT CENTER Provides
relief to caregivers who have elderly persons
living with them. Activities include social
events, outings, noon meal and snacks.
Meets Thurs. from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Prince of
Peace Lutheran Church, Eagle River. Call
(715) 617-0584.
KIDS IN NEED Confidential 24-hour hot
line, 1-(800) 622-9120, to teens and their
families. Call Mary Gadzalinski at Community
Mental Health Services, (715) 369-2994.
MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH HOTLINE:
Mothers in need of health and nutrition infor-
mation, financial aid or advocacy can contact
the hot line 24 hours a day at 1-(800) 722-2295
or Web site www. mch-hotlines.org.
MOMS IN MOTION CLASS Free classes
for pregnant women or new mothers Tues. and
Thurs. from 6-7:30 p.m. at Saint Marys Hospi-
tal in Rhinelander. Call (715) 369-6522.
NARCONON Provides answers to drug
addiction, free assessment, evaluation and
referral services. Call 1-(800) 468-6933; Web
site: www.stopaddiction.com.
NORTHWOODS AREA PARKINSONS DIS-
EASE SUPPORT GROUP Meets at 10 a.m.
the second Tues. of the month at Ascension
Lutheran Church in Minocqua. Call Denny Lei-
th, (715) 358-2207.
SEXUAL ASSAULT SUPPORT GROUP
Sponsored by Tri-County Council on Domestic
Violence & Sexual Assault. Meets Mon. from
4:30-6 p.m. in Rhinelander; Thurs., 2-3:30 p.m.
in Rhinelander; Thurs., 5:30-6:45 p.m. in
Minocqua. Call (715) 362-6841 Mon.-Fri. from
8 a.m.-4 p.m.
SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE SUPPORT
GROUP Meets the third Thurs. of each
month from 5-7 p.m. at Trigs RiverWalk Center
in Rhinelander. Meetings are free and open to
the public. Call Sue Mackowski at (715) 275-
5399 or Tina Werres at (715) 499-3002.
VISUALLY IMPAIRED Transportation is
available upon 24-hour advance notice by call-
ing (715) 479-7450. Support group meetings
are held at Kalmar Senior Center in Eagle Riv-
er at 1 p.m. the fourth Tues. of each month. Call
Marion, (715) 479-2312.
Recreation
Events
Meetings
September
W T F S S M T
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
The Almanac
Future cheerleader at Northland Pines. --STAFF PHOTO
Health
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 7B
LIFESTYLE
BANKRUPTCY
CREDIT CARD DEBT, MEDICAL BILLS, DEBTS
RESULTING FROM A LOST JOB OR FAILED BUSINESS?
Chapter 7 Bankruptcy may be your answer for relief from financial problems.
Phone us for a free initial consultation.
CIRILLI LAW OFFICES, S.C.
116 E. Davenport St., P.O. Box 159, Rhinelander, WI 54501-0159
Phone: (715) 369-3443 Toll-Free: 1-(888) 844-3443
[Our office is a debt-relief agency that helps people file bankruptcy for relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code]
Compiled by
Jean Deditz
ONE YEAR AGO
Admitting for the first
time that he had a hand in
killing his wife 11 years ear-
lier, Douglas Plude of Land
O Lakes pleaded guilty to
first-degree reckless homi-
cide . . . Frank Tomlanovich
defeated James Maillette in
the Republican primary elec-
tion for Vilas County sheriff
. . . Federal officials
announced that a proposal to
remove gray wolves from the
Federal Endangered Species
list in Wisconsin, Minnesota
and Michigan was worth
studying more closely.
FIVE YEARS AGO
A revaluation of property
in the town of Washington
sparked complaints due to
some assessments tripling
in value . . . Headwaters
Trails merged with the Sno-
Eagles Snowmobile Club in
Eagle River . . . Dedication
ceremonies were held for
the new $28.5 million
Northland Pines High
School in Eagle River.
10 YEARS AGO
The estimated cost of a
Vilas County Courthouse
remodeling project was set
at $3.4 million . . . An out-
break of oak wilt was con-
firmed in the Che-
quamegon-Nicolet National
Forest . . . A former part-
time assistant soccer coach
at Lakeland High School in
Minocqua was charged
with delivery of marijuana.
15 YEARS AGO
State officials expressed
surprise and elation that
U.S. District Judge Barbara
Crabb dismissed a treaty
right case because of the
actual words in the treaty
. . . Vilas County officials
approved a plan to build a
jail and juvenile detention
facility . . . Students
returned to classes at Phelps
School two weeks later than
expected due to delays in
completing an expansion
and remodeling project.
20 YEARS AGO
A compromise between
the Lac du Flambeau Band
of Chippewa Indians and the
Wisconsin Department of
Natural Resources reopened
the upcoming walleye ice
fishing season on Big St.
Germain Lake . . . Suzanne
Mirwald resigned from her
position as executive director
of the Eagle River Area
Chamber of Commerce . . . A
new state law was being con-
sidered that would prohibit a
minor from drinking alcohol
in a tavern even when
accompanied by a parent.
30 YEARS AGO
The Northland Pines
School Board voted to drop
the hot lunch program for
the school year . . . One of
the nations first deluxe
cross-country ski facilities
was constructed at Eagle
River Nordic near Butter-
nut Lake . . . A 15-year-old
Three Lakes boy woke after
spending more than a week
in a coma after the trail
bike he was riding collided
with another trail bike.
40 YEARS AGO
Vilas County officials were
predicting a 55% increase in
population for the county
over the next 20 years . . .
Tom Hill of Phelps bagged a
524-pound black bear . . . Dr.
T.J. Doyle was elected presi-
dent of the Eagle River
Recreation Association.
50 YEARS AGO
After more than six
years of fundraising efforts,
Eagle River Memorial Hos-
pital opened its doors for
the first time . . . North
Woods residents were
offered a chance to acquire
free fallout shelter plans
from the Vilas County Civil
Defense Department.
60 YEARS AGO
A suitcase, identified as
belonging to a Cicero, Ill.,
man who checked into a
North Woods resort one
evening in June and was
reported missing the next
morning, was discovered in
the woods on an abandoned
railroad track . . . First
National Bank announced
that the U.S. government
was seeking to collect pen-
nies and nickels due to a
shortage of copper.
70 YEARS AGO
A total of 30,000 finger-
ling brook trout were plant-
ed in Vilas County streams
. . . Herbert Garbisch was
appointed to fill the term
left vacant on the Eagle
River Graded School Board
by the death of Mae Lawler.
80 YEARS AGO
More than 200 students
were enrolled at Three
Lakes School . . . Madison
engineers were visiting
Three Lakes to consider
construction of dams on
Thunder Lake.
Gerd Klausmeyer of Fox Lake, Ill., contributed this post-
card showing passengers waiting for a train at the railroad
station at Ballard Lake in the town of Plum Lake in 1920.
BACKWARD GLANCES
PUBLIC NOTICES
_____________
(Two Weeks, 9/14-9/21/11)
Vilas County Zoning and Planning
Committee Public Hearing Notice
Date: October 3, 2011
Time: Immediately Following Public Hear-
ing 1B
Location: St. Germain Community Center
545 STH 155
St. Germain, WI 54558
Public Hearing 1C Description
The hearing will be on a petition submitted
by Tara Spoon, agent for Hwy 51 Properties,
LLC, to amend the Vilas County Comprehen-
sive Plan 2010 Map 7-2 showing Generalized
Future Land Use for a portion of properties
from Residential to Commercial in Govern-
ment Lot 8, Sections 13 and the NW 1/4, Sec-
tion 24, Town 42 North, Range 5 East, Town
of Manitowish Waters, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin. Known as Vilas County Computer Parcel
Numbers 16-1224, 16-1225, and 16-618-13.
An on-site may be conducted at the Commit-
tees discretion, with the public hearing to fol-
low at the St. Germain Community Center.
A copy of the petition is on file in the Vilas
County Zoning Office.
Dated at Eagle River this 12th day of
September, 2011.
Dawn M. Schmidt, Zoning Administrator
For: Zoning and Planning Committee
If you have special needs, or require spe-
cial accommodations, please call (715) 479-
3620 or write: Vilas County Zoning, Vilas
County Courthouse, 330 Court St, Eagle Riv-
er, WI 54521.
ANY ZONING COMMITTEE MEMBER
UNABLE TO ATTEND PLEASE CONTACT
THE ZONING OFFICE.
1768
_____________
(Six Weeks, 8/24-9/28/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-20
______________________________________________
JP Morgan Chase Bank, National
Association, Successor by Merger
to Chase Home Finance, LLC
Plaintiff,
vs.
Kristin I. Bloom a/k/a Kristin I. Renkes, John
Doe Bloom a/k/a Josh Renkes and Wells Far-
go Bank, NA
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on July 5,
2011 in the amount of $90,160.55 the Sheriff
will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
TIME: October 13, 2011 at 2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashiers check or certi-
fied funds, payable to the clerk of courts (per-
sonal checks cannot and will not be accept-
ed). The balance of the successful bid must be
paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier's
check or certified funds no later than ten
days after the courts confirmation of the sale
or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to
the plaintiff. The property is sold as is and
subject to all liens and encumbrances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: Lots 1 and 14 of Block 4 of
the Original Plat of the Village (Now City) of
Eagle River, Vilas County, Wisconsin, said
Plat lying in the NW 1/4 of the NE 1/4, Section
33, Township 40 North, Range 10 East,
according to the Recorded Plat thereof.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 322 S 3rd St Eagle
River, WI 54521-9046
DATED: August 5, 2011
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1721
_____________
(Three Weeks, 9/14-9/28/11)
NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF
HILDEGARD CEMETERY ASSOCIATION OF
PIONEER LAKE LUTHERAN CHURCH
CONOVER, WISCONSIN
The meeting will be held at the Pioneer
Lake Lutheran Church Thursday, Oct. 6th, at
7 p.m. Any lot owner or member of the
church who has an interest in the cemetery
will be welcome to attend. Officers will be
elected and annual reports will be read and
business transacted.
Hildegard Cemetery Association
Eleanor C. Mitchell, Secretary
1765
_____________
(Two Weeks, 9/14-9/21/11)
Vilas County Zoning and Planning
Committee Public Hearing Notice
Date: October 3, 2011
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Location: St. Germain Community Center
545 STG 155
St. Germain, WI 54558
Public Hearing 1A Description
The hearing will be on a petition submitted
by Tara Spoon, agent for Broken Arrow Hold-
ings, LLC, to amend the Vilas County Com-
prehensive Plan 2010 Map 7-2 showing Gen-
eralized Future Land Use for a portion of a
property from Residential to Agricultural in
the SE 1/4, SE 1/4, Section 25, Town 42 North,
Range 5 East, Town of Manitowish Waters,
Vilas County, Wisconsin. Known as Vilas
County Computer Parcel Number 16-1310-04.
An on-site may be conducted at the Commit-
tees discretion, with the public hearing to fol-
low at the St. Germain Community Center
A copy of the petition is on file in the Vilas
County Zoning Office.
Dated at Eagle River this 12th day of
September, 2011.
Dawn M. Schmidt, Zoning Administrator
For: Zoning and Planning Committee
If you have special needs, or require spe-
cial accommodations, please call (715) 479-
3620 or write: Vilas County Zoning, Vilas
County Courthouse, 330 Court St, Eagle Riv-
er, WI 54521
ANY ZONING COMMITTEE MEMBER
UNABLE TO ATTEND PLEASE CONTACT
THE ZONING OFFICE
1766
_____________
(Two Weeks, 9/14-9/21/11)
Vilas County Zoning and Planning
Committee Public Hearing Notice
Date: October 3, 2011
Time: Immediately Following Public Hear-
ing 1A
Location: St. Germain Community Center
545 STG 155
St. Germain, WI 54558
Public Hearing 1B Description
The hearing will be on a petition submitted
by Tara Spoon, agent for Broken Arrow Hold-
ings, LLC, to rezone a portion of a property
from Single Family Residential District to
Agricultural Zoning District in the SE 1/4, SE
1/4, Section 25, Town 42 North, Range 5 East,
Town of Manitowish Waters, Vilas County,
Wisconsin. Known as Vilas County Computer
Parcel Number. 16-1310-04.
An on-site may be conducted at the Commit-
tees discretion, with the public hearing to fol-
low at the St. Germain Community Center.
A copy of the petition is on file in the Vilas
County Zoning Office.
Dated at Eagle River this 12th day of
September, 2011.
Dawn M. Schmidt, Zoning Administrator
For: Zoning and Planning Committee
If you have special needs, or require spe-
cial accommodations, please call (715) 479-
3620 or write: Vilas County Zoning, Vilas
County Courthouse, 330 Court St, Eagle Riv-
er, WI 54521.
ANY ZONING COMMITTEE MEMBER
UNABLE TO ATTEND PLEASE CONTACT
THE ZONING OFFICE.
1767
_____________
(One Week, 9/21/11)
NOTICE
AMENDMENTS TO THE MUNICIPAL CODE
OF THE CITY OF EAGLE RIVER
ORDINANCE 507 & 508
Notice is hereby given that the Common
Council of the City of Eagle River enacted
Ordinances 507 & 508 which are amendments
to the Municipal Code of the City of Eagle Riv-
er, Vilas County, Wisconsin relating to annexa-
tion. These ordinances were passed on Septem-
ber 13, 2011 and have been placed on file and
are open for public inspection in the office of
the City Clerk/Treasurer, 525 E. Maple Street,
Eagle River, Wisconsin, Monday through Fri-
day between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30
p.m., in accordance with the procedures pro-
vided under section 66.0103, Wis. Stats.
Dated this 14th day of September, 2011.
/s/ Debra A. Brown, WCMC-CMC-CMTW
Clerk/Treasurer
1772
_____________
(One Week, 9/21/11)
NOTICE
On September 19, 2011, a resolution was
offered, adopted and approved by the Three
Lakes Sanitary District No. 1, Oneida Coun-
ty, Wisconsin (the Municipality), whereby
the Municipality authorized and directed
the issuance and sale of up to $258,810 Water
System Revenue Bonds, Series 2011. The
closing on these Bonds will be held on
September 28, 2011. A copy of all proceedings
had to date with respect to the authorization
and sale of said Bonds is on file and may be
examined in the office of the Secretary.
This Notice is given pursuant to Section
893.77, Wisconsin Statutes, which provides
that an action or proceeding to contest the
validity of such municipal financing, for oth-
er than constitutional reasons, must be com-
menced within thirty (30) days after the date
of publication of this Notice.
Dated: Sept. 19, 2011.
THREE LAKES SANITARY DISTRICT
NO. 1, WISCONSIN
Rebecca J. Bellman, Secretary
1786
WNAXLP
I love you!
Happy 70th,
Mom
8414
The Marshfield Clinic Minocqua Centers radiol-
ogy department was recently remodeled to
install new magnetic resonance imaging equip-
ment. --Contributed Photo
Marshfield Clinic Minoc-
qua Centers radiology depart-
ment was recently remodeled
to allow for the installation of
new magnetic resonance
imaging (MRI) equipment.
MRI is noninvasive imag-
ing of soft tissues, bones and
muscles. The exams are used
to help physicians diagnose a
wide range of medical issues,
from orthopedic and sports-
related injuries to breast and
other cancers. They are also
used for specialties like neu-
rology, angiography and cardi-
ology.
Weve had MRI technology
on site at Minocqua Center for
a number of years, but in
todays world, technology can
become outdated very quick-
ly, said Kris Slavinsky, man-
ager, radiology, Marshfield
Clinic Northern Division.
This new MRI offers our
patients the latest, most cur-
rent equipment and software,
providing patients faster,
more comfortable exams, and
physicians more accurate
images, stated Slavinsky.
The new MRI has a wider
open bore, which is the tube-
like structure where the
patient lies during the imag-
ing process, Slavinsky ex-
plained.
The wider bore can pro-
vide better comfort and access
for larger patients up to
550 pounds. Additionally, the
new MRI has a shorter bore,
which helps to alleviate con-
cerns patients may have
about claustrophobia, since
most exams can be performed
with the patients head out-
side of the bore, he added.
For more information, call
the Marshfield Clinic Minoc-
qua Center at (715) 358-1000
or 1-(800) 347-0673.
Marshfield installs new MRI equipment
The Northwoods Knitters
and Purlers group will hold a
meeting Monday, Sept. 26, at
12:30 p.m. at the Woodruff
Town Hall, located on High-
way 47.
The meeting is open to
anyone who has an interest
in knitting or crocheting and
will offer something for any-
one from beginner to
advanced skill levels.
For more information, con-
tact Carol at (715) 453-8055.
Knitters group
to hold meeting
Volunteers of Senior Eagle
River Volunteer Enterprise
(SERVE) welcome the public
to join them at a Fall Fest
fundraiser Saturday, Oct. 8, at
Kalmar Senior Community
Center in Eagle River.
Crafts and a bake sale will
start off the festivities at 5:30
p.m., with entertainment by
the Bill Hassey Orchestra
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Food
and coffee will be served at 7
p.m. Beverages will be avail-
able, along with 50/50 raffles
and more.
Advance tickets will be $7
or $8 at the door. Tickets will
include food, coffee and music
and can be purchased at the
Kalmar Center Mondays,
Tuesdays and Wednesdays,
the Senior Craft Shop on Wall
Street, or by calling Karen at
(715) 479-5850.
SERVE to hold Fall Fest Oct. 8
Kalmar Center
Senior Nutrition
Meals
Highway 45 North
Monday through Friday
Serving at noon
Sponsored by Vilas County
Commission on Aging
Reservations or cancella-
tions need to be called in 24
hours in advance between 10
a.m. and 1 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Call
Penny LaFata at (715) 479-
2633. Home-delivered meals
are available based on eligibil-
ity. While there is no set fee for
a meal, the suggested dona-
tion is $3 per meal. No one will
be denied service because of
inability to contribute.
MONDAY, SEPT. 26
Spaghetti and meat sauce
Mixed green salad
Bread stick
Pears
Fruit Bavarian with yogurt
TUESDAY, SEPT. 27
Ranch baked chicken
Baked potato
Apricots
Whole-grain roll
Angel food cake
with strawberries
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 28
Burgundy beef
Noodles
Baby carrots
Fruit
Oat bran bread
Pumpkin bar
THURSDAY, SEPT. 29
Poor mans lobster
with butter and lemon
Twice-baked potato
Sweet-sour coleslaw
Rye bread
Pistachio dessert
FRIDAY, SEPT. 30
Open-faced turkey sandwich
Whipped potatoes with gravy
Brussels sprouts
Lemon meringue pie
All meals include 1% milk
and coffee.
LEAGUE DONATIONS The Lake Forest Ladies Wednesday
Morning Golf League in Eagle River recently donated $75 each
to Angel On My Shoulder, Tri-County Council on Domestic Vio-
lence and Sexual Assault Inc. and Vilas Food Pantry. Included
in the $75 donations was the Vilas County animal shelter.
League President Jane Ellett, right, presented one of the
checks to the shelters director, Jennifer Primich.
--Photo By Sharon Gifford
EAGLE RIVER
DUPLICATE BRIDGE
Results of 9/12/11
First: Lois Killinger and Sally
Kemp.
Second (tie): Bill Murphy and
Terry McCloskey; Lila Fletcher
and Kaye McCardle; Bob and
Mary Ellen Peterman.
Results of 9/15/11
First: Bob & Mary Ellen
Peterman.
Second: Mary Ann McNeil and
Lois Killinger.
Third: Jean Schroeder and
Terry McCloskey.
Duplicate bridge is played every
Monday at 1 p.m. and every Thursday
at 6:30 p.m. in the basement of First
Congregational United Church of
Christ, located at the corner of First
and Division streets. The public is
welcome. For more information, call
(715) 546-3021.
BADGER BRIDGE
IN EAGLE RIVER
Results of 9/12/11
North-South: First, Mickey
Barricklow and Mary Defnet;
second, Dan Del Ponte and Ron
Waller.
East-West: First, Mary Malo-
ney and Ed Stoever; second,
Patricia Stafford and Bob
Waters.
Bridge is played every Monday
from 1 to 4 p.m. at Boondockers
Lounge at Wild Eagle Lodge in Eagle
River and is open to the public. For
information, call Ed Stoever, club
manager, at (715) 362-8933.
8B WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
1800 Superior St.
Three Lakes, Wis.
715-546-2555
Wed.-Sat. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Youll feel welcome at
Going-Out-of-Business Sale
50%OFF Cards, Gifts, Old Hardcovers
CDs
$
4 Reg. Size Paperbacks 3/75

$
2 a Bag for all Romance Novels
After I close to the public, any nonprofit
with tax-exempt status can call me to set
up an appointment to come in and take
ANYTHING for FREE.
Going-Out-of-Business Sale
EVEN LOWER PRICES!
JAN HINTZ
(715) 546-2712
jehintz@hotmail.com
1144 MEDICINE LAKE LODGE RD., THREE LAKES,WI 54562
THREE LAKES
FASHION SHOW The Three Lakes Womens Club held its
annual Scholarship Luncheon and Fashion Show Sept. 14 at
the Reiter Center. Senior girls from Three Lakes High School
helping out as luncheon servers (above) included, front row,
from left, Josie Kenney, Stephanie Comella and Keirsten Nei-
hous; back row, Dana Kotarski, Jena Kendall, Zana Lor-
betske, Miranda Lindner, Sarah Kwaterski, Connor Pride,
Katie Stephens and Stephanie LaBeau. Students acting as
model escorts (right) included, from left, Lauren Tomasoski
and Keirsten Neihous. Members of the Three Lakes Womens
Club (below), who modeled fashions provided by 13 local
merchants during the fashion show included, front row, Karla
Lederhaus, Marilyn Schaefer, Bev Radford, Mary Ann Ander-
son Stoll, Rosie Obukowicz and Colleen Thompson; back
row, Lois Grajkowski, Judy Block, Jayme Levandoski, Joyce
Nykolayko, Mary Hitchcock, Marjorie Wendt and Sue Sad-
owske. Event proceeds help the club provide scholarships for
girls graduating from Three Lakes High School.
--Photos By Jan Hintz
_____________
(One Week, 9/21/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF
NATURAL RESOURCES
PUBLIC NOTICE OF INTENT TO REIS-
SUE A WISCONSIN POLLUTANT DIS-
CHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM (WPDES)
PERMIT No.WI-0063401-02-0
Permittee: Northernaire Condominium
Association, Inc., 6914 Bengs Road, Three
Lakes, WI 54562
Facility Where Discharge Occurs: Norther-
naire Sanitary District, 6914 Bengs Road
Three Lakes, Wsiconsin
Receiving Water and Location: The
Groundwater of the Eagle River Watershed
in the Upper Wisconsin River Drainage
Basin in Oneida County
Brief Facility Description and Summary of
Proposed Changes: The Northernaire Condo-
minium Association owns and operates a pri-
vate on-site wastewater treatment system
with a present annual average design flow of
10,240 gallons per day (gpd). After a gradual
four-phased expansion, the final annual
average design flow will be 30,000 gpd. The
second phase of the project may be complet-
ed during the next permit term, but is depen-
dent on the economy. The wastewater treat-
ment system consists of two trash (septic)
tanks to remove heavier solids followed by
three recirculation tanks that help equalize
the flow entering the Bio Microbics, Inc.
Micro Fixed Activated Sludge Treatment
(FAST) systems which provide biological
wastewater treatment. From the FAST units
the flow then goes back through the recircu-
lation tanks for more treatment or to the fil-
ter tank which is just prior to final disposal
in the absorption cells. The absorption cells
are designed to further treat the water as it
percolates down to the groundwater. There
are currently four monitoring wells around
the treatment system to identify any impacts
from the facility to groundwater.
The Department has tentatively decided
that the above specified WPDES permit
should be reissued. The proposed expiration
date will be December 31, 2016. Limitations
and conditions which the Department
believes adequately protect the receiving
water are included in the proposed permit.
The only change to this permit is enough
groundwater data was collected during the
past permit term that the groundwater pre-
ventative action limits (PAL) could be calcu-
lated and added.
Permit Drafter: Sheri A. Snowbank, DNR,
810 Maple Street, Spooner, WI 54801, (715)
635-4131, sheri.snowbank@wisconsin.gov
Basin Engineer: Steven Ohm, DNR, 107
Sutliff Avenue, Rhinelander, WI 54501, (715)
365-8939, steven.ohm@wisconsin.gov
Persons wishing to comment on or object
to the proposed permit action, or to request
a public hearing, may write to the Depart-
ment of Natural Resources at the permit
drafters address. All comments or sugges-
tions received no later than 30 days after the
publication date of this public notice will be
considered along with other information on
file in making a final decision regarding the
permit. Anyone providing comments in
response to this public notice will receive a
notification of the Departments final deci-
sion when the permit is issued. Where desig-
nated as a reviewable surface water dis-
charge permit, the U.S. Environmental Pro-
tection Agency is allowed up to 90 days to
submit comments or objections regarding
this permit determination. If no comments
are received on the proposed permit from
anyone, including U.S. EPA, the permit will
be issued as proposed.
The Department may schedule a public
informational hearing if requested by any
person and shall schedule a public informa-
tional hearing if a petition requesting a
hearing is received from 5 or more persons
or if response to this notice indicates signifi-
cant public interest pursuant to s. 283.49,
Stats. Requests for a public informational
hearing shall state the following: the name
and address of the person(s) requesting the
hearing; the interest in the proposed permit
of the person(s) requesting the hearing; the
reasons for the request; and the issues pro-
posed to be considered at the hearing.
Information on file for this permit action,
including the draft permit and fact sheet (if
required), may be inspected and copied at
the permit drafters or basin engineers
office, Monday through Friday (except holi-
days), between 9:00 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Please
call the permit drafter or basin engineer for
directions to their office location, if neces-
sary. Information on this permit action may
also be obtained by calling the permit
drafter at (715) 635-4131 or by writing to the
Department. Reasonable costs (usually 20
cents per page) will be charged for copies of
information in the file other than the public
notice and fact sheet. Permit information is
also available on the internet at:
http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/wm/ww/drafts/pu
bnot.htm. Pursuant to the Americans with
Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodation,
including the provision of informational
material in an alternative format, will be
made to qualified individuals upon request.
1781
PUBLIC NOTICE
WNAXLP
The Three Lakes Diamond
Club has announced its cash
raffle winners.
John Bridgewater of Mosi-
nee won the grand prize of
$1,000. In second place was
Fritz Westfall of Three Lakes
for $500, while Jamie Fath of
St. Germain won the third-
place prize of $300. The fourth-
place prize of $200 went to
Brad Bisnette of Three Lakes.
The Three Lakes Diamond
Club supports Three Lakes
High School baseball and soft-
ball teams, providing the
equipment necessary for com-
petition in the Wisconsin Inter-
scholastic Athletic Association.
Please come out and see the
teams play next spring, said
club member Kayla Wilkowski.
Thank you to everyone for all
of the support.
Diamond Club raffle
winners announced
The Three Lakes Genealogi-
cal Society will meet Monday,
Sept. 26, at 1 p.m. in the lower
level of the Demmer Library.
After the business meeting,
member Nancy Brewster will
highlight websites that could
help family historians find
their ancestral roots.
The Three Lakes Genealogi-
cal Society welcomes those
interested in family history
research to attend and join the
society. A member of the society
will be available one hour
before the meeting starts for
questions about genealogical
research.
The online and print
resources of the Demmer
Library are also available for
family history researchers. For
more information, call Debby
at (715) 546-2757.
Genealogical society
sets meeting at Demmer
The Three Lakes American
Legion will host a baked
chicken dinner Saturday,
Sept. 24, serving from 5 to
6:30 p.m.
The dinner will include
baked chicken with all the
trimmings plus coffee and
dessert for a cost of $8.
The Bill Hassey Orchestra
will begin performing music
at 7 p.m.
For reservations, call (715)
546-3431 after noon. Tickets
are also available at the
American Legion.
The next business meeting
of the American Legion Post
431 and Auxiliary will be held
Tuesday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m.
Legion to host
chicken dinner
The Friends of Demmer
Library will hold its monthly
used book sale Saturday, Sept.
24, from 9 a.m. until noon in
the lower level of the library.
The librarys lift is now
available for those who
require assistance reaching
the lower level.
The next meeting of the
Friends of the Demmer
Library will be Monday, Oct.
3. Book sorting will begin at
11:30 a.m., followed by a sack
lunch at noon and the general
meeting at 12:30 p.m.
Anyone interested in join-
ing the Friends of the Dem-
mer Library is welcome to
attend.
Demmer plans
used book sale
NEW DIRECTORS The Three Lakes Historical Society recently
held its annual meeting and announced its new board of directors.
The new board includes, front row, from left, Jim Nelson, Donna
Mather, Julie Tryczak, Mary Hitchcock and Jean Dick; back row,
Brian Thorstad, Bill Hayes, David Sorgel, Tom Rulseh, Tom Oben-
berger and Dave Hintz. Missing from the photo were Erica Brew-
ster, Linda Goldsworthy and Lee Klauk.
--Photo By Jan Hintz
The Oneida County UW-
Extension office and the Fami-
ly Resource Connection will
partner with the YMCA of the
Northwoods to present a par-
enting workshop in October
and November.
The workshop, Raising a
Thinking Child, will take place
at the Rhinelander YMCA
Thursdays from 5:30 to 7 p.m.,
Oct. 6 through Nov. 17.
Free child care will be avail-
able at the YMCA for those reg-
istered for the course.
Raising a Thinking Child
aims to help parents teach chil-
dren as young as 4 to 7 years
old to think for themselves in
new ways.
During this workshop, par-
ents will learn skills to teach
young children how to solve
problems and resolve daily con-
flicts, explore alternative solu-
tions and their consequences
and consider the feelings of
others.
The program helps shy chil-
dren become more assertive
and impulsive children to cope
with frustration when things
dont go their way, said Oneida
County family living educator
Erica Brewster. The skills chil-
dren learn can prevent or
reduce early behaviors that
predict later problems such as
violence, abuse and depres-
sion.
Workshop co-facilitators
include Brewster and Deb
Blackstone, director of the
Family Resource Connection in
Rhinelander.
To register or to request a
program brochure, contact
Brewster at (715) 365-2750 or
ebrewster@co.oneida.wi.us by
Thursday, Sept. 15.
The $25 registration fee is
refundable if a participant
attends at least six of the seven
sessions. A program brochure is
available via download at onei-
da.uwex.edu.
Parenting workshop set for October-November
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 9B
PUBLIC NOTICES
jehintz@hotmail.com
THREE LAKES
JAN HINTZ
(715) 546-2712
1144 MEDICINE LAKE LODGE RD.
THREE LAKES, WI 54562
BID NOTICE
The Vilas County Highway Department will be accepting
quotes on the following:
One (1) Boom Mower Purchase or Lease to Purchase
Specifications may be picked up at the Vilas County Highway
Department office in Eagle River. Quotes must be in the Highway
Department office prior to 3:00 p.m., Sept. 26, 2011. Vilas County
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all quotes and to
accept the quote deemed most advantageous to the county.
/s/ Jarred Maney
Interim Highway Commissioner 1764
_____________
(Six Weeks, 9/21-10/26/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 2011-CV-101
______________________________________________
CitiMortgage, Inc., successor by merger to
ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.
Plaintiff,
vs.
James J. Turner
Defendant.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on April 29,
2011 in the amount of $106,735.34 the Sheriff
will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
TIME: November 8, 2011 at 2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashiers check or certi-
fied funds, payable to the clerk of courts
(personal checks cannot and will not be
accepted). The balance of the successful bid
must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash,
cashiers check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land being a
part of Government Lots 2 and 3, Section 2,
Township 41 North, Range 11 East of the
Fourth Principal Meridian, Township of
Phelps, Vilas County, Wisconsin, and being
more particularly described as follows: Com-
mencing at the East 1/4 corner of said Sec-
tion 2; thence N 89 18' 00" W 2198.91 feet
(N89 17' W of record) along the East-West 1/4
line of said Section 2 to an iron pipe at the
center of said Section 2 and also being the
PLACE OF BEGINNING; thence S 0 00' 20"
W 100.00 feet to an iron pipe on the Westerly
right-of-way of a 66.00 foot Private Road;
thence S 33 44' 52" W 95.66 feet along said
right-of-way line to an iron pipe; thence
leaving said right-of-way line N 84 30' 30" W
270.08 feet to a 4" square concrete monu-
ment; thence N 55 22' 11" W 231.63 feet (N 55
23' W 232.0 feet of record) to a 4" concrete
monument on the Easterly right-of-way of
State Trunk Highway 17; thence along said
right-of-way line N 34 01' 15" E 34.53 feet (N
34 37' E 34.5 feet of record) to an iron pipe
and N 34 36' 00" E 120.03 feet (N 34 37' E of
record) to an iron pipe; thence leaving said
right-of-way line S 89 18' 00" E 325.23 feet (S
89 17' E 335 plus or minus feet of record) to
a point on the West line of the High School
parcel; thence along said West line S 0 02'
12" W 100.14 feet (S 100.0 feet of record) to an
iron pipe on the South line of said Govern-
ment Lot 3; thence along said South S 89 18'
00" E 100.00 feet (S 89 17' E of record) back
to the place of beginning. EXCEPTING
THEREFROM that parcel of land conveyed
to the State of Wisconsin, Department of
Transportation as described in Warranty
Deed recorded in Volume 1575 Records, page
451 as Document No. 468228 and legally
described as follows: Parcel 34 of Trans-
portation Project Plat 9195-07-21-4.04,
recorded in Volume 1 of Transportation Pro-
ject Plats, Page 15, as Document No. 464283,
recorded in Vilas County, Wisconsin.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 4430 Old School
Rd Phelps, WI 54554-9401
DATED: September 9, 2011
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain
the bid for this sale.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1775
_____________
(Six Weeks, 9/14-10/19/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 10-CV-359
______________________________________________
M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Frank C. Rodgers and Sandra J. Rodgers;
STC Capital Bank; Lampert Yards, Inc.,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure
made in the above-entitled action on March
31, 2011, I will sell at public auction in the
Vilas County Courthouse, located at 330
Court Street, Eagle River, WI 54521, on
November 1, 2011
at 2:00 p.m., all of the following described
premises, to wit:
Parcel A: A parcel of land located in the SW
1/4 of the NW 1/4, Section 30, Township 40
North, Range 11 East, Washington Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at the
West 1/4 corner of said Section 30; thence N
3 26'00" W, along the West line of said Section
30 a distance of 408.83 feet to an iron pipe
said pipe marking the point of beginning of
this parcel of land; thence continuing N 3
26'00" W, a distance of 895.57 feet to an iron
pipe; thence S 89 37'40"E, a distance of
1782.94 feet to a concrete monument; thence
S 6 32'00"E, a distance of 172.22 feet to an
iron pipe; thence S 11 20'E, a distance of
181.90 feet to an iron pipe; thence S 1 20'E, a
distance of 148.98 feet to an iron pipe; thence
S 34 59'W, a distance of 215.17 feet to an iron
pipe; thence S 68 44'00"W, a distance of
836.73 feet to an iron pipe; thence S 89
43'10"W, a distance of 78.19 feet to an iron
pipe; thence S 83 49'40"W, a distance of
119.29 feet to an iron pipe; thence S 83 32'50"
W, a distance of 85.24 feet to an iron pipe;
thence S 72 54'00" W, a distance of 98.00 feet
to an iron pipe; thence S 66 38'10" W, a dis-
tance of 98.14 feet to an iron pipe; thence S
63 55'10"W, a distance of 228.66 feet to an
iron pipe; thence N 58 22'40"W, a distance of
113.57 feet to an iron pipe; thence N 9 40'50"
W, a distance of 231.06 feet to the point of
beginning.
Parcel B: A parcel of land located in the SW
1/4 of the NW 1/4 and Government Lot 2, Sec-
tion 30, Township 40 North, Range 11 East,
and Government Lot 2, Section 25, Township
40 North, Range 10 East, also part of Lots 22,
23, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28 all in the recorded
plat of Smile-A-While, as the same appears of
record in Volume 2 of Plats, page 15, said
Plat being a subdivision of Government Lot
2, Section 25, Township 40 North, Range 10
East, all being in Washington Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at the 1/4
corner between Sections 25 and 30; thence S
3 26'W, a distance of 130.93 feet to the point
of beginning of this parcel of land, said point
being situated on the Southerly right of way
line of State Trunk Highway 70; thence
along said right of way line N 72 22'20"E, a
distance of 202.78 feet to an iron pipe; thence
along the arc of a curve concave to the North
a distance of 490.33 feet, said curve having a
radius of 7719.44 feet and a long chord that
bears N 70 33'10"E, 490.24 feet to an iron
pipe; thence N 68 44'00"E, a distance of
957.69 feet to an iron pipe; thence S 54 16'E,
a distance of 139.56 feet to an iron pipe situ-
ated at the intersection of the Southerly
right of way line of State Trunk Highway
70 and the Westerly right of way line of
Everett Road; thence along said Westerly
right of way line S 2 49'20"W, a distance of
342.81 feet to an iron pipe; thence along the
arc of a curve concave to the East a distance
of 274.98 feet, said curve having a radius of
605.96 feet and a long chord that bears S 10
40'10"E, 272.62 feet to an iron pipe; thence S
23 10'40"E, a distance of 104.96 feet to an
iron pipe; thence S 45 07'E, a distance of
239.22 feet to an iron pipe; thence leaving
said Westerly right of way line S 6 29'00"E, a
distance of 696.86 feet to an iron pipe situat-
ed on the Northerly shore of Catfish Lake;
thence along a meander line of Catfish Lake
N 63 31'40"W 323.19 feet to an iron pipe, N 35
33'30"W 289.25 feet to an iron pipe, N 53
19'20"W, 454.47 feet to an iron pipe, N 78
42'50"W, 173.48 feet to an iron pipe, S 71
09'20"W, 172.05 feet to an iron pipe, S 64
57'40"W, 245.52 feet to an iron pipe, N 24
10'W, 107.33 feet to an iron pipe, N 7 28'40"W,
302.67 feet to an iron pipe, N 70 04'10"W,
332.17 feet to an iron pipe, N 85 47'40"W,
156.05 feet to an iron pipe. S 76 12'20"W,
187.90 feet to an iron pipe, S 58 46"W, 172.62
feet to an iron pipe; thence N 62 14'W, 101.87
feet to an iron pipe situated on the Souther-
ly right of way line; thence leaving said lake
shore meander along the Southerly right of
way line of State Trunk Highway 70, N 72
22'20"E, a distance of 384.90 feet to the point
of beginning. Including the land lying
between the lake shore baseline and the
waters edge.
Parcel C: A parcel of land located in the SW
1/4 of the NW 1/4, Section 30, Township 40
North, Range 11 East, Washington Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at the
West 1/4 corner of said Section 30; thence N
3 26'00W, a distance of 1304.40 feet to an iron
pipe; thence S 89 37'40"E, a distance of
1782.94 feet to a concrete monument; thence
S 6 32'00"E, a distance of 820.92 feet to an
iron pipe, said pipe marking the point of
beginning of this parcel of land; thence con-
tinuing S 6 32'00"E, a distance of 277.70 feet
to an iron pipe; thence N 82 26'20"W, a dis-
tance of 102.61 feet to an iron pipe; thence N
2 49'20"E, a distance of 177.28 feet to an iron
pipe; thence N 35 44'E, a distance of 104.98
feet to the point of beginning.
Parcel D: A parcel of land located in the
SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4, Section 30, Township 40
North, Range 11 East, Washington Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at the
West 1/4 corner of said Section 30, thence N
3 26'00"W, a distance of 1304.40 feet to an
iron pipe; thence S 89 37'40"E, a distance of
1782.94 feet to a concrete monument; thence
S 6 32'00"E, a distance of 387.34 feet to an
iron pipe, said pipe marking the point of
beginning of this parcel of land; thence con-
tinuing S 6 32'00"E, a distance of 98.30 feet to
an iron pipe; thence N 55 01'W, a distance of
16.16 feet to an iron pipe; thence N 1 20'E, a
distance of 88.42 feet to the point of begin-
ning.
Parcel E: A parcel of land located in the SW
1/4 of the NW 1/4 also Government Lot 2, Sec-
tion 30, Township 40 North, Range 11 East,
Washington Township, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin, more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the West 1/4 corner of said
Section 30, thence N 3 26'00"W, a distance of
1304.40 feet to an iron pipe; thence S 89
37'40"E, a distance of 1782.94 feet to a con-
crete monument; thence S 6 32'00"E, a dis-
tance of 1201.74 feet to an iron pipe, said
pipe marking the point of beginning of this
parcel; thence continuing S 6 32'00"E, a dis-
tance of 126.04 feet to a concrete monument;
thence S 6 29'00"E, distance of 384.87 feet to
an iron pipe situated on the Easterly right of
way line of Everett Road; thence along said
right of way line N 45 07'00"W, a distance of
143.70 feet to an iron pipe; thence N23
10'40"W, a distance of 92.16 feet to an iron
pipe; thence along the arc of a curve concave
to the East 245.03 feet, said curve having a
radius of 539.96 feet and a long chord that
bears N 10 40'10"W, 242.93 feet to an iron
pipe; thence N 2 49'20"E, a distance of 98.26
feet to an iron pipe, said pipe being situated
at the intersection of said Easterly right of
way line and the Southerly right of way line
of State Trunk Highway 70 as presently
existing; thence along said Southerly right
of way line S 82 26'20"E, a distance of 119.14
feet to the point of beginning.
Parcel F: A parcel of land being the NW 1/4
of the NW 1/4 of Section 30, Township 40
North, Range 11 East, Washington Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at a con-
crete monument marking the Northwest cor-
ner of said Section 30; thence N 89 56'20"E, a
distance of 1626.74 feet to an iron pipe situ-
ated at the intersection of the Northerly line
of Section 30 and the Westerly right of way
line of Range Line Road; thence S 27
20'30"E, along said Westerly right of way line
a distance of 211.42 feet to an iron pipe situ-
ated at the intersection of said Westerly
right-of-way line and the West 1/16th line of
said Section 30; thence S 6 56'00"E, along
said West 1/16th line a distance of 1135.89
feet to a concrete monument; said monu-
ment marking the center 1/16 Northwest;
thence N 89 37'40"W, along the North 1/16th
line of Section 30 a distance of 1782.94 feet to
an iron pipe, said pipe marking the West 1/16
Northwest; thence N 3 26'00"W, along the
West line of Section 30, a distance of 1304.40
feet to the point of beginning.
Parcel G: Government Lot 1, Section 30,
Township 40 North, Range 11 East, Washing-
ton Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin.
Except that part conveyed to the Town of
Washington as described in Volume 357 M/R,
page 259.
Tax Key No. G1 (26-2845); G2-1 (26-2846); 7-
1 (26-2886); PL22-1 (26-662); 6 (26-2885)
THE PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD SUB-
JECT TO ALL LEGAL ENCUMBRANCES.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH or CASHIERs
CHECK (10% downpayment at sale, balance
due within ten (10) days of Court approval).
DATED at Eagle River, Wisconsin, on
September 9, 2011.
/s/ Frank Tomlanovich
Sheriff of Vilas County, Wisconsin
BASS & MOGLOWSKY, S.C.,
Attorneys for Plaintiff
The above property is located at 3545 East
State Highway 70, Eagle River, WI 54521.
1762
_____________
(Six Weeks, 8/17-9/21/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case Number 11 CV 91
______________________________________________
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
Vs
ESTATE OF GAY A. HOLZER, et al.
Defendant(s)
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on June 30,
2011, in the amount of $109,859.03 the Sheriff
will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
TIME: October 4, 2011 at 2:00 PM
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay
balance due will result in forfeit of deposit
to plaintiff. 2. Sold as is and subject to all
legal liens and encumbrances.
PLACE: at 330 Court Street, Eagle River,
Wisconsin 54521
DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in
part of Government Lot 1, Section 30, Town-
ship 40 North, Range 8 East, in the Town of
St. Germain, Vilas County, Wisconsin,
described as follows: Commencing at a
meander corner common to Sections 29 and
30 near the South shore of Big St. Germain
Lake being the Northeast corner of Govern-
ment Lot 1, marked by a Vilas County alu-
minum capped monument in place, refer-
enced by a 5" square concrete monument in
place which bears South 49.00 feet; thence
South 51 29' 27" West, 1128.31 feet to a 2"
diameter iron pipe in place near the Wester-
ly shore of Fawn Lake; the place of begin-
ning. Then meandering along said Westerly
shore line, South 40 45' 18" West, 104.89 feet
to a 1" diameter iron pipe, thence leaving
said meanderline, North 49 52' 32" West,
236.68 feet to a 1" diameter iron pipe on the
South edge of the public roadway; thence
North 42 04' 35" East, (North 40 15" East, of
record) along the South line of said roadway,
109.89 feet to a 2" diameter iron pipe; then
South 48 40' 00" East, 234.14 feet (South 49
East, 242 feet of record) to the place of begin-
ning. The side lot lines extend Southerly to
the shore of Fawn Lake including all lands
lying between the meanderline and waters
edge.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1575 White Horse
Lane, St Germain, WI 54558
TAX KEY NO.: 24-1639-04
Annie M Schumacher
State Bar # 1074726
Blommer Peterman, S.C.
165 Bishops Way
Brookfield, WI 53005
Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com
to obtain the bid for this sale.
Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditors
attorney and is attempting to collect a debt
on its behalf.
Any information obtained will be used for
the purpose.
274920
1707
_____________
(Two Weeks, 9/14-9/21/11)
Vilas County Zoning and Planning
Committee Public Hearing Notice
Date: October 3, 2011
Time: Immediately Following Public Hear-
ing 1C
Location: St. Germain Community Center
545 STH 155
St. Germain, WI 54558
Public Hearing 1D Description
The hearing will be on a petition submit-
ted by Tara Spoon, agent for Highway 51
Properties, LLC, to rezone a portion of prop-
erties from Single Family Residential Zoning
District and Multi-Family Residential Zon-
ing District to Community Business Zoning
District in Government Lot 8, Section 13 and
NW 1/4, Section 24, Town 42 North, Range 5
East, Town of Manitowish Waters, Vilas
County, Wisconsin. Known as Vilas County
Computer Parcel Numbers 16-1224, 16-1225,
and 16-618-13.
An on-site may be conducted at the Com-
mittees discretion, with the public hearing
to follow at the St. Germain Community Cen-
ter.
A copy of the petition is on file in the Vilas
County Zoning Office.
Dated at Eagle River this 12th day of
September, 2011.
Dawn M. Schmidt, Zoning Administrator
For: Zoning and Planning Committee
If you have special needs, or require spe-
cial accommodations, please call (715) 479-
3620 or write: Vilas County Zoning, Vilas
County Courthouse, 330 Court St, Eagle Riv-
er, WI 54521.
ANY ZONING COMMITTEE MEMBER
UNABLE TO ATTEND PLEASE CONTACT
THE ZONING OFFICE
1769
WNAXLP
Three Lakes Center for the
Arts in the Northwoods
(TLCFA) recently raised more
than $14,000 at its fifth annu-
al Affair of the Arts event.
The event featured the
Fiesta Ball, which was pre-
sented with a Latin theme.
Carrie and Harry Strickland
prepared authentic dishes
from south of the border,
while The Fine Line from
Boulder Junction performed
the music.
Much of the evenings focus
at the Three Lakes Reiter
Center was the silent auction
of donated art and items from
individuals and local busi-
nesses.
Board member Jim Cowee
was master of ceremonies for
a live auction, which featured
an original abstract watercol-
or painting of downtown
Three Lakes by Vicki Morley,
another TLCFA director.
Board President Linda
Woiak announced a list of
wants and needs for the not-
for-profit art center, ranging
from a $55,000 state-mandat-
ed sprinkler system to cases
of popcorn for the theater.
One donor underwrote the
2012 summer childrens art
program for $600, and anoth-
er supporter offered $1,000
anonymously if 10 matching
gifts of $100 were donated.
Organizers said the goal was
met within minutes.
Plans are under way for the
2012 ball, according to event
organizers.
Fiesta Ball raises $14,000
for Center for the Arts
Three Lakes
Senior Citizen
Nutrition Menu
Reservations and cancella-
tions must be made 24 hours
in advance. Phone Diana
Kern, site manager, at (715)
546-2959.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 22
Creamed chipped beef
on a biscuit
Vegetable
Peaches
Peanut butter bar
MONDAY, SEPT. 26
Spaghetti and meat sauce
Mixed-green salad
Bread stick
Pears
Fruit Bavarian with yogurt
TUESDAY, SEPT. 27
Ranch-baked chicken
Baked potato
Apricots
Whole-grain roll
Angel food cake
with strawbderries
Some of the event organizers welcomed guests to the Affair of
the Arts at the Reiter Center. --Contributed Photo
The Three Lakes School
Community Learning Center
will hold Learning in Retire-
ment/Great Books classes
Thursdays throughout the fall
season from 2 to 4 p.m. in the
Three Lakes School District
boardroom.
Participants are asked to
enter the boardroom using the
outdoor entrance.
Upcoming classes this sea-
son will include the following:
Sept. 15, Parts of Animals by
Aristotle; Sept. 22, The Way
Things Are by Lucretius;
Sept. 29, Novum Organum
by Francis Bacon;
Oct. 6, Conclusion to On
the Origin of Species by
Charles Darwin; Oct. 13,
Struggle for Existence by
Charles Darwin; Oct. 20,
Silas Marner by George
Eliot, Part I, chapters 1 to 8;
Oct. 27, Silas Marner by
George Eliot, Part II, chapters
9 to 15;
Nov. 3, Silas Marner by
George Eliot, Part III; chapter
16 to conclusion; Nov. 10, The
Descent of Man by Charles
Darwin; Nov. 17, Natural
Selection by Charles Darwin;
Nov. 24, Thanksgiving, no
meeting;
Dec. 1, Experiments in
Plant Hybridization by Gregor
Mendel; Dec. 8, An Introduc-
tion to the Study of Experimen-
tal Medicine by Claude Ber-
nard; Dec. 15, Christmas party.
To make arrangements for
the books, call Mary Ann
McCloskey at (715) 546-8306.
Community Learning Center
organizes Great Books classes
The Three Lakes Commu-
nity Learning Center will
host free classes for the pub-
lic Tuesdays from 8:30 to 9:30
a.m. in the board room at
Three Lakes School through-
out the fall semester.
Participants are asked to
sign in at the high school office
upon arrival and enter the
board room through the out-
door entrance. Cooking classes
will meet in Room 208.
Classes this semester will
include: Sept. 27, Three Lakes
High School Fitness Center
tour and discussion of the
facilities; Oct. 4, 11, 18 and 25,
Computers for Beginners with
Mr. Welhoefer and Mr. Brown;
and Nov. 1, 8, 15 and 22 , holi-
day cooking with Mrs. Kroll.
Participants should pre-
register for classes by calling
Peggy Bennett at 546-3321,
ext. 206.
Free classes set
throughout fall
A pumpkin from last years event exemplifies one of the con-
tests decorative entries. This year, the contest is set for Satur-
day, Oct. 8, in downtown Three Lakes. --Contributed Photo
Three Lakes will hold its
second annual community-
wide Pumpkin Decorating
Contest Saturday, Oct. 8, in
the downtown area.
Last year, hundreds of visi-
tors viewed more than 50
entries, and organizers said
they hope for even more par-
ticipation this year.
Judging will be based on
three age categories 5 to 9,
10 to 15, and 16 and older
and will judge both tradition-
al carved pumpkins and
painted or decorated entries.
Natural or synthetic pump-
kins are allowed in the con-
test, and any lighting must be
battery powered.
All community members
are welcome to participate.
Contestants must register
their pumpkins at the regis-
tration booth by 10 a.m. the
day of the event. Judging will
take place at noon.
Participating Three Lakes
merchants will have display
surfaces in front of their busi-
nesses and pumpkins can
remain on display until 7 p.m.
The contest is sponsored by
the Three Lakes Business
Chain and the Three Lakes
chamber of commerce.
Pumpkin Decorating Contest
planned downtown Oct. 8
Northwoods Petroleum
Museum in Three Lakes was
featured in the Sept. 5 issue of
Auto Week Magazine, which
was founded in Detroit in
1958 and has 285,000 sub-
scribers worldwide.
Museum owner Ed Jacob-
sen was surprised by the arti-
cle, saying he wasnt informed
it would be published. He only
learned of its existence
through the many phone calls
he received.
Im proud to have good
publicity about Three Lakes
in any publication, especially
a national magazine as large
as Auto Week, said Jacobsen.
Since the article ran, the
museum has seen an increase
in fall business due to the
Auto Week subscribers in the
North Woods. Jacobsen said
hes had people visit the
museum from Minocqua,
Phelps, Sayner, Milwaukee
and Madison because of the
article.
The article was written and
photographed by Contribut-
ing Editor Phil Berg, who also
runs the car enthusiast Ulti-
mateGarages.com website.
Bergs company also offers a
two-volume hardbound edition
of featured garages with open-
ing comments by Jay Leno.
Good news about Three
Lakes keeps popping up
nationally from the likes of
Budweiser, Kraft and now
Auto Week, and thats a good
thing, said Jacobsen.
Northwoods Petroleum Museum
gets article in national magazine
ALZHEIMERS WALK The Alzheimers Association recently
held its Walk to End Alzheimers, formerly known as the Mem-
ory Walk, at Nicolet College in Rhinelander. The purpose of the
walk is to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimers care, sup-
port and research. In Three Lakes collecting funds for the walk
were, from left, Barbara Holtz of Three Lakes and Jan Dougher-
ty of Appleton. --Photo By Jan Hintz
10B WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
HARRY & JOANNE SCHEHL
(715) 479-1362
jschehl@frontier.com
8166 MELODY DR., ST. GERMAIN, WI 54558
ST. GERMAIN/SAYNER
ANNUAL PICNIC The St. Germain PrimeTimers recently
held a picnic at St. Germain Community Park. The afternoons
activities included line dancing and bingo, and a picnic lunch
was served. Enjoying the lunch were, front row, from left, Rhon-
da Coker, Barb Ratajczyk, Pat Krueger and Joy Sinclair; back
row, Pat Lichter, Dorie Komorowski, Kathleen Marshall and
Dorothy Schorr. --Photo By Harry Schehl
The Friends of the Plum
Lake Library will hold a bake
sale at the Sayner-Star Lake
Colorama Brunch Sunday,
Sept. 25, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The remaining Plum Lake
Centennial T-shirts also will
be for sale.
Members are welcome to
take homemade baked items
to the library Saturday, Sept.
24, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. or to
the community building
before 9 a.m. Sunday. Items
should be prepackaged in
small quantities and priced.
For more information, call
the library at (715) 542-2020.
Members are reminded to
pick up their quilt ticket enve-
lope if they have not already
done so. Due to a state law,
the tickets can no longer be
mailed. Arrangements can be
made for someone else to pick
them up. Ticket stubs and
money are due no later than
Monday, Oct. 24. Additional
tickets are still available.
Membership fees for the
2011-12 membership year are
due at this time. Forms are
available at the library or call
the library to have one sent.
The next meeting of the
Friends will be Tuesday, Sept.
27, at 1 p.m. in the librarys
meeting room.
Friends of library announce
sale, raffle, membership dues
A $2-per-vehicle fee to be
charged for use of St. Germain
yard waste facility was one of
seven action items approved
at the Sept. 12 town board
meeting.
The yard waste facility,
located on Juve Road, will be
open this fall from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. every Friday and Satur-
day for five weeks beginning
Oct. 14.
Leaves, small tree branches
or bushes and other yard and
garden waste will be accepted.
The Public Works Commit-
tee recommended the fee to
subsidize the cost of manning
the site to prevent illegal
dumping. The board had some
discussion about keeping the
site open without supervision.
Supervisor Fred Radtke,
who has been in charge of the
site for several years, coun-
tered that the contractor
hired to provide chipping of
the waste had problems with
sand, gravel and other illegal
items that were dumped with
yard waste, which caused
problems with his chipper.
Radtke also reported that
the compost pile being accu-
mulated is in good shape and
will be available for residents
use next spring.
The motion was approved
by a vote of 3-2 with Supervi-
sors Camp, Christensen and
Radtke voting in favor and
Bates and Vojta voting against.
The use of old plastic
garbage bags was another
action item that generated
considerable discussion. Many
residents still take their
garbage to the town transfer
station in the old $2 Town of
St. Germain bags. The station
is now under a new contract
with Eagle Waste with a $3-
per-30-pounds charge per bag.
In a letter sent to the town
board, Eagle Waste main-
tained that the town owed
them a $3,962 fee for the
acceptance of the old bags
since they took over the ser-
vice in July. In the same letter,
Eagle Waste also submitted a
proposal to purchase the old
compactor for $4,000.
Radtke moved and John
Vojta seconded a motion that
the use of the old garbage
bags will no longer be accept-
ed at the transfer site as of
Oct. 1, and that the town sell
the compactor to Eagle Waste
for $4,000 with the under-
standing that there will be no
further charges for old bags.
The motion was unanimously
approved.
In other actions on the
boards agenda, the board
approved putting up a handi-
capped child sign and a 25-
mph speed limit sign on Sun-
set Boulevard to provide
added protection for the care-
giver and the handicapped
child to use a motorized
wheelchair in the area.
Since the cost of the signs
was not currently in the town
budget, Patricia Falkenstern,
who was in attendance at the
meeting, offered to pay for the
two signs so they could be
immediately installed.
Town Chairman Walt
Camp proposed rejuvenating
an old town generator to be
hooked up to the public works
building so that the gas
pumps, lights and doors could
be operated in case of a power
outage. The board approved
the proposal as long as the
generator could be placed in
working order for a reason-
able cost.
Ellen Allen reported to the
board that the Friends of the
Red Brick Schoolhouse and
Red Brick Schoolhouse Inc.
have combined to form a new
group which has chosen the
name Supporters of the Old
School Building.
Allen stated that the new
group felt that it was time for
the town board to make a
decision so that the public
landmark could remain stand-
ing. She said that the public
is reluctant to contribute to
renovating the building with-
out town support.
Supervisor Lee Chris-
tensen suggested that the
group prepare a resolution
concerning the preservation of
the 1941 portion of the build-
ing for placement on the Octo-
ber town board agenda for
action.
A motion to consider an
employee grievance resolution
was tabled by the board after
Radtke moved to table the
action. He requested more
time to review the grievance
proposal since it would not
take effect until Jan. 1, 2012.
In a final action item, the
board appointed Nancy Neff
to a new five-year term on the
St. Germain Housing Authori-
ty, beginning in September
2011 and ending in Septem-
ber 2016. All apartments in
the senior housing units are
currently rented.
Under committee reports,
Fire Chief Tim Clark reported
25 calls in August, which
included fires, gas leaks, trees
down, accidents, medical
assistance and a false alarm.
Clark was concerned about
the number of false alarms
the department is receiving
and suggested that some fur-
ther action be taken.
Clark also reported that
the 2-year-old Pierce fire
truck is now problem free. The
fire department has been con-
ducting pump and hose test-
ing and is currently conduct-
ing an inventory.
The department now has
28 members, and is always
looking for new volunteer
members.
Camp updated progress on
the St. Germain Bike and
Hike Trail by confirming that
the town would be able to
extend the trail from South
Bay Road to Old Highway 70
using town crew work to pro-
vide matching dollars to a
$17,000 Department of Natu-
ral Resources grant.
Christensen reported that
golf course use has been good
and the town crew has been
helping with repair projects.
The Golf Course Committee is
finalizing a plan to refinance
$500,000 of the town debt on
the golf course.
Jack Santerelli, the new
town constable, provided a
detailed report on his activi-
ties, which included 14 dog
calls, one accident, seven road
calls, eight traffic stops, nine
vandalism to vehicle calls,
four traffic control calls, three
disorderly conduct calls, 13
underage drinking calls and
15 mailbox vandalism calls.
He reported 70 hours of
patrolling at the towns flea
market and 13 hours at the
Pig in the Pines festival. He
expressed concern about the
inability to ticket offenders
and asked the board to look
into the matter.
Supervisor Bill Bates,
chairman of the Planning and
Zoning Committee, is current-
ly working on a cemetery ordi-
nance.
He also told the board that
the Town Lakes Committee
conducted a two-hour annual
public meeting with Onterra
consultants providing
progress on the lakes grant.
Under citizens concerns
and nonappointed committee
reports, Verdelle Mauthe
reported an attendance of 79
at the PrimeTimers Septem-
ber meeting and 100 at its
annual picnic. The Prime-
Timers donated $250 for
repainting the community
center gym.
Gary Guyman expressed
concern about allowing dogs
at the flea market, observing
that it was just a matter of
time before someone got bit.
Phil Monday reported con-
cern about bike trail riders
crossing Highway 70 at the
bridge on Highway 70 West.
He almost hit a group of rid-
ers crossing the highway at
the bridge, instead of using
the path down the hill and
using the bridge underpass
provided for bike trail riders.
He urged the Bike and Hike
Committee to review the situ-
ation.
Mike Davidson asked the
town to do something about
the abandoned property at the
corner of Normandy Court
Road and Highway 70.
Rosalie Sherwin submitted
a list of questions she would
like answered to the town
chairman. Camp responded
that he would promptly
answer her questions in writ-
ing. Falkenstern wanted infor-
mation on Boyd Bests posi-
tion as deputy town clerk.
Town Clerk Tom Martens
listed the following upcoming
town meetings that will be
held at the Community Cen-
ter: October town board meet-
ing Monday, Oct. 10, at 5 p.m.;
the November town board
meeting will be moved from
its regular schedule to Tues-
day, Nov. 15, at 5 p.m.
There will be a meeting Fri-
day, Oct. 21, at 5 p.m. to make
a decision on town insurance;
Paul Carlson, the towns
assessor, will hold an open-
book session Monday, Oct. 24,
from 9 to 11 a.m.
The board of review on
assessments will be held
Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 7 p.m.
Martens recorded 27 people
in attendance at the meeting
in addition to the board mem-
bers.
Town board approves yard waste fee
___________
BY MARY PLATNER
SPECIAL TO THE NEWS-REVIEW
___________
Come Join Us
Traditions Annual Colorama Sale!
Sept. 23, 24 & 25, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
2
5
%
O
ff
S
torew
id
e
Phone Orders
W
elcome
2959 Main Street, Sayner, WI 54560 (715) 542-2101
Sale Excludes Antique Items
20%Off
Storewide
Sept. 23, 24 & 25
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fri. & Sat.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sun.
C
o
l
o
r
a
ma
S
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www.RusticRiverDecor.com

f Hwy
r
o f H w y
COLORAMA in sayner
Friday, Saturday & Sunday, Sept. 23, 24 & 25
BIKE HIKE SHOP EAT
C
O
L
O
R
A
M
A
BRUNCH & CRAFT
S
H
O
W
Sunday, Sept. 25, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at the Sayner Community Center
Adults $9, Children 10 & Younger $6
Enjoy a bountiful brunch, local crafters and sensational raffle prizes.
Sponsored by the Sayner-Star Lake Chamber of Commerce
The community center is located on the corner of Hwy. 155 (Main St.) and Hwy. N
2977 Main St., Sayner, Wis. (715) 542-2788
Open All Year
Enjoy Colorama, Sept. 23, 24, 25
Visit Downtown Sayner
Environmentally Smart
Clean - Efficient - Convenient
Safe - No Chimney Required
The Nations Largest Selection & Dealer of Pellet Stoves
We now have
Bicycle Rentals
so enjoy our great trails.
Licenses Camping Supplies
Sporting Goods Live Bait Ice
Fishing Tackle Wild Rice
Motor, Canoe and
Kayak Rentals
Prime-Time
Dining
Prime-Time Dining is
available at the St. Germain
senior nutrition site located
at Fibbers Restaurant, 8679
Big St. Germain Drive. Meals
are served Mondays, Wednes-
days and Fridays at noon.
Home-delivered meals are
available based on eligibility.
While there is no set fee for
a meal, donations will be
accepted. No one will be
denied service because of
inability to contribute.
For reservations, contact
Verdelle Mauthe, site manag-
er, 24 hours in advance, at
(715) 542-2951.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 23
Tuna melt on rye
with American cheese
Potato chips
Cantaloupe
Lemon citrus bar
MONDAY, SEPT. 26
Spaghetti and meat sauce
Garlic bread
Tossed green salad
Apple bars
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 28
Meatloaf
Mashed potatoes and gravy
Green beans
Carrot cake
All meals served with bread
or roll, margarine and
low-fat milk.
In conjunction with its
yearlong centennial anniver-
sary, the town of Plum Lake
Centennial Committee will
close its time capsule at the
Vilas County Historical
Museum Sunday, Sept. 25, at
1:30 p.m.
The ceremony will cap off
the weekends Colorama
activities at the museum,
located at 2889 Highway 155
in Sayner.
The committee collected
commemorative items and
pictures throughout the year.
These items will be placed
inside a small time capsule
and sealed. The capsule will
be kept at the museum, to be
opened in 50 years.
Participants are welcome
to take small commemorative
items to be placed inside the
time capsule. Everyone is wel-
come. Refreshments will be
served.
The town of Plum Lake,
which encompasses the Vilas
County communities of Sayn-
er and Star Lake, was official-
ly created by an ordinance
passed by the Vilas County
Board Jan. 5, 1911.
Committee to seal
time capsule
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 11B
SNOWPLOWING BID NOTICE
The School Board of the School District of Phelps will accept bids to plow
snow at the Phelps School grounds. Those interested in bidding should
submit a quote per snowfall and/or for the entire season. Bidders will be
expected to plow the blacktop area, plow entrances, and when possible,
plowing should be completed by 6 a.m. Bidders should be able to provide
a certificate of insurance and can visit the area. Bids are to be mailed pri-
or to Monday, Oct. 10, 2011, to Delnice Hill, District Administrator, 4451
Old School Road, Phelps, WI 54554. Questions can be directed to Rick
Buell at (715) 545-2724.
The Phelps School District is an equal opportunity employer
and reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. 1777
SNOWBIRDS
DC Schultz Builders, Inc.
Your FL Contractor Connection
David C. Schultz
715-892-5480
dcsbuilders@hotmail.com
Licensed and Insured FL and WI
FL Cert. Residential Contractor #CRC1330274 FL Cert. Roofing Contractor #CCC1329417
WI Cert. Contractor #910992, #910990 Est. Since 1992
gifford112288@nnex.net
PHELPS
SHARON GIFFORD
(715) 545-4008
2462 ST. LOUIS RD.,
PHELPS, WI 54554
PUBLIC NOTICES
_____________
(Six Weeks, 8/24-9/28/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-29
Classification Code: 30301, 30304 & 30404
______________________________________________
RIVER VALLEY BANK,
Plaintiff,
-vs-
ALBERT W. PETERSON,
AMY L. PETERSON,
STEVEN J. REGNIER,
JEANNE M. REGNIER,
CITIBANK NA,
MINISTRY MEDICAL GROUP
NORTHERN REGION,
REINHART FOODSERVICE LLC,
MARSHFIELD CLINIC,
-and-
STATE OF WISCONSIN
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of a
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-captioned action on May 31, 2011 in
the amount of $564,767.65 against the Defen-
dants Albert W. Peterson and Amy L. Peter-
son (collectively, the Petersons), the under-
signed Sheriff of Vilas County, or Sheriffs
representative, will sell at public auction in
the Vilas County Courthouse foyer, 330
Court Street, Eagle River, Vilas County, Wis-
consin, on Thursday, September 29, 2011, at
2:00 p.m. the Mortgaged Premises described
by said judgment and described as follows:
The property located in Vilas County, Wis-
consin is legally described as set forth on the
attached Exhibit A.
Exhibit A
PARCEL 1:
PARCEL 1 of that certain Survey Map of
Northwoods Surveyors, Inc. and William S.
Cameron, Land Surveyor, dated January
1972, and revised August 1972, and being
part of the unrecorded Plat of Birch Lake
Resort and Campground, and more particu-
larly described as:
A parcel of land in Government Lot 3, Sec-
tion 11, Township 43 North, Range 5 East,
Town of Winchester, Vilas County, Wisconsin,
more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the section corner com-
mon to Sections 1, 2, 11 and 12, marked by an
axle shaft in East Birch Lake Road, wit-
nessed by an iron pipe bearing N 89 08' W
(solar bearing) 17.0 feet; thence S 89 20' W,
2507.1 feet along the section line to the
PLACE OF BEGINNING, marked by an iron
pipe. Thence continuing S 89 20' W, 130.0
feet along the section line to the one-quarter
corner common to Sections 2 and 11, marked
by an iron pipe, witnessed by a railroad
spike in a 12" White Pine bearing S 48 E, 34.3
feet; thence S 0 40' W, 261.4 feet along the
West line of Government Lot 3 to the mean-
der corner marked by an iron pipe near the
Northerly shore of Birch Lake; thence S 78
22' E, 80.0 feet along the lake to an iron pipe;
thence N 11 05' E, 284.3 feet to the PLACE
OF BEGINNING.
The above lateral lot lines extend to the
lake.
Subject to an easement for telephone and
electric power lines.
Subject to an easement 20 feet in width
approximately 280 feet from the lake for the
purpose of ingress and egress to parcels to
the East.
Together with the right for ingress and
egress to County Trunk Highway W over
the easement road approximately 280 feet
from the lake.
PARCEL 2:
PARCELS 2 & 3 of that certain Survey Map
of Northwoods Surveyors, Inc. and William
S. Cameron, Land Surveyor, dated January
1972, and revised August 1972, and being
part of the unrecorded Plat of Birch Lake
Resort and Campground, and more particu-
larly described as:
A parcel of land in Government Lot 3, in
Section 11, Township 43 North, Range 5 East,
Town of Winchester, Vilas County, Wisconsin,
more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the section corner common
to Sections 1, 2, 11 and 12, marked by an axle
shaft in East Birch Lake Road, witnessed by
an iron pipe bearing N 89 08' W (solar bear-
ing), 17.0 feet; thence S 89 20' W, 2177.1 feet
along the section line to the PLACE OF
BEGINNING, marked by an iron pipe; thence
continuing S 89 20' W, 330.0 feet along the sec-
tion line to an iron pipe; thence S 11 05' W,
284.3 feet to an iron pipe near the Northeast-
erly shore of Birch Lake; thence S 71 06' E,
100.0 feet and S 61 17' E, 100.0 feet along the
lake to an iron pipe; thence N 29 07' E, 415.8
feet to the PLACE OF BEGINNING.
The above lateral lot lines extend to the
lake.
Subject to an easement for telephone and
electric power lines.
Subject to an easement 20 feet in width
approximately 280 feet from the lake for the
purpose of ingress and egress to parcels to
the East.
Together with the right for ingress and
egress to County Trunk Highway W over
the easement road approximately 280 feet
from the lake.
PARCEL 3: PARCELS 4 & 5 of that certain
Survey Map of Northwoods Surveyors, Inc.
and William S. Cameron, Land Surveyor, dat-
ed January 1972, and revised August 1972,
and being part of the unrecorded Plat of
Birch Lake Resort and Campground, and
more particularly described as:
A parcel of land in Government Lot 3, Sec-
tion 11, Township 43 North, Range 5 East,
Winchester Township, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin, more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the section corner com-
mon to Sections 1, 2, 11 and 12, marked by an
axle shaft in East Birch Lake Road, wit-
nessed by an iron pipe bearing N 89 08' W
(solar bearing), 17.0 feet; thence S 89 20' W,
1827.1 feet along the section line to the
PLACE OF BEGINNING, marked by an iron
pipe. Thence continuing S 89 20' W, 350.0
feet along the section line to an iron pipe;
thence S 29 07' W, 415.8 feet to an iron pipe
near the Northeasterly shore of Birch Lake;
thence S 20 04' E, 100.0 feet and S 51 14' E,
100.0 feet along the lake to an iron pipe;
thence N 34 33' E, 120.0 feet to an iron pipe;
thence N 41 11' E, 564.8 feet to the PLACE
OF BEGINNING.
PARCEL 4:
PARCEL 6 of that certain Survey Map of
Northwoods Surveyors, Inc. and William S.
Cameron, Land Surveyor, dated January
1972, and revised August 1972, and being
part of the unrecorded Plat of Birch Lake
Resort and Campground, and more particu-
larly described as:
A parcel of land in Government Lot 3, Sec-
tion 11, Township 43 North, Range 5 East,
Winchester Township, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin, more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the section corner com-
mon to Sections 1, 2, 11 and 12, marked by an
axle shaft in East Birch Lake Road, wit-
nessed by an iron pipe bearing N 89 08' W
(solar bearing), 17.0 feet; thence S 89 20' W,
1440.2 feet along the section line to the
PLACE OF BEGINNING, marked by an iron
pipe. Thence continuing S 89 20' W, 386.9
feet along the section line to an iron pipe;
thence S 41 11' W, 564.8 feet to an iron pipe;
thence S 34 33' W, 120.0 feet to an iron pipe
near the Northeasterly shore of Birch Lake;
thence S 53 59' E, 100.0 feet along the lake to
an iron pipe; thence N 51 48' E, 949.4 feet to
the PLACE OF BEGINNING.
The above lateral lot lines extend to the
lake.
Subject to an easement for telephone and
electric power lines.
Together with the right for ingress and
egress to County Trunk Highway W over
the easement road approximately 210 feet
from the lake on the Easterly line of said
parcel.
PARCEL 5:
PARCELS 25 & 26 of that certain Survey
Map of Northwoods Surveyors, Inc. and
William S. Cameron, Land Surveyor, dated
January 1972, and revised August 1972, and
being part of the unrecorded Plat of Birch
Lake Resort and Campground, and more
particularly described as:
A parcel of land in the SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4
and in the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4, Section 2,
Township 43 North, Range 5 East, Winch-
ester Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin,
more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the section corner common
to Sections 1, 2, 11 and 12, marked by an axle
shaft in East Birch Lake Road, witnessed by
an iron pipe bearing N 89 08' W, (solar bear-
ing) 17.0 feet; thence S 89 20' W, 1205.2 feet
along the section line to the PLACE OF
BEGINNING, marked by an iron pipe. Thence
continuing S 89 20' W, 1171.9 feet along the
section line to an iron pipe; thence N 1 58' W,
316.3 feet to an iron pipe on the Southerly
right-of-way of County Trunk Highway W;
thence N 85 54' E, 1180.0 feet along the right-
of-way to an iron pipe; thence S 0 51' E, 386.9
feet to the PLACE OF BEGINNING.
Subject to an easement for telephone and
electric power lines.
EXCEPTING THEREFROM the East 3.00
acres of the following described parcel,
which is a strip of land lying West of and
abutting the East boundary of the following
described parcel, having a perpendicular
width of 347.10 feet, to-wit:
A parcel of land in the SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4
and in the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4, Section 2,
Township 43 North, Range 5 East, Town of
Winchester, Vilas County, Wisconsin, more
particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the section corner com-
mon to Sections 1, 2, 11 and 12, marked by an
axle shaft in East Birch Lake Road, wit-
nessed by an iron pipe bearing N 89 08' W,
(solar bearing) 17.0 feet; thence S 89 20' W,
1205.2 feet along the section line to the
PLACE OF BEGINNING, marked by an iron
pipe. Thence continuing S 89 20' W, 1171.9
feet along the section line to an iron pipe;
thence N 1 58' W, 316.3 feet to an iron pipe on
the Southerly right-of-way of County Trunk
Highway W; thence N 85 54' E, 1180.0 feet
along the right-of-way to an iron pipe;
thence S 0 51' E, 386.9 feet to the PLACE OF
BEGINNING.
PARCEL 27:
A parcel of land in the SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4,
Section 2, Township 43 North, Range 5 East,
Winchester Township, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin, more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the section corner com-
mon to Sections 1, 2, 11 & 12, marked by an
axle shaft in East Birch Lake Road, wit-
nessed by an iron pipe bearing N 89 08' W
(solar bearing) 17.0 feet; thence S 89 20' W,
2377.1 feet along the section line to the
PLACE OF BEGINNING, marked by an iron
pipe. Thence continuing S 89 20' W, 260.0
feet along the section line to the one-quarter
corner common to Sections 2 & 11 marked by
an iron pipe, witnessed by a railroad spike
in a 12" White Pine bearing S 48 E, 34.3 feet;
thence N 0 17' W, 296.9 feet along the West
line of the SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4 to an iron pipe
on the Southerly right-of-way of County
Trunk Highway W; thence N 84 09' E, 141.6
feet along the right-of-way to an iron pipe;
thence N 85 54' E, 110.0 feet to an iron pipe;
thence S 1 58' E, 316.3 feet to the PLACE OF
BEGINNING.
Subject to an easement for telephone and
electric power lines.
Subject to an easement 20 feet in width
over the existing road running Northerly
near the West line of said parcel for purpose
of ingress and egress to parcels to the South
and East.
NOW KNOWN AS
Units 1 through 6 and 8 through 47 of
BIRCH LAKE ESTATES CONDOMINIUM and
the undivided interest in the Common and
Limited Elements and Facilities appurtenant
thereto, together with the exclusive use and
right of easement of and in the limited com-
mon elements and facilities appurtenant to
said units, being a condominium created
under the Condominium Ownership Act of
the State of Wisconsin by Declaration of Con-
dominium of BIRCH LAKE ESTATES CON-
DOMINIUM, being part of the SW 1/4 of the
SE 1/4, Section 2, and part of Government Lot
3, Section 11, Township 43 North, Range 5
East, Winchester Township, Vilas County, Wis-
consin, in accordance with the Declaration of
Condominium as recorded in the office of the
Register of Deeds, Vilas County, dated Decem-
ber 21, 2006 and recorded December 21, 2006
in Vol. 1466 Records, Pages 218 through 245 as
Document No. 451215, amended in Vol. 1466
Records, page 625 as Document No. 451285
and as recorded in Vol. 3 Condo Plats, pages
382 through 383 as Document No. 451214,
amended in Vol. 1618 Records, page 296 as
Document No. 474919.
TERMS OF SALE: Pursuant to said judg-
ment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid
to the Sheriff at the sale in cash, cashiers
check or certified funds, payable to the clerk
of courts (personal checks cannot and will
not be accepted). The balance of the success-
ful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in
cash, cashiers check or certified funds no
later than ten days after the courts confir-
mation of the sale or else the 10% down pay-
ment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The proper-
ty is sold as is and subject to all liens and
encumbrances. Bids made after the plain-
tiffs opening bid will be accepted in $100.00
increments only.
THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A
DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED
WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Dated this 17th day of August, 2011, at
Eagle River, Wisconsin.
By: Frank Tomlanovich,
Vilas County Sheriff
Vilas County, Wisconsin
Drafted by:
Scott A. Jackman, Esq.
JACKMAN LAW FIRM, LLC
2620 Stewart Avenue, Suite 314
P.O. Box 1205
Wausau, WI 54402-1205
(715) 298-9445
1724
_____________
(Six Weeks, 8/31-10/5/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No.: 11-CV-55
Code No.: 30404
Foreclosure of Mortgage
Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00
______________________________________________
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Trustee for
Option One Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-6,
Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-6
Plaintiff,
vs.
CLIFFORD D. MAULSBY and JANE DOE
unknown spouse of Clifford D. Maulsby
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on April 12,
2011, in the amount of $162,135.85, the Sher-
iff will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:.
TIME: October 18, 2011 at 2:00 oclock p.m.
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified
funds at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay
balance due will result in forfeit of deposit
to plaintiff.
2. Sold as is and subject to all legal liens
and encumbrances.
3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real
Estate Transfer Tax.
PLACE: Vilas County Courthouse, located
at 330 Court Street, Eagle River, Wisconsin.
DESCRIPTION: PARCEL A
A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PART OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION
25, IN TOWNSHIP 41 NORTH, RANGE 10
EAST, CONOVER TOWNSHIP, VILAS COUN-
TY, WISCONSIN, AND BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCING AT THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4; THENCE SOUTH ALONG
THE EAST LINE OF THE SAID SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 A DISTANCE
OF 500 FEET TO A POINT AS THE PLACE
OF BEGINNING OF THE LANDS TO BE
DESCRIBED; THENCE WESTERLY AND
PARALLEL TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 A DISTANCE OF 545 FEET TO A POINT;
THENCE SOUTH AND PARALLEL TO THE
EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF 100
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE EAST AND
PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 A
DISTANCE OF 545 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4
OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 THENCE NORTH
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF TIE NORTHWEST 1/4 A DIS-
TANCE OF 100 FEET TO THE PLACE OF
BEGINNING.
PARCEL B
A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PART OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 OF SECTION 25, IN TOWNSHIP 41
NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST, CONOVER TOWN-
SHIP, VILAS COUNTY, WISCONSIN; MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCING AT AND BEING THE
POINT OF BEGINNING 400 FEET SOUTH
OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4
AND ON THE EAST LINE THEREOF.
THENCE WESTERLY AND PARALLEL TO
THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 A DISTANCE
OF545.0 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
SOUTHERLY PARALLEL TO THE EAST
LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET
TO A POINT; THENCE EASTERLY AND
PARALLEL TO THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4
545.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE
OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG
THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4
OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF
100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
PROJECT A030 (AHMA) 647-63428990
COUNTY: VILAS, STATE-WISCONSIN
MORE COMMONLY KNOWN AS 3319
STATE HIGHWAY 17 NORTH.
TAX KEY NO. 8-1341
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3319 Highway 17
North, Town of Conover.
TAX KEY NO.: 8/1341
Frank Tomlanovich
Sheriff of Vilas County, WI
ODESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
1414 Underwood Avenue, Suite 403
Wauwatosa, WI 53213
(414) 727-1591
ODess and Associates, S.C., is attempting
to collect a debt and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose.
If you have previously received a Chapter
7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspon-
dence should not be construed as an attempt
to collect a debt.
1737
WNAXLP
Phelps Senior
Citizen Nutrition
Center Menu
Lillian Kerr
Healthcare Center
by Rennes
Meals for seniors (60+) are
served Mondays, Wednesdays
and Fridays at noon.
Make reservations 24 hours
in advance to Sandy Mutter at
(715) 545-3983.
Home-delivered meals avail-
able, based on eligibility.
MONDAY, SEPT. 26
Swedish meatballs
Noodles
Broccoli
Fruit cobbler
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 28
Vegetable lasagne
Tossed salad
Garlic bread
Cherry crisp
FRIDAY, SEPT. 30
Tilapia
Au gratin potatoes
Asparagus
Dinner roll
Coconut cream pie
Milk, coffee, tea, bread and
butter are served with
all meals.
Phelps School District saw
exceptional advanced place-
ment (AP) U.S. history scores
for the second year in a row
during the 2010-11 school
year, according to a recent
report.
The College Board, who
monitors the test and assess-
ment, released the findings in
July, revealing that Phelps
students scored above the
national average in all nine
categories.
Phelps students Emma
Korinek and Ross Samuelson
obtained high enough scores
on the AP U.S. history exam to
earn college credit.
Dean of Students Jason Per-
tile administered the exam in
May. It consisted of 80 multi-
ple-choice questions, two essay
questions and a document-
based question in which stu-
dents constructed an essay
using only primary sources
and their background knowl-
edge of the subject matter.
The scores that Emma and
Ross achieved are a true tes-
tament to what can be
obtained when students put
their mind to something and
work hard, said Phelps histo-
ry teacher Alex Sjogren.
These two students worked
all year long studying an
enormous amount of content.
They spent two weeks prior to
the test studying as hard as
they could, and their hard
work paid off.
Sjogren said the college
credit will give the students a
head start.
Both of these students will
graduate this year and will
have a history class already
under their belt, he said.
Report shows Phelps students
rank high in AP U.S. history
Emma Korinek and Ross Samuelson received high enough
scores on the advanced placement U.S. history exam to earn
college credit. Phelps students in general scored above the
national average on the test. --Photo By Sharon Gifford
The 16th annual Phelps
Volunteer Fire Department
prime rib dinner is scheduled
Saturday, Oct. 8, at Hillside
Resort, located on Lac Vieux
Desert at 2474 South Shore
Road in Phelps.
Dinner will be served from
4:30 to 8:30 p.m.
The cost is $20 and tickets
can be purchased from all
Phelps volunteer firefighters
and at Phelps business out-
lets, including Sand Lake
Pub, Northern Exposure, First
National Bank, Phelps Conve-
nience Center, Village Barber,
Holiday Lodge and The Great
Escape.
This is an important
fundraiser for our volunteers
because we work hard to gen-
erate sufficient funds to buy a
badly needed tanker truck to
replace our current pumper
tanker that has been in use
for the last 30 years, said
Phelps Fire Chief Steve Waier.
We take special pride in
this dinner because we feel
Hillside Resort serves the
very best prime rib in the
North Woods, Waier. It all
started with Rob Andersen
Jr., who has, for more than 30
years, been a volunteer mem-
ber of our fire department. As
the previous owner of Hillside
Resort, Rob had developed his
own special recipe for cooking
prime rib. It is a family secret
he passed along to his son,
Robbie Andersen III, who now
owns and operates Hillside.
Robbie Anderson said Hill-
side is just doing its part to
support the department.
We are happy to handle
the annual prime rib dinner
for the Phelps firefighters, he
said. We do take pride in our
special prime rib. Using my
dads special recipe, we slow
cook the meat overnight and
it comes out to perfection.
Waier said the firefighters
also are a big help at the
fundraiser.
It is always a special night
for our volunteers who jump
in to don aprons to serve as
assistant cooks, waiters, wait-
resses, busboys and dishwash-
ers and, believe me, they do a
great job, said Waier. During
the course of the evening, the
firefighters sell 50-50 draw-
ings which help us to raise
extra funds that help us to
provide emergency fire-fight-
ing service to the families in
the town of Phelps, as well as
providing assistance to the
communities of Conover, Land
O Lakes, Alvin, Nelma and
Iron River, Mich.
Last year, the firefighters,
who are on call 24 hours a day,
responded to 46 fire emergen-
cies.
In addition to the response
to fires, our volunteers make
many calls to road accidents
and are always available to
assist our Phelps Volunteer
Ambulance Service when the
emergency medical techni-
cians (EMTs) may require
special assistance, said
Waier. I know that last year,
Carole Selin and her staff of
EMTs responded to 198 calls,
and we were ready to assist
whenever we were needed to
help.
The prime rib dinner will
include soup, salad, baked
potato and dessert. Beverages
will be available at the Hill-
side Resort bar.
Annual prime rib dinner to benefit fire department
___________
BY DON RUCK
SPECIAL TO THE NEWS-REVIEW
___________
OLD TIMERS The Keg Krew, sponsored by Holiday Lodge,
recently won first place at the Old-timers Slow-pitch Tournament at
Wavering Park. The team included, front row, from left, Aaron Hick-
son, Mark Grmick, John Weston, Ron Buell, Gunk Buell, Craig Kist-
ing and Mike Boelter; back row, Don Held, Randy Jensen, Jay
Kolling, Mike Grmick, Chad Martin and Greg Buckmaster. The
Phelps Booster Club sponsors the event, which raises funds for
school athletes and scholarships. --Photo By Sharon Gifford
12B WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
jilliebabes@yahoo.com
JILL JAMES
(715) 547-3930
4540 EVERGREEN DR.,
LAND O LAKES, WI 54540
LAND O LAKES PUBLIC NOTICES
_____________
(One Week, 9/21/11)
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
Monday, July 18, 2001
The regular meeting of the Northland
Pines Board of Education was called to
order by President Jim Mulleady at four
thirty-six p.m. (4:36 p.m.), on Monday, July
18, 2011, at the Northland Pines High School
in the Large Group Instruction Room, Eagle
River. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited.
Present were Board members: Jim Mulleady;
John Sarama; Eric Neff; and Holly McCorma-
ck. Mike Jovanovic, Mike Sealander and
Mark Vander Bloomen were absent. Quorum
was established. Also present were Mike
Richie, District Administrator; Margo Smith,
Business Manager; Scott Foster, Elementary
Principal/Director of Technology; Jim Brew-
er, High School Principal; Josh Tilley, Dean
of Students; and Susie Block, Recording Sec-
retary. There were five citizens in atten-
dance.
Open Meeting Verification Jim Mulleady
stated that the meeting had been duly called
with meeting notices posted at the following
locations:
1. The Northland Pines High School and
Middle School in Eagle River
2. The Northland Pines Elementary
Schools in Eagle River, Land O Lakes and St.
Germain
3. The Vilas County Courthouse - Eagle
River
4. The Eagle River City Hall
5. Additional notice has been given:
I. The Vilas County News-Review-Eagle
River
II. WERL/WRJO Radio Station-Eagle Riv-
er
III. The Rhinelander Daily News-
Rhinelander
IV. WHDG Radio Station-Rhinelander
Approval of Agenda - MOTION by Eric Neff
that the Board approves the agenda as pre-
sented and leaves the order to the discretion
of the Chair. Second by John Sarama. Voice
vote 4-0. Motion carried.
Employment Handbook work session
The Board started working on the Employ-
ment Handbook.
Pay Periods Board said keep them the
same on the 1st and 15th of each month
Benefits section work on draft:
Board said begin the 12% health insur-
ance deduction for all staff on January 1,
2012.
Mike Jovanovic arrived at 4:45 p.m.
Alternate benefit section: Mike Richie not-
ed he checked with Steve Kolling and he said
if you add 32 more people the first year there
is no impact on premium because there is no
claims base; however, it could impact the
premiums for the next year if these 32 people
had a lot of claims. Remember it could also
go down if overall claims were better. Richie
indicated right now we are expecting an
increase to premiums of about 3% in Octo-
ber.
Mike Sealander arrived at 4:50 p.m.
Board continued discussing alternate
benefit and then said it will be $5,000 and we
need to add a line indicating that the
employee must show proof of other insur-
ance.
Board said begin the 12% dental insur-
ance deduction for all staff on January 1,
2012.
Board said begin Wisconsin Retirement
System (WRS) deduction on September 1,
2011, for all certified employees and non-rep-
resented employees.
Board said begin the Wisconsin Retire-
ment System (WRS) deduction for NEST I
and NEST II employees on January 1, 2012;
the reason for this is that they still have col-
lective bargaining agreements in effect until
December 31, 2011.
Board said keep the retirement plan for
Health and Dental benefits as outlined in the
draft.
Board said sick leave incentive $50 per
day for accrued sick days up to 120 to be giv-
en at time of retirement as a lump sum pay-
ment at retirement or within one year of
retirement (so as to lessen the taxes on the
payment)
Board said keep Flex, life insurance, and
long term disability as is
Board said they need clarification on
Long Term Care as currently WEA requires
100% participation of teachers to keep this
active; however, if teachers choose to opt out
of the union and they no longer have 100%
participation will that cancel the LTD poli-
cy? This will be tabled until we can get clar-
ification.
Board said COBRA stays in as it is law
and COBRA also covers the surviving spouse
issue
Board said Leaves of Absence (extended
leaves) section can remain as is
Board said on mileage pay full rate for
traveling teachers who are required to do
interdistrict traveling as part of their job
noting we only have a few traveling teach-
ers; but only pay half the federal rate for
conferences/workshops within the state.
Board said maternity leave may not bor-
row from sick bank. Obviously they may use
their own accrued sick leave for maternity
leave.
Board said child rearing leave, jury
duty, personal leave, bereavement leave, mil-
itary leave good as is. Sick leave 12 days and
can accrue up to 120
Board said add perfect attendance
incentive section in.
Board said leave sick bank in as is
Board said FMLA section good as is not-
ing it is law
The Board had to suspend discussion on
the employment handbook at this point as it
was 5:55 p.m. and they needed to take a short
break.
Mark Vander Bloomen arrived at 5:55 p.m.
In addition, Brian Margelofsky, Dave
Bohnen, Fritz Crall, Jackie Coghlan and
Maggie Peterson arrived. The regular meet-
ing business then began at 6:07 p.m.
Public Participation
There were no comments.
Minutes of Past Meetings MOTION by
Eric Neff that the Board dispenses with the
reading of the following: Regular Meeting
Minutes of June 27, 2011 including the closed
session portion of the minutes; Special Meet-
ing Minutes of July 6, 2011; Special Meeting
Minutes of July 13, 2011; and the Board
approves them as presented. Second by Mike
Sealander. Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Board Committee Reports/Communica-
tions
Jim Mulleady reported that he received
a letter from the National Association of
School Superintendents (NASS) indicating
that Mike Richie received semi-finalist for
Superintendent of the Year. Richie was one
of the top three chosen in the United States.
Mike Jovanovic reported the Finance
Committee meeting minutes were distribut-
ed in the board packet.
Jim Mulleady reported the Policy, Cur-
riculum & Education Committee did not
meet during the month of July.
YMCA Report was included in the packet.
Administrators Reports
Mike Richie reported the following:
Enrollment update is in the board pack-
et, is monitored regularly and fluctuates
throughout the summer; firm numbers are
established with the 3rd Friday September
pupil count.
Open Enrollment report for the first
year since Open Enrollment was implement-
ed in the late 1990s, Northland Pines has a
positive number of students open enrolling
in to the district versus open enrolling out.
We currently have 93 registered in and 74
out. Our goal each year has been to increase
this number as it does affect our revenue. We
are up 20 students from last year and this is
great news for the district.
Staffing update was given to the Board
at the meeting
Updated Board on Summer Administra-
tive Trainings
Updated Board on the Leadership Team
meetings
Effective dates under 2011 WI Acts 10
and 32 were attached to the board packet
Discussion/Action Items:
Payment of Bills - MOTION by John Sara-
ma that the Board approves the payment of
bills according to the summary check regis-
ter dated 06/21/11 06/30/11 in the amount of
$1,293,674.51; and further, that the Board
approves the payment of bills according to
the summary check register dated 07/01/11
07/11/11 in the amount of $59,277.09. Second
by Mike Sealander. Voice vote 7-0. Motion
carried.
New Course Madrigal Singers - MOTION
by Eric Neff that the Board approves the
new course entitled Madrigal Singers. Sec-
ond by Mike Sealander. Voice vote 7-0.
Motion carried.
Contracts - MOTION by Holly McCormack
that the Board approves the issue of con-
tracts for the following:
Art High School Joe Grittner
Kindergarten Eagle River Stephanie Zillmer
Grade 2 Land O Lakes HollyPulvermacher
Grade 4 Land O Lakes Amber Maile
4K St. Germain Katie Hauser
Kindergarten St. GermainCarrie Olson
Spanish teacher Jenny Weber
Second by Mike Sealander. Voice vote 7-0.
Motion carried.
Parking Lot bids MOTION by John Sara-
ma that the Board awards the parking lot
bid for additional spaces at the K-8 building
to Pitlik & Wick in the amount of $36,285.00.
Second by Holly McCormack. Voice vote 6-1.
Motion carried.
Technology backup equipment - MOTION
by Mike Sealander that the Board approves
the backup technology equipment project
proposal as presented. Second by Holly
McCormack. Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Neola policy legal updates - MOTION by
Mike Sealander that the Board approves the
Neola legal updates for Phase I, Phase II and
Phase III as presented. Second by Holly
McCormack. Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Resignations MOTION by Eric Neff that
the Board accepts the resignation of Kara
Houg and imposes the late resignation fee of
$200.00. Second by Mike Sealander. Voice
vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Executive Session MOTION by Jim Mul-
leady that the Board adjourns to executive
session in accordance with Chapter 19, Sub-
Chapter IV, pursuant to s. 19.85(1)(c)(e) of
the Wisconsin Statutes, to discuss the Total
Base Wages for staff noting that this is the
one item that may still be bargained pur-
suant to the new law; and further, to discuss
co-curricular salaries and contracts:
(c) Considering employment, promotion,
compensation or performance evaluation
data of any public employee over which the
governmental body has jurisdiction or exer-
cises responsibility.
(e) Deliberating or negotiating the pur-
chasing of public properties, the investing of
public funds, or conducting other specified
public business, whenever competitive or
bargaining reasons require a closed session.
Second by Mike Sealander. Roll call vote:
Mark Vander Bloomen, yes; Holly McCorma-
ck, yes; John Sarama, yes; Jim Mulleady, yes;
Mike Sealander, yes; Eric Neff, yes; Mike
Jovanovic, yes. Motion carried.
Reconvene to Open Session - MOTION by
Jim Mulleady that the Board reconvenes to
open session to take such action(s) as the
Board deems appropriate, following consid-
eration given in executive session. Second by
Eric Neff. Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Co-Curricular coaching salaries and con-
tracts
MOTION by Jim Mulleady that the Board
approves the co-curricular salaries and
coaches as recommended. Second by Mike
Sealander. Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Mike Jovanovic left the meeting at 7:20
p.m.
Employment Handbook work session con-
tinued
Board said keep hours of work 8:00 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m. and put the hours change off
until next year; we are changing a lot this
year and this will help ease the transition
Board said Mike Richie can draft some-
thing for them to consider for prep time;
look at what other districts are doing with it.
Board said mileage reimbursement sec-
tion is good and agrees with what was stated
earlier in the meeting.
Board said dress code, personal commu-
nications, use of employer property/equip-
ment, skin tuberculin test good. Add physi-
cal exam language.
Board said use of personal property at
school, emergency closings, travel expenses
good.
Board said tobacco, training and report-
ing work related injury sections were good.
Mark Vander Bloomen questioned the
section on Acceptable Use of District Tech-
nology. Vander Bloomen said that instead of
saying users have a limited privacy expec-
tation the Board should say the Users have
no expectation of privacy. The Wisconsin
Rapids teacher email situation was brought
up and Mike Richie indicated we are going
with what the attorneys are recommending
for this section; however, Richie will clarify
this and we will check with Neola policies as
updates are coming rapidly as things change
frequently in the technology area.
Board said email, social media, staff dis-
cipline, grievance procedure, drug and alco-
hol use and employee receipt and acknowl-
edgement sections looked good.
The Board asked Mike Richie and Susie
Block to implement the changes discussed at
the last few meetings and create a Draft 3
which the Board will look at in its entirety at
the August 1st Special Board Meeting begin-
ning at 6:00 p.m.
Gretchen Yagow asked the question if
there was a policy or something regarding
protection from litigation for a teacher if a
child was injured and it was not the teach-
ers fault. Mike Richie indicated he would
research this answer and get back to her;
Richie indicated we did have a situation in
the past where a student was injured and in
that case the district did pay for legal coun-
sel to defend the teacher as this is part of our
district liability insurance.
Adjournment
MOTION by Mark Vander Bloomen that
the Board adjourns. Second by Eric Neff.
Voice vote 6-0. Motion carried. The meeting
adjourned at 7:50 p.m.
SPECIAL BOARD MEETING
August 1, 2011
The special meeting of the Northland
Pines Board of Education of Monday, August
1, 2011, was called to order by President Jim
Mulleady at six-o-four p.m. (6:04 p.m.) in the
Large Group Instruction Room located in
the Northland Pines High School, Eagle Riv-
er, Wisconsin. Present were board members:
John Sarama; Holly McCormack; Jim Mul-
leady; Eric Neff; and Mike Jovanovic. Mark
Vander Bloomen and Mike Sealander were
absent. Quorum was established. Also pre-
sent were Mike Richie, District Administra-
tor; Margo Smith, Business Manager; Scott
Foster, Elementary Principal; Jim Brewer,
High School Principal; Matt Spets, Elemen-
tary Principal; Jackie Coghlan, Middle
School Principal; Josh Tilley, Dean of Stu-
dents; Tera Fritz, Payroll & Benefits; and
Susie Block, Recording Secretary. There
were 12 citizens in attendance.
Open Meeting Verification
Jim Mulleady stated that the meeting had
been duly called with meeting notices posted
at the following locations:
1. The Northland Pines High School and
Middle School in Eagle River
2. The Northland Pines Elementary
Schools in Eagle River, Land OLakes and St.
Germain
3. The Vilas County Courthouse - Eagle
River
4.The Eagle River City Hall
5. Additional notice has been given:
I. The Vilas County News Review-Eagle
River
II. WERL/WRJO Radio Station-Eagle Riv-
er
III. The Rhinelander Daily News-
Rhinelander
IV. WHDG Radio Station-Rhinelander
Approval of Agenda
MOTION by John Sarama that the Board
approves the agenda as presented. Second
by Mike Jovanovic. Voice vote 5-0. Motion
carried.
Employment Handbook discussion
The Board reviewed Draft 3 of the Employ-
ment Handbook. (Revisions from Draft 2
appeared in purple.)
Cover page, no changes
Table of contents will be updated when
handbook is complete
Page 2-3, no changes
Page 4 add words in bold to this sen-
tence..The provisions set forth in this
Employment Handbook may be altered, mod-
ified, changed, or eliminated at any time by
a majority vote of the full membership of the
Board, with or without notice.
Pages 5 through Page 10, no changes
Page 11 Selection of staff for reduction
once positions have been identified, will be
based on the following considerations,
including but not limited to:
Qualifications, Community/School Involve-
ment;
Employee evaluations; Student/Parent Rela-
tionships;
Job performance, Lesson Planning;
Input from direct supervisors, Preparation;
Student Learning/Growth, Classroom prac-
tice;
Instructional Practices, Use of data;
High Expectations for students, Professional
Dress;
Professionalism, Attendance
Page 12, change then to than 3rd para-
graph down, also under Medical plan Dis-
trict will continue to waive husband/wife
premium if both spouses work for the dis-
trict
Page 13, dental insurance, District will
continue to waive husband/wife premium if
both spouses work for the district
Page 13, Retirement Health & Dental bene-
fits - Board changed as follows:
a. 1st year District to pay 80% of current
premium; employee pays 20%
b. 2nd year District to pay 70% of current
premium; employee pays 30%
c. 3rd year District to pay 60% of current
premium; employee pays 40%
d. 4th year District to pay 52% of current
premium; employee pays 48%
e. 5th year District to pay 45% of current
premium; employee pays 55%
f. 6th year no benefits
Also, add that the above retirement benefit
ceases upon Medicare eligibility.
Pages 14 & 15 The Board discussed Long
Term Care and decided to leave just one sen-
tence in the handbook on this issue as fol-
lows: Long Term Care (LTC) may be avail-
able at the employees expense.
Page 16 The District will pay profession-
al staff members half the federal rate for
mileage reimbursement related to profes-
sional leave.
Page 17 Add Paternity wherever it refers
to maternity
Pages 18 20 no changes
Page 21 under hours of work, change
meeting to meetings plural.
Pages 22 24 no changes
Page 25 under Travel Expenses change
Board of Education to District
Pages 26, 27 no changes
Page 28 under grievance procedure
change an to any employee
Pages 29 31 no changes
Page 32 Add the information in bold to
this sentence on the Employee Receipt &
Acknowledgment section. I understand that
the terms described in the Employment Hand-
book for Professional Staff Members may be
altered, modified, changed, or eliminated at
any time by a majority vote of the full mem-
bership of the Board, with or without prior
notice.
MOTION by Holly McCormack that the
Board approves the 1st review of the
Employment Handbook. Second by Eric Neff.
Voice vote 4-1. Motion carried.
Resignation MOTION by Eric Neff that
the Board accepts the resignation of Emily
Huss and imposes the $200 late resignation
fee. Second by Holly McCormack. Voice vote
5-0. Motion carried.
Contracts for vacant teacher positions
MOTION by John Sarama that the Board
approves the issue of contracts as follows:
High School Tech Ed Teacher to Timothy
Lehman
Middle School Special Education Teacher
to DeAnna Kaehler
Middle School Math Teacher to Tara
Petreikis
St. Germain Special Ed Teacher to Donna
Hejtmanek
Second by Eric Neff. Voice vote 5-0. Motion
carried.
The Board will work again on the Employ-
ment Handbook on August 22, 2011.
Adjournment
MOTION by Eric Neff that the Board
adjourns. Second by Holly McCormack.
Voice vote 5-0. Motion carried. The meeting
adjourned at 7:45 p.m.
1774
WNAXLP
_____________
(Six Weeks, 9/21-10/26/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11 CV 38
______________________________________________
Federal National Mortgage Association,
assignee of Chase Bank USA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Tammy L. Maney, unmarried,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure
made in the above-entitled action on May 3,
2011, I will sell at public auction in the Vilas
County Courthouse, located at 330 Court
Street, Eagle River, WI 54521, on
November 9, 2011
at 2:00 p.m., all of the following described
premises, to wit:
All the following described Real Estate in
Vilas County, State of Wisconsin: Lot Twenty
(20) of the plat of Holiday Estates, being a
plat in the Southwest Quarter of the North-
east Quarter, Southeast Quarter of the
Northeast Quarter, Northwest Quarter of the
Southeast Quarter, and the Northeast Quar-
ter of the Southeast Quarter in Section Thir-
ty-Three, Township Forty North, Range
Eight East of the Fourth Principal Meridian,
St. Germain Township, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin, as the same appears of Record in Volume
7 of plats, Page 30.
Tax Key No. PL-20 (024-1852)
THE PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD SUB-
JECT TO ALL LEGAL ENCUMBRANCES.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH or CASHIERs
CHECK (10% down payment at sale, balance
due within ten (10) days of Court approval).
DATED at Eagle River, Wisconsin, on
September 7, 2011.
/s/ Frank Tomlanovich
Sheriff of Vilas County, Wisconsin
BASS & MOGLOWSKY, S.C.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
The above property is located at 128 East
Lullaby Lane, St. Germain, WI 54558.
Bass & Moglowsky, S.C. is a law firm / debt
collector representing a creditor in the col-
lection of a debt that you owe to said credi-
tor. We are attempting to collect such debt
and any information obained from you will
be used for that purpose.
1776
WNAXLP
_____________
(Six Weeks, 8/31-10/5/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case Number: 09 CV 413
______________________________________________
WILSHIRE CREDIT CORPORATION,
AS SERVICER FOR HSBC BANK USA,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE ELLINGTON TRUST SERIES 2007-2
Plaintiff,
Vs
TY TRAPP, et al.
Defendant(s)
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on March
16, 2010, in the amount of $325,260.55 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: October 18, 2011 at 2:00 PM
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay
balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to
plaintiff. 2. Sold as is and subject to all
legal liens and encumbrances.
PLACE: at 330 Court Street, Eagle River,
Wisconsin 54521
DESCRIPTION: Lot 18 of the Plat of GOLD-
ENVIEW, said Plat being a part of Govern-
ment Lots 2, 3 and 4, Section 26, Township 40
North, Range 6 East, Town of Arbor Vitae,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, as the same appears
of record in Volume 10 of Plats, pages 36 and
37.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1522 Marsha Lane,
Woodruff, WI 54568
TAX KEY NO.: 2-1215-19
Christina E Demakopoulos
State Bar # 1066197
Blommer Peterman, S.C.
165 Bishops Way
Brookfield, WI 53005
262-790-5719
Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com
to obtain the bid for this sale.
Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditors
attorney and is attempting to collect a debt
on its behalf.
Any information obtained will be used for
the purpose.
276468
1738
WNAXLP
_____________
(Two Weeks, 9/21-9/28/11)
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
BEFORE THE VILAS COUNTY
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
STATE OF WISCONSIN

COUNTY OF VILAS
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
Pursuant to Chapter 59.694 of the Wiscon-
sin State Statutes and Article X, Section 10.3
of the Vilas County General Zoning Ordi-
nance:
Public Notice is hereby given to all per-
sons that a public hearing will be held at the
Manitowish Waters Town Hall at USH 51 and
Airport Rd, Manitowish Waters, WI 54545 on
Wednesday, October 12, 2011 at 10:00 am.
Relative to Laird Strand, owner of 117 E.
Spider Lake Rd, Manitowish Waters, WI
54545
On the following real estate to wit: Unit
One of Pinecone Point Condominium, being
a part of Outlot B of the Plat of Birchwood,
located in Government Lot 3, Section 13,
Town 42 North, Range 5 East, Town of Mani-
towish Waters, Vilas County, Wisconsin; iden-
tified by Vilas County Computer Parcel
Number 16-668.
Requesting a Variance to the Vilas County
Shoreland Zoning Ordinance, Article VI, Sec-
tion 6.5(A)(2) prohibiting the rebuilding of a
structure voluntarily demolished,
To voluntarily demolish and rebuild in the
same footprint a structure located 47 ft from
the OHWM of Spider Lake at its closest
point, and entirely within the 75 foot setback
area.
The Vilas County Shoreland Zoning Ordi-
nance, Article VI, Section 6.5(A)(2) states, in
part:
An existing structure may not be rebuilt or
replaced closer than the applicable OHWM
setback if it has been voluntarily demolished
such that any of the following apply:
Replacement of 50% or more of the build-
ings supporting members
The Board of Adjustment will conduct an
on-site inspection of the above described
property prior to the public hearing. The
Board will meet at the Manitowish Waters
Town Hall at 9:30 am to proceed to the prop-
erty.
All persons interested are invited to attend
and be heard at the Manitowish Waters Town
Hall.
Vilas County Board of Adjustment
Glyn A. Roberts, Chairperson
Dated at Eagle River this 19th day of
September, 2011.
1784
WNAXLP
_____________
(Six Weeks, 9/21-10/26/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 10 CV 311
______________________________________________
RIVER VALLEY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Michael T. Downar, Debra A. Downar,
OMooses Pub, LLC,
Howard Young Health Care, Inc.,
And Marshfield Clinic,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of and pursuant to a judgment of
foreclosure filed on November 8, 2010, I will
sell at public auction on the front steps of
the Vilas County Courthouse, 330 Court St.,
in the City of Eagle River, Wisconsin, in said
county, on:
DATE: November 9, 2011
TIME: 2:00 P.M.
Property address: 10640 Big Arbor Vitae
Drive
all of the following described mortgaged
premises, to wit:
PARCEL I
A parcel of land in Government Lot Three
(3), Section Thirty (30), Township Forty (40)
North, Range Seven (7) East of the Fourth
Principal Meridian, Town of Arbor Vitae,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, described as fol-
lows:
Commencing on the West shore of Arbor
Vitae Lake at the Meander Corner on the
East and West Quarter Section line; thence
South along the shore a distance of 33 links
or 21.8 feet; thence West a distance of 3
chains or 198 feet to the center of the road;
thence North 28 links or 18.5 feet to the East
and West Quarter Section line; thence West
on said Quarter Section line a distance of 2
chains and 31 1/2 links or 152.8 feet to a con-
crete monument marking the NW corner of
the Albert Mykleby property as described in
deed recorded in Volume 58 on page 76;
thence South a distance of 3 chains and 46
links or 228.4 feet to a concrete monument
on the Westerly side of Highway 70 marking
the SW corner of the above mentioned Albert
Mykleby property and the PLACE OF
BEGINNING of the land herein described.
From this Place of Beginning thence S 45 E
across Highway 70 a distance of 485.5 feet to
an iron pipe on the East side of Highway 70;
thence N 58 E along the Southeasterly bank
of Creek a distance of 95 feet to an iron pipe
and continuing along the same line 5 feet,
more or less, to the shore of Arbor Vitae Lake;
thence Northerly along the shore of lake a dis-
tance of 315 feet, more or less, to a line drawn
East from the place of beginning; thence West
21 feet, more or less, to a concrete monument;
thence West 218.5 feet to a concrete monu-
ment; thence West 129 feet to a concrete mon-
ument and the Place of Beginning.
EXCEPTING THEREFROM the right-of-
way of Highway 70.
Together with all riparian rights to the
shore of Arbor Vitae Lake lying between the
Northerly and Southerly boundaries above
described, lying and being in the County of
Vilas, State of Wisconsin.
PARCEL II
Government Lot Three (3), Section Thirty
(30), Township Forty (40) North, Range Sev-
en (7) East of the Fourth Principal Meridian,
Town of Arbor Vitae, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin, lying East of State Trunk Highway 70 as
now located but EXCEPTING such parts of
said Government Lot 3 as follows:
a) That part as described in Volume 102
Deeds, page 116;
b) That part as described in Volume 58
Deeds, page 76;
c) That part as described in Volume 66
Deeds, page 179;
d) That part as described in Volume 95
Deeds, page 383;
e) That part as described in Volume 217
Records, page 462;
f) That part as described in Volume 79
Deeds, page 424.
TERMS OF SALE: 10% down in cash or cer-
tified funds, with a minimum deposit of not
less than $10,000, required at the time of sale
made payable to the Clerk of Circuit Court,
and the balance of the sale price to be paid
within 10 days of confirmation of sale by the
court. Failure to pay balance due will result
in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. This proper-
ty to be sold as is and subject to all legal
liens and encumbrances, any delinquent real
estate taxes plus accrued interest, real estate
taxes for the year of sale, and any special
assessments, if any. Purchaser to pay appli-
cable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax.
Frank Tomlanovich
Vilas County Sheriff
OBrien, Anderson, Burgy,
& Garbowicz, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
PO Box 639
Eagle River, WI 54521
Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Prac-
tice Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are
required to state that we are attempting to
collect a debt on our clients behalf and any
information we obtain will be used for that
purpose.
1771
_____________
(Three Weeks, 9/14-9/28/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT, VILAS COUNTY
PROBATE
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 11-PR-56
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
BARRY L. SCHMITZ
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal administra-
tion was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
12/09/1951 and date of death 08/05/2011, was
domiciled in Vilas County, State of Wiscon-
sin, with a mailing address of 2670 Hwy. H,
Lac du Flambeau, WI 54538.
3. All interested persons waived notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim against
the decedents estate is December 23, 2011.
5. A claim may be filed at the Vilas County
Courthouse, Eagle River, Wisconsin, Probate
Branch.
/s/ Dawn Halverson
September 1, 2011
Attorney Timothy B. Melms
Hogan & Melms, LLP
P.O. Box 1008
Rhinelander, WI 54501
715/365-1008
Bar Number 1021201
1760
WNAXLP
PUBLIC NOTICES
MEET THE AUTHOR Land O Lakes Public
Library recently hosted Thomas Stenklyft, a
Land O Lakes seasonal resident and author of
The House That Billie Built, the story of Litera-
cy Education Services Inc. founder Billie Pollard.
Stenklyft was accompanied by his wife, Carol,
center, with library visitor Bonita Ross of
Watersmeet, Mich. --Photo By Jill James
The Land O Lakes Cham-
ber of Commerce and the
town of Land O Lakes will
welcome the public to Col-
orama Weekend Friday
through Sunday, Sept. 23-25.
Friday will kick off with a
pig roast at the Buzz on B
(formerly Fiddleheads). Food
will be served from 5 to 7 p.m.
with music by Whitewater
from 7 to 9 p.m.
Raffles and an auction will
be held to benefit the Land O
Lakes Area Artisans Inc.
building fund. Parking will be
available at the Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 8400.
Many of the downtown busi-
nesses have decorated for
autumn and have displayed
scarecrows. The decorations
and the scarecrows will be
judged Saturday at 1 p.m.
Many of the participating shops
will have Colorama sales.
Saturdays events will
include Art in the Yard from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the
grounds of Fir Tree Cottage
directly across from the post
office on Highway B and a Fall
Harvest Farmers Market
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. across
from the library.
A full afternoon and
evening of Back to the Fifties
activities are planned at the
Land O Lakes Memorial Park
Pavilion and will include an
apple pie-baking contest,
Green Bay Packers ticket and
pontoon boat tour raffle and
50/50 drawings.
Old-fashioned games for
children will take place from 2
to 4 p.m. and a Back to the
Fifties dance with Wildfire
Mobile D.J. will be held from 4
to 8 p.m.
Food and refreshments will
be available throughout the
evening. Proceeds from the
activities will benefit commu-
nity enrichment projects.
Wilderness Lakes Trails
will sponsor its Fall Bike Tour
Sunday with three guided
bike tours for all abilities
starting at 8 a.m. and 9 a.m.
Participants will meet at
the Memorial Park Pavilion.
Trail representatives will be
available from 7:45 to 10 a.m.
to provide assistance. To reg-
ister, visit wildlakes.org or
call (847) 302-4982.
The weekend events will
conclude with the annual
chamber of commerce Col-
orama Dinner Sunday from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Alberts
Catholic Church Parish Hall.
Tickets are $10 for adults
and $5 for children 12 years
old and younger.
The menu will include
ham, chicken, homemade side
dishes, salads and desserts
and carryouts will be avail-
able. Tickets will be available
at the door and at the cham-
ber office.
Land O Lakes Chamber lists
Colorama Weekend activities
Land O Lakes Area Arti-
sans Inc. (LOLA) will host Jon
Helminiak, author of Images
of America: Land O Lakes
Friday, Sept. 30, from 4 to
5:30 p.m. at the art center,
located at 4262 Highway B in
downtown Land O Lakes.
A presentation of Helmini-
aks historical book will be at
4 p.m. with a book signing to
follow. Light refreshments
will be served.
Helminiak has been a part-
time local resident of Land O
Lakes for the past 30 years.
He is an adventurer who has
traveled the world and has
canoed and kayaked much of
the Land O Lakes area.
He has written two other
books, Nothing Routine, and
Course Set for Manito-wish:
The History.
For more information on
the event, contact Wendy at
(715) 493-5361.
Artisans to host
history author
All meals served with fat-free milk, bread or rolls
and margarine.
TUES., SEPT. 27
Cup of vegetable
beef soup
Grilled ham and cheese
Chips
Chocolate cake
Land O Lakes Senior Menu
Meals for seniors 60 and older are available Tues., Thurs. and
Fri. at State Line Restaurant, 4072 Highway B. Meals are served at
11:30 a.m. Home-delivered meals are available based on eligibility.
While there is no set fee for a meal, donations will be accepted. No
one will be denied service because of inability to pay. For reserva-
tions, contact Kathy Niesen, site manager, 24 hours in advance at
(715) 547-6071.
THURS., SEPT. 29
Swedish meatballs
Egg noodles
Baby carrots
Rice pudding
FRI., SEPT. 30
Baked fish
Pasta salad
Coleslaw
Brownies
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 13B
JANET GARLING
(715) 479-9265 janetgarling@yahoo.com
CONOVER LATE CLASSIFIEDS
Classifieds published here are those received too late for our Trader deadline, which is 10 a.m. Thursday.
PUBLIC NOTICES
SUCCESSFUL SEASON The Conover/Land
O Lakes Headwaters Youth Soccer Association
recently ended its season undefeated with a
total of seven wins. Team members included,
front row, from left, Josh Wiggington, Hunter
Indermuehle, Cameron Ramesh, Julianna Erick-
son, Justin Wiggington and Alex Gengler; middle
row, Dawson and Sawyer Hogenmiller, Derrick
Fuchs-Noffke, Sophie Spiess, Laura Garling and
Shannon Clark; back row, coaches Pete Hogen-
miller and Mike Garling.
--Photo By Janet Garling
The Conover Sno-Buddies
snowmobile club will hold its
third annual Summer Funfest
Trail Benefit Sunday, Sept.
25, from 1 to 4 p.m. at Bill &
Toris Log Cabin, located on
Highway K in Conover.
A buffet of broasted chick-
en and beef sandwiches along
with sides, salads and
desserts will be offered. A con-
tribution of a dessert to share
will be appreciated.
Donations will be accepted
for the meal. All proceeds will
go toward trail maintenance.
For more information, con-
tact Tori at (715) 479-2787.
The Sno-Buddies also will
hold a brat and bake sale Fri-
day, Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. at Trigs in Eagle River.
Donations of baked goods
are welcome and can be
dropped off at Energy Mart in
Conover Thursday, Sept. 29,
until 6 p.m.
For more information about
the sale, contact Jim Pipp at
(715) 479-2885.
Sno-Buddies set trail benefit, sale
ANNUAL OKTOBERFEST Virgil Mains
enjoyed some of the German food served by
Sharon Olander, at left, and Debbie Jensen at
Oktoberfest recently hosted by the Conover
Chamber of Commerce at the towns community
center. --Photo By Janet Garling
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR RENT: Commercial space in a high-
visibility, easily accessible location in the city
of Eagle River. Ideal for professional office.
Plenty of parking, quality finish throughout.
Approx. 1,100 sq. ft. available. Call (715)
479-3348 or (715) 891-7453. 52-1589-tfcL
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR RENT: First-class professional office
space. Excellent location at the intersec-
tion of highways 45, 70 and 17 in Eagle
River. Plenty of parking, quality finish
throughout. Ideal for attorney, accountant
or medical office. Shared building with
well-established, high-traffic realty office.
Approx. 2,300 sq. ft. Call 1-(800) 404-
4496 or (715) 891-7453. 52-5159-tfcL
--------------------------------------------------------
STUMP GRINDING: Full-service stump
grinding, rates as low as $1 per inch. Fully
insured. Call Americas Best Tree Service for
a free estimate at (715) 477-2900. 8946-tfcL
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR RENT: 1-bdrm. lower apartment in
Three Lakes. Includes appliances, water,
washer/dryer hookups, garage, $450/mo.
No dogs, no smoking. Some security
required. (715) 546-2450 or (715) 617-
2199. 2p-1573-27L
--------------------------------------------------------
HOME FOR SALE OR RENT: 3 bdrms., 2
baths, 3-car attached garage, main-floor
laundry, 4303 Martens Rd., Eagle River.
$225,000 or $750/mo. rent. (715) 891-
2206. 4p-1585-29L
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE: Pride Legend motorized 3-
wheel scooter hydraulic lift for hauling,
like new, $1,500, in Eagle River. (847)
902-2220. 2p-1578-27L
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR RENT: 1-bdrm. duplex, on the Chain,
includes refrigerator, stove, electric &
snowplowing. Heat not included. Close to
E.R. No smoking or pets. $500/mo. plus
security. (715) 891-0482. 1c-1640-27
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR RENT: 2-bdrm., 1-bath home in
Phelps, Wis. 2-car attached garage, like
new, must have references, $575/mo.
(715) 891-1236, call Julie. 2c-1642-28L
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE: 1965 Ford Falcon 2-door
sedan needs work, asking $3,700.
(715) 479-8751. 1p-1634-27
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE: 1998 Bobcat 763 Skidsteer
well maintained, only 1,950 hours, asking
$10,900. Call Gregg, (952) 381-4585 for
details. 1p-1638-27
--------------------------------------------------------
TUMBLING CLASSES OFFERED: Ages
4-12. Call (715) 891-0901 to register. 1p-
1635-27
--------------------------------------------------------
HELP WANTED: Independent insurance
agency CUSTOMER-SERVICE AGENT
Full-time position available with a grow-
ing agency for a P&C licensed agent for
commercial and personal lines. Licensed
in life and health would be a plus. Please
send rsum to Box L, c/o Vilas County
News-Review, P.O. Box 1929, Eagle Riv-
er, WI 54521. 1637-tfcL
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE: 21-in. Tappan oven/range
(almond) almost like new, perfect for
small kitchen or cabin, $100; Toro snow-
blower 24-in. gas/electric start, like
new, $250; 1964 (Mercury 39) 3.9-HP out-
board motor $200. (715) 891-0290.
1641-tfc
--------------------------------------------------------
EISEL SERVICES: Handyman/mainte-
nance services. Yard work/landscaping,
window cleaning, painting/staining, snow-
plowing, welding, toilet install and much
more. Fully insured. Call for free estimate,
(715) 490-2259. 1p-1636-27
--------------------------------------------------------
SERVICES: Need clean windows for the
winter? Call the pros today. (715) 891-
8023. 1p-1643-27
--------------------------------------------------------
ESTATE/TAG SALE: Thurs., Fri. & Sat.,
Sept. 22, 23 & 24, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
2100 Pinewood Dr., Eagle River, Wis.
North of Eagle River on Hwy. 32/45 to right
on Chain O Lakes Rd. (by BP station).
Then travel approx. 2 miles to Pinewood
Dr. on left. Watch for signs. Everything
must go! Simplicity snowblower, 16-ft.
fiberglass canoe, utility trailer, Schwinn
bicycle built for two, lawn mower, ladders,
tools, good clean household furnishings,
cookware, record albums, collectibles and
lots more. Everything well cared for. CASH
ONLY! 1c-1639-27
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR RENT: Newly remodeled 2-bdrm.
home on Chain pier, beach, water
views from living room, appliances, half-
acre wooded lot, near town, $550/mo.
(608) 669-7747. 2p-1645-28
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE BY ONEIDA COUNTY. Mini-
mum bid for tax parcels: Rhinelander (RH)
1422, $1,000; RH774, $1,500; RH657-1,
$100, RH304-2, $6,400; Woodboro 381-1,
$16,500; Pelican 1036-1, $3,500; Pine
Lake 581-12, $1,400. Bids due Oct. 7,
2011. For details go to http://www.co.onei-
da.wi.gov, click Departments, click Land
Information Office, scroll to Public Informa-
tion, choose Current Real Property Sale
Offerings, or contact Oneida County Land
Information Office, Courthouse,
Rhinelander, (715) 369-6179. Email
lio@co.oneida.wi.us. 2c-1633-28
--------------------------------------------------------
SAMUELSON CONSTRUCTION: New
homes & room additions, complete remod-
eling kitchens, baths, decks, siding.
Full-line builder. Call for an estimate. Ref-
erences available. (715) 479-3231. 4c-
1646-30
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE: Gas tankless water heater
Model 125FX, some hookup parts includ-
ed, $300; Baldwin Panoramic electric
organ good condition, $65; also
antiques. Call (715) 479-9097. 1p-1644-
27
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE: Barnett Wildcat C5 cross bow
never used, $400; Marlin Model 60SS,
22-cal., LR, Ducks Unlimited never
used, $225; Ruger Ranch rifle 233-cal.,
$550; Lyman Mustang Breakaway 209
mag., muzzleloader, 50-cal., $320. (715)
547-6289. 2p-1647-28
CAXCA
FAMILY LIVING AGENT (100%)
FLORENCE, FOREST and VILAS COUNTIES
Be an educational leader by helping to promote family strengths through community-based
educational programming. Backed by University research, incorporate pertinent findings
from the family and consumer sciences into educational programs on topics such as par-
ent support and community partnerships; managing life transitions; nutrition, health and
food safety for families; increasing family self-sufficiency; and family and public policy.
Build and strengthen community coalitions and partnerships while collaborating with a
diverse network of community-based agencies, educational institutions, groups and
individuals. Identify, recruit and develop program volunteers.
For a complete position description and how to apply, please visit: www.uwex.edu/ces/hr.
UWEX is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. We promote excellence
through diversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply. 9232
DISPLAY AD
DISPLAY ADS (2 column x 2 inch) ARE AVAILABLE
IN THE VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW and
THE THREE LAKES NEWS through Ad Network.
Coverages NE Region, NW Region, SE Region and SW
Region or Statewide, which includes all 4 regions.
Call Liz,
Vilas County News-Review
(715) 479-4421
has immediate, permanent, full-time and part-time teaching positions
available in its established growing Early Headstart and Headstart
Programs in Eagle River and St. Germain. Successful candidates will
be dependable, motivated, self-starters and knowledgeable about ear-
ly childhood development and interested in a fun learning environ-
ment. Preference will be given to degreed and experienced applicants.
Please call Sharon Goller at
(715) 477-2273 or (715) 542-2273 6962
HELP WANTED
LITTLE PINE C NES & LITTLE AC RNS L DGE
CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER, LLC
_____________
(One Week, 9/21/11)
NATIONAL FOREST TIMBER FOR SALE
CHEQUAMEGON/NICOLET
NATIONAL FOREST
The Cutting Methods 2011 Sale is located
within Sections 22, 27, 28, T38N, R12E, Forest
Co., WI. The Forest Service will receive
sealed bids in public at Eagle River Ranger
District Office at 2:00 p.m. local time on
10/18/2011 for an estimated volume of 44 CCF
of Mixed Hardwood sawtimber, and 51 CCF
of Mixed Hardwood pulpwood marked or
otherwise designated for cutting. The Forest
Service reserves the right to reject any and
all bids. Interested parties may obtain a
prospectus from the office listed below. A
prospectus, bid form, and complete informa-
tion concerning the timber, the conditions of
sale, and submission of bids is available to
the public from the Forest Service offices in
either Eagle River or Florence. The USDA is
an equal opportunity provider and employer.
1785
_____________
(Six Weeks, 9/21-10/26/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11 CV 77
Code: 30404 - Foreclosure
______________________________________________
RIVER VALLEY BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
RUTH L. CONSOER,
Defendant.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment
entered in the above-entitled action on May
3, 2011, I will sell at public auction in the lob-
by of the Vilas County Courthouse, 330 Court
Street, Eagle River, WI 54521, Wisconsin, in
said county on November 8, 2011 at 2:00 p.m.,
all of the following described mortgaged
premises, to wit:
A parcel of land in part of Government Lot
3, Section 34, Township 40 North, Range 8
East, St. Germain Township, Vilas County,
Wisconsin, more particularly described as
follows:
Commencing at the NW corner of said Sec-
tion 34, marked by a Vilas County aluminum
breakaway monument in place, thence S 02
degrees 28' 07" W along the section line for a
distance of 1309 02 feet to the N 1/16th cor-
ner, marking the NW corner of said Govern-
ment Lot 3, thence N 87 degrees 51' 20" E
along the North line of said Government Lot
3 for a distance of 463 06 feet to an iron pipe,
the PLACE OF BEGINNING.
Thence continuing N 87 degrees 51' 20" E
along said North line of Government Lot 3
for a distance of 453 00 feet to an iron pipe,
thence S 00 degrees 00' 48" W along the West
line of Lot 1 of Vol 9 Certified Surveys, page
188, for a distance of 610 91 feet to an iron
pipe on the North right-of-way line of a Town
Road known as Winkle Road, thence along
said right-of-way line N 82 degrees 40' 15" W
for a distance of 243 64 feet and N 82 degrees
19' 41" W for a distance of 189 73 feet to an
iron pipe, thence leaving said right-of-way
line N 02 degrees 27' 52" W along the East line
of the parcel described in Vol 562 Records,
page 443 for a distance of 538 05 feet to the
PLACE OF BEGINNING.
Street address: Winkle Road
TERMS OF SALE:
1. This is a cash sale. A certified check or
bank draft in the amount of 10 percent of the
amount bid must accompany the bid, with
the balance due upon confirmation of sale by
the Court.
2. Sale is subject to all unpaid real estate
taxes and special assessments.
3. Purchaser shall pay any Wisconsin real
estate transfer fee.
4. The property is being sold on an as is
basis without warranties or representations
of any kind
5. Purchaser shall be responsible for
obtaining possession of the property.
You are notified that we are attempting to
collect a debt. Any information obtained will
be used for that purpose.
Frank Tomlanovich
Vilas County Sheriff
John D. Leary
Attorneys for River Valley Bank
RUDER WARE, L.L.S.C.
402 Graham Avenue
Post Office Box 187
Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54702
Telephone: 715.834.3425
Facsimile: 715.834.9240
1782
_____________
(Six Weeks, 9/14-10/19/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 10-CV-412
Hon. Neal A. Nielsen, III
Br. 1
______________________________________________
NICOLET CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THEODORE H. PASTERNAK
LOU ANN PASTERNAK
MARSHFIELD CLINIC
STATE OF WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT
OF REVENUE
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of a
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-captioned action on March 14, 2011, in
the amount of $169,102.93, the Sheriff or his
assignee will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: October 27, 2011 at 2:00 p.m.
PLACE: in the main lobby of the Vilas
County Courthouse, 330 Court Street, Eagle
River, WI 54521
DESCRIPTION: All that part of the South-
east Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE
1/4 SE 1/4), in Section Twelve (12), Township
Forty-one (41) North, Range Eleven (11) East
of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Township
of Phelps, Vilas County, Wisconsin, LYING
SOUTH and EAST of the Deerskin River.
EXCEPTING THEREFROM those lands as
described in Volume 876 Micro Records, page
646.
ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM those
lands as described in Volume 1528 Records,
page 564 as Document No. 460894.
Together with an easement for ingress and
egress, said road being 36 feet wide, 18 feet
on either side of the following described cen-
terline:
Commencing at the Southeast corner of
Section 12 marked by a brass cap in con-
crete; thence N 89 degrees 11' 40" W, along the
South boundary line of the SE 1/4 of the SE
1/4, a distance of 225.84 feet to the intersec-
tion of the centerline of an access road and
the POINT OF BEGINNING of the centerline
road easement. Thence N 06 degrees 46' 33"
W, along said centerline a distance of 172.40
feet to the point of ending of said road ease-
ment.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1920 St. Louis
Road, Phelps, WI 54554
TERMS: Cash; down payment required at
the time of Sheriffs Sale in the amount of
10% by cash, money order, cashiers check or
certified check made payable to the Vilas
County Clerk of Courts; balance of sale price
due upon confirmation of sale by Court.
Property to be sold as a whole as is and sub-
ject to all real estate taxes, accrued and
accruing, special assessments, if any, penal-
ties and interest. Buyer to pay applicable
Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the
proceeds of the Sale upon Confirmation of
the Court. Purchaser to pay the cost of title
evidence.
/s/ Frank Tomlanovich, Sheriff
Vilas County, Wisconsin
Plaintiffs Attorney:
Mallery & Zimmerman, S.C.
500 Third Street, Suite 800
P.O. Box 479
Wausau, WI 54402-0479
(715) 845-8234
This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any
information obtained will be used for that
purpose. This communication is from a debt
collector.
1761
_____________
(Six Weeks, 8/31-10/5/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-76
______________________________________________
JP Morgan Chase Bank, National
Association, Successor by Merger to
Chase Home Finance, LLC
Plaintiff,
vs.
Eric G. Kane, Jennifer M. Kane, National City
Bank, Citibank (South Dakota) NA and
Howard Young Health Care Inc
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on April 15,
2011 in the amount of $288,944.79 the Sheriff
will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
TIME: October 26, 2011 at 2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashiers check or certi-
fied funds, payable to the clerk of courts
(personal checks cannot and will not be
accepted). The balance of the successful bid
must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash,
cashiers check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: Lot Two (2) of that Certi-
fied Survey Map recorded in Volume 2 of Cer-
tified Surveys, Page 220 as Map No. 421,
being a part of Government Lot Seven of Sec-
tion Nine, Township Forty-one North, Range
Six East of the Fourth Principal Meridian,
Township of Arbor Vitae, Vilas County, Wis-
consin. Together with access for ingress and
egress over the existing 33 foot road to the
Town Road.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 4006 Popes Rd
Arbor Vitae, WI 54568-9548
DATED: August 24, 2011
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain
the bid for this sale.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1734
_____________
(Four Weeks, 9/21-10/12/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-19
______________________________________________
JP Morgan Chase Bank, National Associa-
tion, Successor by Merger to Chase Home
Finance, LLC
Plaintiff,
vs.
Gary Lade, Amanda Lade and
Associated Bank, NA,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
AJOURNED
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on February
24, 2011 in the amount of $68,953.02 the Sher-
iff will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
ORIGINAL TIME: September 13, 2011 at
2:00 p.m.
ADJOURNED TIME: October 19, 2011 at
2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashier's check or certi-
fied funds, payable to the clerk of courts
(personal checks cannot and will not be
accepted). The balance of the successful bid
must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash,
cashier's check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the court's confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
'as is' and subject to all liens and encum-
brances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: Lot One Hundred (100) of
the recorded Plat of Holiday Estates, as
recorded in Volume 7 of Plats, page 30 in the
Town of St. Germain, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 197 E Lullaby Ln
Saint Germain, WI 54558-8813
DATED: September 13, 2011
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain
the bid for this sale.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1773
_____________
(Six Weeks, 8/17-9/21/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 10-CV-296
______________________________________________
JP Morgan Chase Bank, National
Association, Successor by Merger
to Chase Home Finance, LLC
Plaintiff,
vs.
Henry L. Szott, Nancy J. Szott a/k/a Nancy
Szott, Ministry Medical Group Northern
Region, Neal A Potrykus, DDS, James S. Kim,
DDS, State of Wisconsin, Department of Rev-
enue, United States, Milton Propane Inc. and
Ultra Mart Foods, Inc d/b/a Pick 'n Save
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on March
30, 2011 in the amount of $430,677.75 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: October 6, 2011 at 2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashiers check or certified
funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal
checks cannot and will not be accepted). The
balance of the successful bid must be paid to
the clerk of courts in cash, cashier's check or
certified funds no later than ten days after the
courts confirmation of the sale or else the 10%
down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The
property is sold as is and subject to all liens
and encumbrances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: The North One-half (N1/2) of
Government Lot One (1) in Section Thirty (30),
Township Forty (40) North, Range Nine (9)
East lying East of Birchwood Drive; Except
the South 425 feet thereof. Being located in the
Town of Cloverland, Vilas County, Wisconsin.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1610 Birchwood Dr
Saint Germain, WI 54558-9176
DATED: August 4, 2011
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain
the bid for this sale.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1708
_____________
(Six Weeks, 8/24-9/28/11)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-71
Code No. 30404
Foreclosure of Mortgage
Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00
______________________________________________
BMO HARRIS BANK, NA AS SUCCESSOR TO
M&I MARSHALL & ILSLEY BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
CINDY S. ARTS and JOHN DOE,
unknown spouse of Cindy S. Arts; and
BMO HARRIS BANK, NA as successor to
M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank;
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on August 9,
2011, in the amount of $130,185.91, the Sher-
iff will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:.
TIME: October 11, 2011 at 2:00 oclock p.m.
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified
funds at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay
balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to
plaintiff.
2. Sold as is and subject to all legal liens
and encumbrances.
3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real
Estate Transfer Tax.
PLACE: Vilas County Courthouse, located
at 330 Court Street, Eagle River, Wisconsin.
DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1) of Volume 2 of
Certified Surveys, page 89, as Map No. 338,
being a part of Government Lot One (1), Sec-
tion Fourteen (14), Township Forty (40)
North, Range Eleven (11) East, Town of Wash-
ington, Vilas County, Wisconsin. Together
with an easement over the 30' easement road
to Highland Drive.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2148 Calanca Road,
Town of Washington.
TAX KEY NO.: 26-2193
Frank Tomlanovich
Sheriff of Vilas County, WI
ODESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
1414 Underwood Avenue, Suite 403
Wauwatosa, WI 53213
(414) 727-1591
ODess and Associates, S.C., is attempting
to collect a debt and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose.
If you have previously received a Chapter
7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspon-
dence should not be construed as an attempt
to collect a debt.
1731
WNAXLP
14B WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS