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49: Respiratory Medications
PRACTICE QUESTIONS
1. A nurse is preparing to administer albuterol (Proventil) to a client. The nurse checks for which of the following before and during therapy? 1. Increased urine output 2. Nausea and vomiting 3. Respiratory distress 4. Complaints of headache Answer: 3 Rationale: Albuterol is a bronchodilator of the adrenergic type. The nurse checks the respiratory pattern, pulse, and blood pressure prior to and during therapy. The color, character and amount of sputum are also noted. Options 1, 2, and 4 are not directly related to this medication. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the ABCs—airway, breathing, and circulation—to answer the question. Option 3 is the only option that addresses airway. Review this medication if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Data Collection Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Hodgson, B., & Kizior, R. (2005). Saunders nursing drug handbook 2005. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 22. 2. A nurse is administering a dose of isoproterenol (Isuprel) to a client. The nurse plans to monitor for which side effect of this medication? 1. Increased pulse and blood pressure 2. Drowsiness 3. Hyperglycemia 4. Hypokalemia Answer: 1 Rationale: Isoproterenol is an adrenergic bronchodilator. Side effects can include tachycardia, hypertension, chest pain, dysrhythmias, nervousness, restlessness, and headache, among others. The nurse monitors for these effects during therapy. Options 2, 3, and 4 are not side effects. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination, recalling that this medication is a bronchodilator. Remembering that tachycardia is a side effect should assist in selecting the option that identifies an increased pulse, option 1. Review the side effects of this medication if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Data Collection Content Area: Pharmacology References: Hodgson, B., & Kizior, R. (2005). Saunders nursing drug handbook 2005. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 133C.

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McKenry, L., & Salerno, E. (2003). Mosby’s pharmacology in nursing (21st ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, p. 467. 3. A nurse has an order to give a client metaproterenol sulfate (Alupent), two puffs, and beclomethasone (Vanceril), two puffs, by metered-dose inhaler. The nurse administers the medication by giving the: 1. Beclomethasone first and then the metaproterenol 2. Metaproterenol first and then the beclomethasone 3. Alternating a single puff of each, beginning with the beclomethasone 4. Alternating a single puff of each, beginning with the metaproterenol Answer: 2 Rationale: Metaproterenol is a bronchodilator. Beclomethasone is a glucocorticoid. Bronchodilators are always administered before glucocorticoids, when both are to be given on the same time schedule. This allows for widening of the air passages by the bronchodilator, which then makes the glucocorticoid more effective. Test-Taking Strategy: To answer this question correctly, it is necessary to know two different things. First, you must know that a bronchodilator is always given before a glucocorticoid. This would allow you to eliminate options 3 and 4, because you would not alternate the medications. To select between options 1 and 2, it is necessary to know that metaproterenol is a bronchodilator, whereas beclomethasone is a glucocorticoid. Review these medications if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Implementation Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: McKenry, L., & Salerno, E. (2003). Mosby’s pharmacology in nursing (21st ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, pp. 705-706. 4. A client has begun therapy with oxtriphylline (Choledyl). The nurse tells the client to limit the intake of which of the following while taking this medication? 1. Oysters, lobster, and shrimp 2. Coffee, cola, and chocolate 3. Cottage cheese, cream cheese, and dairy creamers 4. Oranges and pineapple Answer: 2 Rationale: Oxtriphylline is a xanthine bronchodilator. The nurse teaches the client to limit the intake of xanthine-containing foods while taking this medication. These include coffee, cola, and chocolate. Test-Taking Strategy: Focus on the name of the medication to determine that oxtriphylline is a xanthine bronchodilator. Recalling which food items are naturally high in xanthine will direct you to option 2. Review the foods naturally high in xanthine if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Implementation

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Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: McKenry, L., & Salerno, E. (2003). Mosby’s pharmacology in nursing (21st ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, p. 724. 5. A client with an order to take theophylline (Slo-bid) daily has been given medication instructions by the nurse. The nurse determines that the client needs further information about the medication if the client states that he or she will: 1. Avoid changing brands of the medication without physician approval. 2. Avoid over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medications unless approved by physician. 3. Drink at least 2 L fluid per day. 4. Take the daily dose at bedtime. Answer: 4 Rationale: The client taking a single daily dose of theophylline, a xanthine bronchodilator, should take the medication early in the morning. This enables the client to have maximal benefit from the medication during daytime activities. Additionally, this medication causes insomnia. The client should take in at least 2 L of fluid per day to decrease viscosity of secretions. The client should check with the physician before changing brands of the medication. The client also checks with the physician before taking OTC cough, cold, or other respiratory preparations because they could cause interactive effects, increasing the side effects of theophylline and causing dysrhythmias. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Note the key words, needs further information. These words indicate a false response question and that you need to select the incorrect client statement. General principles related to medication therapy will assist in eliminating options 1 and 2. Additionally, recalling that option 3 is an important measure to thin secretions will direct you to option 4. Review this medication if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Comprehension Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: McKenry, L., & Salerno, E. (2003). Mosby’s pharmacology in nursing (21st ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, pp. 723-724. 6. A client is taking brompheniramine maleate (Dimetane). The nurse checks for which of the following side effects of this medication? 1. Excitability 2. Drowsiness 3. Excess salivation 4. Diarrhea Answer: 2 Rationale: A frequent side effect of brompheniramine, an antihistamine, is drowsiness or sedation. Others include blurred vision, hypertension (and sometimes hypotension), dry mouth, constipation, urinary retention, and sweating. Test-Taking Strategy: Focus on the name of the medication to determine that this medication is an antihistamine. Recalling that antihistamines typically cause drowsiness will direct you to

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option 2. Review the side effects of antihistamines if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Data Collection Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: McKenry, L., & Salerno, E. (2003). Mosby’s pharmacology in nursing (21st ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, p. 225. 7. A client taking brompheniramine maleate (Dimetane) is scheduled for allergy skin testing and tells the nurse in the physician’s office that a dose was taken this morning. The nurse determines that: 1. A lower dose of allergen will need to be injected. 2. A higher dose of allergen will need to be injected. 3. The client should have the skin test read a day later than usual. 4. The client should reschedule the appointment. Answer: 4 Rationale: Brompheniramine is an antihistamine, which provides relief of symptoms caused by allergy. Antihistamines should be discontinued for at least 3 days (72 hours) before allergy skin testing to avoid false negative readings. This client should have the appointment rescheduled for 3 days after discontinuing the medication. Test-Taking Strategy: Focus on the name of the medication to determine that this medication is an antihistamine. It is also necessary to know that antihistamines reduce the allergic response. With this in mind, option 1 is eliminated first, because it makes no sense. Options 2 and 3 are also eliminated, because the medication would still interfere with the test results. Review this medication if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Analysis Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: McKenry, L., & Salerno, E. (2003). Mosby’s pharmacology in nursing (21st ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, p. 227. 8. A client is receiving acetylcysteine (Mucomyst), 20% solution diluted in 0.9% normal saline by nebulizer. The nurse should have which item available for possible use after giving this medication? 1. Suction equipment 2. Nasogastric tube 3. Intubation tray 4. Ambu bag Answer: 1 Rationale: Acetylcysteine can be given orally or by nasogastric tube to treat acetaminophen overdose, or it may be given by inhalation for use as a mucolytic. The nurse administering this medication as a mucolytic should have suction equipment available in case the client cannot manage to clear the increased volume of liquefied secretions. Test-Taking Strategy: To answer this question, it is necessary to know that acetylcysteine may be

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given for either acetaminophen overdose or as a mucolytic agent. It is also necessary to know that the inhalation route is only used for mucolytic effects. With this in mind, options 3 and 4 are eliminated because the client does not need resuscitation. Option 2 is eliminated also, because a nasogastric tube may be used in the client with acetaminophen overdose. If you had difficulty with this question, review the purpose of this medication and the related nursing interventions. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Implementation Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Skidmore-Roth, L. (2005). Mosby’s drug guide for nurses (6th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, p. 10. 9. A nurse is assisting to administer acetylcysteine (Mucomyst) to a client admitted with acetaminophen (Tylenol) overdose. Before giving this medication, the nurse would ensure that the: 1. Client knows how to use a nebulizer. 2. Antidote to acetaminophen is readily available. 3. Stomach is empty from emesis or lavage. 4. Solution is given full strength. Answer: 3 Rationale: Acetylcysteine can be given orally or by nasogastric tube to treat acetaminophen overdose, or it may be given by inhalation for use as a mucolytic. Prior to giving the medication as an antidote to acetaminophen, the nurse ensures that the client’s stomach is empty through emesis or gastric lavage. The solution is diluted in cola, water, or juice to make the solution more palatable. It is then administered orally or by nasogastric tube. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Begin to answer this question by eliminating options 1 and 2. This medication is not given by the inhalation route to treat acetaminophen overdose, and acetylcysteine is the antidote (to acetaminophen). To select between the remaining options, remember that the solution must be diluted and that the stomach must be emptied for maximal effect of the antidote. Review this medication if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Implementation Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Skidmore-Roth, L. (2005). Mosby’s drug guide for nurses (6th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, p. 10. 10. A client has an order to take guaifenesin (Humibid) every 4 hours, as needed. The nurse determines that the client understands the most effective use of this medication if the client states that he or she will: 1. Take the tablet with a full glass of water. 2. Take an extra dose if the cough is accompanied by fever. 3. Watch for irritability as a side effect. 4. Crush the sustained-release tablet if immediate relief is needed.

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Answer: 1 Rationale: Guaifenesin is an expectorant. It should be taken with a full glass of water to decrease viscosity of secretions. Sustained-release preparations should not be broken open, crushed, or chewed. The medication may occasionally cause dizziness, headache, or drowsiness as side effects. The client should contact the physician if the cough lasts longer than 1 week or is accompanied by fever, rash, sore throat, or persistent headache. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Begin to answer this question by eliminating option 4 first. Sustained-released preparations are not crushed or broken. Option 2 is eliminated next, because fever indicates infection, and an “extra dose” of an expectorant is not helpful in treating infection. From the remaining options, recalling that increased fluids helps liquefy secretions for more effective coughing will direct you to option 1. Review this medication if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Comprehension Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Evaluation Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Skidmore-Roth, L. (2005). Mosby’s drug guide for nurses (6th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, p. 410. 11. A postoperative client has received a dose of naloxone (Narcan) for respiratory depression shortly after transfer to the nursing unit from the postanesthesia care unit. Following administration of the medication, the nurse checks the client for: 1. Pupillary changes 2. Sudden episodes of diarrhea 3. Sudden increase in pain 4. Scattered lung wheezes Answer: 3 Rationale: Naloxone is an antidote to opioids, and may also be given to the postoperative client to treat respiratory depression. When given to the postoperative client for respiratory depression, it may also reverse the effects of analgesics. Therefore, the nurse must check the client for a sudden increase in the level of pain experienced. Options 1, 2, and 4 are not associated with this medication. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Recalling that this medication is an antidote to narcotic analgesics will assist in directing you to option 3. Remember that this medication will cause sudden pain in the postoperative client or return of pain in the client who received narcotic analgesics. If you had difficulty with this question, review this medication. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Data Collection Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Hodgson, B., & Kizior, R. (2005). Saunders nursing drug handbook 2005. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 749. 12. A client with suspected narcotic overdose has received a dose of naloxone (Narcan). The client subsequently becomes restless, starts to vomit, and complains of abdominal cramping.

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The blood pressure increases from 110/72 to 160/86 mm Hg. The nurse provides emotional support and reassurance while administering care to the client, knowing that: 1. These effects will only last a few moments 2. These are signs of opioid withdrawal 3. The client may otherwise sign out against medical advice 4. The client may become suicidal Answer: 2 Rationale: Signs of opioid withdrawal include increased temperature and blood pressure, abdominal cramping, vomiting, and restlessness. They can occur at any time, from a few minutes to a few hours after administration of naloxone, depending on the opioid involved, the degree of dependence, and the dose of naloxone. Options 1, 3, and 4 are incorrect interpretations. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Eliminate option 1 first, because the symptoms identified in the question are not likely to disappear in a few moments. Option 4 is eliminated next, because there is no supporting information in the question. From the remaining options, knowing that the client with narcotic overdose may have a history of prior chronic use will direct you to option 2. Review the signs of opioid withdrawal if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Analysis Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Implementation Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Hodgson, B., & Kizior, R. (2005). Saunders nursing drug handbook 2005. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 749. 13. A nurse is assisting in caring for a client who is receiving a dose of naloxone (Narcan) intravenously to treat narcotic overdose. The nurse plans to have which of the following available as supportive equipment in case it is needed? 1. Nasogastric tube 2. Paracentesis tray 3. Central line insertion tray 4. Resuscitation equipment Answer: 4 Rationale: The nurse should have resuscitation equipment readily available to support naloxone therapy, if it is needed. Other adjuncts that may be needed include oxygen, a mechanical ventilator, and emergency medications. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination and note the key words, narcotic overdose. Recalling the effects of narcotics will direct you to option 4. Also, note that option 4 is the umbrella (global) option. Review care of the client receiving naloxone if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Planning Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Skidmore-Roth, L. (2005). Mosby’s drug guide for nurses (6th ed.). St. Louis:

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Mosby, p. 600. 14. A nurse is reinforcing instructions to a client about the effects of diphenhydramine (Benadryl), which has been ordered as a cough suppressant. Which statement by the client indicates the need for further instructions? 1. “I need to avoid driving or other activities requiring mental alertness while taking this medication.” 2. “I need to use sugarless gum, candy, or oral rinses to decrease dry mouth.” 3. “I need to avoid alcohol while taking this medication.” 4. “I need to take the medication on an empty stomach.” Answer: 4 Rationale: Diphenhydramine has several uses, including as an antihistamine, antitussive, antidyskinetic, and sedative/hypnotic. Instructions for use include taking the medication with food or milk to decrease gastrointestinal upset and to use oral rinses, sugarless gum, or hard candy to minimize dry mouth. Because the medication causes drowsiness, the client should avoid the use of alcohol or central nervous system depressants, operating a car, or engaging in other activities requiring mental acuity during use. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination and note the key words, need for further instructions. These words indicate a false response question and that you need to select the incorrect client statement. Knowing that the medication has a sedative effect helps you eliminate options 1 and 3 first. Next, recalling that the medication causes dry mouth helps you eliminate option 2. If you had difficulty with this question, review the client teaching points related to this medication. Level of Cognitive Ability: Comprehension Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: McKenry, L., & Salerno, E. (2003). Mosby’s pharmacology in nursing (21st ed.). St. Louis: Mosby, p. 743. 15. A client has been taking isoniazid (INH) for 1½ months. The client complains to a nurse about numbness, paresthesias, and tingling in the extremities. The nurse interprets that the client is experiencing: 1. Small blood vessel spasm 2. Impaired peripheral circulation 3. Hypercalcemia 4. Peripheral neuritis Answer: 4 Rationale: A common side effect of INH is peripheral neuritis. This is manifested by numbness, tingling, and paresthesias in the extremities. This side effect can be minimized by pyridoxine (vitamin B6) intake. Options 1, 2, and 3 are incorrect. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Options 1 and 2 would not cause the symptoms presented in the question, but instead would cause pallor and coolness. From the remaining options, you should know either that peripheral neuritis is a side effect of the medication or that these signs and symptoms do not correlate with hypercalcemia. Review the

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side effects associated with INH if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Analysis Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Data Collection Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Kee, J., & Hayes, E. (2003). Pharmacology: A nursing process approach (4th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, pp. 435-436. 16. A client is to begin a 6-month course of therapy with isoniazid (INH). A nurse plans to teach the client to: 1. Drink alcohol in small amounts only. 2. Report yellow eyes or skin immediately. 3. Increase intake of Swiss or aged cheeses. 4. Avoid vitamin supplements during therapy. Answer: 2 Rationale: INH is hepatotoxic, and therefore the client is taught to report signs and symptoms of hepatitis immediately (which include yellow skin and sclera). For the same reason, alcohol should be avoided during therapy. The client should avoid intake of Swiss cheese, fish such as tuna, and foods containing tyramine because they may cause a reaction characterized by redness and itching of the skin, flushing, sweating, tachycardia, headache, or lightheadedness. The client can avoid developing peripheral neuritis by increasing the intake of pyridoxine (vitamin B6) during the course of INH therapy. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Alcohol intake is prohibited with the use of many medications, so option 1 should be eliminated first. Because the client receiving this medication typically is supplemented with vitamin B6, option 4 is incorrect and is eliminated next. From the remaining options, recalling that the medication is hepatotoxic will direct you to option 2. If you had difficulty with this question, review this medication. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Hodgson, B., & Kizior, R. (2004). Saunders nursing drug handbook 2004. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 560. 17. A client has been started on long-term therapy with rifampin (Rifadin). A nurse teaches the client that the medication: 1. Should be double-dosed if one dose is forgotten 2. May be discontinued independently if symptoms are gone in 3 months 3. Causes orange discoloration of sweat, tears, urine, and feces 4. Should always be taken with food or antacids Answer: 3 Rationale: Rifampin should be taken exactly as directed. Doses should not be doubled or skipped. The client should not stop therapy until directed to do so by a physician. The medication should be administered on an empty stomach unless it causes gastrointestinal upset,

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and then it may be taken with food. Antacids, if prescribed, should be taken at least 1 hour prior to the medication. Rifampin causes orange-red discoloration of body secretions and will permanently stain soft contact lenses. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Use of general medication administration principles will assist in eliminating options 1 and 2. Eliminate option 4 next because of the absolute word "always." If you had difficulty with this question, review the side effects associated with this medication. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Kee, J., & Hayes, E. (2003). Pharmacology: A nursing process approach (4th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 436. 18. A nurse has given a client taking ethambutol (Myambutol) information about the medication. The nurse determines that the client understands the instructions if the client states that he or she will immediately report: 1. Gastrointestinal (GI) side effects 2. Impaired sense of hearing 3. Orange-red discoloration of body secretions 4. Problems with visual acuity Answer: 4 Rationale: Ethambutol causes optic neuritis, which decreases visual acuity and the ability to discriminate between the colors red and green. This poses a potential safety hazard when a client is driving a motor vehicle. The client is taught to report this symptom immediately. The client is also taught to take the medication with food if GI upset occurs. Impaired hearing results from antitubercular therapy with streptomycin. Orange-red discoloration of secretions occurs with rifampin (Rifadin). Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Option 1 is the least likely symptom to report; rather, it should be managed by taking the medication with food. To select from the other options, it is necessary to know that this medication causes optic neuritis, resulting in difficulty with red-green discrimination. If this question was difficult, review antitubercular medications, because incorrect options for this question are typical side effects of other antitubercular medications. Level of Cognitive Ability: Analysis Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Hodgson, B., & Kizior, R. (2004). Saunders nursing drug handbook 2004. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, pp. 388-389. 19. Cycloserine (Seromycin) is added to the medication regimen for a client with tuberculosis. Which of the following would the nurse include in the client teaching plan regarding this medication? 1. To take the medication before meals

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2. To return to the clinic weekly for serum drug level testing 3. It is not necessary to call the physician if a skin rash occurs 4. It is not necessary to restrict alcohol intake with this medication Answer: 2 Rationale: Cycloserine (Seromycin) is an antitubercular medication that requires weekly serum drug level determinations to monitor for the potential of neurotoxicity. Serum drug levels lower than 30 mg/mL reduce the incidence of neurotoxicity. The medication needs to be taken after meals to prevent gastrointestinal irritation. The client needs to be instructed to notify the physician if a skin rash or early signs of central nervous system toxicity are noted. Alcohol needs to be avoided because it increases the risk of seizure activity. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. Eliminate options 3 and 4 first, using guidelines related to general medication administration principles. From this point, knowing that the medication level needs to be monitored will assist in selecting the correct option. If you had difficulty with this question, review this medication. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Kee, J., & Hayes, E. (2003). Pharmacology: A nursing process approach (4th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 435. 20. A client with tuberculosis is being started on antituberculosis therapy with isoniazid (INH). Before giving the client the first dose, a nurse ensures that which of the following baseline studies has been completed? 1. Coagulation times 2. Electrolyte levels 3. Serum creatinine level 4. Liver enzyme levels Answer: 4 Rationale: INH therapy can cause an elevation of hepatic enzyme levels and hepatitis. Therefore, liver enzyme levels are monitored when therapy is initiated and during the first 3 months of therapy. They may be monitored longer in the client who is over age 50 or abuses alcohol. Test-Taking Strategy: Use the process of elimination. In order to answer this question correctly, it is necessary to know that this medication can be toxic to the liver. Review the adverse effects of the various antitiberculosis medications if this is an area that is unfamiliar to you. Level of Cognitive Ability: Application Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Data Collection Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: Kee, J., & Hayes, E. (2003). Pharmacology: A nursing process approach (4th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, p. 433. <AQ>21. A client with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is receiving theophylline (TheoDur) and the nurse is monitoring the client for side effects of the medication. Select the side

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effects of this medication. ____Bradycardia ____Restlessness ____Headaches ____Tremors Answers: Restlessness Headaches Tremors Rationale: Theophylline (Theo-Dur) is a xanthine bronchodilators that dilates the airways of the respiratory tree and relaxes the smooth muscles of the bronchi. Xanthine bronchodilators stimulate the central nervous system and respiration, dilate coronary and pulmonary vessels, causing diuresis, and relax smooth muscle. Side effects include palpitations and tachycardia, dysrhythmias, restlessness, nervousness, tremors, and gastrointestinal effects such as anorexia, nausea, and vomiting. Other side effects include headaches and dizziness. Test-Taking Strategy: Note the type of medication that the client is receiving. Recalling the action of a xanthine bronchodilator will assist in determining the side effects. Review the side effects of a xanthine bronchodilator if you had difficulty with this question. Level of Cognitive Ability: Analysis Client Needs: Physiological Integrity Integrated Process: Nursing Process/Data Collection Content Area: Pharmacology Reference: (2005). Mosby’s 2005 drug consult for nurses. St. Louis: Mosby, p. 1389.

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