Pro/ENGINEER Wildfire™ 2.

0

®

Behavioral Modeling Help Topic Collection

®

Parametric Technology Corporation

Copyright © 2004 Parametric Technology Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
User and training documentation from Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) is subject to the copyright laws of the United States and other countries and is provided under a license agreement that restricts copying, disclosure, and use of such documentation. PTC hereby grants to the licensed user the right to make copies in printed form of this documentation if provided on software media, but only for internal/personal use and in accordance with the license agreement under which the applicable software is licensed. Any copy made shall include the PTC copyright notice and any other proprietary notice provided by PTC. This documentation may not be disclosed, transferred, modified, or reduced to any form, including electronic media, or transmitted or made publicly available by any means without the prior written consent of PTC and no authorization is granted to make copies for such purposes. Information described herein is furnished for general information only, is subject to change without notice, and should not be construed as a warranty or commitment by PTC. PTC assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this document. The software described in this document is provided under written license agreement, contains valuable trade secrets and proprietary information, and is protected by the copyright laws of the United States and other countries. It may not be copied or distributed in any form or medium, disclosed to third parties, or used in any manner not provided for in the software licenses agreement except with written prior approval from PTC. UNAUTHORIZED USE OF SOFTWARE OR ITS DOCUMENTATION CAN RESULT IN CIVIL DAMAGES AND CRIMINAL PROSECUTION. Registered Trademarks of Parametric Technology Corporation or a Subsidiary Advanced Surface Design, Behavioral Modeling, CADDS, Computervision, CounterPart, EPD, EPD.Connect, Expert Machinist, Flexible Engineering, HARNESSDESIGN, Info*Engine, InPart, MECHANICA, Optegra, Parametric Technology, Parametric Technology Corporation, PartSpeak, PHOTORENDER, Pro/DESKTOP, Pro/E, Pro/ENGINEER, Pro/HELP, Pro/INTRALINK, Pro/MECHANICA, Pro/TOOLKIT, Product First, PTC, PT/Products, Shaping Innovation, and Windchill. Trademarks of Parametric Technology Corporation or a Subsidiary 3DPAINT, Associative Topology Bus, AutobuildZ, CDRS, Create Collaborate Control, CV, CVact, CVaec, CVdesign, CV-DORS, CVMAC, CVNC, CVToolmaker, DataDoctor, DesignSuite, DIMENSION III, DIVISION, e/ENGINEER, eNC Explorer, Expert MoldBase, Expert Toolmaker, GRANITE, ISSM, KDiP, Knowledge Discipline in Practice, Knowledge System Driver, ModelCHECK, MoldShop, NC Builder, Pro/ANIMATE, Pro/ASSEMBLY, Pro/CABLING, Pro/CASTING, Pro/CDT, Pro/CMM, Pro/COLLABORATE, Pro/COMPOSITE, Pro/CONCEPT, Pro/CONVERT, Pro/DATA for PDGS, Pro/DESIGNER, Pro/DETAIL, Pro/DIAGRAM, Pro/DIEFACE, Pro/DRAW, Pro/ECAD, Pro/ENGINE, Pro/FEATURE, Pro/FEM-POST, Pro/FICIENCY, Pro/FLY-THROUGH, Pro/HARNESS, Pro/INTERFACE, Pro/LANGUAGE, Pro/LEGACY, Pro/LIBRARYACCESS, Pro/MESH, Pro/Model.View, Pro/MOLDESIGN, Pro/NC-ADVANCED, Pro/NC-CHECK, Pro/NC-MILL, Pro/NCPOST, Pro/NC-SHEETMETAL, Pro/NC-TURN, Pro/NC-WEDM, Pro/NC-Wire EDM, Pro/NETWORK ANIMATOR, Pro/NOTEBOOK, Pro/PDM, Pro/PHOTORENDER, Pro/PIPING, Pro/PLASTIC ADVISOR, Pro/PLOT, Pro/POWER DESIGN, Pro/PROCESS, Pro/REPORT, Pro/REVIEW, Pro/SCAN-TOOLS, Pro/SHEETMETAL, Pro/SURFACE, Pro/VERIFY, Pro/Web.Link, Pro/Web.Publish, Pro/WELDING, Product Development Means Business, ProductView, PTC Precision, Shrinkwrap, Simple Powerful Connected, The Product Development Company, The Way to Product First, Wildfire, Windchill DynamicDesignLink, Windchill PartsLink, Windchill PDMLink, Windchill ProjectLink, and Windchill SupplyLink. Patents of Parametric Technology Corporation or a Subsidiary Registration numbers and issue dates follow. Additionally, equivalent patents may be issued or pending outside of the United States. Contact PTC for further information.
6,665,569 B1 16-December-2003 6,625,607 B1 23-September-2003 6,580,428 B1 17-June-2003 GB2354684B 02-July-2003 GB2384125 15-October-2003 GB2354096 12-November-2003 6,608,623 B1 19 August 2003 GB2353376 05-November-2003 GB2354686 15-October-2003 6,545,671 B1 08-April-2003 GB2354685B 18-June-2003 6,608,623 B1 19 August 2003 6,473,673 B1 29-October-2002 GB2354683B 04-June-2003 6,447,223 B1 10-Sept-2002 6,308,144 23-October-2001 5,680,523 21-October-1997 5,838,331 17-November-1998 4,956,771 11-September-1990 5,058,000 15-October-1991 5,140,321 18-August-1992 5,423,023 05-June-1990 4,310,615 4,310,614 4,310,614 5,297,053 5,513,316 5,689,711 5,506,950 5,428,772 5,850,535 5,557,176 5,561,747 21-December-1998 30-April-1996 22-April-1999 22-March-1994 30-April-1996 18-November-1997 09-April-1996 27-June-1995 15-December-1998 09-November-1996 01-October-1996

Third-Party Trademarks Adobe is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems. Advanced ClusterProven, ClusterProven, and the ClusterProven design are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States and other countries and are used under license. IBM Corporation does not warrant and is not responsible for the

operation of this software product. AIX is a registered trademark of IBM Corporation. Allegro, Cadence, and Concept are registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Apple, Mac, Mac OS, and Panther are trademarks or registered trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. AutoCAD and Autodesk Inventor are registered trademarks of Autodesk, Inc. Baan is a registered trademark of Baan Company. CADAM and CATIA are registered trademarks of Dassault Systemes. COACH is a trademark of CADTRAIN, Inc. DOORS is a registered trademark of Telelogic AB. FLEXlm is a trademark of Macrovision Corporation. Geomagic is a registered trademark of Raindrop Geomagic, Inc. EVERSYNC, GROOVE, GROOVEFEST, GROOVE.NET, GROOVE NETWORKS, iGROOVE, PEERWARE, and the interlocking circles logo are trademarks of Groove Networks, Inc. Helix is a trademark of Microcadam, Inc. HOOPS is a trademark of Tech Soft America, Inc. HP-UX is a registered trademark and Tru64 is a trademark of the Hewlett-Packard Company. I-DEAS, Metaphase, Parasolid, SHERPA, Solid Edge, and Unigraphics are trademarks or registered trademarks of Electronic Data Systems Corporation (EDS). InstallShield is a registered trademark and service mark of InstallShield Software Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Intel is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation. IRIX is a registered trademark of Silicon Graphics, Inc. LINUX is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. MatrixOne is a trademark of MatrixOne, Inc. Mentor Graphics and Board Station are registered trademarks and 3D Design, AMPLE, and Design Manager are trademarks of Mentor Graphics Corporation. MEDUSA and STHENO are trademarks of CAD Schroer GmbH. Microsoft, Microsoft Project, Windows, the Windows logo, Windows NT, Visual Basic, and the Visual Basic logo are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Netscape and the Netscape N and Ship's Wheel logos are registered trademarks of Netscape Communications Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation. OrbixWeb is a registered trademark of IONA Technologies PLC. PDGS is a registered trademark of Ford Motor Company. RAND is a trademark of RAND Worldwide. Rational Rose is a registered trademark of Rational Software Corporation. RetrievalWare is a registered trademark of Convera Corporation. RosettaNet is a trademark and Partner Interface Process and PIP are registered trademarks of “RosettaNet,” a nonprofit organization. SAP and R/3 are registered trademarks of SAP AG Germany. SolidWorks is a registered trademark of SolidWorks Corporation. All SPARC trademarks are used under license and are trademarks or registered trademarks of SPARC International, Inc. in the United States and in other countries. Products bearing SPARC trademarks are based upon an architecture developed by Sun Microsystems, Inc. Sun, Sun Microsystems, the Sun logo, Solaris, UltraSPARC, Java and all Java based marks, and “The Network is the Computer” are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States and in other countries. TIBCO, TIBCO Software, TIBCO ActiveEnterprise, TIBCO Designer, TIBCO Enterprise for JMS, TIBCO Rendezvous, TIBCO Turbo XML, TIBCO Business Works are the trademarks or registered trademarks of TIBCO Software Inc. in the United States and other countries. WebEx is a trademark of WebEx Communications, Inc. Third-Party Technology Information Certain PTC software products contain licensed third-party technology: Rational Rose 2000E is copyrighted software of Rational Software Corporation. RetrievalWare is copyrighted software of Convera Corporation. VisTools library is copyrighted software of Visual Kinematics, Inc. (VKI) containing confidential trade secret information belonging to VKI. HOOPS graphics system is a proprietary software product of, and is copyrighted by, Tech Soft America, Inc. G-POST is copyrighted software and a registered trademark of Intercim. VERICUT is copyrighted software and a registered trademark of CGTech. Pro/PLASTIC ADVISOR is powered by Moldflow technology. Moldflow is a registered trademark of Moldflow Corporation. The JPEG image output in the Pro/Web.Publish module is based in part on the work of the independent JPEG Group. DFORMD.DLL is copyrighted software from Compaq Computer Corporation and may not be distributed. METIS, developed by George Karypis and Vipin Kumar at the University of Minnesota, can be researched at http://www.cs.umn.edu/~karypis/metis. METIS is © 1997 Regents of the University of Minnesota. LightWork Libraries are copyrighted by LightWork Design 1990–2001. Visual Basic for Applications and Internet Explorer is copyrighted software of Microsoft Corporation. Parasolid © Electronic Data Systems (EDS). Windchill Info*Engine Server contains IBM XML Parser for Java Edition and the IBM Lotus XSL Edition. Pop-up calendar components Copyright © 1998 Netscape Communications Corporation. All Rights Reserved. TECHNOMATIX is copyrighted software and contains proprietary information of Technomatix Technologies Ltd. Technology "Powered by Groove" is provided by Groove Networks, Inc. Technology "Powered by WebEx" is provided by WebEx Communications, Inc. Oracle 8i run-time and Oracle 9i run-time, Copyright © 2002–2003 Oracle Corporation. Oracle programs provided herein are subject to a restricted use license and can only be used in conjunction with the PTC software they are provided with. Apache Server, Tomcat, Xalan, and Xerces are technologies developed by, and are copyrighted software of, the Apache Software Foundation (http://www.apache.org) – their use is subject to the terms and limitations at: http://www.apache.org/LICENSE.txt. Acrobat Reader is copyrighted software of Adobe Systems Inc. and is subject to the Adobe End-User License Agreement as provided by Adobe with those products. UnZip (© 1990-2001 Info-ZIP, All Rights Reserved) is provided “AS IS” and WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. For the complete Info-ZIP license see ftp://ftp.info-zip.org/pub/infozip/license.html. Gecko and Mozilla components are subject to the Mozilla Public License Version 1.1 at http://www.mozilla.org/MPL. Software distributed under the MPL is distributed on an "AS IS" basis, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, either expressed or implied. See the MPL for the specific language governing rights and limitations. The Java™ Telnet Applet

(StatusPeer.java, TelnetIO.java, TelnetWrapper.java, TimedOutException.java), Copyright © 1996, 97 Mattias L. Jugel, Marcus Meißner, is redistributed under the GNU General Public License. This license is from the original copyright holder and the Applet is provided WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND. You may obtain a copy of the source code for the Applet at http://www.mud.de/se/jta (for a charge of no more than the cost of physically performing the source distribution), by sending e-mail to leo@mud.de or marcus@mud.de—you are allowed to choose either distribution method. The source code is likewise provided under the GNU General Public License. GTK+The GIMP Toolkit are licensed under the GNU LGPL. You may obtain a copy of the source code at http://www.gtk.org, which is likewise provided under the GNU LGPL. zlib software Copyright © 1995-2002 Jean-loup Gailly and Mark Adler. OmniORB is distributed under the terms and conditions of the GNU General Public License and GNU Library General Public License. The Java Getopt.jar, copyright 1987-1997 Free Software Foundation, Inc.; Java Port copyright 1998 by Aaron M. Renn (arenn@urbanophile.com), is redistributed under the GNU LGPL. You may obtain a copy of the source code at http://www.urbanophile.com/arenn/hacking/download.html. The source code is likewise provided under the GNU LGPL. Mozilla Japanese localization components are subject to the Netscape Public License Version 1.1 (at http://www.mozilla.org/NPL). Software distributed under NPL is distributed on an "AS IS" basis, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, either expressed or implied (see the NPL for the specific language governing rights and limitations). The Original Code is Mozilla Communicator client code, released March 31, 1998 and the Initial Developer of the Original Code is Netscape Communications Corporation. Portions created by Netscape are Copyright © 1998 Netscape Communications Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Contributors: Kazu Yamamoto (kazu@mozilla.gr.jp), Ryoichi Furukawa (furu@mozilla.gr.jp), Tsukasa Maruyama (mal@mozilla.gr.jp), Teiji Matsuba (matsuba@dream.com). UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED RIGHTS LEGEND This document and the software described herein are Commercial Computer Documentation and Software, pursuant to FAR 12.212(a)-(b) (OCT’95) or DFARS 227.7202-1(a) and 227.7202-3(a) (JUN’95), is provided to the US Government under a limited commercial license only. For procurements predating the above clauses, use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is subject to the restrictions set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software Clause at DFARS 252.227-7013 (OCT’88) or Commercial Computer Software-Restricted Rights at FAR 52.227-19(c)(1)-(2) (JUN’87), as applicable. 012304 Parametric Technology Corporation, 140 Kendrick Street, Needham, MA 02494 USA

Table Of Contents
Behavioral Modeling Extension ......................................................................... 1 Using Behavioral Modeling ............................................................................ 1 About Behavioral Modeling ......................................................................... 1 To Open the Saved Analysis ....................................................................... 1 Persistent Display...................................................................................... 2 Configuring Behavioral Modeling .................................................................... 2 About Configuring Behavioral Modeling ........................................................ 2 To Set Behavioral Modeling Configuration Options ......................................... 2 bm_graph_tool ......................................................................................... 2 bmgr_pref_file .......................................................................................... 3 excel_analysis_directory ............................................................................ 3 Behavioral Modeling Tools ............................................................................. 3 Analysis Feature ....................................................................................... 3 User-Defined Analysis ...............................................................................11 Design Studies.........................................................................................19 Analyses .................................................................................................37 Comparing Graphs ...................................................................................46 Graphing Tools ...........................................................................................47 About Graphing Tools ...............................................................................47 To Modify the Graphtool ............................................................................48 To Use the Print Dialog Box .......................................................................50 Customizing Graph Display Settings ...........................................................51 Index ...........................................................................................................53

v

Behavioral Modeling Extension
Using Behavioral Modeling
About Behavioral Modeling
Behavioral Modeling contains a set of tools for performing a wide variety of analyses on a model and incorporating the analysis results into the model. Behavioral Modeling lets you modify the model design to reflect the desired solution. You use the Behavioral Modeling tools to: • • • • • • Create feature parameters based on measurements and analyses of the model. Create geometric entities based on measurements and analyses of the model. Create new types of measurements tailored to application-specific needs. Analyze the behavior of measured parameters as variable dimensions and parameters change. Automatically find dimension and parameter values that achieve a desired behavior of the model. Analyze the behavior of measured parameters within a specified design space.

The basic building blocks of Behavioral Modeling are: • • • • • • • • • Field point Analysis feature Persistent analysis display User-Defined Analysis (UDA) Sensitivity, Feasibility, and Optimization Studies Optimization feature Multi-Objective Design studies External Analysis Motion Analysis

To Open the Saved Analysis
Click Analysis > Saved Analysis to open a saved analysis and use the Saved Analysis dialog box to perform the following operations: • • • Hide or unhide any saved analysis Redefine a selected analysis Use the filter to select the type of analysis that you want to view

1

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection •

Delete a saved analysis

Persistent Display
Pro/ENGINEER supports the persistent display of any field type analysis (curve analysis, surface analysis, or user-defined analysis based on a field point). If you define and save an analysis, the display of this analysis remains on the screen. The analysis display updates with all changes to model geometry. You can turn the persistent display of any saved analysis off or on by clicking Analysis > Saved Analysis. Note: The persistence of display can be intermittent if the model is displayed in shaded mode.

Configuring Behavioral Modeling
About Configuring Behavioral Modeling
You can customize certain aspects of Behavioral Modeling by setting configuration file options. Help for Behavioral Modeling provides a list of configuration options arranged in alphabetical order. Each option contains the following information: • • • Configuration option name. Default and available variables or values. The default value is in italic. Brief description and notes describing the configuration option.

To Set Behavioral Modeling Configuration Options
1. Click Tools > Options. The Options dialog box opens. 2. Click the Show only options loaded from file check box to see currently loaded configuration options or clear this check box to see all configuration options. 3. Select the configuration option from the list or type the configuration option name in the Option box. 4. In the Value box type or select a value. Note: The default value is followed by an asterisk (*). 5. Click Add/Change. The configuration option and its value appear in the list. A green status icon confirms the change. 6. Click Apply or OK. See Also

bm_graph_tool
default, excel_linked, excel_embedded, generic_graphtool For UNIX machines:

2

Behavioral Modeling Extension • •

default—Opens a customizable Grapher window with several utilities available. generic_graphtool—Opens a generic graph window.

For Windows NT machines: • • • • default—Opens a customizable Grapher window with several utilities available. excel_embedded—Opens an Excel window that is part of the Pro/ENGINEER window. excel_linked—Opens a stand alone Excel window. generic_graphtool—Opens a generic graph window.

When you work with Behavioral Modeling on an NT or a Windows 95 machine, you can specify the format for displaying graphs.

bmgr_pref_file
<path> Specifies the location of the graph preference file for the graph tool settings, such as axis, line weights, label fonts, and so on. Pro/ENGINEER uses the settings in the text file to render the graphs as per your specifications.

excel_analysis_directory
<directory path> You can specify the directory for saving the Excel analysis results.

Behavioral Modeling Tools
Analysis Feature About an Analysis Feature
An analysis feature is a regular Pro/ENGINEER datum feature that is used to capture a measurement. The analysis feature may contain a regular Pro/ENGINEER analysis, user-defined analysis, or feature relation. An analysis feature is composed of: • • • • A name A type (measure, model analysis, surface analysis, curve analysis, relation, or UDA) A definition (consisting of the measurement or analysis to be performed, the relations to be evaluated, or a UDA) Results of the analysis to be included in the feature

3

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

The results of an analysis feature can be one or more real or integer parameters containing the value of the measurements made within that feature. You can also create datum points, coordinate systems, or graphs as a result of analysis features. These parameters and datums can be used the same way as all Pro/ENGINEER parameters and datums to drive subsequent features. For example, you can create a parameter controlling a measurement of the mass of a part at the instance where the analysis feature occurs in the regeneration cycle. You can then place a coordinate system of the center of mass as measured at this point in the regeneration cycle. Note: You can use the configuration option clearance_triangulation to improve the quality of the results of an Analysis feature. Setting this configuration option affects the quality of the initial guess for Newton's method, used in distance, clearance, and interference computations. Note that the improved quality of computations increases the analysis time. You can capture results of an analysis in an analysis feature while still working with the Analysis dialog box. After you compute the analysis, click Add Feature in the ANALYSIS dialog box and specify the name for the feature. The analysis feature appears in the Model Tree and updates whenever you regenerate the model.

To Create an Analysis Feature
1. Click Insert > Model Datum > Analysis. The ANALYSIS dialog box opens. 2. Under Name, specify a name for the analysis or use the default name. 3. Under Type, select the analysis that you want to perform. Note: If you have registered an external application with Pro/TOOLKIT and your Pro/TOOLKIT application is running, External Analysis is available as an additional analysis type. 4. Under RegenRequest, specify the regeneration option by selecting one of the following: o o o Always—Always regenerates the analysis feature during model regeneration. Read Only—Excludes the analysis feature from the model regeneration. Only Design Study—Regenerates the analysis feature only when it is used by a design study.

5. Click Next. Depending on the type of analysis that you have selected, the appropriate analysis dialog box opens. 6. Specify the Type and Definition for the analyses that you want to perform. 7. Click Compute. The results of the analyses appear in the Results box. 8. Click Close. In the Result params section, the parameters associated with the analyses appear in a table with their details under Create, Param name, and Description.

4

Behavioral Modeling Extension

9. To create a parameter, select the parameter in the Result params table and click YES under Create. The selected parameter is created and NO changes to YES for that parameter in the Result params table. 10. Under Param name, specify a name for the parameter or accept the default name. 11. For analyses that allow creation of a datum point, coordinate system, or datum feature, click Next to open the Result datums section and define the resulting features. 12. Click . The analysis feature is created.

Note: To create a feature using curve and surface analysis, click Analysis > Geometry and select the appropriate command.

Tip: Using the Graph as a Result of the Analysis Feature
When you create an analysis feature using a UDA made on curve or edge, you have the ability to create a datum graph. The x-axis of the graph represents the curve Length parameter that varies from 0 to 1 along the curve or edge. The y-axis represents the computed UDA value as a function of the curve Length parameter. You can create feature parameters using an analysis feature of relation type to capture the values from this graph. The following example illustrates this technique. Suppose the analysis feature creates the graph (containing the UDA) called analysis1. You can create a relation initial_value = evalgraph(analysis1,0) that sets the value of the floating point real parameter initial_value to the y-axis value which corresponds to the x-axis value of 0 in the graph of analysis1. You can now use initial_value parameter just like any analysis feature parameter in a sensitivity, optimization, or feasibility study. For example, you can study the effect of some model dimensions on the initial value of the graph.

Example: Including Mass Properties in the Family Table
Summary: This example shows how to use the analysis feature in conjunction with Family tables. Problem: You want to select an instance from the Family table by its mass. Solution: You can use the analysis feature to create a desired measurement (in this example - mass properties) and include it in the Family table. The following basic steps outline this example: 1. Open a part file and select the generic part to retrieve. 2. Create an analysis feature. In the ANALYSIS dialog box, do the following: o o Enter the name of the analysis, bolt_mass. Select Model Analysis as the type of the analysis.

5

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection o o o o o o o o

Click Next to go to the next page to specify a parameter that you want to create. Select Model Mass Properties as the type of measure. Click Compute to compute the mass. Click Close. Under Result params, select the parameter Mass and click Yes to create this parameter. Click Next to create a coordinate system as a result of the analysis feature. Under Result datums, select the coordinate system, click Yes to create, and specify the name for the coordinate system. Click OK.

3. Include a new parameter of the type Feature in the Family table. Select the analysis feature from the Model tree, and then select the parameter Mass. 4. To update the Family table, click Tools > Verify. Pro/ENGINEER regenerates the table and includes the mass parameter in the Family table. Close the Family tree window. 5. Open the Family table. Notice that the table contains a new column, mass (see the next figure). Now you can select an instance by its mass.

Example: Using a Measurement in a Relation
Summary: This example shows you how to use an analysis feature to create a dependency between the geometry of a rotor blade and the rounds added at the edges where the blade is attached to the rotor. Problem: In this model, the geometry of a blade is controlled by three graphs, one for each direction. A round is created along the edges of the blade where it is attached to the rotor. When you change a graph, the geometry of the blade is

6

Behavioral Modeling Extension

updated. However, this change may cause rounds created at the edges to fail due to a conflict in the radius values. Solution: You can relate the geometry of the round to the angle between the blade and the rotor. Do this by creating an analysis feature that measures the dihedral angle at several points along the edge where the blade is attached to the rotor. Then you can create a round and define the radius value at each point as a function of the measured dihedral value. The resulting round is driven by the dihedral angle. Each time you modify the geometry of the blade and the dihedral angle changes, the geometry of the round is updated to reflect new radius values. The following basic steps outline this example: 1. Open a part BLADE and create datum points at the locations where you want to specify different radius values for the round. 2. Measure the dihedral angle between the rotor and the blade at the selected datum points by creating an analysis feature at each point. In the Point dialog box, specify the following: a. Enter the name of the analysis, analysis1. b. Under Type, select Feature and select a datum point. c. Click Definition. The selected point appears in the Point box. d. Click Feature. The Parameters table and the Datums table on the Point dialog box display the associated parameters and datum points with their details under Create, Name and Description. e. Click NO against the name of the parameter in the Parameters table. The selected parameter is created. f. Click . The analysis feature is created.

3. Create an advanced round at the attachment edge with variable radius values. When specifying the radius value for each datum point, enter a relation in the following format: K * measurement_name:fid_analysis_name where: K – Coefficient you specify. measurement_name—Name of a measurement, for example, dihedral. analysis_name—Name of the analysis feature for the selected datum point, for example, analysis1. For the first point selected, a relation may appear as follows: 0.1 * dihedral:fid_analysis1 4. Finish creating the round. This round is driven by the current value of the dihedral angle. When you change the graph that controls the blade, Pro/ENGINEER recomputes the values of the dihedral angles and rebuilds the round accordingly. 7

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

The next figure shows an example part.

The next figure illustrates datum points at which the dihedral angle is measured.

The next figure shows how a round is created.

8

Behavioral Modeling Extension

To Create a Motion Analysis Feature
1. Click Insert > Model Datum > Analysis. The ANALYSIS dialog box opens. 2. Under Name, specify a name for the analysis or accept the default name. 3. Under Type, click Motion Analysis. 4. Under RegenRequest, specify the regeneration option by clicking one of the following: o o o Always—Always regenerate the analysis feature during the model regeneration. Read Only—Exclude the analysis feature from the model regeneration. Only Design Study—Regenerate the analysis feature only when it is used by a design study.

5. Click Next to create the Definition part of the analysis. The Motion Analysis dialog box opens. 6. Under Parameters, select the parameters that you want to compute. 7. Under Options, select from the following: o Use All Moving Parts—Create a motion envelope using all moving parts. If you do not want to include all moving parts, clear this option and select the parts individually. Create Motion Envelope—Show the motion envelope for all or selected moving parts. Envelope quality—Enter the number for accuracy of the display of the quilt that represents the motion envelope.

o o

9

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection o

Update Interval—Enter the number of frames between two update events. The number of frames determines how often the system updates the graphical results of the computation.

8. Click Run to begin the analysis. The system shows the moving parts in motion, computes the values of the parameters that you have included in the analysis, and shows the graphs. The number of computation points for the analysis depends on the number of frames in the motion definition. The results of the computation appear in the Results box. For each parameter, the system computes the minimum and maximum values, and the time when these values were reached. 9. To view the results in an Information Window, click Info. 10. To change the display settings for the motion envelope, click Display. 11. Click Close to return to the ANALYSIS dialog box. The Result params window opens. The parameters associated with the measurement appear in a table under the headers Create, Parameter name, and Description. 12. To create a parameter, select it from the Result params list, and click YES under Create. 13. Under Parameter name, accept the default name or type a name for the parameter. 14. If you selected the option Create Motion Envelope, click Next (otherwise go to the last step). The Result datums window opens, listing the quilt. 15. Click YES under Create to create a quilt feature. 16. Under Datum name, accept the default name or type a name for the feature name. 17. Click OK to finish.

Motion Analysis Feature
The Motion Analysis feature enables you to create: • • Top-level assembly feature parameters A multifaceted quilt representing the motion envelope

To Create an External Analysis Feature
1. Click Insert > Model Datum > Analysis. The ANALYSIS dialog box opens. 2. Under Name, accept the default name or type the name for the analysis. 3. Under Type, select External Analysis. 4. Click Next to create the Definition part of the analysis. The External Analysis dialog box opens.

10

Behavioral Modeling Extension

5. Specify the name of the analysis under Type. 6. Under RegenRequest, specify the regeneration option by clicking one of the following options: o o o Always—Always regenerate the analysis feature during the model regeneration. Read Only—Exclude the analysis feature from the model regeneration. Only Design Study—Regenerate the analysis feature only when it is used by a design study.

7. Click the Analysis UI button. This brings up the user interface defined by your Pro/TOOLKIT application. 8. Follow system prompts to make selections as specified in your Pro/TOOLKIT application. 9. Click Compute to perform the analysis. 10. To view the results of the analysis in an Information window, click Info. 11. To save the analysis, click Save and specify a name. 12. Click Close to close the External Analysis dialog box. The ANALYSIS dialog box becomes active. 13. Continue to define the resulting datums and parameters as you do for a regular analysis feature.

External Analysis Feature
You can create an analysis feature defined by an external application that is registered with Pro/TOOLKIT. This type of analysis feature is referred to as an external analysis feature. If you have registered your analysis with Pro/TOOLKIT, and your Pro/TOOLKIT application is running, the ANALYSIS dialog box has an additional option under Type – External Analysis.

User-Defined Analysis About a User-Defined Analysis
You use user-defined analyses (UDA) to create measurements and analyses beyond those on the Analysis menu. A user-defined analysis consists of a group of features that you create to make a desired measurement. This group of features is referred to as a Construction group. You can think of a Construction group as a definition for making measurement. You can save and reuse this definition as needed. To define a Construction group, you create a local group whose last feature is an Analysis feature.

11

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

If the Construction group has a field point as its first feature, the analysis can be performed at any selected point on the domain or on the entire domain of the field point. When the analysis is performed on the entire domain, the UDA behaves as a curve or surface analysis. For this, the system temporarily forms the construction at each point of the domain and then displays the results similar to the results of standard curve and surface analyses. If the UDA is not based on a field point, it represents a simple measurement that you can apply as any other standard measurement. Performing a user-defined analysis involves two main procedures: • Create a Construction group—Create all necessary features that you will use for the required measurement and then group these features using the Local Group. The last item selected for creating a Construction group must be an Analysis feature. Apply a Construction group to create a UDA—This is an actual computation. Click Analysis > User-Defined Analysis and use the User-Defined Analysis dialog box to perform the analysis.

Rules and Recommendations for Using the UDA Functionality You use UDAs to create customized measurements to investigate characteristics of the model. With these measurements, you can find modeling solution that satisfy user-defined constraints. Note the following rules and recommendations: • Geometry that you create to define a UDA Construction group (a field point, datum plane, and so on) is intended for this purpose only. Do not use these features for regular modeling activities. After you create a Construction group, suppress it to make sure its features are not used for modeling purposes. When suppressed, a Construction group is still selectable for UDA purposes. To avoid using construction group features for modeling, you may need to create some features twice—once for modeling purposes and once for UDA purposes.

To Create a Field Point
1. Click Insert > Model Datum > Point > Field. The Field Datum Point dialog box opens. 2. Select a point on the model. A field point is added to the selected domain. 3. To change the name of the field point, click the Properties tab. 4. Click OK.

Field Point
A field point is a type of datum point intended for use only in conjunction with userdefined analysis (UDA). A field point defines a domain from which it was selected—

12

Behavioral Modeling Extension

curve, surface, or quilt. To create a field point, select a point on an entity. The field point does not require dimensions because it belongs to the entire domain. You use field points with other features to apply a particular measurement to the selected domain. Note: A field point must be used only as a reference for features that define a UserDefined Analysis. Do not use a field point as a reference for regular modeling. A field point is displayed at the location on the domain at which it was picked. Field points have names in parts FPNT# and in assemblies AFPNT#. To change the domain of the field point, you must redefine the feature.

To Define a Construction Group
1. In part or assembly, click Edit > Feature Operations > Group. 2. Click CREATE GROUP > Local Group. 3. Enter the name of the group. 4. Select features from the Model Tree. The last item in the group must be an analysis feature that you previously created. 5. Click Done to create the group. Pro/ENGINEER informs you that the Construction group is created successfully. You can also create a Construction Group as follows: 1. Select the features from the Model Tree. The last item in the group must be an analysis feature that you previously created. 2. Right-click on the features you selected. A shortcut menu appears. 3. Click Group. A local construction group is created.

Construction Group
A Construction group is a set of features that you create with the purpose of making a particular measurement. A Construction group defines a UDA. A Construction group can have features of any type. If a construction group includes a field point, the analysis is defined over the domain of the field point. Rules for creating a construction group: • • Only one field point is allowed in a Construction group, and it must be the first feature in the group. The last feature in the group must be an Analysis feature.

To Create a User-Defined Analysis
Note: Before creating a UDA, you must create a Construction group. 1. Click Analysis > User Defined Analysis. The User-Defined Analysis dialog box opens. 13

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

2. Under Type, select a Construction group. 3. Under References, accept the default references used by the feature or select your own references. To select new references, clear Default and select all the references for the UDA type. 4. Under Parameters, select the analysis feature parameter you want to compute. 5. Specify where to perform calculations by choosing an option from the Domain list: o o Selected Point—Select one or more points on the domain where you want to perform the calculation. Entire Field—(Default) Perform the calculation on the entire domain where the field point is located (for example, the entire surface).

6. Under Computation Settings, define the resolution by clicking the appropriate icon: o Define the resolution by setting the density of points. The default density is 1. To increase the quality, you can increase the number. Define the resolution by setting the exact number of points.

o o

Define the resolution by setting the distance between two adjacent points in the model units.

7. Under Computation Settings, set any of these options: o Max/Min Refinement—Obtain more accurate results for the minimum and maximum values without increasing the density or accuracy. This option is available only for the Entire Field domain. Create Graph—Show results in a graph window. Dynamic Update—Pro/ENGINEER updates the results automatically. You need not choose Compute to update.

o o

8. Under Results, click: o Settings—Set the scale and density of the display and specify calculation options. For UDAs with the field point on an edge or curve, you can set the scale and density. If the field point references a surface or a quilt, you can set increment (linear, logarithmic, or two-color), spectrum (upper and lower limits, and sensitivity), and accuracy (low, medium, high, or very high). Choose OK to close the dialog box. Compute—Generate the results of the analysis. The results appear in the box under Results. The results of a UDA can be a porcupine display accompanied by a graph (if the field is a curve or an edge) or a shaded display (if the domain is a surface or a quilt).

o

14

Behavioral Modeling Extension o

Clear—Erase the display of the results.

9. Click the Saved Analyses bar to expand the dialog box for the functions related to saving analyses. 10. To save this analysis in an analysis feature, click Add Feature and enter the name for the feature. A new analysis feature appears in the Model Tree. 11. Click Close.

Working with a User-Defined Analysis
A user-defined analysis (UDA) supplements the set of pre-defined analysis options available from the Measure, Model Analysis, and Geometry commands. You can save, retrieve, blank, or delete an analysis in the model. To perform these functions, you use the Saved Analysis field in the UDA dialog box. To use the Saved Analysis field functions: 1. Click the Saved Analyses bar to expand the dialog box for the functions related to saving analyses. 2. The box under Saved Analyses lists previously saved analyses with the following information: o o o Display status of the analysis: unblanked or blanked Analysis type Name of the analysis

You can perform the following operations on the analysis:

o o o o

To save the analysis, type a name in the Name field and click To show or hide a selected analysis in the model, click .

.

To run a previously saved analysis, click Retrieve. The results appear in the box under Results. To delete a selected analysis, click Delete.

Example: Analyzing the Cross Section of a Pipe
Summary: This example shows how to create a UDA analysis to investigate how a model parameter changes along a trajectory. Problem: Need to analyze how the cross section of a solid pipe changes along its trajectory. Solution: You can create an analysis feature to compute the cross section at a point on the curve. Then you can create a UDA to analyze the cross section along the entire curve.

15

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

Follow these basic steps to create the UDA: 1. Create a field point on the trajectory curve. Click Insert > Model Datum > Point > Field. 2. Create a datum plane through the field point. 3. Create an analysis feature to measure the cross section of the pipe. Click Insert > Model Datum > Analysis. In the ANALYSIS dialog box: o o o o o o o o o o o Enter the name of the analysis, pipe_area. Select Model Analysis as the type of the analysis. Click Next to go to the next page to select a parameter that you want to create. Select X-Section Mass Properties as the type of measure. Place a checkmark in front of Use Plane and choose the name of the datum plane to create the cross section. Click Compute to the mass. Click Close. Under Result params, choose the parameter XSEC_AREA and select Yes to create this parameter. Click Next to go to the next page to create a coordinate system as a result of the analysis feature. Under Result datums, choose the coordinate system, choose Yes to create, and enter the name for the coordinate system. Click OK.

4. Create a UDA Construction group by grouping all required features and parameters. Click Edit > Feature Operations > Group > Local Group. Specify a name for the group. From the Model tree, select the field point, the datum plane through the field point, and, the analysis feature (the last item). 5. Create a user-defined analysis using the Construction group you have just defined. Click Analysis > User-Defined Analysis. Note: For a hollow pipe (with or without thickness), create a flat surface using the datum through the field point as the sketching plane. Sketch the surface outline using the Use Edge option.

Example: Analyzing the Reflectivity of a Lamp Shade
Summary: This example shows how to use a UDA to analyze some reflection properties of a lamp shade. Problem: Need to analyze the angle at which the light is reflected from of the surfaces of a lamp shade.

16

Behavioral Modeling Extension

Solution: Measure the reflection angle using the analysis features. Then you can create a UDA to apply the value of the reflection angle to the entire surface. The next figure shows the lamp shade part.

The next illustration shows the geometrical construction that is required to measure the reflectivity angle.

17

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

In this diagram: 1 – The angle between incident light and the central axis. 2 – The angle between incident light and the surface normal at the field point. 3 – The reflection angle. 4 – The equal angle to angle 2. Thick blue line – Contour of a lamp shade. Red line – Incident light originating at the bulb point PNT0 and reflected off the surface at the field point FPNT1. Follow these basic steps to create the UDA: 1. Create all necessary geometry to make the measurement: o o o o Create a central axis A_1 through the bulb point PNT0 in a vertical downward direction. Create a field point FPNT1 on the surface whose reflectivity you want to analyze. Create an axis SURF_NORM through this field point normal to the surface. Create an axis from the bulb PNT0 to the field point.

2. Create an analysis feature to measure angle1 (the angle between incident light and the central axis). 3. Create an analysis feature to measure angle2 (the angle between incident light and the surface normal at the field point). 4. Create an analysis feature of the relation type to measure the reflectivity angle using the following relation: ref_angle = angle3 = 2 * angle2 - angle1 5. Create a UDA Construction group by grouping features starting from the field point and concluding with the last analysis feature (reflection angle measurement). 6. Create a UDA to measure the reflection angle on a selected surface. Select the parameter to calculate ref_angle and click Compute. The next figure shows the results of the computation: the portion of the surface highlighted in blue indicates the smallest reflection angles. 7. To analyze another surface for reflectivity, clear the Default option in the UDA dialog box. To specify new references, select a surface, select the bulb point PNT0, and the central axis A_1. The next figure shows the graphical results of the UDA.

18

Behavioral Modeling Extension

Design Studies Feasibility and Optimization Studies
About Feasibility and Optimization Studies Feasibility and optimization studies allow you to have the system compute dimension values that cause the model to satisfy certain user-specified constraints. To access a feasibility or optimization study, click Analysis > Feasibility/Optimization and select the type of study from the dialog box. Optimization Study With an optimization study, you can specify the goal function in addition to the parameters for a feasibility study. For an optimization study, you define the following attributes: • • • • A set of dimensions to vary A range within which each dimension can vary A set of constraints that you want the design to satisfy A goal function to be optimized (maximized or minimized)– a goal function is created as the result of an analysis feature

For an optimization study, the system does the following actions: • • Looks for feasible solutions Out of feasible solutions, selects the solution that optimizes the goal function

19

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

Feasibility Study For a feasibility study, you define the following attributes: • • • A set of model dimensions to vary A range within which each dimension can vary A set of constraints that you want the design to satisfy

The analysis constraints are defined as equalities or inequalities that use parameters (which are the result of an analysis feature) and constant values. A sample constraint may appear as follows: length < 6.3 or distance = 11 For a feasibility study, the system performs the following actions: • • Attempts to find a set of dimension values within the specified ranges that satisfies all of the constraints. If a solution is found, changes the model display to show the dimensions modified to the new values.

You can either accept these new dimensions or undo the changes and revert the model to its state before the feasibility study. There can be many solutions in a feasibility study that satisfy all constraints. The system converges to one of the solutions. Using Mechanica Parameters and Analyses You and and and can use previously created Mechanica measures and analyses in optimization feasibility studies. If you have a license for Mechanica, Mechanica parameters analyses that have been previously defined are included in the list under Goals Design Constraints.

After you select Mechanica parameters or analyses and click Compute, the system runs multiple Mechanica analyses. After the analyses are finished, the study directory remains in place. Note: When a measure or an analysis referenced by BMX is removed in Mechanica, the system displays a warning. Example: Sensitivity, Feasibility, and Optimization Studies Summary: This example shows how you can achieve a design goal by using a sensitivity analysis, feasibility study, and an optimization study. Problem: For optimal balance, the center of gravity of a crankshaft part must be coincident with its axis of rotation. The axis of rotation of the crank cannot be altered, but other design conditions, such as the width of the crank, can vary. In this part, you want to minimize the distance between the axis and the center of mass while achieving the minimum part mass. Solution: You can find the center of gravity and create an analysis feature to measure the distance between the axis of rotation and the center of gravity. Then you can perform a sensitivity analysis to investigate which dimensions have the most 20

Behavioral Modeling Extension

effect on the location of the center of gravity. Finally, you can perform a feasibility study to investigate if it is feasible to set the distance between the center of gravity and the axis of rotation to zero. If a solution exists, you can then perform an optimization study to minimize the mass of the crank while maintaining the center of gravity on the crank axis.

1. Create an analysis feature to perform a model analysis to determine the mass properties. Compute the mass and create a coordinate system and a datum point at the center of gravity as well as the MASS parameter.

2. Create an analysis feature to measure the distance from the datum point at the center of gravity to the axis of rotation. As a result of the measurement, create a parameter for this distance. 3. Perform a sensitivity analysis to determine how varying the width dimension affects the location of the center of gravity.

21

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

4. Perform a sensitivity analysis to determine how varying the height dimension affects the location of the center of gravity.

5. Create an analysis feature to measure the distance between the shaft and the outer edge of the profile of the part. You can use this measurement to define the constraints in a feasibility study. Create datum points at the beginning and end of the distance line. In the next figure, this measurement is shown as E-E distance.

6. Perform a feasibility study to determine if it is feasible to make the center of gravity coincident with the axis of rotation. In the study, you vary the width,

22

Behavioral Modeling Extension

height, and radius dimensions while maintaining some distance between the shaft of the part and the outer edge of the profile of the part (E-E distance). 7. Perform an optimization study to minimize the mass (goal function) while maintaining the same constraints as outlined in Step 6. Creating an Optimization Feature as a Result of Design Studies When you conduct an optimization or feasibility study, you can capture the study in an Optimization feature. To create an Optimization feature, click File > Make Feature in the Optimization/Feasibility dialog box. Note: In addition to saving a design study as a feature, you can also save the study with all its settings by selecting File > Save from the Optimization/Feasibility dialog box. You can later retrieve a previously saved study with its settings and click Compute to solve the study. The Optimization feature is a very powerful feature. After you add an Optimization feature, it appears in the Model Tree and solves the corresponding design study each time you regenerate the model. Consider the following aspects of the Optimization feature: • • Including an Optimization feature in your model may significantly add to the regeneration time. Each time you regenerate, Pro/ENGINEER initiates the study and applies its results. If you set the Optimization feature attribute, Regen Request, to Read Only, the model does not get optimized, and the regeneration time does not increase. As a result of optimization, only geometry created prior to the Optimization feature can change. You can create several Optimization features in a model, but they cannot be nested.

• •

To Perform an Optimization Study If you have a license for Mechanism Dynamics, the dynamics measures created in Mechanism Dynamics are available under Goals and Design Constraints. Note: You cannot specify an integer parameter to be used in the optimization or feasibility study. 1. Click Analysis > Feasibility/Optimization. The Optimization/Feasibility dialog box opens with Optimization selected. 2. Under Goal, select the objective of the optimization to be applied to a given analysis feature parameter. 3. From the list of available analysis feature parameters on the right, select the parameter to optimize. 4. To create a design constraint, click Add under Design Constraints. The Design Constraints dialog box opens. 23

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

a. Select an analysis feature parameter and an operator. b. Under Value, click Current to accept the current value, or click Set to type the value for the constraint. c. Click OK in the Design Constraints dialog box to return to the Optimization/Feasibility dialog box. The names and values for the selected constraints appear under Parameter, Operator, and Value. You can edit these entries directly by clicking the cell. 5. To delete a design constraint, select a constraint and click Delete. 6. To set design variables, click one of these buttons under Design Variables: o o Add Dimension—Select a dimension to vary and enter its minimum and maximum values. You can add several variable dimensions. Add Parameter—From the Parameter Selection dialog box, select an existing independent model parameter and enter its minimum and maximum values.

7. To edit an entry, click the cell and enter a new value. 8. To delete a design variable, select a variable and click Delete. 9. (Optional) Set display preferences for the study by clicking Options > Preferences. In the Graphs tab, you can set the following options: o o o Graph goal—Show in a graph the convergence between the selected goal parameter and the chosen constraints after the computation is made. Graph constraints—Show in a graph the constraint parameter values during the computation. Graph variables—Show in a graph the variable values during the computation.

In the Run tab, you can set the following options: o Convergence %—Use the default or type a value for the convergence criterion. Computation stops when the difference between the parameter values for the current and previous iteration is less than the Convergence %. The lower the value, the longer the calculation takes and, if there is a feasible solution, the more accurate the results. Max Iterations—Use the default or type in a value for the maximum number of iterations for the computation. The higher the value, the longer the calculation takes and the more specific the results. Animate model—Animate changes in the model for the computed results.

o

o

Under the Method tab, you can select the optimization method: o GDP—Use the standard algorithm to optimize the model using the current model conditions as the starting point.

24

Behavioral Modeling Extension o

MDS—Use the multi-objective design studies algorithm to determine the optimum starting point for the optimization. You can specify the number of starting points to compute in the Max Iterations field. This method has a higher chance of finding the overall optimum design within the design parameters and dimensions.

Click Close to close the Preferences dialog box. 10. To create an Optimization feature, click File > Make Feature and enter the name of the feature. 11. To save the study, click File > Save. 12. Click Compute. Pro/ENGINEER calculates and displays the results. 13. Click Close. Optimization Study An optimization study seeks a solution to an objective (minimization or maximization of an analysis feature parameter) while being constrained by a set of rules specified in the form of allowable ranges for model dimensions and other analysis feature parameters. If a solution exists for the objective given the set of constraints, the model is optimized and changed to the new configuration. To Perform a Feasibility Study Note: You cannot specify an integer parameter to be used in the optimization or feasibility study. 1. Click Analysis > Feasibility/Optimization. The Optimization/Feasibility dialog box opens. 2. Under Study Type/ Name, select Feasibility. 3. Accept the default name or type the name for the study. 4. To create a design constraint, click Add under Design Constraints. The Design Constraint dialog box opens. a. Select an analysis feature parameter and an operator operator (=, <, or >=). b. Under Value, click Current to accept the current value or click Set to type the value for the constraint. c. Click OK in the Design Constraints dialog box to return to the Optimization/Feasibility dialog box. The names and values for the selected constraints appear under the headings Parameter, Operator, and Value. You can edit these entries directly by clicking on the cell. 5. To delete a design constraint, select a constraint and click Delete. 6. To set a design variable, choose one of these buttons under Design Variables:

25

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection o o

Add Dimension—Select a dimension to vary. Enter its minimum and maximum values. You can add several variable dimensions. Add Parameter—From the Parameter Selection dialog box, select an existing independent model parameter and enter its minimum and maximum values.

7. To edit an entry, click the cell and enter a new value. 8. To delete a design variable, select a variable and click Delete. 9. Optionally, you can set preferences for the study by choosing Options > Preferences. In the Graphs tab, you can set the following options: o o o Graph goal—Show in a graph convergence between the selected goal parameter and the chosen constraints after the computation is made. Graph constraints—Show in a graph constraint parameter values during the computation. Graph variables—Show in a graph variable values during the computation.

In the Run tab, you can set the following options: o Convergence %—Use the default or type in a value for the convergence criterion. Computation stops when the difference between the parameter values for the current and previous iteration is less than the Convergence %. The lower the value, the longer the calculation takes and, if there is a feasible solution, the more accurate the results are. Max Iterations—Use the default or type in a value for the maximum number of iterations for the computation. The higher the value, the longer the calculation takes and the more specific the results are. Animate model—Animate changes in the model for the computed results.

o

o

10. Click Close to close the Preferences dialog box. 11. To create an Optimization feature, click File > Make Feature and enter the name of the feature. 12. Click Compute. Pro/ENGINEER calculates and displays the results. 13. To save the study, click File > Save. 14. Click Close to close the dialog box. Feasibility Study A feasibility study searches for a solution within the range of chosen dimensions to meet a set of constraints. If this search is successful, a message informs you that a solution exists. The constraints are specified by means of one or more analysis feature parameters.

26

Behavioral Modeling Extension

Example: Feasibility Study Summary: This example shows how you can use a feasibility study to investigate if there is a solution that satisfies your design constraints. Problem: Need to create a bottle with a desired volume within given dimension constraints. Solution: Create an analysis feature to measure the volume of the part. Then you can perform a feasibility study to investigate if it is feasible to obtain a desired volume (design constraint) while maintaining the key dimensions (design variables) in a certain range. The next figure shows the BOTTLE part.

The following basic steps outline this example: 1. Create an analysis feature to create the volume parameter. Click Insert > Model Datum > Analysis. In the ANALYSIS dialog box, do the following: o o o o o o o o Enter the name of the analysis, analysis1. Click Model Analysis. Click Next. Select One-Sided Volume as the type of measure. Select the datum plane to define the side where volume is to be measured. Click Compute. When the volume is computed, click Close. Click Yes to create a parameter ONE_SIDE_VOL. Click OK.

2. Create a feasibility study by clicking Analysis > Feasibility/Optimization. In the Optimization/Feasibility dialog box, do the following: o Click Feasibility.

27

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection o

Under Design Constraints, click Add to add a parameter. In the Design Constraints dialog box, choose ONE_SIDE_VOL:ANALYSIS1 as the parameter constraint. Click Set and enter the desired volume. Click OK. Under Design Variables, click Add Dimension, select a dimension on the model that you want to vary (the height dimension), and set its range. You can add another dimension to vary by clicking Add Dimension. Click Compute.

o

o

3. The system makes computations and searches for the solution. If a solution is possible, the system modifies dimensions to the values that give the desired volume. You can keep the modified model or undo the changes by clicking Undo. The next figure shows the modified bottle.

Multi-Objective Design Study
About the Multi-Objective Design Study A multi-objective design study helps you find optimal solutions that satisfy several design criteria (design goals). For example, you can investigate possible shapes of a part that let you maintain the part mass and location of the center of gravity within a desired range. A multi-objective design study provides the following benefits: • • • The study helps you find an optimal range of design variables that is most suitable for searching for optimal solutions. You can select the Automatic method of sampling or the Manual method of sampling to conduct the study. The study finds solutions for multiple design objectives that may be contradictory in nature.

28

Behavioral Modeling Extension • •

If more than one optimal solution exist, the study presents you with the results so you can choose the preferred solution. You can expand the range for sampling design goals, or you can narrow it down by using different methods for analyzing the data obtained in the experiments.

Working with the Multi-Objective Design Study A Multi-Objective Design study consists of a master table and derived tables in their hierarchical order. Initially, the study lets you examine an entire range in which design variables are allowed to change. There are two methods of conducting the multi-objective design study: • Automatic—Uses an algorithm that evenly distributes the selection of sample points throughout the allowable design space. It combines the design variables in a manner that covers the maximum design space to be included in the study. This is the default. Manual—Allows you to manually specify sampling points for the design variable or import the sampling points from an ASCII text file of the CSV format.

The result of the initial investigation is the master table that lists records of all experiments. You can then narrow down the focus of the study by creating derived tables so you can examine the behavior of the model with a subset of constrained values for design goals or design variables. You can access any of the tables through the Table Tree to examine its results or edit a table by altering its conditions. After you have examined your findings, you can expand the master table by specifying additional experiments to be conducted within the range designated for the study. You can save a study to disk with the Save command and then open it later when you return to the model. Saving a study saves all table data. Note: The system saves the Table Tree within the model. If you do not save the model, the Table Tree is lost and only a text file with the master table is saved to the hard disk. About the Terminology Used in the Multi-Objective Design Study A multi-objective design study uses the following terminology: • • • Experiment—A sampling event whose purpose is to obtain design goals for a particular combination of design variables. Master table—A table that contains records of all experiments conducted within the specified range of design variables (dimensions). Sampling Method—Two methods of sampling are available: o Automatic—A sampling method that allows the selection and deletion of design variables (dimensions and parameters) and setting their minimum and maximum values.

29

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection o

Manual—A sampling method that allows the selection and deletion of design variables manually. It also allows the All Combinations or One Per Row method to determine the number of experiments to be conducted for the design study.

Derived table—A table that is derived from a parent table using a particular method (Constraints or Pareto) for selecting experiments that satisfy certain conditions. Constraints method—A method for creating a derived table by specifying a minimum or maximum value for each selected design goal. The system examines the parent table to find experiments that satisfy the conditions. Pareto method—A method for creating a derived table by selecting design goals that you want to optimize (minimize or maximize). The system examines the parent table to find experiments whose results fall within an optimal range. This method can give you multiple optimal solutions: while one solution gives the best result for one goal, the other solution yields a better result for another goal. Because none of the Pareto solutions is better then the others, the system lets you decide which one is more preferable to you.

Example: Using the Pareto Method You can apply the Pareto method to optimize multiple variables with contracting conditions. The graphic illustration of the solution results is a set of points in the ndimensional coordinate system (where n is the number of design variables designated for the analysis). This example illustrates how the Pareto method is used to optimize two design goals, Goal 1 and Goal 2, and find experiments that yield maximum values for both design goals. In the graph, the x-axis shows values for Goal 1, and the y-axis shows values for Goal 2. Each point in the graph represents a record of an experiment. Using the Pareto method, the system starts comparing records, trying to find maximum values for both design goals. As a result of this analysis, all experiments shown as gray points are filtered out because their results are worse than those shown as black points. The three best experiments (shown as black points) represent optimal solutions – they are all acceptable and none of them is better than the other ones.

30

Behavioral Modeling Extension

To Conduct a Multi-Objective Design Study To conduct a multi-objective design study, you must define the design variables and the design goals. You can select dimensions or top-level model parameters (except integer parameters) as the design variables. For the design goals, you can select parameters that were created through the Analysis feature. 1. Click Analysis > Multi-Objective Design Study. The Multi-Objective Design Study dialog box opens. The dialog box consists of two sections: o Table Tree—The first column displays the hierarchy of tables in the study, including the master table and derived tables. The second column is a feedback section, displaying the number of records for each table. Table Data—Displays the contents of the currently active table. Each record in the table includes a record number, design goals, and design variables.

o

2. To create a new study, click File > New and specify a name for the study. To open an existing study, click File > Open and select the name of the study. 3. To set up a master table, click Setup > Variables/Goals. The Master Table dialog box opens. 4. In the Sampling Method box, select Automatic or Manual as the method of sampling. 5. If you select the Automatic method, specify the following in the Master Table dialog box: o Design Variables—For each design variable, click to add a dimension

or to add a parameter as a design variable in the study. The dimension or parameter that you add is included as a design variable in the study. Each design variable is assigned to a unique row of the Design Variables table. Specify its minimum and maximum values or accept the default values. To delete a variable from the list of design variables, select the variable and click o Design Goals—Click Select Goals. The Parameter Selection dialog box opens. Select the parameters that you want to include in your study and click OK.

6. To set up a master table using the Manual method of sampling, select Manual from the Sampling Method box. The Master Table dialog box opens. 7. Under Run Experiments on, specify one of the following: o o All Combination—Calculates the number of experiments using all possible combinations of the sampling points defined for the design variables. One Per Row—Sets the number of experiments as the number of rows that are defining the sample points in the Design Variables section of the Master Table.

31

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

Note: An error message is displayed if you do not specify the same number of sampling points for all design variables. 8. Specify the design variables and design goals as described for the Automatic method of sampling. Note: Each design variable is assigned to a different column in the Design Variables table. 9. The following are also available in the Design Variable section of the Master Table: o o o o —Inserts an empty cell above the cell that you select. —Deletes the cell that you select. —Deletes all the cells in the table. —Opens a file browser that lets you select an ASCII text file of the CSV format. The file you import must not contain alpha characters. The number of columns in this file must be less than or equal to the number of design variables included in your study.

10. Click OK to accept the setup. 11. To review the setup, click Setup > Show setup. 12. To compute the master table, click Setup > Compute and type the number of experiments you want Pro/ENGINEER to generate, to conduct the study. The Multi-Objective Design Study dialog box displays the results. The Table Tree displays the Master Table. The Record #, Goals, and Variables appear in the Table Data section of the Master Table. Note: If you have selected the Manual method of sampling, then Pro/ENGINEER calculates the number of experiments and displays it in the message area. 13. To create a derived table, click Table > Derive The Derive Table dialog box opens. Note: You cannot expand a master table that has been created using the Manual method of sampling. 14. Select one of the following methods for deriving a table: • Constraints—Creates a derived table by setting the maximum and minimum values for the design goals. Select a parameter in the parameter list and specify new values in the Min and Max boxes or accept the default values. Pareto—Creates a derived table by optimizing your design goals. Click on a cell under Options and set its value to Maximize, Minimize, or Exclude.

15. Type the table name and click OK The results are displayed in the MultiObjective Design Study dialog box. The Table Tree displays the derived table icon. The contents of the table appear in the Table Data section. Each row in the 32

Behavioral Modeling Extension

table represents a record of an experiment. A record includes the Record number, computed values of the design goals, and the corresponding values of the design variables. Note: The record number of an experiment is derived from the master table. 16. To create another derived table, click a table in the Table Tree, click Table > Derive, and create a table from the parent table by selecting the Constraints or the Pareto method. Each derived table appears in the Table Tree with an icon indicating its method of creation. 17. To save the study including the derived tables, click File > Save in the MultiObjective Design Study dialog box. 18. Click File > Exit to end the study. Table Operations The following table summarizes table operations that you can perform while working with a Multi-Objective Design study. Note: You can also use a shortcut menu by selecting a table in the Table Tree and clicking the right mouse button. The commands on the shortcut menu are: Derive, Edit, Show Data, and Delete. Table Operation Create a new study. Open an existing study. Save a study. Delete a study. Exit a study. Set up the master table. Show the setup for the table. Generate the master table or expand the master table. Generate the derived table. Edit a derived table. User Action Click File > New. Click File > Open. Click File > Save. Click File > Delete. Click File > Exit. Click Setup > Variables/Goals. Click Setup > Show setup. Icon

Click Setup > Compute/Expand.

Click Table > Derive.

Select a table in the Table Tree and click Table > Edit.

33

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

Show data for the selected table. Delete a table.

Select a table in the Table Tree and click Table > Show Data. Select a table in the Table Tree and click Table > Delete. Select a record and click Record > Show Model. Select a record and click Record > Save Model. Click Tools > Approximation Table. Click Tools > Approximation Value. Select a table in the Table Tree and click Tools > Graph study. Click Options > Preferences.

Show the model for the selected record. Save the model for the selected record. Generate the approximation table. Find approximation values. Generate graphs for the selected table. Set preferences for the study. Set the default range for the variables.

Click Options > Default Range.

To Expand the Master Table You can expand the master table by specifying an additional number of experiments to be conducted for the study. Expanding the table provides a more frequent sampling of the field designated for the study and therefore yields more accurate data. You cannot expand a master table that has been created using the Manual method of sampling. To expand the master table: 1. In the Multi-Objective Design Study dialog box, click Setup > Compute/Expand or click the icon. The Master Table dialog box opens.

2. Specify the number of new experiments you want to add. Pro/ENGINEER conducts additional experiments and adds their records to the master table. If you have set the preferences to update feedback after expanding the master table, the Records column in the Table Tree window shows the updated number of records for the master table and affected derived tables. To Display the Results of the Study To display the model that corresponds to a selected record: 1. Select a table in the Table Tree. 34

Behavioral Modeling Extension

2. Click a row in the Table Data window. 3. Click Record > Show Model, or click the by double-clicking the record. To Save the Results of the Study 1. To save the study, choose File > Save from the dialog box. 2. Make sure to save the model after you have saved the study. To save the model that corresponds to a particular record: a. Select a record and click Record > Save Model or click the icon. icon. You can also display a model

b. The system creates a temporary directory with the name .tmp_mobj_save_# (where # is the record number) and saves the model in that directory. The name of the saved model is modelname_#, where # is the record number. c. When you save an assembly model, the system opens a Pro/TABLE window that shows two columns: component names in the original assembly and component names in the model you are saving. You can change the names in the second column. To save your changes and exit, click Exit. If you attempt to save an assembly that has been previously saved, the system prompts you to change the component names to avoid overwriting the existing files. Note: Each time you save the model corresponding to a particular record, the system saves it to the record-specific directory and overwrites a previously saved model that may exist in that directory. To preserve the model that you have saved, move it from the temporary .tmp_mobj_save_# directory to a different directory. To Generate Graphs for the Multi-Objective Design Study For the master or a derived table, you can generate graphs that illustrate how a selected goal changes with respect to a selected dimension variable. To set graph preferences, click Options > Preferences and click the Graph tab. 1. Select a table for which you want to generate graphs. 2. Click Tools > Graph Study or click the icon. The Graph dialog box opens. The dialog box contains two tabs: X-Axis and Y-Axis. 3. Specify the parameter for the x-axis. Select a design goal or design variable by clicking in the appropriate column. 4. Specify the parameter for the y-axis. Click on the Y-axis tab. Select a design goal or design variable by clicking in the appropriate column. 5. To generate the graph, click Graph in the Graph dialog box. The system opens a window with the graph. Each yellow point in the graph corresponds to an experiment.

35

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

6. To finish generating graphs, click Close in the Graph dialog box. Note: The system lets you display up to 10 graphic windows. To Set Preferences To set preferences, click Options > Preferences. Select a tab for the function you want to set: Update, Graph, or Compute. In the Update tab, you can set the following options: • Update Rate—When expanding the master table, update the Records column in the Table Tree window of the dialog box at regular intervals after the specified number of experiments. Auto Save Rate—When expanding the master table, automatically save the .pdl file at regular intervals after the specified number of new experiments.

In the Graph tab, you can set the following options: Keep graphs after study—The graph windows remain displayed after you have exited the study. Set the Graph Update options attribute: • • • Do not update graphs—The graphs do not update after you have expanded the master table. Update graphs after expansion—Update the graphs after you have expanded the master table. Update graphs dynamically—Update the graphs at regular intervals set by the Update Rate in the General Preferences dialog box.

In the Compute tab, you can set the following option: Use Distributed Computation—Distribute computation tasks among the participating workstations in your network. To Generate Approximation Values To obtain approximate values for a single point: 1. Click Tools > Approximation Value. The Approximate Evaluation dialog box opens. 2. For the design variables that you want to set for your evaluation, select the current value of the variable and type in the desired value. 3. Click Run > Approximate or click to generate approximate values. The system estimates values for the design goals and fills out the Design Goals table. 4. To reset values for the design variables, click Run > Reset. Note: To generate exact values, click Run > Exact or click the icon.

36

Behavioral Modeling Extension

To conduct a sensitivity analysis on approximate values: 1. Click Tools > Approximation Value. The Approximate Evaluation dialog box opens. 2. Select a design variable and a design goal for which you want to generate a graph. 3. Click the icon to plot a graph. The graph shows points with estimated results and a curve that approximates these results. Note: If you want to obtain a smoother curve, you can increase the noise level (deviation of the plotted curve from estimated points). If you want to obtain a curve that approximates estimated results with more accuracy, you can decrease the noise level. 4. To set the noise level, click Tools > Preferences from the Approximate Evaluation dialog box. Set the value in the Preferences box and click OK. You can now generate another graph by clicking the icon.

Using Approximation in Multi-Objective Design Studies In a Multi-Objective Design Study, you have the ability to generate approximate evaluations of the design study goals. To generate approximation values, Pro/ENGINEER uses the concept of a "response surface." For a given point or set of points in the n-dimensional design space, the response surface gives approximate values of the design study goals. The approximate results are based on all conducted experiments. Instead of conducting time-consuming regenerations, you can evaluate goals and create sensitivity studies based on approximated values. The approximated values allow you to quickly evaluate how design goals change for the specified values of the design variables. To use approximation values, click Tools > Approximation Value on the Multi-Objective Design Study dialog box. In addition, you can create an approximation table derived from the master table. The approximation table gives you approximated values of the design study goals for the requested number of experiments. To create the approximation table, click Tools > Approximation Table on the Multi-Objective Design Study dialog box.

Analyses Sensitivity Analysis
About the Sensitivity Analysis Sensitivity analysis allows you to analyze how various measured quantities (parameters) vary when a model dimension or an independent model parameter is varied within a specified range. The result is a graph for each selected parameter showing the value of the parameter as a function of the dimension.

37

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

To access a sensitivity analysis, click Analysis > Sensitivity Analysis. To create the analysis, you define the following attributes: • • • • A model dimension or parameter to vary. The range of values within which the dimension will vary. The number of steps (computations in the range). Parameters that have been created as the results of analysis features.

To generate the sensitivity analysis, the system does the following: • • • • Varies the selected dimension or parameter within the range Regenerates the model at each step. Computes the selected parameters. Generates a graph.

To Perform a Sensitivity Analysis 1. Click Analysis > Sensitivity Analysis. The Sensitivity dialog box opens. 2. Create a new or open an existing study. o To create a new study, click the study. . Accept a default name or type a name for

o

To open an existing study, click list.

. Select the name of the study from a

3. Under Variable Selection, select design variables as follows: o To select a variable dimension, click Dimension and select a dimension in the model. Note: You cannot select driven dimensions. They appear on the left side of a relation. o To select an independent model parameter, click Parameter. An independent model parameter is a parameter on the right hand side of a relation.

4. Specify the range for design variables by typing the minimum and maximum values in the respective fields in the dialog box. 5. Under Parameters to Plot, click the selection arrow button and select any of the previously created analysis feature parameters from the Parameters dialog box. 6. Click OK to return to the Sensitivity dialog box. Note:

38

Behavioral Modeling Extension o

If you have a license for Mechanica, Mechanica parameters and analyses that have been previously defined also appear in the Parameters list box. After you select Mechanica parameters or analyses and click Compute, the system starts running multiple Mechanica analyses. If you have a license for Mechanism Dynamics, dynamics measures created in Mechanism Dynamics are available under Goals and Design Constraints.

o

7. Under Steps, enter the number of calculations you want to make between the minimum and maximum values. 8. Optionally, to see the model change as each value is calculated, click Options > Preferences and click Animate model. 9. Click OK to return to the Sensitivity dialog box. 10. Optionally, to set the default range for design variables, click Options > Default Range. 11. Click Compute or click . For each selected parameter, a graph window opens to display the calculations. 12. To save the study, click 13. Click Close. Example: Sensitivity Analysis Summary: This example shows how to create a sensitivity study to investigate the relationship between two model parameters. Problem: Need to analyze how the part mass changes as you change the number of teeth in the gear. Solution: Create an analysis feature to measure the mass of the gear. After the MASS parameter is created, you can conduct a sensitivity study to investigate how the mass changes as you change another parameter, the number of teeth in the gear. The following basic steps outline this example: 1. Create an analysis feature to measure the mass of the gear. Click Insert > Model Datum > Analysis. In the ANALYSIS dialog box, do the following: o o o o o o Enter the name of the analysis, gear_mass. Click Model Analysis as the type of the analysis. Click Next. Click Model Mass Properties as the type of measure. Click Compute. Click Close.

39

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection o o

Under Result params, select the parameter MASS and select Yes to create this parameter. Click OK.

2. Create a sensitivity analysis by clicking Analysis > Sensitivity Analysis. In the Sensitivity dialog box, specify the following: o o o o o o Click Parameter. Click the number of teeth (N) as the parameter to vary and click OK. Set the range to 10 – 20 teeth. Select a parameter to plot (MASS) and click OK. Specify the number of passes, 11. Click Compute.

3. Inspect the graph produced by the analysis. Click Close. The following graph shows the output of the sensitivity study. The graph shows how the mass of the gear (y-axis) changes as you change the number of teeth (x-axis). The number of points in the resulting curve corresponds to the number of computations within the selected range.

40

Behavioral Modeling Extension

External Analysis
About the External Analysis and Analysis Feature In addition to standard analyses provided by Pro/ENGINEER, you can create a customized analysis using a Pro/TOOLKIT application, register the application, and start it from within Pro/ENGINEER in a parametric, associative fashion. To access an external analysis, click Analysis > External Analysis from the toolbar menu. You can also create an analysis feature that is driven by an external analysis. The external application determines which parameters and datum features will be created as a result of this analysis feature. The external application allows you to create geometry (for example, datum curves) and use this geometry as regular Pro/ENGINEER features for modeling and analysis. To create an external analysis feature, click Insert > Model Datum > Analysis and select External Analysis as the analysis type. For information on using Pro/TOOLKIT to define the analysis functions and for examples of external analyses, refer to the Pro/TOOLKIT User's Guide. To Perform an External Analysis Note: Before creating an external analysis, you must register your application as the analysis type in Pro/TOOLKIT. For information on using Pro/TOOLKIT to define the analysis functions, refer to the Pro/TOOLKIT User's Guide. 1. Click Analysis > External Analysis. The External Analysis dialog box opens. 2. Under Type, select an application supplied by Pro/TOOLKIT. 3. Click the Analysis UI button. This brings up the user interface defined by your Pro/TOOLKIT application. 4. Follow system prompts to make selections as specified in your Pro/TOOLKIT application. 5. Click Compute to perform the analysis. 6. To view the results of the analysis in an Information window, click Info. 7. To save the analysis, click Save and enter its name. 8. To save this analysis in an analysis feature, click Add Feature and enter the name for the feature. A new analysis feature appears in the Model Tree. 9. Click Close to close the External Analysis dialog box.

Motion Analysis
About Motion Analysis Motion Analysis produces the following results: 41

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection • •

Maximum and minimum values of the top-level assembly feature parameters and the time when these values were reached A graphical display of the motion envelope

To Create a Motion Analysis 1. Click Analysis > Motion Analysis. The Motion Analysis dialog box opens. 2. Under Motion Definition, select the motion definition that you want to analyze. 3. Under Parameters, select the parameters that you want to compute. Note: If you have a license for Mechanism Dynamics, the Parameters list includes the dynamics measures created in Mechanism Dynamics. 4. Under Options, select from the following: o Use All Moving Parts—Create a motion envelope using all moving parts. If you do not want to include all moving parts, clear this option and select the parts individually. Create Motion Envelope—Show the motion envelope for all or selected moving parts. Envelope quality—Enter an integer that defines accuracy of the display of the quilt that represents the motion envelope. Update Interval—Enter the number of frames between two update events. This number determines how often the system updates the graphical results.

o o o

5. Click Run to begin the analysis. The system shows the moving parts in motion, computes the values of the parameters included in the analysis, and shows the graphs. The number of the computation points for the analysis depends on the number of frames in the motion definition. The results of the computation appear in the Results box. For each parameter, the system computes the minimum and maximum values, and the time when these values were reached. 6. To view the results in an Information window, click Info. 7. To change the display setting for the motion envelope, click Display. 8. To save or retrieve the results of the analysis, click Saved Analyses. 9. To save this analysis in an analysis feature, click Add Feature and enter a name for the feature. A new analysis feature appears in the Model Tree. 10. Click Close.

42

Behavioral Modeling Extension

Mechanica Analysis
To Create a Mechanica Analysis With a Mechanica license, you can run structure and thermal analyses that have been previously defined in Mechanica. Note: When running Mechanica analyses in Behavioral Modeling, the number of load sets or modes may be restricted. 1. Click Analysis > Mechanica Analysis. The Mechanica Analysis dialog box opens. 2. Under Type, choose the type of the analysis: Structure or Thermal. 3. To retrieve a Mechanica analysis, select its name from the Definition list. 4. Under Results, select the measures that you want to compute. 5. Click Compute. 6. To view the results in an Information window, click Info. 7. To save or retrieve the results of the analysis, click Saved Analyses. 8. To save this analysis in an analysis feature, click Add Feature and enter a name for the feature. The new analysis feature appears on the Model Tree under the name of the analysis. 9. Click Close to end the analysis.

Excel Analysis and Excel Analysis Feature
About the Excel Analysis and Excel Analysis Feature As part of your Behavioral Modeling activities, you can use an external Excel file to define the analysis that you want to perform on a Pro/ENGINEER model. You can then capture the results of the Excel analysis in the Excel Analysis feature. This functionality is intended for Windows 95 and Windows NT machines. You cannot access Excel analysis on a UNIX workstation. If you retrieve a model with an Excel analysis on a UNIX workstation, the Analysis feature becomes frozen. When you save an Excel analysis or create an Excel Analysis feature, the system saves the complete path to the .xls file. When you retrieve an Excel analysis or when an Excel Analysis feature is regenerated, the system searches for the .xls file in these locations in the following order: • • • The original location of the file from which it was selected for the analysis The current working directory The directory specified by the configuration option excel_analysis_directory.

43

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

To Create an Excel Analysis Input values for the Excel analysis can be the following: • • • Model dimensions Top-level model parameters Analysis feature parameters

1. Click Analysis > Excel Analysis. The Excel Analysis dialog box opens. Click Load file and select a .xls file to open. If you want to create an Excel table on-the-fly, click New file. The system opens the Excel file so that you can specify input and output values for the analysis. 2. Specify input settings by associating a model dimension or parameter with the corresponding cell in the Excel spreadsheet. To associate a dimension, click Add Dimension, in the model window. Select a dimension that you want to use in the analysis, and click the corresponding cell in the Excel spreadsheet. Accept the selection. Click Add Dimension to continue. To associate a parameter, click Add Parameter. Select a parameter that you want to use in the analysis from the Parameters dialog box, and click the corresponding cell in the Excel spreadsheet. Accept the selection. Click Add Parameter to continue. The dimension and parameter selected for the analysis appear in the Input Settings table in the Excel Analysis dialog box. For each dimension or parameter, the table lists its current value and the corresponding cell in the spreadsheet. To remove a dimension or parameter from the selection, select a row in the Input Settings table and click Remove. 3. Specify output settings by selecting what you want to compute from the spreadsheet. Click Output Cells in the dialog box, in the spreadsheet click a cell that contains an output value, and click Done Select. The selected cells appear in the Output cells field in the dialog box. 4. Click Compute. The system runs the Excel analysis. The results of the computation appear under Results in the Excel Analysis dialog box. 5. To view the results of the analysis in an Information window, click Info. 6. To save the analysis, click Saved Analyses, enter its name, and click the Save icon. 7. Click Close to close the Excel Analysis dialog box. To Create an Excel Analysis Feature You can create an Excel Analysis feature by using the results of an Excel analysis. 44

Behavioral Modeling Extension

1. Click Insert > Model Datum > Analysis. The ANALYSIS dialog box opens. 2. Under Name, type a name for the analysis or accept the default name. 3. Under Type, click Excel Analysis. 4. Under RegenRequest, specify the regeneration option by clicking one of the following options: o o o Always—Always regenerate the analysis feature during the model regeneration. Read Only—Exclude the analysis feature from the model regeneration. Only Design Study—Regenerate the analysis feature only when it is used by a design study.

5. Click Next. The Excel Analysis dialog box opens. 6. To retrieve a previously saved analysis, click Saved Analyses and select the name of the .xls file. To load an existing Excel file, click Load file and select an .xls file. To create a new Excel file, click New file. 7. After loading or creating the Excel file, define the analysis as required. Note: If you created a new file, you must save and reload it into the current analysis feature. 8. Click Compute to run the analysis. 9. Click Close to return to the ANALYSIS dialog box. The Result params window opens. All cells selected for the output settings appear in the Result params table. The table lists the parameter status, parameter name, and description. 10. To create a parameter, select it from the Result params table and click YES under Create. 11. Under Param name, accept the default name or type a name for the parameter. The defaults parameter name XL_<columnletter>_<rownumber> reflects the position of the corresponding output cell in the Excel spreadsheet. 12. To save this analysis in an analysis feature, click Add Feature and enter the name for the feature. A new analysis feature appears in the Model Tree. 13. Click OK to create the Analysis feature.

45

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

Comparing Graphs About Comparing Graphs
You can compare two graphs to determine the difference in the distributions of one parameter along the other parameter. For example, in your project you may be required to change the cross section of a pipe according to a certain rule, or graph. To analyze the distribution, you can compare the actual distribution of the cross section along the length of the pipe to the desired distribution, which is defined by a graph feature. Once you have measured the difference between the two graphs, you can use this parameter in Behavioral Modeling to optimize the difference and obtain the most desired distribution.

To Compare Two Graphs
Matching two graphs involves two basic steps: 1. Create a Relation Analysis Feature that compares two graphs. Use the Analysis feature to compute the difference between the graphs. 2. Run an optimization study to minimize the difference. To compare two graphs, add a relation using the following syntax: relation_name = comparegraphs("name_1", "name_2", "type", left_bound_1, right_bound_1, left_bound_2, right_bound_2) where: • • • • • • relation_name – is the name for the relation. name_1 – is the name for the first graph or analysis feature. name_2 – is the name for the second graph or analysis feature. left_bound_1 and right_bound_1 – are the left and right boundaries of the first graph. left_bound_2 and right_bound_2 – are the left and right boundaries of the second graph. type – is the method for computing the difference between the graphs. Choose from the following types: lone (default), ltwo, linf, area. The table explains the different types of measurement.

Measurement Based on the Formula Type lone L1 norm of f(t)-g(t) = ? ¦f(t)-g(t)¦dt - 8 <t<8

What it Measures Measures the area between f(t) and g(t). When f(t) -

ltwo

L2 norm of f(t)-g(t) = sqrt (? (f(t)-

46

Behavioral Modeling Extension

g(t))2 dt - 8 < t < 8)

g(t) is a measure of the error, larger values of the error have more weight on the L2 norm. Measures the maximum error between two functions. Measures the signed area between f(t) and g(t).

linf

L8 norm of f(t)-g(t) = max f(t)-g(t) - 8 <t<8

area

integral of f(t)-g(t) = ? (f(t)-g(t)) dt - 8 <t<8

When specifying arguments for the comparegraphs function, you have the following options: • • • Specify only two arguments – Specify the names for the graphs only. By default, the system uses the lone result type and the entire lengths of the graphs. Specify only three arguments – Specify the names for the two graphs and the result type. By default, the system uses the entire lengths of the graphs. Specify all 7 allowable arguments.

Note: You can specify the name for the second graph (name_2) as "zero". Then the system will compute the function with respect to the horizontal base y=0.

Graphing Tools
About Graphing Tools
You can customize various aspects of the Grapher window using the Grapher tools. • File : o o Export Excel—Save raw data in a Microsoft Excel file. Export Text—Save raw data in a text file under the extension .grt. In the text file, data is listed in columns, separated by tabs. The first row lists the xaxis values. To save the file, use the Export To Text dialog box. Print—Print the graph or save the image in a preferred format using the Print dialog box. Exit—Close the graphics window.

o o

47

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection •

View : o o o o Toggle Grid—Turn the grid display on or off. Repaint—Refresh the display. Refit—Reset the graph to the default size. Zoom In—Zoom into a portion of the graph. The system displays the selected portion of the graph using the minimum and maximum values for the x-axis.

Format : o Graph—Open the Graph dialog box.

The next tables shows the icons on the Grapher toolbar. Icon Function Opens the Print dialog box. Toggles the display of grid lines. Runs the Repaint command. Runs the Zoom In command. Runs the Refit command. Opens the Graph Window Options dialog box.

To Modify the Graphtool
1. Click Format > Graph. The Graph Window Options dialog box opens. Note: You can also open this dialog box through the shortcut menu, or by clicking in the toolbar, or clicking one of the following items in the Graphtool: • • • x-axis and y-axis labels graph title data series legend

2. Click the X Axis and Y Axis tabs to specify the following: • • Graph—List the name of the graph. Axis Label—Specify a new label for the axis. A name can contain a single line of text up to 32 characters long.

48

Behavioral Modeling Extension • • • •

Display Axis Label—Click or clear the Display Axis Label check box to display or erase the label on the axis, respectively. Text Style—Select the character style for the axis label from the Graph Font Editor dialog box. You can also select the font, color, and character height. Range—Change the default range for the graph axis by specifying maximum and minimum values. Gridlines—Select the gridline style from the Style list. To set the color of grid lines, click to open the Color Editor.

Tick Marks—Specify the number of major and minor tick marks on the graph. Two is the minimum value for the major tick marks, zero for the minor tick marks. Click Reset to recalculate the tick marks for the user-supplied range. Axis—Set the line width for the axis from the Thickness list. To set the color of grid lines, click to open the Color Editor.

• •

Tick Labels—Set the alignment of tick labels to horizontal or vertical. Click Text Style to select the character style for the axis label from the Graph Font Editor. You can also specify the font, color, and character height. Scaling—Scale the axis using Log Scale. Alternatively, to compress the y-axis, clear the Log Scale check box and specify a scaling factor.

3. Click the Data Series tab to specify the following: • • Graph—Displays the name of the graph. Data Series edit table—The number of rows in the table corresponds to the number of data series. This table has the following columns: o o o o o o o • Data Series—Displays the default name for the data series. You cannot edit this box. Label—Displays the name that appears in the legend. You can type a new name. Point—Displays the default color for point display. Click this box to change the color using the Color Editor. Line—Displays the default color for line display. Click this box to change the color using the Color Editor. Point Display—Displays the current style for point display. You can select a different style from the list. Interpolation—Displays the current interpolation method. To change the method, select from the list. Thickness—Displays the current line thickness style. To change the line thickness, select from the list.

Legend—Turn the display of the legend on or off.

49

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection •

Text Style—Select the character style for the data series from the Graph Font Editor. You can select the font, color, and character height.

4. Click the Graph Display tab to specify the following: • • • • • Title—Specify a new title for the graph. A title can contain up to 80 characters and can have two lines of text. Display Title—Turn the display of the title on or off. Text Style—Change the style of the title using the Graph Font Editor. You can select the font, color, and character height. Background Color—Change the background color by clicking .

Blended Background—Set the background to blended. To change the blended background, click Edit. To change the blended background to solid, clear the Blended Background checkbox. Selection Color—Click to change the selection color.

Note: Click Set default in the Graph Window Options dialog box to customize the graph settings and set them as default. The text file that defines the settings for the graphs is automatically updated with the new settings. Set default is available only if you set the bmgr_pref_file configuration option in the config.pro file.

To Use the Print Dialog Box
1. Click on the Graphtool window.

2. Select the output format by choosing from these formats: Microsoft Print Manager, PostScript (Vector), HPGL2, TIFF, BMP, Encapsulated PostScript, JPEG. 3. Select the printer. To configure the printer, click Properties. 4. Select the paper size. You can also set the custom paper size by selecting Variable in mm or Variable in Inch from the Size list and entering the width and height dimensions. 5. Select the image resolution and depth. Note: For TIFF and BMP formats, you can define the plot quality by specifying Resolution and Image Depth. For JPEG and Encapsulated PostScript, you can define the quality by specifying Resolution. 6. Specify the output options: o o To File—Save the plot to a file in the selected format. Specify the file name and location. To Printer—Send the plot to the printer. Enter the print command to use. You can specify whether you want to delete the temporary plot file (tmplot.plt) by selecting one of these options:

50

Behavioral Modeling Extension

Never—Do not delete the plot file. Immediately—Delete the plot file after the plot has been sent to the printer. Dialog—Display a dialog box, allowing you to delete the plot file. 7. Specify the plot format options: o o o Select the orientation of the plot: Landscape or Portrait. Scale up or scale down the plot image by specifying the zoom factor. Offset the location of the graph on the paper by specifying the x-axis and y-axis offset values.

8. Specify the number of copies. 9. To preview the plot, click Preview. 10. To finish, click OK.

Customizing Graph Display Settings
You can use the bmgr_pref_file configuration option to customize various settings for your graphs. You can define the axis and graph line weights, label fonts, tick mark types, grid styles and so on. With this configuration option included in your config.pro file, Pro/ENGINEER uses settings stored in a user-created graph preferences text file to determine how to render your graphs. Customising your graph helps you ensure the exact graph display characteristics you want, each time you view a graph. To change the appearance of the customised graph, click Format > Graph. You can also save the time of manually reformatting each graph through the Graph Window Options dialog box. You can create a graph preferences file as follows: 1. Create a text file that contains the settings you want. 2. Add the bmgr_pref_file configuration option to your config.pro file and set it to the name of your graph settings file. To help you create a valid graph settings file, here is a sample file, that shows the items you can set and what some of the possible values might be. X_Axis_Color 5.019608e-01f,5.019608e-01f,1.000000e+00f X_Axis_DisplayLabel 1 X_Axis_GridColor 5.019608e-01f,5.019608e-01f,0.000000e+00f X_Axis_GridEnabled 1 X_Axis_GridStyle 2 X_Axis_LabelColor 1.000000e+00f,1.000000e+00f,1.000000e+00f X_Axis_LabelEnabled 1 X_Axis_LabelFont graphtool_font X_Axis_LabelFontHeight 1.500000e-01f X_Axis_Thickness 4 51

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

X_Axis_TickColor 1.000000e+00f,1.000000e+00f,1.000000e+00f X_Axis_TickFont graphtool_font X_Axis_TickFontHeight 1.000000e-01f X_Axis_TickHorizontal 1 Y_Axis_Color 1.000000e+00f,0.000000e+00f,0.000000e+00f Y_Axis_DisplayLabel 1 Y_Axis_GridColor 5.019608e-01f,5.019608e-01f,0.000000e+00f Y_Axis_GridEnabled 1 Y_Axis_GridStyle 2 Y_Axis_LabelColor 1.000000e+00f,1.000000e+00f,1.000000e+00f Y_Axis_LabelEnabled 1 Y_Axis_LabelFont graphtool_font Y_Axis_LabelFontHeight 1.500000e-01f Y_Axis_Thickness 2 Y_Axis_TickColor 1.000000e+00f,1.000000e+00f,1.000000e+00f Y_Axis_TickFont graphtool_font Y_Axis_TickFontHeight 1.000000e-01f Y_Axis_TickHorizontal 1

52

Index
A Analysis saved ......................................... 1 Analysis ........................................ 1 Analysis feature creating...................................... 4 definition .................................... 3 external...............................10, 11 graph as a result of ...................... 5 motion analysis type .................... 9 overview..................................... 3 Analysis feature.............................. 3 B Behavioral Modeling Extension overview..................................... 1 Behavioral Modeling Extension ....... 11 C compare graphs functions.............. 46 construction group for UDA creating.................................... 13 definition .................................. 13 rules for creating ....................... 13 construction group for UDA ............ 13 D Design study creating an optimization feature... 23 Design study................................ 23 E Excel analysis creating.................................... 44 53 overview ...................................44 Excel analysis ...............................44 Excel Analysis feature creating ....................................45 overview ...................................44 Excel Analysis feature .............. 44, 45 External analysis creating ....................................41 overview ...................................41 External analysis ...........................41 External Analysis command ............41 External Analysis feature................10 external application running .....................................41 external application .......................41 F Feasibility study definition...................................27 overview ...................................38 performing ................................25 Feasibility study ............................38 Feasibility/Optimization command ...24 field point creating ....................................12 definition...................................12 overview ...................................11 types ........................................12 field point ....................................12 Field Point command .....................12

Behavioral Modeling® - Help Topic Collection

G graph study for Multi-Objective Design Analysis.................................... 35 graphs comparing ................................ 46 display ..................................... 51 graphs ........................................ 46 graphtool..................................... 48 Graphtool window modifying ................................. 49 Graphtool window....................48, 51 L Local Group command CREATE GROUP menu ................ 13 Local Group command................... 13 M master table expanding............................33, 34 generating ................................ 33 master table ................................ 28 Mechanica analyses .................21, 43 Motion analysis ............................ 42 Motion Analysis command.............. 42 Motion Analysis feature ................... 9 motion definition .......................... 42 motion envelope creating in BMX ......................... 42 motion envelope........................... 42 Multi-Objective Design study conducting ................................ 31 constraints method .................... 28

derived table .............................28 expanding master table...............34 generating graphs ......................35 master table ..............................28 overview ...................................28 Pareto method ...........................28 saving results ............................35 terminology ...............................29 Multi-Objective Design study ..........28 O Optimization feature ......................23 Optimization study definition...................................25 methods....................................24 overview ...................................38 performing ................................24 Optimization study ........................38 P persistent display ........................1, 2 preferences for Multi-Objective Design study ...36 preferences ..................................36 S Sensitivity Analysis command .........38 Sensitivity study overview ...................................38 performing ................................38 Sensitivity study ...........................38 U UDA creating ....................................13

54

Index

UDA............................................ 13 User-Defined Analysis (UDA) creating.................................... 13 definition .................................. 11

rules and recommendations .........11 saving.......................................15 User-Defined Analysis (UDA) ..........11

55

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful