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Rheumatoid arthritis diet


People suffering from this debilitating problem have a wide range of symptoms, which include:
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Joint stiffness when waking which lasts for a couple of hours Swelling in specific fingers or wrist joints Swelling and pain in the soft tissue surrounding the joints

After repeated requests from visitors, we have added this page which contains a generic diet for people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. The 7-day eating plan listed below for rheumatoid arthritis patients was compiled by a dietitian and although it would be best that a dietitian work out a tailor-made diet for every person, our diet below can be used as a foundation to plan your diet. We have a selection of herbal products available, and some are formulated to assist with this problem. To view our product catalogue, please click here.

The typical onset age of rheumatoid arthritis


This can start anything from 25 - 50 years, but earlier or later onset is not uncommon and affects more than 2.9 million people in the United States alone.

Dietary advice
In the effective management of rheumatoid arthritis it is important to change the type of fat in the diet. Omega-3 fatty acids play an important role in the inflammatory pathway of the human body and thus have increased popularity in the dietary management of this problem. It would be a good idea to increase your omega-3 fatty acid intake either in tablet form or as part of your daily diet.

Foods that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids are:


canola oil (the oil and margarine) salmon oil soybean oil soybeans walnut oil walnuts avocado oil fresh avocado.

Increase the daily intake of raw or steamed foods as well as fish, chicken, whole grains, fruits, vegetables and rice. Foods to avoid Many foods can aggravate rheumatoid arthritis and precipitate flare-ups and should therefore be kept to the bare minimum, or preferably cut out of the diet. Should you be unsure of the cause of flare-ups in your diet, follow an eliminating diet, where certain suspect foods are eliminated from the diet, and then added one at a time in order to pinpoint the exact culprit/s when a flare-up appears after adding the particular food to your diet again. Foods that are acid and should be restricted:

alcohol dairy berries tea coffee refined wheat saturated fats salts processed foods fried and grilled foods

7 day eating plan


You can receive the diet plan by e-mail as well. Click here.

Day 1
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Breakfast 1 apple 1 block Weetbix (Wheat cereal) with low fat milk 1 boiled egg on 1 slice of whole wheat toast or roll with canola margarine Light meal 125 ml apple juice Tuna salad made with 60 gram tuna, green salad, cucumber, celery and low fat salad dressing

1 whole wheat bread roll with canola margarine Main meal 120 gram skinless chicken 125 ml sweet potato 50 ml sauce of choice 125 ml peas 125 ml cooked carrots tossed green salad comprising of 1 small tomato, mushrooms, cucumber and lettuce 1 slice paw-paw

Day 2
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Breakfast 200 ml apple juice 180 ml bran flake breakfast cereal with low fat milk 45 gram lean bacon on 1 slice of whole wheat toast with canola margarine Light meal 1 apple Greek salad comprising of 60 gram feta cheese, lettuce, small tomato, 5 olives and low fat salad dressing 1 bran muffin with canola margarine and jam Main meal 120 gram beef strips stir-fried 125 ml cooked pasta shells 50 ml sweet 'n sour sauce 125 ml mixed vegetable thinly sliced and stir-fried French salad comprising of 1 small tomato, cucumber and thinly sliced carrot, 2 slices pineapple Breakfast 1 banana 180 ml Rice Crispies breakfast cereal with low fat milk 1 bran muffin with canola margarine and 30 gram grated cheese and jam Light meal 125 ml apple juice Chicken pasta comprising of 60 gram chicken in a white sauce on 250 ml cooked pasta 125 ml carrot and pineapple salad Main meal 120 gram baked fish 1 medium potato 40 gram low fat cottage cheese 125 ml spinach 125 ml peas Waldorf salad comprising of 1 grated apple, 20 gram celery, 30 gram seedless raisins, 50 gram chopped walnuts with 50 ml mayonnaise and 50 ml low fat fruit yogurt Breakfast 200 ml apple juice 125 ml cooked porridge (e.g. oats) 3 fish fingers on 1 slice whole wheat toast with canola margarine

Day 3
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Day 4
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Light meal Ham and cheddar cheese sandwich comprising of 30 gram cheese and 30 gram ham on 2 slices whole wheat bread with canola margarine 125 ml tossed salad comprising of 1 small tomato, cucumber and lettuce with low fat salad dressing Main meal 120 gram chicken a la king 125 ml brown rice 50 ml sauce of choice 125 ml cauliflower 125 ml butternut 1 cup fruit salad Breakfast 200 ml apple juice 120 ml Muesli with 175 ml low fat fruit yogurt 1 scrambled egg on 1 slice whole wheat toast with canola margarine Light meal 1 banana 60 gram pork sausage and 100 gram mashed potato prepared with canola margarine and low fat milk 125 ml Greek salad comprising of 30 gram feta cheese, lettuce, 1 small tomato, 2 olives and low fat salad dressing Main meal 120 gram grilled fish fillet 100 gram savory potato dish 50 ml sauce of choice 125 ml mixed vegetables 125 ml marinated cucumber slices 1 pear Breakfast 1 pear 180 ml bran based breakfast cereal with low fat milk 1 bran muffin with canola margarine and 30 gram grated cheese Light meal 125 ml apple juice 1 slice spinach quiche 250 ml stir-fried vegetables 1 whole wheat bread roll with canola margarine Main meal 120 gram chicken kebabs 125 ml pearled wheat or brown rice 50 ml sauce of choice 125 ml green beans 125 ml carrots 125 ml tinned fruit Breakfast 200 ml apple juice 125 ml cooked porridge (e.g. oats)

Day 5
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Day 6
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Day 7
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1 wheat scone or bran muffin with canola margarine and 30 gram grated cheddar cheese Light meal 1 slice paw-paw 1 pita bread with 60 gram chicken strips 125 ml tossed salad comprising of 1 small tomato, cucumber and lettuce Main meal 120 gram lean beef pot roast 100 gram brown rice 50 ml sauce of choice 125 ml cooked broccoli 125 ml pumpkin fritters Green salad comprising of tomato, mushrooms, cucumber and lettuce with low fat salad dressing 250 ml fruit salad and small amount of vanilla ice cream.

Arthritis Diet: The Best Foods To Eat


A healthy diet is important for everyone. The foods you eat can affect arthritis. Evidence shows that excessive weight and your diet may influence symptoms of certain types of arthritis and related conditions. Research has shown a connection between food, nutritional supplements, and different forms of arthritis, such as Rheumatoid arthritis, Osteoarthritis, and Gout. A list of foods that may relieve general arthritis symptoms include: Fruits (Those that are high in Vitamin C) Strawberries Kiwi Fruit Peaches Mango

Cantaloupe Papaya Apples

Vegetables (High in Vitamin A (beta-carotene) and Vitamin C) Collards Squash Sweet Potatoes Broccoli

Spinach Brussels Sprouts Bell Pepper

Fish (Rich in Omega-3 essential fatty acids & high in Vitamin E) Salmon Mackerel Sardines Herring Tuna Trout

Unsalted Nuts and Seeds (Also high in Omega-3 essential fatty acids & high in Vitamin

E) Walnuts Brazil nuts Almonds Pulses and Grains All lentils Chick Peas Anti-Inflammatory Foods Turmeric Ginger
http://www.vaxa.com/arthritis-diet.cfm

Sunflower seeds Linseeds Pumpkin seeds

Brown rice Whole wheat bread

Garlic Apples

Olive oil and rheumatoid arthritis Written by Keith vonB Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that typically causes inflammation of the joints and other parts of the body. It affects about 1% of the US population (more than 2 million), and is 2 to 3 times more common in women. However, when men are affected, the symptoms are usually more severe.

The relation between diet and rheumatoid arthritis


This study is about: olive oil
This study called "Dietary factors in relation to rheumatoid arthritis: a role for olive oil and cooked vegetables?", confirmed that the lifelong consumption of olive oil and cooked vegetables decreases the risk for rheumatoid arthritis. Each of these independently reduced the risk of getting rheumatoid arthritis. They surveyed the use of 100 different foods over many years and found out that out of the 100 foods, only two had a signficant effect on the risk of getting rheumatoid arthritis: olive oil and cooked vegetables. Two quotes from the study: The risk of developing RA decreased significantly with increased lifelong consumption of olive oil Both cooked vegetable and olive oil consumption had an independent effect on risk of developing RA, whereas no other food group appeared to play a role of comparable significance (data not shown). Exclusion of the variables of sex, age, social class, occupation, and education from the model did not alter the effect estimates or P values.

References
Full text of the study American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 70, No. 6, 1077-1082, December 1999

Experimental study of Mediterranean diet for patients with rheumatoid arthritis


This study is about: mediterranean diet
This study looked into the effects of a mediterranean diet versus a normal western diet and

whether or not it had an effect on the disease activity in patients who had rheumatoid arthritis for at least 2 years and were receiving stable pharmacological treatment. The results indicate that patients with RA, by adjusting to a Mediterranean diet, did obtain a reduction in inflammatory activity, an increase in physical function, and improved vitality.

GOOD LOOKS COME WITH GOOD FOOD AND A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE. WHAT YOU EAT IS WHAT SHOWS ON YOUR FACE, HAIR AND FIGURE. Dos Want to eat right but not sure how? Divide your plate. Half should be full of vegetables, and the rest should be divided between proteins - chicken, fish, tofu, egg white, sprouts - and cereals. Include two servings of fruit. To keep your metabolism high: Eat smaller, more frequent meals. Ditch your three meals a day and eat five-six small meals instead. Leave a gap of three hours between each meal. Nutrients for good skin include proteins, essential fats, vitamins A, E, C, B complex, selenium, zinc and copper. Get your proteins right: Essential fatty acids (linoleic and alphalinoleicacid) which are found in seed oils are important in maintaining lustrous skin. Fatty fish, alsi (flaxseeds) and evening primrose oil provide essential fatty acids for the skin. Vitamin A: Best known as a vitamin for healthy skin, is found in fish liver oil, liver, carrot, berries, melons, peppers, broccoli, cabbage, papaya, mango, green leafy vegetables, tomato and yellow pumpkins. Vitamin C: Also boosts collagen production, which helps keep the skin firm. Top up on citrus fruits (orange, lemon), guava, amla (gooseberry), papaya, broccoli, berries and green leafy vegetables. These have Vitamin C - vital to maintain good skin. Vitamin E: Is an antioxidant that helps maintain good skin health, and protects from sun damage. You can get it from vegetable oils (sunflower, safflower, soybean), butter, nuts, wheat germ, whole grain cereals, eggs and green leafy vegetables. Your body requires antioxidants to keep healthy and glowing. Herbs and spices such as cloves, turmeric, dalchini (cinnamon), ginger, pepper, oregano and peppermint, and tomatoes, onions, garlic, bell peppers, beans, peas, black pepper, sunflower and sesame seeds are rich sources. Reach for THE yoghurt - the probiotics in it enhance absorption of antioxidants and other nutrients. Avocados are high in calories, but they're a brilliant source of healthy nutrients including good fats, vitamins A, E, C and B6. Snack healthy with a handful of nuts and seeds: Almonds, walnuts, sunflowers seeds, alsi (flax seeds) and pistachios. Walnuts are a rich source of fatty acids and almonds contain more calcium than any other nut. All of them help you feel fuller for longer. Don'ts Trans fats are a by-product that are formed during the process of hydrogenation - adding hydrogen to liquid oils to make them solid. This way, cheap vegetable oils can be made more

like animal fat. Vanaspati, Dalda, margarines, shortenings and butter substitutes fall into this category. They increase the risk of degenerative chronic diseases. Almost all commercially prepared and pre-packed ready-to-eat foods, including commercially prepared biscuits, cakes, cake mixes, chocolates, doughnuts, cereals, fried namkeens and French fries, have trans fats. Cigarettes are a smoking gun: With every puff producing millions of free radicals, depleting the skin of oxygen, leading to dryness and dry spots, premature lines and wrinkles, dull unhealthy-looking complexion, and loss of radiance. Alcohol: Excessive alcohol is a dehydrator, which also damages your cells and leads to dull skin, enlarged pores, discolouration, wrinkles and sagging. An occasional glass of wine has antioxidants - "occasional" and "glass" are the key words.