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15: Medication and Intravenous Administration
PRACTICE QUESTIONS
1. A physician orders 1000 mL of 0.9% normal saline to run over 12 hours. The drop factor is 15 drops/1 mL. The nurse plans to adjust the flow rate at how many drops per minute? 1. 15 drops/minute 2. 17 drops/minute 3. 21 drops/minute 4. 23 drops/minute Answer: 3 Rationale: The prescribed 1000 mL is to be infused over 12 hours. Follow the formula and multiply 1000 mL by 15 (gtt factor). Then, divide the result by 720 minutes (12 hours × 60 minutes). The infusion is to run at 20.8, or 21, drops/minute. Formula: Total volume (in mL) × drop factor _______________________________ = flow rate in drops/minute Time in minutes 1000 mL × 15 drops 15,000 _________________ = _________ = 20.8, or 21, drops/minute 720 minutes 720 Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for calculating an infusion rate for an IV. Be sure to change 12 hours to minutes. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review the formula for calculating infusion rates if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 202. 2. A physician orders an intramuscular dose of 400,000 U of penicillin G benzathine (Bicillin). The label on the 10-mL ampule sent from the pharmacy reads penicillin G benzathine (Bicillin) 300,000 U/mL. The nurse prepares to administer how many milliliters to administer the correct dose? 1. 1.3 mL 2. 13 mL 3. 1.5 mL 4. 10 mL Answer: 1 Rationale: Follow the formula for dosage calculation. Formula: Desired 400,000 U

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_________ × mL = mL/dose ___________ ×1 mL = 1.3 mL/dose Available 300,000 U Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for the calculation of the correct dose. Focus on the key information: 300,000 U/mL. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculation problems if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Christensen, B., & Kockrow, E. (2003). Foundations of nursing (4th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, p. 569. <AQ>3. A physician orders 3000 mL of 5% dextrose to run over a 24-hour period. The drop factor is 10 drops/1 mL. The nurse plans to adjust the flow rate at how many drops per minute? (Round to the nearest whole number.) Answer: 21 Rationale: The prescribed 3000 mL is to be infused over 24 hours. Follow the formula and multiply 3000 mL by 10 (gtt factor). Then, divide the result by 1440 minutes (24 hours × 60 minutes). The infusion is to run at 20.8, or 21, drops/minute. Formula: Total volume (in mL) × drop factor _____________________________ = flow rate in drops/minute Time in minutes 3000 mL × 10 drop 30,000 _________________ = _________ = 20.8, or 21, drops/minute 1440 minutes 1440 Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for calculating the infusion rate for an IV. Be sure to change 24 hours to minutes. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator and remember to round to the nearest whole number. Review the formula for calculating infusion rates if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 202. <AQ>4. A physician’s order reads phenytoin (Dilantin) 0.2 g orally, twice daily. The medication label states 100-mg capsules. How many capsule(s) will the nurse prepare to administer one dose? Answer: 2 Rationale: Convert 0.2 g to mg. In the metric system, to convert larger to smaller, multiply by 1000 or move the decimal three places to the right. Therefore, 0.2 g = 200 mg. Formula:

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Desired _________ × capsules = capsules per dose Available 200 mg _______ × 1 capsule = 2 capsules 100 mg Test-Taking Strategy: In this medication calculation problem, it is necessary to first convert grams to milligrams. Follow the formula for conversion and read the question carefully. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations and conversions if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Implementation Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116. 5. A physician orders 1000 mL of half-normal saline to run over 8 hours. The drop factor is 15 drops/1 mL. The nurse plans to adjust the flow rate at how many drops per minute? 1. 20 drops/minute 2. 22 drops/minute 3. 28 drops/minute 4. 31 drops/minute Answer: 4 Rationale: The prescribed 1000 mL is to be infused over 8 hours. Follow the formula and multiply 1000 mL by 15 (gtt factor). Then, divide the result by 480 minutes (8 hours × 60 minutes). The infusion is to run at 31.2, or 31, drops/minute. Formula: Total volume in mL × drop factor ______________________________ = flow rate in drops/minute Time in minutes 1000 mL ×15 drops 15,000 _________________ = ______ = 31.2, or 31, drops/minute 480 minutes 480 Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for calculating the infusion rate for an IV. Be sure to change 8 hours to minutes. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review the formula for calculating infusion rates if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general

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and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 202. 6. A physician orders 2000 mL of D5 half-normal saline to run over 24 hours. The drop factor is 15 drops/1 mL. The nurse plans to adjust the flow rate at how many drops per minute? 1. 15 drops/minute 2. 17 drops/minute 3. 21 drops/minute 4. 28 drops/minute Answer: 3 Rationale: The prescribed 2000 mL is to be infused over 24 hours. Follow the formula and multiply 2000 mL by 15 (gtt factor). Then, divide the result by 1440 minutes (24 hours × 60 minutes). The infusion is to run at 20.8, or 21, drops/minute. Formula: Total volume (in mL) × drop factor _____________________________ = flow rate in drops/minute Time in minutes 2000 mL x 15 drops 30,000 _________________ = _______ = 20.8, or 21, drops/minute 1440 minutes 1440 Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for calculating the infusion rate for an IV. Be sure to change 24 hours to minutes. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review the formula for calculating infusion rates if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 202. <AQ>7. A physician’s order reads cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) 100 µg IM. The medication label reads cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12), 0.5 mg/mL. The nurse administers how many milliliters to the client? Answer: 0.2 Rationale: Convert 100 µg to mg. In the metric system, to convert smaller to larger, divide by 1000 or move the decimal three places to the left. Therefore, 100 µg = 0.1 mg. Formula: Desired _________ × mL = mL/dose Available 0.1 mg 0.1 _______ × 1 mL = _______ = 0.2 mL 0.5 mg 0.5

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Test-Taking Strategy: In this medication calculation problem, it is necessary to first convert mcg to mg. Follow the formula for conversion and read the question carefully. Focus on the key information, 0.5 mg/mL. After you have performed the calculation verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations and conversions if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Implementation Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116. <AQ>8. A physician orders 3000 mL of 5% dextrose to be administered over a 24-hour period. The nurse prepares to set the infusion rate knowing that how many milliliters per hour are to be administered? Answer: 125 Rationale: To determine how many milliliters per hour are to be administered, simply divide the total prescribed amount of IV solution by the prescribed time period for infusion. Formula: Total volume in mL 3000 mL __________________ = amount of mL/hour _________ = 125 mL/hour Number of hours 24 hours Test-Taking Strategy: Focus on the issue of the question, mL per hour. Follow the formula and, after you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review the formula for determining the amount of milliliters to infuse per hour if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 202. 9. A physician’s order reads levothyroxine (Synthroid), 150 µg orally daily. The medication label reads levothyroxine, 0.1 mg/tablet. The nurse prepares to administer how many tablet(s) to the client? 1. 1 tablet 2. 1.5 tablets 3. 2 tablets 4. 2.5 tablets Answer: 2 Rationale: Convert 150 µg to mg. In the metric system, to convert smaller to larger, divide by 1000 or move the decimal three places to the left. Therefore, 150 µg = 0.15 mg. Formula: Desired

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_________ × tablet(s) = tablet(s)/dose Available 0.15 mg ______ × 1 tablet = 1.5 tablets 0.1 mg Test-Taking Strategy: In this medication calculation problem, it is necessary to first convert µg to mg. Follow the formula and, after you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations and conversions if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 202. <AQ>10. A physician orders 1000 mL 5% dextrose to run at 125 mL/hour. The nurse calculates the infusion rate knowing that it will take how many hours for 1 L to infuse? Answer: 8 Rationale: To determine how many hours it will take for 1 L to infuse, first recall that 1 L is equal to 1000 mL. Next, divide the 1000 mL by the amount being delivered in 1 hour. Formula: Total volume in mL 1000 mL __________________ = infusion time in hours _______ = 8 hours mL/hour 125 mL Test-Taking Strategy: Focus on the issue of the question—how many hours for 1 L to infuse. Follow the formula and, after you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review the formula for determining the infusion time if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Implementation Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Asperheim, M. (2005). Introduction to pharmacology (10th ed.). Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, p. 38. 11. A physician orders one unit of packed red blood cells to run over 4 hours. One unit of blood contains 250 mL. The drop factor is 10 drops/1 mL. The registered nurse (RN) asks the licensed practical nurse (LPN) to assist in monitoring the flow rate during the infusion. The LPN monitors the flow rate knowing that how many drops per minute should infuse? 1. 10 drops 2. 15 drops 3. 17 drops 4. 20 drops Answer: 1

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Rationale: The prescribed 250 mL is to be infused over 4 hours. Follow the formula and multiply 250 mL by 10 (gtt factor). Then, divide the result by 240 minutes (4 hours × 60 minutes). The infusion is to run at 10.4, or 10, drops/minute. Formula: Total volume (in mL) × drop factor _____________________________ = flow rate in drops/minute Time in minutes 250 mL x 10 drops 2500 _________________ = ______ = 10.4, or 10, drops/minute 240 minutes 240 Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for calculating the infusion rate for an IV. Be sure to change 4 hours to minutes. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review the formula for calculating infusion rates if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Implementation Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 202. 12. A physician’s order reads triazolam (Halcion), 125 µg orally at bedtime daily. The medication bottle is labeled triazolam (Halcion), 0.125-mg tablets. The nurse prepares how many tablet(s) to administer one dose? 1. 1 tablet 2. 1.5 tablets 3. 2 tablets 4. 2.5 tablets Answer: 1 Rationale: Convert 125 µg to mg. In the metric system, to convert smaller to larger, divide by 1000 or move the decimal three places to the left. Therefore, 125 µg = 0.125 mg. One tablet is administered. Test-Taking Strategy: In this medication calculation problem, it is necessary to first convert mcg to mg. Follow the formula for conversion and, after you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations and conversions if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, pp. 22-23.

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13. A physician’s order reads atenolol (Tenormin), 0.025 g orally daily. The medication bottle reads atenolol (Tenormin), 50 mg-tablets. The nurse prepares how many tablet(s) to administer the dose? 1. 0.5 tablet 2. 1 tablet 3. 2 tablets 4. 3 tablets Answer: 1 Rationale: Convert 0.025 g to mg. In the metric system, to convert larger to smaller, multiply by 1000 or move the decimal three places to the right. Therefore, 0.025 g = 25.0 mg. Formula: Desired 25.0 mg _________ × tablet = number of tablets/dose _______ × 1 tablet = 0.5 tablet Available 50 mg Test-Taking Strategy: In this medication calculation problem, it is necessary to first convert grams to milligrams. Follow the formula for conversion and, after you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations and conversions if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, pp. 22-23. 14. A physician’s order reads hydromorphone hydrochloride (Dilaudid), 3 mg intramuscular every 4 hours PRN. The medication label reads hydromorphone hydrochloride (Dilaudid), 4 mg/ 1 mL. The nurse prepares to administer which of the following to the client? 1. 1.3 mg 2. 1.5 mL 3. 0.8 mL 4. 4 mg Answer: 3 Rationale: Follow the formula for dosage calculation. Formula: Desired 3 mg _________ × mL = mL/dose _________ × 1 mL = 0.75, or 0.8, mL Available 4 mg Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for the calculation of the correct dose. Focus on the key information: 4 mg/1 mL. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills

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Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116. <AQ>15. A physician’s order reads digoxin (Lanoxin), 0.25 mg PO daily. The medication label reads digoxin (Lanoxin), 0.125 mg/tablet. The nurse prepares how many tablet(s) to administer the dose? Answer: 2 Rationale: Follow the formula for dosage calculation. Formula: Desired _________ × tablet = number of tablets per dose Available 0.25 mg ________ × 1 tablet = 2 tablets 0.125 mg Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for the calculation of the correct dose. Focus on the key information: 0.125 mg/tablet. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116. 16. A physician’s order reads meperidine hydrochloride (Demerol), 80 mg intramuscular PRN. The medication label reads meperidine hydrochloride (Demerol), 100 mg/mL. The nurse prepares to administer how many milliliters to the client? 1. 100 mL 2. 1.25 mL 3. 1 mL 4. 0.8 mL Answer: 4 Rationale: Follow the formula for dosage calculation. Formula: Desired 80 mg _________ × mL = mL/dose ________ × 1 mL = 0.8 mL Available 100 mg Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for the calculation of the correct dose. Focus on the key information: 100 mg/mL. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills

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Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116. <AQ>17. A physician orders heparin sodium (Liquaemin), 650 units subcutaneous (SC) every 12 hours. The medication vial reads heparin sodium (Liquaemin), 1000 U/mL. The nurse prepares how many milliliters to administer one dose? (Round to the nearest whole number.) Answer: 0.7 Rationale: Follow the formula for dosage calculation. Formula: Desired 650 U _________ × mL = mL/dose _________ × 1 mL= 0.65, or 0.7, mL Available 1000 U Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for the calculation of the correct dose. Focus on the key information: 1000 U/mL. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator and remember to round to the nearest whole number. Review medication calculations if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116. <AQ>18. A physician orders trimethobenzamide hydrochloride (Tigan), 250 mg intramuscular PRN. The medication label reads trimethobenzamide hydrochloride (Tigan), 200 mg/2 mL. The nurse plans to prepare how much medication to administer the dose? Answer: 2.5 Rationale: Follow the formula for dosage calculation. Formula: Desired _________ × mL = mL/dose Available 250 mg _________ × 2 mL = 2.5 mL 200 mg Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for the calculation of the correct dose. Focus on the key information: 200 mg/2 mL. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116.

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19. A physician orders meperidine hydrochloride (Demerol), 35 mg intramuscular, stat. The medication label states meperidine hydrochloride (Demerol), 50 mg/mL. The nurse plans to prepare how much medication to administer the dose? 1. 0.5 mL 2. 0.6 mL 3. 0.7 mL 4. 1.0 mL Answer: 3 Rationale: Follow the formula for dosage calculations. Formula: Desired _________ × mL = mL/dose Available 35 mg _________ × 1 mL = 0.7 mL 50 mg Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for the calculation of the correct dose. Focus on the key information: 50 mg/mL. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116. 20. A physician orders prochlorperazine (Compazine), 20 mg intramuscular every 4 hours PRN. The medication label states prochlorperazine (Compazine), 10 mg/mL. The nurse prepares how much medication to administer the dose? 1. 0.5 mL 2. 2.0 mL 3. 2.5 mL 4. 2.9 mL Answer: 2 Rationale: Follow the formula for dosage calculation. Formula: Desired _________ × mL = mL/dose Available 20 mg _________ × 1 mL = 2.0 mL 10 mg Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for the calculation of the correct dose. Focus on the key information: 10 mg/mL. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations if you had difficulty with this question.

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Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116. <AQ>21. A physician orders atropine sulfate, 0.4 mg intramuscular, stat. The medication label states atropine sulfate, 0.3 mg/0.5 mL. The nurse prepares how much medication to administer the Answer: 0.7 Rationale: Follow the formula for dosage calculation. Formula: Desired _________ × mL = mL/dose Available 0.4 mg _________ × 0.5 mL = 0.66, or 0.7, mL 0.3 mg Test-Taking Strategy: Follow the formula for the calculation of the correct dose. Focus on the key information: 0.3 mg/0.5 mL. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator and remember to round to the nearest whole number. Review medication calculations if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 116. 22. A physician orders levodopa (Dopar), 1 g orally twice daily. The medication label states 500-mg tablets. The nurse prepares to administer how many tablets at the evening dose? 1. 2 tablets 2. 3 tablets 3. 4 tablets 4. 5 tablets Answer: 1 Rationale: Convert 1 g to mg. In the metric system, to convert larger to smaller, multiply by 1000 or move the decimal three places to the right. Therefore, 1 g = 1000 mg. Formula: Desired 1000 mg _________ × tablet = number of tablets per dose _______ × 1 tablet = 2 tablets Available 500 mg Test-Taking Strategy: In this medication calculation problem, it is necessary to first convert grams to milligrams. Follow the formula for conversion and read the question carefully. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication

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calculations and conversions if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, pp. 22-23. 23. A physician orders zidovudine (AZT), 0.2 g orally every 4 hours. The medication label states zidovudine (AZT), 100-mg tablets. The nurse prepares to administer how many tablets for one dose? 1. 0.5 tablet 2. 1 tablet 3. 1.5 tablets 4. 2 tablets Answer: 4 Rationale: Convert 0.2 g to mg. In the metric system, to convert larger to smaller, multiply by 1000 or move the decimal three places to the right. Therefore, 0.2 g = 200 mg. Formula: Desired 200 mg _________ × tablet = number of tablets/dose _______ × 1 tablet = 2 tablets Available 100 mg Test-Taking Strategy: In this medication calculation problem, it is necessary to first convert grams to milligrams. Follow the formula for conversion and read the question carefully. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations and conversions if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, pp. 22-23. <AQ>24. A physician orders atropine sulfate, gr 1/300, to be administered. The medication label states atropine sulfate, 0.5 mg/0.5 mL. How many milliliters will the nurse prepare to administer to the client? Answer: 0.2 Rationale: Convert gr 1/300 to mg using ratio and proportion. Then, use the dosage calculation formula. Ratio and Proportion: gr 1:60 mg = gr 1/300: x mg 60 ∞ 1/300 = x x = 0.2 mg Formula: Desired 0.2 mg 0.1 mg

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_________ × mL = mL/dose ______ × 0.5 mL = _______ = 0.2 mL Available 0.5 mg 0.5 mg Test-Taking Strategy: In this medication calculation problem, it is necessary to first convert grains to milligrams. Follow the formula for conversion and read the question carefully. Focus on the issue: 0.5 mg/0.5 mL. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review medication calculations and conversions if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills Reference: Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, pp. 9, 22-23. 25. A physician’s order states to administer aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), 650 mg orally for a temperature above 38° C. The medication bottle states aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), gr 5/tablet. The nurse takes the client’s temperature and notes that it is 101° F. The nurse plans to take which of the following actions? 1. Not administer the aspirin at this time 2. Check the client’s temperature in 30 minutes 3. Administer 2 aspirin tablets 4. Administer 3 aspirin tablets Answer: 3 Rationale: Calculation of this problem requires more than one step. Convert Fahrenheit to Celsius, convert mg to gr, and then calculate the dose to be administered. Step 1: Convert Fahrenheit to Celsius Formula: To convert Fahrenheit to Celsius, subtract 32 and divide the result by 1.8: C = (101− 32) divided by 1.8; C = (69) divided by 1.8; C = 38.3° Step 2: Convert mg to gr gr 1:60 mg::x gr :650 mg 60x = 650 x = gr 10.8 Step 3: Dosage calculation Desired gr 10.8 _______ × tablet = number of tablets/dose _______ × 1 tablet = 2.16, or 2, tablets Available gr 5 Test-Taking Strategy: Focus on what the question is asking you to determine. In this medication calculation problem, it is necessary to first convert Fahrenheit to Celsius, and then you need to convert mg to gr. Follow the formula for conversion and read the question carefully. After you have performed the calculation, verify your answer using a calculator. Review these formulas if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Fundamental Skills

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References: Asperheim, M. (2005). Introduction to pharmacology (10th ed.). Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, p. 13. Kee, J., & Marshall, S. (2004). Clinical calculations: With applications to general and specialty areas (5th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, pp. 9, 22-23.

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