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INFUSED ALCOHOL OK IN CALIFONIA FOOD PAGE 20 TURNING UP PRESSURE OBAMA TO CONGRESS:RETURN MY

INFUSED ALCOHOL OK IN CALIFONIA

FOOD PAGE 20

TURNING UP PRESSURE OBAMA TO CONGRESS:RETURN MY JOBS BILL,PASSED NATION PAGE 7
TURNING UP PRESSURE
OBAMA TO CONGRESS:RETURN MY JOBS BILL,PASSED
NATION PAGE 7
OBAMA TO CONGRESS:RETURN MY JOBS BILL,PASSED NATION PAGE 7 PRATT IN A GROOVE SPORTS PAGE 11

PRATT IN

A GROOVE

SPORTS PAGE 11

BILL,PASSED NATION PAGE 7 PRATT IN A GROOVE SPORTS PAGE 11 Wednesday • Sept. 28, 2011

Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011 Vol XII, Edition 36

www.smdailyjournal.com

Speier denounces senatorforblocking pipeline bill

FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier called a Kentucky senator “blinded by ideol- ogy” for his opposition on philo- sophical grounds of federal legisla- tion that would strengthen safety rules for oil and gas pipelines, a bill that even the pipeline industry and companies in his own state support.

pipeline industry and companies in his own state support. Jackie Speier “We must learn the lessons

Jackie Speier

“We must learn the lessons of the deadly pipeline explo- sion in San Bruno that killed eight of my constituents. The gas industry is in desperate

eight of my constituents. The gas industry is in desperate R a n d P a

Rand Paul

need of strong regulation and oversight,” said Speier, D-San Mateo. Republican Sen. Rand Paul’s opposition to the bill hasn’t wavered even

after a gas pipeline rupture last week shook people awake in three counties in his home state of Kentucky. Paul, a Tea Party ally who shares with his father, Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, a desire to shrink the role of the federal government, won’t dis- cuss his role in stymieing the bill. But industry lobbyists, safety advo-

cates and Senate aides said he is the only senator who is refusing to agree to procedures that would per- mit swift passage of the measure. A deadly gas pipeline explosion in San Bruno last year — along with other recent gas explosions and oil pipeline spills — has created con- sensus in Congress, as well as in the

See BILL, Page 24

sensus in Congress, as well as in the See BILL , Page 24 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Larry Gunning has worked at Millbrae Lumber Company for nearly 30 years.The company is set to close next month,however, after being in business since the 1930s.

Millbrae Lumber Company to close

Family-owned business in city more than 80 years

to close Family-owned business in city more than 80 years By Bill Silverfarb DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Last year, the Millbrae Lumber Company, established in 1939, was named the business of the year by the city’s Chamber of Commerce and Rotary Club. This year, however, is a different story as the family-owned business prepares to shut its doors in just a few weeks. The history of the company is long and its current owners, the Thurston and Massolo families, bought the lumber yard back in the early 1980s. Most of the company’s 10 employees have been with Millbrae Lumber for more than 25 years and its youngest employee, 28, started with the company 10 years ago right out of high school. The company’s oldest employee is 75.

See LUMBER, Page 22

Officials mulling bag ban

Board taking input on possible regulations,community interest

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

County supervisors are weighing the potential environmen- tal benet of banning plastic bags against the concerns of retailers and plastic representatives who say some industries like restaurants and dry cleaning don’t have equitable alterna- tives. The board held a study session Tuesday afternoon to gather public input and clarify legal wrinkles as it considers whether any regulation is a move the county wants to make for the unincorporated areas. The board did not outright decide to embrace a ban but agreed to ask cities if they want to partici- pate in a coordinated effort. Supervisor Don Horsley also

See BAGS, Page 22

Enrollment top issue in San Carlos school race

Three vie for two seats on Board of Trustees

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Growing enrollment is the top issue facing San Carlos schools and building more space is the only solution, accord- ing to candidates hoping to serve on the school board. Trustee Seth Rosenblatt, technology executive Adam Rak and civil engineer Peter Tzifas are vying for two four-year positions on the San Carlos Elementary School District Board

See ELECTION, Page 24

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2 Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“A great truth is a truth whose opposite is also a truth.”

— Thomas Mann,German writer (1875-1955)

This Day in History

1787 The Congress of the Confederation

voted to send the just-completed

Constitution of the United States to

state legislatures for their approval.

In 1066, William the Conqueror invaded England to claim the English throne. In 1542, Portuguese navigator Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo arrived at present-day San Diego. In 1850, ogging was abolished as a form of punishment in the U.S. Navy. In 1920, eight members of the Chicago White Sox were indict- ed for allegedly throwing the 1919 World Series against the Cincinnati Reds. (All were acquitted at trial, but all eight were banned from the game for life.) In 1924, two U.S. Army planes landed in Seattle, having com- pleted the rst round-the-world ight in 175 days. In 1939, during World War II, Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed a treaty calling for the partitioning of Poland, which the two countries had invaded. In 1961, “Dr. Kildare,” starring Richard Chamberlain and Raymond Massey, and “Hazel,” starring Shirley Booth, pre- miered on NBC-TV. In 1974, rst lady Betty Ford underwent a mastectomy at Bethesda Naval Medical Center in Maryland, following dis- covery of a cancerous lump in her breast. In 1989, deposed Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos died in exile in Hawaii at age 72. In 1991, jazz great Miles Davis died in Santa Monica, Calif., at age 65. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush told reporters the United States was in “hot pursuit” of terrorists behind the Sept. 11 attacks. The U.N. Security Council approved a sweeping resolution sponsored by the United States requiring all 189 U.N. member nations to deny money, support and sanctuary to terrorists.

nations to deny money, support and sanctuary to terrorists. Actress Janeane Garofalo is 47. Birthdays Writer-actor

Actress Janeane Garofalo is 47.

Birthdays

to terrorists. Actress Janeane Garofalo is 47. Birthdays Writer-actor Bam Margera is 32. Actress Hilary Duff

Writer-actor Bam Margera is 32.

Garofalo is 47. Birthdays Writer-actor Bam Margera is 32. Actress Hilary Duff is 24 Actor William

Actress Hilary Duff is 24

Actor William Windom is 88. Actress Brigitte Bardot is 77. Singer Ben E. King is 73. Actor Joel Higgins is 68. Singer Helen Shapiro is 65. Movie writer-director-actor John Sayles is 61. Actress Sylvia Kristel is 59. Rock musician George Lynch is 57. Zydeco singer-musician C.J. Chenier is 54. Actor Steve Hytner is 52. Country singer Matt King is 45. Actress Mira Sorvino is 44. TV personality Moon Zappa is 44. Actress-model Carre Otis is 43. Actress Naomi Watts is 43. Country musician Chuck Crawford is 38. Country singer Mandy Barnett is 36. Rapper Young Jeezy is 34. World Golf Hall of Famer Se Ri Pak is 34. Actor Peter Cambor is 33. Actress Skye McCole Bartusiak is 19. Actor Keir Gilchrist is 19.

Skye McCole Bartusiak is 19. Actor Keir Gilchrist is 19. REUTERS A Massachusetts cat with two

REUTERS

A Massachusetts cat with two faces that has become the world’s longest surviving so called ‘janus’feline at 12 years of age. The cat,who is named Frank and Louie,has two mouths,two noses and three eyes.Frank and Louie have one brain,so the faces react in unison.

and Louie have one brain,so the faces react in unison. A person who reaches the age

A person who reaches the age of 110 or

more is called a supercentenarian. *** The rst supermarket was King Kullen Grocery Company, a 6,000-square-foot self-service store opened in 1930 in Queens, N.Y. Michael Cullen (1884- 1936) opened the one-stop shopping store that adhered to the motto “Pile it high. Sell it low.”

***

A Super Big Gulp drink at 7-Eleven is

44 ounces. A Double Gulp is 64 ounces. An average can of soda is 12 ounces. *** Lake Superior, one of the Great Lakes, is the largest freshwater lake in the world. *** When a California chemist created com- pressed rubber that had remarkable bounce, he wasn’t sure what could be done with it, so he brought it to a toy company. Wham-O toys used the rubber, dubbed zectron, to make the Super Ball, which quickly became a fad of the

1960s.

*** The Super Bowl was originally called the World Championship Game. While

trying to think of a better name for the end of season playoff game, Lamar Hunt (born 1932), coach of the Kansas City Chiefs and creator of the AFL (American Football League), remem- bered his daughter playing with a Super Ball. He suggested the name Super Bowl.

*** Former President George Bush (born 1924) was the rst president to partici- pate in a Super Bowl coin toss in person.

Bush and Hall of Fame quarterback Roger Staubach (born 1942) did the coin toss in 2002. In 1985, President Ronald Reagan (1911-2004) participated in the coin toss via satellite from the White House with Hugh McElhenny (born

1928).

*** Do you know who the rst person was to travel at supersonic speed, breaking the sound barrier? The year? See answer at

end.

*** “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious,” a song in the Disney movie “Mary Poppins” (1964), was the subject of a lawsuit in 1965. Two songwriters sued Disney for $12 million for copyright

infringement. They claimed they wrote a

called

song

“Supercalafajalistickespeealadojus.” Disney proved that variants of the long word were used before 1949 and won the case.

*** Supernovas have been seen in space, but the last time one was seen in the Earth’s galaxy, the Milky Way, was in 1604. The exploding star was so bright that

in

1951

German astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) saw it with his naked eye. *** Supermodel Cindy Crawford (born 1966) has been on over 600 magazine covers.

*** Superman, Batman, Robin, Wonder Woman and Aquaman were the super- heroes that made up the group in the Saturday morning cartoon “Super Friends” (1973-1977). The superheroes’ sidekicks were Wendy, Marvin and Wonder Dog. ***

Superstition says a broken mirror is an omen of bad luck. It dates back to the belief that the mirror was a reection of the soul, therefore damaging a mirror damaged the soul. To minimize the bad luck, the mirror should be buried in the earth, or at least removed from the house.

*** Mario and Luigi are the brothers in the 1985 Nintendo video game “Super Mario Brothers.” In the game, the Super Mushroom turns Mario into Super Mario, which gives him power and dou- bles his size. ***

Answer : American aviator Chuck Yeager (born 1923) was the rst human to y faster than the speed of sound. Yeager ew the rocket-powered Bell X-1 plane at Mach 1 on Oct. 14, 1947.

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in the weekend and Wednesday editions of the Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344- 5200 ext. 114.

knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344- 5200 ext. 114. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

NFYNU

letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. NFYNU ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All
letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. NFYNU ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ENALK

Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ENALK DGAERU VYNCOO Find us on Facebook
Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ENALK DGAERU VYNCOO Find us on Facebook

DGAERU

Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ENALK DGAERU VYNCOO Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble
Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ENALK DGAERU VYNCOO Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble
Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ENALK DGAERU VYNCOO Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

VYNCOO

Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ENALK DGAERU VYNCOO Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Now
Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ENALK DGAERU VYNCOO Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Now
Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ENALK DGAERU VYNCOO Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble Now
Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble
Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: Jumbles: Yesterday’s Answer: (Answers tomorrow) OPERA FURRY GOSSIP NEPHEW Their diving at Santa Monica
Ans:
Jumbles:
Yesterday’s
Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
OPERA FURRY GOSSIP NEPHEW
Their diving at Santa Monica Beach created
this — “PIER” PRESSURE

Lotto

Sept. 24 Super Lotto Plus 2 8 14 29 43 24 Mega number
Sept. 24 Super Lotto Plus
2 8
14 29
43
24
Mega number
Sept. 27 Mega Millions 2 20 28 36 45 37 Mega number
Sept. 27 Mega Millions
2 20
28 36
45 37
Mega number

Fantasy Five

7 15 27 34
7
15
27
34

Daily Four

7
7
0
0
5
5
5
5

Daily three midday

 
8
8
0
0
7
7

Daily three evening

 
3
3
5
5
7
7
37
37

The Daily Derby race winners are No.11 Money Bags in first place; No. 01 Gold Rush in second place;and No.08 Gorgeous George in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:46.04.

Local Weather Forecast

Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s to lower 70s. North winds around 5

mph

Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy.

Lows in the mid 50s. West winds 5 to 10

mph

Thursday: Mostly cloudy. Highs in the

60s. Light winds

afternoon. Thursday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s. South winds 5 to 10 mph. Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy. Highs in the 60s.

Becoming southwest around 10 mph in the

Highs in the 60s. Becoming southwest around 10 mph in the Becoming west in the afternoon.

Becoming

west in the afternoon.

Becoming southwest after midnight.

Friday night through Sunday night: Mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 50s. Highs in the 50s to upper 60s.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

3

Kaiser shows off new San Mateo offices

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Kaiser Permanente unveiled its new high- tech medical facility in San Mateo yesterday that will serve about 50,000 members who live in mid-county. Kaiser recently broke ground on a new hos- pital in Redwood City and is investing about $1 billion in the county as it is also set to expand its hospital in South San Francisco, the company’s Chief Executive Officer Robert Pearl told the Daily Journal yesterday. Kaiser has hospitals situated about 18 miles from each other on the Peninsula and the new medical ofces means that most Kaiser mem- bers have a facility within ve miles of where they live, Pearl said. The new San Mateo Medical Ofce is a satellite of the Redwood City campus and started serving patients last month. “We want to be the most convenient, high- quality health care provider,” he said. The completion of Kaiser’s San Mateo Medical Ofce represents the last piece of development for Bay Meadows Phase I, which includes hundreds of housing units, retail centers and the city’s new police head- quarters situated at Hillsdale Boulevard near Highway 101. San Mateo had originally tried to lure a hotel to the spot as a way to boost revenue for the city but the downturn in the economy caused nancing to collapse for such a proj- ect. “A hotel was proposed and it would have been nice,” said San Mateo Mayor Jack Matthews yesterday. “The Kaiser facility will be a great amenity for the city though. This will serve San Mateo well.” About 47 percent of Kaiser members who access the hospital in Redwood City live in the middle part of the county, said Dr. Jim O’Donnell, the physician in chief of the new facility. About 20 physicians will work at the facil-

new facility. About 20 physicians will work at the facil- BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Kaiser Permanente unveiled

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Kaiser Permanente unveiled its new medical office in San Mateo yesterday morning.

ity under the guidance of Dr. Srinivas Ganesh, the physician in charge of the new facility. The 65,000-square-foot medical ofce has a primary care clinic, lab services and a full- service pharmacy, Ganesh said. It also features the very latest in technolo- gy, he said. Kaiser has its own clinical library and best practices that each of its doctors can access by mobile device, Ganesh said. The new ofce includes the latest digital imaging equipment, which improves accura- cy and provides results more quickly to mem- bers, who can securely view their results online. The equipment is also more environ- mentally friendly because digital mammo- grams and digital X-rays do not require the

chemicals and lm that are used in conven- tional imaging. The facility is also equipped with the latest “telederm” technology, where a primary care physician can send a digital image of a patient’s skin condition to a KP dermatologist for an “instant read” — in which the derma- tologist identi es and diagnoses the condi- tion, and prescribes a treatment during the patient’s primary care visit. A farmers’ market is planned for the facili- ty and Kaiser also contributed funds toward public art in the area, the mayor said.

Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver- farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344- 5200 ext. 106.

Police reports

Road rage

A woman was followed home and spit on by another driver who was unhappy with her driving on East Hillsdale Boulevard in Foster City before 12:51 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10.

BELMONT

Burglary. Computers were taken from an apartment on Irene Court before 8:54 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23. Weapon offense. Someone was arrested for possession of a weapon at the intersection of El Camino Real and O’Neill Avenue before 5:26 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 20. Burglary. Several items were taken from a residence on Old County Road before 6:05 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14. Theft. A purse was taken from an unlocked vehicle on Skymont Drive before 9:09 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14. Fraud. A fraud was reported at a bank on Belmont Woods Way before 5:23 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13. Disturbance. Two kids were riding a go-kart on Adelaide Way before 4:44 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13. Drunk in public. An impaired bicyclist was reported on El Camino Real before 2:45 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13.

FOSTER CITY

Drunk driving. A man was cited for driving under the influence at the intersection of Beach Park and Shell boulevards before 9:56 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21. Burglary. A woman’s car was broken into while parked in a complex on Admiralty Lane before 8:11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21. Bike theft. A boy’s 18-speed mountain bike was stolen from the front porch of a residence on Blythe Street before 5:13 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13. Threat case. A person was threatened at the front counter of a business on Shell Boulevard before 1:32 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13.

case . A person was threatened at the front counter of a business on Shell Boulevard
case . A person was threatened at the front counter of a business on Shell Boulevard
case . A person was threatened at the front counter of a business on Shell Boulevard

4

Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

THE DAILY JOURNAL

4 Wednesday • Sept. 28, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL Public Invited: Join us for “Friday Nights
4 Wednesday • Sept. 28, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL Public Invited: Join us for “Friday Nights
4 Wednesday • Sept. 28, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL Public Invited: Join us for “Friday Nights
4 Wednesday • Sept. 28, 2011 THE DAILY JOURNAL Public Invited: Join us for “Friday Nights
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

5

City picks public art for park

Sculpture beats out clock as San Carlos’top choice

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

When choosing public art for a down- town San Carlos park, the mayor’s vote tipped the balance — rather tting, con- sidering the winning piece is a life-like metal sculpture entitled “Balancing Act.” The majority of the council, including Mayor Andy Klein, opted for the sculp- ture over “Laurel Wreath,” a clock encir- cled by leaves. The Arts and Culture and Parks and Recreation commissions had both given the latter the greenlight but also recommended the sculpture as an alternative for Laurel Street Park. The piece is the city’s rst public art outside a ne art collection of paintings on the second oor of City Hall. Although Klein appeared to be the swing vote during the discussion, the council ultimately voted 4 to 1 with Councilman Matt Grocott dissenting because he preferred neither option. Klein said his decision was simple. “The clock seemed more decorative and ornamental; it isn’t going to be the conversation starter or fun piece of pub- lic art that I think our rst purchase should be,” Klein said in an email. Klein said young children frequenting the park are more likely to notice and enjoy the man rather than an ornamental clock. “Balancing Act” is by San Rafael-

an ornamental clock. “Balancing Act” is by San Rafael- Rendering of San Carlos’new sculpture ‘Balancing

Rendering of San Carlos’new sculpture ‘Balancing Act.’

based artist James Moore. The existing kiosk in the park will be demolished to make way for the sculpture which is a boxy lifelike gure with one arm held up and balancing three multi-colored balls.

In contrast, the proposed clock piece would have sat atop the kiosk.

A new bulletin board to replace the

kiosk will be placed elsewhere in the park.

A desire to replace the kiosk rather

than adding to it was a consideration, said Councilman Randy Royce. Royce, like Klein, also liked taking a different approach. “It’s kind of taking a risk in doing something unique,” Royce said. Moore works with metal sculpture and mixed media on metal, ranging from tabletop pieces to “monumental” public works, according to his website. His nearby commissions include pieces in Palo Alto, the Hillview Community Center in Los Altos and Kaiser Permanente in Oakland. The city is buying the art with $12,500, including $3,500 left over from the city’s 75th anniversary events and the remainder from a private donation.

Royce said he understands the art may not be everybody’s cup of tea. “With art, whatever you pick out half the people will love it and half the peo- ple will hate it,” said Royce.

It is estimated the sculpture will be

installed within 60 to 90 days, said Assistant City Manager Brian Moura.

Michelle Durand can be reached by email:

michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:

(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.

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Around the Bay

Beaten Giants fan goes outside first time in six months

SAN FRANCISCO — Relatives of the San Francisco

Giants fan nearly beaten to death outside Dodger Stadium says he went outside for

the rst time in nearly six months as he

shows more signs of improvement. Bryan Stow’s family wrote on their web- site that the father of two looked toward

on their web- site that the father of two looked toward Bryan Stow the sun Friday

Bryan Stow

the sun Friday and said “It’s magical.”

Stow over the past week also made jokes, recognized family members and recalled memories from his childhood.

The family says the 42-year-old paramedic speaks just a few words at a time rather than full conversa- tions.

FBI: Marin County’s Belvedere is state’s safest city

BELVEDERE — California’s safest city hasn’t had a rape, homicide or other violent crime since 2007. But it’s also less than one square mile in size and surrounded on three sides by San Francisco Bay. New FBI data from last year put Belvedere, population 2,050, at the top of the state’s municipalities with more than 2,000 residents in terms of security. The rankings were based on gures supplied by 461 city police departments. Sheriff Bob Doyle says the city’s showing is unsurprising given its average age of 53 and median household income of

$120,000.

Reports: Cancer patient wrongly got supplement

OAKLAND — A cancer patient who died at a California

hospital during a nurses’ strike was given intravenously a nutritional supplement meant to be administered through a feeding tube, according to published reports. A replacement nurse at Alta Bates Summit Medical Center

in

Oakland mistakenly hooked the nutrient solution up to an

IV

for 66-year-old Judith Ming, instead of to the tube leading

to Ming’s stomach.

the nutrient solution up to an IV for 66-year-old Judith Ming, instead of to the tube
the nutrient solution up to an IV for 66-year-old Judith Ming, instead of to the tube

6 Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

LOCAL/STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Local briefs

Notre Dame receives $2.9M grant

Notre Dame de Namur University has received a $2.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to fund an expan- sion of services to Hispanic students and other underserved populations interested in careers in science and technology.

The grant was awarded under the department’s Hispanic Serving Institution Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics and Articulation programs. NDNU is the only four-year, private university in Northern California to hold the HSI designation, which means that at least 25 percent of its undergraduate population is composed of students who identi- fy themselves as Hispanic, according to a school press release. The grant, which will be paid out over ve years, will nance the university’s “Building a Pipeline to STEM Success at Notre Dame de Namur” project, which aims to:

• Increase the number of Hispanic and other low-income stu-

dents attaining degrees in the STEM elds at NDNU by pro- viding increased academic support, including new equipment;

professional development for instructors; mentoring, and other programs;

• Create model transfer and articulation agreements between NDNU and two-year Hispanic-Serving Institutions, such as

Cañada College, which make it easier for students at communi- ty colleges to know exactly which courses they must take to qualify to transfer to NDNU; and,

• Improve data collection and analysis to improve Hispanic

and other low-income NDNU students’ educational outcomes related to enrollment, persistence and completion. In its application, the university noted it expects the data col- lection and analysis it has planned to lead to new knowledge and better methods of serving Hispanic and other low-income students majoring in STEM elds.

SPORT’s third annual fun run this Saturday

This Saturday, the third annual SPORT Fun Run will be held at the Aragon High School track. The Fun Run, which will be held from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 1, raises money to support after school sports for San Mateo Foster City middle schools — Abbott, THE Bayside S.T.E.M. ACADEMY, Borel and Bowditch. Last year, more than 500 participants came out on a bright fall day to run, walk and talk. The event draws students from all four schools, as well as teachers, staff and parents and siblings. Last year, the “Fun Runners” ran 8,645 laps. This year’s goal is 10,000 laps. For more information about volunteering or par- ticipating visit www.smfcsport.com or email sportfunrun@gmail.com.

‘Spare the Air’alert issued for Wednesday

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District has issued a “Spare the Air” alert for Wednesday, warning of unhealthy pol- lution levels and asking residents to take public transit. Jack Broadbent, executive ofcer of the air district, said high temperatures and light winds are hurting air quality in the Bay Area this week. District ofcials explained that car exhaust, industrial emis- sions and household chemicals contain volatile organic com- pounds that can combine with oxygen in the heat and create ground-level ozone. “As hot weather returns to the Bay Area, it’s important that residents continue to do their part to reduce pollution by car- pooling, taking public transit, going easy on energy use and making other clean-air choices,” Broadbent said in a statement. Wednesday will be the region’s eighth Spare the Air alert of the year, according to the district.

Spare the Air alert of the year, according to the district. First 5 weighs cuts to

First 5 weighs cuts to children’s services

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A possible $15.5 million funding loss to services for children 5 and under forced First 5 San Mateo County of- cials to make hard budget choices Monday — the rst step in changes that will be nalized later this year. Making these cuts could mean less opportunities for training providers, updating facilities and retaining child- care professionals. However, money would remain for programs that benet children academically and medically. California’s budget includes Assembly Bill 99, which requires First 5 Commissions throughout the state to send $1 billion in reserve funds to the state by June 30, 2012. For San Mateo County, such a cut means a $15.5 mil- lion loss. While lawsuits were led to stop the loss, First 5 San Mateo County is planning for the worst — cutting $15.5 million from a nearly $60 million long-term investment plan through 2015. To give stability to programs, the board made decisions about local cuts

Monday. Direction was given about which programs will likely continue and how much funding will be offered allow- ing staff to start renegotiating contracts. Those contracts will be nalized and return before the board in December allowing changes to take place in January. Debby Armstrong, First 5 San Mateo County executive director, called the decision a major step in the process of cutting the budget by 32 percent. First 5 currently works with 14 agen- cies throughout the county to provide 18 programs. Nearly all were given notice that the contracts would end Dec. 31, said Armstrong. On Monday, the Board approved 14 out of 15 proposed con- tracts. One contract — a $2.5 million contract with the County Office of Education for the Early Childhood Quality Improvement Project — will come back before the board in October. Programs the commission is seeking to maintain will provide services for chil- dren in terms of learning but also help with access to medical care, according to the staff report. It will cut back on pro-

grams that address facilities and recruit- ing and retaining child care providers, Armstrong said. The move is a plan for the county as a statewide lawsuit barring the move to sweep the funds was heard in August. The judge has 90 days to respond which could result in an additional 60-day appeal delay. Ultimately, legal action could delay a nal decision for months. First 5 California works to provide educational and health programs for children up to 5 years old. It is funded through a 50 cent per pack tobacco tax passed through 1998’s Proposition 10. Through partnerships, First 5 works to offer direct services like expanding child-care services; providing therapists in programs to train teachers to identify and address emotional or behavioral issues; covering health insurance premi- ums for children ages 0 to 5; and sup- porting children with special needs. Last year, more than 16,000 people received services funded through First 5 — 6,800 children ages 0 to 5; over 5,100 parents and guardians; and 4,200 child- care providers, said Armstrong.

County passes $1.75 billion budget

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The Board of Supervisors yesterday signed off on a roughly $1.75 billion budget that includes using $11 million for a variety of one-time needs like upgrading its chambers, helping employees relocate and installing infor- mation kiosks throughout the county. The scal year 2011-12 budget adopt- ed by the Board of Supervisors at its Tuesday meeting is increased from the tentative budget crafted in June. The changes include $47.7 million in nal adjustments and $5.1 million in September revisions. Of the adjust- ments, $19.2 million will be added to reserves and the remaining $18.7 million used for one-time needs.

The one-time expenses include $11 million in non-departmental ERAF reserves for a laundry list of items, such as $110,000 to modernize Board Chambers with tablets and docking sta- tions and better audio. The budget also includes $4.87 million for information technology projects, $43,000 for county- wide information kiosks, $739,085 to operate the recently acquired Circle Star properties and $2.3 million for the June 2012 primary election. ERAF, shorthand for Educational Revenue Augmentation Funds, is money collected for schools by the state. The excess after meeting funding mandates can be used by the county for other needs. Altogether, the budget changes mean

an increase in net county costs of

$414,034.

Although the adopted budget sets the stage for the county’s finances this fis- cal year, the supervisors are expected to have bigger picture discussions in October and November about the ongo- ing structural deficit and the potential of more so-called trigger cuts by the state. In June, the board agreed to use $50 million in reserves to balance its budget

and whittle away at the structural decit. With the most recent changes, the county’s structural decit stands at $50 million for scal year 2011-12 but that

gure does not include costs such as a

new jail, other facility debt and state

realignment.

Hells Angels members charged with mortgage fraud

By Paul Elias

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Two local lead- ers of the Hells Angels motorcycle gang and six others were charged with partic- ipating in a $10 million mortgage fraud that allegedly funded the purchase of

marijuana “grow houses,” according to a federal grand jury indictment unsealed Tuesday. The indictment alleges that Jacob Moynihan, a loan ofcer with several San Francisco companies between 2005 and 2007, submitted false income docu- ments, employment histories and bank statements on behalf of the Hells Angels

members and others to secure mortgages for unqualied borrowers. The indictment alleges that Raymond Foakes and Josh Leo Johnston are mem- bers of the Sonoma County chapter of the Hells Angels and used the mortgages obtained through Moynihan to buy prop- erties they allegedly turned into “grow houses” to cultivate marijuana.

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LOCAL/NATION

Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

7

Congress dodges crisis, on to the next

By Donna Cassata

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — One crisis averted, on to the next. The day after Congress managed to avoid a government shutdown — again — Republicans and Democrats stared ahead Tuesday at major ghts over spending that underscore a deep divide that’s sure to dene the fast- approaching national elections. Monday night, lawmakers had postponed their dispute over whether billions for disaster aid must be paid for with cuts elsewhere in the budget, nessing a pact to keep the govern- ment operating. But tea party-driven Republicans are still insisting on signi cant spending cuts this fall, with some arguing that a hard-fought congres- sional agreement this summer to fund the government at $1.043 trillion in 2012 was too generous. Democrats, many of whom complained of too many concessions and reductions in this year’s showdowns, are furiously trying to protect government pro- grams. The next skirmish will be over how and where to spend the new year’s budget, with a Nov. 18 deadline for that legislation. President Barack Obama’s $447 billion jobs proposal that would cut payroll taxes and increase spending on school con- struction and other infrastructure has already divided the parties. But the next really big deal is the special 12- member bipartisan supercommittee and whether it can come up with a plan to slash $1.5 trillion over 10 years by Nov. 23 — the day before Thanksgiving. These ghts will unfold against the backdrop of a feeble economy that Obama is desperate to jump-start as he pushes for a second term, and an exasperated electorate that looks at Washington and dislikes what it sees.

REUTERS Barack Obama holds a copy of the American Jobs Act as he speaks during

REUTERS

Barack Obama holds a copy of the American Jobs Act as he speaks during an event at Abraham Lincoln High School in Denver,Colo.

Obama to Congress: Pass my jobs bill

By Erica Werner

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DENVER — Capping a cam- paign trip for his economic plan and his re-election, President Barack Obama on Tuesday tried to keep pressure on Congress to con- sider his nearly $450 billion jobs bill, saying it had been two weeks since he sent the bill to Capitol Hill “and now I want it back.” “I want it back, passed, so I can sign this bill and start putting peo- ple back to work,” Obama said from Abraham Lincoln Hill School, a site chosen to emphasize

the education elements of his bill. The president tailored his com- ments to his audience, saying the school’s science labs were built decades ago and schools around the country need updated facilities. Yet his broader speech was nearly identical to ones he has given around the country. There has been no clear sign that his campaign for his bill is winning over Republicans in Congress whose support he needs. Obama’s spokesman, Jay Carney, told reporters the White House hopes members of Congress are hearing from their constituents

about the need to act. Obama made that pitch himself to the audience of several thousand people, saying:

“Every one of you can help make it happen by sending a message to Congress, a simple message: ‘Pass this jobs bill.’ Obama’s bill would spend about $25 billion to modernize public schools. The White House said Colorado’s share could support up to 3,400 jobs. Overall, his jobs plan is a mix of payroll tax cuts and spending that he says could be paid for by requir- ing wealthier individuals, families and companies to pay more.

Home arsonist seeks mental treatment

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The Daly City man who reported- ly told authorities he was a long- time undercover agent who trained for years before setting re to his bedroom in June pleaded no contest to arson and child endangerment charges. However, Werner Heinz Mulberg, 50, may receive treatment rather than jail time if accepted into the Pathways Mental Health Court next month.

Prosecutors say Mulberg has sev- eral delusional beliefs, such as working 30 years as an undercover government agent, and is known to county health ofcials. On June 1, Mulberg allegedly sprayed a can of deicer on a vest, ignited it with a lighter and climbed out his bedroom window in the 200 block of Westbrook Avenue in Daly City. He shares the home with his wife, who is also his stepsister, their two children and their parents.

Mulberg’s teen son saw smoke pouring from his parent’s bedroom and grabbed a re extinguisher. The re damaged one wall and a ceiling in the bedroom. Mulberg does not appear to have wanted to kill or harm his family and thought his son would extin- guish the blaze, District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe has said. The re required a 75-minute full response by the North County Fire Department.

Mulberg’s attorney previously mulled a possible plea of not guilty by reason of insanity but ultimately opted against that route. Mulberg pleaded no contest to felony arson of an inhabited struc- ture and misdemeanor child endan- germent. He faces up to a year in county jail if Judge Mark Forcum does not deem him qualied for Pathways at an Oct. 7 hearing. Mulberg remains in custody in lieu of $100,000 bail.

Local briefs

Pipeline testing rescheduled

PG&E has rescheduled hydrostatic testing of portions of its natural gas lines along San Carlos’ Brittan Avenue. The testing, which was initially supposed to start yesterday, is now tentatively scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. Wednesday and continue on Thursday, PG&E spokeswoman Brittany Chord said. The rst step in the testing will be venting gas near the intersection of Interstate Highway 280 and Edgewood Road. Residents may hear the venting or smell natural gas, city ofcials said. Affected residents were notied by mail and by telephone by PG&E, city ofcials said. “The natural gas will quickly dis- sipate into the atmosphere and will not be harmful,” PG&E said in its letter to local residents and business- es. The work is not expected to inter- rupt service to PG&E customers.

Slain nursing student Le remembered at vigil

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NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the nation

Census: 131,729 gay couples report they are married

WASHINGTON — Increasingly visible, the number of gay Americans telling the U.S. census they’re living with same-sex part- ners nearly doubled in the past decade, to about 650,000 couples. And more than 130,000 recorded partners as husband or wife. Census gures released Tuesday provide a rare snapshot of married and unmarried same-sex couples in

the U.S. based on the government count conducted last year, when gay marriage was legal in ve states and the District of Columbia. It comes at

a time when public opposition to

gay marriage is easing and advocacy groups are seeking a state-by-state

push for broader legal rights. Some 131,729 same-sex couples checked “husband” or “wife” boxes

on their decennial census forms, the

rst time people could do so, after gay marriage became legal in Massachusetts starting in 2004. That 2010 tally of married gay couples is higher than the actual number of legal marriages, civil

unions and domestic partnerships in the U.S. Even after New York legal- ized gay marriage in June, a Census Bureau consultant, Gary Gates of UCLA, put the actual number of legally recognized gay partnerships

at 100,000.

NASA: Satellite fell in south Pacific, not Canada

WASHINGTON — That dead NASA satellite fell into what might be the ideal spot — part of the southern Pacic Ocean about as far from large land masses as you can get, U.S. space officials said Tuesday. New U.S. Air Force calculations put the 6-ton satellite’s death plunge early Saturday thousands of miles from northwestern North America, where there were reports of sight- ings. Instead, it plunged into areas where remote islands dot a vast ocean. NASA says those new calcula- tions show the 20-year-old satellite entered Earth’s atmosphere general- ly above American Samoa. But falling debris as it broke apart didn’t start hitting the water for another 300 miles to the northeast, south- west of Christmas Island, just after midnight EDT Saturday.

Engineers prep monument inspection

midnight EDT Saturday. Engineers prep monument inspection REUTERS Workers prepare rappelling lines at the top of

REUTERS

Workers prepare rappelling lines at the top of the Washington Monument

as inspections to the structure begin.

By Ben Nucklos

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Bad weather delayed the daredevil work of engi- neers who will rappel down the Washington Monument for a visual inspection, but tourists who ven- tured to the earthquake-damaged obelisk on Tuesday were nonethe- less treated to a rare sight. For several hours, engineer Dave Megerle was perched atop the 555- foot monument, setting up a rope system and other equipment that will allow the rappelling team to traverse the exterior of the monu- ment looking for cracks, chips and other damage. To get there, he climbed through a hatch that hadn’t been opened in 11 years. The preparations took longer than expected, and by late afternoon,

lightning in the area prompted the private engineering rm retained by the National Park Service to call it a day. The engineers are among a rel- atively small group in their profes- sion certied to hoist themselves up and down the sides of buildings. The monument sustained numer- ous cracks during a 5.8-magnitude quake that shook the nation’s capital last month, and the site has been closed to visitors ever since. The engineering rm Wiss, Janey, Elstner Associates Inc., based in Northbrook, Ill., has spent the past month inspect- ing the interior of the obelisk, where pieces of stone and other debris rained down during the quake. Weather permitting, WJE’s team will begin slowly sliding down ropes Wednesday morning to look for additional damage on the exteri- or.

Florida welfare applicants less likely to use drugs

By Bill Kaczor

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Preliminary figures on a new

Florida law requiring drug tests for welfare applicants show that they are less likely than other people to use drugs, not more. One famous Floridian suggests that it’s the peo- ple who came up with the law who should be submitting specimens. Columnist and best-selling author Carl Hiaasen offered to pay for drug testing for all 160 members of the

Florida Legislature in what he called “a patriotic whiz-fest.” Several of the law’s supporters say they’re on board. “There is a certain public interest in going after hypocrisy,” Hiaasen said Tuesday, two days after he made his proposal in a Miami Herald column. “Folks that are applying for DCF (Department of Children and Families) money normally wouldn’t be standing in that line, and on top of that humiliation they now get to pee in a cup so they can get grocery money for their kids,” Hiaasen told

the Associated Press in an interview at his Vero Beach home. Gov. Rick Scott and other sup- porters of the law — the only one of its kind currently on the books in the U.S. — say the tests will save the state cash by weeding out peo- ple who would use welfare money on drugs. Critics say that just a few months after it went into effect, the law has already refuted the idea that people receiving public assistance are more likely to use drugs. Preliminary figures show that about 2.5 percent of up to 2,000 applicants for Temporary

Assistance for Needy Families have tested positive since the law went into effect in July. Another 2 percent declined to take the test, Department of Children and Families ofcials say. The Justice Department estimates that 6 percent of Americans 12 and older use illegal drugs. The American Civil Liberties Union is challenging the law, saying it violates welfare applicants’ con- stitutional right against unreason- able searches. For that reason, a federal appellate court struck down a similar Michigan law in 2003.

In GOP race, Romney, Perry and Paul are the money men

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Only three Republican presiden- tial candidates are worth any money — campaign money, that is. Mitt Romney, Rick Perry and Ron Paul have banked millions. But the other GOP candidates are struggling or broke, putting their candidacies in question four months before the rst nominating contests take place.

Ahead of a critical fundraising deadline Friday, all of the GOP’s contenders — regardless of the level of their nancial health — are furi- ously courting donors in Texas, Georgia, Washington and elsewhere. It’s a last-minute attempt to pick up cash before they le a three-month summary that will measure one aspect of the nancial strength of their campaigns.

Poll: Young people report online meanness pervasive

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Catherine Devine had her rst brush with an online bully in seventh grade, before she’d even ventured onto the Internet. Someone set up the screen name “devinegirl” and, posing as Catherine, sent her classmates instant messages full of trashy talk and lies. “They were making things up about me, and I was the most innocent 12- year-old ever,” Devine remembers. “I

hadn’t even kissed anybody yet.” As she grew up, Devine, now 22, learned to thrive in the electronic vil- lage. But like other young people, she occasionally stumbled into one of its dark alleys. A new Associated Press- MTV poll of youth in their teens and early 20s nds that most of them — 56 percent — have been the target of some type of online taunting, harass- ment or bullying, a slight increase over just two years ago.

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OPINION

Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

9

Reed,Wozniak for Belmont City Council

T he long and involved process regarding the desire for more youth to

play on Koret Field at Notre Dame de Namur University was but one issue facing the city of Belmont in recent years. But as often is the case, sometimes one decision, or the process for one decision, can paint a picture of a community. On one hand, you had a university which wanted expanded hours for play while also allowing youth sports groups access. On the other hand, you had a group of neighbors who wanted to limit the amount of play to keep the noise down. During the process, feelings were hurt and the situation became worse than it needed to be. It may be a simplistic perspective, but some- times the way a city conducts its business is as important as the busi- ness at hand. No one should feel good about how the Koret Field sit- uation was handled. This is one issue in a city with many — how to best manage

Editorial

nances affected by the state and an

economic downturn, what to do about its downtown and how best to work with varied interests whether they be businesses, the city’s univer- sity or other cities. There are two incumbents running for City Council, David Braunstein and Christine Wozniak. Challenging them are Paul Brownlee, Michael McGuinness and Eric Reed. Reed is an obvious choice for this position. His mindset is positive and determined in his resolve to work with the entire community. He sees

a denitive need to address the

city’s infrastructure, to be proactive with downtown and to improve the

strained relationship with Notre

Dame de Namur University. If a city

is to be strong, it must work well

with all communities and be as friendly as possible to its families. He has a strong background of com- munity service, with his current

position as chair of the Planning Commission and understands the need to diversify the city’s business community. As part of the city’s leadership, he also has a rm grip on how it runs, what it needs and its place on the Peninsula. But most importantly, he will be a refreshing voice of calm, openness and sensi-

bility. He will be a great addition to the City Council.

Of the two incumbents, Wozniak

is a strong choice. She understands the need to communicate well with other cities as a member of regional boards and has a strong grasp on city issues, both large and small. She put in long hours trying to save

the strained re department relation- ship with the city of San Carlos even though the two cities eventual- ly went their separate ways. She has demonstrated positive leadership

and understands the city’s nances well. We would have liked a more open-minded position when it came to the Koret Field position, however her strong desire to represent a cer-

Letters to the editor

Treatment of mentally ill in community versus jail

The Daily Journal received a copy of this letter to the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors:

It has come to the attention of our organization, NAMI San Mateo County (National Alliance on Mental Illness), that our Board of Supervisors is very close to making the decision and the nancial com- mitment to move forward with the building of a new jail. As an advocacy organization dedi- cated to improving the quality of life for people with mental illness and their families, we strongly urge the entire Board of Supervisors ensure that, by default, the new jail does not become the location where those with mental illness and behavioral health issues ultimately receive “treatment.” The criminalization of mental illness is not acceptable and must be prevented by preserving and even increasing funding for such proven services as CIT (crisis inter- vention team) training for all law enforcement; the SMART TEAM; Mateo Lodge, Inc. Support Team; Full Service Partnerships; Pathways Court; residential treatment and basic ACCESS to services. Whatever it takes to keep people in the com- munity and out of jail. It costs tax- payers much more when citizens are incarcerated than when they can be treated in a supportive community setting. Criminal Justice Realignment is happening beginning in a few days and despite planning for reentry etc.,

it likely won’t be clear what the needs of these former state prisoners will be until they arrive in our coun- ty. There will be potentially further overcrowding of county jail and sub- sequent increased demands on the courts and denitely an increase for health and behavioral health servic- es. It is not prudent or acceptable at this critical time to shift money away from health/behavioral health. In closing: There is no health without mental health and if citizens are “healthy” the safety of all is pret- ty much a given.

Patricia Way

Michael Stimson

San Mateo

The letter writers are co-presi- dents of the National Alliance on Mental Illness San Mateo County.

Overlooking the obvious

Editor, The article “Unsustainable UC tuition” published in the Sept. 24-25 weekend edition of the Daily Journal overlooks the obvious. Dened benet public employee pension plans are the major problem facing all levels of government. Multi-billion dollar retirement funds and investment pools, run by gam- blers promising unsustainable returns, are at fault. And, the poten- tial for insider trading abuse is huge.

Jack Hickey

Emerald Hills

End capital punishment

Editor, The execution of Troy Davis was another example of the moral bank- ruptcy of the institution of capital punishment. While I personally believe that capital punishment is

never right, in Davis’ case, there is overwhelming doubt that he was guilty of the crime (“Davis’ backers seek next step after execution” pub- lished in the Sept. 22 edition of the Daily Journal).

A million people signed petitions

stating that they doubted his guilt,

yet 12 jurors and a judge had the power to order him executed. Because we claim and strive to be a civilized society, we must end this practice of capital punishment once and for all.

Nancy Miceli

San Mateo

Enumerated powers

Editor, The Federal Government has become the politburo, the nanny and the menace. Formerly referred to in our constitution as the legislatures, “Congress,” the executive, “the pres- ident” and judicial, counts all three branches of our government. The above goes for the states in spades. We as people have a right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happi- ness. My advice to my fellow citizens:

Do not vote based on 30-second tel-

Endorsements

Previous Daily Journal endorsements

• San Mateo County Community College

District Dave Mandelkern, Patricia Miljanich, Karen Schwarz

• Sequoia Union High School District

Carrie Du Bois,Olivia Martinez,Lorraine Rumley

• San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District

Audrey Ng,Colleen Sullivan

• Hillsborough City Elementary School District

Greg Dannis,Margi Power

• Redwood City Elementary School District

Shelly Masur, Alisa Greene MacAvoy, Dennis McBride

• San Bruno Park Elementary School District

Jennifer Blanco,Joseph Capote

• Belmont City Clerk Terri Cook

tain point of view is understandable. Braunstein also has a rm grip on the city’s issues and speaks as if he likes being a “connector.” There is something to be said for quiet lead- ership, and we have seen ashes of leadership from him when he took over the mayor’s seat because of the resignation of another councilmem- ber. However, he has not provided enough evidence of active leader- ship or overall interest to be consid- ered over Reed or Wozniak.

evision and radio advertisements. Please read the Constitution and compare what’s enumerated in the Constitution with what the federal government has been doing. What is not enumerated in the Constitution needs to be cut!

Irvin E. Chambers Menlo Park

Open obstruction

Editor, The Department of Justice’s (DOJ) open obstruction of the “Fast and Furious” investigation makes one question its integrity. Why would it not want to know who is authorized selling automatic weapons to Mexican drug cartels? Why did it give House Oversight and Government Reform Committee blank pages and redacted docu- ments? It certainly makes one won- der what side they are on. The same questions arise with the Solyndra scandal. Immediately upon declaring bankruptcy the FBI seized Solyndra’s records. This gave the company executives a reason to plead the fth. We all know the DOJ does not comment on open investi- gations. The executives taking the fth cannot tell us who authorized the $535 million loan. How conven- ient.

Keith C. De Filippis San Jose

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Stopthewave

W inning the World Series was fun. The parade was good.

Don’t get me wrong. I loved it.

I even dealt with the trophy cer-

emonies, the arm patch, the ring

ceremonies

(yes, there were

multiples), the Panda hats, the

Baby Giraffe

hats, the striped

socks, the injuries, the lack of hitting and the fans who kept say- ing “Believe” when it was so obvious this was not to be a repeat year. But I draw the line at the wave. During Monday night’s game, fans at AT&T Park did the wave approximately six times around the stadium as reliever Sergio Romo was in the midst of a tremendous hitless inning streak which ended. I don’t think the

wave was to blame for the streak’s end, but it certainly didn’t help.

I get it. These games are worth

nothing. The Giants made it inter- esting up to this past weekend when they were pummeled by the Diamondbacks, who celebrated their division title on the field in front of the Giants, their World Series championship accomplish-

ment further fading in front of their eyes. Now, it’s extra time with the Giants playing out the string against the Rockies. Both

their seasons will end this week.

against the Rockies. Both their seasons will end this week. I was once in the bleachers

I was once in the bleachers at

AT&T Park when a group of fans in the left field section tried to start the wave in the later innings

of a loss. A stalwart fan snapped to attention in the bleachers and

ran to the edge of the section with

a fervent motion of both hands up, palms out and a very vocal “Stop!” It did. And the game was

better for it. It’s the way it should be. Going to a baseball game is about the game itself. The deliber- ate pace makes the play on the field calm and methodical until something happens, then it’s excit- ing. That is the time to cheer. Not in a wave that has nothing to do with the play on the field at all. If

a fan is bored at a game, there is

plenty to do. You can look at the

pitch count, check out the stats on the big board, contemplate the field position of various players according to who is at bat, watch the pitch locations or consider the matchups in the next inning. If that doesn’t grab you, there is quiet and contemplative people watching or even an opportunity to grab a refreshment. But the wave is not the answer. It’s disre- spectful to the team and other fans who want to watch the action on the field.

I thought it was an unwritten

rule at AT&T Park. I thought Giants fans had more sense and respect for the game that to revert to a useless and mindless cheer. Maybe it is still an unwritten rule that was violated. Maybe it was an anomaly that capped a season with its share of disappointment. Or maybe it was the appropriate response to the lackluster play and unnecessary pageantry. The season ends today. Maybe it was a wave goodbye.

Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He can be reached at jon@smdailyjournal.com.

10 Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Dow 11,190.69 +1.33% 10-Yr Bond 2.0160% +0.1120 Nasdaq 2,546.83 +1.20% Oil (per barrel) 83.74 S&P
Dow
11,190.69
+1.33%
10-Yr Bond 2.0160% +0.1120
Nasdaq 2,546.83
+1.20%
Oil (per barrel)
83.74
S&P 500 1,175.38 +1.07%
Gold
1,654.70
WE’RE OPEN EVERYDAY
6:30am-3pm, Monday-Sunday
“Original New York Bagels”
& Lots of Noshes
Great Bagel & Croissant Sandwiches
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680 E. 3rd Ave & Delaware (by 7-11 Store) San Mateo
fax 680 E. 3rd Ave & Delaware (by 7-11 Store) San Mateo Stocks rise again By

Stocks rise again

By Chip Cutter

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Stocks rose broadly Tuesday on hopes that Europe was mov- ing closer to resolving its debt crisis. The Dow Jones industrial average closed up 146 points as industrial and materials companies led the market higher. Germany’s chancellor Angela Merkel said her country would do whatever it could to help Greece regain investors’ con dence. Greece’s nance minister also said that country would receive the next round of bailout loans in time to avoid a default. Greece was at risk of running out of money by mid-October if it did not receive the funds. “Europeans are finally starting to understand that they need to act with some force to get ahead of the European debt crisis,” said John Briggs, a xed- income strategist at RBS. The Dow rose 146.83 points, or 1.3 percent, to close at 11,190.69. It had been up as many as 325 points earlier. The Dow has added 419 points over the last two days, making up more than half of its 737-point plunge last week. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 12.43, or 1.1 percent, to 1,175.38. Materials stocks led the S&P higher. Specialty metals company Allegheny Technologies Inc. rose 7.4 percent, the

Wall Street

most in the index. The Nasdaq composite rose 30.14, or 1.2 percent, to 2,546.83. The gains were broad. Five stocks rose for every one that fell on the New York Stock Exchange. All 10 company groups that make up the Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose. Volume was slightly higher than average at 4.9 billion shares. Small companies rose more than larg-

er ones, a sign that investors were mov-

ing money into riskier investments. The Russell 2000 index, a benchmark for small-cap stocks, rose 2.2 percent. European markets also closed sharply higher. Germany’s DAX rose 5.3 per- cent, France’s CAC-40 5.7 percent. Britain’s FTSE 100 rose 4 percent. The encouraging signs from Europe also sent commodities prices higher. Investors fear that a blowup in Europe’s debt crisis could drag down economic growth across the globe. That would reduce demand for raw materials such as crude oil and copper. Oil soared 5.3 percent, copper 4.8 per- cent. That helped the stocks of energy producers and mining companies. Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. rose 3.1 percent and Exxon Mobil Corp. rose 1.7 percent.

Big movers

Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:

NYSE

Chevron Corp.,up $2.05 at $93.54

A Raymond James analyst reiterated his“Strong

Buy” rating on the oil company after it got approval for a new platform off Australia. RealD Inc.,up 71 cents at $12.22

A Merriman Capital said the 3D technology

company is a takeover target,or may be taken private,since its shares are so low. Ivanhoe Mines Ltd.,up $2.53 at $17.08 Miner Rio Tinto PLC said it bought another 3.7 million shares of the gold and copper miner, raising its stake to 49 percent. Walgreen Co.,down $2.26 at $33.77 The drugstore operator’s earnings met

expectations,but it said there was no progress in extending a lucrative deal with Express Scripts. Cliffs Natural Resources Inc., up 70 cents at

$60.77

The Cleveland-based mining company said it

is closing and selling an underperforming

biomass production plant in Michigan. Las Vegas Sands Corp.,up $1 at $44.69

A Deutsche Bank analyst said casinos in Macau,

the only place gambling is legal in China,could see their revenues rise in October.

Nasdaq

Research In Motion Ltd.,up 97 cents at $22.65 Shares of the BlackBerry maker rose after rumors spread that billionaire investor Carl Icahn has bought a stake in the company. Rush Enterprises Inc.,up 45 cents at $15.85 Morgan Keegan upgraded the commercial vehicle dealership operator saying that it may benefit from a higher demand for heavy trucks.

Spring buying boosts U.S.home prices

By Derek Kravitz

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The depressed housing market ashed a positive signal in July, with home prices in most major U.S. cities rising for the fourth straight month The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller index released Tuesday showed that prices rose from June to July in 17 of the 20 cities the index tracks. Detroit, Chicago and Minneapolis posted the biggest percentage gains. Prices fell in two cities among those hit hardest by the housing crisis — Las Vegas and Phoenix. The index, which covers half of all U.S. homes, measures prices compared

with those in January 2000 and creates a three-month moving average. The July data are the latest available. Analysts cautioned that the price increases are likely temporary, buoyed by seasonal buying, and not evidence of

a housing recovery. Home sales have

declined in each of the months in which prices rose. Prices are expected to drop again this fall and winter, based on the poor sales and on expectations that banks will resume processing a raft of foreclosures that have been in limbo. “This is still a seasonal period of stronger demand for houses, so monthly price increases are expected,” said David M. Blitzer, chairman of S&P’s index

committee. “While we have now seen four consecutive months of generally increasing prices, we do know that we are still far from a sustained recovery.” Over the past 12 months, prices have fallen in all but two cities: Detroit and

Washington, D.C. In Detroit, prices have risen 1.2 per- cent. Its housing market has been among the nation’s worst over the past decade. In July, prices there equaled 1995 levels. “In some cities, prices are so under- valued they are not likely to fall further,” said Patrick Newport, U.S. economist at IHS Global Insight. “Detroit, which largely avoided a run-up in prices but still saw prices collapse, may be a case in point.”

Cantaloupe outbreak could be deadliest in a decade

By Mary Clare Jalonick

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — As many as 14 people have died from possible listeria illnesses traced to Colorado cantaloupes, health ofcials say — a death toll that would make the food outbreak the dead- liest in more than a decade. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said last week that 55 illness- es and eight deaths were linked to the outbreak. Since then, state and local health departments in Kansas, Nebraska, Texas and Wyoming have reported six

additional deaths that may be linked to the tainted fruit. Nine people died in an outbreak linked to salmonella-tainted peanuts almost three years ago. Deaths linked to the cantaloupes are expected to easily sur- pass that number. Listeria is more deadly than more well-known pathogens like salmonella and E. coli, though those outbreaks gen- erally cause many more illnesses. Twenty-one people died in an outbreak of listeria poisoning in 1998 traced to contaminated hot dogs and possibly deli meats made by Bil Mar Foods, a sub- sidiary of Sara Lee Corp. Another large

listeria outbreak in 1985 killed 52 people and was linked to Mexican-style soft cheese. Listeria generally only sickens the eld- erly, pregnant women and others with compromised immune systems. The CDC said last week that the median age of those sickened was 78. Dr. Robert Tauxe of the CDC says the number of illnesses and deaths will probably grow in coming weeks because the symptoms of listeria don’t always show up right away. It can take four weeks or more for a person to fall ill after eating food contaminated with lis- teria.

Google to finance home solar systems

By Jonathan Fahey

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Google wants to buy solar panels for your house. The search giant announced Tuesday that it will provide $75 million to build 3,000 residential solar electricity systems across the country. Google will own the panels, and get paid over time by cus- tomers who purchase the electricity the panels produce. Google is creating a fund with a San Francisco company called Clean Power Finance that local solar installers will be

able to tap so they can offer nancing plans to prospective buyers. The plans allow homeowners to install

a $30,000 solar electricity system on

their house for little or no money up front. Instead, customers pay a monthly fee that is the same or less than what they would otherwise be paying their local utility for power. Google will earn what it calls an attractive return on its investment in two ways. It gets the monthly fee from home- owners, and, as the owner of the systems, Google will get the benet of federal and state renewable energy subsidies.

Business brief

Judge refuses to extend sale timeline for Solyndra

WILMINGTON, Del. — A Delaware bankruptcy judge has refused to extend the sale timeline of failed solar-panel manufacturer Solyndra LLC, which received a half-billion-dollar federal loan and was once touted by President Barack Obama in support of his admin- istration’s economic policies. The judge on Tuesday said the time- frame proposed by company based in Fremont to sell its assets will remain in place.

MASCOT IRON MAN: JOEL ZIMEI — WHO IS GIANTS MASCOT LOU SEAL — HASN’T MISSED
MASCOT IRON MAN: JOEL ZIMEI — WHO IS GIANTS MASCOT LOU SEAL — HASN’T MISSED A HOME GAME IN 13 YEARS >>> PAGE 14
Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011
<< Stanford ready to get back to work, page 15
• Tour champ added to U.S. President’s Cup team, page 17

Mills climbs out of cellar

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

While neither the Mills nor the San Mateo boys’ water polo teams will probably contend for the Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division championship, they both had a chance to climb out the cellar when they met in San Mateo Tuesday afternoon. Both came into the match winless in division play, so there was a sense of urgency on both sides. In the end, the Mills defense was the difference in an 8-6 Vikings’ victory. “I think our defense is improving. Defense wins games. That’s in any sport,” said Mills coach Daniel Chen. “You can’t just swing for the fences (offensively all the time).”

After trailing 5-4 at halftime, Mills (1-3 PAL Ocean) outscored San Mateo (0-4) 4-1 over the final 14 minutes. The Bearcats pulled within two, 8-6, on a goal from Tom McCall with 2:23 left in the match. They had their chances in the final minutes — their best chance com- ing with McCall winding up for a shot, only to have the ball swatted away and stolen from behind. The Mills defense blocked two more shots as the Vikings survived for the win. “Today was the game we were supposed to win,” said San Mateo’s John Halet. “We have a problem when we think too much about offense.” Halet was San Mateo’s main man, but when one player is the team’s

best passer, best defender and best scorer, that’s a big load to shoulder. Halet scored three times for the Bearcats, including a goal from midpool as the second quarter ended, putting his team up 5-4. “I’m more surprised when I miss shots,” Halet said. “I want to be able to put the team on my back, but I want them to get better.” Mills countered Halet with Wonsik Kim, who scored twice and had three assists. “He’s a small kid by water polo standards, but he has heart. He does- n’t quit,” Chen said of Kim. “He’s the best player I have on the squad.” San Mateo opened the scoring at the 3:42 mark of the first quarter on

See POLO, Page 16

the 3:42 mark of the first quarter on See POLO , Page 16 NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

A Mills defender tries to go over San Mateo’s Tom McCall to steal the ball during the Vikings’8-6 win over the Bearcats.It was Mills’first PAL win.

Pratt powers Panthers

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Against the Willow Glen girls’ water polo team last Thursday, Burlingame’s Charlotte Pratt was a one-woman scoring machine. While most players would be more than ecstatic with scoring 16 goals in a single sea- son — hey, maybe even a career — the senior captain of the Panthers’ water polo team did it in a single game — including the final two to give her team a 19-18 victory. We believe the appropriate term is, “en fuego.” “I was pretty pleased at the end of that game with how I played,” Pratt said. “And happy with my individual performance. So yeah, but I don’t really know what was going on that day.” One of the symptoms of being “in the zone” is a slight lapse in short-term memory, and Pratt was there and a bit beyond — the senior scored those 16 goals on only 22 shots, scor- ing from everywhere on the pool. Heck, had she taken a shot from the parking lot, she was so dialed Thursday, she probably would have scored from there, too. But Pratt didn’t stop there. In four games at the Amanda McDonald Invitational Tournament over the weekend, No. 19 scored 18 more times. For those keeping score at home, that’s a five-game stretch in which she scored 34 times. For her efforts, Pratt is the Daily Journal Athlete of the Week. “It was a very competitive tournament,” Pratt said of the MacDonald. “There were a lot of good teams there. Overall, I think we played really well. We went up against Sacred Heart Prep and Menlo-Atherton and we held our own even though we lost those two games.” Burlingame competed, finishing seventh in field that included Prep, M-A, St. Francis and Soquel.

See AOTW, Page 14

Athlete of the Week

Francis and Soquel. See AOTW , Page 14 Athlete of the Week JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL In

JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL

In five matches last week,Burlingame’s Charlotte Pratt scored 34 goals,including 16 against Willow Glen alone.

Aragon

sweeps

Panthers

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The Burlingame High School gym hasn’t been very nice to the Aragon volleyball team in recent memory. According to Aragon coach Annette Gennaro- Tremble, the seniors on her team had lost to the Panthers team three years running, so Mangini Way had been a bit of a jinx for the Dons — that is, until Tuesday. Aragon, behind some fantastic net play, swept the Panthers 25-20, 25-22, 27-25 in an early season marquee matchup between two teams that expect to figure into the PAL Bay Division title equation. “We haven’t beat them in a couple of years,” said Aragon middle blocker Jessica Navarro. “So we just wanted to come here, work hard, as hard as we could, and play as a team together and beat them. (The win) shows that we’re really working hard this year.” “(The team) was really excited to get this win,” Gennaro-Tremble said. “I think we did really well at the net and hitting at the top. Overall, I thought we had a pretty good game.” It was a statement-like performance by the Dons, who came into the game as a definite con- tender in the Bay Division following a successful preseason and a 2-0 start in league play. In Burlingame, the Dons faced their first legiti- mate test — and they passed with flying colors. The start wasn’t so hot, however. The Panthers, behind the service of Madison McKeever, jumped out to a 6-0 lead to start Game 1. Gennaro-Tremble

See DONS, Page 14

Hall of Fame festivities hype CSM football

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

If you’re the College of San Mateo football team, it’s hard to know how well the Bulldogs really played in their 83-0 shellacking of visiting West Valley last Saturday afternoon.

“We just want to get better,” said Tim Tulloch, CSM defensive coordi- nator and assistant head coach. “We have goals and we made all our goals, offensively and defensively.” Tulloch believes the team was espe- cially hyped for the game, given the school’s opening of its new Hall of

Fame Plaza over the weekend. With CSM legends such as Tom Martinez and multiple Super Bowl winner Neal Dahlen in attendance, Tulloch believes the team wanted to show that the program is in good hands for the 2011 season. “Our guys were part of the ribbon-

cutting ceremony (Friday afternoon),” Tulloch said. “That was big for them. “With that comes accountability to carry on the tradition. … Moments like that are priceless.” Up next for the Bulldogs is their second road game of the year when they travel across the San Mateo

Bridge to take on an undefeated Chabot of Hayward squad Saturday night. “They’re a well-coached football team,” Tulloch said. “They’re blowing people out. They’re explosive on offense.”

See CSM, Page 16

12 Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Pats prepare for another up-and-coming team

By Howard Ulman

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — New England’s 15-game winning streak over the Buffalo Bills is over. Now the Patriots are preparing for another improving team that struggled the past decade. The Oakland Raiders are 2-1 after going eight seasons without a winning record. The Bills have just one winning season in the past 11 but snapped that long slide against the Patriots last Sunday with a 34-31 win.

So the Patriots have plenty to prepare for against a team they haven’t played in three years. “We studied them quite a bit in the offsea- son to become familiar with them because we hadn’t played them since ’08,” Patriots coach Bill Belichick said Tuesday. “That’s a good football team and it looks like they’re getting better.” Sunday’s game matches the NFL’s top pass- ing offense, led by Tom Brady’s 442.3 yards per game, against the No. 1 rushing attack with Darren McFadden, who leads the league with 131 yards per game. “They definitely like to run the ball,” Belichick said. “They throw enough deep balls and they do enough in the passing game

to make you worry about that, too. You can’t

just stop one thing. They’re certainly a very good running team, one of the best that we’ll face.”

McFadden ran for a career-high 171 yards and two touchdowns in last Sunday’s 34-24 win over the New York Jets. One week earlier, the Raiders built a 21-3 lead at Buffalo but

lost 38-35 on a touchdown pass with 14 sec-

onds left. Then it was the Patriots turn to blow

a big lead against the Bills, who overcame a

21-0 decit last Sunday. That left the Bills at 3-0. Belichick knows it could have been the Raiders with the unbeat- en record.

They’re “really a couple of seconds away

from being 3-0,” he said, “very explosive, got

a lot of big pass guys, playing with a lot of

condence and we’re going out there on the road.” The Patriots also had a good shot at a 3-0 record when they built their 21-0 lead. It was 31-31 when the Bills got the ball at their 20- yard line after a touchback on a kickoff with 3:25 remaining. They needed just three plays to get to the 1, then worked the clock down until Rian Lindell’s winning 28-yard eld goal on the nal play. New England couldn’t stop the Bills from marching downeld. In fact, the Patriots have given up more total yards and yards passing than any other team. Their defense against the run is ranked 10th best — one promising sign against a run-oriented attack like Oakland’s — but that’s deceiving since teams have had to pass more to try to overcome decits. Jason Campbell is the NFL’s 10th-ranked quarterback but has thrown only 82 passes in the Raiders’ three games. “They mix in some gadget plays, some reverses, some things like that, along with their power running game and do a good job in their passing game of getting the ball down the eld and also getting it to their backs and underneath people, too,” Belichick said. “They make you defend the whole eld and

said. “They make you defend the whole fi eld and REUTERS Oakland will have its hands

REUTERS

Oakland will have its hands full in trying to stop New England QB Tom Brady,who is on a record-breaking pace this season.

any time you can be successful running the ball that opens up the play action and the pass- ing game and everything else.” The Patriots are a pass-rst team. When they run the ball, BenJarvus Green-Ellis and Danny Woodhead get most of the work, although rookie Stevan Ridley led them with 44 yards on seven carries against Buffalo. “Last week was basically the rst game that he had played a decent amount,” Patriots offensive coordinator Bill O’Brien said. “He’s got a long way to go, just like any rookie, as it relates to the overall scheme and knowing

what to do and things like that. I think that whole position has been good for us this year.”

For the second straight game, the runners will have to contend with big defenders. “Buffalo has the biggest team in the league,” director of player personnel Nick Caserio said. “The Raiders are a big They are strong and physical and also have fast and athletic guys.” Against the Bills, Brady completed 30 of 45 passes for 387 yards and four touchdowns. But he also threw four interceptions, matching his total for all last season, with one returned for a touchdown. He should do better against the Raiders, who have allowed more yards passing than all but four teams. Wes Welker burned the Bills with 16 catch- es for 217 yards and two touchdowns. But Chad Ochocinco hasn’t made an impact in three games with his new team. He caught two passes for 28 yards but dropped a perfect pass near the end zone. In three games he has just

ve catches. “Chad, just like everybody else in that game — me included — would probably wish to have a couple of plays back,” O’Brien said. The Patriots get another chance on Sunday against another team trying to leave behind a history of futility. “Each week presents new challenges,” Belichick said. “Sometimes the matchups from one week are more or less favorable than the week before. Again, a lot of times you never know exactly how a team is going to play anyway so you have to be ready to make adjustments during the game.”

Niners unveil plans for new stadium

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA — The San Francisco 49ers still don’t know whether they will have the nancing to build a new sta- dium near their practice facility in Santa Clara but were opti- mistic enough to unveil plans for one Tuesday. If nothing else, the 49ers dream large. Everything about the stadium, from the 165 luxury suites to

a planned ve-story photo of “The Catch,” which sent the 49ers to their rst Super Bowl in 1981, has been designed to

make it a fan-friendly entertainment center. The 49ers opened a preview center, at a cost of $2.5 million, last November to showcase the new stadium for prospective suite, club seat and season ticket holders. “It was a work in progress until today,” 49ers chief operating ofcer Paraag Marathe said. In June 2010, Santa Clara voters passed a plan by the 49ers to build the 68,500-seat stadium. Under the agreement with the team, the city and area hotels would contribute $114 million to the $937 million project next to Great America theme park.

Jed York, president and CEO of the 49ers, said the team is still focused “100 percent” on the Santa Clara project. He is hoping to start construction in January 2013 and open the sta- dium for the 2015 season, although there’s still a shortfall in cash. The 49ers did move to clear one obstacle. The York family is partnering with local real estate rm JMA Ventures to buy the Santa Clara theme park that had opposed the 49ers’ new stadium plans.

real estate fi rm JMA Ventures to buy the Santa Clara theme park that had opposed
real estate fi rm JMA Ventures to buy the Santa Clara theme park that had opposed
real estate fi rm JMA Ventures to buy the Santa Clara theme park that had opposed
real estate fi rm JMA Ventures to buy the Santa Clara theme park that had opposed
real estate fi rm JMA Ventures to buy the Santa Clara theme park that had opposed
real estate fi rm JMA Ventures to buy the Santa Clara theme park that had opposed
real estate fi rm JMA Ventures to buy the Santa Clara theme park that had opposed

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

13

Man behind the mask: ‘Lou Seal’ makes it 13 in a row

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Joel Zimei exhibits what can only be considered a mascot swagger. No matter that almost nobody knows his real name, save for those behind the scenes with the San Francisco Giants. To the masses, he is the beloved Lou Seal. The mascot bounces around the ballpark, dances on the dugout and poses for photos. He signs autographs, too. And Lou Seal is riding quite the impressive streak. When the reigning World Series champi- ons wrap up their season Wednesday, it will mark Zimei’s 1,054th consecutive home game — a Cal Ripken-like record in his costume-wearing world. That’s 13 straight seasons, spanning the final days at Candlestick Park to the present in the Giants’ picturesque waterfront spot. How has he pulled off this remarkable run while balancing life as a husband, homeowner and soon-to-be first-time father? “Stubbornness and determination,” Zimei said while hurriedly getting ready for Monday night’s game against the Colorado Rockies. “That’s 13 straight seasons without missing a game.” Yet Zimei has lost track of his streak. He knows June 8 marked 1,000 straight home games — the team honored him with a banner that day. After that, Zimei has to make a quick count on the magnetic schedule stuck to the door of the “Seal Cave,” his locker room. It’s an approxi- mately 12-foot-by-12-foot closet where he trans- forms himself into San Francisco’s Lou Seal sim- ply by pulling on that larger-than-life fluffy gray seal suit. Virtually anonymous — the way he prefers it — instincts take over once Zimei gets dressed. “It’s almost automatic, no matter how I’m feel-

“It’s almost automatic, no matter how I’m feel- JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL The man who plays Lou

JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL

The man who plays Lou Seal — Joel Zimei — will have donned the suit for every home game for the last 13 seasons,without missing a game.

ing,” Zimei said. “It’s like hitting an involuntary switch and I just become Lou. After 13 years, sooner or later, it just blends.” On this night, he apologizes for the McDonald’s garbage on the floor. He swears it’s the first time in six months he has eaten fast-food for his pregame meal. Sometimes, there’s no choice because of the time crunch. He also needs his fuel considering how active he is each night and it’s typically 45 degrees warmer inside his suit than it is outside.

Zimei has had some close calls along the way keeping his streak alive. He once drove through the night from Reno, Nev., to make it back from vacation just in time for a day game after his flight from Denver to San Francisco got canceled. He told his wife, Sierra, he couldn’t miss the game. “This is my full-time gig,” said Zimei, who is aided with all aspects of his operation by assistant Anthony Pava. “It’s the longest streak. All of us

are pretty good friends. NFL guys, good luck catching me. You’d have to have a 100-year run to get close.” Zimei became Luigi Francisco Seal in 1999. He has his own magnets, World Series pictures that he autographs, even business cards with his real name and that of Lou Seal. He’s “5-foot-9-something” as he puts it and 170 pounds. In costume, Zimei stands 6-2. Just like all the ballplayers he cheers, Zimei remembers his callup to the big leagues as if it were yesterday.

A college student in criminal justice at the time,

he became a mascot by accident. Zimei took a job working for Philadelphia’s Triple-A Scranton club when he got the chance to help out the Phillies mascot during the 1998 sea- son. That offseason, he wrote to most of the major league clubs and discovered the Giants, Mets and Red Sox all were holding mascot auditions.

“I didn’t want to be a Red Sox, I didn’t want to

be a Met. My grandfather was a huge, huge Willie Mays fan back in the Willie Mays New York Giants days,” Zimei said. “I figured it would be fun to get off the East Coast, come out here and check out California, and I’ve been here ever since.” In the winter, Zimei works for the NBA’s Golden State Warriors across the bay in Oakland. Though he doesn’t give his body much of a break, he has never been on the mascot disabled list. “Fortunately the injuries I have had I’ve been able to work through,” he said. “I broke my right hand the last day of the season in 2004 because I was a sore loser and punched a brick wall after I found out we didn’t make the playoffs that year. Fortunately for me it healed through the offsea- son.”

Rockies crumble against Giants

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Giants 7, Rockies 0

SAN FRANCISCO — Madison Bumgarner and two relievers combined on a three-hitter, Brandon Belt homered into McCovey Cove and the San Francisco Giants beat the Colorado Rockies 7-0 on Tuesday night. Conor Gillaspie, making a rare start at third base in place of Pablo Sandoval, hit an inside-the-park home run in the seventh while Brandon Crawford added two hits and an RBI for the Giants, who have won two straight following a four-game losing streak. That’s little consolation for the defending World Series champs, who will still miss the postseason a year after claiming their first title in 54 years. Giants manager Bruce Bochy juggled his lineup slightly, starting Gillaspie at third and moving Sandoval to first. It seemed to do the trick. Gillaspie singled and scored on Belt’s homer in the fourth then

singled and scored on Belt’s homer in the fourth then stumbled his way around the bases

stumbled his way around the bases in the seventh for his first career home run. The Giants rookie hit a deep fly ball into the gap in right center that sailed over the head of Colorado outfielder Ty Wiggington. Gillaspie raced around the bases and broke for home when Wiggington overthrew cutoff man Mark Ellis. He tripped after rounding third then had to hustle to beat the throw home from short- stop Tommy Field. Belt hit his ninth homer, a two-run shot off Rockies starter Alex White, in the fourth. It was Belt’s first splash hit and the 84th over- all at the Giants waterfront ballpark. The only player younger than the 23-year-old Belt to reach the waters at ATA&T Park is Sandoval, who did it 12 days shy of his 23rd birthday. Giants hitters have done it a total of 60 times, 35 from home run king Barry Bonds.

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14 Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

SPORTS

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Guillen tweets he’s heading to Marlins

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MIAMI — Ozzie Guillen tweeted Tuesday that he was in town

“ready to go” with the Florida Marlins, and the clubhouse buzz was all about the new manager. One minor holdup: The Marlins had yet to confirm a deal, sav- ing some suspense for the final day of the regular season Wednesday. But Guillen’s website eliminated much of the drama by leaking the news he has agreed to become

the Marlins’ manager. A post Monday night quoted Guillen announcing he was Florida bound. The blog was taken down a short time later and replaced by a post that discussed Guillen’s departure from the Chicago White Sox, while making no mention of the Marlins. On Tuesday afternoon Guillen tweeted:

“Weird to be in miami in this time but very happy ready to go”.

That sounded fine to Marlins players. “This should be a good thing,” catcher John Buck said. “It’s a step forward. It’s a commitment by the team showing we want to win. Part of that is getting a manager who has proven that.” Guillen’s briefly posted blog item said he had hoped to spend his entire managerial career with the White Sox, where he won a World Series title in 2005. “But there comes a point when you need to move on, and that point has come,” he was quoted as saying. “The Florida Marlins believe I am the right man for the job to bring another World Series to South “I can’t tell you how thrilled I am to be a part of the Marlins organization. I have an unbelievable amount of respect for the Marlins, owner Jeffrey Loria, president Larry Beinfest, and gen- eral manager Michael Hill. I can’t thank them enough for this opportunity and look forward to the future. I can’t wait to get started!” Florida manager Jack McKeon said Monday he planned to retire at the end of the season. Guillen announced his departure with the White Sox hours later, but said nothing about taking another job. Florida officials declined to comment.

taking another job. Florida officials declined to comment. Ozzie Guillen NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL Aragon libero

Ozzie Guillen

job. Florida officials declined to comment. Ozzie Guillen NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL Aragon libero Ariel Mangum goes
job. Florida officials declined to comment. Ozzie Guillen NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL Aragon libero Ariel Mangum goes

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Aragon libero Ariel Mangum goes low to dig up a ball during the Dons’three-game sweep of Burlingame.

DONS

Continued from page 11

was forced to call a timeout to try and regroup her girls. The move worked, and following a Jamie Moore kill,Aragon was off and running. The Dons tied the game at 10 and took a lead they wouldn’t relinquish on the next point, a service ace by Ariel Mangum. Mangum’s serve gave the Panthers problems the entire game. No. 6 finished with three service aces in Game 1. Burlingame kept it close, tying things up at 20. But Aragon reeled off five straight points, including a Navarro kill, to take the set 25-20. “That (game) was big for us,” Gennaro-Tremble said. “The kids can do it and I was happy to see them do it because we definitely did- n’t want to come out and lose the first game and then have to fight back in the rest of them to beat Burlingame.” Taking Game 1 seemed to settle the Dons and prepared them for

a Panther team looking to play catch up. In Game 2, it was more of

the same back-and-forth action. Madison McKeever led the way for the Panthers with seven assists, a couple to her sister Morgan. But Aragon captain Stephanie Miller was just as good distributing the rock, getting the likes of Navarro, Moore and Anjali Joshi involved in the attack. Just like in Game 1, the score would be close late, with things tied at 21. But Aragon was stronger down the stretch, taking four of the last five points to win Game 2. “The kids fought hard to come back,” Gennaro-Tremble said. “And I think they did a good job in having confidence, not getting nervous and doing what they had to do.” With a 2-0 lead, the Dons took Burlingame’s best shot in Game 3 and if you thought Game 2 was tight, the last frame was neck-and- neck. Starting at 14-all, Game 3 would be tied at eight different times, with Burlingame squandering a couple of game points down the stretch. Aragon would equalize and come 25-25, a hitting error by Burlingame and a thunderous Navarro kill gave the match to the vis- itors. “We wanted to close it out as soon as possible,” Navarro said. “(Game 3) showed that we really wanted it.”

AOTW

Continued from page 11

Against CCS powerhouse SHP, Pratt found the back of the net four times in a 15-8 loss. The Panthers bounced back nicely against Soquel, winning 9-6. Pratt added three goals there. She’s scored four more in a 12-6 loss to M-A. And against Palo Alto, in

a game to decide sixth place, Pratt scored seven of her team’s nine goals (11-9 loss). But her play over the weekend was sparked by that game against Willow Glen, in which Pratt was nearly unstoppable. “I was really excited to play that game because I didn’t play Willow Glen last time because I was injured,” Pratt said. “(And) rather than play the usual league teams, it’s fun when you don’t really know what to expect. We didn’t know anything about them.

I don’t think they knew anything about us. So I was a little nerv-

ous (and) I just wanted to come out strong.” Pratt was more like Superman-strong in her effort and the Panthers needed every bit of it to win, with four players ejected from the game due to an accumulation of major penalties. The bout against Willow Glen went into overtime, with the vis-

itors taking the lead heading into the second OT period. Pratt and the Panthers clamped down on defense and when they needed goals, No. 19 was more than happy to oblige. “I definitely have a lot more that I can work on,” Pratt said of her game. “But I definitely think I improved a lot over the sum- mer.” Surprisingly, Pratt takes pride in a different side of her game; one that you might not expect. “I definitely like playing defense,” she said. “Even though I do score a lot, I usually play 2-meter defense on my club team and the only thing I like more than scoring is getting steals. You’re not really expected to make a steal. It’s a lot harder to do than getting a shot off and scoring. I really like the defensive side of the game also.” As the lone senior on a very young Burlingame team, Pratt has stepped up, and become almost like a second coach in the water. “I also think challenging a lot of girls is very important,” Pratt said. “I like to go up against every girl on the team when we’re working on releases, presses (in practice). I think it’s good for them to be challenged because that’s what we’re going to be fac- ing in league. I’m just trying to make them stronger.” Pratt will take her talents down to Southern California next fall, where she’ll play for UCLA.

make them stronger.” Pratt will take her talents down to Southern California next fall, where she’ll
make them stronger.” Pratt will take her talents down to Southern California next fall, where she’ll

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

15

No. 6 Stanford gets back to work

By Antonio Gonzalez

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

STANFORD — Andrew Luck spent the bye weekend stuck on his couch watching so much football that he had to force himself to get outside at one point, if nothing else just to take a break. There won’t be many of those for a while. With fall classes beginning this week and sixth-ranked Stanford opening its Pac-12 home slate Saturday night against UCLA, the strong-armed quarterback and Heisman Trophy hopeful will be plenty busy the rest of the season. Not just on the football eld, either. The architecture major said he’s taking three classes this quarter:

architecture since 1900, urban sus- tainability and archaic Greek art history. He also is planning to increase his practice regimen to make sure the Cardinal (3-0) stay

perfect. “I’m sort of sick watching football, to be honest,” said Luck, whose beard reformed over the break. “I was glued to the couch for 10

hours.” UCLA gures to give him some exercise this week. Luck passed for just 151 yards and two scores against the Bruins (2-2) last season in Stanford’s rst win at the Rose Bowl since 1996, although the low productivity — by his standards, anyway — didn’t stop the Cardinal from trouncing their neighbors to the south 35-0. Luck considers his start this sea- son solid but not great, throwing for eight touchdowns and one intercep- tion — which came on a tipped ball at Duke. He studied lm late last week and ne-tuned his fundamen-

fi lm late last week and fi ne-tuned his fundamen- Andrew Luck tals on the fi

Andrew Luck

tals on the eld with the other quar- terbacks before allowing himself to be a little lazy over the weekend. Even that wasn’t all fun. Luck admits he has a hard time watching football without analyzing games, but he certainly tries. So he left his place Saturday night to attend a Stanford women’s soccer game while the West Virginia-LSU game was still going — even though his father, Oliver, is the athletic director at West Virginia — to take advantage of the time off. “I love not having school,” Luck said, before somebody reminded him he could have been the NFL draft’s No. 1 pick already and never had to take a class again. “I guess that’s true. Jokes on me, right?” Not exactly. The Cardinal will be heavily favored for the next four games — UCLA, Colorado, at Washington State and back home against Washington — before traveling to Southern California on Oct. 29. The

only other major test will be the biggest, hosting Oregon at Stanford Stadium on Nov. 12, and the Cardinal also have a date with strug- gling Notre Dame. Stanford coach David Shaw tried to take some time away, too, know- ing that the bye week — although it’s early — will be one of the few opportunities until December to relax. He cooked breakfast for his three children — cream of wheat and bacon — on Saturday and attended his daughter’s soccer game, then traveled to a Bay Area high school game for recruiting, took his wife to dinner and ended the night with a local television show. So, no work, right? “I was watching lm on my iPad while in transit,” he said. Shaw has reason to stay busy. The biggest concern for the new coach is replacing inside linebacker and leading tackler Shayne Skov, who suffered a season-ending left knee injury in a 37-10 victory over

Arizona before the break. He’d also like to improve the red zone offense, which has scored touchdowns on 12 of 16 attempts and made all four

eld goals, an output that’s efcient

by almost any other program’s stan- dards. Just not one with Luck. Shaw has been pleased with his quarterback’s play, and Luck believes he’s a far better player than the one who led Stanford to a 12-1 record and an Orange Bowl victory over Virginia Tech last season. Shaw likes how Luck is taking less chances, not forcing plays, scram- bling well, helping new receivers and leading the offense and the team. He just can’t help but want more from such a talent. “He’ll be the rst to tell you he hasn’t played a great game yet,” Shaw said. “He’s played well.” That’s a scary thought for the rest of the Pac-12.

Lawmakers want to unify concussion protocols

By Samantha Henry

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NUTLEY, N.J. — As awareness continues to grow about sports- related concussions among student athletes, two New Jersey lawmakers say it’s time for schools to start fol- lowing nationwide protocols gov- erning such injuries. U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez and Rep. Bill Pascrell announced Tuesday that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention agreed to study and develop nation- al guidelines for managing sports-

related concussions for student ath- letes. Menendez and Pascrell, both New Jersey Democrats, had sponsored legislation, which passed the House but stalled in the Senate, that would have made such protocols mandato- ry. Several states, including New Jersey, have laws requiring a physi- cian’s approval for a student to return to sports, but Pascrell said there needs to be nationwide guid- ance for schools and youth sports programs to follow. “The science may be changing, but that’s no excuse for not estab-

lishing a protocol,” Pascrell said, referring to differing scientic nd- ings on concussions. “We’re close to that for our soldiers, we need to be even closer for our children.” Stressing that “every concussion is brain damage,” Pascrell said 41 percent of student athletes who suf- fer concussions return to playing too soon, sometimes with serious or even fatal consequences. The CDC will convene a panel of experts to dene the scope of the protocol, review existing literature, review the current state of science on concussions and have protocols

ready for distribution by fall of 2014, according to Pascrell. “Sports are a great way for kids and teens to stay healthy and this project will help us continue the important work in traumatic brain injuries in sports and other activi- ties,” said Dr. Linda C. Degutis of CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. “CDC’s new initiative on pediatric guide- lines will work to improve diagnosis and management of brain injuries in younger children and teens who are injured on or off the playing eld.” About a dozen states, including

New Jersey, have rules related to concussions and brain injuries among student athletes, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Other states are con- sidering similar measures. Concussions are caused by a blow that forces the head to move vio- lently. They can affect memory, judgment, reexes, speech, balance and muscle coordination and the symptoms become worse if not properly treated. Young people, par- ticularly girls, are more susceptible to long-term repercussions than adults.

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16 Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

SPORTS

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Sports Briefs

Ward-Froch Super Six final rescheduled for Dec. 17

LOS ANGELES — Andre Ward’s bout with Carl Froch in the Super Six super middleweight tournament final has been rescheduled for Dec. 17. Ward and Froch were slated to meet Oct. 29 in Atlantic City, N.J., before Ward sustained a serious cut during training last week. Ward’s promoter, Dan Goossen, confirmed the rescheduled date Tuesday. The fight still will take

place in Atlantic City’s Boardwalk Hall. Ward (24-0, 13 KOs), from Oakland, is the WBA’s 168-pound champion. Froch (28-1, 20 KOs), from Nottingham, England, holds the WBC super middleweight belt. Ward and Froch dominated the six-man 168- pound tournament backed by premium network Showtime, eliminating favorites Mikkel Kessler and Arthur Abraham on the way to the final.

Castroneves fined $30,000 for Twitter comments

INDIANAPOLIS — IndyCar officials have

fined Helio Castroneves $30,000 and put him on probation because of critical comments he made on Twitter. Castroneves, a three-time Indianapolis 500 win- ner, complained about a penalty imposed by race director Brian Barnhart on the final lap at Japan. Barnhart dropped Castroneves from seventh to 22nd place after he made a pass under yellow. The driver acknowledged his maneuver was illegal but said he should’ve received a one-spot penalty. After the race Castroneves tweeted: “It is sad to see one person being responsible for bringing down an entire series” and “Brian Barnhart is a cir- cus clown!”

CSM

Continued from page 11

CSM is looking forward to getting back on the road, considering the last time the Bulldogs were the away team they were smoked by Fresno, 43- 7. The Bulldogs want to get that bad road taste out of their mouths. “The only road game we’ve played was at Fresno and that didn’t go very good,” Tulloch said. “[The question is] can we go over to Chabot … and can we bring that same fire (we’ve had the last two weeks)? “Everything we look at is through the lens of winning the NorCal (Conference). To win NorCal, we have to play big on the road.”

Women’s water polo

The Bulldogs are nearing the halfway point of the season and they are still poised to claim a spot in the Northern California playoffs.

CSM is coming off yet another one-goal win, this time a 6-5 victory over Santa Rosa last Friday. “It was slow and boring,” said CSM coach Randy Wright, which is just the way he likes it. “I liked the pace of the game. I liked there was zero transition. But we had too many missed shots and too many missed easy shots. “Our defense did a good job. Our offense, at times, was anemic.” Much like the San Francisco Giants, the Bulldogs have been involved in a number of tight, one-goal games. Which is fine, as long as the Bulldogs are winning them. “They’re exciting for fans,” Wright said. “But one-goal games can be demoralizing (if you lose).” CSM will travel to the Santa Cruz coast Friday to take on a Cabrillo squad the Bulldogs have already beaten once this season — by a goal. Wright, however, said he has a bit of surprise for Cabrillo this time around. “We’ve expanded our offense (since the first

time we played them),” Wright said. “If they come in expecting us to do the things we did the first time, (Cabrillo is) going to be in trouble.”

Cross Country

The CSM cross country will host the Crystal Springs invitational Friday at the course in Belmont. The women’s race begins at 3:45 p.m., with the men’s race going off at 4:30 p.m. “It gives us, and all the other teams (compet- ing), a chance to preview the course, which is the site for Nor Cals,” said CSM cross country coach Joe Mangan. Because of the nature of the program at CSM, Mangan is always looking to have the team peak at the end of the season. “We got a late start with a lot of kids,” Mangan said. “A lot of kids I have have a lot of stuff going on. “I’m hoping we put together a good, represen- tative effort (Friday). Will that come to pass? We’ll see.”

POLO

Continued from page 11

a goal from Dylan Babbs, but Mills quickly countered with a goal from Ivan Verbov 13 sec- onds later. The Bearcats went up 3-1 early in the second period on goals from Shadi Barhoumi and Halet, who fired a shot just inside the far left post from about 10 meters. But the Vikings responded with two unanswered Kim goals — the second com- ing when Aaron Ho lost control of the ball as he was on a drive, only to be bailed out by Kim, who corralled it and fired it home to tie the match at 3. Halet put the Bearcats up 4-3, but Mills tied it again on a Jonathan Cheung breakaway strike. With time running down in the second quarter, Halet surprised everyone by burying a shot from midpool to put the Bearcats up 5-4 at halftime. In the third quarter, San Mateo lost focus and discipline and Mills took advantage, scoring three unanswered goals on man advantages. Cheung’s second goal of the game tied it at 5, Kevin Lee put the Vikings ahead to stay with his goal at the 3:31 mark of the third and Cheung gave Mills a two-goal cushion with 1:08 left in the period. The Vikings pushed their lead to 8-5 with 6:30 left to play when Verbov’s shot with the shot clock expiring glanced off the hands of the San Mateo goalie and into the back of the goal. McCall got the Bearcats back to within two, but ran out of time. “We’re a team in development,” Chen said. “We’re on the cusp of being competitive in league.”

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SPORTS

Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

17

Haas selected to Presidents Cup team

By Doug Ferguson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Turns out that sudden-death playoff Bill Haas won at East Lake was worth more than $11.44 million. It earned him a spot in the Presidents Cup. U.S. captain Fred Couples used his two picks Tuesday on Tiger Woods and Haas, who won the Tour Championship for his rst win of the year. Couples took Haas, the son of vice captain Jay Haas, over Keegan Bradley, whose two wins this year include the PGA Championship. International captain Greg Norman took Robert Allenby and Aaron Baddeley, both of whom grew up in Melbourne. He said Allenby was an “automatic pick” because of his longtime success at Royal Melbourne, while Baddeley made it an easier choice when he tied for third at the Tour Championship.

choice when he tied for third at the Tour Championship. Bill Haas “Bill Haas knew he

Bill Haas

“Bill Haas knew he had to win last week, and he did it,” Couples said. “I

could not leave him off the team after that. When a guy knows that second

and he’ll tell you,

second place isn’t good enough. And he under- stood that.”

He said if Haas had lost the playoff at East Lake and Bradley had n- ished fourth or fth — he wound up tied for 11th — then Bradley would have been the pick. Couples said if Steve Stricker cannot play because of an injury, then Bradley would be chosen to replace him. Stricker had an MRI on Tuesday because of weakness in his left arm, although results were not immediately disclosed. Woods was announced as a pick ve weeks

ago. Couples thought it was important to let

place

ve weeks ago. Couples thought it was important to let place the rest of the Americans
ve weeks ago. Couples thought it was important to let place the rest of the Americans
ve weeks ago. Couples thought it was important to let place the rest of the Americans
ve weeks ago. Couples thought it was important to let place the rest of the Americans

the rest of the Americans know there would be only one open spot after qualifying ended. Woods, who missed most of the summer with left leg injuries, did not return until August and played only two tournaments, missing the cut in the PGA Championship. He is playing next week at the Frys.com Open, and will play in the Australian Open the week before the matches.

The Presidents Cup is Nov. 17-20 at Royal Melbourne. “Things are going great,” Woods said. “We’re practicing very hard up at The Medalist, and I’m playing as much as I possi- bly can, something that I hadn’t done all sum- mer because I hadn’t been cleared to do it. “I’m really looking forward to getting my game rounded for The Presidents Cup.”

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18 Wednesday Sept. 28, 2011

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL SCOREBOARD

Boys’water polo Mills 8,San Mateo 6 Mills 1 3 3 1 — 8 San Mateo 1 4 0 1 — 6

Goal scorers:M — Cheung 3;Kim 2;Lee,Verbov.SM

Halet 3;Babbs,Barhoumi,McCall.Goalie saves:

M

— Chan 9.SM — Wailes 9.Records — Mills 1-3

PAL Ocean;San Mateo 0-4.

Menlo School 6,De La Salle 5 Menlo School 0 4 1 1 — 6 De La Salle 2 0 1 2 — 5 Menlo goal scorers — Wilson 2; Hale, Haaland, Walker, Carlisle. Menlo goalie saves — Dillon 10. Records — Menlo School 8-2 overall.

Girls’tennis Crystal Springs 5,Pinewood 2 SINGLES — Chui (CS) d.Zhang 6-1,6-1;Tsuei (CS) d.T.Chen 6-4,7-5;Wen (P) d.Chen 6-3,6-3;Fuller (P) d. Milligan 6-2, 6-1. DOUBLES — Loh-Park (CS) d. Manheim-Uppal 6-4,2-6,(10-3);O’Leary-Wang (CS) d. Schut-Sutter 6-2, 6-2; Kerestzti-McCrum (CS) d. Lawson-Topper 6-2,6-3.Records — Crystal Springs 1-0 WBAL Foothill;6-0 overall.

Aragon 7,Mills 0

SINGLES — Ishikawa (A) d. A. Lee 6-0, 6-0; Wong

(A) d.Xian 5-0,6-2;Sun (A) d.Kobayashi 6-3,6-0;Ma

(A) d. Chan 6-0, 6-1. DOUBLES — Jiang-Hsu (A) d.

T. Lee-Chen 6-1, 6-1; Ozorio-Lim (A) d. Heo-Pham 6-3,6-3;Yip-Ahn (A) d.Fung-Wang 6-0,6-0.Records

— Aragon 4-2 PAL Bay,8-4 overall;Mills 1-5,2-5.

Burlingame 6,Hillsdale 1

SINGLES — Tsu (B) d. Liu 6-4, 3-6, (12-10); Ilimuna

(H) d. Davidenko 6-2, 6-2; Harrigan (B) d. Palisoc 6-

3, 6-1; Sinatra (B) d. Ota 6-0, 6-1. DOUBLES — M.

Patel-Fregosi (B) d. Holmstrom-Bou Zeid 6-0, 6-0; Murphy-Hu (B) d.Shayo-Branting 6-2,6-0; L.Patel- Delehenty (B) d.Harada-Banh 6-1,6-1.Records — Burlingame 5-0 PAL Bay,5-3 overall.

Menlo School 5,Sacred Heart Prep 2

SINGLES — Nordman (SHP) d. Ong 6-1, 6-1; Jor- gensen (MS) d. Hemm 6-1, 6-1; Eliazo (MS) d. Bokman 6-0, 6-3;Yao (MS) d.Schulz 6-1, 6-3.DOU- BLES — Hong-Golikova (MS) d. Sarwal-Marshall 7-6(4), 4-6, (10-6); L. Ackley-Westerfield (SHP) d. Hoag-Mabeira 6-2,3-6,7-5;Schinasi-Zhong (MS) d. Casey-K. Ackley (SHP) 7-5, 6-0. Records — Menlo School 1-0 WBAL Skyline Division, 6-1 overall; Sa- cred Heart Prep 0-1,9-1.

Girls’volleyball Carlmont def. Mills 25-18, 25-19, 25-18 (High- lights:C — Bedard 12 kills,8 digs,4 aces;Duba 13

digs, 2 aces;Tupou 5 kills, 11 digs, 4 aces). Records

Carlmont 3-0 PAL Bay,11-5 overall;Mills 1-2,5-

8.

South City def.Westmoor 25-17, 25-21, 21-25, 25-27, 16-14 (Highlights: W — Bandalan 8 kills; Alcantara 7 kills;Tom 16 assists).Records — West- moor 1-2 PAL Ocean,11-7 overall;South City 2-1.

Aragon def. Burlingame 25-20, 25-22, 27-25. Records — Aragon 3-0 PAL Bay, 19-3 overall; Burlingame 1-2,9-7.

Sacred Heart Prep def. Mercy-Burlingame 25- 20,25-19,25-13 (Highlights:SHP — Ebner 12 kills, 4 blocks).Records — Sacred Heart Prep 1-0WBAL

Skyline Division,11-3 overall;Mercy-Burlingame 0-

1.

TRANSACTIONS

NFL

BUFFALO BILLS—Released TE David Martin.Signed

CB Terrence Wheatley from the practice squad.

HOUSTON TEXANS—Released RB Steve Slaton. Signed Chris Ogbonnaya from the practice squad. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Released DL Landon Cohen.

NEW YORK JETS—Signed FB-TE Josh Baker from the practice squad.Placed TE Jeff Cumberland and OL Robert Turner on injured reserve. Signed WR Michael Campbell,DB Julian Posey and TE Martell Webb to the practice squad.Released LB Matthias Berning and DB Andrew Sendejo from the prac- tice squad. MLB American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Named pitching coach Don Cooper interim manager and computer scout- ing analyst Mike Gellinger interim bench coach. Agreed to terms with Cooper and first base coach Harold Baines on multiyear contracts. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Traded 1B Kila Ka’aihue

to Oakland for RHP Ethan Hollingsworth and as-

signed him to Omaha (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS—Claimed RHP Esmerling

Vasquez off waivers from Arizona.Transferred INF Alexi Casilla to the 60-day DL.

National League NEW YORK METS—Exercised the 2013 contract option on manager Terry Collins. NBA GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Promoted Ray- mond Ridder to vice president of public relations. NHL NHL—Suspended Anaheim F Jean-Francois Jacques for the remainder of the preseason and five regular-season games for leaving the bench on a legal line change for the purpose of starting a fight with Vancouver F Mike Duco during Satur- day’s game. COLLEGE PAC-12 CONFERENCE—Reprimanded Southern California QB Matt Barkley for violating the confer- ence’s policy on sportsmanship by referring to Arizona State LB Vontaze Burfict as a dirty player. DETROIT—Announced senior basketball F Eli Hol-

man is on an indefinite leave of absence. MEMPHIS—Named Ronnie Bradford safeties coach.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

East Division

 

W

x-Philadelphia

101

Atlanta

89

Washington

79

New York

76

Florida

72

Central Division W

x-Milwaukee

95

St.Louis

89

Cincinnati

79

Pittsburgh

72

Chicago

70

Houston

56

West Division

 

W

x-Arizona

93

San Francisco

86

Los Angeles

81

Colorado

72

San Diego

70

x-clinched division

L

Pct

GB

60

.627

72

.553

12

81

.494

21 1/2

85

.472

25

89

.447

29

L

Pct

GB

66

.590

72

.553

6

82

.491

16

89

.447

23

90

.438

24 1/2

105

.348

39

L

Pct

GB

67

.581

75

.534

7 1/2

78

.509

11 1/2

89

.447

21 1/2

90

.438

23

Monday’s Games Pittsburgh 9,Milwaukee 8 L.A.Dodgers 4,Arizona 2 San Diego 2,Chicago Cubs 0 San Francisco 3,Colorado 1

Tuesday’s Games Cincinnati 5,N.Y.Mets 4,13 innings Philadelphia 7,Atlanta 1 Florida 3,Washington 2 St.Louis 13,Houston 6 Milwaukee 6,Pittsburgh 4 L.A.Dodgers at Arizona,late Chicago Cubs at San Diego,late San Francisco 7,Colorado 0 Wednesday’s Games Cincinnati (Volquez 5-6) at N.Y. Mets (Batista 4-2), 11:10 a.m. Colorado (Pomeranz 1-1) at San Francisco (M.Cain 12-11),12:45 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 0-1) at Florida (Volstad 5- 12),1:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 1-2) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 16- 10),4:10 p.m. St. Louis (C.Carpenter 10-9) at Houston (Myers 7- 13),5:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Locke 0-2) at Milwaukee (Greinke 15-6), 5:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Dempster 10-13) at San Diego (LeBlanc 4-6),5:35 p.m. L.A.Dodgers (Lilly 11-14) at Arizona (J.Saunders 12- 12),6:40 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE

East Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

x-New York

97

64

.602

Boston

90

71

.559

7

Tampa Bay

90

71

.559

7

Toronto

80

81

.497

17

Baltimore

68

93

.422

29

Central Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

x-Detroit

94

67

.584

Cleveland

80

81

.497

14

Chicago

79

82

.491

15

Kansas City

71

90

.441

23

Minnesota

62

99

.385

32

West Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

x-Texas

95

66

.590

Los Angeles

86

75

.534

9

Oakland

73

88

.453

22

Seattle

67

94

.416

28

x-clinched division

Monday’s Games Baltimore 6,Boston 3 Detroit 14,Cleveland 0 Tampa Bay 5,N.Y.Yankees 2 Kansas City 7,Minnesota 3 Chicago White Sox 4,Toronto 3 Seattle 4,Oakland 2 Tuesday’s Games Boston 8,Baltimore 7 Detroit 9,Cleveland 6 Tampa Bay 5,N.Y.Yankees 3 Minnesota 7,Kansas City 4 Chicago White Sox 2,Toronto 1 Texas 10,L.A.Angels 3 Oakland 7,Seattle 0 Wednesday’s Games Toronto (Morrow 11-11) at Chicago White Sox (Humber 9-9),11:10 a.m. Boston (Lester 15-9) at Baltimore (Simon 4-9),4:05 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 0-1) at Detroit (Porcello 14- 9),4:05 p.m. N.Y.Yankees (Undecided) at Tampa Bay (Price 12- 13),4:10 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 14-9) at L.A.Angels (Richards 0- 2),5:05 p.m. Kansas City (Chen 12-8) at Minnesota (Pavano 8- 13),5:10 p.m. Oakland (G.Gonzalez 15-12) at Seattle (A.Vasquez 1-5),7:10 p.m.

NFL

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

East

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Buffalo

3

0

0

1.000

113

73

New England

2

1

0

.667

104

79

N.Y.Jets

2

1

0

.667

83

61

Miami

0

3

0

.000

53

78

South

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Houston

2

1

0

.667

90

60

Tennessee

2

1

0

.667

57

43

Jacksonville

1

2

0

.333

29

62

Indianapolis

0

3

0

.000

46

84

North

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Baltimore

2

1

0

.667

85

40

Cleveland

2

1

0

.667

61

62

Pittsburgh

2

1

0

.667

54

55

Cincinnati

1

2

0

.333

57

54

West

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Oakland

2

1

0

.667

92

82

San Diego

2

1

0

.667

65

69

Denver

1

2

0

.333

58

62

Kansas City

0

3

0

.000

27

109

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

East

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Dallas

2

1

0

.667

69

67

Washington

2

1

0

.667

66

53

N.Y.Giants

2

1

0

.667

71

60

Philadelphia

1

2

0

.333

78

77

South

 

W

L

T

Pct

PF

PA

Tampa Bay

2

1

0

.667

60

60

New Orleans

2

1

0

.667

104

88

Carolina

1

2

0

.333

60

68

Atlanta

1

2

0

.333

60

77

North