NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2006 ORACLE.

COM/ORACLEMAGAZI NE
FIVE YEARS OF EDITORS‘ CHOICE AWARDS
HONORING LEADERS AND INNOVATORS OF 2006
OUR CIOs OF THE YEAR
JEAN CHAVINIER
PERNOD RICARD
YOSHIKAZU AMANO
TOYOTA MOTOR
KEVIN HORNER
ALCOA
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CVRD
IN THIS ISSUE: ORACLE WAREHOUSE BUILDER 10g R2 • ORACLE TIMESTEN • RESTORE POINTS • WORKING WITH COLLECTIONS
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OTN Bulletin / 18
Learn what’s happening with Oracle’s most
dynamic online community.
Oracle News Briefs / 21
From Our Readers / 9
Readers tell us what they think.
From the Editor / 11
Recognizing winners
—Tom Haunert
AT ORACLE
Events / 12
Find out about upcoming
conferences and training.
Oracle Resources / 17
Here’s your guide to Oracle’s
broadband, education, and
online offerings, plus what’s
new at Oracle.
DEPARTMENTS
FEATURE
12
EDITORS’ CHOICE AWARDS 2006
Honoring Leaders
and Innovators
The editors of Oracle Magazine are proud to
announce the recipients of our fifth annual
Editors’ Choice Awards. It takes vision and
commitment to build and manage enterprise
technologies, and these winners most certainly
demonstrate these qualities. From language
development and applications adoption to
systems architecture and enterprise planning,
see how these remarkable people use
technology to build their businesses today
and prepare for tomorrow.
—David A. Kelly
—David A. Kelly
Cover: CIO photographs by Ton Hendriks, Paulo Fridman,
Mark Bolster, and Yasu Nakaoka.
B
O
B
A
D
L
E
R
CONTENTS
VOLUME XX, I SSUE 6
/29
4 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
RESOURCES
Oracle Certified Advantage
Partner Index / 80
Advertisers’ Index / 82
CHANNELS
Partner News / 24
Capgemini, EDS, Inter Access, HP, IBM,
Nextance, TEMENOS, EnergySys/
Digital Steps, Accenture, LogicaCMG,
NewFrontiers Consultancy, Tata Consultancy
Services, TUSC
Book Beat / 24
Peer-to-Peer / 27
Avi Abrami, Syed Jaffar Hussain, Chris Foot
DEVELOPER
FRAMEWORKS
Jump-Start J2EE Development / 55
Finish development faster with Oracle JHeadstart.
—Steve Muench
BROWSER- BASED
Taking Up Collections / 57
Use collections to manage session state in Oracle
Application Express. —Mike Hichwa
PL/ SQL PRACTI CES
On Object Types in Collections / 59
Best practices for retrieving objects and object attributes
from objects —Steven Feuerstein
TECHNOLOGY
RECOVERY
Restore to the Point / 61
Use named points in time to roll your database back by
using flashback query. —Arup Nanda
EMBEDDED
When Microseconds Count / 65
The Oracle TimesTen in-memory database is always ready.
—Jonathan Gennick
DATA WAREHOUSI NG
Managing Data Quality / 69
Oracle Warehouse Builder 10g handles the truth.
—Ron Hardman
ASK TOM
On Rescue Analytics and Popularity / 73
Our technologist explains the saving power of analytics and
shares popularity. —Tom Kyte
I NSI DE OCP
Testing Database Security / 77
Questions and answers on securing your Oracle database by
using FGA and VPD —Aradhana Puri
24
61
55
80
COMMENT
I N THE FI ELD
Asking the Right Questions / 83
Data provides dry information on its own, but
business analytics can pry the meaning loose.
—Ari Kaplan
ANALYST’ S CORNER
Finding Information on Demand / 84
Ease of use and risk management drive
companies to enterprise search.
—David Baum
83
When information
comes together,
everybody feels
much better.
Information lives at El Camino Hospital. A leading California medical facility, El Camino Hospital received the highest ranking
in a recent patient survey. But they never rest in their mission to use information technology to help them improve patient
care. So they turned to EMC to build a flexible information infrastructure that reduces costs and provides fast, reliable
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6 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
SUBSCRI PTI ON I NFORMATI ON
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Senior Managing Editor Caroline Kvitka caroline.kvitka@oracle.com
Features Editor Kay Keppler kay.keppler@oracle.com
Contributing Editor and Writer Blair Campbell
Editor in Chief, OTN Justin Kestelyn justin.kestelyn@oracle.com
Technology Advisors Tom Kyte, Christopher Beck
Contributing Writers Marta Bright, Liz Campbell, Ed DeJesus, Jeff Erickson, Andre Kvitka,
Aaron Lazenby, Fred Sandsmark, Rich Schwerin
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EDI TORI AL BOARD
Ian Abramson, Jeff Bernknopf, Karen Cannell, Andrew Clarke, Chris Claterbos, Karthika Devi, Kimberly Floss, Kent Graziano,
Taqi Hasan, Tony Jambu, Tony Jedlinski, Ari Kaplan, Val Kavi, Steve Lemme, Carol McGury, Sumit Sengupta,
Danisment Gazi Unal, Jonathan Vincenzo, Dan Vlamis, Billy Yu
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O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 9
f r o m o u r READERS
GETTING DIGITAL WITH IT
Thank you to all who wrote to us regard-
ing the new digital version of Oracle
Magazine. The digital Oracle Magazine is
a pilot program that offers a custom online
format with hyperlinks and a PDF format
for download and offline viewing.
Many of our readers have praised the
convenience of viewing Oracle Magazine
in this form; some have written about issues
encountered when trying to access the
digital magazine; and some have asked why
they are receiving the digital version.
The digital magazine is currently going
out to those who noted on their subscrip-
tion cards or forms that they would like to
receive Oracle Magazine in digital form.
If you wish to change this preference, com-
plete and send in the printed subscription
card with your new preference, or change
the preference in the online form at
www.submag.com/sub/oc?pk=orafaq.
—The Editors
THINK SMALL, THINK SAMPLE
As a regular reader, I like the articles
in Oracle Magazine, but it would be
helpful if you could include some
small articles that would be useful
for beginners in technology on topics
such as databases, the Web, JavaServer
Pages, and servlets. Articles should
include sample code.
Ranjith Kn
ranjithmenon2004@gmail.com
There are articles on aspects of Oracle
Database in every issue of Oracle
Magazine, and most technologies
described have at least one Web inter-
face. Please take a look at our technology
article index at oracle.com/technology/
Send your opinions about what you read in Oracle
Magazine, and suggestions for possible technical
articles, to opubedit_us@oracle.com.
Or click on the Write the Editors link on our Web
site, oracle.com/oraclemagazine.
Letters may be edited for length and clarity and
may be published in any medium. We consider
any communications we receive publishable.
send mail to theEDITOR
Your corrections, your opinions, and your requests:
Here’s your forum for telling us what’s right and
wrong in each issue of Oracle Magazine, and for
letting us know what you want to read.
oramag/sitemap_techarticles.html for
more information.
A PLACE FOR SHARING
I am a regular reader of Oracle
Magazine, and I can assure you that
it is very helpful. I have a sugges-
tion, however: For all areas of Oracle
Magazine, please find a way for people
to share their experiences. For example,
create a Web site for all DBAs every-
where to share information and experi-
ence and somehow help each other.
Baddi Mbarek
mbarek.baddi@gmail.com
People share their Oracle Magazine expe-
riences by sending e-mail to opubedit_
us@oracle.com; many requests sent to that
address are published here. For sharing
Oracle technology experiences, the editors
highly recommend the Oracle Technology
Network (OTN) online community at
oracle.com/technology—and, specifically,
the OTN forums at forums.oracle.com.
Here Oracle technologists can share their
experiences in technology-specific forums.
MORE OFTEN
I always look forward to reading Oracle
Magazine; you guys are doing a great
job. I just wonder if the magazine could
be made monthly instead of publishing
every two months.
Oluyemi Ajiboso
oajiboso@hotmail.com
STRONG SUPPORT
I agree with the readers who wrote into
your From Our Readers section in the
July/August 2006 issue to say that there
should be some articles and tutorials
specifically for young “babysitter” DBAs
and other beginners.
I strongly support and want you to
publish articles and columns on all types
of database backups, with their steps
explained in a manner that’s understand-
able to beginners.
Another thing I would like is noti-
fication, for candidates appearing for
Oracle Certified Professional [OCP]
exams, of the times available for taking
the exam, the number of questions
asked, and so on. Could you please
publish articles helpful for OCP
candidates?
Vinay Bhardwaj
vinaybhardwaj1087@yahoo.com
Inside OCP is a regular column in Oracle
Magazine and a source for information
about the content of the OCP exams. See
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/ocp
for an index of Inside OCP articles. For
more-detailed information about a par-
ticular OCP exam, including duration and
number of questions, go to education.oracle
.com and click the Exam Details link (under
Certification). Click an exam number link
to see detailed exam information.
©
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O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 1 1
f r o m t h e EDITOR
ach issue of Oracle Magazine includes similar types
of content: Oracle product, partner, event, and com-
munity news; features about Oracle products and cus-
tomers; hands-on information on how to use Oracle
technology; and community commentary.
The specific content that becomes each issue, however,
travels a long road, through nomination, scrutiny, creation,
more scrutiny, revision, and, finally, print. Input for this
content comes via Oracle product managers, Oracle subject
matter experts, customers, initiatives, technology events,
authors, and more.
Most of the time, it’s what’s new, innovative, and leads
the market that drives our content. New technologies,
new Oracle technology and industry solutions, customers
succeeding with new Oracle solutions, new application
architectures, and new applications are what most of our
customers want to read about, so that’s what we want to
cover in Oracle Magazine.
IT’S GOOD TO HAVE OPTIONS
The July/August and September/October 2006 issues of Oracle
Magazine included articles about Oracle Real Application
Clusters, Oracle Enterprise Manager Management Packs,
Oracle Partitioning, Oracle Content Database, Oracle Records
Database, Oracle Database Vault, Oracle Advanced Security,
and Oracle Label Security. All of these offerings have some-
thing in common—they are Oracle Database options, powerful
extensions to Oracle Database. I highly recommend that you
follow the link in nextSTEPS to read more about them.
Now, we did not specifically plan to cover Oracle Database
options in these last two issues. We ran these articles because
the Oracle people behind the technologies, Oracle customers,
and our authors demonstrated the technical innovation of
these options and how these technologies lead the market.
And as much as technology innovation drives the content
of Oracle Magazine, we do not plan a magazine issue just a
Recognizing Winners
Innovators and leaders drive the content of Oracle Magazine.
READ more about
Oracle Database options
oracle.com/database/database-options.html
VIEW the Oracle Magazine editorial calendar
oracle.com/oramag/misc/orapub_calendar.html
few weeks before publication based on the newest technology.
We generally start work on an issue six months before the
issue date, and we don’t start an issue without a content plan.
We create an editorial calendar with issue content outlined
more than a year in advance. (We posted our 2007 calendar
in August 2006.) On this calendar we identify some content
areas, such as security, high availability, and content man-
agement, as well as some specific products, such as Oracle
Enterprise Manager Grid Control. We revise the editorial
calendar continuously, sometimes moving articles to accom-
modate product release schedules and sometimes switching
from a content area to a specific product (or vice versa).
With some of the newer Oracle Database options that
we’ve recently covered—specifically Oracle Content Database,
Oracle Records Database, and Oracle Database Vault—we were
planning articles on content management and security many
months before these options were in production. Their intro-
duction, as well customers’ success with beta versions, put
these new options on our revised editorial calendar.
And as much as we are involved in deciding on the article
topics and producing the finished articles, I don’t think we
actually dictate the technologies that we cover in each issue.
To me, compelling Oracle technology solutions nominate
themselves for coverage in Oracle Magazine and vote for them-
selves with their features and competitive qualities. We editors
simply recognize the innovation in the winners.
PEOPLE WIN
In the same way that we recognize the strongest Oracle tech-
nology solutions with articles in Oracle Magazine, we recognize
the people who bring these solutions to life in the enterprise
with the Oracle Magazine Editors’ Choice Awards.
The Editors’ Choice award candidates do not nominate
themselves; rather, Oracle and Oracle partner representatives
nominate them. The representatives complete a lengthy form
with information about a candidate’s leadership and innova-
tion, and these completed nomination forms are exercises in
passion that demonstrate each candidate’s successes.
To choose the winners, all the editors need to do is recog-
nize the leadership and innovation in the candidates. All the
candidates are leaders and innovators, but even amid elite
company, the winners stand out. And we’re proud to recognize
them one more time.
Tom Haunert, Editor in Chief
tom.haunert@oracle.com
1 2 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
a t O r a c l e EVENTS
events LOCATOR
1,000 Events—Oracle
Applications World Tour
November and December,
various cities
The Oracle Applications World Tour
winds up in December with the last of
1,000 user-centric events that Oracle has
hosted in 2006. Learn about Applications
Unlimited and the evolutionary path to
Oracle Fusion Applications. Find a local
event at oracle.com/events/worldtour.
ProcureCon 2006
November 6–9, Brussels, Belgium
This pan-European procurement event pro-
vides an environment for attendees to learn
from procurement leaders, get practical advice
on operational issues, and participate in inter-
active discussions. Register at www
.wbresearch.com/procureconeurope.
SANS Amsterdam 2006
November 6–11, Amsterdam,
the Netherlands
This annual training event includes a full-week
class, “Securing Oracle,” that provides a com-
prehensive introduction to planning, auditing,
and securing an Oracle database. Learn more
at www.sans.org/amsterdam06.
Single Euro Payment Area
(SEPA) Conference
November 8–10, London
The two-day SEPA conference brings together
the major decision-makers in the European
payments arena, plus banks and corporations,
to debate critical SEPA issues. A one-day
summit on e-invoicing in the Eurozone follows.
Sign up at www.iir-events.com/IIR-conf/
Finance/EventView.aspx?EventID=708.
German Oracle User Group
Conference
November 14–17, Mannheim, Germany
This two-day conference includes hands-on
sessions and networking opportunities. It is
preceded by a one-day user group event and
followed by a training day. Register at www
.doag.org/konferenz/doag/2006.
U.K. Oracle User Group
Conference and Exhibition 2006
November 14–17, Birmingham, U.K.
With increased exhibition space and an exten-
sive conference agenda covering Oracle and
Oracle’s PeopleSoft, JD Edwards, and Siebel,
this annual conference is among the largest
user-run events. Read about it and sign up at
www.ukoug.co.uk/2006.
Business Process Management
and Integration Symposium
November 22–23, London
Sponsored by Butler Group, this event includes
sessions built around three themes: integration
through SOA, managing an SOA environment,
and real-time process management. Sessions
focus on the needs of both IT and business
decision-makers. Learn more and register at
www.butlergroup.com/events/BPMI.
XML2006
December 4–7, Boston
The largest annual XML get-together boasts
tutorials, seminars, and demos. Tracks include
Enterprise XML Computing, XML on the Web,
Documents and Publishing, and Hands-on
XML. Register at 2006.xmlconference.org.
Hampton Roads and Greater Richmond
Oracle Users Groups Combined
Conference
November 2, Williamsburg, Virginia
www.ocoj.cc
Northern California Oracle Users Group
Fall Conference
November 2, San Francisco
www.nocoug.org
Australian Oracle User Group (AUSOUG)
2006 National Conference: Oracle with
20:20 Foresight
November 2–3, Melbourne;
November 8–9, Perth
www.ausoug.org.au/2020
India OAUG Conference
November 14, Mumbai
www.india.oaug.org
Ohio PeopleSoft/JD Edwards Regional
User Group
November 16, Columbus, Ohio
www.ohiorug.blogspot.com
Caribbean Regional Users’ Group (CRUG)
Annual Conference
November 17–18, Port of Spain,
Trinidad
64.28.139.231/psoftcarib
Rocky Mountain Oracle Users Group
Quarterly Educational Workshop
November 17, Denver, Colorado
www.rmoug.org
Swiss Oracle User Group Oracle Data
Warehousing & Data Mining Training
November 22, Baden-Dättwil,
Switzerland
www.soug.ch
Central Florida Oracle User Group
Meeting
December 4, Orlando, Florida
www.cfoug.org
New York Oracle User Group Winter
General Meeting
December 14, New York
www.nyoug.org
Indiana PeopleSoft/JD Edwards
User Group
December 14, Indianapolis, Indiana
www.indypsjderug.blogspot.com
Technology Events
Conferences and sessions to help you stay on the cutting edge
Oracle Events
oracle.com/events
Locate user groups
oracle.com/technology/collaboration/user_group
O R A C L E U S E R S
G R O U P S
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a t O r a c l e RESOURCES
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 1 7
What’s New at Oracle
The latest courses, online articles, offers, and more
ORACLE WEBCASTS
Oracle OpenWorld
oracle.com/openworld
Watch all the keynotes from this year’s
conference, including those of Larry Ellison,
Charles Phillips, and many other speakers.
Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC)
for SAP Customers
oracle.com/pls/ebn/live_viewer.main?p_
direct=yes&p_shows_id=4907190
Hear why so many SAP customers run their
applications on Oracle RAC.
Automating Security Testing
oracle.com/pls/ebn/live_viewer.main?p_
direct=yes&p_shows_id=4879727
Hear about Oracle’s industry-leading best
practices that make up the company’s
secure development process, and learn
how you can automate security testing as
part of your development process.
Managing Content in the Enterprise Database
oracle.com/pls/ebn/live_viewer.main?p_
direct=yes&p_shows_id=4855741
Find out how to leverage your Oracle
Database investment and skill set to
manage unstructured content transparently
in business processes and applications
throughout the enterprise.
NEW PODCASTS
“Focus on Identity Management:
Fine-Grained Authorization”
oracle.com/techcasts
Frank Villavicencio, product manager for
Oracle Identity Management, explains the
new requirements that drive the need for
fine-grained authorization in the middle tier
as well as the standards shaping its future.
“Crawls and Keywords: Deploying Oracle
Secure Enterprise Search on Oracle.com”
oracle.com/techcasts
Mark Clark, Oracle director of IT and a key
player in Oracle.com’s deployment of Oracle
Secure Enterprise Search, shares best
practices for installing, configuring, custom-
izing, and optimizing the product.
“The Benefits of Oracle’s Strategy of
Applications Unlimited”
oracle.com/appcasts
Jesper Andersen, Oracle’s senior vice
president of applications strategy, discusses
Applications Unlimited, Oracle’s plan to
continue providing ongoing enhancements
to current Oracle Applications beyond the
delivery of Oracle Fusion Applications.
“The Benefits of Oracle’s Reporting Tool,
XML Publisher”
oracle.com/appcasts
Learn about Oracle XML Publisher with
Mike Tobin, IT manager, Oracle Applications
Development and Architecture for
Qualcomm, and Tim Dexter, Oracle XML
Publisher group product manager.
ORACLE UNIVERSITY
11i Extend Oracle Applications: Customizing
OA Framework Applications
oracle.com/education
(Search keywords: 11i Extend Oracle
Applications)
This four-day course focuses on the skills
needed by developers and consultants who
want to make changes to existing Oracle
Applications Framework pages. Because
Oracle Applications Framework supports
several types of development, this course
focuses on changes to existing pages along
with the deployment skills needed to deploy
any sort of Oracle Application Framework
page or application.
Oracle Database 10g: RAC for Administrators
oracle.com/education
(Search keywords: Oracle Database 10g RAC)
This five-day course offers students an
introduction to Oracle Database 10g Release
2 for Oracle Real Application Clusters
(Oracle RAC). Students learn how to con-
figure and administer a database for use
with Oracle RAC. The course also explains
how to set up and use Automatic Storage
Management in an Oracle RAC environ-
ment. Lectures are reinforced by hands-on
practice designed to walk students through
Oracle RAC administration.
ORACLE ON DEMAND
Austin Data Center
oracle.com/broadband/showondemand
.html?4819402
Take a video tour of Oracle’s award-winning
Austin Data Center, where information
technology uses a utility model to help cus-
tomers achieve better business results.
Customers Find Business Value and ROI with
Oracle On Demand
oracle.com/pls/ebn/live_viewer.main?p_
direct=yes&p_shows_id=4852551
An IDC analyst and Oracle On Demand
customers discuss the benefits of software
as a service.
NEW RESOURCE CENTERS
Welcome Center
oracle.com/welcome
New to Oracle? The Welcome Center helps
new Oracle customers get started in the
right direction, with links to contacts and
information on support, training, partners,
customer programs, user groups, and more.
Oracle Identity Management Resource Library
oracle.com/products/middleware/identity-
management/resource-library.html
Implementing Oracle Identity Management?
Find business white papers, technical white
papers, analyst reports, internet seminars,
and much more.
KNOW YOUR OPTIONS
oracle.com/database/
database-options.html
Did you know that Oracle offers a wide
range of options—such as Oracle Content
Database and Oracle Spatial—to extend the
power of Oracle Database 10g Enterprise
Edition? These options allow you to meet
specific requirements in the areas of perfor-
mance and availability, security and compli-
ance, data warehousing, and manageability.
1 8 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
a t O r a c l e OTN BULLETIN
BY JUSTI N KESTELYN
The Semantic Web Runs on Oracle
Oracle.com’s new virtual press room makes Web 2.0 look quaint.
OTN home
oracle.com/technology
OTN headlines
oracle.com/technology/pub/news
Free software downloads
oracle.com/technology/software
Documentation
oracle.com/technology/documentation
Technology and Developer Centers
oracle.com/technology/tech
Podcasts
oracle.com/techcasts
Technical articles
oracle.com/technology/pub/articles
Blogs
blogs.oracle.com
Discussion forums
forums.oracle.com
racle has deployed a radically
new version of its virtual press
room. Now this may not seem
like particularly interesting
news for Oracle Magazine readers in
and of itself. But once you become
aware of the technology running under
the covers, I fully expect a change in
your outlook.
Developed in conjunction with
Siderean Software, the revamped press
room runs on a Semantic Web engine
integrated with Oracle Database. For
those unfamiliar with the term, the
Semantic Web, to describe it simplisti-
cally, is an information processing
model in which computers—via a
set of World Wide Web Consortium
(W3C) data modeling specifications
called Resource Description Framework
(RDF) and other technologies—can
parse deep relationships between data
that otherwise would need to be explic-
itly created by humans. For example,
in the un-Semantic Web, a computer
has no intuitive understanding that
Larry Ellison is the founder and CEO
of Oracle, only that Larry, Ellison,
Oracle, CEO, and founder may all be
present in a given document. (This
limited understanding, of course, is
the basis of traditional search and Web
2.0 architecture.) In contrast, in the
Semantic Web, an information-
gathering computer can deduce that
relationship, making the information
discovery experience much more intui-
tive for users. Think of it as interactive
search: Any given keyword will lead
you to new keywords you may never
have considered in the context of the
search at hand.
This concept is manifest in the
new Oracle virtual press room, which
permits you to make new connections
through the data—you can navigate
across content relationships whose
existence you may otherwise not know
about. In our virtual press room model,
Oracle Secure Enterprise Search serves
as the eyes and ears of the Seamark
Navigator Semantic Web engine by
crawling the available content and
metadata, and the Oracle RDF Store
(which is fully integrated with Oracle
Database out of the box) serves as its
memory by storing RDF data.
Explore the advanced virtual press
room at oracle.com/corporate/pressroom.
ORACLE TECHCASTS STILL LOUD AND CLEAR
We’re well past the first birthday of the
Oracle TechCast podcast program: The
first show, in which Oracle TopLink
Product Manager Shaun Smith dis-
cussed Enterprise JavaBeans 3.0, was
published May 17, 2005. Since then,
as of this writing, TechCast shows have
been downloaded or clicked more than
125,000 times. (There are some good
AppCasts out there too, by the way.)
With the help of a top-notch produc-
tion team, we have accelerated the rate
of publication in the last few months.
This acceleration is a reflection of our
continuing commitment to this format
and of the interesting goings-on at
Oracle in 2006—such as Oracle Secure
Enterprise Search and its deployment
across customer-facing Oracle Web
sites, and new database options such
as Oracle Database Vault and Oracle
Content Database.
Clearly iTunes support for podcast-
ing was a major success factor. We
were lucky in that the Oracle TechCast
program launched just before this
support became available, and we
managed to attract some media atten-
tion in the process. And unless I’m
mistaken, Oracle was the first major
company to publish podcasts from the
floor of an event (Oracle OpenWorld
2005). So you could say that podcasting
is in our DNA.
Subscribe to the Oracle TechCast
RSS feed, or listen to TechCast MP3s in
hosted mode, at oracle.com/techcasts.
GUIDE TO LINUX COMMAND MASTERY,
EXPERT EDITION
Oracle ACE Arup Nanda has followed
up on Sheryl Calish’s popular OTN
article “Guide to Linux File Command
Mastery” with a four-part series on
the use of advanced Linux commands
as well as of more-routine commands
for purposes you may not have thought
of. He has also included helpful
Oracle-specific tips of particular inter-
est to Oracle DBAs and sysadmins. You
can find Nanda’s “Guide to Advanced
Linux Command Mastery” at oracle
.com/technology/pub/articles/advanced-
linux-commands/part1.html. O
Justin Kestelyn (justin.kestelyn@oracle.com) is the
editor in chief of Oracle Technology Network.
i Demand More...
innovation.
800.809.3003
sales@usi.net
www.usi.net
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the marketplace, USi is also the largest independent provider for
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USi, we know better than anyone how to deliver on these demands.
Trust USi for your Enterprise Resource Planning and eBusiness
needs. Scores of organizations in the Fortune 1000 already do.
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O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 2 1
ORACLE WAREHOUSE BUILDER 10g
RELEASE 2 MANAGES DATA LIFECYCLE
O
racle Warehouse Builder 10g Release
2 brings new data quality, integra-
tion, and administrative features to the
database design and extract, transform,
and load (ETL) tool that helps custom-
ers manage the lifecycle of data and
metadata from design to deployment
and maintenance. The easy-to-use tool
enables users to rapidly design, deploy,
and manage data integration projects
and business intelligence (BI) systems.
The new release includes enhance-
ments to name and address cleansing
and deduplication. It also includes the
ability to design relational and online
analytical processing (OLAP) database
structures, making it easy to store data
in a common Oracle Database reposi-
tory and offer users a choice of BI tools.
Other enhancements include support for
targeting non-Oracle databases, allowing
users to choose where their data is ulti-
mately stored.
The tool’s pricing model has also
been updated. The core database
design and ETL capabilities of Oracle
Warehouse Builder 10g Release 2 are
now included with Oracle Database 10g
Release 2 Enterprise Edition, Standard
Edition, and Standard Edition One at
no additional cost.
New options and connectors are
also available. The Oracle Warehouse
Builder Enterprise ETL Option supports
multienvironment deployments typical
of enterprise data warehouse projects
by enabling improved performance and
scalability of ETL processes. The Oracle
Warehouse Builder Data Quality Option
promotes a comprehensive and system-
atic approach to data quality by offering
data profiling, data rules, data cleansing/
autocorrection, and data auditing in
one tool. Oracle Warehouse Builder
connectors enable customers to extract
data quickly and easily, and in some
cases, target data to and from their core
customer relationship management and
enterprise resource planning applica-
tions, including Oracle E-Business Suite
and Oracle’s PeopleSoft Enterprise.
“With the proliferation of data, and
a growing demand for better-quality
systems, organizations now more than
ever require tools that help them rapidly
design data structures and efficiently
integrate data from disparate reposito-
ries,” says Ray Roccaforte, vice president
of Oracle’s data warehousing and BI
platform. “Oracle Warehouse Builder
10g Release 2 represents a major invest-
ment by Oracle in data integration,
and by including core capabilities with
Oracle Database 10g at no extra cost,
organizations of all sizes can easily turn
raw data into quality information to help
meet their users’ requirements.”
NEW ORACLE DATA MINER RELEASE
INCLUDES CODE GENERATOR
O
racle Data Miner Release 10.2.0.2,
a graphical user interface for Oracle
Data Mining Release 10.1 and above,
adds Oracle Data Miner PL/SQL Code
Generator. The code generator pro-
duces PL/SQL code that contains all
the steps in a mining activity, includ-
ing data preparation, data transforma-
tions, and modeling operations. Users
can generate PL/SQL code from one or
more mining activities with a wizard in
Oracle Data Miner or with an extension
to either Oracle JDeveloper or Oracle
SQL Developer.
Oracle Data Miner helps data ana-
lysts mine their Oracle data to find
patterns, relationships, and anomalous
activities and to discover valuable new
insights. Data analysts can mine data
with Oracle Data Miner’s easy-to-use
wizards that guide them through the
data preparation, data mining, model
evaluation, and model scoring process.
Oracle Data Miner PL/SQL Code
Generator then creates PL/SQL pack-
ages that can be integrated into auto-
mated business processes.
ORACLE DELIVERS COMPREHENSIVE
COMPLIANCE MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK
O
racle is bundling, at no additional
cost, the Control Objectives for
a t O r a c l e BRIEFS
?
KNOW D I D Y O U
AJAX, REST ON THE MOVE
Web services with Web 2.0 interfaces
are coming on strong. Close to half of 400
developers surveyed in spring 2006 are
working with Asynchronous JavaScript and
XML (Ajax) or plan to do so in the coming
year; the same survey found a 37 percent
increase in respondents implementing or
considering Representational State Transfer
(REST), with 25 percent of those surveyed
saying they are considering REST-based Web
services instead of SOAP-based services.
Thirty percent of survey respondents say the
ability to reuse a service is the greatest cost
advantage provided by Web services.
Source: Evans Data Corporation
www.evansdata.com/n2/pr/releases/Web%20Servcies
%207_25_06.shtml
PEERS ARE TRUSTED INFLUENCERS OF IT
PURCHASING DECISIONS
A survey of more than 2,300 IT and business
professionals in 2006 showed that 77.6
percent turn to experienced peers as a source
of information when conducting purchasing
research, followed by online information
sources at 77.4 percent. (Respondents could
choose more than one answer.) When it
comes to the information sources they trust
most, experienced peers ranked first, at 1.63
on a scale of 1 through 6 (with 1 being most
trusted), followed by online information sources
at 2.74. Other sources, in order of trust, were
paid research (3.29), trade magazines (3.91),
print-based catalogs and buyer’s guides (4.25),
and vendor salespeople (4.69).
Source: ITtoolbox 2006 IT Purchasing Cycle Survey
www.ittoolbox.com/help/presscenter.asp?i=106
AWAY FROM WORK, YET AVAILABLE
The majority of 278 respondents to an online
survey conducted in 2006 feel obligated to
remain available to their employers 24/7
through the use of portable electronic devices.
Fifteen percent said they’re absolutely
obligated to be available, 22 percent feel
obligated, and the largest group—44
percent—feels somewhat obligated. Most of
the survey respondents work in information
technology in the United States.
Source: Info-Tech Research Group
www.infotech.com/Press%20Releases/Employes
%20Obligated%2024,-s-,7.aspx
2 2 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
BRIEFS
Information and Related Technology
(COBIT) 4.0 framework with Oracle
Internal Controls Manager, a compliance
management tool used to document,
test, and certify internal controls and
monitor ongoing compliance. COBIT
is the IT governance public domain
framework and the most widely adopted
standard for IT controls and audit-
ability under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.
This bundle provides customers with a
single application that manages compli-
ance control requirements for IT.
Previously, companies had to create
separate connections between the
control frameworks in IT and finance.
COBIT gives users a single connection
and allows them to implement best
practices in application and general
IT controls while enabling them to
meet the Committee of Sponsoring
Organizations of the Treadway
Commission framework control
objectives. By partnering with the
Information Systems Audit and Control
Association and members of the global
IT audit industry to embed COBIT 4.0
in Oracle Internal Controls Manager,
Oracle is able to offer users direct
access to the premier comprehensive
risk and audit control framework for IT
processes. COBIT emphasizes regula-
tory compliance, helping organizations
increase the value attained from IT
and simplifying the implementation of
the COBIT framework. Additionally, it
presents activities in a streamlined and
practical manner that facilitates contin-
uous improvement in IT governance.
“Companies need to align best
practices in IT management with the
business to achieve more-efficient oper-
ations,” says Chris Leone, Oracle group
vice president of application strategy.
“We continue to recommend that enter-
prises use COBIT to bolster their IT
governance procedures and to improve
the controls they have in place.”
ORACLE SQL DEVELOPER 1.1 ENHANCES
DATABASE DEVELOPMENT PRODUCTIVITY
O
racle SQL Developer 1.1 provides
users with the ability to create
master/detail reports, add charts,
manage snippets, and set additional user
preferences for customizing the envi-
ronment. This latest release of Oracle
SQL Developer, a free graphical tool
for database development, also features
a redesigned object browser with new
filtering capabilities and updates to the
SQL Worksheet and data grid.
Oracle SQL Developer enhances pro-
ductivity and simplifies database devel-
opment tasks by providing a graphical
interface for browsing, creating, and
updating database objects, and running
SQL statements and scripts. The tool
has been widely embraced by the user
community, with the first release hitting
the 100,000-download mark within
two months of production. This second
release includes many enhancements
requested by the user community.
Oracle recently launched the Oracle
SQL Developer Exchange, where users
can share code, from small snippets to
more-complex reports. The exchange
also provides an environment for cus-
tomers to enter feature requests and to
rate requests placed by others.
NEW ORACLE APPLICATION EXPRESS
RELEASE EASES APPLICATION DEPLOYMENT
O
racle Application Express Release
2.2. supports the reuse of Web
applications, enabling users to package
applications and dependent objects such
as table, seed data, and images into a
single file and install the application into
other Oracle Databases running Oracle
Application Express.
Oracle Application Express, a free
tool that enables users to build, deploy,
and manage secure Web applications
using a Web browser, also includes
component-level export; an item finder
that allows users to search within appli-
cations; and an Access Control Wizard
to control access to applications, indi-
vidual pages, and page components.
The Web-based tool is integrated
with all editions of Oracle Database
10g and Oracle9i Database Release 2.
The tool enables users with limited
programming experience to rapidly
develop scalable Web applications that
can be deployed to tens, hundreds, or
thousands of users.
“Thousands of users have turned
to Oracle Application Express to build
secure Web applications that can take
advantage of the performance, reliabil-
ity, and scalability of Oracle Database,”
comments Michael Hichwa, vice presi-
dent of software development at Oracle.
“We’re committed to providing users
with an easy-to-use tool featuring a
broad range of capabilities that enable
users to develop and deploy Web appli-
cations efficiently.”
ORACLE ACQUIRES INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
ASSETS OF SIGMA DYNAMICS
O
racle has acquired the intellectual
property assets of Sigma Dynamics,
a provider of real-time predictive analyt-
ics technology, in order to enhance its
Oracle Business Intelligence Suite and
Oracle Fusion Middleware offerings.
Sigma Dynamics’ Real-Time Decision
software combines customer insight
and business requirements to make the
best recommendation in each customer
interaction and operational decision by
intelligently adapting to continuously
changing information. Key decision
applications include real-time offer man-
agement, field service optimization, pre-
dictive call routing, and fraud detection.
This technology, combined with Oracle
Business Intelligence Suite and Oracle
Fusion Middleware, will allow busi-
nesses to leverage the insight contained
in both historical and real-time data
sources to drive better decisions. O
Oracle Warehouse Builder 10g
Release 2
oracle.com/technology/products/warehouse
Oracle Data Miner 10.2.0.2
oracle.com/technology/products/bi/odm/
odminer.html
Oracle Internal Controls Manager
oracle.com/applications/financials/
internal_controls_mgr.html
Oracle SQL Developer 1.1
oracle.com/technology/products/database/
sql_developer
Oracle SQL Developer Exchange
sqldeveloper.oracle.com
Oracle Application Express 2.2
oracle.com/technology/apex
Oracle and Sigma Dynamics
oracle.com/sigma-dynamics
$ervers
$torage
$ysteæs Maoageæeot
$ervices
$oItware
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0ell Tests orJ VoliJotes Scluticrs
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üell
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offers ore-enuineered, tested, and validated solutions for 0racle
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üatabase 10g
on Linux
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and the ooeratinu svsteu - and üell offers services to helo vou accelerate deolovuent.
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Ior üracIe ßatabase 10g.
c h a n n e l s PARTNER NEWS
Oracle JDeveloper
for Forms & PL/SQL
Developers: A Guide
to Web Development
with Oracle ADF
By Peter Koletzke and
Duncan Mills
Oracle Press
www.oraclepress.com
ISBN 0-07-225960-4
Looking for an efficient way to learn Java
Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE)
programming techniques? Peter Koletzke,
Oracle Certified Master, and Duncan Mills,
senior principal product manager of application
development tools at Oracle, demonstrate
techniques for working within Java EE and Oracle
JDeveloper for the thousands of developers
currently using Oracle Forms and PL/SQL.
Throughout the book, high- and low-level Oracle
Forms concepts are related to Java concepts to
help readers become more comfortable with the
new terminology, and special mentions in the
text describe how Oracle JDeveloper techniques
translate to PL/SQL or Oracle Forms.
The book delves into new components
required when developing and deploying a Java
EE application and covers Oracle Application
Development Framework (Oracle ADF), Oracle ADF
Faces, and Oracle JDeveloper Release 10.1.3.
Browse for Oracle books at oracle.com/
technology/books/10g_books.html.
OSOA, ORACLE PARTNERS REPORT
SOA SUCCESSES
O
racle is one of 17 technology
vendors in the Open Service
Oriented Architecture (OSOA) initiative,
which is developing service component
architecture (SCA) and service data
objects (SDO) specifications. The group
has developed draft SCA specifications
for a declarative policy framework;
improved description of connectivity
with bindings specifications for JMS,
JCA, and Web services; and created new
BPEL and PHP authoring models. Draft
specifications for SDO and for Service
Assembly, Java, and C++ service author-
ing have been updated. These new spec-
ifications can help organizations create
reusable services to meet changing busi-
ness requirements.
Many Oracle system integrator
partners have deployed successful
service-oriented environments (SOAs)
using Oracle Grid Technology. Certified
Advantage Partner Capgemini has
delivered five large SOA projects with
Oracle 10g and determined that the
Oracle Grid platform enables access to
SOA functionality across large organiza-
tions. Certified Advantage Partner EDS
is delivering the EDS Agile Enterprise
Platform based on Oracle 10g and other
technologies; being grid-enabled allows
EDS customers to reduce total cost of
ownership by up to 50 percent through
reduced hardware requirements and
related maintenance and staffing costs.
And Certified Advantage Partner Inter
Access runs an Oracle Grid–based
Linux data center with 10 live SOA cus-
tomers. Inter Access says its SOA-related
revenue has increased by hundreds of
percentage points year over year.
ORACLE-HP REFERENCE CONFIGURATIONS
EASE DATA WAREHOUSE PLANNING
O
racle and HP have developed refer-
ence configurations that can acceler-
ate implementation of Oracle Database
10g–based data warehouses on HP
servers and storage. Choosing a refer-
ence configuration, rather than design-
ing and building a custom configuration,
can cut weeks from the buying cycle and
speed implementation.
The reference configurations range
from single HP ProLiant servers running
Linux to HP Integrity Superdome
servers running HP-UX 11i. Using refer-
ence configurations enables IT planners
and architects to start from a proven
platform—based on the customer’s raw
data size, database, operating system,
processor, and infrastructure architecture
preference—when building or upgrad-
ing a data warehouse. The Oracle-HP
reference configurations can then be
customized for specific workloads and
requirements. Each reference configura-
tion balances processing power, storage,
and throughput.
IBM OFFERS SYSTEM I FOR ORACLE’S
JD EDWARDS ENTERPRISEONE
I
BM is offering a System i 520 Solution
Edition specially configured for
Oracle’s JD Edwards EnterpriseOne
and designed for small and medium
businesses. Available at a cost that is
competitive with comparably configured
Windows-based solutions, the new IBM
offering combines hardware and soft-
ware integration with open standards,
and features built-in security, virus resis-
tance, and simplified management of
database, storage, and system software.
PARTNERS USE ORACLE XML DB TO
POWER SOLUTIONS
O
racle has incorporated XML support
into its products since Oracle8i, and
this leadership continues with important
contributions from Oracle partners.
Oracle Partner Nextance creates
contract management solutions that help
Oracle customers to increase the strate-
gic value of—and realize the full finan-
cial return on—contractual relationships
with suppliers, customers, and distribu-
tors. Nextance supports Oracle XML DB/
XQuery, providing visibility into both
unstructured and structured data.
Using Oracle XML DB, Certified
Advantage Partner TEMENOS supports a
2 4 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
BEAT b o o k
Oracle Performance
Tuning for 10 g R2,
Second Edition
By Gavin Powell
Elsevier
www.Books.elsevier.com
ISBN: 1-55-558345-8
Oracle Certified Professional Gavin Powell delves
into four central themes of Oracle9i Database
and Oracle Database 10g Release 2 performance
tuning. These include: denormalizing data models
to fit applications; tuning SQL code according
to both the data model and the application in
relation to scalability; creating a well-proportioned
physical architecture at the time of initial Oracle
installation; and, most important, mixing skill sets
to obtain the best results.
The book includes all three aspects of Oracle
database tuning: data model tuning, SQL and
PL/SQL code tuning, and physical and
configuration tuning. It contains real-world
examples using large data sets and emphasizes
a development perspective as opposed to an
operating system perspective.
Powell also discusses how building an
appropriate data model and writing properly
performing SQL code can give 100 percent
performance improvement.
variety of incoming XML formats without
incurring the time and expense of pro-
gramming and custom code.
EnergySys, a subsidiary of Oracle
Partner Digital Steps, makes extensive
use of Oracle XML DB in its GAMMA
framework for hydrocarbon allocation
and commercial operations. By separat-
ing data access, business logic, and pre-
sentation, GAMMA supports constantly
changing asset acquisition, asset dis-
posal, and company relationships.
GLOBAL PARTNERS SUPPORT WAREHOUSE
BUILDER 10g RELEASE 2
O
racle Warehouse Builder 10g Release
2 is receiving wide industry support
through partnerships with leading tech-
nology vendors and systems integrators
who are helping their customers turn
data into tangible results.
LogicaCMG, an international consul-
tancy specializing in business consult-
ing, systems integration, and IT business
process outsourcing, is using Oracle
Warehouse Builder to offer its custom-
ers a single interface to data quality,
extract, transform, and load (ETL), and
metadata management. NewFrontiers
Consultancy creates data warehous-
ing solutions for companies using SAP
transaction processing; with Oracle
Warehouse Builder, NewFrontiers can
extract data from SAP R/3 systems and
integrate it into an enterprise data ware-
house or business intelligence (BI) solu-
tion. Tata Consultancy Services (TCS),
an IT consulting, services, and business
process outsourcing organization, uses
its BIDS (Business Intelligence Decision
Support) methodology to create and
execute BI programs, and maintains a
center of excellence dedicated to Oracle
BI and data warehouse technologies.
And TUSC, a midsize consultancy
that helps Fortune 500 companies to
implement, manage, and use Oracle
solutions, combines functional business
experience, expert knowledge of data
warehouse architecture, and a proven
approach to deliver BI solutions and
enterprise-scale data warehouses. O
Open Service Oriented Architecture
(OSOA) initiative
www.osoa.org
SIs leverage Oracle Grid-SOA
offerings
oracle.com/partners/home/bi/global/grid/
unauth/systems-integrators.pdf
www.capgemini.com/collaboration/
alliancepartners/oracle
www.eds.com/services/alliances/agility
www.interaccess.nl
Oracle-HP Reference Configurations
oracle.com/features/hp/data-warehousing.html
IBM System i
www.ibm.com/systemi
Partners support XML
www.nextance.com
www.temenos.ch
www.digitalsteps.com
Accenture Innovation Center
for Oracle
www.accenture.com/oracle
Partners support Oracle
Warehouse Builder
oracle.com/technology/products/warehouse/
www.logicacmg.com
www.newfrontiers.nl
www.tcs.com
www.tusc.com
A
ccenture has opened the Accenture Innovation Center
for Oracle, dedicated to the development of solutions
based on Oracle’s Server Technologies and Applications.
The Innovation Center, located at Oracle headquarters
in Redwood Shores, California, provides a direct link
between Oracle’s research and development teams and
Accenture’s global network of delivery centers and tech-
nology labs. Its efforts will initially focus on the devel-
opment of reference architectures for service-oriented
architecture (SOA) and reference applications based on
Oracle Fusion Middleware.
The center is the first of its kind to be located on the
Oracle campus, according to Jim Hayes, managing direc-
tor of Accenture’s global Oracle practice, who calls it “an
important step forward in our ongoing efforts to help
clients derive maximum value from their Oracle solutions.”
The center “conveys Accenture’s and Oracle’s commit-
ment to providing our joint customers with solutions
to take advantage of service-oriented architectures,”
says Thomas Kurian, senior vice president of Server
Technologies at Oracle. “With more than 31,000 global
customers using Oracle Fusion Middleware as the foun-
dation for their SOA infrastructures, it is critical that we
work with Accenture to help ensure that deployments are
quick and seamless.”
The center will enable Accenture and Oracle to develop
and deliver first-to-market, Oracle-based solutions using
Accenture processes, methodologies, and tools. It will also
serve to demonstrate new Accenture service offerings that
leverage Oracle Fusion Middleware, Oracle Applications,
and Oracle industry solutions.
The new Innovation Center, together with Accenture’s
recently opened Center of Excellence for Oracle in
Bangalore, India, will allow Accenture and Oracle to
develop a portfolio of products and services that will lead
to more-rapid and cost-effective Oracle-based implementa-
tions around the world.
Accenture has committed to invest US$450 million in
SOA and has already developed a first version of an SOA
reference architecture consisting of definitions, frame-
works, best practices, decision trees, and code—all based
on Oracle Fusion Middleware. Development of the second
version of the reference architecture is underway at the
new Innovation Center; it will become the foundation for
future joint Accenture-Oracle solution development and
customer engagements.
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT
Accenture Opens Innovation Center for Oracle
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 2 5
Structure Your
Unstructured Data
Copyright © 2006, Oracle. All rights reserved. Oracle, JD Edwards, PeopleSoft and Siebel are registered trademarks of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates.
Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.
oracle.com
or call 1.800.ORACLE.1
Oracle Content Database—
Enterprise wide policies. Interface via desktop.
Secure search and backup.
Office
Documents
Spreadsheets
Rich Media
Images
Plans & Designs
Oracle Content Database
BY BLAI R CAMPBELL
c h a n n e l s PEER-TO-PEER
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 2 7
Features class in particular was a
huge help when I was preparing
for my Oracle Database 10g New
Features for Administrators exam.
The course material offered brief
but comprehensive information that
really helped me understand the
important terminology.
If you were going to the Space Station
for six months, which Oracle reference
books would you take? I recommend
Cary Millsap’s Optimizing Oracle
Performance [O’Reilly Media, 2003],
Tom Kyte’s Expert One-on-One
[Apress, 2005], and Jonathan Lewis’
Cost-Based Oracle Fundamentals [Apress, 2005].
Chris Foot
How did you get started in IT? I was hurt in an on-the-job accident
while I was working for a construction company, and because
I could no longer fulfill my responsibilities in my old profes-
sion, I was eligible for a state-sponsored retraining program.
The program trained handicapped people for
jobs in the computer industry,
so I learned COBOL program-
ming. I was ultimately offered
a job writing COBOL programs
and later moved on to database
administration.
Looking forward, what trends do
you see in database administration?
Automatic Database Diagnostic
Monitor and the intelligent
advisers may not currently be a
total replacement for DBA experi-
ence and expertise, but sooner
or later, they will be. And no, we
won’t all be out of jobs—we’ll
just be doing different things.
The list of what Oracle Database
10g allows us to do just goes on
and on. It took me four blog
entries [see www.dbazine.com/
blogs/blog-cf/chrisfoot] to cover just
a subset of the new features in
the latest release. O
Avi Abrami
Tell us about the airport manage-
ment solutions (AIMS) produced
by your company. InterSystems
has an AIMS, a flight informa-
tion display system [FIDS],
and other related products.
While our main customers are
airports, our software is suit-
able for any place that displays
information on signs—in fact,
we’re vying to be a technology provider for the 2008 Beijing
Olympics. Oracle Database drives our FIDS system, and we
use OC4J [Oracle Containers for J2EE] as our Web server.
How do you use the internet on the job? I mainly use it to monitor
the Java-related forums on Oracle
Technology Network (OTN). I don’t
have a blog, but in a way I use the
OTN forums as my blog—someone
always asks a question or posts a
reply that allows me to provide a
code snippet or offer my opinion
on something. Actually, my main
blog-type message on the forums is,
“When all else fails, read the docu-
mentation.” But I must admit I got
that one from my boss.
Syed Jaffar Hussain
What kinds of topics do you discuss on your blog, at www.jaffardba
.blogspot.com? I’ve discussed a few of the tuning problems
we’ve encountered at the bank where I work. For example,
we had a 1.7TB Oracle9i database on AIX, which we moved
to an HP Superdome. After a successful migration, one of our
queries—which was supposed to run for just a few minutes—
was taking forever. I realized that
the problem was the query_
rewrite_enabled parameter—it
was set to FALSE on the HP
database. So I blogged about
the impact of various parameter
settings on SQL performance.
Tell us about your experiences with
Oracle University (OU). I’ve taken
several five-day OU courses, and
the Oracle Database 10g New
Peers in the Blogosphere
Three ACEs love talking tech—in their blogs and in blog-like musings on OTN.
Company: InterSystems, a
provider of airport information
management solutions
Job Title/Description: Senior
software engineer, responsible for
developing InterSystems’ AIMS
product
Location: Modi’in, Israel
(InterSystems is based in Denver,
Colorado)
Length of Time Using Oracle
Products: 17 years
oracle.com/technology/community/
oracle_ace
Company: Banque Saudi Fransi,
a full-service commercial bank and
financial services provider
Job Title/Description: Senior
Oracle DBA, with responsibility for
critical bank databases—including
core banking, data warehousing,
and local share trading databases
Location: Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Oracle Credentials: Oracle-
certified DBA (Oracle8i, Oracle9i,
Oracle Database 10g ), with more
than 8 years of experience using
Oracle products
peerSPECS
oracle.com/technology/community/
oracle_ace
Company: Remote DBA Experts, a
remote database services provider
Job Title/Description:
Database operations manager,
responsible for coordinating the
support efforts of a large remote
DBA services staff
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Oracle Credentials: Oracle-
certified instructor, with 20 years of
experience using Oracle products
peerSPECS
oracle.com/technology/community/
oracle_ace
peerSPECS
SQLDetective 3.4
www.sqldetective.com
Take even more control
of your database applications
with SQLDetective 3.4
1. The PL/SQL Debugger, integrated in the Stored Program
Editor, debugs procedures, functions, packages, object
types and triggers
2. The Code Explorer displays hierarchical information
about the package's components, such as variables and
parameters, their types and structures and allows efficient
navigation through stored programs
3. This tab displays watches - variables, including complex
data types such as records, indexed tables and cursors
4. Values of variables displayed as tooltips at the cursor
position
5. Indicates a Breakpoint/Marker where code execution
stops during debugging
6. Multiple objects (tabs) can be opened at the same time
1. The Storage Manager manages tablespaces, datafiles,
segments and quotes in the database instance. Operate
and manage multiple tablespaces at the same time
2. Customizes column visibility or their order using Dataset
Manager. Filters the list of tablespaces using pre-defined
or user-defined filters
3. Object Summary displays object quantity and size,
grouped by object owner and type for the selected
tablespaces. The grid displays all objects and detailed
information such as object size, blocks, extents, etc.
4. Relocate/Move objects (table, index, and partition)
between tablespaces. Relocate LOBs and index-organized
tables as well
5. Display/Modify segment attributes of the selected object
in the grid.
6. Displays used space for tablespaces graphically and as
a percentage
SQLDetective 3.4 is ideal for developing database objects,
writing and debugging stored programs, executing, testing
and formatting SQL and PL/SQL statements, managing table
spaces and rollback segments.
Discover SQLDetective 3.4 - the world class tool for every-
body’s budget. Visit www.sqldetective.com to learn why 3.4
is one of the most powerful, advanced and easy2use Oracle
application development tools available.
THE WORLD CLASS TOOL FOR EVERYBODY’S BUDGET
BY DAVID A. KELLY
Anthony Abbattista
Dennis Alley
Yoshikazu Amano
Øystein Amundsen
Rob Aneweer
Mark Arratoon
Eddie Awad
Jean Chavinier
Albino Faustino Jr.
Adriana Ferreira
Steven Feuerstein
Tim Hall
Erin Hamm
Ton Hardeman
Lisa Harris
Kevin Horner
Basheer Khan
Linda Leong
Jonathan Lewis
Kunal Malik
Brad Maue
Jim McDonald
Logan McLeod
Barak Moffitt
Gordon Mohr
Deb Morton
Chris Newcombe
Jay Parmar
Vasif Pasha
Rob Patton
Pratik Ray
Regent Roberge
John Scott
Michael Smith
Marc Staheli
John Stegeman
David Ufton
Brian T. Wilkinson
FIVE YEARS OF EDITORS’ CHOICE AWARDS
HONORING LEADERS AND INNOVATORS OF 2006
Each year the editors of Oracle Magazine present Editors’ Choice Awards to extremely
accomplished candidates—people that best reflect the highest achievements and vision in
their areas of expertise. Nominated from all corners of the globe, these candidates
represent the most advanced, forward-thinking, and experienced people working with
Oracle technology today.
Selecting the winners from a pool of such candidates, all of whom are worthy of
recognition, is a difficult yet rewarding task. We’re pleased to announce the winners of our
fifth annual Oracle Magazine Editors’ Choice awards—together they represent a diverse,
vital, and driving force bringing innovation and leadership to the workforce every day.
–THE EDITORS OF ORACLE MAGAZINE
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 2 9
You might not think that Irish whisky, French champagne, and Russian
vodka have a lot in common, but to Pernod Ricard, the world’s second
largest wine and spirits company, they do. Founded in 1975 by the
merger of two French companies, Pernod Ricard has 15 key brands
including Chivas Regal, Stolichnaya, Jameson, and Perrier Jouët.
“Our strategy is local roots, global reach,” says Jean Chavinier,
group vice president of Information Systems and Oracle Magazine’s CIO
of the Year for Europe, Middle East, and Africa. “Pernod Ricard’s decen-
tralized organization is one of our great strengths, since it sets us apart
from other companies and allows decision-making based on in-depth
knowledge of each market and consumer expectations.”
For Chavinier the strategy is also the challenge. “CIOs now have
to think globally to leverage cost savings and identify benefits for the
whole company, but we have to execute locally to stay close to stake-
holders and react quickly whenever conditions change,” he says. “As a
result, flexibility and adaptability are key drivers for us. The pace of our
IT strategy implementation is also a key success factor—rather than
running lengthy IT projects over years, we try to deliver value to busi-
ness with clearly defined projects that bring quick wins.”
Chavinier’s main objective is to improve the efficiency of Pernod
Ricard IT support while keeping IT costs under control. To do this, he
promotes best practices; sharing solutions, platforms, and resources;
and developing a network approach across the Pernod Ricard IT orga-
nizations. “We are also improving our supply chain by implementing
forecasting and production planning modules [from Oracle], and we
have started a partnership with Oracle to update and extend the wine
modules of [Oracle’s] JD Edwards EnterpriseOne,” Chavinier says.
The company has grown aggressively, including acquisitions of
Seagrams in 2001 and Allied Domecq in 2005. Within a year, the size
of the group has nearly doubled, and IT is moving to a regional cluster
approach with a shared infrastructure. Allied Domecq was using an SAP
R/3 enterprise resource planning (ERP) platform and legacy systems,
but for its common ERP solution, Pernod Ricard chose to continue
to develop and roll out core finance, distribution, and manufacturing
models based on JD Edwards EnterpriseOne for its sales and manufac-
turing regions around the world.
Although this type of approach is not new, it’s a paradigm shift
for a traditionally decentralized organization such as Pernod Ricard.
“Changing a company’s culture is always much more complex than
solving specific technical issues,” says Chavinier.
A key task for Pernod Ricard is to create an IT community, since
the IT directors previously hardly knew each other. “After three years of
communications, conference calls, and IT meetings, we have managed
to establish an IT community with people sharing best practices at the
IT directors’ level,” says Chavinier.
“Good communications and a close community are an important
part of building a successful IT organization.”
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Jean Chavinier
CIO OF THE YEAR, EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST, AFRICA
CIO has strategy of local roots with a global reach.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Jean Chavinier
Job Title/Description:
Group Vice President of
Information Systems
Company: Pernod Ricard
Location: Paris, France
Award: CIO of the Year, Europe,
Middle East, and Africa, 2006
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The business world is sometimes called a jungle, but for
Adriana Ferreira, CIO of Brazil’s Companhia Vale do Rio
Doce (CVRD) and Oracle Magazine’s CIO of the Year for Latin
America, business really can get wild.
“We’re a large mining company, so our people need to
be able to go to the middle of the jungle and other remote
places to examine minerals and conduct business,” says
Ferreira. “We’re not talking big cities or even big countries,
so we’re designing an IT infrastructure that can support
people traveling even in remote parts of the world.”
With operations in more than 17 countries and a market
capitalization of more than US$55 billion, CVRD is the largest
mining company in the Americas and continues to grow
rapidly. From iron ore, aluminum, and copper to three rail-
roads and eight ports, CVRD has extensive and varied busi-
ness units operating around the world.
“The main challenge for
IT is supporting the growth of
the company, including sup-
porting individual business
units,” says Ferreira, who’s
responsible for providing the
IT infrastructure for more
than 23,000 users. “Although
each unit used to have a
separate IT department,
we’ve been centralizing IT
resources to support the rapid growth of the company.”
After centralizing operations, CVRD then selected spe-
cific functions to outsource and started to implement new
enterprise resource planning functionality based on Oracle
E-Business Suite. “We’ve been changing the governance
model of IT to be more flexible and more agile and support
the growth of the company,” says Ferreira. “Oracle
E-Business Suite helps us do that.”
For example, CVRD operates three railroads, each of
which used to have different business processes and IT
applications. Now, under the unified system, it has both an
integrated view and greater flexibility to share resources and
people among the railroads, since the systems and opera-
tions are consistent. “When we unify the systems, we’re
actually unifying the business processes and helping the
businesses to be more efficient,” says Ferreira.
Adriana Ferreira
CIO OF THE YEAR, LATIN AMERICA
CIO provides centralized infrastructure for
enterprise growth and remote capabilities.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Adriana Ferreira
Job Title/Description:
CIO
Company: Companhia Vale do
Rio Doce
Location: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Award: CIO of the Year, Latin
America, 2006
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 3 1
Alcoa produces metal that’s incredibly strong and lightweight, but a
few years ago the company realized its IT systems weren’t.
In 2000, Alcoa—a US$26 billion company and the world’s largest
aluminum producer, with 129,000 employees operating in 44 coun-
tries—had 25 lines of business, each with its own IT and infrastructure
strategy. For example, “In North America alone, we had more than 40
procurement systems,” says Kevin Horner, CIO for Alcoa and Oracle
Magazine’s CIO of the Year for North America. “With that type of infra-
structure, we simply couldn’t support the business processes effectively
from a value standpoint.”
To unify its IT resources and streamline information flow, Alcoa
initiated a strategy to consolidate its IT infrastructure and standardize
its applications. From 2001 to 2003, the company consolidated data
centers around the world, from more than 100 to 4. Between 2001 and
2006, Alcoa rolled out its enterprise business solution of common pro-
cesses and data—enabled by Oracle E-Business Suite—to hundreds of
locations in North America, Europe, Australia, Latin America, and other
areas, replacing a wide set of individual, unintegrated applications with
an integrated Oracle architecture.
Now, Alcoa has a footprint of about 78 Oracle E-Business Suite
modules that are operational inside its production plants, from procure-
ment to financials to process manufacturing, demand planning, and
more. “The current Alcoa North America Oracle application system
is—from Oracle’s perspective—the largest and most complex system
supported in the world,” says Horner. “By the end of 2006, we’ll have
about 75 percent of our revenue operating inside of an Oracle applica-
tion environment. That makes a huge difference in how we can run our
business efficiently, optimize our facilities, and better serve customers.”
Alcoa is also continuing to invest in its solutions, including invest-
ments in three major analytics areas in 2006. “We’re augmenting our
sales and finance applications with customer, product, and market infor-
mation so we can segment our markets and better understand product
and customer profitability. This will enable improved strategic planning
and rationalization of our customers and products,” says Horner. “With
the analytical tools and our Oracle applications, we believe we can
achieve significant value on increasing product profitability.”
A key component of Alcoa’s success at integrating a huge number
of systems and streamlining its business processes has been the Oracle
stack. “One of the biggest benefits to us of the Oracle architecture is
the value of its integration from top to bottom,” says Horner. “It allows
you to gain visibility across your enterprise—from individual plants to
lines of business to collections of business units. It’s a big advantage to
have an integrated environment and common data that allows you to
look across the company.” M
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Kevin Horner
CIO OF THE YEAR, NORTH AMERICA
Alcoa CIO streamlines with Oracle.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Kevin Horner
Job Title/Description:
CIO
Company: Alcoa
Location: Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania
Award: CIO of the Year, North
America, 2006
32 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 3 3
For Yoshikazu Amano, managing officer, Toyota Motor Corporation, and
Oracle Magazine’s CIO of the Year for Asia Pacific, the role of CIO isn’t a
solitary position so much as a team endeavor.
“Everybody on my IT team has CIO-like responsibilities in helping
to ensure that new requirements from our management and users are
satisfied in a timely manner so that Toyota can achieve its corporate
growth objectives,” says Amano.
An important key to Amano’s success as an IT leader at Toyota
has been his ability to lead a streamlining of business processes and
information systems. For example, Amano’s team recently finished the
global standardization of a bill of materials and CAD system that cul-
minated in improved productivity of Toyota’s key business processes,
including its R&D and production processes.
Moving forward, Amano’s corporate IT team is working on an
enterprise architecture to articulate both the next-generation
standards for IT system development
and management as well as
the technologies required to support
business processes from an
end-to-end perspective.
Amano sees globalization and gov-
ernance as his biggest challenge. As
Toyota’s business continues to grow
(2005 saw the launch of the Lexus
brand in Japan and new projects in countries from the Czech Republic
to India and China), the number and magnitude of local and regional
system requirements have increased significantly. Amano and his team
need to not only drive regional localization but also ensure that indi-
vidual plants adhere to standard baseline criteria.
Part of the globalization and governance solution has been Oracle’s
back-office applications. “We have deployed PeopleSoft Enterprise
Human Capital Management and PeopleSoft Enterprise Financial
Management Solutions in Japan, North America, and other overseas
subsidiaries and group companies,” says Amano. “They are very
effective in sustaining Toyota’s global back-office operations and
its competence.”
In addition, Toyota relies on Oracle Database. “We also use Oracle
Database for many third-party software applications throughout the
Toyota companies,” says Amano. “Oracle is valued for high availability,
great usability, and market leadership.”
Yoshikazu Amano
CIO OF THE YEAR, ASIA PACIFIC
Team leader ensures that management and
customer requirements are met in a timely way.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Yoshikazu Amano
Job Title/Description:
Managing Officer
Company: Toyota Motor Corp.
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Award: CIO of the Year,
Asia Pacific, 2006
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Lisa Harris
CTO OF THE YEAR
CTO finds that Oracle is the power behind
the technology.
>
For Lisa Harris, Oracle Magazine’s CTO of the Year, customer satisfac-
tion—and her measure of Oracle’s ability to deliver—comes down to
a paycheck.
“We need scalability, we need flexibility, and we need 24/7 capa-
bilities. We cannot be down,” says Harris, CTO of the Florida-based
human resource services company Gevity. “We need to deliver pay-
checks every day we’re in business. If we cannot deliver a paycheck,
we’re not in business.”
Gevity provides human resource services to small and medium
businesses, with 8,000 clients across the United States, serving almost
140,000 employees. Eleven years ago, Gevity selected Oracle to provide
the core foundation for its HR capability, and the company has grown to
become one of the largest Oracle HR
payroll implementations in the world.
“Technology is core to our business,
and Oracle is the power behind our tech-
nology,” says Harris. “With 8,000 clients, each
with its own business rules, we need an applica-
tion and technology partner that provides the ability
to easily configure to each client’s particular rules.”
Over the years, Gevity has progressed through the Oracle stack, starting with
HR and Payroll and then implementing the rest of the enterprise resource
planning suite, as well as customer relationship management, Oracle
Application Server, and Oracle Fusion Middleware. This year it is imple-
menting Oracle COREid and Oracle Collaboration Suite. The resulting
scalable suite of Gevity services is delivered on Oracle Portal.
An important initiative for Gevity was its recent launch of a
new solution aimed at the midmarket and built using Oracle
Fusion Middleware 10g, including Oracle Identity Management
Suite as well as Oracle SOA Suite and Oracle Portal. And by
using Oracle BPEL Process Manager for application integra-
tion, Gevity was able to enhance the end-user experience of
the online portal and significantly improve service.
Key to it all has been Gevity’s ability to leverage Oracle’s
technology. Harris notes, “As Oracle extends its product line,
we are also able to extend our service offerings. Our Oracle
relationship is a competitive advantage.”
3 4 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
winnerSPECS
Name: Lisa Harris
Job Title/Description:
CTO
Company: Gevity
Location: Bradenton, Florida
Award: CTO of the Year 2006
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Just as successful retail stores have to adapt their product lines to serve changing styles and
consumer interests, software suppliers to the retail industry have to adjust their solutions for
individual businesses and clients.
“Retail technology is very different from customer to customer. Some of our clients have
hundreds of stores and a limited number of items, and other clients have few stores but a huge
number of items,” says Regent Roberge, database administrator and principal architect for
Jesta I.S. and Oracle Magazine’s DBA of the Year. One of Roberge’s key challenges is to make
Jesta I.S. solutions work for a wide range of customer needs.
The Jesta I.S. Vision Suite of Oracle-based solutions enables
retailers and specialty markets to manage inventory, sales, trans-
fers, distributions, and other business functions. Jesta I.S. retail
clients are located mainly in the United States, Europe, and
China and range from organizations that process 50,000
sales transactions per day to those that process 10 million.
Roberge works with Jesta I.S. clients to install, config-
ure, and customize the Oracle database and application
server underpinning the Jesta I.S. solutions. Since each
installation is so different, both the application and the
underlying Oracle database typically have to be optimized for
customer needs. “If we have to do tuning at the database
level, it’s usually easy,” says Roberge. “We also leverage
database scalability so that as our client’s business
grows, it can simply add hardware to scale.”
Since Jesta’s application is built on the
Oracle stack, the architecture is important to
Roberge. “What I really like about Oracle is
that there are so many things that you can
do with the database and so many fea-
tures to take advantage of,” he says. “It
has so much flexibility and power.”
The fact that Jesta I.S. solutions
are built on Oracle helps make the
sale. “Most of our large clients,
especially in the retail and whole-
sale markets, are looking for
solutions based on Oracle
because they already run
Oracle,” says Roberge. “They
want to be able to integrate
with their existing systems that
already run on Oracle, so it’s
compelling for them and easy to
integrate for us.”
Regent Roberge
DBA OF THE YEAR
Architect makes Oracle-based solutions work for a wide
range of retail customers.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Regent Roberge
Job Title/Description: DBA and
Principal Architect
Company: Jesta I.S.
Location: Verdun, Quebec, Canada
Award: DBA of the Year 2006
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 3 5
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When Deb Morton, Oracle Magazine’s Oracle Applications Implementer
of the Year, joined the storage networking products and solutions
provider McDATA in 2000, the company was preparing for its IPO. But
it was also expanding its business; moving into new markets; aggres-
sively acquiring new customers; and growing its revenues, shipments,
and customers at 30 percent quarter over quarter.
Not an easy set of challenges to manage, but Morton did just that.
In fact, after reevaluating infrastructure needs and doing a total-cost-
of-ownership and return-on-investment analysis, Morton and McDATA
decided to replace the company’s existing SAP enterprise resource
planning system with Oracle’s E-Business Suite.
Morton served as the key project manager for the Oracle 11i
E-Business Suite migration, implementing the full suite of Oracle appli-
cations in approximately seven months. Since then, McDATA has added
warehouse management and Oracle’s advanced supply chain to help
manage its new, fully outsourced contract manufacturing strategy.
“We don’t contemplate an upgrade without reviewing what the
improvements are on the business side. It’s not just about IT,” says
Morton. “For example, when we went to [Oracle E-Business Suite 11i
Release] 11.5.10, there were a lot of benefits for our finance organiza-
tion around intercompany invoice streamlining and streamlining the
order processing between locations and headquarters.”
With all the applications and solutions McDATA has deployed from
Oracle, Morton is increasingly impressed with the robustness of the
solutions. “When we rolled out 11.5.10, we were amazed at the lack of
patches we needed to apply—it was very solid,” she says. “We were
able to upgrade in six weeks.”
Another key initiative for McDATA is continuing to streamline
its business and IT operations. “We have an internal project called
“Consolidating to the Core.” With all the acquisitions we’ve done,
we’ve ended up with data centers around the United States and the
world. So we’re consolidating using
our own products so we get the
strength of a single data center with
failover for disaster recovery,” says
Morton. “We’ll be more cost-effective
by consolidating our data center, but
we’re not losing any of the perfor-
mance that users expect.”
With its ever-changing business
needs, McDATA finds Oracle’s Fusion path particularly compelling.
“Our strategy is to stay on top of the Fusion path that Oracle has laid
out,” says Morton. “We absolutely want to take advantage of that new
functionality, since it seems like we’re doing an acquisition or upgrade
or two every year. But we also need to make sure that each time we’re
delivering value to the business.”
Deb Morton
ORACLE APPLICATIONS IMPLEMENTER OF THE YEAR
Director leads migration from SAP to manage growth,
acquisitions, and consolidation.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Deb Morton
Job Title/Description:
Director of Business Systems
Company: McDATA
Location: Broomfield, Colorado
Award: Oracle Applications
Implementer of the Year 2006
3 6 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
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Albino Faustino Jr.
IT MANAGER OF THE YEAR
For this CIO, success is all about connecting.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Albino Faustino Jr.
Job Title/Description: CIO
Company: GRSA
Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil
Award: IT Manager of the
Year 2006
“The main challenge we face as a company is connecting everybody
in the business to the same systems so they can act together and
make business decisions from the same data sources and applica-
tions,” says Albino Faustino Jr., CIO of GRSA and Oracle Magazine’s
IT Manager of the Year. GRSA, part of the Accor Group and Compass
Groups, is a regional leader in catering and owns seven specialized
brands, which supply food services at schools, airports, bus stations,
companies, and hospitals.
Since he became CIO in 2004, Faustino has focused on imple-
menting a three-phase plan for converging strategic information and
integrating end-to-end processes. He started by consolidating eight key
systems into only two, both running on Oracle. “Apart from the intrinsic
benefits of a consolidated architecture, we have significantly reduced
our total cost of ownership by cutting system maintenance and support
costs,” says Faustino.
In the second phase, GRSA consolidated multiple data centers
into one built on a grid architecture. In the third phase, GRSA used
Oracle Collaboration Suite as a single-sign-on portal to deliver applica-
tions with supporting tools to users within a single view. The Oracle
Collaboration Suite portal will help move GRSA toward a service-
oriented architecture infrastructure.
An important part of Faustino’s success has been his partnership
with Oracle, beginning with GRSA’s 2003 implementation of Oracle
E-Business Suite. “The management of this project has been run in a
partnership between our IT team and Oracle consultants,” says Faustino.
“The project was efficiently run, based on the high-quality stan-
dards of Oracle AIM [Application Implementation Method] methodol-
ogy,” he says. “We completed it on time and on budget with a 1.5-year
return on investment. It was an excellent performance standard for this
type of project.”
Since the completion of the original Oracle deployment, GRSA has
expanded its capabilities with the use of Oracle 10g Real Application
Clusters and, most recently, Oracle Discoverer to develop a business
intelligence layer for translating a daily cost assessment model and as
a basis for a move toward menu centralization. “The implementation of
our business intelligence solution has practically doubled our business
in Brazil in the last three years,” says Faustino.
Overall, Faustino is extremely satisfied with the scope of GRSA
Oracle solutions and the benefits they’ve achieved. “We’ve been pio-
neers in this technology in Brazil, and we’ve achieved a 140 percent
gain in our processing speed,” says Faustino. “We’re very happy with
our Oracle-based deployments.”
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For Michael Smith, Oracle Magazine’s Oracle Spatial Developer of
the Year, hurricanes and natural disasters are an integral part of the job
he does every day.
A physical scientist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Smith
and his group mainly work on civilian-related projects, including sup-
porting sound water resources solutions and emergency-management
functions when there’s flooding or hurricane damage.
“The Corps has a central system called EngLink, the emergency
response link, that we’ve developed the GIS [geographic information
systems] portion for,” says Smith. “We used an Oracle database with
spatial components and developed PL/SQL packages that allow individ-
ual users to log in from throughout the United States to create, update,
and examine GIS information that’s stored in the central database.”
Smith’s group works on a wide variety of other GIS-enabled
applications and finds that the Oracle Spatial solution is particularly
efficient. “One of the really nice things about Oracle Spatial is that
it doesn’t take a lot more development effort to do spatial applica-
tions,” says Smith. “In addition to ease of use, the inherent features of
Oracle—such as role-based access and Virtual Private Database—add
to the effectiveness of Oracle Spatial applications.”
Michael Smith
SPATIAL DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Scientist develops geographic information systems for
emergency response.
>
If you’re walking a tightrope with a short time to complete the act and you’re
trying out a new wire, it’s nice to discover that you have a safety net, as John
Stegeman, senior program director for Cambridge Solutions, discovered.
Stegeman, Oracle Magazine’s Java Developer of the Year, was working on
a consulting project for a large hotel chain that involved creating a Java-based
application for managing the hotel’s capital projects. “We were looking for the
latest and greatest Oracle Java tools that would enable us to deliver results fast
and to iterate improvements easily in the future,” says Stegeman. “We had only
two months to develop a medium-to-large–sized application.”
Cambridge Solutions went with Oracle JDeveloper, although the new version
had just been released. “Our biggest concern was that we’d have trouble finding
help when we ran into roadblocks using Java tools that were newly released,”
says Stegeman. “We were saved by the community process for sharing infor-
mation that Oracle provides in the user forum [forums.oracle.com]. Whenever
we couldn’t figure out a problem, we’d post a question and get a response back
fairly quickly. Being able to get that kind of response was a big help.” S
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winnerSPECS
Name: Michael Smith
Job Title/Description:
Physical Scientist
Company: U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers
Location: Hanover,
New Hampshire
Award: Spatial Developer of
the Year 2006
John Stegeman
JAVA DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Program director uses community process and information
sharing to take the risk out of adopting new technology.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: John Stegeman
Job Title/Description:
Senior Program Director
Company: Cambridge Solutions
Location: Oak Brook, Illinois
Award: Java Developer of the
Year 2006
3 8 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 3 9
David Ufton
XML DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Architect stores and transports energy with XML.
>
Composite applications and Sanskrit may not seem to have a lot in
common unless you’ve met Pratik Ray, Oracle Magazine’s Composite
Applications Developer of the Year.
Ray studies Vedic scriptures for insights. “I love learning about Vedic
culture, because one aspect of it is the integration of human life—how we
depend on each other. Each of us as individuals is integrated with others,
and we are all an integral part of the universe.” Ray applies the compa-
ny’s philosophy of integration and innovation to develop new versions of
Landmark’s OpenWorks software, the most widely used Exploration and
Production Project Data Management system in the oil and gas industry.
Bridging the past and future is important for both Ray and Landmark’s
customers. “As we develop new generations of project data manage-
ment, we have to support the legacy systems and maintain backward
compatibility for our existing customers,” says Ray. “We do that by using
composite applications and leveraging Oracle technologies.”
For Ray the direction of IT architectures is certain. “Organizations have
investments in their existing products and don’t want to rewrite them
because something new comes out, unless there’s a value-added proposi-
tion for their customers,” he says. “Composite applications let organiza-
tions integrate technologies seamlessly for the benefit of the bottom line.” P
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If energy could be captured in an XML format, David Ufton, senior architect at
EnergySys, could design a better way to process and transport it. The company
develops applications (most notably, for hydrocarbon accounting) for the oil and
gas industry. The applications, based on Java architectures and leveraging XML,
manage everything from inventory positions to processes that schedule vessels
arriving to transport oil, gas, or liquefied natural gas from processing plants.
“We used to have relational tables in the database. We were forever writing
code to translate that data into the business and user interface tiers,” says
Ufton, Oracle Magazine’s XML Developer of the Year. “Then we realized that if
we stored XML in the database, we could process it in the business tier in XML
form, transform it using standard tools, and pass it straight to the user interface.”
The result: an enterprise architecture that uses XML standards from end to
end. “We use Oracle’s XML DB, XPath, and XQuery to retrieve and create the XML
that we have in the repository,” says Ufton. “Although the packets of information
we pass across tiers are somewhat larger than traditional solutions, we don’t
have to translate them as much as we did with older approaches. Using XML
creates a far more flexible and robust architecture that benefits our clients.”
Pratik Ray
COMPOSITE APPLICATIONS DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Architect’s philosophy of integration leverages
technologies and benefits the bottom line.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: David Ufton
Job Title/Description:
Senior Architect
Company: EnergySys
Location: Guildford, England
Award: XML Developer
of the Year 2006
winnerSPECS
Name: Pratik Ray
Job Title/Description:
Systems Architect
Company: Landmark
Location: Houston, Texas
Award: Composite Applications
Developer of the Year 2006
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“If you enter a URL in our Wayback Machine, you’ll get a list of all the
captures we’ve made of that site over the 10 years of our history,” says
Gordon Mohr, Oracle Magazine’s Open Source Developer of the Year. “You can
click on the links and browse the Web as it was at a prior date and time.”
An architect and lead developer for Web projects at the Internet Archive,
Mohr has been a pioneering user of Oracle Berkeley DB Java Edition, incor-
porating it into an open source Web crawler, Heritrix.
“The Heritrix crawler uses hundreds of threads to communicate with
Web sites and retrieve their contents,” says Mohr. “Oracle’s open source
Berkeley DB Java Edition is a good fit for our requirements since it works so
well with big, changing data sets in a highly concurrent environment.”
Mohr has been a key contributor to the Berkeley DB Java Edition devel-
opment effort by stress-testing the system and working with the develop-
ment team to analyze, reproduce, and fix key bugs.
A key challenge is keeping up with Web designs and technologies. “We
watch innovations in browsers and Web site design closely, since our soft-
ware has to capture it all in an automated fashion,” says Mohr.
Gordon Mohr
OPEN SOURCE DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Developer watches Web innovations and uses open
source to go back in time.
>
“PL/SQL developers don’t test their code often enough or deeply enough,”
says Steven Feuerstein, Oracle Magazine’s PL/SQL Developer of the Year. “It’s
a big problem, and not just in our small part of the programming world. Sure,
unit testing is tough and there are lots of obstacles, but we’ve got to reduce the
number of bugs that make it into production applications.”
Feuerstein emphasizes testing in his training sessions and conference pre-
sentations. He’s also the development manager for a new unit testing tool for
PL/SQL from Quest Software. Of course, there is more to coding than testing, and
Feuerstein’s ten books on PL/SQL prove the point. He complements his interest
in testing with a broader focus in his Best Practice PL/SQL column on Oracle
Technology Network and his PL/SQL Practices column in Oracle Magazine.
His take on the PL/SQL language? “It’s elegant and accessible. It may not
have all the power of Java, but it is without doubt the premier database pro-
gramming language,” says Feuerstein. “And let’s face it: the tens of thousands
of mission-critical production applications built on PL/SQL will be running for
decades. It’s critical for developers to pay attention to the robustness, maintain-
ability, and testability of that code.”
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Name: Gordon Mohr
Job Title/Description:
Architect and Lead Developer
Company: Internet Archive
Location: San Francisco, California
Award: Open Source Developer
of the Year 2006
winnerSPECS
Name: Steven Feuerstein
Job Title/Description:
PL/SQL Evangelist
Company: Quest Software
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Award: PL/SQL Developer
of the Year 2006
Steven Feuerstein
PL/SQL DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Writing good code—and testing it—is one
developer’s mission.
>
Oracle Application Express enables fast, easy creation of Web-based applications,
and John Scott, owner of Shellprompt Hosting and Oracle Magazine’s Oracle
Application Express Developer of the Year, sees unlimited opportunities for it.
“I haven’t come up against a Web site or system that I wouldn’t like to do
in Oracle Application Express,” says Scott, who recently became an Oracle ACE.
“It can be used for any Web site that’s backed by a database—there are a huge
number of potential applications out there on the internet.” Shellprompt Hosting
specializes in hosting Oracle-based Web sites and applications. “Oracle has refined
the technology into something you can use to develop everything from a personal
Web site to a sophisticated e-commerce system,” says Scott. “You don’t even
need to install anything on your computer to use it—all you need is a browser.”
Oracle Application Express also reduces maintenance and security concerns.
“It’s a lot simpler to maintain an application written in Oracle Application Express
because everything is stored in the database, meaning you have fewer moving
parts to look after,” says Scott. “Oracle has gone to great lengths to ensure that
the security features available in the database, such as fine-grained access
control, can be seamlessly used in your application.”
John Scott
ORACLE APPLICATION EXPRESS DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Business owner brings fast, easy development to personal
Web sites and e-commerce systems alike.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Kunal Malik
Job Title/Description:
Director of Global Applications
Company: Wind River Systems
Location: Alameda, California
Award: Oracle Fusion Middleware
Developer of the Year 2006
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Name: John Scott
Job Title/Description:
Owner
Company: Shellprompt Hosting
Location: Leeds, England
Award: Oracle Application Express
Developer of the Year 2006
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 4 1
With platforms that control devices from Apple’s AirPort to NASA’s Mars Rover,
Wind River Systems routinely creates efficient technology solutions. But when
the company needed a streamlined way for customers to access its internal
applications, Wind River turned to Oracle Fusion Middleware.
“When we did the competitive evaluation, the comparison and value
weren’t close,” says Kunal Malik, director of global applications for Wind River
and Oracle Magazine’s Oracle Fusion Middleware Developer of the Year. “It was
an easy decision to standardize on Oracle Fusion Middleware.”
A key goal was to empower customers and provide them with more self-
service–based applications. The solution needed to be secure but easy to
navigate as customers accessed different applications. “In a matter of months,
we launched the solution worldwide. It integrated all the composite applica-
tions, including support-ticketing systems, license-managing systems, and
other custom applications,” says Malik. “Customers register once, and they get
access to everything.” Oracle Fusion Middleware has helped Wind River transi-
tion to a service-oriented architecture (SOA).
“If you ask me what my SOA strategy is, I’d have to say it’s Oracle Fusion
Middleware,” says Malik. “It provides great time to market, it’s able to inte-
grate, and it’s able to build and leverage reusable services that we create.” M
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ORACLE FUSION MIDDLEWARE DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Director streamlines access and empowers customers.
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“Solving the collaboration problem between devices, information,
and different people with different roles is very complex,” says Mark
Arratoon, a senior technical architect for GE Healthcare Integrated
IT Solutions and Oracle Magazine’s BPEL Developer of the Year. GE
Healthcare provides healthcare products and services ranging from
medical imaging to information technologies.
“Combining loosely coupled service-oriented architecture [SOA]
approaches with the transparency and maintainability of business-
process-management [BPM]–based process design is a great fit for
the complex and varied collaborations that happen between people
and machines in today’s hospital and healthcare environments,” says
Arratoon, whose group provides information system solutions for hos-
pitals and integrated delivery networks.
Arratoon sees BPM and its associated standards such as
Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) as the perfect fit
for healthcare. “We’re driven by standards-based approaches
and platforms,” he says. “One of the key standards for BPM
is BPEL, and we believe that BPEL is emerging as the
dominant standard and approach to developing BPM-
based solutions.”
BPEL gives organizations transparency into the
processes that constitute their business, and it gives
them a relatively easy way to maintain and extend
those processes as they grow and change. “That’s
important for us, because we find that for many
large-scale healthcare ISVs [independent software
vendors] the problem of customized installations is
a large one, given the complexity of organizations,”
says Arratoon. “Anything that helps us be more
agile in the process of customization, installation,
and maintenance is a definite advantage.”
Enter Oracle BPEL Process Manager. “We’re
very impressed with Oracle BPEL Process
Manager and its relative maturity and rich capa-
bilities, compared to other tools,” says Arratoon.
“We’re particularly impressed with Oracle BPEL
Process Manager’s close adherence to the BPEL SOA
standards. Oracle is in the forefront of shaping those
standards as they evolve.” Arratoon also likes Oracle BPEL
Process Manager’s support for different application servers
and database platforms. “As a supplier to the enterprise-
level healthcare providers, we need to have the flexibility to
deploy on different platforms, so it’s important for us that
our server-side architecture adheres to standards as we
go forward,” says Arratoon.
Arratoon is optimistic about the possibilities. “BPM,
BPEL, and SOA hold great promise for healthcare from
our point of view,” says Arratoon.
Mark Arratoon
BPEL DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Architect uses BPEL to keep systems in good health.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Mark Arratoon
Job Title/Description:
Senior Technical Architect
Company: GE Healthcare
Location: Burlington, Vermont
Award: BPEL Developer
of the Year 2006
4 2 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
“A reliable application depends upon solid database design, and with
today’s emphasis on workflow and top-down system design, people
sometimes lose sight of designing a solid database structure,” says
Linda Leong, a system architect at Hansen Information Technologies
and Oracle Magazine’s .NET Developer of the Year.
Hansen creates public sector enterprise applications that manage
government services from local cities and towns to state and federal
agencies worldwide. Hansen’s latest release, Hansen 8, is designed
around a .NET framework, so customers can deploy their applications on
Microsoft’s Internet Information Server and access them via browsers.
As important as .NET is to Hansen solutions, Oracle Database is an
equally critical component for many customers, since many Hansen
clients run on the Oracle platform. Leong focuses extensively on opti-
mizing the Hansen platform and its .NET framework for Oracle-based
deployments. “Many of our clients use Oracle for their large-scale
database applications,” notes Leong. “The database is a core tier of our
application, so we use Oracle’s ODP.NET data provider. We use ADO.NET
to interact with the database from our .NET business logic.”
Running a successful investment company requires that your employees
have the right information at the right time. That’s why American Century
Investments upgraded its portal strategy by deploying Oracle Portal.
“Our vision is that the portal becomes the work space for all American
Century employees—the launching pad from which we do our jobs,” says Rob
Aneweer, who along with Erin Hamm is Oracle Magazine’s Portal Developer
of the Year. American Century had an internal portal composed of flat HTML
pages, but the company has converted to a dynamic portal environment based
on Oracle Portal and Oracle Business Intelligence Suite. The process integrated
more than 80,000 legacy Web pages into Oracle Portal and consolidated frag-
mented intranet sites and disparate content sources into one portal.
“The key to our portal’s success is its integration to external applications
outside of the portal, dashboard reporting, and the integration of the exter-
nal database for the display of key metrics within the portal,” says Hamm.
Oracle Portal’s security features are also important.
“We’ve taken advantage of the security inherent in the Portal applica-
tions so that we can distribute information to specific groups within our
company,” says Aneweer. “It’s much more efficient than our previous intranet.”
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Linda Leong
.NET DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Architect’s solutions start at the database.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Rob Aneweer, Erin Ham
Job Title/Description:
Portal Developers
Company: American Century
Investments
Location: Kansas City, Missouri
Award: Portal Developers
of the Year 2006
winnerSPECS
Name: Linda Leong
Job Title/Description:
System Architect
Company: Hansen Information
Technologies
Location: Rancho Cordova,
California
Award: .NET Developer
of the Year 2006
Rob Aneweer,
Erin Hamm
PORTAL DEVELOPERS OF THE YEAR
Developers create a business launching pad.
>
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 4 3
Dennis Alley
RFID ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Developer uses RFID to streamline business.
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Consultant Øystein Amundsen’s natural inclination is to find solutions.
Although he programs extensively in Oracle JDeveloper, Amundsen, Oracle
Magazine’s Oracle JDeveloper Extensions Developer of the Year, also needs to use
Microsoft Visual Source Safe for version management of his code and applications,
because it’s the company’s standard.
When he couldn’t find existing support for using Microsoft Visual Source Safe
with the Oracle JDeveloper environment, he solved the problem by creating an
Oracle JDeveloper Extension that allows developers to easily integrate the two.
Amundsen also made the extension available as an open source project, so
other developers can leverage the code, learn from it, and enhance it.
For Amundsen, the Oracle community can be a rich source of support and
opportunity. “There are a lot of plug-ins out there that make the job of writing
code easier. Developers should explore the upgrade center [the integrated func-
tion in Oracle JDeveloper, located in the top menu bar at Help/Check] and see
what’s available, because they can really make things easier,” says Amundsen.
“If there are features that you’re lacking, I’d recommend checking out the
Oracle JDeveloper Extension API, because it’s easy to understand and it holds
the key to almost all the features of the Oracle JDeveloper environment.”
For Dennis Alley, Oracle Magazine’s RFID Developer of the Year
and a partner at Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), radio-
frequency identification (RFID) is an increasingly important way to
streamline business processes. For example, working with a major
defense contractor, Alley was recently challenged to design an RFID
solution that could be used by all of the contractor’s business units
to meet the Department of Defense compliance shipping requirements.
Rather than take a simple “slap and ship” approach to RFID
deployment, Alley’s team suggested using Oracle Database and
Oracle Application Server and enhancing Oracle’s RFID Supplier
Compliance Workspace application so the contractor could incorpo-
rate interfaces with the customer’s SAP system and share informa-
tion to streamline processing and reduce manual interactions.
“We ended up wanting to deliver a solution that went beyond
the Oracle RFID Supplier Compliance Workspace application, so we
designed extensions to the database and reworked the application
to interface with SAP and generate the RFID-enabled military ship-
ping labels,” says Alley.
To meet their goals, the CSC team worked closely with Oracle
engineers. “We worked very cooperatively with Oracle—it was a
good give-and-take situation,” says Alley. “We were able to com-
plete the work on time and get the solution installed successfully.”
Øystein Amundsen
ORACLE JDEVELOPER EXTENSIONS DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR
Finding solutions and sharing them is what this developer
is all about.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Dennis Alley
Job Title/Description: Partner
Company: Computer Sciences
Corporation
Location: Oak Brook, Illinois
Award: RFID Architect
of the Year 2006
winnerSPECS
Name: Øystein Amundsen
Job Title/Description:
System Developer
Company: Bouvet AS
Location: Karmsund, Norway
Award: Oracle JDeveloper
Extensions Developer of the
Year 2006
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Basheer Khan
INTEGRATION ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Architect finds that integration improves efficiency.
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“Integration has always played a critical role in improving the efficiency
of businesses and providing information to decision-makers,” says
Basheer Khan, Oracle Magazine’s Integration Architect of the Year.
“While there have been other historical approaches, we’re now seeing
the industry move toward a more efficient, flexible, scalable, and stan-
dards-based approach to data and process integration.”
Khan uses this approach at his own company, Innowave Technology,
helping companies integrate their Oracle, JD Edwards, and PeopleSoft
applications with third-party applications. For example, he recently lev-
eraged Oracle Fusion Middleware and a service-oriented–architecture
approach to integrate 52 touch points between a customer’s Oracle
E-Business Suite applications and a third-party logistics provider.
“What’s compelling about the solutions that Oracle brings to the table
with Oracle Fusion Middleware and Oracle BPEL Process Manager is that
no matter what legacy or third-party application a customer may have,
they can easily use Oracle adapters to integrate their systems without
a lot of investment in rewriting their code,” says Khan. “That makes it
easy for customers to maintain and troubleshoot any integration—it’s
kind of a ‘what you see is what you get’ approach to integration.”
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 4 5
winnerSPECS
Name: Basheer Khan
Job Title/Description:
President
Company: Innowave Technology
Location: Los Angeles, California
Award: Integration Architect of
the Year 2006
Marc Staheli
SMB ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
CTO chooses Oracle to scale up to
multibillion-dollar customers.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Marc Staheli
Job Title/Description:
CTO
Company: vAudit Group
Location: San Diego, California
Award: SMB Architect
of the Year 2006
Even small companies dream big. And when they do, they plan their IT
infrastructure in advance. “We’re a small company now, but we antici-
pate growing dramatically, so Oracle gives us peace of mind because
we can scale up endlessly with them as we grow,” says Marc Staheli,
CTO of vAudit and Oracle Magazine’s SMB Architect of the Year.
vAudit provides a suite of online tools that helps companies comply
with their sales and use tax across the United States and Canada. Staheli
and his partner Robert Schulte created the idea in 2003 when they
realized the potential of helping companies manage their tax compli-
ance issues. Initial funding came in 2005, and the company now serves
clients with revenues ranging from US$20 million to US$5 billion.
When it came time to build the infrastructure, vAudit chose Oracle
Database 10g Standard Edition with Real Application Clusters and
Oracle Application Server 10g, along with Oracle JDeveloper. “We do
have a significant amount of traffic, so we wanted to have an extremely
stable platform and one that could support significant growth,” says
Staheli. “Oracle’s platform comes with a comprehensive set of powerful
tools and features, which makes us very efficient and highly productive.
Oracle’s solutions really fit the SMB market these days.”
Vasif Pasha
ORACLE FUSION MIDDLEWARE ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Engineer integrates system information with workflow
capabilities improves collaboration.
>
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Sometimes little things can mean a lot—especially in the silicon wafer
manufacturing business, where a small drop in production can result in
a huge hit to corporate profits or a large financial loss.
To avoid such problems, SUMCO USA, a manufacturer that supplies
silicon wafers for chip manufacturers, turned to Oracle BPEL Process
Manager to manage its customer order specification review processes.
“The implementation of a spec registration system was essential for
our company, and the key was to reduce the cycle time for order pro-
cessing. We needed the ability to review specifications collaboratively to
make efficient decisions on product manufacturing,” says Vasif Pasha,
software engineer for SUMCO USA and Oracle Magazine’s Oracle Fusion
Middleware Architect of the Year. “Efficient integration of our system
processes with human workflow capabilities was critical not only for
achieving reduced cycle time for order processing but also generating
cycle time data for reports.”
Integration was an important consideration for SUMCO USA. It
needed to create systems that could work easily across multiple plat-
forms, languages, and technologies, since the company works closely
with a large number of chip manufacturing companies. SUMCO USA
used Oracle BPEL Process Manager to improve its decision-making
process for capability analysis of wafer manufacturing by integrating
information and workflows to collaborate with divisions across multiple
sites and systems. The implementation involved creating business
processes on-the-fly and enabling parallel execution of flows within a
business process.
While SUMCO USA faced new challenges with the e-mail notification
service and subsystem install with the initial product version, Pasha
and the SUMCO USA team worked closely with Oracle’s BPEL engineer-
ing team to address them. “Oracle’s team has been extremely quick
in responding to our questions and giving us alternative solutions for
problems we came up with,” says Pasha.
The project was a success. “I think one of the key points is that it’s
not difficult to implement a solution with Oracle BPEL Process Manager,”
says Pasha. “It doesn’t take much time, it’s reliable, and you basically
implement an SOA [service-oriented architecture] with minimal effort
while producing an extremely valuable solution for your company.”
For Pasha, using Oracle BPEL Process Manager to support, auto-
mate and manage complex workflows that included a high degree
of human interaction was exciting. “I had a great time implementing
Oracle BPEL Process Manager and building solutions on top of it,” says
Pasha. “Developers who are interested in SOA or BPEL don’t need to
be apprehensive about learning a new language or technology—they
should try it, and they’ll see how easy it is to use.”
4 6 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
winnerSPECS
Name: Vasif Pasha
Job Title/Description:
Software Engineer
Company: SUMCO USA
Location: Phoenix, Arizona
Award: Oracle Fusion Middleware
Architect of the Year 2006
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 4 7
Jim McDonald
SECURITY ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Manager makes the case for data security by tying it to
business strategy.
>
“My main technology interest is building flexible, scalable systems that
are highly available in the presence of operator errors or software defects.
That’s why I’m such a strong advocate of Oracle Berkeley DB,” says
Chris Newcombe, senior software engineer at Amazon.com and Oracle
Magazine’s Embedded Architect of the Year. “Elegance of design is essen-
tial, because elegance implies minimal artificial complexity.”
A transparent and efficient IT infrastructure is imperative for Amazon.
Transparency enables the business without impeding Amazon’s innova-
tion, yet systems must also be high-performing and cost-effective so that
Amazon can keep prices low for customers.
For years Amazon has used Oracle Berkeley DB for fast read-only
caches of catalog data. Newcombe built a nonintrusive repartitioning
solution for the primary catalog cache, based on Oracle Berkeley DB. It’s
a mission-critical system that serves several hundreds of thousands of
requests per second.
“Berkeley DB applications can be designed to require very little (poten-
tially zero) human administration cost, which helps keep our costs down,”
says Newcombe. “Berkeley DB has simple, convenient APIs, which helps
with rapid prototyping and fast time to market.”
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Chris Newcombe
EMBEDDED ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Software engineer strives for elegance of design to
maintain simplicity and transparency.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Jim McDonald
Job Title/Description:
Manager of IT
Company: Ingersoll Rand
Location: Annandale,
New Jersey
Award: Security Architect of the
Year 2006
winnerSPECS
Name: Chris Newcombe
Job Title/Description:
Senior Software Engineer
Company: Amazon.com
Location: Seattle, Washington
Award: Embedded Architect of
the Year 2006
When industrial giant Ingersoll Rand created a portal for its dealer network, the
company planned to streamline business processes and make the portal secure.
“At Ingersoll Rand, security is a top priority and an integral part of our IT strategy,”
says Jim McDonald, manager of IT and Oracle Magazine’s Security Architect of the
Year. One of McDonald’s biggest challenges is trying to be both a security strategist
and an implementer.
Keeping the business requirements foremost is critical. “A single security breach
could cost more than the investment in proper security,” says McDonald. “That’s the
key: talking about security as an investment and tying it to the business strategy.”
In developing the portal, both business and security goals were paramount. “We
invested significantly in our portal’s security infrastructure,” McDonald says. “Our busi-
ness case was that we could simplify access for our dealer portal and at the same
time tighten our defenses around data security.”
The result was a dealer portal with security built around Oracle’s COREid identity
management platform that enabled Ingersoll Rand to delegate management capabili-
ties to individual dealers.
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What is business intelligence worth? One law firm can tell you.
“Our Oracle-based data warehouse has more than paid for itself by
a factor of five or ten,” says Brad Maue, CTO of Stuart Maue Mitchell &
James, a pioneer in legal cost management. The firm specializes in han-
dling all legal fees for major litigations such as large class-action suits.
“We put all [the bills] into an Oracle database and sort everything out
for our clients, along with identifying billing abuses,” says Maue, Oracle
Magazine’s Business Intelligence Implementer of the Year.
Stuart Maue Mitchell & James started its business intelligence
initiative to enable customized reporting for its customers. It uses Oracle
Database 10g for the data warehouse: Transactional data is imported
nightly, and clients use Oracle Discoverer to run ad hoc queries and
reports. The solution has been extremely successful with the firm’s
clients; it contains information on more than US$2.2 billion in legal fees.
“The Oracle Warehouse Builder was phenomenal,” says Maue. “In
the past you’d have to write tens of thousands of lines of code manually,
while Oracle Warehouse Builder has built-in intelligence and just writes
the code for you. It cuts down on development time by a factor of ten.”
Every financial company has to translate its strategy into a business model.
For financial giant ABN AMRO, the resulting business processes are complex,
because its business is built around a multichannel sales and customer service
approach. ABN AMRO needs to ensure that its customers can start a business
process (such as opening a new account) in one channel (such as a call center)
and continue it in another (such as a bank) seamlessly. To manage the complexi-
ties and enable business agility, Chief Business Architect Ton Hardeman and his
team designed a business process management (BPM) solution for multichannel
customer contact for key processes and built the infrastructure using PeopleSoft
CRM components with PeopleTools as a programming environment.
“It’s had a direct and positive impact on our business,” says Hardeman,
Oracle Magazine’s Business Process Management Architect of the Year. “With
this BPM solution, we’ve seen an increase in customer satisfaction. In addition,
all customer interaction around standard bank products has been unified into
one system, giving a 360-degree customer view. A BPM management layer
manages/guides the interaction with the customer. Our customers obtain better
service, and we have more up-sell and cross-sell opportunities.”
Brad Maue
BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE IMPLEMENTER OF THE YEAR
CTO uses business intelligence to increase efficiencies
and improve client service.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Brad Maue
Job Title/Description:
CTO
Company: Stuart Maue Mitchell
& James
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Award: Business Intelligence
Implementer of the Year 2006
Ton Hardeman
BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Architect uses business process management to manage
complexity and increase customer satisfaction.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Ton Hardeman
Job Title/Description:
Chief Business Architect
Company: ABN AMRO
Location: Amsterdam,
the Netherlands
Award: Business Process
Management Architect
of the Year 2006
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Brian T. Wilkinson
SOA ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Manager finds that many business processes can
benefit from a service-oriented architecture.
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In today’s business climate, having a lot of customer data is only good if it
can be put to use quickly. Especially if you’re like Egg, an internet-based
bank that’s part of the Prudential Group.
Originally, Egg had relied on an outsourced service to manage its
data. But it frequently took up to six weeks for managers to get data for
marketing or business analysis purposes—way too long in a fast-moving,
consumer-driven company.
“To be competitive we needed to build our own data warehouse. We
based it on Oracle and Sun, and that delivers data in near-real time,” says
Jay Parmar, former head of data and now programme manager for Egg
and Oracle Magazine’s Oracle Data Warehouse Architect of the Year.
Egg’s warehouse now sits on a Sun F15, under Oracle9i Database. It
leverages Oracle’s materialized views and parallelism to provide added
flexibility and uses Oracle Discoverer for reports. The data warehouse is
approximately 2TB in size and shifts several gigabytes daily.
“With the new Oracle-based warehouse, we could increase our
marketing capability from a handful of campaigns to more than 100
per month across a range of channels,” says Parmar. “In addition, we
increased our ability to deliver against regulatory reporting requirements.
We’ve built a much more strategic solution than we ever had before.”
Implementing a service-oriented architecture (SOA) requires technology. But it
also requires something else—a business driver.
“You need a strong connection to the business process to improve exist-
ing processes, enable new capabilities, and ultimately make SOA successful,”
says Brian Wilkinson, senior manager, SOA Practice at Accenture and Oracle
Magazine’s SOA Architect of the Year. “Not all business processes should be
architected using SOA, but there’s a healthy set that can benefit greatly from
SOA—and those are the ones that organizations should address.”
Over the past year, Wilkinson’s team at Accenture has produced an SOA
reference architecture to define a set of reference services that organiza-
tions can easily deploy to speed the implementation of an Oracle Fusion
Middleware–based project. “With SOA, the ability now exists to integrate the
human and automated components of a business process and gain real-
time visibility into business performance metrics and compare them against
historical trends,” says Wilkinson. “As a result, organizations can change the
way they’re performing in the marketplace in almost real time with SOA.”
Wilkinson says that Accenture is already seeing clients benefit from SOA,
a trend that he says will increase over time. “We see SOA and how Oracle
has ‘baked’ it into Fusion as fundamental to the future of Oracle,” he says.
“Oracle’s SOA direction is consistent with how Accenture views SOA.”
Jay Parmar
DATA WAREHOUSE ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Manager uses data warehouse to get data quickly.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Jay Parmar
Job Title/Description:
Programme Manager
Company: Egg
Location: Derby, England
Award: Data Warehouse Architect
of the Year 2006
winnerSPECS
Name: Brian T. Wilkinson
Job Title/Description:
Senior Manager for
SOA Practice
Company: Accenture
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Award: SOA Architect
of the Year 2006
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Tim Hall became Oracle Magazine’s Oracle ACE of the Year by not
minding his own business. “I’m inquisitive,” says Hall. “I like to be
involved when people make design decisions, because I believe that a
DBA should be the most skilled person at handling a database as well
as helping developers understand [how] to optimize their applications.”
Hall earned a PhD in 1994 and took a job programming Oracle Forms;
at his current job, he is responsible for all the databases (Oracle Database
10g Real Application Clusters and Oracle9i ) and Oracle Application
Servers. And he shares his knowledge with the Oracle community.
“Whenever I was studying for an OCP [Oracle Certified Professional] exam
and writing revision notes, I would put them on the internet so others
could read them,” says Hall. “I get e-mails from all over the world from
people telling me how much my notes helped.” But for Hall, enabling new
learning is even more important. “It’s fine to tell people how to do some-
thing, but if you can show them how to learn, that’s much better.”
To learn more about the Oracle ACE program, visit oracle.com/
technology/community/oracle_ace.
Tim Hall
ORACLE ACE OF THE YEAR
Teaching how to learn is consultant’s goal.
>
For some firms, content management isn’t a luxury. “In a business like ours—
property and casualty insurance—the amount of structured and unstructured
data that moves through our business processes is astonishing,” says Anthony
Abbattista, vice president of enterprise technology strategy and planning for
Allstate Insurance and Oracle Magazine’s Content Management Architect of the
Year. “To manage that data, we’re automating and virtualizing many of our busi-
ness processes with Oracle Content Management Services to increase efficiency
and to attract and retain customers.”
A key factor of Allstate’s content management strategy was developing a tax-
onomy that enables a standard set of services across the enterprise, so employees
can access information easily. “We’re unleashing the power of both our existing
data and the new content that we’re creating,” adds Abbattista. The result is back-
office operations and business processes that serve customers better. “Having a
content management strategy that marries structured and unstructured data into a
coherent record management strategy is important,” he says.
Resiliency was also important for Allstate. “Because Oracle has great tech-
nology with RAC [Oracle Real Application Clusters], the database, and a good
application server layer, we could take advantage of that physical configuration
as a disaster recovery mechanism,” he says. “Oracle has such a strong database
heritage that they tend to have bulletproof infrastructure at the base level.”
Anthony Abbattista
CONTENT MANAGEMENT ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Managing structured and unstructured data is critical to this VP.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Anthony Abbattista
Job Title/Description:
Vice President of Enterprise
Technology Strategy and Planning
Company: Allstate Insurance
Location: Northbrook, Illinois
Award: Content Management
Architect of the Year 2006
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Name: Tim Hall
Job Title/Description:
DBA/Developer
Location: Birmingham, England
Award: Oracle ACE of the Year
2006
5 0 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
Rob Patton, Barak Moffitt
HIGH AVAILABILITY ARCHITECTS OF THE YEAR
Directors scale up their site for greater availability, reliability.
>
Managing a worldwide IT infrastructure requires efficient use of IT
resources and a thorough knowledge of what is deployed and where. To
gain that, Dell Inc. IT embraced Oracle Grid Control. Last year Dell Inc.
IT embarked on a global deployment of Oracle Grid Control to manage
all of Dell Inc.’s Oracle Database production infrastructure, enabling a
single console for managing all database infrastructure throughout the
enterprise, regardless of the deployment platform or physical location.
“Our biggest challenge was our own legacy—we’ve got thousands
of Linux servers that have been deployed over many years by many
teams,” says Logan McLeod, IT strategist at Dell Inc. IT and Oracle
Magazine’s Oracle Grid Control Architect of the Year. “So the biggest
challenge was getting the Oracle Grid Control agents deployed con-
sistently on all those servers.” Once the agents were deployed, the
benefits were realized immediately. “Now we can instantly get a holis-
tic view of our entire database environments around the world,” says
McLeod. “We’re also managing our database environment much more
proactively and have begun leveraging capacity and change manage-
ment capabilities of the tool. Grid provides a solid foundation for our
Oracle strategy here at Dell Inc. IT.”
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Logan McLeod
ORACLE GRID CONTROL ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR
Strategist manages huge stack with Oracle Grid Control.
>
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winnerSPECS
Name: Logan McLeod
Job Title/Description:
IT Strategist
Company: Dell Inc.
Location: Round Rock, Texas
Award: Oracle Grid Control
Architect of the Year 2006
Name: Rob Patton, Barak Moffitt
Job Title/Description:
Executive Director, Business
Intelligence and Data Architecture;
Executive Director, Production
Operation (respectively)
Company: Edmunds.com
Location: Santa Monica, California
Award: High Availability
Architects of the Year 2006
winnerSPECS
With almost ten million people coming to edmunds.com every month to
research new and used cars and collect automotive advice, high availability
definitely matters.
“Availability is critical to our dealer leads and advertising revenue,” says
Barak Moffitt, Oracle Magazine’s High-Availability Architect of the Year, along
with Rob Patton. “We chose Oracle 10g RAC [Real Application Clusters] for
our database primarily because we have aggressive high-level design prin-
ciples for availability, scalability, reliability, and performance.”
Two years ago, Edmunds realized that its hosting architecture needed to
be replaced with one that could scale up while assuring improved availabil-
ity. To achieve this, Edmunds put in place a new data center approach that
provides high availability by relying on a wide-scale deployment of Oracle
Fusion Middleware on top of Oracle Database 10g using Linux and Intel
EM64T technologies.
“By using Oracle technologies, we were able to create separate yet sym-
metric operational environments to handle the wide spectrum of consumer-
and business-oriented services that Edmunds needs to deploy,” says Rob
Patton. “With Oracle we now have high availability and increased flexibility,
while benefiting from widely supported standards.”
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 5 1
Eddie Awad
ORACLE-RELATED BLOGGER OF THE YEAR
Developer shares and communicates news, information
with other Oracle users.
>
For Eddie Awad, Web logs are a way to keep his head straight about Oracle.
“I’m addicted to Oracle, and I like to share what I learn with other people,”
says Awad, Oracle Magazine’s Oracle-Related Blogger of the Year. “My blog has
become a notebook for me and a great way to share and communicate with
other Oracle users.”
Awad is an application developer for ESCO and has worked with Oracle
since 1994. Awad started blogging to stay in touch with friends but soon real-
ized that blogs could be useful for keeping track of the IT challenges he encoun-
tered in his work. So he started a more-technical blog focused on Oracle.
Awad also created the Oracle News Aggregator (oradot.com/news), a site
that allows readers to monitor Oracle-related news sources and blogs, Firefox
extensions that make it easier for developers to search Oracle documentation,
and oraQA.com, an Oracle question-and-answer blog.
Accuracy is important for Awad, and he keeps the blog fresh by publishing
three or four times a week. “My posts tend to be specific to a certain problem,”
says Awad. “I ensure the accuracy and comprehensiveness of my posts by pro-
viding examples, citing sources, and pointing to additional relevant information.”
Computer glitches rarely launch a writing career, but for Jonathan Lewis, Oracle
Magazine’s Oracle Author of the Year, the Y2K problem was a blessing.
In 1999 Lewis, who lectures, trains, and consults with companies around
the world on maximizing the efficiency of their Oracle databases, found that
corporate budgets were devoted to the Y2K problem. Rather than take a long
holiday, he used the time to write his first book, Practical Oracle8i. This year
Lewis wrote Cost-Based Oracle Fundamentals, the first of a three-volume series.
“Few people understand how Oracle’s Cost-Based Optimizer works. Virtually
anyone who worries about the performance of their database should read the
book,” says Lewis. “I decided to write down some of the stuff I knew about
cost-based optimization so that I could help thousands of people instead of
training individual groups of 50 or 100.”
He found a rich subject—the first book has more than 500 pages and he
has two volumes left to go. But it’s a job he enjoys.
“Researching technology problems can be interesting, and working with
customers on specific performance issues can be exciting,” says Lewis. “But
the writing part of my job is the toughest bit, which is why it gives me the most
satisfaction when I think I’ve got it right.”
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winnerSPECS
Name: Eddie Awad
Job Title/Description:
Application Developer
Company: ESCO
Location: Portland, Oregon
Award: Oracle-Related Blogger of
the Year 2006
Jonathan Lewis
ORACLE AUTHOR OF THE YEAR
Consultant tries to reach as many people as possible by
writing books.
>
winnerSPECS
Name: Jonathan Lewis
Job Title/Description:
Consultant
Company: JL Computer
Consultancy
Location: Surbiton, England
Award: Oracle Author of the
Year 2006
5 2 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
Be Amazed. Be Admired. Join Oracle.
Oracle Consulting across EMEA is currently accepting CVs for the following areas:
Copyright © 2006, Oracle. All rights reserved. Oracle, JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, and Siebel are registered trademarks of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of
their respective owners.
Technology Consultants
Architects for Oracle 10g
RAC, VLDB/DW (10TB+),
Integration/BPEL, Oracle Fusion
Middleware/J2EE, Application
DBA, BI/Portal Dashboard,
Advanced Reporting/Discoverer,
Full DW Lifecycle/OWB, and
security and enterprise.
We are also looking for individuals
who have previous experience
implementing Oracle Database;
Oracle middleware; Oracle
Applications; PeopleSoft,
JD Edwards, and Siebel
applications; Analytics; Oblix;
Protected Enterprise; J2EE; data
mining; TimesTen; ProfitLogic;
Retek; 360Commerce; or other
applicable technologies.
Applications Consultants
CRM, enterprise management,
HRMS/HCM, supply chain, EAM,
leasing, property management,
field services, and logistics.
Please send all CVs to:
career-oracleemea_ww
@oracle.com
Oracle Corporation offers a
full package of benefits to our
full-time salaried employees.
Details of these benefits may vary
slightly from country to country.
Details relevant to your country
can be discussed on request.
Please e-mail a Word document
version of your CV with full
contact information (including
name, address, telephone
numbers, and e-mail address) to
the e-mail address just shown.
You can view all current vacancies
in EMEA at the following site:
emeajobs.oracle.com
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 5 3
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 5 5
Jump-Start J2EE Development
Finish development faster with Oracle JHeadstart.
s you’ve seen in previous
columns, Oracle JDeveloper
10g and Oracle Application
Development Framework
(ADF) provide a complete development
environment with a host of declara-
tive features similar to 4GL tools you
may have used in the past. To help you
make the most of the powerful Oracle
JDeveloper/ADF combination, the Oracle
ADF Learning Center (at oracle.com/
technology/products/adf/learnadf.html)
provides numerous helpful resources,
such as ADF Developer’s Guide for Forms/
4GL Developers, a companion sample
application, and an end-to-end tutorial.
This column shows you another pow-
erful tool to help you harness the poten-
tial of Oracle JDeveloper: the Oracle
JHeadstart application generator. It
demonstrates the new Oracle JHeadstart
10.1.3 version to show you how quickly
you can create real-world applications in
Oracle JDeveloper.
WHAT IS ORACLE JHEADSTART?
Oracle JHeadstart is an Oracle JDeveloper
extension, developed by Oracle Con-
sulting, that generates Web-tier code for
application modules. It was developed as
a result of years of real-world experience
by Oracle consultants who have built
many hundreds of applications for their
customers. It was designed to make the
advanced features of both Oracle ADF
and JavaServer Faces (JSF) easier to use
in your own Web applications.
Oracle JHeadstart works by adding
a set of integrated editors to the Oracle
JDeveloper environment. By using these
editors, along with the data model you’ve
designed for your Oracle ADF business
service, you create and iteratively refine a
high-level application definition for your
project. This application definition lets
you control the functionality and organi-
zation of information in your Web user
interface, based on the view objects in
your application module’s data model.
The application definition editor
in Oracle JHeadstart lets you describe
a logical hierarchy of pages that can
include forms, tables, wizards, search
regions, lists of values (LOVs), shuttle
pickers, and other features standard
in modern Web user interfaces (UIs).
Furthermore, Oracle JHeadstart uses ter-
minology familiar to Oracle Forms and
Oracle Designer users, to make it easier
for you to make declarative choices for
your application definition.
The Oracle JHeadstart application gen-
erator doesn’t actually generate Java code.
Instead, it creates (or regenerates) all of
the declarative artifacts for the view and
controller layers within your Oracle ADF–
based Web application. These artifacts
use your ADF application module as their
business service and your ADF Model
layer for declarative data binding. The
generated files Oracle JHeadstart creates
are the same ones you would produce on
your own when using Oracle JDeveloper’s
built-in visual editors. The key difference
is that Oracle JHeadstart creates them en
masse, based on a higher-level applica-
tion definition you can iteratively refine
until the generated pages match your end
users’ requirements.
The generated files include
O JSF application pages with data-bound
ADF Faces UI components
O Oracle ADF Model page definition XML
files describing each page’s data bindings
O JSF managed bean settings and naviga-
tion rules to handle application page flow
O Resource files containing localizable
UI strings
Once you’re satisfied with your
Oracle JHeadstart–generated pages, you
can use the Oracle JDeveloper develop-
ment environment to fine-tune your UI
or develop additional pages. If you modify
an Oracle JHeadstart–generated page,
you can adjust the generator templates
so the page adheres to your specifica-
tions on subsequent runs of the applica-
tion generator, or you can set a flag to
prevent the customized page from being
regenerated at all. Because the Oracle
JHeadstart–generated pages and your
custom-designed pages both leverage the
same Oracle ADF Faces UI components,
your pages will all automatically inherit
a consistent look and feel.
GENERATING YOUR FIRST WEB APPLICATION
The best way to appreciate what Oracle
JHeadstart can do is to take the fully
functional trial edition for a spin. In this
section, I’ll experiment with just a few
of Oracle JHeadstart’s many application
generation preferences, using the famil-
iar EMP and DEPT tables in the SCOTT
schema. You can find installation instruc-
tions for the Oracle JHeadstart 10.1.3 trial
edition at the Oracle JHeadstart Product
Center on OTN (oracle.com/technology/
consulting/9iServices/JHeadstart.html).
After installing it, check the Extensions
tab of the Oracle JDeveloper Help->
About dialog box to ensure that you see
the Oracle JHeadstart extension.
In Oracle JDeveloper, start by cre-
ating a new application, using the
Web Application [JSF, ADF BC] tem-
plate. Right-click the Model project,
select New, and start the Business
Components from Tables wizard from
the New Gallery dialog box. (Because
I’ve performed these tasks in previous
columns, I’ll go through the steps quickly,
but if you need a more basic walk-
through of Oracle JDeveloper, check out
any of the past Frameworks articles.) In
the wizard, specify oramag.model as the
package name and create default entity
objects and updatable view objects based
d e v e l o p e r FRAMEWORKS
BY STEVE MUENCH
5 6 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
FRAMEWORKS
READ online-only column content
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/06-nov/
o66frame.html
READ more about
Oracle JDeveloper 10g and
Oracle ADF
oracle.com/technology/products/jdev
oracle.com/technology/products/jdev/tips/muench/
designpatterns
DOWNLOAD
Oracle JHeadstart
oracle.com/technology/consulting/9iServices/
JHeadstart.html
Oracle JDeveloper 10g
oracle.com/technology/products/jdev
VISIT the Oracle ADF Learning Center
oracle.com/technology/products/adf/learnadf.html
on the EMP and DEPT tables. Name your
application module HRModule, and do not
create any read-only view objects.
Next, edit the HRModule compo-
nent to provide more-meaningful names
for your default view object instances.
To do so, right-click HRModule
from the Applications Navigator and
open the Application Module Editor.
Select the Data Model panel, and
rename the DeptView1, EmpView2,
and EmpView1 view instances to
Departments, DepartmentStaff, and
Employees, respectively.
Now that you have a simple appli-
cation module in place, you can use
Oracle JHeadstart to generate a Web
application for it. Start by right-
clicking the ViewController project
from the Application Navigator and
selecting Enable JHeadstart on this
Project. On the title page of the
JHeadstart Enable Project wizard, click
Next, and then click Finish. After the
wizard performs the required configu-
ration steps, click Finish again to exit
the wizard. Click the Save All toolbar
button to save all the changes.
Now you can add a new Oracle
JHeadstart application definition. Right-
click the ViewController project again,
and select New JHeadstart Application
Definition. On the first page of the New
JHeadstart Application Definition
wizard, choose HRModuleDataControl
as the data control to use for your
Web application. It should actually
be selected by default, because it’s the
only one in your workspace. Leave the
Create default Groups for all Data
Collections check box checked. This
setting creates a default application defini-
tion, based on the view objects in your
application module’s data model, which
you then can modify to fit your needs.
Click Next, and keep the defaults for
the service name and application defini-
tion XML filename on the next page that
appears. Click Next again, and check the
Generate LOV’s instead of dropdown
lists? check box. Leave the default layout
styles for parent and child groups, and
click Next. Click Finish on the next
screen, and the wizard will create a new
Oracle JHeadstart application definition.
Finally, click Finish again to close the
dialog box and click Save All to save all
the changes.
After you’ve saved all your project
files, right-click the ViewController
project again and select Edit JHeadstart
Application Definition, which launches
the JHeadstart Application Definition
Editor. You will use this editor later to
fine-tune your application generation
options. For now, simply note that this
editor is a modeless window that you
can keep open at the same time as your
main Oracle JDeveloper IDE window.
The editor displays the hierarchical
structure of the groups of information
that constitute the pages of your Web
application. Note that the structure ini-
tially mimics the hierarchical structure
of the view objects in the data model of
your HRModule.
Now run the Oracle JHeadstart appli-
cation generator. By running it now,
you can see the kind of Web application
you get when using the default appli-
cation definition settings. To run the
application generator, click the Run the
JHeadstart Generator toolbar button in
the Application Definition Editor or right-
click the ViewController project from
the Application Navigator and select Run
JHeadstart Application Generator.
When the Generation Finished alert
appears, click OK.
RUNNING THE DEFAULT APPLICATION
To run the application, right-click
the ViewController project from the
Application Navigator and select Run.
Oracle JDeveloper launches the embedded
Oracle Containers for J2EE (OC4J) server
and opens the generated application in
your Web browser, using a tabbed display.
If you toggle between your browser
window and the JHeadstart Application
Definition Editor, you’ll see that each top-
level group in the application definition
is rendered as a separate top-level tab
in your UI. On the Departments page,
click the DepartmentStaff button to drill
down to the related staff members in that
department. As you do so, note that a
navigation guide known as breadcrumbs
appears above the page title to show you
where in the Web site hierarchy you are.
Now click the Employees tab, and note
that the page defaults to a table display
style, featuring page-by-page scrolling
and the ability to easily perform multirow
inserts, updates, and deletes. If you
click the Save button, all your changes
will be saved.
The online version of this column, at
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/06-
nov/o66frame.html, includes additional
content about the Oracle JHeadstart–
generated features in this default applica-
tion and information on how to custom-
ize and regenerate the application with
Oracle JHeadstart.
Like Oracle ADF itself, Oracle
JHeadstart comes with an excellent,
detailed developer’s guide that walks
you through every generation option
and advanced feature. You can visit the
Oracle JHeadstart product center on
OTN (oracle.com/technology/consulting/
9iServices/JHeadstart.html) for additional
online product demos, tutorials, and
white papers, as well as details on pricing,
support, and related consulting services. O
Steve Muench is a consulting product manager for
Oracle JDeveloper and an Oracle ACE. In his more than
16 years at Oracle, he has developed and supported
Oracle tools and XML technologies and continues to
evangelize them. Muench coauthored the Oracle ADF
Developer’s Guide for Forms/4GL Developers (Oracle,
2006) and wrote Building Oracle XML Applications
(O’Reilly Media, 2000). He shares tips and tricks on OTN
(oracle.com/technology) and in his Dive into BC4J and
ADF blog (radio.weblogs.com/0118231).
BY MI KE HI CHWA
d e v e l o p e r BROWSER-BASED
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 5 7
Taking Up Collections
Use collections to manage session state in Oracle Application Express.
racle Application Express is an
easy-to-use application develop-
ment tool. However, sometimes
even simple applications can
get a bit tricky.
That is exactly what happened when a
former colleague of mine asked for some
assistance in building an application to
help him manage his wholesale shoe
business. He had been using a spread-
sheet to manage orders, but he wanted to
move to the Web and use an Oracle data-
base. He had been dabbling with Oracle
Application Express but didn’t know how
he could duplicate his spreadsheet.
He wanted his salespeople to be able
to order one or more shoe styles for
retailers (his customers) by using a simple
grid specific to each product, just as they
were doing at the time with the spread-
sheet. As a one-time Oracle employee, my
former colleague also wanted to store the
data in properly normalized tables.
The solution described in this
column, Matrix Order, is available with
the online version of this column, at
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/06-
nov/o66browser.zip. You can download a
single SQL file, install the application at
apex.oracle.com or in your local Oracle
Application Express 2.2 instance, and
see how everything works. The single
SQL file creates the application, tables,
sequences, and sample data required to
illustrate the solution.
The solution is a three-step wizard,
Create Order, that lets salespeople iden-
tify the customer (step 1) and then select
a product style and enter quantities for
each available color and size (step 2).
In step 3, the complete order appears,
allowing confirmation or cancellation.
Step 2 of the wizard, shown in Figure
1, collects order details in an efficient,
intuitive way: Salespeople can select a
product from the product list and have a
grid populated automatically with color,
price, and size information.
Data entered and preserved across
page views can be transformed into a
table, MATRIX_ORDER_ITEMS, that
has one row per cell in the grid. The
application uses collections to manage
a grid of data until the user gives final
approval, at which point the data in the
collection is transposed and stored in
application tables.
WHY COLLECTIONS?
A collection is an Oracle Application
Express utility that can manage a two-
dimensional session state—basically a
table of data. The APEX_COLLECTIONS
API offers developers methods for popu-
lating, querying, and updating collections.
In many ways, collections are similar
to tables. The big difference is that they
are specific to an Oracle Application
Express session, so collections are
(conveniently) cleaned up when your
session is purged. Collections come in
handy whenever your application needs
to maintain an arbitrary number of
attributes, such as a “shopping cart” of
attributes you load into your application
tables at checkout.
This application collects the order
data via the wizard, enabling the sales-
person to preview the order on a differ-
ent page and return to the prior page
and make changes, if necessary. When
the Create Order wizard finishes, the
contents of the collection are used to
populate the MATRIX_ORDER_ITEMS
table; the collection is then emptied until
the next session begins.
CREATING A COLLECTION
When you initiate the Create Order
wizard, a before-header PL/SQL page
process (shown in Listing 1) seeds the
collection with all product styles and
colors, along with a column for each
available size. The page process deletes
the collection if it already exists and
creates the matrix necessary to manage
Figure 1: Identify customer (Create Order wizard, step 2)
5 8 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
BROWSER-BASED
At the end of the loop, the process
populates page items (including order
numbers and totals) that are used in the
“Order Processed” confirmation message
displayed to the user. After this PL/SQL
page process executes, the ordering
process is complete.
That’s the process. The Matrix Order
application demonstrates how to use col-
lections to manage session data entered
in a matrix format. The application
stores and maintains the data across any
number of product changes, and then it
loads the collection into the application
tables for permanent storage. O
Mike Hichwa (michael.hichwa@oracle.com) is vice
president of software development at Oracle and
manages Oracle Application Express, Oracle SQL
Developer, and other database development tools. He
was the original architect of Oracle Application Express.
the data entry screen.
Step 2 of the wizard creates a report
layout based on this SQL query:
select c001, c002, c003, nvl(c004,’0’)
c004, nvl(c005,’0’) c005, nvl(c006,’0’) c006,
nvl(c007,’0’) c007
from apex_collections
where collection_name = ‘MATRIX’ and
c001 = :p3_product
Note that APEX_COLLECTIONS is a
public view with columns C001 through
C050, although this example uses only
seven columns.
The contents of the collection—
MATRIX—are populated from the query.
C001 is the product style, C002 is the
color, C003 is the unit price, and C004
through C007 contain the values for the
quantity ordered: sizes S, M, L, and XL.
After creating the report and adjust-
ing the column headings, I modified the
last four columns (S, M, L, and XL) to
be updatable. I did this by clicking the
column in the Report Attributes tab
of the Edit Region page in the Oracle
Application Express Application Builder.
To make the last four columns updat-
able, I simply changed the Display As
attribute to Text Field and set Element
Width to 8.
SAVING REPORT COLUMNS INTO
A COLLECTION
The application must allow users to move
around on the pages of the wizard in
any way they want to, entering different
quantities for multiple products; preview-
ing the in-process order; and returning
to a prior page and making changes, if
necessary. That means that each time the
user leaves the Order Entry page, the
application must save changes to the col-
lection. To handle this, the application
uses an after-submit PL/SQL page process
(shown in Listing 2, available with the
online version of this column, at oracle
.com/technology/oramag/oracle/06-nov/
o66browser.html) that updates order
values in the collection.
The PL/SQL page process loops
through all the rows of the MATRIX
collection, updating each of the size
columns (S, M, L, XL). The value of the
first updatable column in the first row
of the report can be accessed by use of
the WWV_FLOW.G_F01(1) array value;
the second updatable column of the first
row is WWV_FLOW.G_F02(1).
When a salesperson changes a
product in the list, the report queries the
details of the new product and creates a
new matrix with no values.
As the product changes, the exist-
ing values (for the previously displayed
product) need to be saved for the
previously saved product, not for the
newly selected product. A hidden item,
P3_PRODUCT_ON_LOAD, ensures
that this happens correctly: The value
of this hidden item is set to the value of
the selected product by use of an after-
header computation.
TRANSFORMING COLLECTION MEMBERS INTO
TABLE ROWS AND COLUMNS
So far I’ve shown how to populate,
query, and update a collection. Now,
the last step is to transform the collec-
tion into an INSERT statement for the
MATRIX_ORDER_ITEMS table.
Step 3 of the wizard, shown in Figure
2 and available with the online version
of this column, queries the collection to
display the current orders and provides
a Confirm Order button. Clicking the
button initiates the on-submit page
process (shown in Listing 3, available
with the online version of this column),
which saves the collection to the table
by looping through the collection and
inserting a row into the MATRIX_
ORDER_ITEMS table for each cell in
the collection.
READ online-only column content
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o66browser.html
DOWNLOAD
Oracle Application Express 2.2
oracle.com/technology/products/database/
application_express
sample application code
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/06-nov/
o66browser.zip
VISIT the Oracle Application
Express Forum on OTN
forums.oracle.com/forums/forum
.jspa?forumID=137
LEARN more in the
Oracle Application Express
Developer’s Guide
download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B31036_01/doc/
appdev.22/b28839/toc.htm
if apex_collection.collection_exists(p_collection_name=>’MATRIX’) then
apex_collection.delete_collection(p_collection_name=>’MATRIX’);
end if;
apex_collection.create_collection_from_query(
p_collection_name=>’matrix’,
p_query=>’select
p.pro_style,
p.pro_color,
p.pro_unit_price,
max(decode(p.pro_colour,’S’,0,null)) s,
max(decode(p.pro_colour,’M’,0,null)) m,
max(decode(p.pro_colour,’L’,0,null)) l,
max(decode(p.pro_colour,’XL’,0,null)) xl
from matrix_products p
group by p.pro_style, p.pro_colour, p.pro_unit_price
order by 1,2,3’);
codeLISTING 1: “Reset collection” before-header page process
BY STEVEN FEUERSTEI N
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 5 9
d e v e l o p e r PL/SQL PRACTICES
On Object Types in Collections
Best practices for retrieving objects and object attributes from objects
have declared an object type, varray, that
has three columns of datatype number,
varchar2, and another object, respectively.
How can I retrieve the third field (object
type) from the varray?
Let’s construct a varray (a type of
collection in which you specify the
maximum number of elements that may
be defined in the collection) that follows
your requirements, and I will show how
you can reference each and every part of
it. Because I like to eat, I will work with
a food paradigm for the example.
First I create an object type for
general food things; its three attributes
let me keep track of the name of the
food item, its food group, and the domi-
nant color of the food:
CREATE TYPE food_t AS OBJECT (
name VARCHAR2 ( 100 )
, food_group VARCHAR2 ( 100 )
, color VARCHAR2 ( 100 )
);
/
Next, I create a meal object type com-
posed of the number of people served,
the type of meal, and the food served:
CREATE TYPE meal_t AS OBJECT (
number_served INTEGER
, meal_type VARCHAR2 ( 100 )
, food_served food_t
);
/
Now I create a varray of up to three ele-
ments to hold all the meals in a day:
CREATE TYPE meals_vat
IS VARRAY ( 3 ) OF meal_t;
/
Next I write the code in Listing 1 to
populate the varray with three meals for
the day: breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
Note that I use constructor func-
tions (functions that have the same
name as the type on which they are
defined, created by Oracle Database) to
create object type instances in line with
the assignment. I could also declare
local variables to hold the intermediate
objects, as in the following:
DECLARE
-- A locally defined varray
-- initialized with no elements.
l_one_day_of_meals meals_vat
:= meals_vat ( );
-- A local object type
-- instance for breakfast
l_breakfast food_t
:= food_t ( ‘Scrambled Eggs’,
‘Protein’, ‘Yellow’ );
BEGIN
l_one_day_of_meals.EXTEND;
l_one_day_of_meals ( 1 )
:= meal_t ( 4, ‘BREAKFAST’,
l_breakfast );
END;
/
That is how to add elements to the
varray. Now let’s access the values within
an element in the varray using the code
shown in Listing 2.
Note the interesting lines in Listing 2:
Lines 4–8. In this block, I initialize the
varray with a single element, calling
both the meal_t and food_t constructor
functions to load up the first row in the
varray with my breakfast data.
Line 12. I obtain the number of people
served breakfast, by specifying the varray
and then the index in that collection:
l_one_day_of_meals ( 1 )
Line 15. I show the name of the food
served for breakfast using dot nota-
tion (specifying object.attribute, just as
I would specify a table’s column with
table.column) to get to the attribute of
the element in the varray:
DECLARE
-- A locally defined varray initialized with no elements.
l_one_day_of_meals meals_vat := meals_vat ( );
BEGIN
-- Make room for the three meals.
l_one_day_of_meals.EXTEND ( 3 );
-- Add breakfast, using the constructor for both the meal
-- and within it the food object type instance.
l_one_day_of_meals ( 1 ) :=
meal_t ( 4, ‘BREAKFAST’
, food_t ( ‘Scrambled Eggs’, ‘Protein’, ‘Yellow’ ));
-- Add lunch
l_one_day_of_meals ( 2 ) :=
meal_t ( 6, ‘LUNCH’
, food_t ( ‘Deluxe Salad’, ‘Vegetables’, ‘Mostly Green’ ));
-- Add dinner
l_one_day_of_meals ( 3 ) :=
meal_t ( 10, ‘DINNER’
, food_t ( ‘Tofu and Rice’, ‘Protein’, ‘White’ ));
END;
/
codeLISTING 1: Populating the varray
6 0 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
PL/SQL PRACTICES
SQL> DECLARE
2 -- A locally defined varray initialized with one element.
3 l_one_day_of_meals meals_vat
4 := meals_vat ( meal_t ( 4
5 , ‘BREAKFAST’
6 , food_t ( ‘Scrambled Eggs’, ‘Protein’, ‘Yellow’ )
7 )
8 );
9 BEGIN
10 -- If more than 2 people are served,
11 -- then show the name of the food.
12 IF l_one_day_of_meals ( 1 ).number_served > 2
13 THEN
14 DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line (
15 l_one_day_of_meals ( 1 ).food_served.name );
16 END IF;
17 END;
codeLISTING 2: Accessing an element in a varray
READ online-only column content
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o66plsql.html
READ more
Best Practice PL/SQL
oracle.com/technology/pub/columns/plsql
Feuerstein
www.oracleplsqlprogramming.com
LEARN more about using PL/SQL
collections with SQL object types
Oracle Database PL/SQL User’s Guide and Reference
download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/
appdev.102/b14261/objects.htm#sthref2434
DOWNLOAD Oracle Database 10g
oracle.com/technology/software/products/database/
oracle10g
l_one_day_of_meals ( 1 ).food_served
The food_served attribute is,
however, very different from number_
served. Rather than being a scalar value,
it is itself an object. So I can obtain the
value of an attribute of that object by
using dot notation once again, followed
by the name of that attribute:
l_one_day_of_meals ( 1 ).food_served
.name
That should give you a solid under-
standing of how to reference elements and
subelements in these complex structures.
RETRIEVING OBJECT ATTRIBUTES
FROM OBJECTS
I have declared a nested object type table that
has three columns of datatype number, varchar2,
and another object, respectively. I then define
a relational table with this nested table as a
column. How can I retrieve an attribute of this
object from a nested table in a row of the table?
The previous answer in this column
describes how to use dot notation to
drill down to a collection’s object’s
attribute. Let’s now take a look at how
you can get a hold of that data when
it is stored as a column in a table. In
this answer, I work with nested tables
instead of varrays. Everything I demon-
strate here applies to both types of col-
lections, except where noted.
I build a relational table on top of the
types defined in the previous question
and this new nested table type:
CREATE TYPE meals_nt IS
TABLE OF meal_t;
/
CREATE TABLE all_my_meals (
date_served DATE,
name VARCHAR2(100),
meals_served meals_nt
) NESTED TABLE meals_served
STORE AS i_meals_nt
/
I then insert two rows into this table
as shown in Listing 3, available with
the online version of this column at
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/
06-nov/o66plsql.html.
I can then query the data from the
relational table as follows:
SQL> select * from all_my_meals
2 /
DATE_SERV
-----------------------------------------------------
MEALS_SERVED(NUMBER_SERVED, MEAL_
TYPE, FOOD_SERVED(NAME, FOOD_GROUP,
COLOR))
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
22-JUL-06
MEALS_nt(MEAL_T(4, 'BREAKFAST', FOOD_
T('Scrambled Eggs', 'Protein', 'Yellow')),
MEAL_T(6, 'LUNCH', FOOD_T('Deluxe Salad',
'Vegetables', 'Mostly Green')), MEAL_T(10,
'DINNER', FOOD_T('Tofu and Rice', 'Protein',
'White')))
23-JUL-06
MEALS_nt(MEAL_T(4, 'BREAKFAST', FOOD_
T('Scrambled Eggs', 'Protein',
.
.
.
But you don’t want to simply display
all that data. You want to drill all the
way down to an attribute of the object
within the nested table. Let’s suppose
that you want to see the type of meal
served for each row in the nested table.
It might seem as though you could
employ dot notation along these lines:
SQL> SELECT amm.meals_served
.meal_type
2 FROM all_my_meals amm
3 /
Unfortunately, this would not work;
you would get the following error:
SELECT amm.meals_served.meal_type
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-00904: “AMM”.”MEALS_SERVED”
.“MEAL_TYPE”: invalid identifier
Life is a bit more complicated, but
not too much. The online version of this
column shows how to apply the TABLE
operator and use dot notation to get the
meal_type values. O
Steven Feuerstein (steven@stevenfeuerstein.com) is
Quest Software’s PL/SQL evangelist. He has published
10 books on Oracle’s programming language, including
Oracle PL/SQL Programming and Oracle PL/SQL Best
Practices (O’Reilly Media). Feuerstein is building a unit
testing tool for PL/SQL programs (www.unit-test.com).
BY ARUP NANDA
t e c h n o l o g y RECOVERY
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 6 1
Restore to the Point
Use named points in time to roll your database back by using flashback technology.
ane, the lead DBA at Acme Bank,
has three visitors today. The
first, Paul, is the head of Quality
Assurance. Paul’s team creates a
variety of test scenarios for the applica-
tions. For each scenario, they put together
the test data, and after they
run each test, they need to
modify the data to bring
back the pretest values.
The second visitor
is Tom, the operations
manager. Tom is responsible
for processing batch financial
transaction files from each
branch of the bank. If the
file from a branch produces
an error, the entire process is
aborted and must be started
from the beginning.
The third visitor is Harry,
a business manager of an
application developed by a
third-party vendor. Harry
gets updates from the
vendor to modify the data-
base structure, modify data, and so on, as
part of the application upgrade process.
Most upgrades go smoothly; however,
when an upgrade fails, things get messy.
Harry’s team spends considerable time
devising ways to undo failed changes.
Paul, Tom, and Harry are asking Jane
to help make their processes more effi-
cient. Jane assures them that she has
a solution. Fortunately, Acme is using
Oracle Database 10g Release 2, and it is
possible to “rewind” the database to a
named point in time.
SETUP
Jane sits her visitors down and reminds
them all of how it’s possible to turn back
the hands of time and reinstate the data-
base to a certain point in time using a
simple command: flashback database. In
Oracle Database 10g Release 2, Jane says,
the functionality is now enhanced signifi-
cantly by the ability to name a specific
point in time, called a restore point. Using
this, Paul, Tom, or Harry (or a DBA acting
on their behalf) can mark and flash back
the database to a logical point in time.
Jane starts a demonstration on a test
database. She notes that the database
must be running in archivelog mode and
with flashback logging enabled. She first
shuts down the database and then brings
it up in mounted mode.
shutdown immediate;
startup mount;
Then she converts the database to run in
archivelog mode.
alter database archivelog;
To enable flashback, Jane first configures
two parameters in the database.
alter system set db_recovery_file_dest_
size = 2G;
alter system set db_recovery_file_dest =
‘/u02/flashbackarea/acmeprd’;
In flashback mode, the database
creates flashback log files, which record
the old images of the data
after a change is made.
These files are kept in the
location specified by the db_
recovery_file_dest parameter,
up to the size specified by
the db_recovery_file_dest_
size parameter, which in this
case is set to 2GB.
Jane then enables flash-
back logging:
alter database flashback on;
She opens the database:
alter database open;
She checks the status
of the archive log mode
and flashback:
select flashback_on, log_mode
from v$database;
FLASHBACK_ON LOG_MODE
--------------------------------------------------------------------- - --------------------------------------------------------
YES ARCHIVELOG
This confirms that the database is
indeed in flashback mode.
RESTORE POINTS
Jane proceeds to demonstrate how to
use restore points, starting with an
example of how Paul’s QA team can
benefit from this technique. Jane creates
a restore point named qa_gold.
create restore point qa_gold; I
-
H
U
A

C
H
E
N
6 2 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
RECOVERY
This command, Jane reminds them,
is new in Oracle Database 10g Release 2.
It creates a named restore point, which
is an alias to the system change number
(SCN) of the database at that time.
Jane runs one of the QA team’s tests,
altering the test data. To flash back the
database to the restore point she created,
Jane shuts down the database, restarts it
in mounted mode, and issues the
flashback database command.
shutdown immediate;
startup mount;
flashback database to restore point
qa_gold;
That’s it; the database is now
“rewound” to the restore point named
qa_gold. There was no need for Jane
to back up the database and perform a
point-in-time recovery. Paul couldn’t
be happier.
For Tom, Jane demonstrates a slightly
different approach. Since Tom runs
the batch process on one file at a time,
Jane suggests creating a restore point
after processing each file with some
predetermined naming convention, for
example, after_branch_n, where n is the
BRANCH_ID.
To keep track of the files being pro-
cessed, Tom has a table—PROC—with
only one column—BRANCH_ID, which
stores the id of the branch whose file
has been processed. Jane runs through
the following process as an example of a
typical batch run using restore points:
1. She creates a restore point named
start_batch to mark the start of the
process.
create restore point start_batch;
2. She updates the PROC table to
specify the branch being processed.
update proc set branch_id = 1;
commit;
3. She processes the file from branch 1.
4. After the branch 1 file is processed,
she creates a new restore point.
create restore point after_branch_1;
needs to do is to flash back the database
to that restore point using the flashback
commands she demonstrated earlier.
GUARANTEED RESTORE POINT
Paul, Tom, and Harry leave Jane’s office
and go back to their respective depart-
ments to test their restore-point solutions.
A few hours later, Tom returns to
Jane’s office with an error message.
When he tried to flash back to a restore
point, he got this error:
ORA-38729: Not enough flashback
database log data to do FLASHBACK.
As the error shows, there are insuf-
ficient flashback logs to flash back the
database to the restore point. Jane’s
explanation is simple—the flashback
logs are kept up to the time specified by
the db_flashback_retention_target
database parameter.
The online version of this article, at
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/
06-nov/o66recovery.html, includes infor-
mation on guaranteed restore points and
restore-point administration.
CONCLUSION
Using restore points, DBAs can mark a
location in time, which can then be used
to rewind and fast-forward the database
to a specific location. Although restore
points are very helpful in recovering the
database quickly from user errors, they
also have other excellent uses. O
Arup Nanda (arup@proligence.com) has been an
Oracle DBA for more than 12 years, handling all
aspects of database administration—from performance
tuning to security and disaster recovery. He is a
coauthor of PL/SQL for DBAs (O’Reilly Media, 2005).
READ online-only article content
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/06-nov/
o66recovery.html
READ more about
restore points
download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/
backup.102/b14192/rpfbdb002.htm
flashback database
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/04-may/
o34tech_avail.html
The process is repeated until the files
from all branches are processed.
Jane demonstrates the restore process
to use if a file from branch 23 has an
error. When the file from branch 23 is
picked up for processing, the BRANCH_
ID value in the PROC table will be 23.
SQL> select branch_id from proc;
BRANCH_ID
-----------------------------------------------------
23
If the processing fails for the file from
branch 23, Jane rolls back the changes to
the after_branch_22 restore point.
shutdown immediate;
startup mount;
flashback database to restore point
after_branch_22;
alter database open;
To confirm that the flashback succeeded,
she checks the PROC table again.
SQL> select branch_id from proc;
BRANCH_ID
-----------------------------------------------------
22
The value of the column is 22, for
the branch file one prior to the creation
of the restore point. All changes made
to the database after the creation of this
restore point are undone.
Sometimes, the file from a branch
fails but that is not known until much
later. For instance, the branch 23 file
processing may have failed, but that
is not discovered until the processing
of branch 29. Jane assures Tom that
whether he’s processing the branch 23
file, the branch 29 file, or any file in
between, he can easily roll back to the
after_branch_22 restore point.
In response to Harry’s application
update issue, Jane suggests a solu-
tion very similar to Paul’s. Just prior to
the database update, Harry or a DBA
would create a restore point named
pre_change. If the application update is
not successful, all that Harry or the DBA
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with Oracle experts and the user community to develop the most
authoritative, comprehensive, and current references on Oracle
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BY JONATHAN GENNI CK
t e c h n o l o g y EMBEDDED
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 6 5
When Microseconds Count
The Oracle TimesTen in-memory database is always ready.
racle Corporation has made
several strategic acquisitions
over the past couple of years,
and one of the more interest-
ing is an in-memory database called
TimesTen. Oracle TimesTen enables the
development of mission-
critical, real-time applica-
tions in which response
time must be measured in
microseconds, not milli-
seconds. It can be used
standalone or as a fast,
bidirectional cache for fre-
quently accessed data from
Oracle Database.
An emergency response
dispatch system, the sort
you might get connected to
by dialing 911 in the U.S.,
is a good example of an
application that can benefit
from Oracle TimesTen. (In
fact, Oracle TimesTen is
actually deployed in at least
one 911-related applica-
tion.) Response time in
such systems is more than critical—it’s a
matter of life and death.
When you dial 911 in most parts of
the U.S., the dispatcher immediately
sees your phone number and address
on the screen, and often the system pro-
vides a map showing your location and
perhaps even information on known
health problems at your location. For
example, a patient with a severe allergy
who has a prescribed epinephrine
autoinjector may choose to record that
information with emergency-response
dispatchers. Immediate access to loca-
tion and other critical information is
key to getting help dispatched quickly.
This article describes the imple-
mentation of a rudimentary database
system that might be used to display
critical information to emergency-
response dispatchers. It shows how
Oracle TimesTen can work with Oracle
Database to provide reliable, micro-
second response time, ensuring that
critical data is always available instantly.
ARCHITECTURE
Figure 1 shows a view of the architec-
ture behind Oracle TimesTen. In the
context of Oracle TimesTen, a database
is referred to as a data store. The on-disk
representation of a data store is called
a checkpoint file. When a data store is
first opened, the entire contents of the
data store are read into memory from
the checkpoint file. Subsequent INSERT,
DELETE, SELECT, UPDATE, and
other database operations take place
in memory. Data store changes from
those operations are periodically and
asynchronously written to the on-disk
checkpoint file. When the data store is
shut down, any remaining unwritten
changes are written to the checkpoint
file before the data store is closed.
Oracle TimesTen also uses disk
storage as a recovery mechanism to
protect transactions. Transactions are
recorded in log files. If the system fails
and is restarted, the checkpoint file
will be read into memory, the trans-
action logs will be applied,
and the data store will be
open for business. The
periodic writing of data-
base changes to the check-
point file during regular
operation minimizes the
time needed for any such
recovery operation that
might occur.
Oracle TimesTen can
run as described as a
standalone database, but it
can also optionally run as
a performance accelerator
for data moving to or from
Oracle Database. Figure 1
shows the cache agent and
replication service that can
connect Oracle TimesTen
to Oracle Database. In this
article’s scenario, some data is stored in
Oracle TimesTen to illustrate the stand-
alone approach and other data is stored
in Oracle Database to illustrate perfor-
mance acceleration. You can combine
both approaches as needed.
CREATING AN ORACLE TIMESTEN DATABASE
Oracle TimesTen runs on several plat-
forms, including various Linux distri-
butions, Windows XP and Windows
Server 2003, Solaris, and HP-UX. The
Oracle TimesTen In-Memory Database
Installation Guide provides install
instructions for all supported plat-
forms. The Windows installation is very
straightforward and is what was used to
run the example in this article.
Access to Oracle TimesTen is ulti- G
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M
A
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6 6 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
EMBEDDED
mately through ODBC. (Java applica-
tions use JDBC, and the TimesTen
JDBC driver, in turn, uses ODBC).
Creating an Oracle TimesTen data
store is as simple as defining an ODBC
datasource and then connecting to it.
Assume, for the purposes of this article,
that you have an Oracle Database
schema named DISPATCH with the
tables shown in Listing 1. Further
assume that you have installed Oracle
TimesTen and your emergency response
dispatch application, the one that
brings up critical information when a
call comes in, on a Windows server.
Use the following steps to create an
Oracle TimesTen data store to support
the dispatch application and cache
critical data from Oracle Database:
1. Go to the Control Panel, and open
the ODBC Data Source Administrator.
(Select Start -> Settings -> Control
Panel -> Administrative Tools ->
Data Sources (ODBC)).
2. Add a system datasource, using the
TimesTen Data Manager 6.0 driver.
3. From the Data Store tab (see Figure
2), enter a datasource name (DSN), a
data store path, and a log directory. The
data store path should end in a filename,
but do not provide an extension.
4. Go to the General Connection tab,
find the User ID field, and type the
name of an Oracle Database user with
access to the tables in Listing 1. You
can use the schema owner’s name here.
5. Go to the Cache Connect tab,
find the Oracle Password field, and
enter a password for the user name
used in Step 4. Then find the Oracle
ID field, and enter the net service
name (from tnsnames.ora) for Oracle
TimesTen to use when connecting to
Oracle Database.
6. Click OK to create the ODBC
datasource.
Note: When running under Linux or
other UNIX-based systems, you define
a datasource by editing a .odbc.ini file.
See the Oracle TimesTen In-Memory
Database Operations Guide for details.
7. Connect to your newly created ODBC
datasource, using the Oracle TimesTen
interactive SQL utility ttIsql (analogous
to SQL*Plus for Oracle Database). Then
issue a CONNECT command to open the
datasource, thereby creating the data
store. For example
C:\A>ttisql
Copyright (c) 1996-2006, Oracle.
.
.
.
Command> CONNECT dsn=ttdispatch;
Connection successful:
.
.
.
You now have a running Oracle
TimesTen data store in memory. By
default, Oracle TimesTen automati-
cally creates a data store the first time
it is used. To see a list of system tables
in that data store, enter the TABLES
command. Type HELP to get a list of
all available ttIsql commands. Be sure
to type a semicolon (;) after any ttIsql
command you execute.
In your data store path directory
(c:\a\timesten in Figure 2), you’ll see
Figure 2: Setting up the Oracle TimesTen datasource
Decrypted
Oracle TimesTen
Data Store
Oracle
TimesTen
Libraries
Application
Cache Connect
Replication
Checkpoint File
Log Log Log Log Log
Shared Memory Segment
Changes asynchronously
written during operation
Final write on
shutdown
Read on
startup
from Oracle Database
to Oracle Database
Time
Figure 1: Oracle TimesTen Architecture
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 6 7
the two copies of the checkpoint file
with the extensions .ds0 and .ds1. The
name of these files is the name you
provided in Step 3 above. In your log
directory (also c:\a\timesten in this
example), you’ll see the log files with
the extension .log.
By using the TimesTen Data
Manager 6.0 driver (in Step 2), you
enable your application to interact
directly with the data store. There are
no context switches and no queries
sent out over the network—just direct,
fast access to the data. Multiple appli-
cations using the data store all share
access to the data store through a
shared memory segment.
By default, Oracle TimesTen reads
all data into memory when the first
user connects to a data store and writes
data back to disk when the last user
disconnects. This is one of the ways
Oracle TimesTen approaches zero main-
tenance. You have additional options
here, though. For example, you can set
Oracle TimesTen to read a data store
into memory upon server startup, so
that the data is already there when the
first user connects.
CREATING TABLES
You create a table in Oracle TimesTen
just as you would in any other data-
base. For example, create the following
table to allow residents to record poten-
tially life-saving data for emergency
dispatchers to access:
CREATE TABLE emergency_info (
phone_num VARCHAR(8),
info VARCHAR(160),
PRIMARY KEY (phone_num));
Now you can record comments that
might prove helpful to dispatchers and
responders in an emergency:
INSERT INTO emergency_info
VALUES (‘555-1234’,
‘Child Jeff allergic to egg white.
Epinephrine autoinjector in orange box
near refrigerator.’);
INSERT INTO emergency_info
VALUES (‘555-2345’,
‘Bedridden resident needs help
exiting home in case of fire.’);
Oracle TimesTen datatypes are
CREATE TABLE phones (
phone_num VARCHAR2(8),
street_addr VARCHAR2(20),
city VARCHAR2(15),
PRIMARY KEY (phone_num));
CREATE TABLE call_log (
call_num NUMBER(9),
event_time TIMESTAMP,
event VARCHAR2(80),
PRIMARY KEY (call_num, event_time));
GRANT SELECT, UPDATE, INSERT ON call_log TO ttdispatch;
INSERT INTO phones VALUES (‘555-1234’,’100 W. Munising Ave’, ‘Munising’);
INSERT INTO phones VALUES (‘555-2345’,’101 E. Varnum’, ‘Munising’);
INSERT INTO phones VALUES (‘555-3456’,’E2904 S. First’, ‘Trenary’);
INSERT INTO phones VALUES (‘555-4567’,’N3284 M-67’, ‘Limestone’);
INSERT INTO phones VALUES (‘555-5678’,’N7569 Spruce St.’, ‘AuTrain’);
INSERT INTO phones VALUES (‘555-6789’,’112 Colwell’, ‘Grand Marais’);
COMMIT;
codeLISTING 1: DISPATCH schema in Oracle Database 10g
Command> connect dsn=ttdispatch;
Connection successful:
.
.
.
Command> call ttCacheUidPwdSet(‘ttdispatch’,’ttdispatch’);
Command> call ttCacheStart();
Command>
Command> CREATE READONLY
> CACHE GROUP phone_data
> AUTOREFRESH
> INTERVAL 5 MINUTES
> FROM dispatch.phones (
> phone_num VARCHAR(8) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
> street_addr VARCHAR(20),
> city VARCHAR(15)
> );
Warning 5112: Cache table DISPATCH.PHONES contains
VARCHAR column(s). Oracle VARCHAR comparison rule is different.
codeLISTING 2: Creating a read-only cache group
Command> SELECT * FROM phones;
0 rows found.
Command> LOAD CACHE GROUP phone_data
> COMMIT EVERY 100 ROWS;
6 rows affected.
Command> select * from phones;
< 555-1234, 100 W. Munising Ave, Munising >
< 555-2345, 101 E. Varnum, Munising >
< 555-3456, E2904 S. First, Trenary >
< 555-4567, N3284 M-67, Limestone >
< 555-5678, N7569 Spruce St., AuTrain >
< 555-6789, 112 Colwell, Grand Marais >
6 rows found.
codeLISTING 3: Performing the initial load
not exactly the same as datatypes in
Oracle Database. For example, in Oracle
TimesTen, you use VARCHAR rather than
VARCHAR2. See the Oracle TimesTen
6 8 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
EMBEDDED
READ online-only article content
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/06-nov/
o66timesten.html
READ more about Oracle TimesTen
oracle.com/technology/products/timesten/pdf/
wp/timesten_tech_wp_dec_2005.pdf
Oracle TimesTen In-Memory Database
Architectural Overview
download.oracle.com/otn_hosted_doc/
timesten/603/TimesTen-Documentation/
arch.pdf
Oracle TimesTen In-Memory Database
Installation Guide
download.oracle.com/otn_hosted_doc/
timesten/603/TimesTen-Documentation/
install.pdf
DOWNLOAD
Oracle TimesTen
oracle.com/technology/software/products/
timesten
sample code for this article
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o66timesten.zip
In-Memory Database API and the SQL
Reference Guide documentation for
detailed information on datatypes,
including how Oracle Database
datatypes can be mapped onto Oracle
TimesTen datatypes.
CACHING READ-ONLY DATA
Phone number and address data in an
emergency dispatch system is likely
to be read-only. You want dispatchers
to see the address for a given phone
number, but you don’t want those same
dispatchers distracted from their jobs
by having to edit that address informa-
tion. It’s reasonable, then, to make the
PHONES table read-only for dispatchers.
Before you create a read-only cache
of phone/address data, create a cache
administrator user in Oracle Database.
This user owns the triggers and tables
that Oracle TimesTen creates in Oracle
Database to track changes to data so
that those changes can be used to effi-
ciently refresh the cached data in Oracle
TimesTen. For example, execute the
following statement while logged in as
the system user to create a cache admin-
istrator named ttdispatch:
CREATE USER ttdispatch
identified by ttdispatch
default tablespace users
quota unlimited on users;
Then make the following grant to
allow the cache administrator to create
triggers on tables owned by other users
(such as the DISPATCH schema owner):
grant create any trigger to ttdispatch;
Next, log in as the dispatch schema
owner and grant SELECT access on the
PHONES table to the cache administrator:
GRANT SELECT ON phones TO ttdispatch;
Now, switch over to Oracle TimesTen
and create a cache group. To do this,
1. Connect to your data store from
ttIsql.
2. Make a call to the built-in
ttCacheUidPwdSet() procedure and
specify the username/password for
Oracle TimesTen to use when con-
necting to Oracle Database as a cache
administrator.
3. Call ttCacheStart() to start the
TimesTen cache agent, which is respon-
sible for doing the actual work of
retrieving data from Oracle Database and
caching that data in Oracle TimesTen.
4. Execute a CREATE CACHE GROUP
statement to define a group of related
tables—in this case, only one table—to
be cached in Oracle TimesTen.
Listing 2 shows all four of these steps.
Note that the warning message at
the end of Listing 2 is a reminder that
Oracle TimesTen considers the empty
string (‘’) to be non-null whereas Oracle
Database treats the empty string as a
null. You’ll need to be careful about
this difference in behavior when writing
queries involving VARCHAR columns.
You now have a cache group named
phone_data. Within that group is a
single, empty table named PHONES.
The cache group is set to automatically
refresh, polling Oracle Database for
data changes at five-minute intervals.
However, that automatic refresh is ini-
tially created in a paused state. Issue
the LOAD CACHE GROUP statement
shown in Listing 3 to initialize the cache
with current data from Oracle Database
and to take the cache group out of
pause. From this point forward, Oracle
TimesTen will query Oracle Database
every five minutes (you can specify
larger or smaller intervals) for changes
to the PHONES table. The triggers and
support tables owned by the cache
administrator (ttdispatch in this case)
make such polling very efficient.
The online version of this article,
at oracle.com/technology/oramag/
oracle/06-nov/o66timesten.html,
includes information about creating a
write-through cache, replication errors,
and aging out old records.
BENEFITS OF TIMESTEN
Oracle TimesTen is flexible in ways well
beyond what you’ve seen here. In addi-
tion, with Oracle TimesTen
O You can create caches in which data is
automatically brought in as needed and
then aged out after a period of time.
O You can specify asynchronous logging,
or even no logging at all, to trade dura-
bility for performance.
O You can use Oracle TimesTen-to-
TimesTen replication to create standby
databases for high availability or to
mirror databases for load balancing.
O You can automatically pass queries
through to Oracle Database when they
access tables found in Oracle Database
but not in Oracle TimesTen.
Combined with sound database and
application design, the in-memory per-
formance of Oracle TimesTen enables
time- and mission-critical database-
backed applications. When minimizing
microseconds can save money or lives,
Oracle TimesTen In-Memory Database
can deliver.
Thanks to Sam Drake and Simon Law
at Oracle for their patience in answering
many questions for this article; to the
Alger County, Michigan, Sheriff’s
Department for providing a detailed tour
of its dispatch center; and to Alger County
Emergency Medical Services for inspiring
the example scenario used in this article. O
Jonathan Gennick (www.gennick.com) is an
experienced Oracle professional and member of
the Oak Table Network. He wrote the best-selling
SQL Pocket Guide and the Oracle SQL*Plus Pocket
Reference, both from O’Reilly Media.
BY RON HARDMAN
t e c h n o l o g y DATA WAREHOUSING
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 6 9
Managing Data Quality
Oracle Warehouse Builder 10g Release 2 handles the truth.
ow much confidence do you
have in the quality of your data?
How about the data your busi-
ness partners are feeding into
your data warehouse? As reported in a
November 2005 Computerworld article,
“Dirty Data Blights the
Bottom Line,” Gartner esti-
mates that more than 25
percent of critical data in
Fortune 1000 companies
will remain flawed through
2007 (computerworld.com/
printhis/2005/0,4814,
105928,00.html).
It may be impossible
to tell the good data from
the bad, because both are
reported identically through
the same interface. And if
you can’t tell which data is
good and which is bad, all
of the data is suspect.
So, how can data
quality be improved in
the organization?
1. Involve users. Data quality is ultimately
a business problem, so people in the
business must be involved. People fre-
quently enter the data being used, so
they are the first line of defense. People
are also the final consumers in most
cases and provide the last line of defense.
2. Monitor processes. Bad data actually
might have been accurate at one time
but has since decayed. For example,
prospect lists get outdated. The more
outdated the information, the more
time and money is wasted trying to
sell goods or services to the wrong
people. Business processes can ensure
timely and accurate updates to data.
Streamlining processes where pos-
sible can reduce the number of hands
touching data, thereby reducing the
chances of manual data corruption.
3. Use Oracle Warehouse Builder. In addi-
tion to offering database design and
extract, transform, and load (ETL) fea-
tures, it includes the ability to profile,
cleanse, and audit data, based on data
rules. This technology provides an
umbrella over the data warehouse, using
predefined rules to catch critical mis-
takes before they make their way into
the decision-making process.
This article demonstrates how Oracle
Warehouse Builder 10g Release 2 can
profile datasources, determine data rules,
and generate corrections. To run the
examples in this article, install and config-
ure Oracle Warehouse Builder 10g Release
2 and create a repository by using the
Repository Assistant. See Oracle Warehouse
Builder Installation and Configuration Guide
for Microsoft Windows and UNIX, at oracle
.com/technology/documentation/
warehouse.html, for setup instructions.
INTRODUCING ORACLE WAREHOUSE BUILDER
Oracle Warehouse Builder is a design
tool for modeling and maintaining a
data warehouse. Its datasources are
not limited to Oracle databases. Oracle
Warehouse Builder also supports other
databases, including DB2, SQL Server,
Sybase, Informix, and Teradata. It also
works with file and enterprise application
datasources, so it supports
the complete collection of
data for the organization.
Oracle Warehouse
Builder provides profiling
and auditing capabilities
through its user interface,
allowing for complete
data quality management
when combined with the
previously mentioned user
participation and process
improvements. Historically,
profiling and cleansing
data required good knowl-
edge of SQL and PL/SQL,
but the Oracle Warehouse
Builder integrated pro-
filer and Data Correction
wizard make this task
relatively easy. Auditing capabilities apply
consistent data rules to the incoming data
stream, making the cleansing of new data
a very simple process.
Oracle Warehouse Builder core
components are now bundled with
Oracle Database 10g Release 2 at no
additional charge.
ORACLE WAREHOUSE BUILDER SETUP
To see profiling and data cleansing
for yourself, run the LOAD_DATA.sql
script, available with the online version
of this article at oracle.com/technology/
oramag/oracle/06-nov/o66owb.zip,
in the same database as your Oracle
Warehouse Builder repository owner.
The script creates users named
STUDENTS and STUDENT_TARGET
and creates a table called STUDENT_ D
A
N

H
U
B
I
G
7 0 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
DATA WAREHOUSING
type t_arr is table of varchar2(2000) index by binary_integer;
s t_arr;
begin
s(0):= ‘MATH’; s(1):= ‘READING’; s(2):= ‘SCIENCE’; s(3):= ‘WRITING’;
-- check for equality first. Function may be called when there is no error.
for i in s.first..s.last loop
if (s(i) = CONTENT_AREA) then
return CONTENT_AREA;
end if;
end loop;
for i in s.first..s.last loop
if (soundex(s(i)) = soundex(CONTENT_AREA)) then
return s(i);
end if;
end loop;
return CONTENT_AREA;
end;
codeLISTING 1: SDX_CONTENT_AREA function
TESTS, with the following definition:
Name Null? Type
------------------------------------------------------------------------ ------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------
TEST_ID NOT NULL NUMBER(10)
TEST_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(30)
CONTENT_AREA NOT NULL VARCHAR2(10)
GRADE NOT NULL VARCHAR2(2)
STATE NOT NULL VARCHAR2(2)
SCHOOL_ID NOT NULL VARCHAR2(15)
FIRST_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(30)
MIDDLE_NAME VARCHAR2(30)
LAST_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(30)
ETHNICITY VARCHAR2(1)
NEW_TO_SCHOOL VARCHAR2(1)
AGE_TESTED NOT NULL VARCHAR2(3)
GENDER NOT NULL VARCHAR2(1)
TOTAL_SCORE NOT NULL NUMBER(3)
PERFORMANCE NOT NULL NUMBER(1)
The LOAD_DATA.sql script then
populates this table with sample test
results for use in the steps in this article.
Next, create a repository user as
follows:
1. To start the repository assistant,
select Start -> All Programs ->
OWB Home -> Warehouse Builder
-> Administration -> Repository
Assistant.
2. Select Advanced Setup and click
Next.
3. Click Next.
4. Select Manage Warehouse Builder
repository users and click Next.
5. Select Create the registration of one
or more Warehouse Builder repository
users and click Next.
6. Select your repository owner, supply
the password, and click Next.
7. Select the STUDENTS and
STUDENT_TARGET users and click
Next.
8. Supply the passwords for
STUDENTS (which is STUDENTS by
default) and STUDENT_TARGET
(which is STUDENT_TARGET); click Next;
and click Finish.
With user, data, and repository user
configuration complete, you can import
the data.
PROJECT DEFINITION
The Oracle Warehouse Builder Design
Center organizes metadata by project.
Nodes are listed under each project and
include items such as databases, data
profiles, and data rules.
When you open the Design Center
and are logged in as the repository owner,
you will see a seed project called MY_
PROJECT. You can either use this project
or create your own. Perform the follow-
ing steps to create your own project:
1. Right-click in the Project Explorer
and click New.
2. Enter STUDENT_PROJECT as the new
project name.
3. Expand the STUDENT_PROJECT
project.
4. Expand the Databases node.
5. Right-click Oracle and click New.
6. Enter STUDENT_SOURCE as the module
name, click Data Source, and click Next.
7. Select Edit next to the default.
O Provide all connection information,
including the STUDENTS / STUDENTS user
name and password.
O Make sure you select the correct data-
base version.
O Click Test Connect to verify your
connection information.
8. Click Finish.
At this point, the datasource con-
nection is established but you must still
select the objects in the datasource. The
Import Metadata wizard opens automati-
cally and prompts you for filter informa-
tion. Complete the wizard as follows:
1. Uncheck everything except Table and
click Next.
Figure 1: Domain tab in the Profile Results Canvas
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 7 1
2. Expand Tables and select
STUDENT_TESTS for import.
3. Click Finish.
The datasource is now defined. Next,
create the target:
1. Right-click Oracle in the Databases
node and click New.
2. Provide STUDENT_TARGET as the
module name, click Warehouse Target,
and click Next.
3. Select Edit next to the default.
O Provide all connection information,
including the STUDENT_TARGET / STUDENT_
TARGET user name and password.
O Make sure you select the correct data-
base version.
O Click Test Connect to verify your
connection information.
4. Click Finish.
The data is ready for profiling.
PROFILING DATASOURCES
Profiling identifies data attributes such as
data structure, common formats, common
values, and minimum/maximum values.
From these findings, Oracle Warehouse
Builder determines domain values, or
values it believes should be allowed in
that column. Not all findings are absolute,
however. If your data includes the abbre-
viations for only half of the states in the
United States, for example, only those 25
states will be shown as existing values.
You must enter the other valid values
before using the values to establish a rule.
To see this in action, do the following:
1. Under the STUDENT_PROJECT
project in the Design Center, right-click
Data Profiles, and select New.
2. Enter STUDENT_PROFILE for the name
and click Next.
3. Select the STUDENT_TESTS table
and click Finish.
The Data Profile Editor opens, but
the data has not been profiled yet. The
Profile Objects window (top left) shows
the STUDENT_TESTS table being
analyzed. Below that is the Property
Inspector window. Modifying the prop-
erties in this window modifies the way
the profiler analyzes the data.
To start profiling, navigate to Profile
on the navigation menu at the top of
the Data Profile Editor and click the
Profile option. If you have never created
a profile before, you will be prompted
to create a schema to hold profile data.
Follow the wizard’s instructions, and
continue to create the profile. When
you’re finished, Oracle Warehouse
Builder submits a job that does the work,
so even though it returns to the main
window, it is working behind
the scenes. You can monitor the
status of the job in the Monitor
Panel at the bottom left of the
Data Profile Editor.
When the job completes,
you are asked whether you
want to retrieve the results
now. Click Yes, and the profile
results appear in the Profile
Results Canvas. Click the
Domain tab, and you will see
the results shown in Figure 1.
If there is more than one
of any value in the source data, it will
appear in the Found Domain column.
Also note the percentage displayed in
the % Compliant column. This reflects
the percentage of the source data that
complies with the identified domains.
CONTENT_AREA, for example, shows
READING and MATH. Click the value
Figure 2: Data Rule Panel
Figure 4: Corrected Modules tab
Figure 3: Cleansing with the Data Correction wizard
7 2 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
DATA WAREHOUSING
READ more about Oracle
Warehouse Builder
oracle.com/technology/products/warehouse
Oracle Warehouse Builder Installation and
Configuration Guide for Microsoft Windows
and UNIX
oracle.com/technology/documentation/
warehouse.html
DOWNLOAD
Oracle Warehouse Builder 10g
Release 2
oracle.com/technology/software/products/
warehouse
sample data for this article
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o66owb.zip
in the Found Domain column, and
examine the Data Drill Panel in the
region beneath it to see how these values
were derived, as shown in Figure 1.
SCIENCE and WRITING are in the
table, but they occur only once, so they
are not included in the Found Domain
column by default. You’ll also notice a
value of WRITEING (misspelled) in the
list. Click this value, and the source row
is shown to the right.
DEFINING DATA RULES
Now that the profiling is finished, it is
time to create some data rules. With the
value in the Found Domain column and
the CONTENT_AREA row still selected,
click the Derive Data Rule button to
launch the wizard. Follow these steps:
1. Enter CONTENT_AREA_CHECK as the
name for the data rule.
2. On the Define Rule page, choose
SCIENCE as a selected value.
3. Type WRITING as a fourth value and
click Finish.
The rule is displayed with a check
box beside it in the Data Rule Panel,
as shown in Figure 2. If additional rules
are defined in the profile, they are listed
here as well.
DATA CORRECTION WIZARD
The data rule can be used to create an
automated correction strategy. To create
a correction, use the Data Correction
wizard as follows:
1. Select Profile -> Create Correction
from the menu at the top of the Data
Profile Editor.
2. Choose Select an existing module,
choose STUDENT_TARGET, and click
Next.
3. Verify that the STUDENT_TESTS
table is selected and click Next.
4. Verify that CONTENT_AREA_
CHECK is selected as a data rule and
click Next.
5. Click Next.
6. Choose Cleanse as the action and
Soundex Match as the cleanse strategy,
as shown in Figure 3, and click Next.
7. Complete the wizard by accepting the
defaults on all remaining screens and
click Finish.
The wizard generates the map-
pings and functions that are required to
perform the correction. To see the map-
pings, tables, and functions created by the
wizard, click the Corrected Modules tab,
as shown in Figure 4. These mappings
show how Oracle Warehouse Builder
processes the data through temporary and
staging tables to complete the correction.
Double-click the M_STUDENT_
TESTS mapping to open the Mappings
Editor. The tables may appear one
behind the other in the window. To see
how the mappings are laid out, separate
the tables and organize them as shown
in Figure 5.
To see the function created by the
Data Correction wizard, return to the
Data Profile Editor and click the SDX_
CONTENT_AREA function. Click the
Implementation tab, and the function
in Listing 1 is displayed.
To deploy the correction, return
to the Design Center and navigate to
Tools -> Control Center Manager. In
the Object Details window, click the
Default Actions button and then the
Deploy icon in the top menu bar. This
submits a job to deploy the objects.
Run the mapping to correct the data
in the target table, by selecting the
M_STUDENT_TESTS mapping in the
Control Center Manager and clicking the
Run button. Confirm that WRITEING
is now shown as WRITING in the cor-
rected STUDENT_TESTS table.
CONCLUSION
Oracle Warehouse Builder’s Data Profile
Editor simplifies rule definition. Simply
specify the source and target, and all of
your data is analyzed. Domain values are
derived from existing data, providing a
great starting point for rule definition.
After you create rules, Oracle Warehouse
Builder’s Data Correction wizard makes
generating corrections easy. Specify the
rules that should be applied as well as
the action to take when a rule is violated,
and all mappings, tables, and functions
are generated automatically. O
Ron Hardman works with Academy District 20 schools
in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and is the founder of
5-Mile Software. He is coauthor of Oracle Database
10g PL/SQL Programming and Expert PL/SQL, both
from Oracle Press, and is an Oracle ACE.
Figure 5: Viewing tables in the Mappings Editor
BY TOM KYTE
t e c h n o l o g y ASK TOM
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 7 3
On Rescue Analytics and Popularity
Our technologist explains the saving power of analytics and shares popularity.
OW_NUM is the primary key of this
table, and I need to update COLA and
COLB to fill up the nulls with the previ-
ous non-null values. After the update,
SELECT * should give the following results:
SQL> select * from t1;
ROW_NUM COLA COLB
- ------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------- - -----------------------------------------------
1 Category 1 Mango
2 Category 1 Mango
3 Category 1 Mango
4 Category 1 Banana
5 Category 1 Banana
6 Category 1 Banana
7 Category 2 Vanilla
8 Category 2 Vanilla
9 Category 2 Strawberry
9 rows selected.
Suppose I have the following table:
SQL> select * from t1;
ROW_NUM COLA COLB
- ------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------- - -----------------------------------------------
1 Category 1 Mango
2
3
4 Banana
5
6
7 Category 2 Vanilla
8
9 Strawberry
9 rows selected.
Is this possible with one SQL statement, or do I
need to write a stored procedure?
Using analytic functions, you can
materialize this data easily. I’ll show
both approaches to carrying down the
last non-null value. This is a problem
people have to solve many times in a
data warehouse when performing time
series analysis against sparse data.
In this case, the Oracle Database 10g
Release 2 query would look like this:
SQL> select
2 row_num,
3 last_value(cola ignore nulls)
4 over (order by row_num) cola,
5 last_value(colb ignore nulls)
6 over (order by row_num) colb
7 from t1
8 order by row_num
9 /
ROW_NUM COLA COLB
- ------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------- - -----------------------------------------------
1 Category 1 Mango
2 Category 1 Mango
3 Category 1 Mango
4 Category 1 Banana
5 Category 1 Banana
6 Category 1 Banana
7 Category 2 Vanilla
8 Category 2 Vanilla
9 Category 2 Strawberry
9 rows selected.
That release added the IGNORE
NULLS clause for certain analytic func-
tions, such as LAST_VALUE (which
retrieves the last value of a given
column in an analytic window). With
IGNORE NULLS, you are able to
retrieve the last non-null value of any
given column in an analytic window,
effectively allowing you to carry the
value down and populate that column.
Now, in earlier releases you did not
have this capability and had to be a
bit more creative in your approach;
an equivalent query (assuming ROW_
NUM is a 10-digit positive number) in
an earlier release would have been
select
row_num,
substr(
max(
case
when cola is not null
then
to_char(row_num,’fm0000000000’)
||cola
end
) over (order by row_num),
11 ) cola,
substr(
max(
case
when colb is not null
then
to_char(row_num,’fm0000000000’)
||colb
end
) over (order by row_num),
11 ) colb
from t1
order by row_num
/
If you are interested in understanding
how that works, you can review oracle
.com/technology/oramag/oracle/04-mar/
o24asktom.html, “On Format, Negation,
and Sliding,” an earlier Ask Tom column
in which I used a similar carry-down
technique to group data.
Once I have that query, updating the
original source data becomes as easy as
this merge:
SQL> merge into t1
2 using (
3 select
4 row_num,
5 last_value(cola ignore nulls)
6 over (order by row_num) cola,
7 last_value(colb ignore nulls)
8 over (order by row_num) colb
9 from t1
10 ) t2
11 on (t1.row_num = t2.row_num)
7 4 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
ASK TOM
12 when matched
13 then update
14 set cola = t2.cola,
15 colb = t2.colb;
9 rows merged.
That again uses an Oracle Database
10g feature: a merge with just the
UPDATE component. In earlier releases,
I would have had to supply not only
a WHEN MATCHED clause but also
a WHEN NOT MATCHED clause. In
this case, because the USING set of
data is based entirely on the data I am
merging into, I know that the WHEN
NOT MATCHED clause will never
happen (because there cannot be any
ROW_NUM in T2 that is not in T1).
So I can just use a dummy WHEN
MATCHED that tries to insert a NULL
into ROW_NUM:
merge into t1
using
(
second query from above
) t2
on (t1.row_num = t2.row_num)
when matched
then update
set cola = t2.cola,
colb = t2.colb
when not matched
then insert (row_num)
values (NULL);
And that does it.
THE MOST POPULAR ANSWER EVER
It was first posted more than five years ago,
and it is the most-read question and answer
on Ask Tom (asktom.oracle.com)—with
almost a quarter of a million views as of
this writing. Here it is:
I want to declare multiple cursors based on
the values passed through a procedure, and
only the WHERE conditions of the cursors will
change. The body of the procedure is the same
for all the cursors otherwise.
This sounds like a good use of ref
cursors to me. Suppose you wanted
to build a generic routine that would
look at the inputs passed to it and
build a WHERE clause for each NON-
NULL parameter passed. This would
result in a large number of statically
defined cursors, so you would use a
ref cursor instead, allowing you to do
this dynamically.
I’ll demonstrate below. I’ll write a
routine that will print out some EMP
data. This routine will take up to three
inputs to constrain the result set. I want
to have up to eight different cursors pos-
sible here:
OOne with no WHERE clause (all
inputs null)
OThree with a single predicate
OThree with “pairs” of predicate
conditions
OOne with all three predicate conditions
Additionally, because the use of bind
variables is one of the most important
things in Oracle programming, I’ll want
to make sure I use them as well. This
will be tricky, because I don’t know if
I’ll have zero, one, two, or three of them
until runtime. I’ll use an application
context to solve that problem.
Here is a sample implementation:
SQL> create or replace
2 context MY_CTX
3 using MY_PROCEDURE
4 /
Context created.
That created my application context
and bound it to my yet-to-be-created
procedure MY_PROCEDURE. Note that
only MY_PROCEDURE will be able to set
values in this context. See asktom.oracle
.com/~tkyte/article2 for more information
on application contexts and their use.
Now for convenience I’ll wrap DBMS_
OUTPUT.PUT_LINE in a small routine.
This is to handle strings larger than
255 characters (not necessary in Oracle
Database 10g Release 2, in which the line
size limit is increased to 32K).
SQL> create or replace
procedure p ( p_str in varchar2 )
2 is
3 l_str long := p_str||chr(10);
4 l_piece long;
5 n number;
6 begin
7 loop
8 exit when l_str is null;
9 n := instr( l_str, chr(10) );
10 l_piece :=
substr( l_str, 1, n-1 );
11 l_str :=
substr( l_str, n+1 );
12 loop
13 exit when l_piece is null;
14 dbms_output.put_line
( substr( l_piece, 1, 250));
15 l_piece :=
substr( l_piece, 251 );
16 end loop;
17 end loop;
18 end;
19 /
Procedure created.
I use this P routine later to dump the
dynamically generated query so I can
see what was built for each execution. It
is not really relevant to the example, just
part of the demonstration.
Now for the “meat” of the answer.
Here’s the routine that dynamically con-
structs a predicate for us:
create or replace
procedure my_procedure
( p_ename in varchar2 default NULL,
p_hiredate in date default NULL,
p_sal in number default NULL)
as
type rc is REF CURSOR;

l_cursor rc;
l_query varchar2(512)
default ‘select *
from emp
where 1 = 1 ‘;
cursor l_template is select * from emp;
l_rec l_template%rowtype;
Here I use what I call “template”
cursors. I like to use these with dynami-
cally opened ref cursors. I use them to
define a record to fetch into. Here, in this
simple example, I could have skipped it
and just defined l_rec as EMP%rowtype,
but I wanted to show how this would
work if I didn’t issue SELECT * on a
single table but on many columns from
many tables. This just helps me create a
nice record type for PL/SQL. The tem-
plate query has only a SELECT and a
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 7 5
FROM. I never put a WHERE clause on
it (even when joining), because I never
actually open it. I just use it to get the
default datatypes, names, and so on for
a record definition right below it. Also,
note the where 1 = 1 trick. That is so
I can just append zero, one, or more
predicates to this query without having
to figure out if I need to append the
WHERE condition or the AND condi-
tion. And because I started the WHERE
clause, I just add AND conditions. Note
that if you are joining multiple tables,
you’ll already have a predicate (using the
old-style join conditions) and won’t need
the where 1 = 1 trick.
begin
if ( p_ename is NOT NULL )
then
dbms_session.set_context
( ‘MY_CTX’, ‘ENAME’,
‘%’||upper(p_ename)||’%’);
l_query := l_query ||
‘ and ename like
sys_context( ‘’MY_CTX’’,
‘’ENAME’’ ) ‘;
end if;
The technique I’m using here is that
for each input, I inspect it to see if it is
non-null. If it is, I add it to the WHERE
clause and set the value in the context.
Note how in the WHERE clause, I
always use the SYS_CONTEXT func-
tion. I never put the literal value into the
query—that would be very bad for
OPerformance
OScalability
OShared pool utilization
OPerhaps most important: security
(SQL injection).
To read about SQL injection, you can
refer to oracle.com/technology/oramag/
oracle/05-jan/o15asktom.html, an earlier
Ask Tom column on that subject.
Also, note how I had to double the
quote marks to get a single quote mark
in the character string literal. In Oracle
Database 10g Release 1 and later, I could
use the new quoting method for string
literals introduced in that release:
l_query := l_query ||
q’| and ename like
sys_context( ‘MY_CTX’,
‘ENAME’ ) |’;
To provide a response that works in
all current releases of Oracle Database,
I’ll use Oracle9i Database and the earlier
approach of using double quote marks
in the remaining text. Now, continuing
on, I process the HIREDATE column:
if ( p_hiredate is NOT NULL )
then
dbms_session.set_context
( ‘MY_CTX’, ‘HIREDATE’,
to_char(p_hiredate,
‘yyyymmddhh24miss’));
l_query := l_query ||
‘ and hiredate >
to_date(
sys_context( ‘’MY_CTX’’,
‘’HIREDATE’’ ),
‘’yyyymmddhh24miss’’) ‘;
end if;
Note here how I am careful to pre-
serve the date and time component (you
are the only one who knows if this is
necessary for your application). Also,
always wrap the SYS_CONTEXT call in
a TO_DATE call when you are compar-
ing with a DATE, to avoid implicit con-
versions in the query at runtime. Last, I
process the third column, SAL:
if ( p_sal is NOT NULL )
then
dbms_session.set_context
( ‘MY_CTX’, ‘SAL’, p_sal);
l_query := l_query ||
‘ and sal >
to_number(
sys_context( ‘’MY_CTX’’,
‘’SAL’’ )
) ‘;
end if;
Note the explicit conversion for the
NUMBER here. Use TO_NUMBER to
avoid implicit conversions. Now I am
ready to debug the query, using my P
routine, and open the ref cursor:
p( l_query );
open l_cursor for l_query;
loop
fetch l_cursor into l_rec;
exit when l_cursor%notfound;
dbms_output.put_line
( l_rec.ename || ‘,’ ||
l_rec.hiredate || ‘,’ ||
l_rec.sal );
end loop;
close l_cursor;
end;
And that’s it. I now have a routine
that will open one of eight possible dif-
ferent cursors. Here is a small test run
just to see how it works:
SQL> exec my_procedure
select * from emp where 1 = 1
SMITH,17-dec-1980 00:00:00,800
.
.
.
KING,,5
PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.
SQL> exec my_procedure(p_ename=>’a’)
select * from emp
where 1 = 1
and ename like
sys_context( ‘MY_CTX’, ‘ENAME’ )
ALLEN,20-feb-1981 00:00:00,1600
.
.
.
JAMES,03-dec-1981 00:00:00,950
PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.
And so on. Because this question and
answer is the most-read, it is also one of
the largest pages on Ask Tom. I encour-
age you to read it, at asktom.oracle.com/
~tkyte/cursor.html; it is interesting to
read the alternative methods proposed
It was first posted more than five years ago, and
it is the most-read question and answer on Ask
Tom (asktom.oracle.com)—with almost a quarter
of a million views.
7 6 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
ASK TOM
ASK Tom
Oracle Vice President Tom Kyte answers your most
difficult technology questions. Highlights from that
forum appear in this column.
asktom.oracle.com
READ more Tom
Expert Oracle Database Architecture: 9i and 10g
Programming Techniques and Solutions
amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1590595300/
READ more about
analytics
“On Format, Negation, and Sliding”
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/04-mar/
o24asktom.html
application contexts
asktom.oracle.com/~tkyte/article2
ref cursors
asktom.oracle.com/~tkyte/cursor.html
join types
Performance Tuning Guide
download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/
b14211/toc.htm
download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/
b14211/optimops.htm#sthref1385
download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/
b14211/optimops.htm#sthref1394
what language to use
asktom.oracle.com/~tkyte/WhatLanguage.html
DOWNLOAD Oracle Database 10g
Express Edition (Oracle Database XE)
oracle.com/technology/xe
by other readers and see the variations
on a theme that this page presents.
SUBQUERIES OR JOINS?
In terms of database performance, which
one is better—joins or subqueries? Can you
explain with an example? Also, what is the dif-
ference between nested loops and hash joins,
and how do you determine which one to use
for better performance?
Well, in general, joins and subqueries
are semantically different. They may
return entirely different results and are
not interchangeable. What you should
do to choose is
OUse a subquery when you need no
columns from the tables referenced in
the subquery
OUse a join when you do need some of
the columns
For example
select *
from emp
where deptno in
( select deptno
from dept );
would be “better” than
select emp.*
from emp, dept
where emp.deptno
= dept.deptno;
But for purely semantic reasons, the
first query is more meaningful. It says
“get me every row from EMP such that
EMP.DEPTNO is in the DEPT table.”
The second query says “join EMP to
DEPT.” You have to read more into the
query yourself to understand its goal
(the question being asked). To the opti-
mizer, those two particular queries are
identical, and the performance will be
the same.
And remember, a subquery cannot
simply be replaced by a join (and vice
versa), because they often result in differ-
ent answers. Consider:
SQL> select *
2 from dept
3 where deptno in
4 (select deptno
5 from emp)
6 /
DEPTNO DNAME LOC
- ------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------- - -----------------------------------------------
10 ACCOUNTING NEW YORK
20 RESEARCH DALLAS
30 SALES CHICAGO
SQL> select dept.*
2 from dept, emp
3 where dept.deptno
4 = emp.deptno
5 /
DEPTNO DNAME LOC
- ------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------- - -----------------------------------------------
10 ACCOUNTING NEW YORK
10 ACCOUNTING NEW YORK
20 RESEARCH DALLAS
20 RESEARCH DALLAS
20 RESEARCH DALLAS
.
.
.
30 SALES CHICAGO
14 rows selected.
The optimizer knows what to do—use
the proper construct based on the ques-
tion being asked. Subqueries and joins
are not interchangeable in general; use the
one that conveys the most meaning.
As for the access paths—the join
types—the Performance Tuning Guide at
download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_
01/server.102/b14211/toc.htm covers
these topics:
Onested loops joins, at download
.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/
server.102/b14211/
optimops.htm#sthref1385
Ohash joins, at download.oracle
.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/
b14211/optimops.htm#sthref1394
WHAT LANGUAGE TO USE
There are popular questions, and there are
just plain “hot” questions. By hot I mean
questions that gather lots of heated feed-
back. Recently, I was asked:
I have a client using PL/SQL for both back-end
database code and front-end presentation.
I think it’s more appropriate to use 3GL lan-
guages, such as Java and .NET, for the pre-
sentation and business logic tier, and to reserve
PL/SQL for the data-intensive processes.
What’s your opinion on this?
I found the question a bit ironic,
given that the site where the person
asked this particular question (Ask Tom)
uses PL/SQL for both back-end database
code and front-end presentation via
Oracle Application Express (formally
known as Oracle HTML DB).
You can probably guess the gist of
my answer, which was: There is more
than one language, and it can make
good sense to use PL/SQL entirely, or
Java, or .NET, or whatever language
happens to lend itself best to the
task at hand. A good back-and-forth
discussion followed. You can see it
online at asktom.oracle.com/~tkyte/
WhatLanguage.html. O
Tom Kyte (thomas.kyte@oracle.com) has worked
for Oracle since 1993. He is a vice president in
the Oracle Public Sector group and the author of
Expert Oracle Database Architecture: 9i and 10g
Programming Techniques and Solutions (Apress,
2005) and Effective Oracle by Design (Oracle Press,
2003), among others.
BY ARADHANA PURI
t e c h n o l o g y INSIDE OCP
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 7 7
Testing Database Security
Questions and answers on securing your Oracle database by using FGA and VPD
he Oracle Database 10g: New
Features for Administrators
exam enables Oracle Certified
Professionals (OCPs) certified
on Oracle9i Database to upgrade their
certifications to Oracle Database 10g.
This is the only exam OCPs certified
on Oracle9i Database need to take to
upgrade their certification credentials to
Oracle Database 10g.
This column focuses on the fine-
grained auditing (FGA) and virtual
private database (VPD) features in
Oracle Database 10g. FGA, introduced
in Oracle9i Database, captures user
activities at a very detailed level and
helps prevent the need for manual,
trigger-based auditing. Introduced in
Oracle8i Database, VPD (also known
as fine-grained access control) provides
powerful row-level security capabilities.
The column presents sample ques-
tions you may encounter when taking
the Oracle Database 10g: New Features
for Administrators OCP exam. Note that
the sample question format and the SQL
code have been adjusted for presenta-
tion in this article.
FINE-GRAINED AUDITING
Auditing is the monitoring and record-
ing of selected user database actions. In
Oracle9i Database, FGA enabled record-
ing of row-level changes, along with
SCN values, to reconstruct old data.
FGA worked for SELECT statements
only and not for DML statements such
as UPDATE, INSERT, and DELETE.
For instance, by using FGA in Oracle9i
Database, you could determine that user
Smith had updated the SALES table that
is owned by SH but you could not see if
user Smith had updated the AMOUNT_
SOLD column or see the value of the
AMOUNT_SOLD column before an
update. In Oracle Database 10g, FGA
can audit DML statements.
The policies you establish with FGA
can monitor data access on the basis of
content. Using policies, you can specify
the columns and conditions for which
you want audit records. Conditions can
include limiting the audit to specific
types of DML statements used in con-
nection with the columns you specify.
You can also provide the name of the
routine (such as a PL/SQL procedure or
package) you want to be called when an
audit event occurs.
Which two statements are correct about the
features of FGA in Oracle Database 10g?
A. FGA records are stored in the SYS
.FGA_LOG$ table and are accessible
through the DBA_FGA_AUDIT_TRAIL
view.
B. The EXECUTE privilege on the
DBMS_FGA package is needed for
administering FGA audit policies.
C. You must enable FGA at the database
level by setting the AUDIT_TRAIL ini-
tialization parameter.
D. FGA policies cannot be enabled and
disabled without loss of the metadata
information.
The correct answers are A and B.
FGA records are stored in the SYS.FGA_
LOG$ table and are accessible through
the DBA_FGA_AUDIT_TRAIL view. To
administer FGA policies, you require
EXECUTE privileges on the DBMS_FGA
package. You use the DBMS_FGA.ADD_
POLICY interface to define each FGA
policy for a table or view, identifying
any combination of SELECT, UPDATE,
DELETE, and INSERT statements.
Answer C is incorrect because you do
not need to set AUDIT_TRAIL to enable
fine-grained auditing. Answer D is incor-
rect because you can temporarily enable
or disable FGA policies without losing
any metadata information. You can use
the DBMS_FGA.ENABLE_POLICY and
DBMS_FGA.DISABLE_POLICY proce-
dures to enable and disable audit policies.
You define the following audit policy:
BEGIN
dbms_fga.add_policy(
object_schema => ‘HR’,
object_name => ‘EMP’,
policy_name => ‘policy_emp_sal_comm’,
audit_condition => NULL,
audit_column => ‘SALARY,COMMISSION_
PCT’,
audit_column_opts=> DBMS_FGA.ALL_
COLUMNS,
statement_types => ‘SELECT, UPDATE’);
END;
Which SQL statements would be audited
as a result of this audit policy? (Choose all
that apply.)
A. UPDATE hr.emp
SET SALARY = SALARY+ 4000
WHERE EMP_ID=197;
B. UPDATE hr.emp
SET SALARY = SALARY+ 4000,
COMMISSION_PCT = COMMISSION_PCT+ 0.5
WHERE COMMISSION_PCT > 0;
C. SELECT emp_id, salary FROM hr.emp;
D. DELETE hr.emp WHERE emp_id = 100;
E. SELECT * FROM hr.emp;
The correct answers are B and E.
When you specify DBMS_FGA.ALL_
COLUMNS for the AUDIT_COLUMN_
OPTS parameter, audit trail entries are
created only when all the columns speci-
fied by the AUDIT_COLUMN parameter
are accessed by the operation(s) speci-
fied for the STATEMENT_TYPES param-
eter. Hence, in the example here, an
audit trail would be created when either
the SELECT or the UPDATE operation is
performed on the SALARY column and
the COMMISSION_PCT column.
Answer A is incorrect because the
UPDATE operation is performed on
the SALARY column only. Answer C is
7 8 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
INSIDE OCP
INSIDE OCP
READ
online-only column content
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/06-nov/
o66ocp.html
“Inside OCP” columns
oracle.com/technology/oramag/oracle/ocp
LEARN more about the Oracle
Certification Program, and download
a free exam guide
oracle.com/education/certification
incorrect because the SALARY column
and the COMMISSION_PCT column
are not being queried. Answer D is
incorrect because the DELETE operation
is not specified for the STATEMENT_
TYPES parameter.
You have implemented regular auditing
by using the AUDIT command in Oracle
Database 10g. Also, you have defined
audit policies by using the DBMS_FGA
.ADD_POLICY procedure. You are inter-
ested in getting a combined view of
regular audits as well as the FGA audit
trail. What would you do?
A. Execute appropriate procedures in
the DBMS_CAPTURE_ADM package
B. Execute appropriate procedures in
the DBMS_METADATA package
C. Query the DBA_COMMON_AUDIT_
TRAIL data dictionary view
D. Query the UNION of DBA_AUDIT_
STATEMENT and DBA_AUDIT_
POLICIES
The correct answer is C. The
DBA_COMMON_AUDIT_TRAIL data
dictionary view is a union of the DBA_
AUDIT_TRAIL and DBA_FGA_AUDIT_
TRAIL data dictionary views. Note that
the DBA_AUDIT_TRAIL view provides
audit trail entries and the DBA_FGA_
AUDIT_TRAIL displays all audit records
for fine-grained auditing.
Answers A and B are incorrect
because procedures in the DBMS_
CAPTURE_ADM and DBMS_
METADATA packages do not provide
audit information. Answer D is incorrect
because to get combined audit informa-
tion, you can either query the UNION
of the DBA_AUDIT_TRAIL and DBA_
FGA_AUDIT_TRAIL data dictionary
views or query the DBA_COMMON_
AUDIT_TRAIL data dictionary view.
VIRTUAL PRIVATE DATABASE
VPD works by transparently modify-
ing requests for data to present a partial
view of tables to users, based on a set
of defined criteria. When a user directly
or indirectly accesses a table, view, or
synonym protected by a VPD policy, the
server dynamically modifies the SQL
statement of the user. The modification
creates a WHERE condition (a predicate)
returned by a function implementing
the security policy. VPD policies can be
applied to SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE,
INDEX, and DELETE statements.
Consider a database user who is allowed
to see employee records in the Sales
division only. This user issues the fol-
lowing query:
SELECT * FROM emp;
The function implementing the secu-
rity policy returns this predicate: division
= ‘SALES’, and the database transparently
rewrites the query. The query actually
executed becomes
SELECT * FROM emp
WHERE division = ‘SALES’;
To implement VPD, you use the
DBMS_RLS package. Alternatively, you
can use the Oracle Policy Manager
graphical user interface, accessed from
Oracle Enterprise Manager, to apply
security policies to schema objects.
You added the following VPD policy:
BEGIN
dbms_rls.add_policy
(object_schema=>’hr’,
object_name => ‘employees’,
policy_name => ‘hr_policy’,
function_schema => ‘hr’,
policy_function => ‘hr_pol’,
policy_type => dbms_rls.static,
sec_relevant_cols => ‘sal,comm’);
END;
Which statements about this policy are
correct? (Choose two.)
A. Oracle Database reevaluates the
policy function at statement execution
time if it detects context changes since
the last use of the cursor.
B. The policy function is not reevaluated
for each query on the EMPLOYEES table.
C. The policy is applied to the SELECT
statement type only.
D. The policy predicates are cached in
the system global area (SGA).
The correct answers are B and D.
Note that POLICY_TYPE is specified as
static. For a static policy type, the policy
functions are executed once and then
cached in the SGA. Note that in previous
releases, policies were dynamic, which
means that the database would run the
policy function for each query or DML
statement. In addition to dynamic poli-
cies, Oracle Database 10g provides static
and context-sensitive policies. These
policy types provide a means of improv-
ing server performance, because they
do not always rerun policy functions for
each DML statement and can be shared
across multiple database objects.
Answer A is incorrect because
setting the POLICY_TYPE parameter to
CONTEXT_SENSITIVE causes the data-
base to reevaluate the policy function
at statement execution time if it detects
context changes since the last use of the
cursor. Answer C is incorrect because
the policy applies to SELECT, INSERT,
UPDATE, and DELETE statements when
the STATEMENT_TYPES parameter is
not specified.
The online version of this column,
at oracle.com/technology/oramag/
oracle/06-nov/o66ocp.html, includes an
additional example question on VPD.
CONCLUSION
Oracle Database 10g provides several
enhancements to FGA and VPD. FGA
captures user activities at a very detailed
level, which helps you avoid manual
trigger-based auditing, and combines the
trails of standard auditing and FGA. VPD
is a very powerful feature with the ability
to support a variety of requirements, such
as masking columns selectively, based on
the policy and applying the policy only
when certain columns are accessed. O
Aradhana Puri (ocpexam_ww@oracle.com) is a
manager, Certification Exam Development, at Oracle.
She has been with the company since 2000.
Does Your DBA
Know Your Financial Results
Before Your CEO?
oracle.com/database/dbvault
or call 1.800.ORACLE.1
Copyright © 2006, Oracle. All rights reserved. Oracle, JD Edwards, PeopleSoft and Siebel are registered trademarks of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates.
Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.
Oracle Database Vault
Support separation of duties
for compliance
Keep data off-limits from
the DBA
Enforce business rules on
data access
Oracle Security
8 0 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
SVOA Public Company Limited www.svoa.co.th
Sysage Technology Co., Ltd. www.sysage.com.tw
System Access Pte Limited www.systemaccess.com
Sysware Corporation www.sysware.com.tw
Systex Information (H.K.) Ltd. www.systex.com.hk
Taiji Computer Corporation www.taiji.com.cn
Tata Infotech Ltd. www.TataInfotech.com
Wezoomtek Corporation www.wezoomtek.com
Canada
MTS Allstream Inc. www.allstream.com
Oto Global Solutions Inc. www.oto.com
Europe
Actebis Peacock GmbH www.actebispeacock.de
ACURE A/S www.acure.dk
Afina Sistemas Informaticos www.afina.es
Alcatel www.alcatel.com
Alcatel CIT www.alcatel.fr
Anelia SAS www.anelia.fr
Ares www.ares.fr
Arinso Nederland BV www.arinso.com
Asseco Poland S.A. www.asseco.pl
Atos Origin IT Services UK www.atosorigin.com
Atos Origin Nederland BV www.atosorigin.com
Basilica Computing Limited www.basilica.co.uk
Bechtle Logistik & Service GmbH www.bechtle.com
Borlas IBC www.borlas.ru
Capgemini Telecom Media und Networks GmbH www.de.cgey.com
CBOSS www.cboss.ru
Cedar Consulting Ltd. www.cedarconsulting.co.uk
CIBER UK www.ciber.com
ComArch S.A. www.comarch.pl
Compelsysao www.compelsysao.co.uk
CompIT Technologies www.compit-t.com.by
Computacenter AG & Co. OHG www.computacenter.de
ComputerLand S.A. www.computerland.pl
Consit A/S www.consit.dk
CROC Incorporated www.croc.ru
Cronos NV www.cronos.be
Cronos Ibérica, SA www.cronosiberica.es
CSC Portugal www.csc.pt
Deutsche Post ITSolutions GmbH www.dp-itsolutions.de
Developing World Systems Ltd. www.dwsonline.co.uk
DIGORA www.digora.com
Distrilogie Belgium BVBA www.abcomp.be
DBConcepts Daten - und Informationsverarbeitungsges.m.b.H. www.dbconcepts.at
DNS Hungary Ltd. www.dns-hungary.hu
Engineering Ingegneria Informatica S.p.A. www.eng.it
Explorer (UK) Limited www.explorer.uk.com
FORS Development Center www.fdc.ru
Fujitsu Services Limited www.uk.fujitsu.com
Getronics PinkRoccade www.getronicspinkroccade.nl
Global Services Aarhus & Copenhagen A/S www.maerskdata.dk
Groupe LGS France www.lgsrecrut.com
GWI Unternehmensgruppe www.gwi-ag.com
Hunkler GmbH & Co. KG www.hunkler.biz
I-Teco www.i-teco.ru
Inatech Solutions Ltd. www.inatech.com
Industrial and Financial Systems, IFS AB www.ifsworld.com
Ineum Consulting www.ineum.fr
Infor Global Solutions GmbH www.infor.de
Informacines Technologijos www.it.lt
Informatica El Cortes Ingles www.ieci.es
Information Technologies Company www.it.ru
Inter Access B.V. www.interaccess.nl
IT Alise www.it-alise.com
KNAPP Systemintegration GmbH www.knapp.com
KPMG Consulting www.kpmg.be
Kurt Salmon Associates www.kurtsalmon.com
Leaves www.leaves.ru
LogicaCMG www.logicacmg.nl
LOGIX www.logix.fr
Mdtvision www.mdtvision.com
Micros-Fidelio GmbH www.micros-fidelio.org
Montora www.montora.com
Morse Group www.morse.com
Msg Systems ag www.msg-systems.com
Network Centric Solutions Limited www.ncsltd.com
Noetix www.noetix.com
Nokia Corporation www.nokia.com
Oficina de Cooperación Universitaria www.ocu.es
OpenPSL www.openpsl.com
Open Technologies www.ot.ru
Opitz Consulting GmbH www.opitz-consulting.de
Oracle PartnerNetwork Certified Advantage Partner Index
The partners featured in this index have recently reached or renewed their status of Certified Advantage Partner in the Oracle PartnerNetwork.
COMPANY NAME URL COMPANY NAME URL
Global
Accenture www.accenture.com
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. www.amd.com
Apple www.apple.com
Avnet, Inc. www.hallmark.avnet.com
BearingPoint www.bearingpoint.com
Capgemini www.capgemini.com
CDW www.cdw.com
CGI Group, Inc. www.cgi.com
Cisco www.cisco.com
Computer Sciences Corporation www.csc.com
Comverse www.comverse.com
Convergys www.convergys.com
Dell Inc. www.dell.com
Deloitte www.deloitte.com
EDS www.eds.com
EMC www.emc.com
Fidelity Information Services www.fidelityinfoservices.com/FNFIS/
Fujitsu Group www.fujitsu.com
Hitachi www.hitachi.com
HP www.hp.com
IBM / IBM Global Business Services www.ibm.com
i-flex www.iflexsolutions.com
Infosys www.infosys.com
Ingram Micro www.ingrammicro.com
Intec www.intecbilling.com
Intel www.intel.com
Microsoft www.microsoft.com
NEC www.nec.com
Network Appliance, Inc. www.netapp.com
Novell www.novell.com
Red Hat www.redhat.com
Satyam www.satyam.com
Sun Microsystems www.sun.com
Sungard www.sungard.com
Tata Consultancy Services www.tcs.com
TechData www.techdata.com
Temenos www.temenos.com
Unisys www.unisys.com
Wipro www.wipro.com
Africa
2Cana Solutions (Pty) Ltd. www.2cana.co.za
EOH Consulting Services (Pty) Ltd. www.eoh.co.za
Implementation Factory (Pty) Ltd. www.ifactory.co.za
Integrated Tertiary Software (Pty) Ltd. www.its.co.za
New Dawn Technologies www.ndt.co.za
Waymark Infotech (Pty) Ltd. www.waymark.co.za
Asia Pacific
ASG (Asia Pacific) Pty Ltd. www.asggroup.com.au
Application Hosting Services Co., Ltd. www.a-host.co.th
Attain IT Pty Ltd. www.attainit.com.au
Automated Systems (HK) Ltd. www.asl.com.hk
Beijing Futong Dong Fang Technology Co. Ltd. www.futong.com.cn
DataHeaven Co., Ltd. www.dataheaven.co.kr
Daesang Information Technology Co., Ltd. www.daesangit.com
Digital China (China) Limited www.digtalchina.com.cn
DMS Software Technologies (Pvt.) Ltd. www.dmsswt.com
ECS International Trading (Shanghai) Co., Ltd.. www.pci.com.cn
FPT Information System www.fis.com.vn
FPT Software Solutions www.fss.com.vn
Fujian Fujitsu Communication Software Co.,Ltd. www.ffcs.cn
Fusion5 Limited www.fusion5.co.nz
GTL Limited www.gtllimited.com
FPT Corporation www.fpt.com.vn
HAND Enterprise Solutions Co., Ltd. www.hand-china.com
Huadi Computer Co., Ltd. www.huadi.com.cn
Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. www.huawei.com/cn
iCE Consulting Co Ltd. www.iceconsulting.co.th
Jigsaw Services Pty Ltd. www.jigsawservices.com.au
LG CNS Co., Ltd. www.lgcns.com
IT&C Co., Ltd. www.itnc.co.kr
KPMG Consulting Co Ltd. www.kpmg.com.tw
Kolon Data Communication Co., Ltd. www.kdc.kolon.co.kr
NCS Pte. Ltd. www.ncs.com.sg
Nucleus Software Exports Ltd. www.nucleussoftware.com
OED Technology Sdn Bhd www.patimas.com
Propia Co., Ltd. www.propia.co.kr
Pythis www.pythis.com
Red Rock Consulting www.redrock.net.au
Sam Yung Holdings IT Business Division www.syhds.com
Samsung SDS www.sds.samsung.co.kr
Shen Yang Neusoft Co., Ltd. www.neusoft.com
Sierra Atlantic www. sierraatlantic.com
O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 8 1
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Preteco SA www.preteco.com.ar
Procwork CRM www.procwork.com.br
Recours Informatica Consultoria e Assessoria Ltda www. www.recours.com.br
RedPartner, S.A. www.sistemas.com.ec
Servicios, Tecnologia y Organizacion S.A. de C.V. (STO) www.stoconsulting.com
Sinergy Solutions, S.A. de C.V. www.sinergysolutions.com.mx
Snoop Consulting S.R.L. www.snoopconsulting.com
Soft Bolivar S.A. www.softbolivar.com
Solusoft www.solusoft.com
Soluciones Casee SOCASEE, S.A. www.socasee.com
Sonda del Peru S.A. www.sonda.com
SQL Technology S.A. www.sqltech.cl
Sunrising Desenvolvimento de Sistemas www.sunrising.com.br
Synos Consultoria e Informatica www.synos.com.br
Sysdesign Consultoria Em Informatica Limitada www.sysdesign.com.br
Tilsor S.A. www.tilsor.com.uy
TSnet S.A. www.tsnetglobal.com
Unimix Tecnologia Ltda www.unimix.com.br
YKP Consultoria e Sistemas Ltda. www.ykp.com.br
Middle East
Bahwan Cybertek LLC www.bahwancybertek.com
Computer and Communications Systems www.ccs.com.jo
Computer Information Systems www.cis.com.lb
Computer and Engineering Bureau CEB www.ceb.com.jo
Districom www.cis.com.lb
Emirates Computers Est www.emiratescomputers.co.ae
Global Technology Services LLC www.gtsuae.com
Hyperlink www.hyperlink-me.com
International Turnkey Systems (ITS) www.its.ws
Intracom Jordan www.intracom.jo
Mannai Trading Company Limited www.mannaicorp.com
Mercator www.mercator.co.ae
Macro Software Systems LLC www.macro-soft.com
Oracle Dedicated Competency Center www.mawarid-odcc.com
Raya Gulf LLC www.rayaholding.com
Royah www.royah.com
United States
170 Systems, Inc. www.170systems.com
Abaris, Inc. www.abaris-inc.com
Agilysys www.agilysys.com
Apex IT, Inc. www.apexit.com
Applications Software Technology Corp. www.astcorporation.com
Applied Biosystems www.appliedbiosystems.com/sqllims
BMC Software, Inc. www.bmc.com
CedarCrestone www.cedarcrestone.com
CherryRoad Technologies www.cherryroad.com
CIBER www.ciber.com/ces/oracle
Compuware Corporation www.compuware.com
CSS International www.cssus.com
DAZ Systems www.dazsi.com
DLT Solutions, Inc. www.dlt.com
Enterprise Business Solutions, LLC www.theebsgroup.com
Hyperion Solutions www.hyperion.com
Impac www.impacservices.com
Intermec www.intermec.com
KBACE Technologies, Inc. www.kbace.com
Kronos Inc. www.kronos.com
Lucidity Consulting Group LP www.luciditycg.com
MI Services Group, Inc. www.mi-services.com
Optimum Solutions Group, LLC www.optimumsolutions.com
OSI Consulting, Inc. www.osius.com
OuterBay Technologies www.outerbay.com
Perot Systems Corporation www.perotsystems.com
Princeton Softech www.princetonsoftech.com
Protege Software Services, Inc. www.protege.com
RCM Technologies www.rcmt.com
Rapidigm, Inc. www.rapidigm.com
Solbourne Computer Inc. www.solbourne.com
SYSTIME Computer Corporation www.systime.net
TITAN Technology Partners www.ttpartners.com
TUSC www.tusc.com
USinternetworking, Inc. www.usi.net
Vertex, Inc. www.vertexinc.com
Waters Corporation www.waters.com
Wave Consulting Group www.wavecg.com
Whitbread Technology Partners, Inc. www.whitbreadtech.com
Xcelicor, Inc. www.xcelicor.com
COMPANY NAME URL COMPANY NAME URL
Patech Solutions Limited www.patech-solutions.com
PC-Ware Information Technologies AG www.pc-ware.de
PDV-Systeme Erfurt Gesellschaft für Systemtechnik mbH www.pdv.de
Peak Systems Support Ltd. www.peaksystems.uk.com
Peter-Service www.billing.ru
Prodatis Consulting AG www.prodatis.com
Professional Computer Services S.A. www.pcs.gr
QAS Ltd. www.qas.com
Quantix Ltd. www.quantix-uk.com
RDTEX www.rdtex.ru
RTC Real-Time Center AG www.rtc.ch
Satyam Computer Services www.satyam.com
S.C. RomSoft S.R.L. www.romsoft.info
SCC PLC www.scc.com
Sddc www.sddc.fr
SIV AG www.siv.de
Service & Systems Solutions www.northgate-is.com
Softman SA www.softman.pl
Software Design & Management AG www.sdm.de
Sogeti Espana www.sogeti.biz
Sopra Group www.sopragroup.com
Sphinx CST www.sphinx.co.uk
TEAM GmbH www.team-pb.de
Teamsolve www.teamsolve.co.uk
Tech Data Midrange GmbH www.tdmidrange.de
Technology Reply Srl www.reply.it
Teta S.A. www.teta.com.pl
TietoEnator Corporation www.tetioenator.com
TimeStamp - Sistema de Informação www.timestamp.pt
TopS Business Integrator www.topsbi.ru
T-Systems International GmbH www.t-systems.com
Up to Data, Professional Services GMBH www.uptodata.de
Vector Software SRL www.vectorsoftware.ro
Version 1 Software www.version1.com
Vertis BV www.vertis.nl
Whitehouse Consultants Ltd. www.whitehouse-consult.com
WM-data Danmark A/S www.wmdata.com
Latin America
Abaco Tecnologia de Informacao Ltda www.abaco.com.br
Acao Informatica Brasil Ltda www.acao.com.br
Advanced Database & IT Sistemas de Informação S.A. www.advancedit.com.br
Asi Consultants www.asiconsutants.com
Aporte Gestao Empresarial e Tecnologia da Informacao Ltda www.aporte.com
Appteck S.A. de C.V. www.appteck.com.mx
Apply Solutions www.applysolutions.com.br
Asistir Ltda. www.asistir.com
B2BR Business to Business Informatica do Brasil www.b2br.com.br
Bertini Consultoria em informatica www.bertini.com.br
BGH, S.A. www.bgh.com.ar
BusinessMind S.A. www.businessmind.com.ec
Casa de Software S/A www.casasoft.com.br
Commit Consultores de Empresas Ltda www.commitconsultores.com.br
Datastar Argentina S.A. www.datastar.com.ar
Datum, S.A. (Guatemala) www.datum.com.gt
Datum, S.A. de C.V. (El Salvador) www.datum.com.sv
Discover Technology Informatica Ltda www.discover.com.br
e-Builders & Consulting Group S. A. C. www.ebuilders.com.pe
E-Partner Comercial e Serviços de Informática Ltda www.epartnerbr.com.br
EN-SOF Consultoria e Informática Ltda. www.en-sof.com.br
ERP Soluciones S.A. de C.V. www.erpsol.com.mx
Excelsis S.A.C.I.G www.excelsis.com.py
Elucid Solutions S.A. www.elucid.com.br
Eserv Expert Services Del Ecuador SA www.eserv-andina.com
FYC Soluciones Integrales, C.A. www.fyccorp.com
Grupo Quanam www.quanam.com
Illuminat www.illuminatnm.com
In Motion Servicios S.A. www.inmotion.cl
Ingenieria Condor S.A. DE C.V. www.i-condor.com
Innovat S.A. www.itexperts.com.ec
J Evans y Asociados S.A.C. www.jevansa.com.pe
JFM Informática Ltda. www.jfm.com.br
Kruger Corporation www.kruger.com.ec
MOST S.A. www.grupomost.com
MPL Corporate Software SA www.mpl.com.br
Netix Distribuidores de Tecnologia, C.A. www.netixcorp.com
Nexsys www.nexsysla.com
Officer Distribuidora www.officer.com.br
Partners able to demonstrate superior product knowledge, competence, and a commitment to doing business with Oracle qualify for the Oracle PartnerNetwork Certified Advantage Partner level. These partners receive a
higher level of service, training, benefits, and resources from Oracle to support them in delivering quality to customers. For more information on partners, please visit the Oracle PartnerNetwork Solutions Catalog at
solutions.oracle.com.
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Allround Automations www.allroundautomations.com 7
Altova www.altova.com 20
AMD www.amd.com 13, 16
Conquest Software Solutions www.sqldetective.com 28
Dell Inc. www.dell.com 23
Embarcadero www.embarcadero.com 2
EMC www.emc.com 5
Fujitsu Group www.fujitsu.com IFC, 1
Ifactory Solutions www.ifactory.co.za 53
McGraw-Hill/Osborne www.oraclepressbooks.com 64
NetApp www.netapp.com OBC
Neos www.neosoftware.com 63
Nokia www.nokia.com 8
Oracle www.oracle.com 53, 79, IBC
OracleExpress.com www.oracleexpress.com 26
Pillar Data Systems www.pillardata.com 54
Quest www.quest.com 10
USi www.USi.com 19
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O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 8 3
BY ARI KAPLAN
c o m m e n t IN THE FIELD
Asking the Right Questions
Data provides dry information on its own, but business analytics can pry the meaning loose.
ata is dead. It just sits there,
taking up space in your data-
base, on your storage system,
useless. Sure, it has the latest
inventory from the warehouse. But other-
wise, it’s of no help. It offers no insights,
like the sphinx, just biding its time until
someone asks the right question.
Business analytics can give you the
right questions. It goes beyond ad hoc
analysis and everyday queries and makes
visualizing and analyzing business data
easier; it can yield useful, sometimes
invaluable, information about your busi-
ness. An analogy might be the receipts
you keep for the IRS: they’re just slips
of paper. But a skilled accountant, using
standard procedures, can discover pat-
terns of earning, spending, and invest-
ment that are tremendously valuable.
Business analytics commonly uses
ordinary business tools to get answers.
Online analytical processing, data ware-
housing, and decision-support systems
all can be part of a business analytics
suite. Modeling is also a part of business
analytics, providing links between one
entity and the others that affect it. These
models are often dynamic—changing in
time—to reflect the nature of business.
Paradoxically, the best type of ana-
lytical tool may not be one that simply
answers your preconceived question.
Instead, it may come up with the ques-
tion for you, perhaps something you
never thought to ask. This can lead to
areas of discovery within your data that
you may never have imagined.
Three common goals of business ana-
lytics are to understand what happened
in the past, to see what’s going on right
now, and to predict the future. The right
analysis can help decision-makers recog-
nize what they need to do, or how they
need to change, to reach their goals.
Oracle supports business analytics in
several ways. First, it presents the data for
analysis. This may involve data marts or
data warehouses, cost-effective archives
for historical data, and rapid loading
of massive amounts of data. Second, it
provides analytical tools. Finally, it offers
ways to share information with the
world, such as XML gateways.
With the acquisitions of PeopleSoft
and Siebel, Oracle now offers a com-
plete palette of tools in Oracle Business
Intelligence Suite, which includes
Oracle Business Intelligence Discoverer,
Oracle Business Intelligence Spreadsheet
Add-In, Oracle Warehouse Builder,
Oracle Business Intelligence Beans, and
Oracle Reports.
Specific tools address well-defined
business areas. For example, look at
the Siebel Business Analytics applica-
tions that are part of the Oracle Business
Intelligence Suite. Oracle’s PeopleSoft
Financial Analytics applications provide
the tools to develop, manage, and
measure corporate strategies that can
drive the most profitable growth. Each
of these is like a question just waiting for
the data to apply itself to.
None of this is meant to replace the
normal queries and reports that busi-
nesses need. Rather, think of business
analytics as adjuncts to the usual infor-
mation generated, possibly providing
new insights into existing data.
My work has used business analytics
extensively in business—and in baseball.
As a consultant to several Major League
teams, I’ve helped decision-makers
understand their situations and plan for
the future. Business and baseball have
remarkable similarities. For example,
both sit on mountains of data and statis-
tics that are just waiting to be used for
analysis. Both also attempt to use past
performance to predict future results.
Business analytics puts data in
context. In baseball, you may have a
player with 80 runs batted in. Is that
good? Well, it may depend on how
many runners were on base while he
was batting, who bats after him, or other
factors. In business, you may have a
product that sold 80,000 units. Is that
good? Again, the answer may depend on
factors that business analytics can tease
out for you. This process can give your
enterprise some meaningful metrics.
When I worked for Pricewaterhouse-
Coopers, my team analyzed products
for Macy’s and used advanced analytics
to determine product placement. For
example, some products sell better in
some areas of the store than in others.
Some products do well when near other
products. Learning this kind of informa-
tion buried in the usual business data can
help any enterprise maximize its profits.
Finally, let business analytics answer
a meta-question about the data itself: is
it useful? Some data can be very useful,
because it’s tied to trends or other
important features. Other data may have
no analytical use at all: it’s incidental to
the basic issues that decision-makers
must consider. Thus, business analytics
can tell us whether that data is useless—
or just waiting for the right question. O
Ari Kaplan (ari_kaplan@ioug.org) is president of the
Independent Oracle Users Group (IOUG) and senior
consultant at Datalink. He founded Expand Beyond, a
leader in mobile IT software. He has been involved in
Oracle technology since 1992.
READ more about Oracle Business
Intelligence
oracle.com/solutions/business_intelligence
DISCOVER Oracle’s Siebel Business
Analytics applications
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sbaa.html
8 4 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 6 O R A C L E . C O M / O R A C L E M A G A Z I N E
BY DAVI D BAUM
c o m m e n t ANALYST’S CORNER
Finding Information on Demand
Ease of use and risk management drive companies to enterprise search.
ue Feldman, research vice
president for content technol-
ogy at IDC, talked to Oracle
Magazine about enterprise
search and discovery technology.
Oracle Magazine: What’s new in the world
of enterprise search technology?
Feldman: We’ve seen major changes in
how enterprise search is used by compa-
nies to unify access to multiple sources
of information. The technology has
also become more sophisticated, with
elements of text analytics, like catego-
rization, or name extraction being built
into the software. We’ve seen advances
in how the index itself is structured to
handle both data and content in one
place. In addition, the skill level of the
average user has improved. Most people
are fairly adept at using search technol-
ogy on the internet, and they expect to
find corporate information just as easily.
Oracle Magazine: What is driving growth
in the enterprise search market?
Feldman: The main driver: People want a
single point of access to all their informa-
tion. Another big driver is risk avoidance.
Executives understand the need for com-
prehensive records management. They
need to be able to find and verify infor-
mation to meet compliance requirements.
Oracle Magazine: What are the essential
components of enterprise search tools?
Feldman: The most vital component is a
mature search-and-discovery platform
that can do secure crawling, index-
ing, and searching. A consumer search
engine searches HTML pages, but an
enterprise search engine must also be
able to search databases, e-mail systems,
intranet portals, document management
systems, and custom applications. You
also need administrative tools that help
you do relevance ranking, and it’s great
if you can hardwire some of the results
to your most frequently asked questions.
Oracle Magazine: What are some of the
advanced capabilities of these tools?
Feldman: The better search engines do
concept matching. For example, if you
search on high blood pressure, they’ll be
smart enough to return results that also
have the term hypertension. They can
also help you qualify your queries. The
term bush could refer to shrubbery or
a person. If you want information on
President Bush, you shouldn’t have to
wade through gardening information.
More-mature tools let you extract a spe-
cific kind of metadata called entities, so
you can specify names of people, places,
and common elements. This lets com-
panies organize their information and
improve search results by categorizing or
tagging concepts within each document.
Oracle Magazine: How do these tools
control access to private documents or
restrict access to specific workgroups?
Feldman: Enterprise-level search tools
let you set business rules, especially
for identity management and security.
For example, Oracle Secure Enterprise
Search 10g is integrated with Oracle’s
identity management solution, Oracle
Internet Directory, and it can be syn-
chronized with other identity manage-
ment solutions such as Microsoft’s Active
Directory. This helps you ensure that the
right people see the right information.
Oracle Magazine: How do companies
include search technology in their enter-
prise applications?
Feldman: Having a flexible platform is
important. It should be easy to embed
search capabilities in whatever you’re
doing, generally with Web services, and
to create composite applications that
include search functions. Your inventory
system, content management system,
workflow engine, and search engine
should work together—along with your
collaborative tools, instant messaging
system, and video conferencing system.
Oracle Magazine: Where is the return on
investment (ROI) in these initiatives?
Feldman: ROI comes from two primary
areas: increasing revenue and decreas-
ing costs. For example, if you can make
it easier for customers to find your
products, your online sales revenue will
increase. Research into clickstream data
reveals that you lose one-third of your
searchers after each click, so connect-
ing people rapidly to the information
they’re looking for is essential. Charles
Schwab saw an immediate payback of
US$128,000 per month from this type
of improvement. Retailers such as Macy’s
and Lands’ End show similar results.
These companies use smart search
engines to get you where you want to
go. Enterprise search technology also
can lead to huge savings in a customer
support center, because it helps users
pinpoint what they need. Each time you
answer a question automatically, it costs
about a penny. Each time you answer
with a low-level person reading a script,
it costs around $4. Each time an experi-
enced tech support person gets involved,
it costs $30 to $40. O
David Baum (david@dbaumcomm.com) is a freelance
business writer based in Santa Barbara, California.
IDC (www.idc.com) provides market intelligence,
advisory services, and events for the information
technology, telecommunications, and consumer
technology markets.
READ about Oracle Secure
Enterprise Search
oracle.com/database/secure-enterprise-search.html
DOWNLOAD Oracle Secure
Enterprise Search 10g
oracle.com/technology/software/products/search
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