Multi-Octave Harmonic Interconnections E.E.Richards Earth Resonance,Inc. P.O.

Box 2 a,Pie Town,NM 87827 Abstract- Through Har.o~ics,the connection of Music and Mathematics, the structural side of Cosaic La.ws may be made clear. By using music scales and harmonic octave relationships,apectrums of octave multiplica tioI1de.onstrate .any harmonic il1ter~.ctions.The Solar System ~ resonancea exhibit lIlany harmonica aa if it were an energy transformer of Phi dimensions an~ aulti-octave motions, employing planetary satellites &8 linked tUBing units. Earth's structure and aotion haraonics generate a 8i.gle ohord foraation,confiraing John Worrell Keely'. Wlique experi.ents; the, also offer related attunaent with the Solar Interplanetary MagnetiC iield,the Moon'a revolution-rotation periods and SchuaanD Resonance. Hikola Tesla's suggested Super-Luainal velocitie8 as confirmed by Charles Yoat's Pi/2 factor are being utilized for planetary 10 Hz. ELl communications effect. by Russian scientists. Calculated 8uperLuainal and Sub-Luminal velocity haraonics co~re8pon~ w1ta the Earth radiation belts and Moon aean distance plac ••ent•• Sound and Light vel~c1t1es offer Super-octave reaolv1ng. The Huaan body Infrared radiation peaks pulsate at SuperAOciave harmonica of the brainwave spectrum and solar system resonances. Human Bior~tha8 demonstrate cosaie connection. via music notation. CODscious altering of brainwave and breathing rhythas allow tuning of higher and lower order" of vibration spectrums. These beginning disooveries of Harmonic develop.ent •• ill offer many olarifications of Ilacrocosmic and microcosmic under8taJldillge, once computerized applications beco.e available.

Early .oming rays reflec~ golden,orange and violet oft distant cloud8,.", ~arietieB of birds 8ing to gree~ the ne. dawn;a half aoon lazily drifts across deep blue heavens,leaving re8inder8 of far oft c08.1c motions magically disappearing from ~iew. the day's frantic adventures call the ants to arieetas coyote betore retirtDa into .haded den tor the welcoae rest.

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All around Creation'. cycle8 renew the1r aecoRda,day. or eo.s of aotion. Reaching out,returning;inhaling,exhaling;pl.,iag,reating; ever~h.re the dance goes on and on. Super Ho~a returns to 8till.ese,a8 revolving Sun aprays 1t. rotatine faa1ly with gathered co••1e .howera-- lnergJ froa .hich to grow. The pertaer.h1p of Earth aDd Mo•• harveat the apiral flow, feediag their growing carden,aproutin& inuuaerable cycle. troa ,athered 00••1c seed. Motioa. of day and night 81gaal awake.ing energie ... tke atmosphere breathea Life i.to each .oaent;.ilent charge ensuea;orieht light.iag di8cAarge .uddealy transforma. Mia1acule particlea of ••imming energy and swirling vibrationa crawl ashere,struggle to their feet aa~ .lowly look aroua~;h.aring the aagic ef .ouada,feeliag the warmth,taating the ecataay,fragrance aboud •• We .tand. center etage for but a .oaent,ill Woader;thea to again dance &ad .in« in"haraony with The SOD«. All fuactiona and movemeats of the uaiverse of foras confera perfectly with the La. of Harmony. Thua.the uni~er8e,the galaxie8,the stara,the .~lar ayste.a,the co.et8,the planets,the planetary aatellitea,the mineral cOA.tituent. of all coa8ie:: bodiea,tae ato.a,the cella,the ani.ala.the pleat.,the insecta,the aicrobe. &ad all thiaga related to or co•• tituted of ,any or all of these all exiat in perfect oDedieDce to the Law Gt HaraODY aa the cardiaal law of the univerae &ad life.

Haraony i8 the sYAchronou8,eymphonioa. aDd BY.pathetic ble.ding of the rhytbae .r rani&at ~ibratioD8 of interrelatiag b.di •••• oaads, thougll,_ &ad •• "io.8. Since each object(lIlacroooa.ic aacllIicrocosmic), actioa,8oUlld and thought vibrate. at ita own frequeJlcy ~d. amplitude. it au.t har.o.iz. with every other element in its en~i:tonme.nt_Q·r discorU will reault. Bar_oRY 1s the fundamental gu1diag pri.ciple of life. (1) Harllo.iclI;the Science of Measure(nuaber) and.Value(toJle),i~L._t.he iDSi8ht into the Law of Numbers in the world of music ;-theconaection between mU8ic and mathematics. (2) The Pyth&8ereaa world view considered the principle of the COS.08 tp be Bar.oDY. In the i<lea of Haraollics the structural sid.. of coamic law8 i8 .ad. clear by transformiBg the audible(qualities) iate nuabera (quotitse.). In this experience of sounding nwaber •• cre.tioa began to souad. Matter acquired a structural counterpart,and the real. of ideas becaae anehered ia Harmonical .hapes and for.s. Bar.oay i. the union of vari-colored things and the haraonizatioa of thil18a diversely attuned. It ~, wholly sprung of opposite •• The Pyth..orean8 saw the world asa reality; i~ which physical g anll apiri tual a8pirations were aa O.e. !his Vlas~~·':':ah.wn tundUlentall~ mellt through the '001 of the ao.ochord,an ••• ustical iJlstr" t with a .oundin! ••• box of on. string and movable bridge. At any given point the bridge diviuea the string i.to a sounding and silent aectio •• Pigure (1). Tradi~io. sa18 that pythagoraa,while experimenting wi~h this instrument,.oYed the bridge to a tone twice 51.8 high!. pitch as the original tone. H. diaco'Yered 8i.1.lltaaeouslythat the aOW'ldiag p.rtio •• : the strillB aali been reduced to half the original length. Be divided the striag accOr<ling to certain ratio. by the chaaging quality of the tones whicA he was hearing. By so dOing,he fOWld that a di'Yi8io 1' the •• stri.g by ear paralledthe divi8ion of the s~ring by leagta. What ca.e to hi. through the organ of hearing was translatable 'i.~o a aeries of rati08 expressed in viaible,aeasurable mathematics. Through hearing, he wa. experie.c1ag the audible comple.ent 01' external measure.

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By subdividing the string,in correspondence wlth the simplest ratios,

or fractions,the notes discovered may now be reduced to written musical notation; together they comprise the 'natural tone-row' or haraonic seriea. Then,by combining overtones and undertones ef thia natural har.onic seriea,the pure major and minor music 8calea may be constructed to tora a whole tone diatoniC scale. Throughout the centuries of music development,it became desirable to refine this scale and therefore,alao play half-notes or se.itones. The chromatio scale of music intervals offered this flexibilitY,and nuaerous interval ratios developed as shown in figure 2. The music interval moat commonly used today is the equal temperament scale,it, however,is n.t based upon ha.rmonic fractions but upen the 12th root of 2. In order to retain harmonic relationships and still make use of s.aller and .maller intervals,! s~ught a natural series to aefine theae values. 'The Science of M~sic'bl n.C.Raasey offers that possibility by formation of a series baaed upon the subdoainant of the fundamental, ~sing simple lIlultiplicansand divisors as seen in figure ,. Ramsey's experi.ents showed that if the twent~-five harmonically placed tones or pendulums were played,they foraed nineteen different raties which all finished their periods,and met at ~ for the atart of a new aeriea. 1 then continued the aeries by the U.se of auditional prime numbera to define the semi tone seris,as per figure 4. (3) !hia Ramsey scale offered a series of ratios within an octave of either thirds,sixtha or whole values aa is shown on figure 2,compared with the aaDy odd numbers of the equal temperament scale. All of tbe barmonics are therefore formed from the fundamental and its subdominant; the notes P and C .old cona.itiGns for the whole octave relationship. It 18 we1.1 known that a particular note of a scale,Buch aa a Ot willhaye a direct harmonic attune.ent to a C in anether scale either above or below itself in frequencYiand that also hGlda true fer all other netes. The notes ot"the upper or lower octave may also be har.onics of that same C not.,;for instance,the third harmonic above C would be a G1,called a tiftA;or a fifta harmonic abeve that C,ealle~ an B2 ora third.

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••lar int••• ity .e.&Bllredto be i. t.e yi.ible yellow ... ,re •• sp.ctrua i•• xactly 40 oc'S&yea ab ... Bb.t .iddle C •• ta. piano e keyMard. fAia ie tae ott •••• nti •••d k., .ot. of ~.ell'8 Wlique .xperi.e.te of d1s8a8sociatioll,levitatioD ..d aOUJld.-i.dllOecl .o'Sora. ~eely· •• uoa .i.UDder.toed .tud1 •• i. hera •• ie util1sati ••• &.1 DO. be ,1.. . :::' " lif •• Ue .tat.d t.at "8oua.d is the d1.tur'baace .f ato.10 e •• .qul1lbr1aa" aa4. prec.ded t. preve it. Hls sugg.sted frequeacl of 42,800 IH~. 18 60 .ctayes below tAe diaaeterof the electro.,a haraoBic .f the water ••l.cul. b,'20 octa.... ,and a super hara ••lc of tAG Barth'a ..... 1rouat.re ••• ,it al•• talls wlthi. t•• ~artll pewer Spectrua.(5) Keell p.rtoraed .i8 ..,;10 u'iDC c••ria.a co.bi.... t10n of .y.rt •••• ••uadea t.get•• r. He .tated,"~ac~ll th•.same law8 a. thoe. which J~v d.v.lop .ouaa k.ep tAo •• ave.ll b.die. in ,h.ir order. You oaa even trace the p.le. in a.und. Tlae'gre.t law ot sy.pat.etic aS800ia"io., once uaderst ••d,.ill b.co.e known aa it i8,'Sh. lov.raing .ediua of tAe uniyer ••• "(6) Iro. figure 6 note the .any Solar IYet •• clcle. w.i •• 1.flu.nce t•• larta' ••• tio. a. co.bl.ed i.to a Bb.inor scale. ,.el a18. relate to h1. eft ••• enti ••ed 'rd,'tA,and 9ths chorda. It is al.o show. tbat aar.oJli&Sof th. Nuclear Mapetic B.eSODance. of ta. proal.ent .l.... t• • 1thi. ta. Eartll eO. it. at.oepaer •.tall directll illt. tae Bb 8Cal •• Hick.l,th. suspect.d aaj.r e~~.e.t of the Eart. cor.,i. a Db "r.oaic to the Iar~'a o1rcuafer.llc.yl~verl stat. of mot1o~ i. eeekiDe a si.11iar state .f .ot1 ••• (7)
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Dr.Jame. De .. in Idano haa performed experi ••nt. u.1ag .ou.~vibrations to .ti.ulat. attract1on,repulslonand .eutra11zatloa •• the •• :Sion801 hollow glass sph.re8 within an enclosed apace. Mr.Dean 18 studying very 010••11 th••• rk. ot J OM •• rrell Ieely.

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Solar Syet •• ia a !raaaforaer' ,BO wrote R.d.el Colli. illai. '.e.ry of ·C.le.ti.alIllflu.u (8). "By Btrippiq our solar Slste.. and ••• . reduciag it to a g ••aetrical projection of spirals upo. pap.r, •• aiaht recogaise it as tae 4iagraa .'1 a polyp .... traasforaer".aa it dri~e. t toward Ve«a at about 12 ailea p.r .eco.d. " •• Muaic of tAe Spa.rea'.an ancient concept .t t.e uaiYersal .oag,i. aere ••••• to be a elear reality. ligures 8 ~d 9 gi~e the re~olutio. &ad rotatioa c••Yerted frequencieaand leelnot •• tor tllle pl.. etar1'/aatellite .ysteaa. Solar eyste. inter-r.soa&llce: i8 here reY.alea. aa aa iateracti •• of c••cordaat and discora .. t .ycl •• ,.it. auc. syste •• aa Jupiter.beias aulti-freque •• iedJtu." treaaforaera, aara.aically rel81ia! e.ergiea about t.e .hole spectrw. of tAis a~tioctay •• ele.tial ayatea. Ixaaple. :'&re.': ••• rey.lutioD .t .A.b ia aaraonically attuaed wi ta II the three large.t .00•• of Jupiter Which are tke.aelye. exactly ••e .ctave separated i. their revolutioJl •• tiona. Jupiter. rotatio. ia a Bb Bara.aio of the Jarta;it. outer aoo. Paaipaa_ 1. i. tuae with the Earta revoluti.n; Uraaus's rotation move. with Ear~'s;Uraaust8 ~ Mir .... has t.e aame key nete aa the larta's revoluti ••• da
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are -a8ily .ee.;our solar syste. i. truly a vast ausic instrument playing it. Yariou •• onge of wai'Veraal e.ergy excll.ange.'igure 10 lists •••• of the.e a&llY haraonic webs. 'Ae.e charts to this p.int only shew tke major ootaye haraoBic ••yet to be calculated are the .any third.fourtA.fitths ana 8ixth. of t.e octave 80ale •• So.e example. of these are: Mercury'. me .. orbital 'Velocity ia ten times that of Plut.;Mar~rati •• f 'Velocities at aphelion and perihelion aake a perfect fifth;Jupiter'a ratio of YelGcities·at ap.elio. and perikeli.B are a Min.r taird; fiye orbit period. of Jupiter make two .f Satura;Saturn's ratios ot velocitie. at aphelio. and perihelion are 4:5 or a Majer third. Tw •• rbit periods .t Unanus .ake one of Neptuae;thousand. of Astroid. m.ye wita the Jovian orbit period;and a strong aaj9r peried aeasured on the Sun". is exactly oae-aiBtA of our Earth day. Pieur. 11 sh••s many of the aoaerved &ad detected peried. and pulsatie ••• f the Sun,a. it sends and receives e.ergies to and from ita cesaio faaily.

Many other aar.onic interconnections

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Mercury Venua Earth Mars Pallas Ceres .. Tuna
Vesta

1 February

198}

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Solar System Inter-Hesona.nce Based. on A= 440 Hz. }<'requency.in Hertz-r means retrograde-* Revolution Db 564.7Hz. A 446.9 CHi' 544.4 D 579.1
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2 F'e 'orllary198;3

r.r.e.

Solar System

Inte.r-Re~onance Earth Rotation Solar Magnetic Sunspot Ea:cth Precess ion Vesta Rev. Amalthea (Jupiter) Himalia (Jupiter) Titan (Saturn) Uranus Rotation (r) Geomagnetic Long (Solar) 44 minute Solar Ab Moon Rot. Mercury Rot. Io (Jupiter) Europa (Jupiter) Ganymede(Jupiter) Neptune Rev.
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Solar Solar

A

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F#*

5 minutes Solar 39.0 rrinutes Solar 19.5 minutes Solar 9.9 minutes Solar Venus Rev. Vesta Rot.

3 minute Solar 24.2 minutes Solar 23.8 minutes Solar 11.9 minutes Solar 47.9 minutes Solar Jupiter Rev. Phoebe (Saturn)(r) Earth Eccentricity

/1

2 Pebruary 1983 Solar System Inter-Resonance Based on A=440 Hz. Frequency in Hertz,r means retrograde,· is 1/4 tone

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SUN Equator Rota~ion Geomagnetic AII* Geomagnetic Long G Sunspot Quasiperotiic Modulation of Sunspot DI* Magnetic Cycle G 160 minute cycle A (1/9 Earth Day) 58 minute Non Raaial Mode ~ 48 minute F#* 40 minute (1/4 Fund.Harmonic) A 29 mir.ute (1/2 Non Raaial Mode) D A 5( minute 3 minute F/* (In Chromosphere) ~arge Solar Peaks at 69.4 minutes 46.3 minutes 24.2 minutes 20.6 minutes B FI F#* Ab*

An entire spectrum of pulsations is known to exist from 160 minutes period down to 3 minutes

(In Photosphere)

Observed Solar Cycles in Minutes 1975 1973 52- E 47:-9 F#* Db* C 30.3 33 21.0 Gil 23.8 FH* 17. 1 B# 16.7 " 14.6 n 13.3 E 11.8 Gb 11.9 Fl· .Gb 10.4 Ab 10·5 8.8 B Bb* 9.2 C# 7.9 Db* 7.6 D 7.2 7.0 D#*
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1981 6b":1b" c G 44.66 A 39.0 32.1 CH* D 28.7 F 24.8 21.0 Gil A 19.5 E 13.3 12. 1 F 11 .4 Gb* 10.7 GIi* A 9.9 BII 8.5 7.8 CII Db* 7.6 6.9 'J# E 6.7 6.S E

Qaee again the Super octave reveals itself in the solar system spectrua of planetary revolutions,there being 20 octayes fro. the slow 247 years of Pluto to tAe fa8~ 7 hours of tae 8mall moons of JupiieritAe rotatioa periods are .ithin 10 octayes for tAe plaaets, the satellite8 have not bee. deterained due to lack ot available data. 'igure " displays many lar~related key notes.

Pll1 18 tae ••11 lea.w. BUIlDer .aiCA, •• eD \lIL1 ia subtracted tr.. 1t, t1 equal. it.... reCiprocal. It represents a eoillcidiJlgof the prooesses ot addi"ion Uld aultiplicatioll,a aeana of gro.th"lIIovoae.t. 1. two di.eJ18i.n. at oDce,a. it u interdi.e.$io.al tr.... toraer. t. Pythagorean_, this tora ••bodies the d1n .. ic8 of the r~tlu1ic genorat1e •• f the COS.O~I a:a.cl ita haraonic principle (repre_ell ,u1 t, veraal lovo. ('I) Its deciaal value of 1.6180339.1ies between the Major .ixta and Min.r 8ixth tor all mu.ic 80&1••• (See figure 14). Here i"8.... Keely .aid about the musical s1xtll ill the language of t harao.ic8,"!Ae sixth n.t. in the scale reduces the range .t ••lecular vibrations thU8 illereasing solid1ticatioa". !he Boldea ratio(~)18 a co_o. reourriJla BWlber found 111nature. It 18 found ill tae .piral a:r::,: arraaceaent .t .el1a.on the surtace ot a pilleapp1e,th, spiral ratio. of leave. gr ••lag OD a ate.,the whorls ot the florets of a sunflower aDd maRl .thers. 'ala phen.aeDa is called 'phylotaxis' &ad is the tend.nol in a.ture to .p1ral. Ihile read1q Peter !o.pkin~,,'lIYsterieB of the Mexi.an Pyruida', it was revealed that ~ or 1.618 .ight be an index of ti•• i.corppl1'.ej;~d· i.t. the law8 of eele8t;.~a.l· Ilee.anics. Calculatioa8 quickl1 sllowed that t.e revolution period ot tke lartb di~id.d by ~ equal. exactly the revolution peri.d of Venus;I theD weBt •• te solYe t.e Plaaetar1 q revolution peri.ds for the".hQle .18te. al 8een 1B f1guro~ ll.te that all express!e •• liliiliaeaiaple fraetions as per ausie S.al.8,&180) the solar aagnetic fiold _ay b. used as the generat~, value tor the complete ••lar slst.a. TAese ¢ calculation8 reveal possible positioninga for aa lel undetect •• planets,.uch additional work 18 Deeded in .rder to include t.e relationships of tke planetary aoons.
(

Solar System Inter-Resonance Based on A=440Hz.,(r) means retrograde,* is 1/4 tone Pluto 247years ell ) Neptune 164y Ab ---) Uranus 84 Y G# Revolution of Planets and Satel~ltee ---) Chiron 51 y Ell ---) Saturn 29.5y D Jupiter 1 1 .9y F#* ---) Vesta 5.59y G ) d.61y Juno Bb Ceres 4.6 y Bb D ---) Pallas 3.63y Repr~senting the now Sinope 2.07y C r --known Solar System of ~ Octaves Pasiphae 2.02y CII*r Carme 1.89y Db*r D ) 1.8Ey M8.rs :::) Octave deslg.natlon Ananke 1 .72y Ebr based upon key of C Phoebe F/*r . 1 .5 y Earth LOy ell* Neried 360.0days CII* Rotation of Planete Lyslthea 264.0d Gb ) Elara 260.0d Gb* Venus Himalia 251.0d G 243~ays 5832houre Ol.*f--l ..,~ 1406h Ab --Mercury 58.6d Leda <Jr; 239.0d Moon 29.5d 708h Au ::: Venus 225.0d A :::) Pluto Db 88.0a Mercury 6.25d 150h B ) Mare 24.5h Gb*:::) Iapetus D# 79.3d ---) Earth Moon 24 h u:» G~ 27.3d AII* ) ~~¢r Uranus D 21 .3d Hypericn ) ~7.sfh.An Neptune 16.5d Callisto F# Vesta 10.6h A Titan 15.9d Saturn 10.3h AI* Oberon A# 13.5d Pallas ) 10.0h All 8.7d Titania F ) Jupiter 9.8h Bb Ganymede 7.2d Ab* Ceree 9.1 h BII 6.4d Charon B Cr Triton 5.9d Fb* Rhea 4.5d ) 4.1 d Umbriel "i'# Ab* Europa 3.6d Db* 2.7d Dione. B 2.7d Db* Dione 2.5d Ariel n# ) 1.9d G#* S17 1.9d G#* 316 1 .ss G;;* Tethys 1 .8d Ab* 10 Miranda 1. 4d e#* 1 .4<1 Enceladus C# ) 1 .26d D#* Deimos 22.6hours G# Mimas 16.7h e#* S11-S10 16.2h Db* 1979J2 15.0h DII S13 ) ld.6h Eb S14 E 14.3h S15 12.0n G Amalthea D 7.7h Phobos ) 7.1 h E 1979Jl-J3

/2-

.,1"e bruary 198~

---

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e February 1983 Solar System Inter-Resonance Based on A : 440Hz. Frequency in Hertz, r means retrograde, * is 1/4 tone
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Ea:r:th Related C;,£c1ll Earth Revolution el/* Earth Rotation G Earth Circumference Bb* Geostationary Orbit Db* (35 ,850 Km.) Schumann Resonance B Moon Circumferential Path about Earth B Earth cycles 53.1 minutes E 54.7 minutes Eb* Tesla Earth Resonance 2 h 49 min. Ab Axial Precession G Axial Tilt A Eccentricity FH Hindu Cosmic Cycles Brhaspati 3600y Prajapati 216,000 Ka11 Yuga 432,000 Dvapara Yuga 864,000 Treta Yuga 1296,000 Kita Yuga 1728,000 Maha Yuga 4,320,000 Kalpa Yuga
4,320,000,000

Human Jll:orhythms 23days 552hours Physical 672h Emotional 28d Intellectuaf 792h 33d

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Brahma Cycle 8,640,000,000 C#* Duration of the Universe 155,520,000,000,000 B

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I. aQ e.. ut tllley e are extre.ely powerful, coincide." wit. tlleso

called ~.. a1.. 'woodpecker' .ignala be1D« continually .eard .n the HP band. for aaQ1 years,and they reseable the suggested wa .. pattern of e the 'eala llapifying 'fransa1tter.(12). fhi. 10 B¥t • ip.l • aee•• to b. tnte.ded fer planetary effecte and relate. t. the 'e.la Barth treque •• y .t !.6 Ha. by a faeter .f Pi/2,as i8 toraulated by Caarle. Yost in h1s Tesla Experimenta.(13). 'fae 10.4 Hs. rate also haa .ther 1.pertant Aaraonic 1.plications, for exaaplea 1t liea exactly 20 •• tave. above the Eartll's .e .. circu.tere.ee wav.length;it falls exactly 20 .etav •• ~el •• the KKK frequency .t oxygen;1t is exactly 12 octaves below the Keely trequency of 42',800 IHz,and when the .pherical resonance cayi ty tonnlla,a. per the Refere~oe Data for Radio Engineera,was calculatea t.r Eartllt1t resulted in a value of 20.6 Hz.tor nearly its first har.onic. Bow these pulsations are being used is not known,however Robert Beck'a exper1ments in~1oate that fielde .f 10.0 and 10.'5 Hz. produce a nt••u.iag and alert1ag" reaction effect--general17 descr1bed as refresh1ng.(10).
"

While working with prime number sequences and powera of ~ for the planetary •• ti.ns,I awoke one morning with the very str.ng dre .. aem.ry .t the Buggestion to calculate the 7th harmonic .f the speed of light vel.city. Immediate response revealed the expeoted auperhar.onic values;later that saae day the urge ca.e to try 80.e subhar.on1e calculations and,quite surprisinglY,on the 7th sUD-aaraonie of the velocity ot light was a number value of the saae seque~ce as the (ee17 aisassociation f'requency(42t857},except in this case it is in b/sec.

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I decided to calculate and plot the EM velocity(C) and its bar_onios as if it w.uld fora a eiroular path for ene lisht se••:nd. This i8 shown in figur. 16; the 7th sub-harll.nie of C would be fOUDd .utside the .t,: oircuaterence .f the Earth,and the 8th within. Unexpeotedly t.e 2nd and 5~ sub-aar.onics tall direotly within the highest energy levels ot tae Van Allen belts;and the 6th super-harmonic of C ia exactly on the Moen's orbital path. (Figure 17). hrtller de.elopments of tlliaunusual pheno.ena feund Jupiter's orbit to be looated at the major fifth above C,5aturn's orbit at 'Ute_jor third abeve C,Venus at exactly 2 octaves below C,and I.ptune at one octa.e below t.e light vel.city. The S.lar circumferenoe wa. at the aajer flft. abeve 2 C. It l.ok. aa if Naiure i. sele_tiD« el.otromap_ti_ velo.ity haraonics for its cone'iruc,j1olls. Add1tioul work will be developed to expand this unexpected possibility. It science CaD use tll.Light Year term t•• eaaur.e the Cas.oa,why net tll.Light Seo.ad ala.'? Anetaer c.naection to thl. unoovering .f velocity aaraonica came when I fouad that the velocity of Sound thru the Earth's ataosphere 1s within t.e 20th octave below the vel.city of light. It occurs as an enharaoni_ third within its octav.;this aay be seen fro. figure 18. Figure 19 gives the sound frequenoies 40 octaves down fro. the total visibl. 11ght .pectru.;once again thia is the frequenoy range often suggested b7 Keely to perfer. his sound-sti.ulated experl.ents. If ••und thru the atmosphere is 20 octaves below th_ velocity of light,could there be a ••diu•• t energy transfer 20 .ctave. a_.ve the 1igat velooiiy? 'ell,a few calculations were perforaed to oheck on this possibility. Tae Earth's aean distance wavelengt. gave a !requenc1 of '33 Hz,;7 .c~ave8 above that .alue i8 ~ae Keely frequency &ad 5 octaves below is the 10.4 Hz. frequencY,wh1chi8 being trans.1tted and shifted allover the Planet. Nitola Tesla was net believed •• en he _laimad to be able to send signals faster than the light vel._itiea. What do ,.u think'?

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Th. peak huaaa,,!lld Earth ~ radiati.ns are coinci~.nt a~ }I101' Hz. or 105 Aag8trOas, .~Qt'e:also .0 ocuv8a above the braiDwave frequency of 27." Hz•• ithin the beta apectr",.. See flgure 20.•. Thi. s~e rbytlua hae "rao.lcs .f ta. •••• olrowaferenc. and the Eartll d.l_e~.r. Allot the Solar sistem radius,diaa.~.r and circumference wavelengths fall .xao~ly within the h~ braiDwave frequencie8;lt ia already .id.ly reo.sa1 ... that the S..u.... reso.ance .r 7.8 Ra. i. a .eaaured fac",. A .i.iliar p•• no••na tor the .t.er ••lar B7at.. b.d1e. ".uld b. expeoted. Ear~'8 rotation frequency .ultiplied oy 20 .ctav •• ia found.it.in the alpha rA7taaa; •• st of the other planet. have a sl.iliar relationship aar'•• nioally. (,'.) Tae .to. d1u.ter freqlle.oie. di.. de4 d.w. 60 oc'ta,v are l'.Wl4 i •• wi~iD t.e delta rh¥tAa8. Huaan b1orAyt .... f tAO pAjaloal,1nt.111cenoe, and e.o~1.u.lrat •• ,corresp.D4. ~o •• ti••• or taelartll.Jup1~er and. the 1I•••• shifted .cavely. T•• pr.a1A.nt AU.aIl brainwaye rhytluaa aav •• uper-eo ...... aoroe.saio all''- .iorocos.io oen:n.ectloa . •• Bet.een 1 and 10 Hz. there exists a sharp d.cllne in the .pectrum due t. the tact that wa..... these frequenci •• are 8tr.ng1y ab80rbed . at 1n t.e 1 8p.er. _d practioally net au.rbed Ilear the Ear~' •• urface, ... thus allowina a relativeJ.1 qu1et spaoe tor suoll f'requelLoy1.Jlterao'\10D.s •. SigDala 1183b. trans.i tted ... r the planet 1"01' e th1. spectnua wi ~ ••• t no 1 8.f eipal strength. (1') ••
<,

Uteril'1&' the brain.aye rhytluls,b7th1.eatrainaeJ'1li,e1t.aer or art1f1c1al1; or natural17 .&1' all.wtUD1n& or. thia Eta apectrwa and, 1. eff.ct, other super and. SUb ecta .. frequency ranges. (10) e

AS •• st 'runners' w111 m•• ,a smoolih,high eaerg state of ••ye.ent maJ b. achle"ed,often call.d. a 's.cond wi.~. I ha...f.und when I aa e in tllat coatortable running .ode,1IY le, farm .otio.~ are attWled w1 tla the a.art beat.,&lld ta. breathing i. exactly 2 octaye. al••er. By alter1nc the breathine rate ta•••• 1. b.dy sl.te. can be tune~ to a hig.er .r lo.er rhytha.
the human bodl 1s to receive energy i.pulees and to be ••ept into activ1ty by the.e i.pulsea,or .treua of toroe, e.aaat1nB fro••••• 80urc. or o~er.
'lh. function

or

Huaan bod.1e8 are perfectly designed pulsating unit. of a co.plex
arOu.p1J&s v1bratiq .1'

oo.po.ante of 8D8rla,87Dohroni •• 4 .1.an orc••• tratien .t perfect rhy'tha.

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Througa Harmonics,the

mat.ematic.

of tae aneient.,a tool may be

utilized for the furiAer under8tan~in, and developing ~he -any wonders of creation. Centuries betore the works of Kepler,Bewten or Eustein expanaed t•• Auman vi.ion of the universe,a science .f haraon1 prevailed. Thte path of adherent. has never been abandoned through.ut the cycles oftl.e,but only loat fro. sight by the flo. of scientific pursuit. The .1n •••• of Ne.t.nlanlleca.,nic& and llelativlt1 await t.e reopening of the .ind ••• f Han.nle. to allow i. the Light,unraveled for ualfied understanding. By looking with auslc th••rY,the Solar Systell exhibit. multiple res.naa.es .f Phi di.enslons and mUlti-octave motio.a. Tae Earth and 1I00D .plq up.n a single cbord in concert with :tlae sol.,r eli.play. Nature .elects hara.n1cs of Light to deaip her Yaried8pectr'WlS ot change u.d. arelaitecture. Ta. huaan experienee aen8es ire. all airectioDs thie ..a.il1& web if interplaying ausie of the spherea,a. a living sundial of cos.ic force. Te q~.te fr•• ialter RusselI,"The breathing of the One creative force,ia your breatAing,and my breathi.g and. that of the mead.ow violet.

A fine .ist fro. nature's waterfall catch •• the late day solar rays, turn1ng to red,then so.e pink,with orange,yellow,green,blue and lots of varied vi.let;.uddenly i~8 a brilliant rainbow dazzaling bef.re eyes 01 w.nder. Just as suddenly its two rainbows gather1Dc up.n slate colered cloud.;and then a third alao,as if to announce or maybe celebrate. f.e stage Aa. been set;iind riae8 8wiftly in eresoend ••• Trees wavine verdaat leaves perfor. a aerry jig,enticing Pl••er. and Grass to join the rhytn.. Bright pink Cloud8,change to gray;a swirling impish gray,ala.at green .. if to say,it's n.w ., play. StreakB .f Light pro.laia .the act .f deep voiced Thunder's curtain call as eager Rain begin. t. fall,after a ,long day of cli.bing and ~uapiac in Barth'8 great ocean .f Air. goes on;Lightning flashes br1,ht,Taunder's aeS8age as if .f cosmic source,rattles the listening ear drua. Wind carefully conduct. tae .ove.ents .f Rain's prancing rhytAa. TAO conoert i8 long, powerful,surrendering and olear;1ts .ag10 creates s.ella .f i.nised oxygea,quicken1ag the breath,flasAinc through aeurens wit. delight, Bow awakeas ~Gughout every cell. SlowlY,hardly even not1ced,QuletnesB ascends with a new beat;drips of life bloed tall around thirsty pin1ons;tiny liquid drops creep over delicate Bl.s •••• ;deep Shad.w. ot Darka.Be deecend;Pragraaoe pervade. the transt.rmed theater,StillnesB .lithers on to cever t•• rbytha. Cloud .ixed Moon moves into view,tollowed by waltzing stare of variea Aue,bill.wing Mist clears the stage &8 C.yote announces the evea1n8 program. Cosmic dra.a commencee,cycles renewed a8 Super Nova ki.dlea it's nourish1ng Ligh~,and Bar.on, goes

'h.pert.raance

.a.

L18~en!

Reterellce Botes: (1) Cook and laaui, Tile Doctr1ne .t Truth, GOLDO!
(2) la,Ja.r,Hana.

'kroa818,' Taeory of World Hanton1cs Pl •• al:t&,re Press ,Boato. 1964
The Selonoe 01' Mus1c IlarousWu-d and Co. Latd

(3) hIIa.y,D.C.

Loaden

1893
1932

lasser,Joseph

'••• ry of Ivolv!ng tonality All. Library of lIu.1coloU III

(4) 0•• e1',.1111 B., 1Ia'\ll' •• et.. o.i •• Vol. 1 .. ".10-. _.ta.onic. Vol 2 !e81a Book 00. _ll1brae,0' (5) UoJu.ri, •• , .1., Barth po•• r Spectr\lllano. It. Potential. • 2n4 Interaatioaal sr.p ••1ua en I•• -Oon~••tional EIleru ,.elm.logy, .tlanta 198' (6) M.ore,Olara Bloo.f1eld, I.e1,y and His Diecoyerie. Moor. ,IeS&D ,Paul ,!renca, !ruber and Co. Lend.. 189' (7)Iiussell,Walter, !he Un1versal ane (8)Coll1a.,IiGdnel, The TiLeory of Celestial Influence Vacent stuart, L..don 1954 (9) Lawlor, Robert , Sacred Geo.otry Crossroad, BY 1982 (10) 100k,110\)ort,iLl Map.tic P1e1ds and lEG Intra1mlellt berO' Unll.ited 12 June 1978 Bl•• ,'i111.. , Magnify1ng Transmitters illAction Planetary Assoc. ter Clean :lDerQ, lewsletter, June 81 (11) least,Robert 0., CRC Handbook of Chellistry and Physic. Booa l1aton,Pla 1981 (12) PuAarlciL,ADdr13a, The Payaics ot tae Tesla Magnifying Trans.ltt.r Planetary Assoc. for Olean Energy Jl.~ 76 (13) 1••t,Charlee, fAe teala hperl.e.t, !eala Bo.k 0•• 198' ( lalt,Jaa •• K., Propagation of ELl Eleotro.agnatic Wave. IEKI Journal of Oc.anic Eng1neeriug Yol. OE He. 2 April 1977 «11h»)lIoDe11,Lu ther , Electromagnet Speotrum Chart North AJlerican AViation Ino.• (15) Dean,Dr.Jaaes. Correspondence

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