www.themontgomerysun.

com
SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 4, 2011
FREE
Special to The Sun
Dick Nierenberg, owner of the Princeton Airport, with his wife, Naomi, and son, Ken. The airport
celebrated its 100th anniversary with a Centennial Open House on Sept. 17.
Proud owners of historic airport
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Open space
Latest land purchase
completes project. PAGE 6
PRSRT STD
US POSTAGE
PAID
BELLMAWR, NJ
PERMIT NO. 1239
By MELISSA DIPENTO
The Montgomery Sun
After four years, much experi-
mentation, perseverance and
dreaming, Wilbur and Orville
Wright successfully flew the first
airplane in 1903 over Kitty Hawk,
N.C., changing history forever.
But I’m sure you didn’t need
me to provide you with that avia-
tion tidbit. You’ve probably heard
it a hundred times or passed
notes while listening about it in
middle school history class.
What you may not know quite
as much about is a small piece of
aviation history, approximately
104 acres in size, sitting right in
your own back yard.
If New Jersey had its own text-
book, your children could very
well be reading about the 100th
anniversary of the Princeton Air-
port, which was established in
1911.
The airport, located off Route
206 in Montgomery Township, re-
cently held its Centennial Open
House, where guests were treated
to a first-hand look at aircrafts of
the past.
In the spirit of witnessing 100
years of aviation in Montgomery,
let’s take a look back in time.
Things all started when the
Bolmer family purchased a large
plot of land at the turn of the 19th
century, said Dick Nierenberg, co-
owner of the Princeton Airport.
In 1911, Richard Newhouse ar-
rived from Germany and began to
build airplanes in nearby Rocky
Hill. And from there, they say, the
rest is history.
The Newhouses ran the airport
until World War II, Nierenberg
said. The family had five sons,
four of whom stayed in aviation.
The last surviving grandson was
present at the Centennial Open
House, Nierenberg said.
The family taught others how
to fly and also used the airport for
flights to and from Long Island.
The airport in those days, Nieren-
berg said, was just a large grass
field with an unpaved runway.
In 1963, Danny Todd purchased
the airport. Under his watch, the
runway was paved, a main termi-
nal was added and additional
hangars were constructed.
The Van Dyke family then pur-
chased the airport in 1969, trans-
forming it into a full service oper-
ation. Princeton Airways was cre-
Princeton
Airport
turns 100
Airport celebrates centennial
with open house that looks
back at Montgomery aviation
please see AIRPORT, page 2
By MELISSA DIPENTO
The Montgomery Sun
Leaves on your lawn? Base-
ment flooded? Need something
fixed?
Have no fear. Members of the
Montgomery High School base-
ball team are ready and willing to
help.
The Cougars recently began a
new initiative in town, offering
their services to complete odd
jobs in the community.
They are hoping to raise
money to make improvements
and spruce up their field at the
high school, said Gary Brune,
president of the Diamond Club,
the fund-raising arm of the team.
The team has recently replaced
the backstop behind home plate,
added a new infield and improved
an outfield fence. The team hopes
to re-sod the field and improve the
batting cages in the near future.
Brune said he recognizes that
the school district budget is tight
and has worked to come up with
other unique ways of fund-rais-
ing.
The idea for the project came
from nearby Hillsborough High
School’s Rent-A-Raider program,
Brune said. The Cougar’s are call-
ing their version of community
handiwork “Leaf the Raking to
Us.”
So far, the team has already
made an impression on one local
woman, who needed help after
Hurricane Irene rolled through
last month.
“We responded to one woman
in town whose basement was
completely flooded. It took three
or four days to clean up. We took
the old furniture out and put the
new furniture in and took every-
thing to the dump,” Brune said.
Players have also heeded the
call of another woman in the
community who needed some fur-
niture moved.
Forty-five students are current-
ly on the roster, which includes
sophomores, juniors and seniors.
For Brune and the players, it’s not
Cougars at your service
please see BASEBALL, page 3
2 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 4, 2011
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ated and began a commuter serv-
ice, with flights to New York’s
Kennedy and LaGuardia airports,
Boston and Washington, D.C.
In the 70s, Nierenberg said, the
family ran into a few problems.
The cost of fuel was going up and
becoming less available. When air
traffic controllers went on strike,
the family put the airport up for
sale in 1981.
The airport remained vacant
for four years. Nierenberg said he
thinks the reason buyers stayed
away was because of the poten-
tial environmental problems and
costs associated with owning the
land.
The Nierenbergs had occupied
the Kupper Airport in Central
Jersey since 1967. In 1985, Nieren-
berg had two years left on his
lease at Kupper, but was looking
for another location to call home.
In April 1985, the Nierenbergs
purchased the airport from the
Van Dykes. No improvements had
been made up until that point, he
added.
Nierenberg said the family ap-
plied for federal aviation aid,
which helped them to add addi-
tional hangars and to construct a
longer runway on the grounds.
Recently, solar panels have been
added to the roofs of some of the
hangars.
Looking back at the past 25
years, Nierenberg said it hasn’t
always been easy to operate the
airport.
“The town and us didn’t always
get along. But now we have a rea-
sonable relationship. We try to fly
neighborly,” Nierenberg said. “I
do respect my neighbors, but the
airport was built a long time be-
fore the houses.”
The airport currently serves as
a relief airport, which means the
facility can help divert traffic
from some of the major airports
nearby. There’s also a helicopter
service, helicopter school and
charter service, as well as a re-
pair station and flight school,
Nierenberg added.
Nierenberg’s wife, Naomi,
oversees the flight trainings. In-
terested individuals can rent an
airplane with a license and train
at the airport.
“We trained one who became
an astronaut and another retired
after 33 years with American Air-
lines,” Nierenberg said.
Nierenberg first became inter-
ested in aviation in the 50s. At the
time, he said, he served in the
Army as an interpreter in Korea.
After the Army, he went to Rut-
gers, where he met his wife. By
the late 50s, he was looking to buy
an airplane with three partners.
Previously, he sold furniture for a
living.
“I was looking for a career
change,” Nierenberg joked. “It
was 1967. The rest is history.”
And history was just what
about 2,000 people showed up to
see earlier this month during the
Centennial Open House.
Nierenberg said he was happy
many had the opportunity to
learn more about the airport’s
history.
“It was a chance to celebrate
and let people know about one of
the older airports around and
show people what we do,” Nieren-
berg said.
The event also gave attendees
the chance to look inside unique
and older airplanes. Guests also
had the chance to hop a ride in an
aircraft for 20 cents per pound
and watch skydivers jump out
with parachutes.
The event was a success in
Nierenberg’s (history) book.
“It was a matter of history,”
Nierenberg said. “Nobody got
hurt and the weather was nice.”
Celebrating historic
anniversary
Visit us online at
themontgomerysun.com
AIRPORT
Continued from page 1
SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 4, 2011 – THE MONTGOMERY SUN 3
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just about making money to fix
the field.
“A couple of the guys I’ve
talked to … they have a sense of
accomplishment and get some
satisfaction from being able to
help others,” Brune said. “A lot of
the fund-raising is parent-driven.
This gives the players a chance to
take ownership. They can step up
and do community service.”
If you are interested in having
players rake you lawn, you only
need to supply the leaf bags. Play-
ers will come with rakes.
Other chores may include
stacking firewood, rearranging
furniture, and other miscella-
neous yard work. The team will
not perform a job involving a lad-
der, roof work, heavy lifting or
power tools.
A donation of $10 per player,
per hour is requested in the form
of a check issued to Montgomery
High School Baseball Diamond
Club.
To sign up using the online
form, please visit www.mh-
scougarbaseball.com or call 609-
497-9108.
BASEBALL
Continued from page 1
Team works odd
jobs to fix field
The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Montgomery Township Police De-
partment:
On Sept. 9 at 1:43 p.m., police re-
sponded to a motor vehicle acci-
dent on County Rt. 601 in front of
MHS. A 58-year-old woman from
Gilette was stopped at a red light
in front of MHS when she was
rear-ended by a car driven by a 19-
year-old woman from Skillman.
The 19-year-old complained of
pain and was transported to
Princeton Medical Center. Both
vehicles sustained heavy damage
and were towed from the scene.
The second driver received a sum-
mons for Careless Driving.
On Sept. 17 at 4:46 p.m., police
responded to a motor vehicle acci-
dent on County Rt. 533 at the in-
tersection with Staats Farm Rd. A
2010 BMW operated by a 63-year-
old man from Belle Mead made a
right off Staats Farm Road and
collided with a 2007 Mazda oper-
ated by a 24-year-old woman from
Hillsborough that was traveling
south on County Rt. 533. There
were no injuries reported. The
first driver received a summons
for Failure to Yield Right of Way
in an Intersection.
On Sept. 14, at 5:04 p.m., police
responded to Rt. 206 for a reported
motor vehicle crash with injuries.
A 50-year-old woman of Skillman
was operating a 2010 Lexus north
on Rt. 206 when she became dis-
tracted and impacted the vehicle
in front of her, a 2006 VW, operat-
ed by a 27-year-old woman of
Monmouth Junction. The second
vehicle was pushed into the vehi-
cle in front of it, a 1997 Ford, oper-
ated by a 28-year-old man, of
Highland Park, who was pushed
into a 2008 Mercedes Benz, operat-
ed by an 84-year-old woman of
Princeton. The 27-year-old was
transported to University Med-
ical Center in Princeton for com-
plaint of pain.
It was reported that the first
driver fled the scene of the acci-
dent. Witnesses were able to pro-
vide police with a vehicle descrip-
tion, registration number and de-
scription of the driver. Police re-
sponded to her residence for fur-
ther investigation of the crash
and determined that she was in-
toxicated. The suspect was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing where she was issued a motor
POLICE REPORTS
please see POLICE, page 5
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vehicle summons for driving
while intoxicated, failure to re-
port an accident, leaving the
scene of an accident with in-
juries, careless driving, and cell
phone use while driving. Police
determined that the cause of the
accident was the driver being dis-
tracted using a cell phone and
driving while intoxicated. She is
scheduled to appear in Mont-
gomery Municipal Court.
On Sept. 1 at 8:56 p.m., MTPD
stopped a 2010 Toyota Camry on
County Route 601 after a lookup
on the registration indicated that
the owner had an outstanding
traffic warrant. The driver was
identified as a 57-year-old woman
from Hamilton. She was subse-
quently arrested for the warrant.
She was released after posting the
full $205.00 bail. She was also
served a summons for driving
while suspended.
On Sept. 14 at 9:08 a.m., police
investigated a motor vehicle
crash with injuries on Great Road
at Inverness Drive (south).
A 30-year-old man from Edison
was driving his 2006 Scion north
on Great Road and turned left in
front of a 2001 Toyota operated by
a 20-year-old from Hillsborough,
resulting in the crash.
The investigation determined
that the first driver failed to yield
the right-of-way.
The second driver had a com-
plaint of pain and was evaluated
by Montgomery Twp. EMS at the
scene, but refused treatment.
Both vehicles were heavily
damaged and towed from the
scene.
The first driver was issued a
summons for careless driving and
is scheduled to appear in Mont-
gomery Township Municipal
Court.
On Sept. 19 at 8:42 a.m., MTPD
responded to the area of the
Tiger’s Tale after receiving a re-
port from the management that a
male had recently fled the estab-
lishment after trespassing.
While on their premise, the
suspect had consumed beer from
their bar.
The suspect was located on a
bench next to ShopRite and iden-
tified as a 30-year-old from Ann
Arbor, Mich.
He was arrested and subse-
quently charged with trespassing
and theft.
He was lodged in Somerset
County Jail in default of $2,500
bail.
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POLICE
Continued from page 3
POLICE REPORTS
Mark your calendar to get on
board the MES PTA Kickoff
Party.
It takes place Saturday, Oct. 1
from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. at Princeton
Elks on Route 518.
Cost is $20 per person and in-
cludes DJ, food, party boards and
a great night out with friends.
Cash bar.
RSVP on Facebook “MES Kick-
Off Party” or visit vespta.org for
more information.
MES PTA Kickoff Party
Send us your news
Have a news tip? Drop us an email at
news@themontgomerysun.com. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
letter to the editor
in our opinion
6 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 4, 2011
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, N.J. 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
KEVIN CANESSA
Associate Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Montgomery Sun is published weekly by
Elauwit Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center,
Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. It is
mailed weekly to select addresses in the
08502 ZIP code. If you are not on the mailing
list, six-month subscriptions are available
for $39.99. PDFs of the print publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please send an
email news@themontgomerysun.com. For
advertising information, call 609-751-
0245 or email advertising@themont-
gomerysun.com. The Sun welcomes sugges-
tions and comments from readers – includ-
ing information about errors that may call
for a correction. Send your comments to
news@themontgomerysun.com, or call the
newsroom at 609-751-0245.
SPEAK UP
The Montgomery Sun welcomes letters from
readers. Brief and to the point is best, so we
look for letters that are 300 words or fewer.
Be sure to include your name, address and
phone number with your letter, and know
that we will print your name and hometown
with the letter. We do not print anonymous
letters. Send letters via e-mail to
news@montgomerysun.com, via fax at 856-
427-0934, or via the mail at 103 Carnegie
Center, Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540.
The Montgomery Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – includ-
ing electronically.
B
y now almost everyone has
heard the dire warning: If the
Postal Service’s finances aren’t
fixed by next summer, mail delivery
stops.
Now, ordinarily, folks would shrug
off such words as hyperbole. But, only
a few weeks ago, the nation teetered
on fiscal default, so, these days, we all
have to pay attention.
Will the Postal Service close?
There’s perhaps the most remote
chance that it will, but, probably not.
Especially since there are a number of
solutions already on the table.
First, end Saturday delivery. It
would inconvenience some, but it
won’t be that big of a deal once every-
one gets used to it.
Second, downsize employees and
close facilities. Every company has to
examine its expenditures. If it makes
sense to lay off some employees and
close some post offices, do it.
Third, expand the non-postal servic-
es provided at post offices. They al-
ready handle passports, for example.
So long as any “extras” don’t give a
government agency an unfair advan-
tage over the private sector, have at it.
But really big money can be found
when lawmakers look at a pre-funded
retiree health benefits commitment
and billions of dollars the service said
it overpaid into a retirement fund.
Our guess is that some combination
of the above, with maybe a few other
ideas tossed in, will keep the mail
flowing for now.
Going forward, though, the Postal
Service should have the flexibility to
adapt to new technology, changing
times and increased competition. Cou-
ple that with budgetary mandates that
include mandatory spending cuts if
goals aren’t hit, and you have the basis
of a plan that could keep the mail com-
ing for years to come.
The mail isn’t here yet
And some say that, come next summer, it never will get here
The postal problems
Would you miss Saturday postal deliv-
ery? What are your thoughts on
restructuring the Postal Service?
Township committee
keeping its word
Our Montgomery Township Committee
team, led by Mayor Mark Caliguire, is
keeping our promises and fulfilling our vi-
sion of “Better, Smarter, Government.”
Over the past year, spending has been re-
duced to below 2004 levels without any im-
pact on municipal services.
We’re accomplishing this by doing what
you do in your own homes or businesses
when times are tough – we’re doing more
with less.
During the last budget cycle, we saved
hundreds of thousands of dollars in health
care costs by moving to a self-insurance
fund.
We signed shared services agreements
with Hopewell and Pennington boroughs
and we saved about a hundred thousand
dollars by seeking out new electricity and
natural gas providers.
Montgomery is now a leader of respon-
sible governance thanks to our vision.
Over the past few years, our municipal
tax levy has increased by less than 1 per-
cent.
Only a handful of New Jersey’s 566
towns have met this standard of fiscal re-
straint (4 percent to be exact).
In comparison, the average municipal
tax levy increase over this time is almost 20
percent.
More importantly, we are committed to
keeping our record of success going next
year. We are working on consolidating mu-
nicipal court services with Hillsborough
and closing the sale of Skillman Park to
the county, which will significantly reduce
our debt and annual debt service pay-
ments.
However, in order to ensure we stay on
the right track, we need to elect Rich Smith
on Nov. 8. Rich will be a tremendous addi-
tion to the township committee. I have
worked closely with Rich on the zoning
board and know him well. We need his real
world business experience and commit-
ment to fiscal conservative principles.
With Rich on board, our vision of “Bet-
ter, Smarter, Government” will continue.
Let’s keep Montgomery moving for-
ward. Please join me in voting for Rich
Smith.
Ed Trzaska
Montgomery Township Committeeman
Montgomery Township recently pur-
chased a 16-acre forested parcel, which
completes the Cherry Brook Preserve in
southern Montgomery. The property is
surrounded by township-owned open
space. This acquisition increases the
acreage of the Cherry Brook Preserve to
more than 375 acres of contiguous open
space.
“I am pleased to see that even in this eco-
nomic downturn, there is a continuing bi-
partisan commitment to open space
preservation, “ Mayor Mark Caliguire said.
“Over one third of the land in Mont-
gomery is preserved as either public or pri-
vate open space. That is critical to the char-
acter and quality of life in our town. We
will continue to move forward when the
money is there and when the deal is right
to continue this preservation effort.”
The total purchase price for this proper-
ty was $110,000. The Montgomery Friends
of Open Space assisted Montgomery Town-
ship with the acquisition, contributing
$30,000, which was provided by a funding
partner, the New Jersey DEP Green Acres
Program. Montgomery Friends of Open
Space therefore owns a 27 percent interest
in the property.
“Montgomery Friends are proud to have
partnered with Montgomery Township on
acquiring this well-positioned piece of
open space,” said Mary Penney, president
of Montgomery Friends of Open Space.
Cherry Brook Preserve is one of the
largest forest areas in the vicinity. Open
Space Chairman Clem Fiori underscored
the ecological significance of the purchase.
“We’ve been working on completing this
forest preserve since 1995,” he said. “Larg-
er blocks of uninterrupted forest canopy
are critically important today due to the
decline in populations of migratory song-
birds and other deep forest species. Unfrag-
mented forest can provide them with the
breeding habitat they need.”
Fragmenting forest into smaller sec-
tions creates more “edge” habitat – the
boundary between forest and fields. This
increases impacts from species which
thrive “on the edge” such as deer that over-
browse and destroy the forest understory,
Recent land purchase
completes Cherry Brook open space
please see OPEN, page 8
This is a reminder, as autumn
has arrived, that residents are re-
sponsible for proper disposal of
their leaves.
Montgomery Township does
not provide a leaf disposal pro-
gram.
Stormwater regulations do not
permit leaves to be placed in the
road or in storm drains.
The township must ensure the
safety of motorists, cyclists and
pedestrians who travel township
roadways and sidewalks.
Here are some guidelines:
n Remember to keep leaves out
of storm drains and out of the
street.
n Follow Montgomery’s yard
waste disposal rules for things
such as holiday tree or tree
branch drop-off.
Check the Container Facility
and Bulletins pages of the town-
ship website at www.mont-
gomery.nj.us or contact Public
Works at (908) 359-8211 ext. 300.
n Use a mulching mower that
recycles grass clippings and
leaves into the lawn.
n Use leaves as a resource for
compost.
For tips on how to compost, go
to the Public Works section of
Montgomery’s website.
Somerset County also has large
compost bins available for $50
each, a considerable discount to
retail price.
The county also provides semi-
nars twice a year on how to com-
post.
Contact the county Office of
Recycling at (908) 231-7109.
SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 4, 2011 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 7
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Somerset County Prosecutor
Geoffrey D. Soriano, Somerset
County Prosecutor’s Office Chief
of Detectives Stuart Buckman
and Montgomery Township Cap-
tain/Director Robert Palmer said
that the investigation is continu-
ing in connection with a fire
which occurred recently on
Hampton Court in Montgomery
Township.
Soriano said that on Sept. 17,
at approximately 9:48 p.m., Mont-
gomery police and fire personnel
were dispatched to a structure
fire on Hampton Court. The loca-
tion of the call is the same resi-
dence that had a suspicious fire
on May 20, 2009. That fire de-
stroyed roughly half of the struc-
ture, and it remained uninhabit-
ed and in a state of disrepair.
When police arrived Sept. 17, they
observed flames from what was
remaining of the second story of
the structure.
Montgomery Fire Companies
No. 1 and No. 2, and the Rocky
Hill Fire Department extin-
guished the fire. Montgomery
EMS also responded. There were
no injuries reported. The cause of
the fire is being investigated by
the Somerset County Prosecu-
tor’s Office and the Montgomery
Police Department.
Soriano, Buckman and Palmer
request that anyone with infor-
mation regarding this incident
contact either the Montgomery
Township Police Department at
(908) 359-3222, the Somerset Coun-
ty Prosecutor’s Office at (908) 231-
7100, the Somerset County Crime
Stoppers’ Tip Line at 1-888-577-
TIPS (8477), or visit
www.888577tips.org or
www.scpo.net and click on either
“Crime Stoppers” or “TIPS HOT-
LINE.” All calls are confidential.
Prosecutor’s office still investigating fire
Township leaf disposal guidelines and regulations
Join Jeff Hoagland, education
director of Stony Brook-Mill-
stone Watershed Association, for
a family-friendly hike in the Sour-
lands on Oct. 15 from 1:30 to 3:30
p.m.
The cost is $5 per person.
Wear hiking boots and bring
water and snacks.
This program does not meet at
the Watershed Reserve.
Please call the Buttinger Na-
ture Center at (609) 737-7592 for
more information and to register.
This program is co-sponsored
by Stony Brook-Millstone Water-
shed Association and the Sour-
land Planning Council.
Sourlands hike Oct. 15
THURSDAY
September 29
FOR ALL
Story Time: At Mary Jacobs Library
for ages 2-6, 10 a.m. and 11 a.m.
FRIDAY
September 30
FOR ALL
Musical Babies: For ages birth-2 at
Mary Jacobs Library, 10 a.m.
SATURDAY
October 1
FOR ALL
Utopia for Pets Fashion Show:
Noon to 1 p.m. Utopia for Pets & Kiki
D's clothing store will be hosting
their 2nd Annual Fashion show. For
more information, call 609 683-
1500.
Recycling and Electronics Drop-
Off Day: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 732-
469-3363 for more info.
Montgomery Farmers Market: 9
a.m. – 1 p.m. at Village Shopper
shopping center, Rt. 206 South,
Skillman.
MONDAY
October 3
FOR ALL
Crafts for Little Hands: At 10 a.m.
and 11 a.m. for ages 2-6 at Mary
Jacobs Library.
TUESDAY
October 4
FOR ALL
Evening Book Discussion: 7 p.m. at
Mary Jacobs Library. This week’s
selection, “A Good Yarn.”
Get Smart Art: 5 p.m. at Mary
Jacobs Library for grades K-2.
Toddler Sing with Pat: For ages 1-3
at 10:30 a.m. at Mary Jacobs
Library.
calendar PAGE 8 SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 4, 2011
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
Want to be listed?
To have your Montgomery
meeting or affair listed in the
Calendar or Meetings, infor-
mation must be received, in
writing, two weeks prior to
the date of the event.
Send information by mail to:
Calendar, The Montgomery
Sun, 103 Carnegie Center,
Suite 300, Princeton, N.J.
08540. Or by email: calen-
dar@themontgomerysun.co
m.
Or you can submit a calen-
dar listing through our web-
site (www.themontgomery-
sun.com).
We will run photos if space is
available and the quality of
the photo is sufficient. Every
attempt is made to provide
coverage to all organizations.
· Cosmetic Dentistry
· Zoom!" Whitening
· InvisaIign
®
InvisibIe Braces
· FamiIy Dentistry
· Emergencies WeIcome
James J. CaIIy, DMD
609-924-8300
New Patients Welcome!
Evening and Weekend
Appointments Available
Montgomery KnoII
192 Tamarack CircIe SkiIIman
www.mysmiIedoc.com
Classic Smiles
and nest predators, such as rac-
coons.
The Montgomery Open Space
Committee has its eye on the fu-
ture.
This parcel is directly adjacent
to a 25-acre farm field where vol-
unteers have undertaken a refor-
estation project.
Montgomery Township re-
ceived a grant in 2007 from the
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and
has planted more than 1,000 trees
and shrubs, which will foster eco-
logical succession to forest, filling
in this hole in the canopy.
The Cherry Brook Preserve is
also unique because it contains
exceptional resource value forest-
ed wetlands, which are home to
certain uncommon species of am-
phibians.
A tributary of the Cherry
Brook forms the southern border
of the new parcel.
The addition of this parcel to
preserved open space will en-
hance surface water quality and
aid stream protection.
“Look at some of the beautiful
preserved parcels in town and
imagine what things would have
been like if we had not moved ag-
gressively to preserve them,”
Caliguire said.
Cherry Brook Preserve con-
tains an extensive recreational
pathway system accessible from
Birchwood Drive and the end of
Linton Drive on Cherry Valley
Road, as well as Cherry Brook
Road across from the Waldorf
School.
For pathway maps, go to the
recreation section of the town-
ship website at www.mont-
gomery.nj.us or go to www.nj-
trails.org.
Landowners interested in pre-
serving their property or in par-
ticipating in open space preserva-
tion as a conservation buyer
should contact Lauren Wasilaus-
ki, township open space coordina-
tor, at (908) 359-8211.
OPEN
Continued from page 6
Cherry Brook
open space
The October meeting of the
Montgomery Woman’s Club will
be held on Thursday, Oct. 6 at 7:30
p.m. at the Rock Brook School.
In addition to a regular meet-
ing of the club, a representative
from Griggstown Quail Farm will
present a program on choosing
organic and locally-raised poul-
try and produce for your table.
Meetings are open to interested
women of the community and
membership information is al-
ways available at meetings.
For more information, call
Membership Chair Gerry Sessa
at (908) 431-0477.
Woman’s Club meeting
Send us your
Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send
us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@themontgomerysun.co
m. Fax us at 856-427-0934.
Call the editor at 609-751-
0245.
SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 4, 2011 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 9
Meet one of our
brilliant marketing
geniuses!
6
We have phone and email…
You can even send us
smoke signals!
steps to
buying a
lamborghini
1
Contact
the Sun
Seriously, we mail this thing
to practically everyone.
Publishers of The Sun
108 Kings Highway East, 3rd Floor
Haddonfield, NJ, 08033
p: 856-427-0933
2
3
*
Results may vary. Ads may only maim or injure.
www.elauwitmedia.com
it all starts with one call!
mention this ad for free color!
4
Make sure
everyone in
town sees it!
make
bank!
5
Buy that
lambo’!
6
This guy!
We’ll make
you a
killer ad!
*
The Montgomery Health De-
partment has announced its flu
vaccination clinic schedule. It’s
free for senior citizens with
Medicare. Pre-registration has
started.
The Centers for Disease Con-
trol recommends vaccination
against influenza for all people
over 6 months of age. CDC ex-
pects plenty of flu vaccine to be
available for all people who want
it.
Montgomery Township Health
Department is offering the follow-
ing flu vaccination clinics this
fall:
Wednesday, Oct. 19
Otto Kaufman Community
Center
356 Skillman Road
Skillman (Both morning and
evening appointments available)
Wednesday, Oct. 26
Pennington Borough Hall
30 N. Main St.
Pennington (Appointments
from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.)
Thursday, Nov. 3
Hopewell Borough Train Sta-
tion
Railroad Place
Hopewell (Appointments from
4 p.m. to 7 p.m.)
Shots will be available by ap-
pointment. Walk-ins will be ac-
commodated if extra vaccines are
available. To reserve your shot:
n Go to http://www.twp.mont-
gomery.nj.us/depts/health/immu-
nizations.asp and click on the
“Schedule Now” button, or
n E-mail health@twp.mont-
gomery.nj.us with your name, ad-
dress, age and phone number, or
n Call the Health Department
at 908-359-8211 ext. 227.
The flu shot will cost $25 for
non-Medicare individuals.
If you can’t afford the flu shot,
you may request a hardship fee
waiver by e-mailing
health@twp.montgomery.nj.us. A
hardship is defined as loss of job
or uninsured.
New this year: The health de-
partment is also offering flu shots
to children age 4 and up (accom-
panied by their parents). Vacci-
nating your kids against flu helps
to keep them from missing
school, and prevents the misery
of flu.
Pneumonia vaccines will also
be available for qualifying seniors
(over 65).
Flu vaccination clinic schedule
Look! Up on the stage! It’s a
lawyer! It’s a stand up comedian!
It’s Joan Weisblatt!
Yes, it’s Joan Weisblatt! After
30 years as a successful environ-
mental attorney with Hoagland,
Longo, Moran, Dunst & Doukas
in New Brunswick, Weisblatt re-
tired and readied herself for the
rest of her life. In October 2010,
she left the practice and decided
to go to comedy school.
“It never occurred to me to do
stand up comedy,” said Weisblatt,
a 20-year resident of Belle Mead.
“I happened to be tooling around
on the Internet and saw an ad for
a comedy school at The Stress
Factory, a comedy club in New
Brunswick. I could not think of
one good reason not to do it.”
Ten months later, she has a
website, wwwjoanweisblattcome-
dy.com, a blog, www.comedianat-
law.blogspot.com, and a long list of
upcoming appearances. In that
short time, she has played at com-
edy clubs, restaurants and chari-
ty benefits throughout New Jer-
sey and in New York City. Her
comedy teacher, Joe Matarese,
who appears regularly on Chelsea
Lately and Comedy Central, told
Weisblatt that she is “a natural”
and invited her to be his opening
act at CB’s Comedy Club in New
York City this past August.
“It was one of the best days of
my life,” she said. “It’s one thing
for your mother to tell you that
you’re funny, and another when it
comes from someone impartial
whom you respect.”
Weisblatt said that she played
to a packed house and that her
performance was very well re-
ceived.
Weisblatt said that she always
has enjoyed writing and story-
telling.
“Most people think that come-
dy is a far cry from practicing law,
but it isn’t because I put my writ-
ing and public speaking skills to
work.” The only difference, she
quips, “is the abject poverty.” She
uses her life as an attorney, wife
and middle-aged female as the
basis for her writing.
Weisblatt hones her comedy
skills at open microphones sever-
al times a week. “The practice is
essential for the development of
comic timing. Sometimes it’s not
so much what you say, but how
and when you say it that makes
the difference between a laugh, a
groan or worst of all, no reaction
at all.”
From attorney to comedian
Family of Dealerships Since 1946 www.LUCASCARS.com
609-521-4861
classified
T HE MO N T G O ME R Y S U N
SEPTEMBER 28-OCTOBER 4, 2011 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week. • All classified ads must be prepaid.
Your Classified ad will run in all of The Sun Newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 x512 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun • West Windsor Sun
Place your classified today!
856-427-0933
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
FREE ESTIMATES
856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Repair and Restoration
“Cracks are our specialty.”
Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete
New Concrete
Seal Coating Power Washing
Mudjacking
Concrete Leveling
Stain Removal
Concrete Repair
Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $250 and up for
more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
Garage SaIe
EIectricaI Services
SDK HOME REPAIR
Any repair you can
think of, we can do.
· Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
· Soffitt Fascia
· Rotten Wood
· Door Installation
· Painting
· Kitchens
Fully Insured · Licensed
609-481-8886
24 hour
Emergency
Service
Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
Home Improvement
Roofing
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 10/5/11.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 10/5/11.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 10/5/11.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 10/5/11.
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
WB
ABB GBOWIHGl
Join the Elauwit Team today!
.And so con you.
Call Ed Lynes 856-528-4698 or
email resume to elynes@elauwit.com
• Opens new business relationships
• Must be outgoing, driven and confident
• Full time
ACCOUNT MANAGER
To Reach EVERY home in
Lawrence and Montgomery!
$
20 ONLY
• Sell Your Stuff
• Have a Garage Sale
• Advertise Your Business
• Home Improvement
• Help Wanted
• Real Estate
Call 609-751-0245 x512
to start today!
The ONLY newspapers in everyone’s mailbox every Wednesday!
DOG WALKING/PET CARE
Insured and Bonded
www.kittykissesandpuppypaws.com
732-616-2634
Dog WaIking
WB
ABB GBOWIHGl
Join the Elauwit Team today!
.And so con you.
Email resume to tengle@elauwit.com or tronaldson@elauwit.com
The combination Front End Developer/Graphic Artist position will
work closely with the Digital Media Manager and Art Director.
The Front End Developer will be needed to enhance existing websites, build
new websites and any other work associated with the building of the Elauwit
brand. Tasks can be day to day or based solely upon projects, which will mainly
include the following:
· WordPress Theming/Development
· Deployment of new Wordpress sites
· Improving existing Wordpress sites
· Ability to create/implement design with/without direction
DESIRED SKILLS:
Front End Developer/Graphic Artist
· HTML/CSS (by-hand, standards-
compliant, with strong under-
standing of cross-browser /
cross-platform issues)
· Good knowledge of JavaScript,
PHP, MySQL
· Experience with frameworks like
jQuery
· Experience with Quark XPress,
Photoshop (Illustrator, a plus)
· Good communication skills
· Strong time management skills –
able to meet deadlines
· Works well together
The Graphic Artist will be needed to build and manipulate ads for the
newspapers, along with other small projects.
Garage Sale
39 Catskill Court, Belle Mead
Sat. Oct. 1st 9AM-3PM
Antique Radios, Amish
Wagon, Aluminum Boat,
Dishes & Much More!
Handyman Services
• Large or Small Repairs
• Dependable, Family-based
Call Buddy Today! 609-468-0585
FREE ESTIMATES!
Fully Insured • Lic. #13VH01208100
When you
mention this ad. 10% OFF
Family of Dealerships Since 1946 www.LUCASCARS.com
609-521-4448