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com September 23, 2011
T i m e s C o m m u n i t y P u b l i c a t i o n s
8 2 6 E w i n g S t r e e t , F o r t W a y n e , I N 4 6 8 0 2
Friday, November 3, 2011
order your tickets at www.fwbusiness.net
IInnovation
Awards
Business Weekly Business Weekly
Awards
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Patsy Dumas, Chairman of
Dancing with the Fort Wayne Stars,
has a special place in her heart for a
local charity, The Carriage House.
Since 2000, through the philanthropic
sorority she is involved in, she has
donated fundraiser proceeds to the
facility.
“I got so involved and so committed
because I saw the results and how effective
what they’re doing is,” Dumas said.
She is now President of the Board of
Directors for The Carriage House, in
addition to chairing the dance event.
Proceeds from this year’s Dancing
with the Fort Wayne Stars, which is
in its sixth year, will go to fund the
operations of the facility.
“The Carriage House is a
rehabilitation facility that
helps get people that have
a mental illness back to
work and restore their
lives,” she said.
“It’s a unique
program
helping
people in
their recovery
from mental illness.”
While Dumas is the lady in
charge behind the scenes, she said she isn’t a
dancer.
“One year, the committee danced,” she said.
“It was hard, but we all had a really good time.”
“Dancing with the Fort Wayne Stars” is
similar to the television show,
Dancing with the Stars, except
the celebrities are all from
Fort Wayne.
“We’ve had 10 celebrities
every year,” Dumas said. “Not that they’re
well known, but they’ve contributed to
things in Fort Wayne or they have a
successful business in Fort Wayne. We choose
five men and five women.”
The contestants are then paired up with a
professional at a local dance studio, where
they undergo weeks of intensive training.
American Style Ballroom, Arthur
Murray Dance Studio, Tiffany & Co.
Studio of Dance, K. Monique’s
Studio of Dance and Sheekristyle
Academy of Dance Arts are this
year’s participating studios.
Hope Huber, the event publicity
coordinator, said the studios “donate
a certain number of lessons. They
donate the lessons to the
student and they also
donate the time, dancing
at the event with the
student. They are really a big
By KELLY MCLENDON
kmclendon@kpcnews.net
Hope Huber and her dance partner, Troy Baeton, were the
winners of last year’s Dancing with the Fort Wayne Stars.
Courtesy photo
Dance competition raises funds, creates
fun for audience and participants
See DANCE, page A19
Sandy Glumb works with three children on a puzzle project at
Creative Treasures.
Creative Treasures
Preschool owners bring
passion to program
Photo by Kelly McLendon
For Sandy Glumb and
Amy Barcelona, working
with children is a passion.
The two previously
worked together at Hunter-
town United Methodist for
many years and recently
decided that this would be
the year to open their own
preschool.
“We decided this year
that it was time to do it,”
Glumb said. The two
searched for an area of
town where there would
be a need for a preschool.
Glumb stumbled upon a
site on Hursh Road one
day while driving around.
“There are not very
many preschools around
By KELLY MCLENDON
kmclendon@kpcnews.net
See PRESCHOOL, page A6
Care 2 Learn working to create
educational success through-
out the community
Cristen Sprunger started
an academic organization,
Care 2 Learn, because of a
need in the community.
Parents at schools,
churches and other service
organizations in the
community were asking
about tutoring and
academic camps and
Sprunger, who has a back-
ground in education,
wanted to help. She
started by teaching
students reading from her
home and then expanded
when she felt the time was
right.
Care 2 Learn is a faith-
based ministry that offers
a variety of academic
programs for children
ages 5 to 18, as well as
adults of any age. The
organization has partnered
with churches to offer
multiple locations around
the city and offers
tutoring, summer
academic camps, home
school academy sessions
and speech-language
therapy. The after school
classes offer anything
from art to math, to study
skills and more, Sprunger
said.
The home school
academy offers classes for
credit for students
working toward their high
school diplomas. “We are
partnering with the home
school parent,” Sprunger
By KELLY MCLENDON
kmclendon@kpcnews.net
Care 2 Learn Tutoring student Cailey Gladieux works with the
Orton-Gillingham based multisensory method for reading, writing
and spelling.
Photo by Cristen Sprunger
See CARE, page A8
I NSI DE THI S I SSUE
Business & Professional...............A20-21
Classifieds .............................................A19
Community Calendar ....................A22-23
Dining & Entertainment .................A16-17
Youth .......................................................A14
Sports........................................................A9
Worship List ..........................................A18
A2 • www.DupontTimes.com Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Sat. Sept 24 -
Sun. Oct 2
Oakmont
Development, LLC
hbafortwayne.com
Fort Wayne’s Premier Home Show
Admission
$
10 per person
Open Daily
Noon - 9pm
Sundays
Noon - 6pm
Rothman Road just east
of Maplecrest
Windsor Homes by Jeff Gilmore
Delagrange Homes
Lancia Homes Slattery Builders
Westport Homes
PARADE of HOMES
at Valencia
Sponsored by:
2011
Welcome to the
:
City Utilities
A portion of the proceeds
benefit Francine’s Friends
Mobile Mammography &
Ronald McDonald House at Parkview
Bob Buescher Homes
Comfort Keepers celebrates
10 years of blessings
This month, Comfort Keepers is celebrating its 10th
anniversary. The business is a leading franchise in the in-
home care market for seniors and other adults needing
assistance.
Owned by Julia and Matthew Anders, the group has
changed much in the past decade. While the business has
expanded and more employees have been hired, it’s not
uncommon to see two fluffy white dogs running around
the office or sitting in chairs. Part of the group too, Beau
and Bella have a paw in taking care of the clients.
Q & A with owner Julia Anders
1. How has your business changed since you
opened?
It’s a lot bigger. Now we have an office staff of seven,
including my husband and myself. Everything I used to
do, we all do. We’re busier and we’ve built an excellent
reputation over 10 years. We also have a nurse on staff—
an RN, who is our director of client care. That’s a really
big thing for us, even though we’re non-medical, having a
nurse on staff.
2. What is “interactive caregiving?”
Comfort Keepers has branded that. I’ve always called it
“Heart-to-Heart” caregiving from the beginning. I’ve
known that we were guests in our clients’ homes and we
treat them like that. We don’t just come in and take over.
I realized from the very beginning that as people age,
they lose a lot of independence. We try to let them hold
onto as much independence as they can. We really work
to make a difference.
3. How does in-home care benefit clients?
We help people stay in their homes. They have choices
now, they don’t have to move. The biggest fear of seniors
is not of dying, it’s of moving into a nursing home.
4. How do the dogs [Beau, short for Beauregard or
Prince Beau] and [Bella, short for Bellablue] help
clients?
They go out and visit our clients, too. Our clients love
it. In fact, one of our clients just called. When I come
back from lunch, I bring something back for them. I had
to answer a call and they were barking in the background
and one of our clients knew who they were. They just
By KELLY MCLENDON
kmclendon@kpcnews.net
Awhile back, Julia Anders was told by a co-worker to get a
“blessing box,” where she could put all of the cards and notes she
received from clients. Seen here are two of her blessing boxes.
Photo by Kelly McLendon
See QUESTIONS, page A3
www.DupontTimes.com • A3 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
10 1
10 1
10 1
Neighborhood
Health Clinics
1725 S. Calhoun St.
Fort Wayne, IN
458-2641
Budget Tight?
Are you pregnant?
Breastfeeding?
Have a child under 5?
WIC might be able to help.
The Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program
provides checks for nutritious foods, breastfeeding
support and nutrition education for all kinds of
families - single parents, married, working,
not working and foster.
Call to see if you qualify.
You can ask about our
medical and dental
services too!
ss
The core team meets one afternoon, assisted by Beau (on the table) and Bella (held by Anders).
Photo by Kelly Mclendon
expect it.
They have their own column in the
newsletter. Our clients love them; they
ask about them all the time. Bellablue,
she’s new; she’s not a year old yet. She’s
like the little sister Beau never wanted.
He is so sweet and she just chases him
around all the time.
5. What makes Comfort Keepers
stand apart from other companies that
offer similar services?
It’s the group of caregivers that are
outstanding. We call it the “Core” group
and they meet every six weeks and
discuss challenges and how we can be
better.
6. In the last decade, what has been
your favorite part about owning the
company in Fort Wayne?
My favorite part is just getting to know
our clients and helping them stay in their
homes and making a difference. In the
beginning, I went into it thinking that this
will be a ministry, too. I didn’t know
people needed the kind of help we
provided. Especially with the hospice
clients-we’re comforting the families, too.
It’s a huge responsibility.
Our clients have been such a blessing
to me and our caregivers. We’re very
selective about who we hire.
7. You host a live radio show on
Sundays. What do you discuss?
It’s a live call-in program, every
Sunday on WOWO, from noon to 1 p.m.
It’s one of my favorite things to do.
[Recently,] we had one of our clients on
and he’s 96 and he was talking about his
life story.
I named the show “Heart to Heart.” I
came up with the format. It just explains
everything as far as I’m concerned with
Comfort Keepers. It’s just a heart to heart
and getting to know our clients.
QUESTIONS
from page A2
Welcome to the
PARADE of HOMES
at Valencia
September 24~ October 2,2011
Daily • Noon - 9 pm
Sunday • Noon - 6 pm
A4 • www.DupontTimes.com Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
PHOTO SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS: • Go to www.kpcnews.net/photocontest
Winners need to contact James Tew at jamest@kpcnews.net or 260-347-0400 x190 by September 30, 2011 to claim your prize.
MICHELLE RISSER
TAMMY WAGNER
I took this picture in my mother-in-law’s
pool in July. The wrinkled feet is what
summer is all about...hanging out by
pool with family and friends, swimming,
and having cookouts. Every one should
have wrinkled feet!
This photo of my
daughter, Emily Jo,
was taken in our
home. Sleeping is the
only time our 7 week old
is still. She is constantly
on the move, kicking her
legs and waving her arms.
Their photos also will appear online at www.kpcnews.com/photocontest.
Tammy Wagner was the KPC staff choice
winner for KPC’s July Photo Contest.
Michelle Risser was the
people’s choice winner
for KPC’s July
Photo Contest.
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Because builders use the Parade of
Homes to show off the best of what they
can do, the houses in the not-quite annual
event sponsored by the Home Builders
Association of Fort Wayne often are a little
grander than most people can afford.
This year’s parade, from Sept. 24 through
Oct. 2 in the Valencia subdivision off
Rothman Road, is all about value, efficiency
and affordable luxury. Homes included in
the parade are expected to be in the
$260,000 to $350,000 range. The focus of
the six homes is less on absolute size than
on the amenities within. “That’s really
where the market is now,” said HBA Presi-
dent Craig Yoder of Colonial Development.
Westport Homes, perhaps best known for
the ranch homes it builds for the first-time
buyer’s market, is participating in the parade
for the first time.
“We wanted to do something that would
show Realtors, in particular, that we can do
something else and still provide value,” said
Charlie Giese, vice president and general
manager.
At about $260,000, Westport’s 2,984-
square-foot “Stonewood” model is probably
the least expensive on the parade block but
still offers four good-sized bedrooms, three
bathrooms, an open kitchen/family room
and a first-floor den and a second-floor
recreation room.
Slattery Builders is also a first-time
participant in the parade. Its “Casselberry
Cottage” is a brand new design and will be
priced at around $310,000. That’s within the
price range Slattery usually builds, said
See PARADE, page A8
By LINDA LIPP
lindal@fwbusiness.com
Herb Delagrange, of Delagrange Homes, is one of six featured builders on the 2011 Parade of Homes
tour in northwest Fort Wayne Sept. 24-Oct. 2.
Photo by LInda Lipp
www.DupontTimes.com • A5 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
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here. A lot of the residents
have to drive a long way,”
she said. “There’s always
a good need for a good
preschool.”
The site she stumbled
upon happened to be
Crossbridge Community
Church, which conducts
its Upward Sports
program at the facility.
“I knew about Cross-
bridge,” Barcelona said.
“My children did Upward
here. It was weird how it
all connected.”
On the particular day
Glumb was driving
around, on a Friday after-
noon, she walked into the
church and Bruce Colbert,
the executive pastor heard
her idea to open a
preschool.
“The best part about
that,” Glumb said, “was
how welcome and open he
was to just a stranger
walking in off the street.”
She said after many
meetings and after
creating a business plan
outline, the two were on
their way to having a
preschool at the church.
The school, called
Creative Treasures
Preschool, will be a part-
nership. Crossbridge will
assist with religion
teaching. The facility will
host 4 and 5 year old chil-
dren on Mon., Wed., Fri.
and 3 year olds on Tues.
and Thurs. The morning
class will run from 8 -11
a.m. and the afternoon
class will take place from
noon-3 p.m.
“We have a set
curriculum and we follow
the foundations to the
Indiana Academic State
Standards for early chil-
dren from birth to age 5,”
Glumb said. The
preschool will also offer
math education, physical
education, foreign
language, music classes
and art classes.
Barcelona and Glumb
have both been working
with children for over a
decade. Barcelona has a
degree in Rehab Coun-
seling and Education
Services from Penn State
University. She has experi-
ence setting up preschool
programs and also
teaching preschool.
She said she believes in
Creative Treasures
because “we’re family
focused” and also because
both owners would like to
focus outreach on the
families of the children
who will attend the
school. They would like to
help educate parents about
parenting and to work as a
support system, to both
the adults and the chil-
dren.
The preschool also
accepts special needs chil-
dren who are trying to
mainstream, Glumb said.
In addition to offering
many resources, Creative
Treasures also connects
with the community.
The Upward soccer
program offers special
needs soccer for ages 3
and up, Glumb said.
“It’s a great connection
there,” Barcelona said.
“We work with other
preschools as well.”
Her co-owner said, “It’s
not a competition. We’re
in a community.”
The Creative Treasures
preschool staff is made up
of both women and also
an instructional aide.
Barcelona hopes the
facility will continue to
grow and expand in the
coming years.
“The children are first,”
Glumb said. “It’s really
important in early educa-
tion. Our job is to develop
a lifelong love of learning
in children.”
She talked about how
she still keeps track of
students she had many
years ago.
Both Glumb and
Barcelona acknowledge
that deciding to open the
preschool—together—was
a positive step in the right
direction.
“It’s more fun to be
together,” Glumb said.
“We have a passion for it.”
Barcelona agreed.
“It’s a passion for us,”
she said. “It’s not a clock
in, clock out.”
For more details, visit
www.creativetreasure-
spreschool.com.
PRESCHOOL
from page A1
A6 • www.DupontTimes.com Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Direct Mailed to 20,000
Homes & Businesses
In Southwest Allen County & Roanoke
Direct Mailed & Rack
Distribution to 12,000
Homes & Businesses
In New Haven & East Allen County
Direct Mailed to 19,500
Homes & Businesses
In North & Northeast Fort Wayne
& Allen County
Direct Mailed & Rack
Distribution to 21,000
Homes & Businesses
In East Fort Wayne & Allen County
Direct Mailed & Rack
Distribution to 80,000
In Allen County & Surrounding Area
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Oct. 28, 2011
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Northeastern Indiana Kennel Club
to Host Old Fort Cluster Dog Show
Mark your calendars for one of the
biggest fall dog shows in the Midwest.
The Northeastern Indiana Kennel Club
along with the LaPorte County Kennel
Club, Sturgis County Kennel Club, and
the Marion Kennel Club have announced
the Old Fort Cluster Dog Show, which
will take place from Wednesday, Nov. 2,
through Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011 at the Allen
County War Memorial Coliseum.
Show hours are from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
daily, with Best of Show awarded at the
end of each day’s show. Admission is
free, but the organization asks that those
attending bring a pet food item that will
be donated to community pets in need
through the Community Harvest Food
Bank. For more information visit the
group’s website at www.neikc.org.
www.DupontTimes.com • A7 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
(ALLEN COUNTY) The nationwide credit
crisis may have turned “the American
dream” into an extended nightmare for
many Indiana home buyers and sellers.
Banks and mortgage lenders (who are
not going out of business) have tightened up
their lending requirements to the point
where many home buyers today can no
longer qualify for a mortgage.
Record foreclosures, rising unemployment,
losses in the financial markets and the
current credit crunch have not only reduced
the number of buyers who can buy but have
also increased the number of houses that
sellers need to sell.
Prices are under pressure as home sellers
lower their asking price to attract a buyer,
and as lenders resell their foreclosed homes
below market value.
And it’s turning into a vicious cycle --
as many buyers need to sell their current
home first -- and many sellers (unless they
plan to rent) need new financing to get into
their next home. As a result, a sea of real
estate agents, mortgage brokers and home
builders are going out of business. These
professionals are in the business of serving
buyers and sellers. But that’s hard to do
with the credit crisis when the entire real
estate industry traditionally relies on
mortgage lending to finance buyers and get
houses sold.
What can homeowners do to sell their
homes? How can buyers get financing if
they can’t meet the tougher lending criteria
on credit scores, income verification, down
payment amounts and debt ratios?
There’s one local real estate profes-
sional who has found a way to make
things work even with the present bank-
ing crisis. Mike MacDonald is the president
of Summit City Investments, Inc. Since
1999, his private investment company has
been buying houses throughout the Allen
County, IN region without ever relying on
banks.
MacDonald’s company takes over
existing mortgages or brings in private
lenders allowing him to pay homeowners
all cash for the properties. He then offers his
properties for rent or “for sale by owner”
using a variety of unique seller financing
programs.
By taking a long term approach and
never relying on banks, business has never
been better for MacDonald and his
company.
Mike says it’s normal for people to
think they must be desperate before calling
him to buy their house. “It’s a very common
misconception. But until I look at a house
and do some research, I won’t know my
game plan for the property or what I can
offer. But after a single visit to the property
and meeting with the homeowners I can let
them know exactly what I can do. My offer
is good for 7 days and it’s only at that point,
with my offer on the table, that a seller can
decide if I’m going to become their buyer.”
In fact, price is not an issue for
MacDonald. As an investor, what’s impor-
tant to him is the determination of what
income the property can produce. “It’s easy
to determine. I also do an appraisal and
look at the recent comparable sales. Then I
do whatever I can to offer a seller up to full
price today -- or about what they might net
sometime in the future pursuing a more
conventional route. What I can pay depends
on the condition, location and financing
options available for that type of property.
It only takes about 10 minutes to prescreen
a property over the phone and to set an
appointment. We typically buy 1 out of
every 4 properties we see. In fact, for about
half of those I have purchased, the seller
pursued their other options and then came
to realize that my offer was the best all
along.”
MacDonald believes the three biggest
reasons a house doesn’t sell are: 1) it is
overpriced, 2) it is poorly marketed, or 3) it
is not fixed up to show well. “I can pay a
fair price on a home that needs work. I
might even plan to increase the value or
marketability by adding a
bedroom or bath, finishing a
basement or installing a new
heating system. Brand new carpet
and paint will go a long way to
attract a qualified buyer. But I
understand that many sellers
don’t have the time, inclination or
money to remodel a house... just to
get it sold. We solve that problem
for sellers.”
Overpricing a home
could be the biggest mistake.
Listing agents sometimes suggest
(or a seller might decide) to ask for
a higher price than needed. This
might be to test the market or leave wiggle
room to negotiate. However, this can
backfire if the seller wants (or needs) a
quick sale, or when the “days on the
market” stacks up causing buyers to wonder
what’s wrong with the property.
Another misconception about how
Mike MacDonald buys houses is the idea
that he’s probably looking for sellers in
financial distress. “Look, when a seller is
out of time or out of options, then I’m
usually their best solution -- if their
property is not over-financed. But most
people headed for foreclosure are either
overleveraged or actually looking to save
their house. If I buy the house the seller
must move. They really need to get into a
more affordable home... but sometimes I
can help by swapping properties.”
MacDonald warns about companies and
real estate investors who target distressed
homeowners. “Recent laws have been
passed in Indiana that apply to any business
and investor who targets people in foreclo-
sure. Be cautious, do your research and
perhaps seek legal advice when anyone
wants to charge you an upfront fee for
helping to get your loan modified, or... if
they’re promising to lease the home back to
you. That rarely works out like the
borrower expects and can lead to accusa-
tions of fraud. Perhaps rightly so.”
What does a real estate investor like
Mike MacDonald do with the houses he
buys each month? What about the
hundreds of houses his company has bought
throughout Allen County, Indiana over the
last 11 years? Simple. He rents them out or
resells them. “We’re usually managing 50
to 60 properties at any given time -- making
us one of the largest owners of single family
homes in the area. Each month we may
have 5 to 10 houses for sale. Some we’ve
owned for years and others we have
recently bought.”
With a reasonable down payment,
MacDonald says he can sell you one of his
properties using his popular owner financ-
ing programs -- even if you have damaged
credit or a short job history.
His most popular owner financing
program includes the opportunity to
build “sweat equity.” Before repairing or
remodeling a newly acquired house,
MacDonald offers it in “as-is” condition to
his buyer’s list. This allows his client to do
the work (to suit their own preferences) in
exchange for all or part of a down payment.
“I have a lot of buyers who check my
website each week looking for these ‘fixer
upper’ deals. But if the home is not under
contract within 10 days or so then I’ll hire
my contractors to fix it up completely.”
His next most popular program is a
down payment assistance plan. Many
buyers turn to MacDonald’s company
because they don’t have the down payment
required by today’s cautious lenders. Mike
helps buyers build up equity or a down
payment over time with his rent-to-own (or
lease with the option to buy) program. In
this program you can rent the property
you’ve decided to buy, but have the option
to close anytime over the next 1, 2... or even
5 years. A portion of the rent each month is
credited toward buying. Additional
amounts can be paid monthly for more
rapid equity build up plus other promised
amounts can be made later... like proceeds
from the sale of another property or a
pending tax refund.
Once the buyer has enough “skin” in
the deal, MacDonald can close with
owner financing at the predetermined,
mutually agreed upon price and terms. Or
the buyer can close with a new bank loan.
According to MacDonald, “There are so
many reasons my buyers like some time
before qualifying for a mortgage. They may
need to sell their house, work on their
credit, establish more time on a job or
establish two years of provable income on
tax returns when self-employed. All our
buyers are put in touch with a sharp
mortgage broker who creates a plan for
them. We can recommend an affordable
credit repair company that can do unbeliev-
able things given even a short 6 to 12
months to work on a file. This also helps out
some sellers who have found themselves in
over their head.”
“We do everything we can to get our
buyers permanent bank financing. It’s a
win-win because we pay sellers all cash and
fund our deals with private lenders. Our
lenders are mostly local individuals seeking
alternatives to low bank CD rates. They
earn 8 to 10% interest on real estate notes
well-secured by our properties. When we
get our buyer cashed out, we finally make
our money and can payoff our investor.
These investors usually want to reinvest
allowing us to buy even more houses.”
Unfortunately many of the mortgage
programs once available are now gone. It’s
reported that 75% of the available lending
disappeared when FHA changed their rules
last October and again early this year. But,
if you have money to put down and can
prove your income, there are still loans
available now. In fact, some rural develop-
ment loans and VA loans still allow quali-
fied buyers to borrow with no money down.
“We help all of our buyers get a bank
loan as quickly as possible... or we finance
them ourselves. But we’ve never relied on
banks. That keeps us in control and main-
tains our sanity. But we get those loans
done every chance we get. In fact, some-
times a buyer can qualify and doesn’t even
know it. Other times they can qualify but
need a flexible seller. We’re one of the most
creative and flexible sellers you’ll ever
find,” says MacDonald.
Does buying or selling a home have to
be difficult? Maybe not!
“President Obama says today's
economy is the worst since the Great
Depression and it may take many years to
recover. Unfortunately I think he’s right
and so do many sharp economists.”
Interested in selling your property
quickly and easily? Looking to buy a new
home without bank qualifying? It may be
worth checking in with Mike MacDonald and
his staff at Summit City Investments, Inc. Call
them at (260) 485-9437 or visit them online
at www.SummitCityInvestments.com.
They’re in a unique position to help
buyers and sellers overcome the new
challenges created by the recent mortgage
market meltdown and credit crisis. And if
you’re looking for a conservative way to
earn 8-10% interest on your idle cash
savings or retirement funds, call and ask for
info on becoming one of their private
lenders.
SUMMIT CITY INVESTMENTS, INC. is
located at 2200 Lake Avenue, Suite 120 in
Fort Wayne, IN, holds a Certificate of
Good Standing from the Indiana Secretary
of State, and is a BBB Accredited business
with the Indiana Better Business Bureau
with an A+ rating,
Mike MacDonald is the President of
Summit City Investments, Inc. He is a
37-year resident in the local community,
and has been a long term partner in his
family’s independent insurance agency and
tax & accounting firm (G. A. MacDonald
Associates, Inc.)
For more information or to view a list of
properties for sale, just visit
www.SummitCityInvestments.com
2200 Lake Avenue, Suite 120
Fort Wayne, IN 46805
Phone (260) 485-9437
-----------------
“Most sellers are unaware
of the options we offer.
What they need most is a
qualified buyer... and we
might just be that buyer.
We can buy houses in as-is
condition, pay top dollar
and close in just a few
days… or whenever they’re
ready.”
“If you can afford a first
month’s rent, a last
month’s rent and a security
deposit, then I can
probably sell you one of my
houses.”
A18 • www.DupontTimes.com Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Sleep is
not just a
“time out”
from
daily life.
You are invited to an open house and
discussion on Sleep Disorders.
www.sleepcentersfw.com
7223 Engle Road, Suite 110 s Fort Wayne, IN 46804
Thursday, October 13 s 6:30 - 8:30 pm
Fort Wayne Neurological Center on the Lutheran Hospital Campus
7956 W. Jefferson Blvd. s Suite 210 s Fort Wayne, Indiana
Reservations required. No charge.
Sponsored by Sleep Centers of Fort Wayne LLC,
accredited by AASM, and accredited by HQAA
for the sale of durable medical equipment.
Please join us for this informative discussion on sleep disorders. Dr. Atiya Khan, Neurologist,
will be the speaker. A question and answer session will follow. The Sleep Centers of Fort Wayne
is owned and operated by sleep disorders physicians who are pioneers in sleep medicine. It is
the first sleep center to obtain double accreditation both in the sleep center and durable medical
equipment sales in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
This is a free event, however reservations are required.
Please call the Sleep Centers at 260-969-6450 or toll-
free at 866-389-4627 for more information.
Light refreshments will be served.
Lutheran
Hospital


Agape Church of The Brethren 11610 Lima Rd ...... 489-6908
Arcola-lake Chapel United Methodist Church
8205 Butt Rd...................................................................................... 625-4787
Arcola United Methodist Church
11311 Arcola Rd, Arcola.............................................................. 625-4103
Ascension Lutheran Church-LCMS
8811 St Joe Rd................................................................................. 486-2226
Agape Church of The Brethren 11610 Lima Rd ....... 489-6908
Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church WELS
11228 Coldwater Rd ...................................................................... 637-3475
Believers Bible Fellowship
316 N. Main, Churubusco........................................................... 693-9664
Bethany United Methodist 7715 Sunny Lane........... 485-5311
Bethel United Methodist Church 8405 Lima Rd..... 489-3651
Calvary Chapel of Churubusco
5475 E 600 N, Churubusco.......................................................... 693-3330
Carroll Community Worship 4506 Carroll Rd ............ 637-5998
Catholic Mass for Shut-ins WISE TV 33 .......Sun. 10:30 p.m.
Christ’s Hope Ministries & Church
2818 Carroll Rd............................................................................... 637-1827
Cedar Creek Church of Christ
1 mi W of Leo-Cedarville on SR 1 ........................................... 627-3653
Church of The Covenant United Methodist
10001 Coldwater Rd ...................................................................... 489-1888
Churubusco Church of The Nazarene
1000 W Whitley, Churubusco.................................................... 693-9401
Churubusco United Methodist Church
750 N Main, Churubusco ........................................................... 693-2154
Covenant United Methodist Church
10001 Coldwater Rd ...................................................................... 489-1888
Concordia Lutheran Church 4245 Lake Ave ............. 422-2449
County Line Church of God 7716 N Co Line Rd ........ 627-2482
Crossbridge Community Church
Dupont YMCA, 10001 Dawson Creek Blvd ......................... 485-5613
Crossover Ministries Christian Church
Shiloh Reception Hall @ 3127 Carroll Rd............................. 610-6101
Crossview Church
12532 Grabill Road, Grabill ......................................................... 627-3551
Destiny Fellowship Church
3311 North Anthony Blvd............................................................ 490-3538
Dunfee Missionary Church
818 West Co Line Rd..................................................................... 625-4621
Dupont Road Bible Church 227 E Dupont Rd ........... 489-2932
Emmanuel Lutheran Church - ELCA
307 S Main, LaOtto ........................................................................ 897-2675
Faith Lutheran Church-LCMS
9251 E 9251 E State Rd 205, Churubusco............................ 693-6254
Faith United Church of Christ
10707 Coldwater Rd ...................................................................... 637-6025
Fellowship of Wesley Chapel UMC
13733 Wesley Chapel Road, Churubusco............................ 693-9800
First Assembly of God
1400 W Washington Center Rd................................................ 490-8585
First Baptist Church of Huntertown
2415 W Shoaff Rd, Huntertown................................................ 637-0416
First Eel River Baptist Church
11022 Carroll Rd, Churubusco.................................................. 693-6513
First Presbyterian Church 300 W Wayne St .............. 426-7421
First Church of Christ, Scientist 4242 Buesching.. 492-0550
Fort Wayne Friends Church 501 W Berry, Rm 201.. 482-1836
Gethsemane Lutheran Church 1505 Bethany Ln.... 483-1813
Good News Baptist Church
812 W Anderson Rd, Churubusco........................................... 693-2108
Grace Point Church of The Nazarene
8611 Mayhew Rd............................................................................ 485-2110
Grace Summit Church
Oak View Elementary, 13123 Coldwater Rd. ...................... 450-6362
Harvest Fellowship 11225 Grabill Rd, Leo ................... 627-2720
Harvest Free Will Baptist 5903 E Dupont Rd............. 483-2590
Holy Cross Lutheran Church 3425 Crescent Ave .... 483-3173
Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox 110 E Wallen Rd ......... 489-0774
Huntertown United Methodist Church
16021 Lima Rd, Huntertown....................................................... 637-3798
Imago Dei 347 W. Berry........................................................... 637-3707
The Journey Free Methodist 3536 W Wallen Rd .... 422-4123
North Park Community Church 7160 Flutter Rd...... 486-2780
Lake Chapel United Methodist 8205 Butt Rd........... 625-4103
LaOtto Wesleyan Church 500 S Main, LaOtto. 260-987-2575
Leo United Methodist Church 13527 Leo Rd............. 627-2161
Life Bridge Church 12719 Corbin Rd................................ 338-0700
Lutheran Hour WOWO 1190AM............................ Sunday 11a.m.
Messiah’s House of Yahvah 7th Day
2023 E 400 S - 57, Churbusco.................................................... 636-2275
North Church of Christ 1230 W Wallen Rd .................. 489-9026
North Point Community Church 10513 Leo Rd........ 484-4277
North Summit Church
607 Airport North Office Park .................................................. 484-4672
Northridge Baptist Church 1300 E Cook Rd .............. 489-6633
Northside Church of Christ 2014 W Wallen Rd ....... 489-9026
Our Hope Lutheran Church 1826 Trinity....................... 637-3625
Pathway Community Church
11910 Shearwater Run................................................................. 469-4444
Pine Hills Church 11331 Coldwater Rd .......................... 637-3198
Praise Lutheran Church 1115 W Dupont ..................... 490-7729
Prince of Peace Lutheran Church-LCMS
12640 Saint Joe Rd....................................................................... 627-5621
Providence Presbyterian Church 639 Putnam St.. 744-1022
Resurrection Lutheran Church 14318 Lima Rd........ 637-5900
Robinson Chapel United Methodist
12707 Tonkel Rd .............................................................................. 484-1163
Salem United Church of Christ 240 Lake Ave.......... 426-5854
Sonrise North Campus Cedar Canyon Schools ........ 469-3700
St. Albans Episcopal Church 7308 St Joe Rd........... 485-8022
St. Andrew’s Anglo-Catholic Church
2014 W Wallen Rd.......................................................................... 489-8116
St. Joe Community Church
Carmike Theater, 3930 E Dupont Rd....................................... 471-4704
St. John Bosco Catholic Church
220 N Main, Churubusco............................................................ 693-9578
St. John’s Lutheran Church-NALC
7914 W Cook Rd.............................................................................. 489-5031
St. Matthew Lutheran Church ELCA
2305 Goshen Rd.............................................................................. 483-9312
St. Patrick Church of Arcola 2305 Arcola Rd........... 625-4151
St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church
1502 E Wallen Rd............................................................................ 489-3537
Suburban Bethlehem Lutheran Church LCMS
6318 W California Rd .................................................................... 484-7873
Sugar Grove Church of God
5019 E 550E-57, Churubusco ..................................................... 693-1718
Till Road Christian Center
3022 Easterday Rd (Sheriff’s Reserve).................................. 490-7162
Triple Pointe Church 3606 Baird Road .......................... 484-0328
Trinity English Lutheran Church (ELCA)
405 W Wayne St ............................................................................ 426-3424
Trinity Presbyterian Church 9600 St Joe Rd............. 485-1571
Union Chapel 12628 Coldwater Rd .................................... 637-3017
Wallen Baptist Church 1001 W Wallen Rd ................. 489-4942
Worship For Shut-ins WPTA TV 21........................ Sun. 6:30 am
WINM TV63.......................................................................... Sun. 11:30 am
Comcast Ch. 55, FiOS Ch. 25.......................... Sun. & Mon. 4:00 pm
Worship List
Reece Richardson was
recently named the
Wolverine-Hoosier
Athletic Conference
Men’s Soccer Defensive
Player of the Week for the
second time. Richardson,
who is from Halifax,
England, “recorded nine
saves while allowing just
one goal in two games this
past week for Tech,”
according to a press state-
ment. “The sophomore
keeper saved three shots
in a 3-1 in against Taylor
University and had six
more in a 1-0 shutout of
19th ranked Bethel
College.”
The Warriors soccer
team “currently stand at 5-
2 overall, partly due to
Richardson’s three
Anytime I meet
someone new and they
find out my profession,
they immediately start
telling me how much they
work out or how well they
eat. I often wonder if it is
what they actually do, or
what they wish they were
doing. I know that usually
it is just a way to make
conversation, but the need
for approval becomes a
quick response of self-
defense. So now I ask
you: when asked about
your health, do you
defend your actions or do
you boast about how
much you do?
If you are like the
majority of Fort Wayne,
which was recently
deemed by Bundle.com as
one of the top five cities
that spends the most on
fast food, you’ll likely
defend yourself. We all
strive to be the best, but
when it comes down to it,
we justify whatever we
want to make our life run
smoothly because let’s
face it-change is hard.
Although it may be hard
to change habits, it’s not
impossible. Notice your
choice of words in the
next few days when it
comes to how you view
yourself or your health. If
you defend yourself, here
are some tips to ensure
your giving it your best
shot so you won’t feel
guilty the next time you’re
asked:
• Journal your food
intake for three days.
Know what you eat!
Start out with just three
days of writing down what
you have to eat and drink
and add up the calories.
Don’t get overwhelmed by
the idea of writing down
everything all the time.
Just take three days that
are typical for you and
don’t judge yourself. You
don’t have to show anyone
else, but you do need to
get an honest perspective
of how much so-called
“little treats,” may affect
you. Use online calorie
counters or phone apps for
quick and easy docu-
menting.
After three days, you’ll
notice your triggers and
what may be hindering
you. If you are looking to
change your lifestyle, I
suggest doing this every
week. After a month or
two, you will have
improved your knowledge
and it will become second
nature. I also recommend
journaling if you’ve come
to a stand-still or plateau
in your weight loss.
• Look at your grocery
receipt.
Save your grocery
receipts for one month.
Notice trends in your
shopping and examine
whether your tendencies
are preventing you from
being healthy. When you
feel like you don’t have
enough money to buy
organic food or vegetables
in general, take a look at
where you are spending
your money. Often times
you may be justifying
buying chips, crackers, or
cookies and your money
is being spent on food
with no nutritional value.
If you are on a budget,
make the most of your
money and buy food that’s
for your best benefit.
• Choose movement.
You don’t have to work
out at a gym or in a group
environment, but you do
need to get moving. This
means anytime, anywhere.
The possibilities are
endless, so be creative.
Examples may include:
holding a squat while
blow drying your hair,
running with high knees
to the bathroom and doing
butt kicks back to your
desk, or stretching while
watching TV. Start with a
few minutes each day and
gradually work your way
to 30 minutes a day. Set
realistic goals to succeed.
Make the intention to
choose movement and
most importantly, allow
your imagination to
inspire you.
Sports
Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011 A9 www.FWDailySports.com
Licensed & Insured
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Feeling confident about your health
By JINA LAUER
Jina Lauer is a mom, wife, yoga teacher, personal trainer, and writer. She’s passionate
about sharing her knowledge of health in a creative, holistic style. Learn more about
Jina at www.jinalauer.com.
Courtesy photo
Two Tech players named WHAC player of the week
Megan Garrison
Courtesy photo
Reece Richardson
Courtesy photo
See WHAC, page A15
A10 • www.DupontTimes.com Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Hosted by:
Showcase your company’s products and services at the HBB Fair!
Call 317-776-4449
Free Admission
Glenbrook Square
Old Marshall Field’s
(upper level)
Sat. 10 AM - 5 PM
October 1st
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(upper level)
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October 1st
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...and it’s not just for business owners. The Fair is open to
EVERYONE in search of great deals and free samples.
Title sponsor:
Meet
Keynote speaker -Dorian Maples: In 2003, she created Dorian
Maples & Associates, Professional Geriatric Care Management. In
2009, the Governor of Indiana appointed Dorian to serve on the
state’s CHOICE board and she was recognized for her career
accomplishments by her professional peers by winning the Nora J.
McFarland Award for 2009.
Guest speaker - Martha Staley: Founder & CEO
Your Perfect Word® Direct Selling Success Strategies.
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The concept of collaboration — of cities, towns and counties working
together — has been identified as a key factor in the continued growth of
the northeast Indiana economy. The Northeast Indiana Regional Partnership
and Leadership Fort Wayne have organized a trip to Denver, Colo., aimed at
providing insight on how the Denver metro area has benefited from a
collaborative approach to economic development. At this Business Weekly
Power Breakfast event, a panel composed of area leaders will discuss why
regional collaboration is important, how other cities have fostered collabo-
ration and how that might be applied in northeast Indiana.
Join Us Friday, October 28
at the Chamber of Commerce • 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.
Cost will be $15 for each reservation and $100 for a table of 8
For more information, go to
www.fwbusiness.com
Call us today for advertising opportunites. 260.426.2640 x305
GREATER FORT WAYNE
Business Weekly
The struggle continues
Created to preserve African-American history,
museum faces low attendance, lack of funding
When Hana Stith saw the four grainy
1936 photographs that comprised the
entirety of the Fort Wayne Historical
Society’s History Center exhibit on
African-Americans, the then-elementary
school teacher knew her heritage was
woefully underrepresented.
That was in 1975, and she and fellow
educator Miles Edwards had been
contacted by the Fort Wayne Urban
League to incorporate local African-
American history into a U.S. bicentennial
celebration exhibit. The two teachers
conducted interviews with African-Amer-
ican community members, combed
through city records, and gathered arti-
facts for the bicentennial display at the
History Center.
Stith then spent the next 25 years
collecting more African-American history,
and on Feb. 1, 2000, the African/African-
American Historical Society Museum
opened its doors with Stith as curator and
society president.
Eleven years later, Stith, now 82, has
lost none of her enthusiasm for the history
of African-Americans. But she said strug-
gles with museum finances and
attendance could lead to the museum’s
closure at some point.
“No one has ever left us an endowment
or any large sum of money.” Stith said.
“So (that) means we’re just operating on
the fringe. We don’t have a lot of money.
Stith said the African-American
museum, which has three part-time
employees (including Stith), is barely
getting by on about $87,000 a year, which
mostly covers salaries and expenses in
operating the museum in a two-story,
4,027-square-foot house at 436 E.
Douglas Ave.
Meanwhile, the museum has averaged
By Kevin Kusisto
news@fwbusiness.com
See MUSEUM, page A11
www.DupontTimes.com • A11 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
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744-2111
1829 Fairfield Avenue, Fort Wayne, IN 46802
Mon.-Thurs. 9-5, Fri. 9-12, Sat. 10-2
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Harder To Resist …
Then It Is To Define.
“My goal is to make a difference in each of the
lives of our residents, but they’re the ones who
make a difference in mine.”
611 W County Line Rd S., Fort Wayne, IN 46814
(260) 208-4044
www.thehearth.net
8,000 to 9,000 visitors a year — slightly
more than one well-attended Fort Wayne
TinCaps game. Adult museum visitors are
charged $5 and children $3, but Stith said
many of the visitors to the museum enter
for free through outreach programs
largely aimed at students.
Stith, a 4-foot-9-inch determined, artic-
ulate bundle of passion, attributes some
of the museum’s problems to the people
the museum is dedicated to honor.
Local foundations — and white resi-
dents in particular — have supported the
museum, she said. But African-Ameri-
cans “feel as though history has bypassed
them; they’re not recognized,” she said.
“They’re not taught (about their history),
they know nothing about themselves, and
they just culturally do not seem to show
the interest in the museum.”
African-Americans, she said, need to
embrace the importance of their history.
“They need to realize that (the
museum) is motivational, it’s educational
and it sort of makes our children realize
that, ‘Hey, we’ve made contributions;
we’ve been more than just slaves in this
country.’
“We need more support from the black
community. If we had more cooperation
from the black community, then we could
keep ourselves going independently
solely with the black community’s
support, which we do not have. If our
funding was cut off from grants, then our
doors would definitely close.”
Stith said she has contemplated step-
ping down as the museum’s curator and
letting someone else tackle the challenge,
although comments she made later
suggested otherwise.
“This place,” she said, “is my life. This
is what I really live for.”
Rubin Brown, current member and
former chairman of the African/African-
American Historical Society board,
agreed that the importance of the museum
is often unrecognized, but he does not
think the museum will close. The
museum, he said, simply needs to find
new sources of funding.
“We need to create change,” he said.
“We need to get into sororities, fraterni-
ties and churches. I think the museum is
always going to be here in some form.”
Whatever happens, Stith is pleased with
what she’s been able to accomplish at the
museum.
The museum’s exhibits, which range
from early African culture and the slave
trade to the civil rights movement and
prominent black community members,
feature displays unique to each.
“I am extremely proud to be here and I
am extremely proud of what we have
managed to acquire,” Stith said. “We have
11 wonderful exhibits here, and if it were
not for this building, all this history
would be lost because there is no other
place for it to go.”
Kevin Kusisto is a junior at Homestead
High School, where he has worked as a
writer and copy editor for the school’s
newspaper. He was a summer intern this
year at Business Weekly and plans on
eventually studying journalism at Indiana
University.
MUSEUM
from page A10
Hana Stith, curator of the African/African-Amer-
ican Historical Society Museum, explains the
importance of one of the exhibits during a walk-
through.
Courtesy photo
Harvest
Days
A12 • www.DupontTimes.com Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Firewood For Sale
Please Call Clif for Pricing &
to Arrange Pick up or Delivery
260-413-6190
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to Arrange Pick up or Delivery
260-413-6190
Buchan Sawmill and Logging, Inc.
2802 Ryan Rd. • New Haven, IN
USDA Emerald Ash Borer Compliant Supplier
Good Shepherd UMC’s
Pumpkin Patch Festival
A festival for kids of all ages!
Proceeds support local & global missions.
Visit our Website:
www.fwgoodshepherd.org
or Call: 260-483-8816
Vance Ave. & Reed Road, Fort Wayne
• Straw Bale Maze
• Face Painting
• A Science Central
Space Exhibit
• Entertainment
• Make It, Take It Tables
• Corn Hole
• Volleyball
• A Pumpkin Drop
• Hourly Shows
• Food
• Much More!
Pumpkins, Gourds, Mums,
Corn Stalks, Bales of Straw
Sale will continue until the end of October.
Sunday, September 25, 2011
11 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Stories of haunted sites
are common around the
city in the month of
October. A simple online
search can reveal many
places around town that
are supposed to be
haunted. This list includes
regular businesses and
homes.
But a local ghost
tracking group, The Fort
Wayne Chapter of Indiana
Ghost Trackers, takes the
evidence of paranormal
activity a little more seri-
ously, especially when
they make house calls to
investigate.
As a chapter of a state
organization that has been
around for 10 years, the
group’s mission, “is to go
out there and gain
evidence,” Lisa Tallman
said.
She is the director of
the Fort Wayne chapter
and has been with the
group for three years.
Another mission of the
organization is also to
“help people feel comfort-
able in the home they are
living in, knowing that
what’s there is either
threatening or non-threat-
ening,” she said.
The Fort Wayne
Chapter does not handle
cases where they find
evidence of threatening
paranormal activity. The
members meet monthly
and go on a hunt.
“We go to a business or
organization or sometimes
even a cemetery,” she
said. The group tries to
collect evidence, through
using digital voice
recorders and cameras.
“We ask questions to try
to see if there’s any para-
normal activity going on,”
Tallman said. “We have
investigations in private
homes.”
She said what is found
during the visits can be
“really interesting.”
“I’ve found that most
places, 50 percent of the
time, there’s no activity,”
she said. “Homeowners
are so relieved to find out
there’s nothing going on
in their home.”
Tallman said that on
some hunts, some
members pick up on
different things.
She described one expe-
rience with the
paranormal as oppressive.
“I’ve been in places
where the room gets
darker and the air is a
little harder to breathe.
[It’s] an oppressive
feeling.”
The chapter tries to find
evidence of why certain
energy waves may
produce such results.
“Electrical fields can
sometimes cause those
feelings,” she said. “I was
in a private home they
were remodeling and I felt
something move past me
and there was nothing in
front of me. We heard
countless voices on our
recorders.”
The voice recordings
are called EVPs, or elec-
tronic voice phenomenon.
A team leader has posted
EVP evidence on the Fort
Wayne chapter’s website.
Tallman said the group
is open to new members.
“I would highly suggest
[people] come to one of
our monthly meetings.
We’re regular people, out
there just to find evidence
and help,” she said.
The first meeting is free
for new members and
Tallman said guests
should bring a flashlight
and dress for the weather.
Sometimes the hunts are
outdoors.
When asked if Fort
Wayne as a whole was
very haunted, she said due
to the city’s long history,
there are bound to be
paranormal occurrences.
“There are a multitude of
homes that have seen all
kinds of things happen
inside them,” Tallman
said.
The chapter does travel
around the area for hunts,
but she said, “we find a lot
of activity right in the Fort
Wayne area.”
For homeowners who
would like the chapter to
investigate their home,
Tallman said there is a
submission form on the
website.
“It’s free,” she said.
“We come out at no
charge, in an effort to help
them find out what’s
really going on in their
home.”
But she said the group
knows what it can handle
and what it cannot. If the
chapter finds evidence of
menacing activity, they
have resources they can
pass the case onto.
“We try not to tell the
spirit what it needs to do,”
she said, referring to cases
where bodily harm is
happening to homeowners
or activity in the home is
malicious.
Tallman does concede
that she wants the public
to know the group is very
much evidence based.
“Our group is based in
science first. Not to
discount how people feel,”
she said, “but feelings are
not evidence. They are
important. We can tell
what our feelings are, but
that’s not evidence. If we
capture something, we can
say, ‘there’s paranormal
activity going on.’”
But Tallman said haunt-
ings don’t just happen
once.
“In truly active places,
you could be there any
time, day or night,” she
said, and there would be
activity.
Before going to homes
or locations, the group
might do research on the
property and previous
owners, to see “if there
were any news stories that
were attached to the
home. It can be pretty
hard, especially if there
was a death of somebody
who lived in the home.”
The chapter uses the infor-
mation and knowledge
they gain from the
searches to better help
them approach the investi-
gation.
The Fort Wayne Indiana
Ghost Trackers group can
be reached online, by
going to www.ftwayneind
ianaghosttrackers.com.
www.DupontTimes.com • A13 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
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Local ghost
tracking group
investigates
reported area
hauntings
By KELLY MCLENDON
kmclendon@kpcnews.net
The Fort Wayne Chapter of Indiana Ghost Trackers sometimes visit graveyards for hunts. They also investigate businesses and homes.
Photo Emmett Tullos via Flickr
Halloween is right around
the corner, so it is time to
carve out a spooky plan for
your celebration. As ghosts, goblins, princesses, and
pirates around the country get ready for trick-or-treating,
here are a few ideas that will make your next Halloween
fright night a scream.
Spooky candy treats. Add a few spook-tacular accents
to your loot for trick-or-treaters: fake rubbery spiders,
jiggly eyes, glow-in-the-dark rings, and other tricks that
make Halloween special.
Cast a spell over your home. Welcome trick-or-
treaters or partygoers young and old with decorating
ideas that will make your house the best on the block.
* Hang glow-in-the-dark cats, skeletons and spiders
from ceilings and trees.
* Write scary Halloween messages on your front
walkway using colored chalk or washable fluorescent
paint.
* Tie small glow sticks with string to helium balloons
and let them float over your house like mysterious lights
in the sky.
Celebrate with sweets and treats. The candy aisle is
not your only option for serving up decadent delights this
holiday. Whip up “Spooky Graveyard Pie,” for the kids
(or the kids at heart) in your house.
Spooky Graveyard Pie
Ingredients
* 3 cups (about 32 cookies) finely ground
chocolate sandwich cookie crumbs, divided
* 3 tablespoons melted butter
* 1 can (12 fl. oz.) evaporated milk
* 2 large egg yolks
* 2 tablespoons cornstarch
* 1 3/4 cups (11.5-oz. pkg.) Nestlé Toll House
Milk Chocolate Morsels
* 8 chocolate filled vanilla wafer cookies
* Black and purple decorator writing gels
* Assorted spooky Halloween candies
* Nestlé Butterfinger and Nestlé Crunch candy
bars, crumbled
Preparation
1. COMBINE 1 1/2 cups cookie crumbs and butter in
9-inch deep-dish pie plate. Press crumb mixture onto
bottom and upsides of pie plate. Set aside remaining 1
1/2 cups crumbs for dirt topping.
2. WHISK together evaporated milk, egg yolks and
Youth
www.DupontTimes.com A14 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Canterbury Scholar
Competition open to
eighth graders
All area eighth graders (for the 2011-2012 school year)
are invited to participate in the Canterbury Scholar
Competition on Saturday, Oct. 1, at 8:45 a.m. at Canter-
bury High School, 3210 Smith Road in Fort Wayne. As
many as ten $4,000 scholarships toward Canterbury High
School tuition will be awarded in this special opportunity
($1,000 for each year of High School). Awards will be
based on standardized testing, an essay, school transcripts
and a personal interview.
Parents of participants are invited to visit the High
School campus to meet Canterbury faculty and students
during the competition. Parents can learn about the
school’s college-preparatory curriculum, athletics, fine
arts opportunities and extra-curriculum programs, as well.
In addition to scholarship awards, need based financial
aid is available to all participants who qualify.
Register online at www.canterburyschool.org or call
260-407-3553 for more information.
Miss Fort Wayne Scholarship Organization hosts two upcoming events
The Miss Fort Wayne
Scholarship Organization
will hold two events this
fall to raise support and
funding. The first
fundraiser will be a
“Mommy and Me
Princess Tea,” held at the
Arlington Park Clubhouse
on Sunday, Oct. 2. The
event is for young girls
and their moms (or
guardians) to enjoy an
afternoon of princess-
themed crafts, snacks and
activities.
The second will be a
Holiday Craft Show on
Saturday, Nov. 12, from
9am-3pm at the Arlington
Park Clubhouse. Crafters
are welcome to start
reserving their tables. The
event is open to the
public.
The Miss Fort Wayne
Scholarship Organization
is a local, preliminary
program as part of the
prestigious Miss America
Organization. The volun-
teer run, not-for-profit
scholarship program
strives to help young
women reach their
academic and personal
goals while becoming
community service advo-
cates and role models.
The program also
promotes scholarships and
service as the foundation
of its mission, while
helping young women
build strong communica-
tion skills, make lasting
friendships, open doors to
new opportunities, and
make a difference in their
communities.
Past and current title-
holders have been very
involved with community
service, each choosing a
personal platform to
promote. These range
from cancer prevention to
helping veterans’ living
conditions, to promoting
volunteerism. Miss Fort
Wayne titleholders have
spent hundreds of hours
combined at various
speaking engagements,
ribbon cuttings,
fundraisers, and events to
promote charities or local
programs. Miss Fort
Wayne and Miss Fort
Wayne’s Outstanding Teen
are goodwill ambassadors,
spokeswomen, and repre-
sentatives for the City of
Fort Wayne. They also
serve as much-needed
wholesome role-models
for the youth of today.
The funding events will
lead up to the next Miss
Fort Wayne Pageant,
which will be held on Feb.
18, 2012 at Summit
Middle School.
For more information
about the organization, to
be a part of any of its
upcoming events, or to
request Miss Fort Wayne
at your event, contact
Melanie at missfort-
waynedirector@yahoo.co
m or visit www.missfort-
wayne.org.
Several Miss Fort Wayne titleholders stand together to receive their recent awards.
Courtesy photo
Frighteningly fun Halloween ideas
Dessert and decorating options for October 31
SOURCE: Nestlé
Family Features
Spooky Pie
PHOTO COURTESY OF FAMILY FEATURES
See HALLOWEEN, page A15
Mission Possible: A
Greener Car
No matter what kind of
car you drive, there are
steps you can take to make
sure you’re doing your part
to preserve our environ-
ment.
The Car Care Council
recommends the following
five steps:
1. Keep your car prop-
erly tuned. This one is a
win-win. A well-tuned
engine means your car is
getting the best balance of
power and the best possible
fuel economy. It’s also
producing the lowest level
of emissions.
2. Check and replace
dirty air filters. A clogged
filter ultimately results in
wasted gas and loss of
engine power. Replace the
air filter, and watch your
car’s performance improve.
3. Check and replace
spark plugs. Bottom line:
Dirty spark plugs can misfire, which
wastes fuel.
4. Maintain your car’s cooling
system. A cooling system thermostat that
causes an engine to run too cold will
lower your car’s fuel efficiency.
5. Stay on top of maintenance. The
Car Care Council also offers a free car
care guide. Order it at carcare.org.
•••
Back-To-School Carpool Etiquette
Really, how hard could it be? You pull
in, you pick up your kid, and off you go!
It sounds simple, but when the school
bell rings at the end of the day, things can
get chaotic in a flash. Here,
we have provided a list of
helpful tips to make the
pick-up procedure as
smooth as possible:
-Know the “traffic
pattern” at your child’s
school. Most likely, you
will be expected to enter in
a specific place and exit in
another. If you try to go
against the flow, you could
put young children in
harm’s way. (And you may
ruffle a few feathers, too.)
-Don’t talk or text on
your cell phone while
you’re in line. Yes, we
know this is a tough one,
especially for multi-taskers,
but it’s best to be alert as
you inch your way toward
the front of the line. Plus,
it’s always nice to smile and
greet teachers, parents and
children who may be
waiting nearby.
-Arrive at the appro-
priate time. This one is a
bit tricky because this “magical” time
varies from school to school.
(Arrive too early, and you’ll sit for 30
minutes before the bell rings. Arrive too
late, and even though you’re on the
school premises, it will take 20 minutes
to snake your way through the parking
lot.)
-Be a friend to the environment. If
you arrive before school is dismissed,
you’ll likely be sitting in one spot for a
few minutes. Be mindful of “no idling”
zones, which are common at many
schools. Turn off your engine until it’s
time to move forward.
www.DupontTimes.com • A15 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
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Professional
Nail Care
by Johnny & Tina
8810 Coldwater Rd.
(next to Lunchbox)
Mon-Sat 9:30-7:30 Sun 12-5
260-497-0245
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shutouts and a .935 save
percentage.”
In addition, Megan
Garrison was named the
Wolverine-Hoosier
Athletic Conference
Women’s Golfer of the
Week. Garrison led the
Warriors to second place
at Hanover College two
weeks ago.
“The junior standout
from Burlington, Indiana
captured the top spot with
a two-day score of 153
and broke her own 36-
hole school record in the
process,” a press state-
ment said. “Garrison fired
a season-best, one-over
par 74 on the final day to
secure the victory.”
For more information
on Indiana Tech athletics
please call the Athletic
Office at 260-422-5561
ext. 2262 or visit their
website at www.indi-
anatech.edu/athletics.
WHAC
from page A9
Car maintenance and
carpool etiquette tips for
the new school year
This column was written by
Don Ayres Honda blogger, mom
of four and Odyssey driver
Jennifer Hans. Don Ayres
Honda is located at 4740 Lima
Road in Fort Wayne. The loca-
tion can be reached via phone
at 888-788-2205 or on the
web by visiting
www.donayreshonda.net or
www.donayreshondablog.com.
Courtesy photo
cornstarch in medium
saucepan. Heat over
medium-low heat, stirring
constantly, until mixture is
very hot and thickens
slightly; do not boil.
Remove from heat; stir in
morsels until completely
melted and mixture is
smooth.
3. POUR into crust.
Sprinkle with remaining 1
1/2 cups cookie crumbs.
Press crumbs down
gently. Refrigerate for 3
hours or until set.
4. DECORATE cookie
tombstones as desired
with writing gels. Sprinkle
crumbled candy bar
topping over the top of the
pie. Insert tombstones
around edge of pie. With
spoon, mound cookie
crumbs to form “fresh
graves.” Decorate graves
with gummies and skulls
and bones to make the pie
as spooky as you want it
to be!
Serves Makes 8 serv-
ings
HALLOWEEN
from page A14
Community
Reporter
Go to fwdailynews.com
Click on “Share News”
A Division of KPC Media Group
Business • Clubs • Church • Family • Outdoors • Sports
Your News
Everyday
The third annual, “Art
to Gogh III,” will allow
attendees to party for a
cause on Thursday, Oct.
13. The event, which
includes live music and
art, will benefit adults and
children with mental
illnesses. The event will
be sponsored by Mental
Health America of Allen
County and will take
place at Ceruti’s Summit
Park, 6601 Innovation
Blvd. The fundraiser will
“help increase awareness
and ensure people who
suffer daily from mental
illness, intellectual
disability, developmental
delay, and chemical
dependency have equal
opportunities for success,
work, and play in their
communities,” according
to a press statement. The
live music and silent
auction will begin at 6
p.m. The live auction will
start at 7;15 p.m. Tickets
are $50 per person or $85
for two. Tables of eight
are also available for
$375.
The evening will feature
works by local artists,
including: Charles Shep-
herd, Pat Delagrange,
Gary Gerardot, Terry
Haffner, Beth Mitchell,
Ted and Abby Weimer-
skirch, Roger Hultquist
and many more.
The attendees enjoy the
event, as well as the
artists.
“I enjoy meeting and
working with the other
artists at Art to Gogh and
it is a very relaxing day.
The proceeds go to a very
The Monogram Shoppe
and more…in Covington
Plaza is hosting an
Indiana exclusive event.
The Spartina 449 Trunk
Show will be held
Saturday, Oct. 1 at the
shoppe. National Sales
Manager for the Spartina
449 brand, Riley O’Con-
nell, will be at the location
from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. to
answer questions from
customers and introduce
the fall collection.
There will be a special
for customers on the
exclusive event day. With
a purchase made that day,
customers will receive a
free journal, with the
covers in Spartina signa-
ture prints. During the
event, there will also be a
drawing for a drawstring
purse from the collection.
The brand comes comes
from and is inspired by
Daufuskie Island in
remote South Carolina.
The distinctive line of
totes, purses and acces-
sories are part of a fast
growing brand in the
country, according to a
press statement.
“The purses are made
from linen that has been
treated with a water and
stain resistant coating. The
trim is genuine leather.
Each purse has lots of
pockets for storage. The
colors for the line change
seasonally so that there is
always something new to
carry,” the statement said.
The collection has new
picks for fall this year,
including a sling bag with
a shoulder strap, an iPad
sleeve, zip wallet, camera
case, clutch, barrel tote
and laptop sleeve. These
products will be available
in rich fall shades,
including reds, oranges,
purples, tans and blues.
They have begun adding
to the line with scarves, in
patterns that match the
totes.
Spartina 449 donates a
portion of each purchase
to the Daufuskie Island
Historical Foundation, to
preserve and protect the
island’s historical and
cultural heritage.
The Monogram Shoppe
and more is the exclusive
representative for Spartina
449 in the Fort Wayne
area.
“We are so excited and
looking forward to having
Riley at our shoppe,” Sara
Keltsch, owner of The
Monogram Shoppe and
more… said.
“Spartina has grown in
sales in the last two years
as more and more people
have seen it while vaca-
tioning in the south and
are thrilled to find it right
in their home town.”
The event will run from
10:00 - 5:00 p.m. on Oct.
1, with O’Connell’s visit
from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The
shoppe is located at
Covington Plaza, 6410
West Jefferson Boulevard.
For more information, call
260-436-3138.
Dining & Entertainment
www.DupontTimes.com A16 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
SZECHWAN, HUNAN & MANDARIN CUISINE
Service Includes: Take Out,
Special Luncheon, Dinner, Banquet & Buffet
Featuring…
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Fruit and Dessert!
Recently Voted as
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Chinese Restaurants
in the USA”
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Fort Wayne, IN 46825
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Collection of bags, clutches and zip wallets
benefit Island Historical Foundation
Italian eatery opens at
Maysville
Ziano’s Italian Eatery has
opened a third location in
Chapel Ridge. Located at 10520
Maysville Road, the new
restaurant location will offer
breadsticks, soups and salads,
sandwiches, pasta dishes and
specialty pizzas. The restaurant
has a children’s menu, as well
as dessert selections. Organic,
gluten-free pasta is also
offered.
There are two other locations
in town: one on Covington
Road and another on East
Dupont Road. Visit them online
at www.zianos.com for more
details and menu items.
Courtesy photo
The Monogram Shoppe and
more…in Covington Plaza is
hosting an Indiana exclusive
event, the Spartina 449 Trunk
Show in October.
Photo by greetingsandreadings.com
Paintings with a purpose
One of the painting’s from last year’s Art to Gogh, done by Gary
Gerardot.
Photo by Mental Health America in Allen County
See PAINT, page A19
Weather balloon
launches, seven-seat
bicycle riding and rolling
entertainment from a car
covered with 250 singing,
dancing fish will be
among the attractions at
the first Fort Wayne
Regional Maker Faire, an
event designed to
encourage learning, explo-
ration, artistic expression
and do-it-yourself
hobbies.
Scientists, artists, inven-
tors, crafters, tinkerers and
techies from 25 cities in
10 states will show how
they make things at more
than 70 maker exhibits
from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct.
1-2 at the Lincoln Finan-
cial Pavilion at
Headwaters Park in Fort
Wayne.
The event is organized
by TekVenture, a nonprofit
group in Fort Wayne with
a mission to improve
public access to the kind
of specialized tools,
equipment and training
required by artists and
inventors to advance inno-
vative projects.
“A lot of these people
are just doing projects
because they’re inter-
esting,” said TekVenture
spokeswoman Jane Apple-
gate, who is coordinating
the event. “It’s all about
getting people to come out
and share their ideas.”
“It’s a forum for the
makers to show their
production process — for
the makers to connect
with one another and to
share their creativity with
others and connect the
general public with these
innovative and creative
people, and to connect
northeast Indiana to this
international maker move-
ment,” she said.
Some of the makers will
have products for sale.
There also will be food
and beverage vendors at
the event — including
Mad Anthony, a local
brewery known for its
hand-crafted beers. The
lineup of bands includes
Moser Woods, which has
a large fan base in the
region.
About 10 seminars and
hands-on workshops will
be offered to teach visitors
how to make things, and
will include presentations
on soldering, welding,
electronics, robotics,
green technology, motor
making, wine making and
papier-maché. Artisans
there will include black-
smiths, woodworkers and
glass blowers.
Jim Merz, a kinetic
sculptor from Fort Wayne
who has participated in a
number of other TekVen-
ture activities, will have
an exhibit at the event,
and so will some makers
he met with some other
TekVenture officials last
summer at a similar
festival in Detroit.
TekVenture secured a
grant from Arts United to
bring Sarah Von Harling,
who manages the Happy
Accident sculpture studio
in Chicago, and her small
foundry to the Fort Wayne
Regional Maker Faire.
Visitors will have an
opportunity to buy items
that Von Harling will
customize for them them
on the spot through a
process she has described
as “industrial technology
meets intuitive creativity.”
Among other attrac-
tions, the Party Cycle,
which is peddled by
several cyclers seated in a
circle but steered by only
one of them, will be oper-
ated by Cirque AmongUs
in Michigan. The Volvo
covered with 250
computer controlled
lobsters, trout, bass,
catfish and sharks —
www.DupontTimes.com • A17 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Dining & Entertainment
Apple Festival
of Kendallville
TM
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1
st
- 9 AM - 6 PM
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2
nd
- 9 AM - 5 PM
At the Noble County Fairgrounds • US 6, Kendallville
Visit us at Facebook.com/applefest or
KendallvilleAppleFestival.org
for festival information and updates
ENTERTAINMENT
CONTESTS
PRIMITIVE AREA
FOOD
ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES
CRAFTS
CHILDREN’S ACTIVITIES
DEMONSTRATIONS MAIN STREET VILLAGE
Craft beer lovers can
toast to good cause
Beer enthusiasts can toast to a
good cause on Saturday, Oct. 8, at
the second annual Craft Beer
Festival at Deer Park Irish Pub.
Proceeds from the festival will go
to the Jerome & Marganelle Henry
Foundation for Neighborhood Health
Clinics. The foundation helps
provide health care to the working
poor.
The festival was organized to
provide a forum for nationally-
known craft brewers to present their
craft beer products to local beer
enthusiasts, said Deer Park owner
Tony Henry.
“We’ll be building on the huge
success of last year’s inaugural craft
beer festival,” Henry said. “Up to
that time, Fort Wayne had never
tapped so many of the country’s
finest craft beers in one place, at one
time,” Henry says. “Craft beer
connoisseurs will enjoy five hours of
beer tasting from a selection of more
than 50 craft and home brews…
they’ll think they died and gone to
beer heaven.”
The microbreweries represented
include Bell’s Brewery of Kala-
mazoo, Mich.; Three Floyds of
Munster; Bloomington’s Upland
Brewery; Founders Brewery of
Grand Rapids, Mich., Widmer
Brothers of Portland, Oregon and
many more.
In addition to the barrels of craft
beers, Mad Anthony’s will be
providing bratwurst, German potato
salad and pulled pork and Riegel’s
Pipe & Tobacco will be hosting a
cigar table featuring imported cigars.
“After all, what better way to
complement a fine craft beer than
with a good brat and imported
cigar?” Henry said.
Admission to the event is $25 in
advance or $30 at the door. The
festival starts at 1 p.m.
Music will be provided by Scratch
& Sniff, featuring Kurt Roberts.
Tickets are available at the Deer
Park Irish Pub, all Fort Wayne area
Belmont Beverages locations and
Wooden Nickel, or online at
www.brownpapertickets.com/event/1
94080.
For more information, contact
Tony Henry, Deer Park Irish Pub, at
260-437-8254.
Beer enthusiasts can raise a pint to a good cause Saturday, Oct. 8,
at the second annual Craft Beer Festival at Deer Park Irish Pub.
Courtesy photo
Second Annual
Craft Beer Festival
Saturday, Oct. 8
1 - 5 p.m.
Deer Park Irish Pub
Spring St. and Leesburg Rd.
$25 advance/$30 day of event
Maker Faire will have more than 70 exhibits
By Doug LeDuc
dougl@fwbusiness.com
Artist Sarah Von Harling pours iron from her blast furnace. She is
among those taking part in the Fort Wayne Regional Maker Faire
Oct. 1-2.
Courtesy photo
See FAIRE, page A19
A18 • www.DupontTimes.com Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Sleep is
not just a
“time out”
from
daily life.
You are invited to an open house and
discussion on Sleep Disorders.
www.sleepcentersfw.com
7223 Engle Road, Suite 110 s Fort Wayne, IN 46804
Thursday, October 13 s 6:30 - 8:30 pm
Fort Wayne Neurological Center on the Lutheran Hospital Campus
7956 W. Jefferson Blvd. s Suite 210 s Fort Wayne, Indiana
Reservations required. No charge.
Sponsored by Sleep Centers of Fort Wayne LLC,
accredited by AASM, and accredited by HQAA
for the sale of durable medical equipment.
Please join us for this informative discussion on sleep disorders. Dr. Atiya Khan, Neurologist,
will be the speaker. A question and answer session will follow. The Sleep Centers of Fort Wayne
is owned and operated by sleep disorders physicians who are pioneers in sleep medicine. It is
the first sleep center to obtain double accreditation both in the sleep center and durable medical
equipment sales in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
This is a free event, however reservations are required.
Please call the Sleep Centers at 260-969-6450 or toll-
free at 866-389-4627 for more information.
Light refreshments will be served.
Lutheran
Hospital


Agape Church of The Brethren 11610 Lima Rd ...... 489-6908
Arcola-lake Chapel United Methodist Church
8205 Butt Rd...................................................................................... 625-4787
Arcola United Methodist Church
11311 Arcola Rd, Arcola.............................................................. 625-4103
Ascension Lutheran Church-LCMS
8811 St Joe Rd................................................................................. 486-2226
Agape Church of The Brethren 11610 Lima Rd ....... 489-6908
Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church WELS
11228 Coldwater Rd ...................................................................... 637-3475
Believers Bible Fellowship
316 N. Main, Churubusco........................................................... 693-9664
Bethany United Methodist 7715 Sunny Lane........... 485-5311
Bethel United Methodist Church 8405 Lima Rd..... 489-3651
Calvary Chapel of Churubusco
5475 E 600 N, Churubusco.......................................................... 693-3330
Carroll Community Worship 4506 Carroll Rd ............ 637-5998
Catholic Mass for Shut-ins WISE TV 33 .......Sun. 10:30 p.m.
Christ’s Hope Ministries & Church
2818 Carroll Rd............................................................................... 637-1827
Cedar Creek Church of Christ
1 mi W of Leo-Cedarville on SR 1 ........................................... 627-3653
Church of The Covenant United Methodist
10001 Coldwater Rd ...................................................................... 489-1888
Churubusco Church of The Nazarene
1000 W Whitley, Churubusco.................................................... 693-9401
Churubusco United Methodist Church
750 N Main, Churubusco ........................................................... 693-2154
Covenant United Methodist Church
10001 Coldwater Rd ...................................................................... 489-1888
Concordia Lutheran Church 4245 Lake Ave ............. 422-2449
County Line Church of God 7716 N Co Line Rd ........ 627-2482
Crossbridge Community Church
Dupont YMCA, 10001 Dawson Creek Blvd ......................... 485-5613
Crossover Ministries Christian Church
Shiloh Reception Hall @ 3127 Carroll Rd............................. 610-6101
Crossview Church
12532 Grabill Road, Grabill ......................................................... 627-3551
Destiny Fellowship Church
3311 North Anthony Blvd............................................................ 490-3538
Dunfee Missionary Church
818 West Co Line Rd..................................................................... 625-4621
Dupont Road Bible Church 227 E Dupont Rd ........... 489-2932
Emmanuel Lutheran Church - ELCA
307 S Main, LaOtto ........................................................................ 897-2675
Faith Lutheran Church-LCMS
9251 E 9251 E State Rd 205, Churubusco............................ 693-6254
Faith United Church of Christ
10707 Coldwater Rd ...................................................................... 637-6025
Fellowship of Wesley Chapel UMC
13733 Wesley Chapel Road, Churubusco............................ 693-9800
First Assembly of God
1400 W Washington Center Rd................................................ 490-8585
First Baptist Church of Huntertown
2415 W Shoaff Rd, Huntertown................................................ 637-0416
First Eel River Baptist Church
11022 Carroll Rd, Churubusco.................................................. 693-6513
First Presbyterian Church 300 W Wayne St .............. 426-7421
First Church of Christ, Scientist 4242 Buesching.. 492-0550
Fort Wayne Friends Church 501 W Berry, Rm 201.. 482-1836
Gethsemane Lutheran Church 1505 Bethany Ln.... 483-1813
Good News Baptist Church
812 W Anderson Rd, Churubusco........................................... 693-2108
Grace Point Church of The Nazarene
8611 Mayhew Rd............................................................................ 485-2110
Grace Summit Church
Oak View Elementary, 13123 Coldwater Rd. ...................... 450-6362
Harvest Fellowship 11225 Grabill Rd, Leo ................... 627-2720
Harvest Free Will Baptist 5903 E Dupont Rd............. 483-2590
Holy Cross Lutheran Church 3425 Crescent Ave .... 483-3173
Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox 110 E Wallen Rd ......... 489-0774
Huntertown United Methodist Church
16021 Lima Rd, Huntertown....................................................... 637-3798
Imago Dei 347 W. Berry........................................................... 637-3707
The Journey Free Methodist 3536 W Wallen Rd .... 422-4123
North Park Community Church 7160 Flutter Rd...... 486-2780
Lake Chapel United Methodist 8205 Butt Rd........... 625-4103
LaOtto Wesleyan Church 500 S Main, LaOtto. 260-987-2575
Leo United Methodist Church 13527 Leo Rd............. 627-2161
Life Bridge Church 12719 Corbin Rd................................ 338-0700
Lutheran Hour WOWO 1190AM............................ Sunday 11a.m.
Messiah’s House of Yahvah 7th Day
2023 E 400 S - 57, Churbusco.................................................... 636-2275
North Church of Christ 1230 W Wallen Rd .................. 489-9026
North Point Community Church 10513 Leo Rd........ 484-4277
North Summit Church
607 Airport North Office Park .................................................. 484-4672
Northridge Baptist Church 1300 E Cook Rd .............. 489-6633
Northside Church of Christ 2014 W Wallen Rd ....... 489-9026
Our Hope Lutheran Church 1826 Trinity....................... 637-3625
Pathway Community Church
11910 Shearwater Run................................................................. 469-4444
Pine Hills Church 11331 Coldwater Rd .......................... 637-3198
Praise Lutheran Church 1115 W Dupont ..................... 490-7729
Prince of Peace Lutheran Church-LCMS
12640 Saint Joe Rd....................................................................... 627-5621
Providence Presbyterian Church 639 Putnam St.. 744-1022
Resurrection Lutheran Church 14318 Lima Rd........ 637-5900
Robinson Chapel United Methodist
12707 Tonkel Rd .............................................................................. 484-1163
Salem United Church of Christ 240 Lake Ave.......... 426-5854
Sonrise North Campus Cedar Canyon Schools ........ 469-3700
St. Albans Episcopal Church 7308 St Joe Rd........... 485-8022
St. Andrew’s Anglo-Catholic Church
2014 W Wallen Rd.......................................................................... 489-8116
St. Joe Community Church
Carmike Theater, 3930 E Dupont Rd....................................... 471-4704
St. John Bosco Catholic Church
220 N Main, Churubusco............................................................ 693-9578
St. John’s Lutheran Church-NALC
7914 W Cook Rd.............................................................................. 489-5031
St. Matthew Lutheran Church ELCA
2305 Goshen Rd.............................................................................. 483-9312
St. Patrick Church of Arcola 2305 Arcola Rd........... 625-4151
St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church
1502 E Wallen Rd............................................................................ 489-3537
Suburban Bethlehem Lutheran Church LCMS
6318 W California Rd .................................................................... 484-7873
Sugar Grove Church of God
5019 E 550E-57, Churubusco ..................................................... 693-1718
Till Road Christian Center
3022 Easterday Rd (Sheriff’s Reserve).................................. 490-7162
Triple Pointe Church 3606 Baird Road .......................... 484-0328
Trinity English Lutheran Church (ELCA)
405 W Wayne St ............................................................................ 426-3424
Trinity Presbyterian Church 9600 St Joe Rd............. 485-1571
Union Chapel 12628 Coldwater Rd .................................... 637-3017
Wallen Baptist Church 1001 W Wallen Rd ................. 489-4942
Worship For Shut-ins WPTA TV 21........................ Sun. 6:30 am
WINM TV63.......................................................................... Sun. 11:30 am
Comcast Ch. 55, FiOS Ch. 25.......................... Sun. & Mon. 4:00 pm
Worship List
www.DupontTimes.com • A19 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Wearing braces
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part of making this event
successful.”
Last year, Huber and
her professional partner,
Troy Baeten won.
“I had a little bit of an
edge,” she said. “I danced
as a kid. I did a dance
minor in college and I had
been doing ballroom
dancing.”
Huber also loved to
watch the “real Dancing
with the Stars show,” she
said. She said there a few
differences from the tele-
vision show and how the
Fort Wayne show will
operate.
“The difference is, you
learn just one routine. You
come out with your
instructor and you do your
routine. The under-
standing is that you’re
wanting to dance. The
point is to raise money for
The Carriage House. As a
dancer, you ask people to
come to the event.”
The audience then
votes. The first vote is
free and after that, it is
$10 per vote, with the
proceeds benefiting the
charity.
Huber said The
Carriage House Director,
Andy Wilson, usually
MCs the show.
“His wonderful, warm
personality is another
reason why the event
works so well,” she said.
“It’s a really good
fundraiser for the organi-
zation.”
DANCE
from page A1
What: Dancing with the Fort Wayne Stars
When: Thursday, Nov. 10
5:30 p.m. Dinner
7:00 p.m. Show time
Cost: $100 per person or $1000 for a table of 10
Where: The Grand Wayne Center
120 W. Jefferson Blvd.
Details: For reservations, contact Connie Slyby
at 260-486-1060 or cslyby@comcast.net.
Or visit the event website at
www.events.org/dancing2011.
worthy cause and I am looking forward to
participating again this year,” Pat Dela-
grange said, in a statement.
Some of the participating fundraiser
artists will be painting, molding and
crafting their pieces on Oct. 1, in the
lobby at Sweetwater Sound, located at
5501 US Hwy 30 West in Fort Wayne.
This event is free, open to the public and
all ages are welcome to watch the artists
as they work.
For tickets and more information about
Art to Gogh III, contact Jen Manske at
260-422-6441 or info@mhaac.com.
PAINT
from page A16
known as the Sashimi
Tabernacle Choir — will
travel to the festival from
Texas.
The event is free for
makers who are not
selling anything, and
Applegate said there may
be some space available
for latecomers up to a
week before the event.
Ticket prices for specta-
tors are $5 for youths, $8
for students and $10 for
adults to help meet costs
of the event not already
covered by business spon-
sors such as 80/20 Inc.
FAIRE
from page A17
Fort Wayne is one of
151 cities named a 2011
Playful City USA
Community by national
nonprofit KaBoom.
This is the second year
Fort Wayne has earned the
distinction, awarded to
communities that empha-
size play opportunities for
children.
“Our parks and play-
grounds bring us a quality
of life that those of us
with children and grand-
children especially
appreciate,” Mayor Tom
Henry said in a recent
press release. “We go to
great lengths to ensure
that they have access to
parks, playgrounds and
other recreation areas that
provide them opportuni-
ties to stay fit, healthy and
ready to learn.”
KaBoom created
Playful City USA in 2007
to help local governments
address the “play deficit”
by ensuring children have
the time and available
spaces to play and be
active.
In Fort Wayne, a play
task force was created,
made up of Parks and
Recreation staff an their
partners at Turnstone, the
League for the Blind and
Disabled, the YMCA and
Easter Seals Arc,
according to Parks and
Recreation Director Al
Moll. “They’ve focused
the last two years on
inclusiveness, safety and
education about why play
is important and have
done an excellent job,”
Moll said in the release.
Contributing to Fort
Wayne’s place among
KABOOM! nominees was
the recent opening of
Taylor’s Boundless Play-
ground, the first
fully-accessible play-
ground in the state, which
celebrated its opening in
Kreager Park in June; An
expanded adopt-a-play-
ground program, adding
12 playgrounds adopted
by organizations that
commit to cleaning them
up periodically throughout
the year; Healthy eating
information incorporated
at 14 summer playground
sites in the summer; and
five “Play Days” at
various locations with the
YMCA’s Healthy Kids
Day at Parkview Field.
More than 5,000 people
attended “Play Days” in
2011, according to the
release.
All Playful City USA
Walgreens stores sell pink light
bulbs for breast cancer awareness
October is Breast Cancer
Awareness Month. This year,
the Susan G. Komen Northern
Indiana affiliate and Walgreens
have joined to promote a
fundraising campaign called
“Pink Your Porch.”
Pink light bulbs for your
porch, post, patio light, or all of
the above will be on sale for $5
each starting September 15,
exclusively at area Walgreens.
Mayor Tom Henry
proclaimed October 2011 as
“Pink Your Porch,” month for
breast cancer awareness at a
ceremony at the Chestnut Plaza
Walgreens on Sept. 15.
Business & Professional
www.DupontTimes.com A20 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Easter Seals Arc project and education partnership updates
Tags sold at Ricker Oil stores to benefit ESA
Ricker Oil stores are offering customers the opportu-
nity to team up with Easter Seals Arc, “in an effort to
help create solutions that change lives of children and
adults with disabilities or other special needs and their
families,” a press statement said.
Ricker Oil stories are selling “Pops the Clown,” hang-
tags for $1.00 in two of their stores in Northeastern
Indiana. The store locations are 5823 Coldwater Road
and 5916 St. Joe Road.
“The purchaser signs his or her name to the hangtag
and the purchased hangtag is displayed in the store,” a
statement said.
“All proceeds will be used to help fund Easter Seals
Arc’s many services and programs that enable people
with a disability to live within the community at the level
of independence of their choice.” For questions about this
program, contact Darlene Amstutz, Community Rela-
tions, at 260-469-2778.
Walker Corporate Foundation awards $250 to Allen
County Education Partnership
The Walker Corporate Foundation has awarded Allen
County Education Partnership $250 in support of the
agency’s Project READS and Parent Literacy Enrichment
programs.
Project READS serves first through third grade
students in Allen County who are currently reading below
grade level. A trained volunteer is paired with each
student for one hour a week to tutor that child in literacy
skills. The program runs from mid-September through
April.
Parent Literacy Enrichment workshops provide skills
and insights to parents of pre-K through 2nd grade
students. A staff of retired teachers and principals present
a parent-friendly approach to supporting what those
parents’ students learn in school.
Fort Wayne named ‘Playful’ community
For a second time, Fort Wayne is a Playful City USA Community
along with 151 other towns and cities nominated by KaBoom.
File photo
See PLAY, page A21
www.DupontTimes.com • A21 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
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communities are now
eligible for Let’s Play
grants, a community part-
nership spearheaded by
Dr Pepper Snapple Group.
A total of 103 grants
worth $2.1 million are
available to Playful City
USA recognized cities
and towns.
Let’s Play, Dr Pepper
Snapple Group and
KaBoom plan to build or
fix up 2,000 playgrounds
by the end of 2013, bene-
fiting an estimated five
million children across
North America, according
to the release.
Recipients of 2011
Let’s Play grants via the
Playful City USA
program will be
announced on Monday,
Sept. 19.
PLAY
from page A20
Sister City Festival brings films,
cultural cuisine to center
The fifth annual Sister
City Film Festival will
take place at the Cinema
Center for four different
weeks in October.
As a fundraiser for Fort
Wayne Sister Cities Inter-
national (FWSCI), the
event will feature films
from each of the countries
where Fort Wayne has a
sister city. Before each
film, there will be a food
tasting, which will feature
cuisine from the featured
country. Tickets for both
the film and food tasting
are $25. They are avail-
able at the Cinema
Center’s box office and at
Artlink Contemporary Art
Gallery. All films will
begin at 7 p.m. The food
tasting will start an hour
before the film begins.
Oct. 6 will feature
German cuisine and film.
Oct. 13 will include Polish
food and the blockbuster
film, “Testosteron,” a
2007 comedy directed by
Andrzej Saramowicz. On
Oct. 20, the Takaoka
Japanese Committee of
FWSCI will have a sushi
tasting, followed by a
Japanese film at 7:00 p.m.
Even though FWSCI has
yet to select a specific
Chinese city, on
Wednesday, Oct. 26, the
Chinese Committee will
present Chinese cuisine at
6:00 p.m. followed by a
movie from China at 7:00
p.m.
According to a press
statement, “Fort Wayne
Sister Cities International
is a 35 year-old, not-for-
profit corporation whose
mission is to promote
global friendship and
peace through student,
civic, artistic and business
exchanges. For more
information about Sister
Cities visit their web site
at www.fortwaynesisterci-
ties.org.”
Fifth Annual Sister City Film Festival
WHERE: Fort Wayne Cinema Center
437 E. Berry St, Fort Wayne, IN 46802
WHEN: Thursdays in October, the 6, 13, 20,
and Wednesday Oct. 26, 2011
Reception before each film at 6:00 p.m.
at Cinema Center
All films begin at 7:00 p.m.
COST: $25 per each film with ethnic food tasting
TICKETS: Tickets available at Artlink and
the Fort Wayne Cinema Center box office,
437 E. Berry St., Fort Wayne;
contact Suzanne Galazka 260-424-7195
TODAY
Consortium for Computing Sciences conference. Huntington University,
2303 College Ave., Huntington. The event will bring together approxi-
mately 120 faculty and students from academic institutions throughout
the Midwest to exchange ideas and information regarding undergrad-
uate computer science. While the conference is open to the public,
registration is required. Early registration is $140 through Sept. 9. After
Sept. 9, registration is $160 and can be handled at the door. For more
information, visit the conference website at
www.ccsc.org/midwest/conference.
Free immunizations. Immunization Clinic, 4813 New Haven Avenue,
New Haven. 8:30-11:30 a.m. For children age two month to 18 years
and immunizations for some adults. Parents must bring shot records.
Call 449-7514 for appointment.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
Aqua Zumba. Jorgensen Family YMCA, 10313 Aboite Center Road, Fort
Wayne. Free for members.
National Alpaca Farm Days Open House. WindSwept Farms Alpacas, 4568
E 6100 N, Churubusco. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free and open to the public.
See the animals in their daily routine. Ask questions about animal
husbandry. Includes Fiber arts displays and alpaca products for sale.
GriefShare support group. Leo United Methodist Church, State Road 1,
Leo. 10 a.m. to noon. For adults who are grieving the loss of a loved
one. Each week’s topic is different and participants may join at any
time. Bible based but non-denominational. ginivj77@yahoo.com.
Alcoholics Anonymous. St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church, 700 W.
Maumee St., Angola. 11 a.m.
Learn To Skate. Lutheran Health Sports Center, 3869 Ice Way, Fort
Wayne. noon to 12:50 p.m. Register today for Learn to Skate and
Hockey Fundamentals classes. Stay cool this summer by chilling on the
ice with us. Spots filling up quickly so sign up today! Call Rick Moran
at (260) 387-6614 or email him at rmoran@icesports.com.
rmoran@icesports.com. www.icesports.com.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
Sunday Services. LifeWater Community Church, 5600 Westbreeze Trail,
Fort Wayne. 10 a.m. Liberty Hills addition. info@lifewatercc.org.
www.lifewatercc.org.
Rally Day. Calvary Baptist Church, 7810 St. Joe Center Rd., Fort Wayne.
10:45 a.m. Carry-in dinner following morning worship at 10:45 a.m.
Singspiration and worship at 2:30 p.m.
Unity Walk. IPFW Walb Student Union, Fort Wayne. 1-3 p.m. Represen-
tatives from eight religions will join together to celebrate Fort Wayne as
a “City of Faiths” and the UN’s International Day of Peace. Scriptures,
prayers, dance and song from the Bahai, Buddhist, Christian, Ethical
Humanists, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh traditions will be offered
throughout the three-quarter mile walk.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
Networking 101 & Business Support. Fort Wayne Women’s Bureau, 3521
Lake Ave, Fort Wayne. 9-11 a.m. No charge.
Open networking. AJ’s Bar & Grill, 2488 Getz Road, Fort Wayne. noon.
No cost, no exclusivity by profession. Each person gets a few minutes
to tell about your business, plus there is a featured speaker.
Wellness Practice for Self-Care. Victory Noll Center, 1900 W. Park
Drive, Huntington. 5:15-6:15 p.m. Four-class workshop that teaches
simple yet effective practices that involve quiet reflection, calming
breath work, gentle movements of T’ai Chi and yoga, and more. All the
practices are flexible enough to accommodate women and men of all
ages and physical abilities. Casual, comfortable clothes are recom-
mended. Monday evening and Tuesday morning classes offered. The
cost is $35 covering all four classes.
National college fair. Emmanuel Community Church, 12222 U.S. 24
West, Fort Wayne. 6:30-8:30 p.m. High school students and adults
seeking post-graduate and degree-completion opportunities will have
the opportunity to meet with Christian college and university represen-
tatives from across North America. For more information about the fair,
visit www.nccf.us or contact Amy Mattox, coordinator of the Fort
Wayne Christian College Fair, at 260-414-5101 or amy@naccap.org.
This event is free and open to the public.
Fathers United for Equal Rights. IHOP, Corner of Coldwater & Coliseum,
Fort Wayne. 7:30 p.m. Topics of interest to divorced fathers. 493-9788.
Embroiderer’s Guild of America. Friendly Fox, 4001 South Wayne Ave.,
Fort Wayne. 8 p.m. Call 749-4987 for info.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
General cancer support. Sugar Grove Church of God, 5019E 500S-57,
Churubusco.
Nature Hikes at Eagle Marsh. Eagle Marsh Barn, South Side Engle R,
one-half mile east of W Jefferson Blvd, Fort Wayne. 9-11 a.m.
Aqua Zumba. Jorgensen Family YMCA, 10313 Aboite Center Road, Fort
Wayne. 6-7 p.m. Free for members.
PCOS support. Dupont Hospital, 2520 E. Dupont Road, Fort Wayne. 6-7
p.m. E-mail Jen at NEIcysters@gmail.com for info.
TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly). Taylor Chapel United Methodist
Church, 10145 Maysville Road, Fort Wayne. 6 p.m. First meeting free.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
Home school PE class. Jorgensen Family YMCA, 10313 Aboite Center
Road, Fort Wayne. Activities include swim lessons, tumbling, gym
games and strength conditioning for kids 11 and up. Various times. Call
Jennifer Harkness at 432-8953 for info. Registration required.
Three Rivers Gem & Mineral Society. Science Central, 1950 N. Clinton
St., Fort Wayne. 7 p.m. meeting, 8 p.m. break, 8:15-9 p.m. featured
program.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29
Yarn Lovers. Woodburn Library, 4701 S.R. 1 North, Woodburn. Learn to
knit or crochet.
Anthony Wayne Toastmasters Meeting. Ivy Tech Community College, ,
Fort Wayne. 6:30 p.m. Toastmasters meetings are open to everyone; for
better public speaking and a lot of fun. fredhn@aol.com. anthony-
wayne.freetoasthoast.org.
Conquering Breast Cancer support group. John Young Center, 2109 E.
State Blvd., Fort Wayne. 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Depression + 12. Christ’s Hope Ministry and Church, 2818 Carroll Road,
Fort Wayne. 7 p.m. 12-step program for those living with depression.
For more info contact Marilee Stroud at 312-6069 or mtstroud@fron-
tier.com.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
Moonlight and Magnolias. Arena Dinner Theatre, 719 Rockhill St, Fort
Wayne. By Ron Hutchinson. $35 dinner (three-course meal catered by
the Bagel Station) and show; cash bar. Box office: 260-424-5622.
Purchase tickets online at www.arenadinnertheatre.org.
Kooky Carnival-TAG Art Company . Kooky Carnival, 12207 Illinois Road,
Fort Wayne. 6-10 p.m. This is a kid friendly event for the entire family!
We will have lots of Fall and Halloween festivities but nothing scary or
with “blood and guts.” We have a lot of different activities for people of
all ages such as pumpkin launching, face painting, storytelling, carica-
tures, performances and a lot more! Check out
www.tagartcompany.com/kookycarnival for information!. rachelnkin-
ingham@gmail.com. www.tagartcompany.com/Kookycarnival.
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. IPFW, 2101 E. Coli-
seum Blvd., Fort Wayne. 8 p.m. One of the funniest musicals ever
written. Music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. Contains mature
subject matter.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1
Birding by Kayak. Gene Stratton-Porter State Historic Site, 1205 Pleasant
Point, Rome City. 8-11 a.m. $3 per person, reservations required. Call
854-3790 to kayak along the waterways to see the autumn migratory
waterfowl and songbirds. John Schaust, chief naturalist for Wild Birds
Unlimited, will discuss some of the beautifully-feathered passers-by.
Each visitor should provide his or her own kayak and personal flotation
device, and we will try to provide kayaks for registered participants
interested in borrowing one.
Brickworld Fort Wayne. Grand Wayne Center, 120 West Jefferson Blvd.,
Fort Wayne. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Brickworld will bring 16,000 square feet
of LEGO displays and interactive activities, including 2011 Brickworld
Master Award winner Arthur Gugick. Creations on display will include
mosaics, sculptures, trains, construction equipment, cars, lots of robots
and much more. Daily admission: $6 for kids, $9 for adults. Cash only
please. Contact kathie@brickworld.us or visit www.brickworld.us for
more details.
Home Based Businesses Fair. Glenbrook Square Mall, 4201 Coliseum
Blvd, Fort Wayne. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Find alternative opportunities for
income. Discover a viable entrepreneurial option.
Attend free expert seminars. Enjoy product sampling, free portrait
(adults only), free health testing, get the latest trends, and best deals at
our specialty exhibitors booths. Prizes will be raffled out during show
hours. Cost to rent booth space is $130. To register call (260) 424-7977
ext. 126 or lhaas@womensenterprise.org.
Miami Indian Heritage Days. Chief Richardville House, 5705 Bluffton
Road, Fort Wayne. 1-4 p.m. Features local artists, performers, and
representatives from the Miami Indians and other Native American
groups demonstrating aspects of their lasting heritage for the public to
enjoy. Admission for each Saturday event is $7 adults and $5 students
Community Calendar
A22 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
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STUDIO
OF
ACTING
Theatre classes for
students grades 2-12
Advanced Drama
Tuesdays or Wednesdays
4: 30-5: 30pm
Grades 4 & 5
Beginning Acting
Tuesdays or Wednesdays
3: 45-4: 30pm
Grades
2
&
3
Character Building
Tuesdays or Wednesdays
5: 30-6: 30pm
Grades 6 & Up
8626 Covington Rd
at Emmaus School
(260) 255-1914
Call or email for more information!
Charactersstudioofacting@gmail.com
and seniors. History Center members and children ages 5 and under are
free. Admission also includes the opportunity to visit the Chief
Richardville House. For more information, contact the History Center at
(260) 426-2882 or visit the website at www.fwhistorycenter.com.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2
The Stonecutter’s Aria. The History Center, 302 E Berry St, Fort Wayne.
2 p.m. Carol Faenzi will speak on her book as part of the 2011-2012
George R. Mather Sunday Lecture Series. This historical novel is based
on the true stories of Faenzi’s Italian marble-carving, opera singing
ancestors. All lectures in this series are free to the public.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6
Fifth Annual Sister City Film Festival. Fort Wayne Cinema Center, 437 E.
Berry St., Fort Wayne. 7 p.m. Featuring films from each of the countries
where Fort Wayne has a sister city. At 6 p.m., before each film, there
will be a food tasting featuring cuisine from the featured country.
Tickets for both the film and food tasting are $25 and are available at
Cinema Center’s box office and at Artlink Contemporary Art Gallery.
For more information about Sister Cities visit their web site at
www.fortwaynesistercities.org.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7
Support Seminar for the Unemployed. Victory Noll Center, 1900 W. Park
Drive, Huntington. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The seminar is for people who are
not working, and who desire to find a job. The purpose is to offer
emotional support, as well as providing opportunities that will help
clarify necessary skills, educational resources, and practical strategies.
A number of local agencies will have staff members on hand who will
be making presentations and hosting workshops to offer training and
other informational opportunities. There is no cost for the program, but
space is limited. Register by Oct. 3. A continental breakfast and lunch
will be provided. To register for the program, or for more information
about the program or Victory Noll Center, contact the Center at (260)
356-0628, ext. 174, or by email at victorynollcenter@olvm.org.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8
Medicare Supplement Educational Seminar. Concordia Lutheran Church,
4245 Lake Avenue, Fort Wayne. 10-11:30 a.m. The Annual Enrollment
Period begins in October this year and we can expect that enrollment
dates are not the only changes! In an effort to help you to be informed,
and up-to-date on all the changes, Concordia Lutheran Church and
Martin Carbaugh, an independent agent and member of Concordia, is
hosting an Educational Seminar to help bring clarity and understanding
to the options seniors have with all of these programs.
You are invited to attend, learn and ask questions about these important
issues. If you have family, friends and neighbors that would also benefit
from this information, please invite them along.
Refreshments provided! Please RSVP to the church office by Sept. 29
at 422-2429 ext. 100. kpape@concordiachurch.org.
concordiachurch.org.
Gaither Homecoming. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum, , Fort
Wayne. 6 p.m. Multi-Grammy Award winning recording artist, Bill
Gaither will present the Gaither Homecoming music spectacular. The
legendary recording artist will present an exciting celebration, filled
with the very best in Christian music, including Gaither’s own multi-
award winning group, The Gaither Vocal Band. Tickets may be
purchased by calling 1-800-745-3000. Tickets are also available at the
Coliseum Ticket Office and all Ticketmaster outlets. Special group rates
are available by calling 260-483-1111.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9
4th Annual Great ANT Race 10K and 5K Run/Walk. Deer Ridge Elementary
School, 1515 Scott Road, Fort Wayne. Includes looped 5K and 10K
routes. The race includes awards for the top finishers in 14 age groups
for the 5K, as well as cash prizes for top winners in the 10K Run.
Online registration: www.fwtrails.org/gar.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12
Allen County Genealogical Society. Allen County Public Library, Fort
Wayne. 7 p.m. Speaker: Margaret Hobson on “Marching to the Drum of
the 44th Indiana Regiment.” Meeting is open to visitors as well as
members. voyagerone@frontier.com. www.acgsi.org.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13
Navigating Life’s Detours. Fort Wayne Marriott, 305 E Washington
Center Road, Fort Wayne. 6 p.m. Seventh annual tribute dinner hosted
by Cancer Service of Northeast Indiana. Designed to give the commu-
nity an opportunity to pause, treasure the memories of people who have
been touched by cancer and pay tribute to cancer survivors, caregivers,
physicians or lost loved ones. Speaker Regina Brett is a columnist for
The Plain Dealer in Cleveland and a breast cancer survivor. Cost is
$100 per ticket, $800 per table. To learn how you can pay tribute to
someone or for tickets, contact Amber Recker at 484-9560 or
arecker@cancer-services.org.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14
Praying with Companions on the Journey. Victory Noll Center, 1900 W.
Park Drive, Huntington. 9 a.m. to noon. Once a month on Friday morn-
ings over the nine-month program, those attending will pray and learn
how lovers of God and neighbor let themselves be led by the Spirit and
moved by the Scriptures. Numerous texts will be explored, using Lectio
Divina as a way of praying God’s Word. The cost is $200 for the nine-
month series. Those cost for those who register by Aug. 26 is $180.
Individual sessions are available for $25 each. To register for the
program, or for more information about the program or Victory Noll
Center, contact the Center at (260) 356-0628, ext. 174, or by e-mail at
victorynollcenter@olvm.org.
Fish fry. Park Edelweiss, 3355 Elmhurst Dr., Fort Wayne. 4:30-7 p.m.
Includes fish, scalloped potatoes, cole slaw, applesauce, rolls and cake.
Live German music by the Haus Musikanten. $8 adults, $5 age 12 and
under.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15
Appleseed Writing Project 2011 Fall Conference. IPFW Walb Student
Union, , Fort Wayne. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event is sponsored by the
Appleseed Writing Project out of IPFW and is open to all area and
regional educators. If you have any questions about the posting, please
contact Lisa Hughes @ jeepluver.hughes@gmail.com. dehr@ipfw.edu.
new.ipfw.edu/microsites/appleseed/fall-conference.html.
Diva Holiday Event. Franke Park, 3411 Sherman Blvd, Fort Wayne. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Pavilion #1. partyplandivasfw@yahoo.com. alexis-
caprino.com/diva-holiday-event/.
Artistry 2011 Silent Auction. Christ’s Community Church, 10616 Liberty
Mills Road, Fort Wayne. 2-4 p.m. Bidding from 2 p.m. to 3:45. Bids
close at 3:45 There will be a variety of beautiful new items hand made
by church members: quilts, child’s oak wood rocking chair, hand knit
and crocheted items, infant/child sweaters and clothing, adult clothing,
home accessories, aprons, jewelry, Vera Bradley, variety of gift baskets,
specialty foods and more. Free refreshments!. Greerkw@aol.com.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21
Return of the Pirates of Eckhart Park. Eckhart Park, 1500 S. Cedar St,
Auburn. 7-9 p.m. Childrens activities include sink the ship, walk the
plank and a treasure hunt in the pavilion maze. Children under the age
of 3 are free. Contact bldaley@ci.auburn.in.us or visit ci.auburn.in.us.
www.DupontTimes.com • A23 Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
Community Calendar
Family
Friendly
Commercial
Free
wbcl.org wbcl.org
Ruckel Chiropractic Clinic
Charles Ruckel DC
7231 Engle Road • Fort Wayne, IN 46804
260-432-5354
www.ruckelchiropractic.com
$
19
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All new patients will receive
a Consultation, Examination,
X-Rays (subject to clinical need)
(Over $225.00 value)
For Only
CELEBRATE
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Col. City 30E
300 S
400 S
500 S
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School
Margie’s
Place
5
0
0
E
4380 S. 500 E., Columbia City
260-248-8660 260-248-8660
The gift shop in the country
Product:
• Pottery: Rowe, Sorrento Dinnerware
• Moda Fabrics • Rod Iron
• Unique Cabinets (all sizes) & Side Tables
• Light Fixtures by Lt. Moses, Willard, Katies
• Old Century Paints • Candles and much more.
Starting Sept. thru Dec. 31
Store Hours: Wed., Turs., Fri. -10 AM - 5:30 PM
Sat. 10 AM - 5:00 PM
Gif Certifcates • Bridal Registry • Layaways
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Fort Wayne Area
Community Band
Tuesday, October 25
7:30 pm
Tuesday, October 25
7:30 pm
Fort Wayne Area
Community Band
In concert at
John & Ruth Rhinehart Music Center
IPFW Campus
Adults $5, Seniors $4
Children under 6 $2
IPFW Students free with ID
For Piano Students
Children and Adults
Sue Pries
Experienced Teacher with Music Degree
Openings Now Available Openings Now Available
Call: 489-7775 Dupont area
North Side High School Class of ‘56 celebrates graduation
To mark its graduation 55 years ago,
the North Side High School Class of
1956 is planning a weekend of reunion
activities in mid-Oct., 2011. To kick off
this event, there will be a casual cock-
tail party at the Covington Creek
Clubhouse, 6700 Covington Creek
Trail, Fort Wayne, at 6 p.m. on Friday,
Oct. 14.
At 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 15, a
downtown walking tour will begin at
the Allen County Courthouse and
continue to the Embassy Theatre.
Lunch will take place at the Marriott
Courtyard’s Champion’s Bar before the
tour continues to Parkview Field and
the Main Library.
There also will be a golf outing on
Oct. 15. The main event will be at the
Pine Valley Country Club, 10900 Pine
Mills Road. Cocktails will be served
beginning at 5:30 p.m. and dinner will
be served at 7 p.m. On Sunday, Oct. 16,
there will be a 10 a.m. buffet brunch in
the Bridge Room at Hall’s Guest
House, 1313 Washington Center Road.
For further information or to make a
reservation, please call the North Side
Alumni Office at 260-471-4499 or e-
mail info@nsalumni.org.
A24 • www.DupontTimes.com Dupont Valley Times • September 23, 2011
2 0 1 1 N O R T H E A S T E R N I N D I A N A S U S TA I N A B L E L I V I N G F A I R

NE IS U S TA I N A B L EL I V I N G. C O M
V I S I T U S O N L I N E AT
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1
9 AM TO 7 PM EACH DAY
FAMILY FRIENDLY
DOWNTOWN GRABILL, IN
I NS PI RED BY GREEN
What i s Sust ai nabi l i t y?
Everything that we need for our survival and
well-being depends, either directly or indirectly,
on our natural environment. Sustainability creates
and maintains the conditions under which humans
and nature can exist in productive harmony,
permitting the fulfillment of social, economic and
other requirements of present and future generations.
Sustainability is important to making sure that we
have, and will continue to have, the water, materials
and resources to protect human health and our
environment.
• Local Amish Baked Goods
• Speakers & Demonstrations on these topics:
• Learn about Rain Gardens
• See Amish Quilting
• Alpaca Fleece Spinning Demonstration
• Candle Making
• Working Bee Hive & Honey
• Renewable Energy
• Green Building
• Hybrid Transportation
• Reduction of Waste
• Farmer's Market Gathering
• Schools are invited and encouraged to join!
Scholarships are part of the event.
(see website for contact information)
• Main Presentation starts at 1 p.m. on Friday

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