EMERGENCY FIRST RESPONSE

Instructor Trainer Guide

®

Primary and Secondary Care and Care for Children

emergencyfirstresponse.com
Product No. 67010 (Rev. 10/06) Version 3.0 © Emergency First Response Corp 2006

Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide

www.emergencyfirstresponse.com Emergency First Response Corp. 30151 Tomas Street Æ Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688 Toll Free US and Canada: 800 337 1864 Tel: +1 949 766 4261 Æ Fax: +1 949 858 8211 info@emergencyfirstresponse.com Emergency First Response Ltd. Unit 7, St Phillips Central Æ Albert Rd Æ Bristol Æ BS2 0PD Æ England Tel: +44 117 300 7328 Æ Fax: +44 117 971 0400 info@emergencyfirstresponse.co.uk Emergency First Response Europe Ltd. Oberwilerstrasse 3 Æ 8442 Hettlingen Æ Switzerland Tel: +41 52 316 3535 Æ Fax: +41 52 304 1498 info@emergencyfirstresponse.ch Emergency First Response (Asia Pacific) Pty Ltd. Unit 3, 4 Skyline Place Æ Frenchs Forest NSW 2086 Æ Australia Tel: +61 2 9454 2980 Æ Fax: +61 2 9454 2999 info@emergencyfirstresponse.com.au Emergency First Response (EFR) Primary and Secondary Care and Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide © Emergency First Response Corp., 2002-2006. All rights reserved. Produced by DSAT (Diving Science and Technology Corp.) for Emergency First Response Corp. Portions of the Appendix of the guide may be reproduced by EFR Instructor Trainers to use in EFR-sanctioned training, but not for resale or personal gain. No other reproduction is allowed without the express written permission of the publisher. Published by Emergency First Response Corp. 30151 Tomas Street Æ Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 92688
Printed in the U.S.A. Product No. 67010 (Rev. 10/06) Version 3.0

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Section One – Course Overview and Standards

Contents
Section One
Emergency First Response Instructor Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Course Overview and Standards Sample Course Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Emergency First Response Instructor Crossover Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Emergency First Response Instructor Retraining Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Care for Children Instructor Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Qualifications and Renewal

Section Two
Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer Presentations 1 – Course Orientation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2 – Emergency First Response Program Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 3 – Learning and Instruction Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 4 – Teaching Emergency First Response Skills Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 5 – Care for Children Course Standards and Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 6 – Care for Children Skills Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 7 – Organizing an Emergency First Response Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 8 – Mannequin Cleaning Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 9 – Marketing Emergency First Response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Emergency First Response Instructor Exam Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

Appendix
Appendix Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1

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Begen. ILCOR is an international standards group representing many of the world’s major resuscitation organizations. FAFOM. the Australian Resuscitation Council. and New Zealand Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Mountain West Anesthesia. EMT Training Director.D. products and emergency care go to www. USA Technical Consultant Jon Sowers. A source authority for the development of content material in the Emergency First Response program is 2005 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations. Circulation. MBChB. the European Resuscitation Council. The Emergency First Response curricula is based on current (2005 – 2006) patient care standards as published in the American Heart Association. DRCOG. MBChB. Auckland. 112:IV-1-IV-5.Occupational Medicine School of Medicine. Corp. BSc. courses. Norway Brian Smith.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Acknowledgments Patient Care Standards Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) follow emergency considerations and protocols from the consensus view of the Basic Life Support (BLS) Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). Emergency Medical Training. UK Des Gorman. New Zealand Jan Risberg. MRCGP Medical Director. © 2005 American Heart Association® Acknowledgments International Medical Review Phil Bryson. M.D. DCH. M. Inc. For More Information about Emergency First Response. 4 . University of Auckland.com.emergencyfirstresponse. PhD NUIAS. PhD Head . Utah. Diving Disease Research Centre. 2005..

Through independent study. Secondary Care (First Aid) and Care for Children courses. classroom sessions and practice teaching assignments.Section One – Course Overview and Standards Emergency First Response® Instructor Training Course Overview and Standards The Emergency First Response Instructor Course provides qualified individuals with the additional training necessary to teach the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR). instructor candidates learn to conduct the Emergency First Response programs. Individuals who are current CPR/first aid instructors with another qualifying organization may choose to earn the Emergency First Response Instructor rating by completing a prescribed program based on portions of the Emergency First Response Instructor Course or the Emergency First Response Instructor Crossover Program. This course builds on the instructor candidates’ skills as primary and secondary care providers and focuses on developing their instructional abilities. This program gives credit for their teaching experience and focuses on familiarizing them with the Emergency First Response program philosophy and structure. 5 .

• 6 . Refine instructor candidates’ primary care.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Goals The Emergency First Response Instructor Course goals are to: 1. Assure that instructor candidates understand the Emergency First Response program structure. 5. secondary care and Care for Children skills to a role-model level. paramedics. 2. 18 years of age Note • Those with current CPR/First Aid instructor credentials from other organizations may take the Emergency First Response Instructor Crossover Program. Encourage instructor candidates to be active Emergency First Response Instructors and to use their skills to train others in the community. doctors) can enroll without having taken the provider-level courses within the past 24 months. Provide instructor candidates with practical suggestions for organizing and marketing their Emergency First Response courses. performance-based and learner-centered. 3. Prerequisites To enroll in an Emergency First Response Instructor Course. Familiarize instructor candidates with the Emergency First Response program philosophy and prepare them to teach courses that are low-stress. 4.g. Have completed a sanctioned course in basic first aid within the past 24 months 3. EMTs. See instructor crossover requirements further into this section Practicing medical professionals (e. an individual must: 1. nurses. Have completed a sanctioned course in adult and child/infant CPR within the past 24 months 2. requirements and procedures.

This ratio may increase to a maximum of 24:1 when using one or more assistants qualified as follows: • • A current Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer A current Emergency First Response Instructor. The maximum instructor candidate-to-mannequin ratio is 12:1. If possible. Training Materials Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer ® Required Materials To teach the Emergency First Response Instructor Course. you must have: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer Guide Emergency First Response Instructor Course Lesson Guides (if available in a language understood by instructor candidates) Emergency First Response Primary and Secondary Care Instructor Guide Care for Children Instructor Guide Emergency First Response Participant Manual Care for Children Participant Manual Emergency First Response Video Care for Children Video Emergency Care at a Glance Course Completion Authorization form and Certificate CPR Mannequins (adult and infant mannequins required. child mannequin recommended) Automated External Defibrillator (AED) training unit (it’s recommended to have child pads in addition to adult pads) Oxygen unit Roller bandages Triangle bandages 7 . Use of more mannequins is recommended.Section One – Course Overview and Standards Supervision and Ratios Only current Emergency First Response Instructor Trainers qualify to teach the Emergency First Response Instructor Course. It’s recommended that mannequins are capable of simulating an airway obstruction if the airway is not positioned properly. have a variety of mannequin types available to familiarize candidates with differences. (See Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer Qualifications and Renewal). The instructor candidate-to-Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer ratio is 12:1.

etc. instructor candidates are required to have personal set of the following materials for the instructor course and to teach Emergency First Response courses (unless they are unavailable in a language the instructor understands): • • • • • • • • Emergency First Response Primary and Secondary Care Instructor Guide Emergency First Response Care for Children Instructor Guide Emergency First Response Course Knowledge Reviews Emergency First Response Participant Manual Emergency First Response Care for Children Participant Manual Emergency First Response Video Emergency First Response Care for Children Video Emergency Care at a Glance In addition. rolled newspaper.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide • • Splints (commercial. the instructor candidate must have the following materials for skill development practice: • • • Gloves Ventilation barrier Gauze pads and dressings for bandaging 8 . ventilation barriers. padded wood. heavy cardboard. gauze pads and dressings for bandaging Recommended Materials • • • • • • • Blankets or towels for shock management Rugs or floor coverings for comfort and protection during skill development Bag marked Biohazard for disposal of barriers to show as example Different types of ventilation barriers to show as examples Phone and other props to use during scenarios Course Completion Authorization envelope to show as example Disinfecting solution for Mannequin Cleaning Workshop ® Emergency First Response Instructor Candidate Required Materials Because teaching Emergency First Response courses requires the ability to easily reference standards and maintain updated materials for reference.) Extra gloves.

Specifically identify what was effective about a participant’s skill demonstration. Demonstrate role-model technique for all 10 (required and recommended) Emergency First Response Primary and Secondary Care program skills. Automated External Defibrillator use – Child. [You. must go over Knowledge Reviews with candidates to make sure they understand any missed questions and fully comprehend the material. the Instructor Trainer. Care for Children.] 7. 4. Make general statements and suggestions that avoid singling out individuals and causing embarrassment. Complete the four Self-Study Knowledge Reviews (Primary and Secondary Care Program Standards. Teach at least two primary or secondary care skills from the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) or Secondary Care (First Aid) courses. Demonstrate role-model technique for Care for Children skills: One Rescuer – Child CPR. Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies). Foster teamwork by asking participants to encourage and guide each other. 5. Reinforce proper technique by pointing out effective demonstrations by other participants. 6. During skill teaching presentations.] 2. Teach at least one skill from the Care for Children course. candidates must identify problems or ineffective techniques and appropriately correct them using at least two of the following positive coaching methods: • • • • • Allow self correction then reinforce positive outcome. an individual must meet the following performance requirements: 1. [You must verify that all skills are performed correctly and slowly enough to adequately exhibit details of the skill.Section One – Course Overview and Standards Performance Requirements and Assessment To be certified as an Emergency First Response Instructor. 3. [You must verify that all skills are performed correctly and slowly enough to adequately exhibit details of the skill.] 9 . staff or in the video. Participate in all (eight) required Emergency First Response Instructor Course Presentations. One Rescuer – Infant CPR. Conscious Choking Child and Conscious Choking Infant.

You. Successfully complete the Emergency First Response Instructor written examination – score 75 percent or higher. Sequence and Duration You must conduct the required Emergency First Response Instructor Course Presentations in sequence. not time-based. the Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer. 10 . Completion Procedures After satisfactorily completing all performance requirements. must sign the application verifying that the candidate met all course performance requirements. however. Keep in mind. an instructor candidate applies to become an Emergency First Response Instructor (which also includes authorization to conduct the Care for Children course) by submitting an Emergency First Response Instructor application with the appropriate processing fee to your Emergency First Response Office. candidate experience and available equipment will influence the length of the practice teaching sessions and course duration. [You must review the exam with candidates to make sure they understand any missed questions and fully comprehend the material. Applicants may purchase materials and begin teaching after they receive authorization to teach from Emergency First Response. that it is performance-based. and candidates may need additional time to meet all performance requirements. The Emergency First Response Instructor Course is typically a two-day program with a class of 12 instructor candidates. however. its recommended place is after Presentation 7 – Organizing an Emergency First Response Course. Refer to the Sample Course Schedule for more information.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 8.] * Recommended skills (AED and emergency oxygen) are required in the Emergency First Response Instructor course. The optional Mannequin Cleaning Workshop may be conducted at any time during the course. The number of candidates.

Each instructor must submit a course completion authorization for at least one course participant to meet renewal requirements. This approach ensures that both instructors receive teaching credit toward their next renewal. when medical standards change or new Emergency First Response programs are released. Individuals may also be eligible to renew if they have completed an Emergency First Repsonse instructor-level continuing education course during the previous two calendar years. instructors agree to read The Responder sent by your Emergency First Response Office. Where legally required for official recognition. Occasionally. or Care for Children Instructor Upgrade. By renewing. instructors may be required to attend an update seminar to retain or upgrade their rating. To maintain the Emergency First Response Instructor rating. Renewal requirements include teaching at least one Emergency First Response course every two years. Emergency First Response Instructors who do not meet renewal requirements and let their rating lapse may have to complete the Emergency First Response Instructor Retraining program or repeat the Emergency First Response Instructor Course. the individual should sign one or more of the course completion authorizations for that course.Section One – Course Overview and Standards Emergency First Response Instructor Renewal ® It is important to renew even if you haven’t yet met teaching status requirements – so you don’t miss any important standards-related information. (Contact your local Emergency First Response Office for verification). 11 . and make changes to the Emergency First Response courses based on new procedures or requirements outlined in The Responder. individuals must renew their rating every two years by submitting a renewal application to Emergency First Response. other renewal requirements may apply. Instructor programs include First Aid at Work (in Asia Pacific region and the United Kingdom). If an instructor chooses to team-teach with another instructor in conducting a course.

Teaching Emergency First Response Skills Workshop 2.5 hour 1.0 hour 1.Mannequin Cleaning Workshop Presentation 9 .75 hour .0 hours 2.0 hour 9 hours Day 2 Presentation 4 .Emergency First Response Program Philosophy Presentation 3 .5 hours 1.Marketing Emergency First Response Written Exam 2. Care for Children Instructor Guide and complete the four self-study knowledge reviews.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Sample Course Schedule (Hours approximate.0 hours 4.5 hours .Care for Children Course Standards and Content Presentation 6 .Learning and Instruction Workshop Presentation 4 . Day 1 Presentation 1 .Course Orientation Presentation 2 . based on 12 instructor candidates) Prior to the course.0 hour 8.5 hour 1.0 hours 1. have instructor candidates obtain an Emergency First Response Instructor Guide.Organizing an Emergency First Response Course Presentation 8 .75 hours 12 .Teaching Emergency First Response Skills Workshop (continued) Presentation 5 .Care for Children Skills Workshop Presentation 7 .

Deutsches Rotes Kreuz. Document current authorization to teach pediatric emergency care courses for another qualifying organization.Section One – Course Overview and Standards Emergency First Response® Instructor Crossover Program Individuals who are current CPR/first aid instructors with another qualifying organization may earn the Emergency First Response Instructor rating by completing an entire Emergency First Response Instructor Course or by attending an Instructor Crossover Program. 13 . or c.* 2. Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation. American Red Cross. Contact your local Emergency First Response office for additional qualifying organizations. American Safety and Health Institute. Cruz Roja de Mexico. Queensland Ambulance Service. Have completed the Emergency First Response Care for Children course within the past 24 months. Meet one of the following criteria: a. Complete Emergency First Response Instructor Course Presentation 5 (Care for Children Course Standards and Content) and 6 (Care for Children Skills Workshop) as part of the Crossover Program. Prerequisites To enroll in an Instructor Crossover Program. Hold a current CPR/first aid instructor rating with another qualifying organization.* or b. * Other qualifying organizations may include: American Heart Association. South African Red Cross Society and St. Medic First Aid. an individual must: 1. John’s Ambulance.

Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide

Supervision, ratios, training material requirements and completion procedures are the same as for the Emergency First Response Instructor Course. Typically the Instructor Crossover Program can be conducted in one full day. Keep in mind, however, that it is performance-based and instructor candidates may need additional time to meet all performance requirements. Incorporating instructor self-study There are two required components of the Instructor Crossover Program that may be completed through self-study: • • The Program Standards, Care for Children, Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies Instructor Knowledge Reviews; and Viewing all skill segments from the Emergency First Response video and the Care for Children video and reviewing all skill performance requirements in the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide and the Care for Children Instructor Guide.

When appropriate, have candidates complete these components before coming to the Instructor Crossover Program. This gives you more in-class time to focus on the required presentations and facilitate skills practice. Use the following Emergency First Response Instructor Course presentations to conduct the Instructor Crossover Program in this sequence: 1. Presentation 1 – Course Orientation 2. Presentation 2 – Emergency First Response Program Philosophy 3. Presentation 5 – Care for Children Course Standards and Content 4. Presentation 7 – Organizing an Emergency First Response Course • Administer the Emergency First Response written exam.

Note
• Teaching Emergency First Response Skills Workshop, and Presentation 9 – Marketing Emergency First Response Courses are optional in the crossover program. When time allows, please include these presentations, as well as Presentation 6 – Care for Children Skills Workshop in your crossover programs.

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Section One – Course Overview and Standards

To be certified as an Emergency First Response Instructor through the Instructor Crossover Program, an individual must meet the following performance requirements: 1. Complete the self-study knowledge reviews for Program Standards, Care for Children, Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies. 2. Watch all skill segments from the Emergency First Response Video and the Care for Children Video and review all skill performance requirements in the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide and the Care for Children Instructor Guide. (Independent Study Recommended) 3. Participate in the four required Instructor Crossover Program Presentations. 4. Successfully complete the Emergency First Response Instructor written examination by scoring 75 percent or higher.

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Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide

Emergency First Response®

Instructor Retraining Program
Emergency First Response Instructors who let their rating lapse may complete an Emergency First Response Instructor Retraining program to reactivate their rating. This program reviews the Emergency First Response program and highlights changes to course standards, materials, content or techniques. Participating instructors refresh their knowledge and skills while updating their instructional materials. Note that after an extended period of inactivity, individuals may need to repeat the entire Emergency First Response Instructor Course to regain their status. Verify with Emergency First Response that a retraining program will meet the participating instructor’s needs. Supervision and ratios are the same as for the Emergency First Response Instructor Course. Typically the retraining program is conducted in one day. Keep in mind, however, that it is performance-based and participating instructors may need additional time to meet requirements. In addition to all materials required for conducting an Emergency First Response Instructor Course, you must also assure that participating instructors have all editions of The Responder missed during their rating lapse. The Retraining Program consists of the following presentations from the EFR Instructor Course: 1. Presentation 1 – Course Orientation. Use the following segments of this presentation to guide your review: Information about how to maintain EFR instructor rating; and the Emergency First Response course structure, requirements and materials (highlighting recent standards changes and new materials).

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Adult CPR Conscious/Unconscious Choking – Adult One Rescuer. must sign the application verifying that the instructor met all retraining program requirements. 3. 5. 4. Participate in the three required Instructor Retraining Presentations. Infant CPR Conscious Choking – Infant Automated External Defibrillator (AED) use (adult and child) 4. Review all skill performance requirements in the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide and the Care for Children Instructor Guide. Presentation 2 – Emergency First Response Program Philosophy. Review all skill performance requirements in the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide and the Care for Children Instructor Guide. After satisfactorily completing all performance requirements. 3. Practice and demonstrate role-model technique for these skills: • • • • • • • Primary Assessment One Rescuer. Skills Practice/Demonstration. Demonstrate role-model technique for skills practiced and demonstrated during the Instructor Retraining Program. the Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer. To regain the Emergency First Response Instructor rating through the Instructor Retraining Program. Along with the application. Presentation 9 – Marketing Emergency First Response.Section One – Course Overview and Standards 2. instructors need to enclose a photo and processing fee. Successfully complete the Emergency First Response written examination by scoring 75 percent or higher. Administer the Emergency First Response Instructor written exam. the instructor selects the retraining box on the Emergency First Response Instructor Application and submits it to Emergency First Response. an individual must meet the following performance requirements: 1. 17 . Child CPR One Rescuer. b. You. Candidates must meet the following requirements: a. Candidates may begin teaching after receiving authorization from Emergency First Response. 2.

Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Emergency First Response® Care for Children Instructor Upgrade Emergency First Response Instructor courses teach instructors how to conduct the Care for Children course. who have not taught an Emergency First Response course during the two-year renewal period. 18 . Additionally. and Care for Children Video. that it is performance-based and participating instructors may need additional time to meet requirements. Care for Children Participant Manual. One Rescuer – Infant CPR 3. To successfully complete the Care for Children Instructor Upgrade program. the instructors should submit a separate Care for Children Instructor Application found in the Appendix of the Instructor Trainer Manual. you can conduct the upgrade program in one day. individuals. Conscious Choking Child 5. it is important to provide this training to the instructors without this credential. Keep in mind. instructor courses did not include this training which means that some Emergency First Response Instructors have not yet upgraded their rating to include these skills. Conscious Choking Infant Upon course completion. may be eligible to renew by completing a Care for Children Instructor Upgrade program. prior to 1 July 2005. candidates must complete the Care for Children self-study Knowledge Review (found in the Care for Children Instructor Guide) and demonstrate role-model techniques for the following Care for Children skills: 1. Automated External Defibrillator Use .Child 4. Because the Care for Children credential is required to teach the CPR & AED course (PADI Americas). Typically. however. Supervision and ratios are the same as for the Emergency First Response Instructor Course. and First Aid at Work programs (United Kingdom and Asia Pacific region). One Rescuer – Child CPR 2. In addition to all materials required for conducting Emergency First Response courses. However. the candidate is required to have the Care for Children Instructor Guide.

Instructor Crossover Program and Instructor Retraining Program. Emergency First Response Instructor Trainers are authorized to teach Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR). child and infant CPR/First Aid.Section One – Course Overview and Standards Emergency First Response® Instructor Trainer Qualifications and Renewal Emergency First Response Instructor Trainers are qualified individuals who have completed an Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer program. you must meet the following requirements: • • • • Be a current instructor with another organization qualified to teach adult. Have no verified quality assurance issues within the past 12 months. Teach at least one Emergency First Response Primary Care/Secondary Care course and Care for Children Course. Have taught at least 25 CPR/First Aid students. you must meet the following requirements: • • • Be an active Emergency First Response Primary Care/Secondary Care and Care for Children Instructor. If you are a CPR/First Aid Instructor with another organization and want to apply for the Emergency First Response Trainer course. Successfully complete the Emergency First Response Instructor Crossover Course. Have issued 25 EFR Completion Cards or taught at least five EFR courses. 19 . Prerequisites To enroll in an Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer Course. Secondary Care (First Aid) and Care for Children courses as well as the Emergency First Response Instructor Course.

Emergency First Response Instructor Courses. Emergency First Response Instructor Trainers who do not meet Trainer renewal requirements may renew as Emergency First Response Instructors if they meet instructor renewal requirements. To maintain the Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer rating. This approach ensures that both Instructor Trainers receive teaching credit toward their next renewal. Individuals may also be eligible to renew if they have completed an Emergency First Response instructor trainer-level continuing education course during the previous two calendar years. the individual should sign one or more of the Instructor Applications for that course. when medical standards change or new Emergency First Response programs are released. Instructor Crossover Programs and Instructor Retraining Programs based on new procedures or requirements outlined in The Responder. 20 . Instructor Trainer programs include First Aid at Work (in Asia Pacific region and the United Kingdom). By renewing. If an Instructor Trainer chooses to team-teach with another Instructor Trainer in conducting a course. Renewal requirements include teaching or assisting with at least one Emergency First Response Instructor Course. Retraining will be required for Emergency First Response Instructor Trainers who let their rating lapse. Occasionally. or Care for Children Trainer Upgrade.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Renewal Requirements To avoid missing important standards-related information. Instructor Trainers agree to read The Responder sent out by Emergency First Response and make changes to Emergency First Response courses. Where legally required for official recognition. Instructor Trainers may be required to attend an update seminar to retain or upgrade their rating. Instructor Crossover Program or Instructor Retraining Program every two years. you should renew this rating even if you haven’t yet met teaching requirements. individuals must renew their rating every two years by submitting a renewal application to Emergency First Response. other renewal requirements may apply. Each Instructor Trainer must submit an Instructor Application for at least one course participant to meet the renewal requirement.

Course Orientation Course Orientation Emergency First Response Instructor Training 2 21 . Obtaining and viewing the Emergency First Response Primary/Secondary Care Video and the Care for Children Video is highly recommended.Section Two – Presentations Emergency First Response® Instructor Trainer Presentations Presentation 1 Course Orientation DURATION: 2 hours Notes to Presenter 1.Study Knowledge Reviews. However. Prior to this session. Emergency First Response Instructor candidates must obtain a current Emergency First Response Primary and Secondary Care Instructor Guide. 2. Emergency First Response Participant Manual and Care for Children Participant Manual and complete the Self. It allows instructor candidates to ask specific questions about their training and also provides them with an overview of the Emergency First Response program. The sample contact is for your consideration and use. Care for Children Instructor Guide. 3. This orientation overviews Emergency First Response Instructor training goals and clearly identifies the course performance requirements. you’re encouraged to create your own contact and stylize the presentation as appropriate.

you’ve familiarized yourself with the Emergency First Response programs. you’re saying that it’s important for everyone to be prepared to take action. Standards and Materials Through self-study. your approach to the situation could vary. or fearfully back away and do nothing. 2 22 . similar emotions and approaches come into play – you can either focus and handle the situation to the best of your ability. Yet. No one wants to feel helpless and not know what to do when faced with a medical emergency. Emergency First Response Programs Overview — Course Structure. you could sit there feeling helpless and frustrated. Everyone has specific reasons for wanting to become an Emergency First Response Instructor. Thank you for caring enough to want to teach others to be Emergency Responders. We all know that the stress of being locked out is minor when compared to the anxiety associated with handling a life-threatening accident. Or. You’ll also be better prepared to fulfill your responsibilities as an Emergency First Response Instructor. You’ll share what you personally hope to gain from this training. Overview Welcome and Introduction The Emergency First Response programs provide people with proven skills to use in handling medical emergencies. We’ll review the basics and answer any questions you may have about the course or materials. you’re taking a proactive approach to emergency management. Given that you’ve chosen to enroll in this instructor training course. organized manner. The instructional method you’ll learn will also make participants more comfortable and willing to use their skills to help others.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Contact Have you ever locked your keys in the car or locked yourself out of the house? How does it feel? Depending on your personality. You may calmly go about solving the problem in a logical. Requirements. Overview Welcome and Introduction Emergency First Response Instructor Training Course Emergency First Response Program Overview – Course Structure. Requirements. experience and mood. Through this training process. you’ll learn teaching techniques that will help course participants recall critical steps when it counts. Standards and Materials Foundational Knowledge – Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies Course Orientation 3 Emergency First Response Instructor Course Knowing the scope of this course along with the completion requirements will help keep you focused and provide success. By being here.

the Emergency First Response program was reviewed by prominent physicians in Australia. 5 Course Orientation b. 2005. The Emergency First Response curricula is based on current (2005 – 2006) patient care standards as published in the American Heart Association. New Zealand. the Australian Resuscitation Council. and New Zealand Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Norway. Introduction A. c. Europe. Prior to its release. A source authority for the development of content material in the Emergency First Response program is 2005 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations Circulation. the European Resuscitation Council. you’ve familiarized yourself with how the human body systems work and how they are relevant to emergency response. This review confirmed that the program content is accurate and consistent with international guidelines. What is the medical basis for the Emergency First Response programs? 1. refer to Patient Care Standards under Acknowledgments in the front of your Instructor Guide. 2. 112:IV-1-IV-5. a. the United Kingdom and the United States. ILCOR is an international standards group representing many of the world’s major resuscitation organizations. You’ve also familiarized yourself with medical emergencies and how to recognize and provide patient care. Outline I. 23 . © 2005 American Heart Association®. Welcome u [Ask instructor candidates to introduce themselves and explain: • • Why they choose to take this course? How they plan to use their Emergency First Response Instructor rating?] Welcome to your Emergency First Response Instructor Training Course Why are you taking this course? How will you use this rating? II. This is primarily the Basic Life Support (BLS) Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR).Section Two – Presentations Foundational Knowledge: Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies Through self-study. 4 Course Orientation Introduction What is the medical basis for the Emergency First Response program? Internationally recognized guidelines produced by practicing emergency medical professionals ILCOR – BLS working group For source information. The programs are based on internationally recognized medical guidelines produced through a consensus process of practicing professionals in the emergency medical field.

The Emergency First Response programs take a flexible approach to accommodating different learning styles as well as cultural and language needs: a. a. Introduction What is the educational basis for the Emergency First Response programs? Well-researched instructional design Studies call for simpler. etc. Studies indicate that simpler. . B. a. Focusing on this simple. Independent study with objective-oriented. . Emergency Responders contribute to patient care. more conventional courses. 6 Introduction Medical basis . easy to remember sequence helps Emergency Responders fulfill their role in the Chain of Survival. By following the lifeline. second. objective-oriented and media-based course Research shows too much information and demand for perfection results in poor performance and lower retention 7 Course Orientation b. Instructor demonstrations with guided practice and positive reinforcement. Visual demonstrations and audio explanations in the Emergency First Response videos. Emergency Responders know what aspect of the situation takes priority so there’s no question as to what to do first. b. Emergency Responders learn to activate Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and immediately attend to most life-threatening conditions. To increase recall. b. Flexible approach to accommodate different learning styles and needs Graphic rich self-study materials Demonstrations on video Reinforcement Self-discovery and group practice Course Orientation b. . . 8 Introduction Instructor guidance and Educational basis . 24 4 . rather than interfere with an emergency medical situation. Research shows that too much information and excessive demand for precision actually results in poor skill performance and lower retention. The programs integrate CPR with other first aid skills to establish a consistent sequence for handling medical emergencies. objectiveoriented and media-based courses do a better job at teaching primary care skills and improving retention than do longer. c. This visual aid leads Emergency Responders through the ABCD’S of patient care. Reviewed by prominent physicians Follows priority of care used by professional emergency care providers Easy recall – ABCD’S of lifeline Course Orientation a. the Emergency First Response programs use the Lifeline diagram. graphics-rich manual. What is the educational basis for the Emergency First Response programs? 1. When faced with a complex situation. The Emergency First Response programs follow the same priorities of care used by professional emergency care providers. The programs are based on well-researched instructional design for skills training.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 3. Through repetition and practice during the course. 2. 4.

Refine your primary. Provide you with practical suggestions for organizing and marketing your Emergency First Response courses. e. The goals of this course are to: a. d. Complete the four Self-Study Knowledge Reviews. 11 10 EFR Instructor Training Course Goals … Refine your skills as role-model Provide practical organizational and marketing suggestions Encourage you to become an active instructor in your community Course Orientation EFR Instructor Training Course Performance Requirements … Complete Knowledge Review Participate in course presentations Practice teaching skills Demonstrate positive coaching techniques Demonstrate role-model technique Primary and Secondary Care + Care for Children Complete instructor examination Score 75 percent or higher Course Orientation d.Section Two – Presentations d. 2. requirements and procedures. c. We’ll look at the educational approach in more detail in the next session – Emergency First Response Program Philosophy. b. What are the Emergency First Response Instructor course goals and performance requirements? 1.] 25 . requirements and procedures Discuss EFR philosophy and prepare you to teach Course Orientation b. Participate in all (eight) required Emergency First Response Instructor course Presentations. Emergency First Response® Instructor course A. Encourage you to be an active Emergency First Response Instructor and use your skills to train others in your community. 9 EFR Instructor Training Course What are the Emergency First Response Instructor Training course goals and performance requirements? Goals Assure understanding of EFR program structure. performance-based and learner-centered. Demonstrate role-model technique for care for children skills. Assure that you understand the Emergency First Response Primary/Secondary Care and Care for Children course structure. Teach at least two primary or secondary care skills from the Emergency First Response program. secondary care and care for children skills to a role-model level. you must: a. c. Self-discovery through stress-free role-play and group practice. u [Review course schedule and candidate skill assignments as appropriate. Demonstrate role-model technique for all Emergency First Response program primary and secondary skills. f. Demonstrate positive coaching techniques in each primary and secondary skill taught. e. g. Familiarize you with the Emergency First Response program philosophy and prepare you to teach courses that are low-stress. III. Successfully complete the Emergency First Response Instructor written examination – score 75 percent or higher. 3. To successfully complete this course.

If you team-teach. to Emergency First Response. you may need to attend update seminars to retain or upgrade your rating. EFR Instructor Training Course What are the procedures for becoming an EFR Instructor? Complete course and submit application When authorized. EFR Instructor Training Course How do you maintain your rating? Submit renewal application to your EFR Office — every 2 years Teach at least one Emergency First Response course every 2 years If you team-teach. b. you’ll submit an Emergency First Response Instructor application. 3. you must sign and submit at least one Course Completion Authorization to get renewal credit for teaching. Occasionally. including a photo and application fee.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide B. By quickly implementing changes. These seminars may be offered in various locations or online. . Any course qualifies. purchase materials and begin teaching 12 Course Orientation 2. b.com for the latest information about the Emergency First Response program. check www. Besides The Responder. As soon as you’re registered with Emergency First Response and receive authorization. What are the procedures for becoming an Emergency First Response Instructor and how do you maintain your rating? 1. Course Orientation 6. Attend update seminars as required Read and implement changes announced in newsletter – The Responder Check emergencyfirstresponse. When you complete all course requirements. Contact your Emergency First Response Office for specifics. 14 EFR Instructor Training Course Maintain rating. you can purchase Emergency First Response instructional and participant materials. you may have to complete a retraining program or repeat this course. when medical standards change or new Emergency First Response programs are released. 26 6 . . 4. As an Emergency First Response Instructor you agree to read The Responder sent out by Emergency First Response and make changes to your Emergency First Response courses based on new procedures or requirements outlined in this bulletin. To maintain your rating you must: a. This is important because it keeps Emergency First Response programs current and in line with new medical emergency practices. You must teach at least one Emergency First Response course every two years. Renew your Emergency First Response Instructor rating by submitting a renewal application to Emergency First Response. and teach Primary Care.emergencyfirstresponse. you ensure that you and your courses are at the leading edge of emergency primary and secondary care training. If you do not meet teaching status requirements and let your rating lapse. Secondary Care and Care for Children courses. sign and submit one course completion authorization every 2 years Retraining necessary if you don’t renew or meet renewal requirements 13 Course Orientation c.com 5. a.

you may need additional training. and how you can qualify to teach them. Beyond Primary and Secondary Care. only as necessary. How is the Emergency First Response Primary/ Secondary Care course structured? u [Have candidates reference their Emergency First Response Primary/Secondary Course Instructor Guide. Both courses have three parts – knowledge development. Requirements and Materials In this segment. To teach these programs. participants complete knowledge development through independent study using the Emergency First Response Participant Manual and Video.] 15 EFR Program Overview Course Structure. Check with your EFR Office for current information on what courses are available in your area.Section Two – Presentations IV. a. you conduct a quick review and provide clarification. A. This course teaches participants to alert EMS and provide care for patients with life-threatening injuries/illnesses while waiting for EMS to arrive. skill development and scenario practice. Though much of this information applies to Care for Children. what other courses does Emergency First Response offer? 1. Primary Care (CPR) includes eight required skills and two recommended skills. Ideally. Skill Development and Scenario Practice Three instructional approaches – Independent Study. The Emergency First Response course consists of two courses: 16 EFR Program Overview How are the Primary Care and Secondary Care courses structured? Two courses – Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) Three course parts – Knowledge Development. 2. Video Guided and Instructor Led Course Orientation a. This course teaches participants to aid patients with nonlife-threatening injuries/ illnesses and to provide care for those with more serious conditions when EMS is significantly delayed or unavailable.] 1. Answer questions and clarify information as appropriate. Use the following points to explain the Emergency First Response program. Emergency First Response® Programs Overview – Course Structure. Regional courses that meet requirements for workers who must have current CPR and first aid skills on the job. In class. u [Go over any relevant EFR regional course offered in your area. standards specific to that course will be covered in Presentation 5.] C. 27 . Secondary Care (First Aid) includes four skills. Care for Children (covered in presentation 5) 2. Knowledge Review u [Go over the Program Standards Knowledge Review instructor candidates completed during selfstudy. Requirements and Materials Knowledge Review B. we’ll reference the Primary/Secondary Care courses. b.

due to logistical constraints or materials not being available in the participant’s language. participants may watch the Emergency First Response Video independently (preferred) or you may show segments in class as an introduction to skills or scenarios. The Instructor Led Approach assumes the Emergency First Response Participant Manual is not available in a language participants understand and you have no means of showing the Emergency First Response Video. You must deliver all knowledge development information and provide role-model skill demonstrations for participants. d. interaction with the Emergency First Response Participant Manual and Video. You have the flexibility and the tools. complete the Knowledge Review and watch the Emergency First Response Video before the first skill development session. You guide them through the manual to complete the Knowledge Review in class. your instructional approach can be very flexible. C. c. a. Use your judgment to provide participants with an appropriate learning situation. You simply verify understanding and begin skill practice. The Independent Study Approach assumes that participants read their Emergency First Response Participant Manual. e. What are the Emergency First Response course goals and core performance requirements? u [Have candidates quickly review the Course Goals and Core Performance Requirements in their Emergency First Response Primary/Secondary Care Instructor Guide. There are three basic approaches – independent study. For skill development and scenario practice. video guided and instructor led. The Video Guided Approach assumes that participants have had little. if any. you may conduct complete knowledge development sessions using the teaching outlines in your instructor guide. 3. Because teaching situations will differ depending on whether Emergency First Response materials are available before training or in a language participants understand. b. c. You also use the video to preview skills before participant practice. If necessary.] 17 EFR Program Overview What are the EFR course goals and core performance requirements? [Refer to EFR Instructor Guide] Course Orientation 8 28 . We’ll look at instructional approaches in more detail in the next session – Emergency First Response Program Philosophy. You may need to use some combination of these teaching approaches.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide b.

Anyone. Qualified assistants may include another Emergency First Response Instructor. It’s best to use mannequins capable of simulating an airway obstruction if the airway is not positioned properly. You may increase the number of participants to a maximum of 24 when using one or more qualified assistants. It’s also a good idea to use as many mannequins as available to maximize practice time. b. You must be a current Emergency First Response Instructor to teach the Emergency First Response courses. 18 Course Orientation b. 5. Course Orientation 29 . b.). People with physical disabilities may also need to find adaptive methods of performing skills. a current CPR/first aid instructor with another recognized organization or a trained medical professional (such as a paramedic. of any age. etc. To enroll in the Emergency First Response Secondary Care (First Aid) course. 19 EFR Program Overview Participation and supervision standards… Ratio – 12 participants to 1 current EFR Instructor 24 participants maximum with one or more qualified assistant Assistant = another EFR Instructor. a. This is required because the Secondary Care (First Aid) course builds upon primary care skills. Shock Management and Spinal Injury Management. a. of any age. Be creative and innovative to help individuals meet the performance requirements. EFR Program Overview What are the course standards specific to participation and supervision? Anyone. you need to orient individuals to Serious Bleeding Management. The maximum participant-to-mannequin ratio is 12:1. Note that because other CPR courses do not include all Emergency First Response primary care skills. 4. a.Section Two – Presentations D. The course ratio is no more than 12 participants per one Emergency First Response Instructor. nurse practitioner. current CPR/first aid instructor or trained medical professional Participant to mannequin ratio – 12:1 b. Keep in mind that children may have difficulty must have previous CPR training with some concepts and find the coordination required to perform certain skills challenging. What are the Emergency First Response course standards specific to participation and supervision? 1. individuals must complete the Primary Care (CPR) course or another qualifying CPR course. Young children may not be mature enough to deal with serious emergency care issues. a. 2. 3. EMT. with an interest Use good judgment when accepting children and adapt material Use adaptive techniques for people with physical challenges To enroll in Secondary Care (First Aid). with an interest may take an Emergency First Response course. Use your judgment when accepting children into courses and adapt the material to meet their needs.

Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide

6. These standards may need modification based on regional guidelines, laws or requirements for basic life support courses. Make sure you understand and abide by regulations for your community or country. u [Review local laws and guidelines for Emergency First Response courses, if applicable.]
EFR Program Overview
What are the procedures for issuing course completion cards and how often should participants refresh their skills?
Completion Card Authorization Cards current for 24 months Independent refresher with manual and video EFR Refresher consists of Skill Development segment and exams
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E. What are the procedures for issuing course completion cards and how often should participants refresh their skills? 1. After participants meet all course performance requirements, you complete and submit a Course Completion Authorization to your Emergency First Response Office.

Course Orientation

a. Completion cards denote which Emergency First Response course or courses the participant completed. The card will also have an AED designation if that recommended skill was completed. b. Completion cards are current for 24 months. 2. Encourage participants to skim through their Emergency First Response Participant manuals or watch the Emergency First Response videos and practice their skills every six months or anytime they feel a refresher is needed. 3. Explain that to maintain their skills they should complete an Emergency First Response Refresher program every 24 months. a. The Refresher consists of the Skill Development portion of the Primary Care (CPR), Secondary Care (First Aid) and Care for Children courses as appropriate. b. During a Refresher program, you should also go over new developments or changes to skill techniques. c. Participants must complete the Primary Care (CPR), Secondary Care (First Aid) and Care for Children exams as appropriate. d. Issue a new Primary Care (CPR), Secondary Care (First Aid) or Care for Children completion card by filling out and submitting a Course Completion Authorization. F. How does Emergency First Response ensure course credibility and quality? 1. Emergency First Response Quality Management Department ensures that Emergency First Response courses meet current emergency care standards by surveying course participants.
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How does your Emergency First Response Office ensure course credibility?
Participant surveys Instructor follow up

Course Orientation

0

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Section Two – Presentations

2. Through this survey process, course credibility and customer satisfaction is monitored. Follow-up with instructors occurs as necessary. G. What materials are required and recommended for teaching Emergency First Response courses? u [Have candidates quickly review the Course Materials and Barrier Requirements in their Emergency First Response Instructor and Care for Children Guides. Provide additional suggestions based on local needs. Explain that you’ll discuss managing materials and supplies in the presentation – Organizing an Emergency First Response Course.]
EFR Program Overview
What materials are required and recommended for teaching Emergency First Response courses?
[Refer to EFR Instructor Guide]

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Course Orientation

V. Foundational Knowledge: Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies
A. What foundational knowledge is necessary to effectively teach Emergency First Response courses? 1. Human Body Systems – Understanding basic principles of how the human body systems work and how that knowledge relates to the Emergency Responder gives you a framework form which to teach.
Foundational Knowledge
What foundational knowledge is necessary to effectively teach EFR courses?
Human Body System — understanding basic principles Medical Emergencies — recognition of various signs and symptoms This information is to help you with instructor level knowledge
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Course Orientation

2. Medical Emergencies – Likewise, your recognition of various signs and symptoms of medical emergencies and how to provide patient care establishes a knowledge base in your instructional role. Medical Emergencies are also outlined in the Reference Section of the Emergency First Response Participant Manual. 3. This information is to help equip you with instructor-level knowledge. Remember not to get into too much detail with participants in these areas as it may detract from the principle of keeping the course simple. B. Knowledge Review u [Go over the Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies Self-Study Knowledge Reviews from the reading assignments in the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide that candidates completed independently. Answer any questions and clarify information as appropriate.]
Foundational Knowledge
Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies
Knowledge Reviews
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Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide

Summary
Welcome and Introduction
1. What is the medical basis for the Emergency First Response program? 2. What is the educational basis for the Emergency First Response program?
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Summary
Welcome and Introduction Emergency First Response Instructor Training Course Emergency First Response Program Overview – Course Structure, Requirements, Standards and Materials Foundational Knowledge – Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies
Course Orientation

Emergency First Response® Instructor Course
3. What are the Emergency First Response Instructor course goals and performance requirements? 4. What are the procedures for becoming and Emergency First Response Instructor and how do you maintain your rating?

Emergency First Response® Program Overview – Course Structure, Requirements, Standards and Materials
5. How is the Emergency First Response program structured? 6. What are the Emergency First Response course goals and core performance requirements? 7. What are the Emergency First Response course standards specific to participation and supervision? 8. What are the procedures for issuing course completion cards and how often should participants refresh their skills? 9. What materials are required and recommended for teaching Emergency First Response courses?

Foundational Knowledge – Human Body Systems and Medical Emergencies
10. What foundational knowledge is necessary to effectively teach Emergency First Response courses?

2

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This presentation expands on the educational philosophy introduced in the Course Orientation. that people learn better when they are comfortable.] Did your instructor [parent. etc. then being able to apply it while teaching Emergency First Response courses is critical to the program’s success. – anything that gets adrenaline pumping and increases anxiety. You should adapt this presentation to instructor candidate needs based on whether they have little or extensive teaching experience using instructional systems. People who practice skills in a reassuring environment that promotes adequate ability they can trust gain confidence. making them more likely to use their skills to handle medical emergencies – the ultimate goal. you’re encouraged to create your own contact and stylize the presentation as appropriate. did your instructor yell at you and demand perfection? Emergency First Response Program Philosophy 2 Almost everyone can think of a stressful moment that was eased by comforting words from a mentor. However. Most people can also recall an already tense situation that got worse because of added pressure from someone who was supposed to be guiding you. The sample contact is for your consideration and use. Contact Think back to when you were learning how to drive a car. and therefore fail to act when faced with the reality of a life-threatening situation. drive a boat. 33 . and aren’t distracted by their surroundings. and well-documented in research.Section Two – Presentations Presentation 2 Emergency First Response® Program Philosophy DURATION: 2 hours Program Philosophy Notes to Presenter 1. It’s human nature. 2. Understanding this philosophy. guide] speak calmly to you and encourage you. yet challenged. u [Options – ride a bike. People who learn under high stress with continual criticism are more likely to doubt their abilities. 3. scuba dive. even when you did something wrong? Or. Learning primary and secondary care skills naturally raises participant anxiety levels – you do not need to add pressure or increase stress. sky dive.

Encouraging practice in a variety of circumstances adds interest and enjoyment. not perfection. Your Role As an Emergency First Response Instructor. Overview Why Simplify? Competent versus Perfect Retention Through Repetition Your Role 3 Program Philosophy Competent versus Perfect Performance-based training as it applies to Emergency First Response courses focuses on competence. your primary responsibilities include providing role-model demonstrations and making learning meaningful. We’ll discuss why it’s best to maintain a low-stress learning environment. Emergency First Response courses are based on current ILCOR emergency guidelines and take the approach that focused training on small amounts of information results in better performance and retention. 4 34 . Overview Why Simplify? As mentioned. Adopting this educational philosophy is key to successfully conducting Emergency First Response courses. as well as logistical.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide As an Emergency First Response Instructor. Retention Through Repetition A crucial part of the simple-is-better philosophy revolves around the ability to maximize repetition of the most important skills. supportive learning environment for participants. one of your primary responsibilities is to provide a comfortable. we’ll discuss Emergency First Response teaching philosophy and how you can apply it in your courses. cultural and language situations. However. In this topic. no matter how the course is set up. your role may vary slightly depending upon participant interaction with Emergency First Response materials. while helping participants retain skills and apply them to real emergencies after the course.

Simplifying skill development by excluding nonessential information. Separating the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) course from the Secondary Care (First Aid) course (even if courses are offered together) helps Emergency Responders properly sequence patient care.Section Two – Presentations Outline I. Simplification results in higher retention. Why Simplify A. which leads to better performance after training. 4 Why Simplify? What are the benefits of simplifying primary care training? Simplification Retention Better Performance = Confidence and action Program Philosophy 2. 3. 35 . they find it easier to recall primary care steps. This makes the participant more confident with the skills. a patient’s chances for recovery increase. Why separate primary care training from secondary care training? 1. it’s logical to avoid introducing too many skills and too much information in one program. Because Emergency Responders learn to focus on the ABCD’S of the Lifeline. b. Also. 4. Simplifying skill development by focusing on important skills and excluding nonessential information. because retention and performance increase with simplification. People hesitate to help if they think they’ll do something wrong or forget to do something important. results in less anxiety. Separating primary care from secondary care results in: a. When Emergency Responders use their training to take action. 5 Program Philosophy Why Simplify? Why separate primary care training from secondary care training? Proper sequencing Manageable information and skill loads Life-threatening separated from nonlife-threatening Consistent care 6 Program Philosophy 2. Two courses that have manageable skill and information loads. results in Emergency Responders who have less anxiety. 3. Skill confidence means that Emergency Responders are more likely to act when faced with life-threatening situations. B. act more quickly and concentrate only on critical patient needs when faced with emergency medical situations. What are the benefits of simplifying primary care training? 1. a. starting with alerting EMS and continuing with basic life support. quicker action and better concentration on critical patient needs.

Skill development should be kept pure and simple. II. • Emergency Responders learn that splinting broken bones or applying more than a direct-pressure bandage to wounds should only occur when EMS is significantly delayed or unavailable. Simplification reduces unnecessary distractions that impede skill development. EMS personnel should be able to quickly continue treatment started by an Emergency Responder. They know that sometimes all they should do is keep a patient still and offer reassurance. c. Why separate skill development from scenario practice? 1. 8 Competent versus Perfect What is performance-based instruction and how does it apply to the Emergency First Response program? Instruction based on clear objectives Participants know expectations Objectives build on previous learning All requirements must be met Participant-centered learning — everyone meets objectives Program Philosophy a. A secondary care course that builds upon primary care. Performance-based instruction revolves around clear course objectives. but emphasizes patient care for nonlife-threatening or not immediately life-threatening medical conditions. 3. Participants know exactly what they’re expected to learn or accomplish during training. there is no benefit to adding circumstances that make participants interpret information. Doing so before adds stress and complicates learning. 2. They learn to record critical information that can be passed on to EMS or health care professionals. Competent versus Perfect A. • d. • • Emergency Responders follow the ABCD’S.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide b. b. What is performance-based instruction and how does it apply to the Emergency First Response program? 1. Other than for scene assessment. The approach is to introduce the skill and keep practice focused on the critical steps and proper sequencing. Why Simplify? Why separate skill development from scenario practice? Simplification – no unnecessary distractions or interpretation Practice focused on steps and sequencing Scenario practice is appropriate after participants are comfortable with skills 7 Program Philosophy a. clearly separates the priority of the primary care skill set. C. 6 36 . It’s appropriate to conduct scenario practice only after participants are comfortable with skills. during skill development. A primary care course that focuses only on supporting a patient with life-threatening conditions while waiting for EMS to arrive.

Again. 37 . Because all participants fulfill all course objectives.Section Two – Presentations b. As an Emergency First Response Instructor. Course objectives are sequenced to build upon previous learning – simple to complex. this makes people less likely to take action when it counts. Perfection is impossible. This undermines confidence. Stressing perfection feeds people’s natural fear of doing something wrong when offering aid. review the ability to replicate skills without hesitation in Section Three of the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. As discussed. Participants have to master subskills or prerequisite information to progress. 2. and people realize that even their very best will fall short of it. You also need to be flexible enough to increase the program’s pace if participants grasp skills quickly. As a performance-based program. No one gets left behind or completes the program without knowing how to perform any of the skills. . 3. thus how much or how little time it takes for a participant to learn is not relevant. it is important to understand that you may need to schedule additional time to help some participants meet the course objectives. B. Increasing participant anxiety will decrease learning efficiency. .) 4. b. b. 9 Competent versus Perfect Performance-based instruction . people learn best in a supportive environment. c. Success is performance Time is not relevant Slow pace and schedule additional time Increase pace as necessary Make adjustments to meet participant needs – be creative Program Philosophy a. The criteria for success is performance. Emergency First Response courses require you to use your instructional skills (and some creativity) to help everyone be successful. Why is it important to focus on competent skill performance rather than demand perfection? u [With instructor candidates. performance-based instruction is participant-centered learning.] 1. (We’ll specifically look at your role in a few minutes. Participants must meet all course performance requirements before successfully completing training. Requiring perfect skill performance introduces unnecessary stress into the learning environment. Competent versus Perfect Why is it important to focus on competent skill performance rather than demand perfection? Requiring perfection introduces stress Raising anxiety level decreases learning efficiency Increasing fear of doing something wrong makes people less likely to act 10 Program Philosophy a. c.

repetition allows motor skill procedures to combine individual steps into a seamless skill. 2. Retention Through Repetition A. a. By encouraging students toward successful technique. the difference between adequate CPR and role-model CPR is minimal as long as EMS is alerted and care begins immediately. One theme that is consistently emphasized throughout the Emergency First Response Participant Manuals: Adequate care provided is better than perfect care withheld. Adequate practice time improves skill development because participants have to think less about each step and can focus more on overall performance. Participants come to you already understanding that competence is essential while perfection is the unattainable ideal. 13 Retention Through Repetition Why is repetition and practice necessary for retention? People can only master motor skills by doing motor skills — no substitutes Repetition and more practice: Reduces required thought and increases overall performance Refines and smoothes execution Reinforces proper sequencing of steps Program Philosophy b. Avoid hinting at any need for perfect performance. a. 38 8 . 4. Do not hint at the need for perfection Create a low-stress environment Encourage self-discovery Use positive words and examples Program Philosophy 12 III. Demonstrations and descriptions aid learning. feeling. you should encourage confidence and adequate competence. People can only master motorskills by doing the motorskills. There is no substitute for actually moving. b. c. Because the ultimate goal is to train people to use their primary care skills when necessary. Create an environment that is low-stress and allows participants to learn and improve through self-discovery. In the Chain of Survival. sensing and adjusting as you attempt a new task.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 2. For complex skills that require proper sequencing. 3. but can’t replace actual practice. a. Why is repetition and practice necessary for retention? 1. You will have a chance to practice positive coaching in the Learning and Instruction Workshop. 3. . b. you minimize fears and foster learning Competent versus Perfect Focus on competent skills. More practice aids skill refinement and results in smoother execution. 11 Consistent Theme Adequate care provided is better than perfect care withheld. Use positive words and examples that motivate participants. .

hear. By rotating roles. Retention Through Repetition How is repetition built into the program? Skills build simple to complex Video and instructor demonstrations a. This aids with retention. participants start each skill with a primary assessment before progressing to secondary care. By changing scenarios or practice parameters. participants get to practice skills in practice groups. Similar to the initial skill development. In the Secondary Care (First Aid) course. How is repetition built into the Emergency First Response program? 1. a. which means that participants review early simple skills each time they learn a new. 4. Keep in mind that practice should not be monotonous or boring. Each skill repetition fosters learning from a different perspective. [Refer to EFR Instructor Guide] 14 Program Philosophy b. feel and perform the skill. Thus. assuring repetition of key skills. Scenarios provide additional practice while encouraging realistic action and building confidence. a patient and an Emergency Responder – provide several learning advantages: u [Have instructor candidates refer to “Section Three. Skills progress from simple to complex. 39 . 2. b.Section Two – Presentations B. Practice with peers lowers stress and increases the opportunity for self-correction and discovery.] a. but fresh and interesting. scenario practice begins with simple situations and progresses to multiple injury accidents. During scenario practice participants work in practice groups which gives each participant the chance to act as the Emergency Responder and view skills repeatedly while others practice. In the Primary Care (CPR) course. Besides watching a video demonstration and an instructor demonstration. more complex skill. b. skills build Practice groups – rotating roles upon or link to previous skills in the order that Scenario practice participants would use them. 3. you help participants stay focused and make the course more enjoyable. Integrating mannequin practice with patient practice within groups adds more repetition. Keep practice fresh and interesting participants learn how to open an airway before learning how to combine rescue breaths with chest compressions during CPR. c. Practice Groups – Why and How” in their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. Practice groups – consisting of a guide. This teaches CPR sequence and priorities in context with the skills themselves. each participant is able to see. Practice variety encourages skill transfer to the real world. For example.

Continue on to scenario practice. quickly review The Role of the Instructor in Section One. complete the Knowledge Review and watch the video before the first skill development session. . This approach results in the shortest contact time. what are your primary duties during training? u [With instructor candidates. nurturing learning environment Program Philosophy 1. your job is to help participants connect knowledge development.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide IV. This approach assumes that participants read their manual. You provide positive reinforcement and encourage self-discovery. You demonstrate and guide without pressuring or lecturing. Which approach or combination of approaches you use depends on knowing what participant preparation levels are and what specific needs individual participants have. How do you determine which instructional approach to use? u [Have instructor candidates refer to “Section One – Course Structure” in their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. emphasizing self-discovery. of their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. As discussed in the Course Orientation. Essentially. b. As an Emergency First Response Instructor. 2. The Independent Study Approach a.] 1. b. d. You do this by creating a positive environment that gives participants the freedom to learn at their own pace.] 15 Your Role As an instructor. 16 Program Philosophy Your Role Independent Study Approach (shortest contact time) Participant completes independent study with manual and video Skill Development Go over Knowledge Review Begin skill practice Program Philosophy Scenario Practice Emphasize discovery Encourage discussion 0 40 . what are your primary duties during training? The Role of the Instructor [Refer to EFR Instructor Guide] Help participants make connections Set the proper tone for a cooperative. You must set the proper tone from the start and make sure that everyone – staff and participants – understand the cooperative nature of the program. skills and application. d. there are three basic instructional approaches – independent study. then begin skill practice. You begin skill development by reviewing their Knowledge Reviews to verify understanding. . c. You provide explanations and suggestions that help participants put it all together. 2. video guided and instructor led. c. B. Your Role A. 17 Your Role How do you determine which instructional approach to use? Identify participant preparation level Analyze individual needs Combine approaches as necessary Let’s review approaches.

you may need to use this approach. f. you introduce the next skill and show that segment of the video to preview the skill before participant practice. The Instructor Led Approach a. but have not seen the video. 19 Your Role Instructor Led Approach Manual and video not available in appropriate language or contact time requirement prompts elaboration (most contact time) Knowledge Development Use notes in Instructor Guide Scenario Practice Skill Development Provide role model demonstrations Begin skill practice Program Philosophy b. 41 . but haven’t had time to read it or they may have had time to look through the manual. 4. interaction with Emergency First Response manuals and videos. If necessary. This approach assumes that participants have had little. Perhaps they have the manual. e. You become the knowledge development source and must deliver all information using the presentations in Section Two of your Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. Continue on to scenario practice as usual. In some areas. Skill Development Cover key information in manual Show video segment Begin skill practice 18 Scenario Practice Emphasize discovery Encourage discussion Program Philosophy b. d. You have the flexibility and the tools to adapt your approach for each course. This approach results in the most contact time. regulations require a minimum number of contact hours for CPR or first aid training. If you need to lengthen a course to meet local requirements. c. you may need to elaborate on information using the presentations in Section Two of your Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. d. You also must provide role-model skill demonstrations for participants to follow during skill development. c. The Video Guided Approach a. This approach results in moderate contact time. Your Role Video Guided Approach (moderate contact time) Participant looks over manual only or receives manual at start of course. This approach assumes Emergency First Response Participant manuals are not available in a language participants understand and you have no means of showing Emergency First Response videos.Section Two – Presentations 3. e. Use your judgment to provide participants with an appropriate learning situation. During skill development. You guide them through the manual to complete their Knowledge Reviews in class. Scenario practice is the same no matter which instructional approach you use. if any. It’s easy to imagine that you may need to use some combination of these teaching approaches depending on the teaching situation. 5.

review key points and critical steps. 23 During skill development. . c. a. If participants have viewed the video. your role is to deliver foundational information in an interesting way. you will show the appropriate video segment before practicing each skill. Your Role 3. For skill development: State performance requirements Review key points and critical steps Provide role-model demonstrations (show video as necessary) Guide practice Reinforce correct technique and provide suggestions Program Philosophy b. How can you best manage the Emergency First Response training system? 1. Your role during skill development is to inform participants of the performance requirements.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide C. you should encourage participants to study independently with participant manuals and videos. if materials are available in a language participants understand. Program Philosophy b. However. As discussed in the Course Orientation. For knowledge development: Encourage independent study Clarify and apply information Keep information within program scope Adapt to different learning styles We’ll look at how you can motivate participants to study independently in the session – Organizing an Emergency First Response Course. c. you should avoid: Talking too much Making negative comments Embarrassing individuals Make thoughtful comments and positive suggestions after practice Program Philosophy 2 42 . don’t talk too much during the practice. provide demonstrations as necessary and guide practice. Avoid adding extra information that is beyond the scope of the course. 22 Manage training system. 2. The Emergency First Response training system combines the use of instructional materials with educational process to achieve learning objectives. During practice. . a. If participants have not seen the video or it’s been awhile since they watched it. d. If participants don’t have the opportunity for self-study. • 21 20 Your Role How can you best manage the Emergency First Response training system? Effectively combine instructional materials with the educational process to achieve learning objectives Program Philosophy Your Role Manage training system. . you may need to adapt the material for participant learning styles and understanding. Ideally. When participants have already mastered background knowledge for primary and secondary care. . your role is to clarify and apply information. As just discussed. reinforce correct technique and offer suggestions for improvement. your role in managing knowledge development will vary depending on how prepared participants are when they come to class. People need time to think and internalize without distraction. you proceed directly to skill practice. because anyone with an interest may enroll in an Emergency First Response course.

.Section Two – Presentations d. Because regulations may vary from country to country. Answer questions by asking questions that cause participants to discover the answer for themselves by applying the Lifeline and the ABCD’S. Avoid letting the mood get too serious or too silly. . Be careful not to answer participant questions by discussing medical conditions or emergency techniques that go beyond the course content. Remember. Close control and supervision may be necessary. e. c. Participants who have medical backgrounds may ask questions or initiate discussions regarding advanced life support or medical treatment. you may need to adapt the course to meet local requirements. 5. Throughout training. This is especially tempting if you have a medical background. but worthwhile. There is no absolute “right” approach. During scenario practice. For example. Always refer participants back to the ABCD’S and guide discussion back to basic emergency medical procedures. Emphasize that each scenario presents an opportunity to apply skills. but worthwhile 24 Program Philosophy c. some areas have minimum course time requirements (for example – 10 hours) to meet CPR and first aid training 26 Your Role Manage training system. When possible. Create a cooperative environment that allows the Emergency Responder to make mistakes without fear of criticism or unwanted advice from other participants. It’s common for participants to ask questions involving specific injuries and illnesses. hold suggestions until the participant completes skill practice and has a moment to think about it. b. Keep it light. Your Role a. For scenario practice: Encourage independent action Emphasize there is no “right” approach Create a cooperative environment Keep it light. 4. your role is to keep the program on track – avoid introducing extraneous topics. Keep it simple and participants will remember and recall. Avoid negative comments and be careful not to embarrass participants who are having difficulty. a. Keep the program on track Avoid introducing extraneous topics Stick to course content and basic emergency care procedures Always refer back to the ABCD’S Keep it simple 25 Program Philosophy b. Your Role Manage training system. Keep in mind that most comments are best made after finishing the entire practice cycle. 6. . and it is not a test. your role is to let participants work through the situation independently with as little guidance as possible. . Manage training system. this is a basic care course. . Adapt course to meet local regulations Minimum course hours? Be aware of cultural differences and local practices Customize information and skills as necessary Program Philosophy 43 . .

What is performance-based instruction and how does it apply to the Emergency First Response program? 5.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide regulations. How is repetition built into the Emergency First Response program? Your Role 8. You also need to be aware of cultural beliefs and practices that may influence training. How can you best manage the Emergency First Response training system? 4 44 . What are the benefits of simplifying primary care? 2. Why is repetition and practice necessary for retention? 7. As an Emergency First Response Instructor. Why separate skill development from scenario practice? 27 Summary Why Simplify? Competent versus Perfect Retention Through Repetition Your Role Program Philosophy Competent versus Perfect 4. Why is it important to focus on competent skill performance rather than demand perfection? Retention Through Repetition 6. 7. additional scenarios and by using the Instructor Led Approach. what are your primary duties during training? 9. How do you determine which instructional approach to use? 10. Customize information or skills practice as necessary to the local area. You can extend your course with more skills practice. Why separate primary care training from secondary care training? 3. Summary Why Simplify? 1.

if possible. This workshop introduces basic learning theory and instructional techniques. to expose candidates to different equipment. Of these attributes. you can identify with these attributes and aspire to develop more of them as you gain experience as an Emergency First Response Instructor. let’s categorize them as Knowledge. What personal and professional attributes does this person have? u [List candidate responses] Hopefully. S and/or A next to each attribute. 2.Section Two – Presentations Presentation 3 Learning and Instruction Workshop DURATION: 4 hours (Based on 12 Candidates) Learning and Instruction Notes to Presenter 1. have different types of mannequins. you’re encouraged to create your own contact and stylize the presentation as appropriate. Keep in mind that those with little or no teaching experience may find the Teaching Workshop challenging and stressful. You should adapt this presentation to instructor candidate needs based on their experience. The sample contact is for your consideration and use. 4. Help them relax and remind them that the process is developmental. However. There should be more As than Ks or Ss. 2 Learning and Instruction Workshop Contact Think of someone you consider to be an effective teacher. 3. It’s designed to help those with little instructional experience develop teaching techniques and formulate presentations for the Emergency First Response program. oxygen units and other first aid supplies available.] 45 . AEDs. Skill and/or Attitude. ventilation barriers. It also serves as a knowledge and teaching skills refresher for those with an instructional background. u [Go through the list – note K. For candidate teaching practice.

you need to understand how people learn and how your instructional approach aids in the learning process. Overview People Learn Best When… As discussed. and further familiarize you with the Emergency First Response program. Formulating a Teaching Presentation Knowing the simple formula for putting together a teaching presentation will help you prepare for the teaching workshop. . You’ll use this knowledge to prepare a teaching presentation for a primary care or secondary care skill and then conduct a practice teaching session. Using what you learn during this presentation. it also takes knowledge and skill. Events of Instruction and the Emergency First Response Program Following the discussion of learning categories. We’ll review learning categories and discuss how they apply to Emergency First Response courses. We’ll specifically define conditions that help people learn best. . you’ll better understand the program’s design. we’ll define learning and describe how the Emergency First Response program’s instructional design fulfills a participant’s learning needs. 6 46 . Besides having the desire to teach. Teaching Workshop Teaching one skill and practicing positive coaching now and again in the next session gets you ready to conduct your first Emergency First Response course. During this workshop. By identifying the events of instruction in the Emergency First Response program. we’ll look at how instruction is formulated to produce the desired learning results. However. one of the most important things you do as an instructor is create an environment that is conducive to participant learning. you’ll prepare another teaching presentation for the next session. 3 Overview People Learn Best When. This practice will add to your instructional knowledge and skills. Five Learning Categories and the Emergency First Response Program Events of Instruction and the Emergency First Response Program Formulating a Teaching Presentation Teaching Workshop Learning and Instruction Workshop Five Learning Categories and the Emergency First Response Program There are differences between how people gain skills and knowledge.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide It’s clear that attitude is the key to being an effective teacher.

Readiness includes: a. c. health or well-being. Being free from stress and anxiety. 5 4 People Learn Best When… When do most people learn best? They need to be ready Have intellectual. psychological and physical ability Are not distracted Free from stress and anxiety Learning and Instruction Workshop People Learn Best When… They can relate information to past experiences Provides context Helps with recall They hear. Apply to Emergency First Response Program u [Knowing about bloodborne pathogens and why barriers are used. Cognitive strategy – plan of action Learning and Instruction Workshop 47 . Verbal information – learned facts or information needed for a particular application. Motor skills – physical movement 2. Motor skills – physical movement. People need to be ready to learn. formulating and calculating Learning and Instruction Workshop 1. Intellectual skills – knowing why and how. People Learn Best When… A. This provides context and helps with recall and sequencing. 3. Apply to Emergency First Response Program u [All skills practice – putting on gloves. see and experience the same information or skills over and over — repetition Learning and Instruction Workshop II.] 2. etc. Learning is also improved when people hear. etc. People learn best when they can relate information to past experiences. 2. b. Not being distracted or having concerns about personal safety. Intellectual skills – knowing why and how things occur. Rescue breath to chest compression ratio. Define the learning category and solicit answers from instructor candidates regarding application to the Emergency First Response program.Section Two – Presentations Outline I. Having the intellectual. formulating and calculating. Understanding cardiac arrest and the need for defibrillation. Five Learning Categories and the Emergency First Response® Program A. opening airway. see and experience the same information or skills over and over again – repetition. Verbal information – learned facts 4. CPR.] 7 Five Learning Categories and the EFR Program 3. Apply to Emergency First Response Program u [Number/method to activate local EMS. What are the five categories of learning and how do they apply to the Emergency First Response program? u [Conduct as a discussion.] 3. Attitude – beliefs and values 5. When do most people learn best? 1.] 6 Five Learning Categories and the EFR Program What are the five categories of learning and how do they apply to the Emergency First Response program? 1. etc. psychological and physical ability to accept new information or try new skills.

] 9 Events of Instruction and the EFR Program What are the nine events of instruction and how are they incorporated into the Emergency First Response program? 1. review or incorporate previous skill into next skill.] 2. breakdown of skills. etc. Present information in small segments u Where do you find this? [Instructor Guide = two courses.] 4. Gain attention and provide value u Where do you find this? [Instructor Guide = value statement for skills. Confidence in ability to aid another person. Attitude – beliefs and values that affect choices. Head to toe search for injury assessment. Apply to Emergency First Response Program u [Recall the lifeline steps – ABCD’S. Apply to Emergency First Response Program u [Willingness to help knowing that you can’t further harm someone with no heartbeat. What are the nine events of instruction and how are they incorporated into the Emergency First Response program? u [Conduct as a discussion. Knowledge Review.] 5. Provide guidance u Where do you find this? [Instructor Guide = using practice groups and your guidance during skill practice. questions in knowledge development outlines. Events of Instruction and the Emergency First Response® Program A. Provide guidance 6. List objectives u Where do you find this? [Instructor Guide = performance requirements for skills.] III. Gain attention and provide value 2. Manual = introduction to topics.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 4. List objectives 3. Cognitive strategy – a mental plan of action or method to accomplish goals. Recall prerequisite learning u Where do you find this? [Instructor Guide = reminder of where material was or will be discussed.] 1. Present information in small segments 5. etc. Define the event of instruction and have candidates look in their Emergency First Response Instructor Guides and/ or Emergency First Response Participant Manuals to find examples of how the event is incorporated into the program.] 3. scenario practice. Manual = short topics.] 5. Recall prerequisite learning Where do you find these? 8 Learning and Instruction Workshop Events of Instruction and the EFR Program 4. Manual = sidebar – Learning Tips. Manual = reminder of where material was or will be discussed. Manual = main objectives. Assess progress along the way Where do you find these? Learning and Instruction Workshop 8 48 .

Assess progress along the way u Where do you find this? [Instructor Guide = evaluating skills and debriefings. body and summary. Provide feedback 8. Knowledge Review. Skill 1 – Scene Assessment. A clear objective statement or performance requirement 12 Formulating a Teaching Presentation What are the three general components of a teaching presentation? 1.Section Two – Presentations 6. evaluate skills and debriefings. Body 3. A value or why the information or skill is important d.] 8. An explanation of the procedures or what conduct is expected from participants. Introduction Topic / skill Objective / performance requirement Value / importance Explanation of what’s coming Procedures / conduct Learning and Instruction Workshop c. u Where do you find this? [Instructor Guide = review Knowledge Review.] 9. Summary 11 Learning and Instruction Workshop Formulating a Teaching Presentation General components . Application – retention and transfer of learning Where do you find these? Learning and Instruction Workshop IV. u [Have instructor candidates look in their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide at Section Three. Introduction 2. All teaching presentations (knowledge or skill development) have three parts – introduction. Manual = sidebar – Follow the ABCD’S.] 7. Application – retention and transfer of learning u Where do you find this? [Instructor Guide = scenario practice. A topic title or name of the skill b. Final assessment 9. . Provide knowledge of results so participants can assess what they’ve learned and what they have yet to master. Point out how most of the work in preparing a presentation is done for them in their guides. 49 . The introduction should include: a.] 10 Events of Instruction and the EFR Program 7. What are the three general components of a teaching presentation? 1. Final assessment u Where do you find this? [Instructor Guide = scenario practice and debriefings.] 2. Formulating a Teaching Presentation A. A quick explanation of what’s coming or how to do the skill e. .

and provide context aid learning. The other instructor candidates and staff will act as participants. At the end of the presentation. Discreetly assign a few problems appropriate to the skill to each instructor candidate playing a student role.] 14 Learning and Instruction Workshop V. Provide ideas for additional ways to handle similar problems. The instructor candidate teaching provides appropriate and positive coaching to help the practice go smoothly and to create a willingness to participate and learn. . The body should include information or organized skill practice to fulfill the performance requirement. but effective. (Sample problems are found in the Appendix of this guide. a. but have not viewed the Emergency First Response Video. As a group. suggestions and context to aid learning Stay within topic scope Learning and Instruction Workshop Formulating a Teaching Presentation General components . 0 50 . . how the body/practice would progress – including use of the Emergency First Response Video – and what may be included in the debriefing. Body Information / skill practice to fulfill performance requirement Demonstrations. . Summary Positive reinforcement Brief review of what. offer tips and suggestions. corrective techniques as outlined in the Positive Coaching – Encouraging Effective Technique segment of the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide (in Section 3 Skills Development). fine-tune their technique and improve skill demonstrations to a role-model level. 15 Teaching Workshop Instructor candidates will demonstrate positive coaching techniques to their role-playing students by offering positive reinforcement and gentle. why and how. . “students” present problems in technique or in their ability to carry out the skill. tips. u [Have instructor candidates turn to Skill 2 why and how – Barrier Use in their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide.) As the instructor candidate is conducting the skill teaching presentation. Avoid giving too much information – going beyond topic scope. discuss what problems occurred (assigned or otherwise) and how they were handled. 13 Formulating a Teaching Presentation General components . Teaching Workshop u [Assign each instructor candidate at least one skill to Your Turn to Practice teach from the Primary and Secondary Care courses (include recommended skills. discuss what the introduction to this skill could be. b. 4. Provide a demonstration.) Explain that they should assume that participants have read the Emergency First Response Participant Manual and completed the Knowledge Review. Tell candidates that this workshop gives everyone the opportunity to practice teaching and coaching.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 3. The summary or debriefing should include positive reinforcement and brief review of what.

skills demonstrations and positive coaching techniques. Make additional candidate assignments or have staff conduct some skills as necessary to review all the skills. . . Between the two practice teaching sessions (this workshop and the next session) conduct all Emergency First Response primary care and secondary care skills (including recommended skills). Have candidates teach their skills in sequence. If candidates are teaching the same skill. but to stylize their presentations to suit their own personalities. Remind them that you and the staff are there for support Give instructor candidates time to organize their presentations. It’s okay to assign the same skill to more than one candidate. it’s acceptable to only show the video segment once. . Provide demonstrations on positive coaching techniques as needed. Offer suggestions or answer questions as necessary. What are the three general components of a teaching presentation? Teaching Workshop 51 . Instructor candidates will conduct one skill teaching presentation during this workshop and the other teaching presentation during the next session. What are the five categories of learning and how do they apply to the Emergency First Response program? Learning and Instruction Workshop Events of Instruction and the Emergency First Response® Program 3. . What are the nine events of instruction and how are they incorporated into the Emergency First Response program? Formulating a Teaching Presentation 4. if necessary. 1. Encourage candidates to learn from each other. Provide positive reinforcement and suggestions for improvement in all aspects of the teaching presentations – how the presentation was delivered.Section Two – Presentations Acknowledge that it’s natural to be a little nervous when presenting to a group. When do most people learn best? Summary People Learn Best When. Summary People Learn Best When. Five Learning Categories and the Emergency First Response Program Events of Instruction and the Emergency First Response Program Formulating a Teaching Presentation Teaching Workshop 16 Five Learning Categories and the Emergency First Response® Program 2.

corrective techniques as outlined in the Positive Coaching – Encouraging Effective Technique segment of the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide (Skills Development section). but effective. ventilation barriers. discuss what problems occurred (assigned or otherwise) and how they were handled. 5. 3. 2. Emergency First Response Skills Workshop 1 2 52 . Assign each instructor candidate at least one skill to teach so that all Emergency First Response primary care and secondary care skills (including recommended skills) are covered. have different types of mannequins. 6.) As the instructor candidate is conducting the skill teaching presentation. At the end of the presentation. You should adapt the pace and scope of the workshop based on instructor candidate experience and skill level. (Sample problems are found in the Appendix of this guide. Plan to conduct at least one role-model Scenario Practice session. oxygen units and other first aid supplies available to expose candidates to different equipment. This workshop helps instructor candidates develop teaching and coaching techniques and formulate presentations for the Emergency First Response program while refreshing their knowledge and skills.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Presentation 4 Teaching Emergency First Response® Skills Workshop DURATION: 3.5 hours (Based on 12 Candidates) Notes to Presenter 1. If possible. Instructor candidates will demonstrate positive coaching techniques to their role-playing students by offering positive reinforcement and gentle. “students” present problems in technique or in their ability to carry out the skill. AEDs. Provide ideas for additional ways to handle similar problems. Make additional candidate assignments or have staff conduct some skills as necessary to review all the skills. Discreetly assign a few problems appropriate to the skill to each instructor candidate playing a student role. 4. The instructor candidate teaching provides appropriate and positive coaching to help the practice go smoothly and to create a willingness to participate and learn. All skills need to be covered between this workshop and the previous workshop.

Provide remediation and additional practice if candidate skills need work. Stress that these questions are intended to help participants discuss the scenario. Have instructor candidates refer to Section Four in the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide and follow along as you review the performance requirement and procedures. Briefly discuss common participant questions and have candidates come up with appropriate answers and explanations. Provide positive coaching and gentle correction to participants with “problems” or ineffective technique. During practice. Show video of skill c. as necessary.] 53 . As a group. it’s acceptable to only show the video segment once. c.] 2 Workshop 2. but to stylize their presentations to suit their own teaching style. evaluate each candidate’s skill technique and coaching skills. Encourage candidates to learn from each other. h.Section Two – Presentations Procedures 1.] 3. discover options and improve performance through self-correction. and supply teaching tips. Review questions and Scenarios answers – clarifying information. f. Always refer to the Lifeline for answers to questions. Review Emergency First Response Participant Manual Knowledge Review. d. go through the Evaluation Questions. and conduct skill practice with emphasis on proper technique (other candidates and staff act as participants). reinforce good decisions. Conduct Scenario Practice u a. Conduct skill development in sequence u [Have candidates (or staff ) teach their assigned skills in sequence. [Role-model setting up an Emergency Scenario. e. d. b. g. If candidates are teaching the same skill. Instruct them to: a. Emphasize that there is no single correct way to approach scenarios. as appropriate. Introduce skill – value and key points b. Divide candidates into practice groups and have them run through the scenario. Conduct an additional scenario as time allows or to increase instructor candidate comfort. Provide role-model demonstration. Emergency First Response Skills Workshop .Procedures Knowledge Review Teaching Your Assigned Skill Introduction u [Have instructor candidates turn to the Knowledge Show Video Role-model demonstration Review Answer Key in their Emergency First Response Positive coaching Answer questions with lifeline Instructor Guide Appendix.

The sample contact is for your consideration and use.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Presentation 5 Care for Children Course Standards and Content DURATION: 1 hour Notes to Presenter 1. instructor candidates must obtain a current Emergency First Response Care for Children Instructor Guide and Care for Children Participant Manual . you’re encouraged to create your own contact and stylize the presentation as appropriate. this training segment will overview how the Care for Children course differs from the Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses and how you can make it an important learning experience for those interested in helping injured and ill children. intentional and unintentional. Care For Children Care For Children Course Standards. Choosing to step forward and help an injured or ill adult is difficult enough for most people. 2. 3. 4 54 . This presentation overviews the Care for Children course standards and structure. Prior to this session. If possible. accounting for almost 40 percent of deaths for ages 1-14? This somber statistic (discussed in the Care for Children course) becomes very real and personal when you find yourself at an accident scene involving children. also have instructor candidates complete the Care for Children Course Instructor Self-Study Knowledge Review prior to this session. 4. Because you already know how to teach people emergency care skills. With proper training and the confidence it brings. Content and Conduct 2 Contact Did you know that injuries. Emergency Responders will be better prepared to offer aid to youngsters needing emergency care. Obtaining and viewing the Care for Children Video is highly recommended. However. are the leading cause of child death in all of the world’s more developed countries. but when it’s a child the anxiety can be intense.

5 Care For Children 55 . which we discussed in the course Orientation Presentation. Course Philosophy and Standards A. Your approach to teaching this course needs to be in line with the Emergency First Response program philosophy. Overview Course Philosophy and Standards Knowledge Development – Key Information Skills Practice – Important Differences Course Conduct – Integrating Programs 3 Care For Children Knowledge Development – Key Information Although most of the knowledge development topics are similar to the Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses.Section Two – Presentations Overview Course Philosophy and Standards The Care for Children course provides people with proven skills to use in handling medical emergencies involving children. We’ll look at the options and provide suggestions for conducting the course. such as CPR and conscious choking that have important differences. Skills Practice – Important Differences Many emergency care procedures are the same whether dealing with either adults or children. The Care for Children course adheres to the same emergency considerations and protocols from the consensus view of the Basic Life Support (BLS) Working Group and the Pediatric Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). Course Conduct – Integrating Programs The Care for Children course may be conducted as a stand-alone program or integrated with other Emergency First Response courses. Knowledge Review u [Go over Care for Children Knowledge Review candidates completed during independent study. What is the medical basis for the Care for Children course? 1. you need to understand the differences to pass on key information to course participants. Outline I. You need to be proficient in these skills to teach the Care for Children course. Answer questions and clarify information using the points following. It’s the most critical skills.refer to Patient Care Standards under Acknowledgements in the front of your Instructor Guide.] B. Care For Children Knowledge Review 4 Course Philosophy and Standards What is the medical basis for the Care for Children course? Consensus view of ILCOR BLS Working Group and the Pediatric Working Group Source .

The Care for Children course follows the same priorities of care used by professional emergency care providers. Follows same priorities of care used by professional emergency care providers Uses the ABCD’S of lifeline diagram Assumes that EMS is available 6 Care For Children a. Course Philosophy and Standards Educational basis. the Care for Children course takes a flexible approach to accommodating different learning styles. the lifeline diagram is a familiar reminder of the care sequence. . b. skills development and scenario practice sessions so that you don’t have to repeat the same information over and over again. . The Care for Children course assumes that local Emergency Medical Service (EMS) is available to support Emergency Responder care. c. you may integrate knowledge development. Similar to the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses. 3. graphics rich manual. easy to remember sequence.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 2. May be taught in conjunction with Primary Care (CPR) and/or Secondary Care (First Aid) Eliminates unnecessary repetition Streamlines program while allowing beneficial repetition 8 Care For Children a. For participants who have previously taken an Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) course (or when you integrate Care for Children with a Primary Care (CPR) course). 6 56 . When taught in conjunction with a Primary Care (CPR) and/or Secondary Care (First Aid) course. who are taking the Care for Children course as a stand-alone program. Course Philosophy and Standards Medical basis . as well as cultural and language needs: a. the Emergency First Response program uses the lifeline diagram used in the Primary/Secondary Care courses. Instructor demonstrations with guided practice and positive reinforcement. For participants with no previous training. d. . What is the educational basis for the Care for Children Course? 1. Self-discovery through stress-free role-play and group practice. Independent study with objective-oriented. It integrates CPR with other first aid skills to establish a consistent sequence for handling medical emergencies. 4. . 2. C. This approach eliminates unnecessary repetition and makes it enjoyable for participants to grasp concepts and learn skills while progressing through the program. the lifeline offers a way to focus on the simple. Visual demonstrations and audio explanations in the Care for Children Video. To increase recall. 7 Course Philosophy and Standards What is the educational basis for the Care for Children course? Takes a flexible approach to accommodating learning styles Independent study Demonstrations Stress free self-discovery Care For Children b.

however. Calling EMS early – Call First – increases the adult’s chances of survival through early professional care. but relative size is important Care For Children Knowledge Development – Key Information What are Call First and Care First and why is understanding these approaches so important in the course? Call First = calling EMS early to increase an adult's chances of survival through early professional care 12 Care For Children 57 .] 1. Who May Take the Course? 2. Infant – a baby less than one year old (or small enough that you can perform effective chest compressions using two fingers. Child = youngster between ages 1–8/puberty (or small/large enough to perform chest compressions on with one hand) Age is primary characteristic. relative size is also important. or approximately eight years old (or small/large enough that you can perform effective chest compressions using one hand.Section Two – Presentations b. You know that when an adult stops breathing. While streamlining the program this educational approach still allows for a beneficial amount of repetition to increase skill retention. What are the Care for Children course standards and requirements? u [Have instructor candidates refer to the Course Standards section of their Care for Children Instructor Guide and prescriptively review the following requirements.) 2. Note that age is the primary defining characteristic. In the Care for Children course. what is the definition of an infant and a child? Infant = baby less than 1 year old (or small enough to perform chest compressions on with two fingers) (See Knowledge Development in your Instructor Guide) Care For Children Knowledge Development – Key Information Definition of infant and child.) 3. too. . the heart usually stops beating. Supervision and Ratios 3. 11 10 Knowledge Development – Key Information In the Care for Children course. Knowledge Development – Key Information u [Have candidates refer to the Knowledge Development section of their Care for Children Instructor Guide. Child – a youngster between one year and puberty. What are Call First and Care First and why is understanding these approaches so important in the Care for Children course? 1. D. This is the approach that participants learn in the Primary Care (CPR) course. B. what is the definition of an infant and a child? 1. . Care for Children Refresher 9 Course Philosophy and Standards What are the Care for Children course standards and requirements? (See Course Standards in your Instructor Guide) Who May Take the Course? Supervision and Ratios Course Materials and Barrier Requirements Completion Requirements Care for Children Refresher Care For Children II.] A. Completion Requirements 5. Course Materials and Barrier Requirements 4. but too large for two fingers.

8 58 . 4. . however. Knowledge Development – Key Information What is the Care for Children course approach to barrier use? Barriers are important to protect against disease transmission Encouraged when assisting child unknown to you Personal choice when assisting a family member or child you have regular contact with 15 Care For Children 3. . they most often continue to have a heartbeat for awhile. consider protecting yourself and the child against disease transmission by using barriers that prevent direct contact with blood or other bodily fluids. . When infants and children experience airway or breathing difficulty. Care First means either directing others to activate EMS after establishing the child needs emergency care or phoning for help yourself after providing about two minutes of CPR (one minute . 2. Exceptions include: a. The general approach is that barrier use is important to protect against disease transmission. C. This is an important concept that is emphasized in the Care for Children course. Thus.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 2. . using barriers is always a matter of personal choice. Children with breathing difficulty often continue to have a heart beat Care First = attending to a child’s breathing and circulation needs first and calling EMS as soon as possible Direct others to activate EMS Call after providing 2 minutes (1 minute Europe) of CPR Care For Children 3. then using barriers is up to you. Knowledge Development – Key Information Call First and Care First . Submersion or near drowning – Care First for all ages. Sudden cardiac arrest in children requires immediate activation of local EMS. The Care for Children course explains that when assisting a child unknown to you. Near drowning patients may need immediate CPR. 13 Knowledge Development – Key Information Call First and Care First . may require CPR for basic life support – even before activating EMS.Europe). Sudden collapse or cardiac arrest in infants or children known to be at risk for heart problems – Call First. Children and infants. an Emergency Responder should call EMS as fast as possible – Care First – but not necessarily first. If you know that the child does not carry any serious viruses or does not have a current infection. however. Keep in mind that course participants also learn that there are also a few exceptions to the Call First and Care First approach regardless of the patient’s age. It also explains that when a child you are assisting is a family member or an individual with whom you have regular contact. This is the only time you would Call First with infants or children. Exceptions include: Submersion or near drowning – Care First Sudden collapse or cardiac arrest in infants or children known to be at risk for heart problems – Call First 14 Care For Children b. What is the Care for Children course approach to barrier use? 1. you are probably very familiar with the youngster’s health.

Knowledge Development – Key Information What are significant differences between emergency medical conditions in children versus adults? Children rarely suffer from sudden cardiac arrest If condition deteriorates to full cardiopulmonary arrest. or due to progressive deterioration from shock. 2. What other differences do Emergency Responders need to be aware of when offering aid to a child? 1. Occurrence of a shockable heart rhythm is relatively uncommon in children. you should use it to give the child every opportunity for revival. choking and head injuries. a. Most often a child’s heart will stop beating after a period of ineffective or no breathing. 18 17 Recent recommendations state that if an AED (with adult or child pads) is available. natural curiosity and limited judgment may lead them into situations that adults avoid. Their size. The Care for Children Participant Manual contains sidebars that address poisoning. b. The physical differences and behavioral tendencies of children make them more susceptible to certain injuries such as poisoning. Care For Children Knowledge Development – Key Information Significant differences . . What are significant differences between emergency medical conditions in children versus adults? 1. you should use it to give the child every opportunity for revival. 19 Knowledge Development – Key Information What other differences do Emergency Responders need to be aware of when offering aid to a child? Age Size Ability to understand and communicate Mental state and willingness to cooperate Care For Children 59 . meaning they are programmed to detect adult heart rhythms and deliver electrical shocks as necessary for adult-sized bodies. The course skills focus on these areas more than the Primary Care (CPR) course does. Recent recommendations state that if an AED (with adult or child pads) is available. E. choking and head injuries from falls. These pads regulate current to deliver an appropriate shock for a child. Child’s age – Procedures do vary when handling an infant versus a child. a child’s heart is not likely to respond to defibrillation 16 Care For Children 2. There are many units that have special pads for use with children. 3. the heart is not likely to respond to defibrillation. Children rarely suffer from sudden cardiac arrest (unless preexisting medical issues exist). If a child’s condition deteriorates to full cardiopulmonary arrest. compare the child’s size to your size. . Child’s size – It’s appropriate to first look at the child’s size and second.Section Two – Presentations D. a. Physical differences and behavioral tendencies make children more susceptible to certain injuries: Poisoning Choking Head injuries Care For Children b. Most Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are designed for use with adults.

injured child. 3. if present. . you should seek permission from a parent or guardian. you should also check with a parent or guardian. b. 4. it’s important to use age appropriate language. a. When speaking with children. injured child may be difficult to handle. . Child’s mental state and willingness to cooperate. A frightened. Emergency Responders need to accept that the care they provide may make a difference. Keep questions and terms simple. Being prepared makes dealing with tough situations easier. Why is it important to emphasize the emotional aspects of offering emergency care to a child during the Care for Children course? 1. With infants. many variables may be beyond their control. Knowledge Development – Key Information Why is it important to emphasize the emotional aspects of offering emergency care to a child during the course? Emotions are intensified Parent may also be frightened Taking on too much is overwhelming Offering care is no guarantee of recovery 20 Care For Children 2. many injuries in children are very preventable with a little knowledge and awareness. Providing emergency care is no guarantee that a child’s condition will improve or that the child will recover. about child injuries. The Care for Children Participant Manual (and the Instructor-Led Knowledge Development session) begins with A Few Facts.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 3. F. G. Attempting to take on the enormous responsibility of fixing everything is overwhelming and often the reason people hesitate to help. Emergency Responders need to know that even with their training. Child’s ability to understand what is going on or to communicate effectively. especially if you are a stranger to the child. When asking a child if you have permission to provide care. but realize that the ultimate outcome may be beyond their personal influence. Although some injuries are not preventable. Why is a discussion about preventing common injuries and illnesses a topic in the Care for Children course? 1. Knowledge Development – Key Information Why is a discussion about preventing common injuries and illnesses a topic in the Care for Children course? Harsh facts show that not all but many injuries are preventable Participants will be interested Share steps to make areas and activities safer 21 Care For Children 0 60 . Knowing that you may not only need to deal with a frightened. Emotions may be intensified when handling an emergency medical situation involving a child. but also with frantic parents or other adult guardians will help Emergency Responders better control the situation and keep everyone focused on assisting the child. 4.

CPR and choking techniques are divided into infant and child skills. III. as well as during various activities to make it safer for children. How are the choking skills organized by local protocols? 1. Skill C-6.Section Two – Presentations 2. has three variations Skill C-6. In the Care for Children Participant Manual and your Instructor Guide. Asia Pacific and Europe. B. it’s responsible to also address preventing problems during the course. Placing bandaging after injury assessment follows the logical order in which an Emergency Responder may offer care.] A. Skills Practice – Important Differences u [Have candidates refer to the Skill Development section of their Care for Children Instructor Guides. Conscious Choking Child. Because the Care for Children course assumes that EMS is readily available. you’ll see that Skill C-5. Conscious Choking Child. then followed by illness assessment. how do the Care for Children course skills differ from skills in the Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses? 1. Conscious Choking Infant. This follows the approach that barrier use is more a matter of personal choice when dealing with children and it also helps streamline skill development. yet unique because it’s based on the most current protocol that allows AEDs designed for use on adults to be used on children. 4. Since many Care for Children course participants will likely be parents or people who regularly interact with children through their jobs or recreational activities. 3. Skills Practice – Important Differences In general. The Recommended Skill – AED Use with Children is similar to the recommended skill in the Primary Care (CPR) course. 3. has three variations labeled: Americas. Skills Practice – Important Differences How are the choking skills organized by local protocols? (See Skill Development in your Instructor Guide) Recommended Skill – AED Use with Children is unique because it’s based on the most current protocol 23 Care For Children Skill C-5. the splinting skill was not included in the course. Let participants share steps they can take at home and in other areas. has two variations Be familiar with protocols used in your local area 24 Care For Children 61 . Take the opportunity to address preventing problems whenever possible during the course. Scene assessment and barrier use are combined into one skill – Skill C-1. Injury assessment is followed by bandaging. 2. In general. how do the course skills differ from skills in the Primary Care and Secondary Care courses? Scene assessment and barrier use combined into one skill CPR and Choking are divided into infant and child skills Secondary care skills rearranged — no splinting 22 Care For Children 2. Conscious Choking Infant has two variations labeled: Americas and Europe and Asia Pacific.

3. Create a cooperative environment. During skill development go over the performance requirements. Emphasize that each scenario is their opportunity to apply skills. 3. use the training system to its fullest extent by combining the instructional materials with educational process to achieve learning objectives. For infants. How can you best manage the Care for Children course? 1. b. During scenario practice. a. What are the key differences between CPR in children versus adults? 1. 4. a. seal lips around mouth and nose For children. As with other Emergency First Response courses. Course Conduct – Integrating Programs How can you best manage the Care for Children course? Use training system to its fullest Encourage independent study Guide skill practice Allow self discovery Create a cooperative environment 26 Care For Children 2. use two fingers for chest compressions Care For Children IV. C. Remember to avoid adding extra information that is beyond the scope of the course. you should show the appropriate video segment before practicing each skill.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 3. For children. review key points and critical steps. You need to be familiar with the protocols used in your local area and guide participants toward learning the proper techniques. If participants don’t have the opportunity for self-study. deliver foundational information using the knowledge development outline in your Instructor Guide. If possible. use one or two hands for chest compressions. 2 62 . If participants have not seen the video or it has been a while since they watched it. you should seal your lips tightly around the infant’s mouth and nose for rescue breathing. 2. Course Conduct – Integrating Programs A. let participants work through the situation independently with little guidance. 25 Skills Practice – Important Differences What are the key differences between CPR in children versus adults? With infants. use one or two hands for chest compressions For infants. Encourage participants to study independently with the Care for Children Participant Manual and Video. use two fingers for chest compressions. provide demonstrations as necessary and guide practice.

remember that your role is to make the program a worthwhile learning experience. 3. People interested in comprehensive emergency care training that covers infants through adults will be attracted to the three-course combination. 4. As mentioned in your guide. Offering two. 5. You may also find several marketing advantages when you integrate courses. Primary Care (CPR) and/or Secondary Care (First Aid) – is efficient and convenient for participants. but avoid reviewing the exact same information and skills over and over. The variation in procedures and techniques could be confusing. Allow participants to master skills before moving on. Avoid overwhelming participants by moving too quickly between adult. Avoid overwhelming course participants by moving too quickly between adult.] 27 Course Conduct – Integrating Programs How can you integrate the Care for Children course with the Primary Care and/or Secondary Care courses? (See Integrating EFR Courses in your Care for Children Instructor Guide) Promote efficiency and convenience Market comprehensive training Avoid repetition Make it worthwhile Care For Children 1.Section Two – Presentations B. child and infant skills. Emergency First Response courses together – Care for Children. This may mean conducting the courses separately for maximum retention. The recommended sequences in your Care for Children Instructor Guide help you include necessary repetition. 2. 28 Care For Children 63 . or all three. How can you integrate the Care for Children course with the Primary Care (CPR) and/or Secondary Care (First Aid) courses? u [Have candidates refer to the Integrating Emergency First Response Courses in Section One of their Care for Children Instructor Guide. child and infant skills.

How can you integrate the Care for Children course with the Primary Care (CPR) and /or Secondary Care (First Aid) courses? 4 64 .Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Summary Course Philosophy and Standards 1. what is the definition of an infant and a child? 5. Why is it important to emphasize the emotional aspects of offering emergency care to a child during the Care for Children course? 10. What is the medical basis for the Care for Children course? 2. What are Call First and Care First and why is understanding these approaches so important in the Care for Children course? 6. How are the choking skills organized by local protocols? 13. What is the educational basis for the Care for Children course? 29 Summary Course Philosophy and Standards Knowledge Development – Key Information Skills Practice – Important Differences Course Conduct – Integrating Programs Care For Children 3. What are the Care for Children course standards and requirements? Knowledge Development – Key Information 4. Why is a discussion about preventing common injuries and illnesses a topic in the Care for Children course? Skills Practice – Important Differences 11. How can you best manage the Care for Children course? 15. In general. What other differences do Emergency Responders need to be aware of when offering aid to a child? 9. What is the Care for Children course approach to barrier use? 7. how do the Care for Children course skills differ from skills in the Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses? 12. What are the key differences between rescue breathing and CPR in children versus adults? Course Conduct – Integrating Programs 14. What are significant differences between emergency medical conditions in children versus adults? 8. In the Care for Children course.

2. Consider going through the Recommended Skill – AED Use with Children. assign the Care For Children skills during the Skills Workshop portion of those programs. Candidates demonstrate positive coaching techniques. 3. Conscious Choking Child.5 hours (Based on 12 Candidates) Notes to Presenter 1. 4. conscious choking child. Assign each instructor candidate to teach at least one skill so that One Rescuer – Child CPR and One Rescuer – Infant CPR. If you must use an adult AED unit. cover AED use with children when introducing AEDs as part of the workshop.Section Two – Presentations Presentation 6 Care for Children Skills Workshop DURATION: 1. During the Emergency First Response Instructor Course or Instructor Crossover Program. Candidates must demonstrate role-model techniques for the following Care for Children skills: one rescuer child CPR. Also. 5. this will give instructor candidates valuable hands-on experience with the child pads. conscious choking infant. If you have a child appropriate unit or trainer unit available. one rescuer infant CPR. Care For Children Skills Workshop 65 . it will still be a great refresher for instructor candidates. This workshop helps instructor candidates develop teaching techniques and formulate presentations for the Care for Children course. Conscious Choking Infant are covered.

Instruct them to: a. d.] 6 66 . Encourage candidates to learn from each other. e. f. but to stylize their presentations to suit their own teaching style. and conduct skill practice demonstrating positive coaching techniques (other candidates and staff act as participants). Show video of skill 2 Care for Children Skills Workshop . Provide remediation and additional practice if candidate skills need work.Procedures Teaching Your Assigned Skill Introduce skill Show video Provide role-model demonstration Answer questions with lifeline Care For Children Skills Workshop c.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Procedures 1. Always refer to the lifeline for answers to questions. g. Provide role-model demonstration. evaluate each candidate’s skill technique and supply teaching tips. If candidates are teaching the same skill. During practice. as appropriate. Introduce skill – value and key points b. it’s acceptable to only show the video segment once. Conduct skill development in sequence u [Have candidates teach their assigned skills in sequence.

4. we’ll look at organization techniques. When friends are organized. Helping unorganized movers is frustrating and uncomfortable. First impressions are lasting and important. especially when conducting their first few Emergency First Response courses. you’re encouraged to create your own contact and stylize the presentation as appropriate. 3. It also reviews administrative procedures and training supplies.Section Two – Presentations Presentation 7 Organizing an Emergency First Response® Course DURATION: 45 minutes (Based on 12 Candidates) Organizing a Course Notes to Presenter 1. Just as you’d like to walk into a friend’s place and see everything organized for a move. Adapt this presentation to instructor candidate needs based on their teaching experience and familiarity with managing training materials. did they have everything packed in neatly stacked and labeled boxes? Or. The sample contact is for your consideration and use. 2. The optional mannequin cleaning workshop is designed to immediately follow this presentation. During this presentation. participants in your Emergency First Response course expect to walk into an organized training program. administrative procedures and equipment needs. This presentation emphasizes course preparation and provides practical “how to” information that instructor candidates will find useful. Organizing a Course Primary Care (CPR) Secondary Care (First Aid) Contact 2 Have you ever helped friends move to a new house or apartment? If so. It’s doubtful that you’ll ever help these friends move again. your staff and the participants. as well as move their belongings? Many of you have probably encountered both types of movers – the organized and the unorganized. was everything still loose and you had to help pack. However. 67 . It makes the move easier on everyone and a lot more enjoyable. A little work ahead of time goes a long way toward helping the course run smoothly and making it easier on everyone – you. you appreciate that they took your time and effort into account. The key to running an efficient program is to prepare in advance and have all the necessary supplies ready.

Curriculum and Attitude Paperwork and Recognition Supplies 3 Organizing a Course Class Preparation – Logistics.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Overview Motivating Independent Study As discussed. We’ll look at ways to manage it all. We’ll review the steps so that you are comfortable filling out required forms. you can influence how and when participants use them to study. When materials are available. Review the five listed benefits. Review ways to motivate independent study. Knowledge Development – Motivating Independent Study in their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. Supplies You already know what training materials and supplies are required. Remind candidates that independent study may not be possible if the Emergency First Response manuals and videos are not available in a language the participants understand. Curriculum and Attitude Besides getting the classroom ready to go.] 4 Organizing a Course B. What are the educational and logistical advantages of independent study? u Motivating Independent Study What are the educational and logistical advantages of independent study? How can you motivate participants to study independently before class? [Have instructor candidates refer to Section Two. Motivating Independent Study A. you and your staff need to be prepared to interact with participants and provide a meaningful learning experience. Outline I. how you organize knowledge development for a course depends upon whether participants study independently or not. Overview Motivating Independent Study Class Preparation — Logistics. Paperwork and Recognition Keeping course documents organized and completing paperwork to ensure that participants are properly recognized for their achievements is important. [Refer to EFR Instructor Guide] Knowledge Development – Independent Study in their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide.] 8 68 . How can you motivate participants to study independently before class? u [Have candidates refer to Section Two.

Section Two – Presentations C. Class Preparation – Logistics. Briefly go over the use of the skill workbook pages. Knowledge Review and Reference sections. 2. Provide participants with Emergency First Responder Participant Packs and videos as soon as they sign up. How can you get materials to participants before class? 1. d. 6 Class Preparation — Logistics. Be sure to tell participants to wear casual clothes suited to getting down on the floor to practice skills during the course. Suggest that participants review a skill in their manual. Include directions for independent study along with the course schedule. go over the class schedule and generate enthusiasm about the training. distribute Emergency First Response Participant Packs. 5 Motivating Independent Study How can you get materials to participants before class? Use Participant Packs and Videos Include independent study directions Review manual structure Explain how best to use video Schedule and orientation session b. Point out the Main Objectives. Curriculum and Attitude How can you prepare logistically for an Emergency First Response program? Classroom Clean and well-ventilated Floor coverings and sitting areas Organizing a Course b. Schedule a brief Emergency First Response orientation session. Have comfortable areas to sit for those who don’t want to spend the whole time on the floor. a. We’ll discuss Emergency First Response material packaging and marketing ideas during the next session – Marketing Emergency First Response. 69 . you can complete enrollment paperwork. you may want to provide clean blankets or towels to spread out – especially on hard floor surfaces. a. If delivered in person. Organizing a Course c. topics. review the participant manual structure with participants. review independent study assignments. well-ventilated and has enough floor space for participants to spread out and practice skills. How can you prepare logistically for an Emergency First Response program? 1. During this short (less than an hour) get-together. Make sure the room or class area is clean. b. Because participants will kneel and lie on the floor. II. c. This session allows potential participants to ask questions or discuss concerns before training starts. then watch the corresponding skill demonstration on the Emergency First Response Videos to prepare for class. Curriculum and Attitude A. a.

Plan to implement improvements for the upcoming course. AEDs. Meet with assistants to discuss expectations and consistency. if necessary. Review the benefits of a low-stress learning environment and the use of positive reinforcement. 10 Class Preparation Prepare yourself and staff. 3. Review your Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. course sequence and specific staff responsibilities. consider participants’ comfort for class duration. oxygen units. 9 8 Class Preparation Prepare logistically.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 2. review your notes and think about your last course. If showing Emergency First Response Videos in class. B. Make sure you have most the current information. How should you prepare yourself and your staff to teach an Emergency First Response program? 1. have support and to pick up additional teaching tips. . Go over the class size. Review course and detail specific staff responsibilities Remind staff to stay within course scope Emphasize need for low-stress. a. Caution Plan to have fun! them not to discuss medical conditions or emergency procedures that go beyond the course content. positive reinforcement and participant self-discovery Organizing a Course b. If using video in class: Position screen for good viewing Test equipment Check sound level Organizing a Course b. c. . 7 Class Preparation Prepare logistically. For your first few courses. Plan to have fun. . Schedule regular breaks. Remind staff of the course scope. 2. make sure the television or screen is positioned for good viewing and adjust sound level. a. a. consider team-teaching with an experienced instructor to gain confidence. Generally. Always refer participants back to the ABCD’S. etc. 70 0 . . etc. Prepare and position mannequins. Test video equipment well before participants arrive to allow time for adjustment or replacement. Look at recent editions of The Responder for program changes as well as teaching tips. etc. Have access to restrooms and water. . Consider participant comfort Facilities Regular breaks Organizing a Course Class Preparation How should you prepare yourself and your staff to teach an Emergency First Response program? Review your instructor guide – update it as necessary Implement noted improvements First few courses — consider team teaching to gain confidence Organizing a Course b. (More on equipment and supplies in a few minutes) 4. Familiarize yourself with equipment and have the video ready to play. . Before each new course. 3. Prepare and position mannequins and other equipment – AEDs. oxygen units. Emphasize the need to give participants room for self-discovery. c.

etc.Section Two – Presentations III. This form provides participants with verification of the course they’ve completed along with a record of what Primary Care Recommended Skills they learned. d. in the front of the participant manuals. Course Enrollment Forms a.] 11 What forms help you organize and document your Emergency First Response courses? Course Enrollment Form Skills Completion Form Organizing a Course 1. Using these forms allows you and your assistants to keep accurate records. b. 2. Skill Completion Forms a. Documenting skill completion is especially helpful if a course is broken into several short segments conducted on different days or if there are a large number of participants and assistants involved in the program. Having this information allows you to keep accurate records and document training. there are participant course and skill completion sheets. Having contact information also allows you to let participants know about other courses or refreshers you offer through flyers. How do you request a completion card for Emergency Responders and recognize them for completing a course? Paperwork and Recognition How do you request a completion card for Emergency Responders and recognize them for completing a course? One card or separate cards? [Refer to EFR Instructor Guide] u [Have candidates refer to Section One – Course Completion Requirement in their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. Emphasize the following:] Secondary Care (First Aid) 12 Primary Care (CPR) plus AED Organizing a Course 71 . b. c. What forms help you organize and document your Emergency First Response courses? u [Have candidates refer to these forms in the Appendix of their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide and Care for Children Instructor Guide. Quickly review standards and procedures for completion card requests. Also. phone calls. At the start of each (if not before) have participants complete the contact information section. d. emails. Fill out the Instructor Statement for students once a course is finished. These forms allows you to track participant progress through the course. B. Paperwork and Recognition Paperwork and Recognition A. Use these forms prior to a course to list how many participants are enrolled. c. Have example Course Completion Authorization and Emergency First Response Completion Certificates available for candidates to handle.

If courses are offered separately. Review this recognition program. For immediate recognition. b.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 1. . C. b. you may request one card for participants that recognizes completion of both courses. 2. 3. . Emergency First Response Secondary Care (First Aid) or Care for Children – but this is not necessary.] Paperwork and Recognition How can you recognize Emergency Responders for using their skills? Emergency Responders in Action [Refer to EFR Instructor Guide] Paperwork and Recognition Request card and recognize completion. Write clearly or type information on Course Completion Authorization to avoid processing errors. you must send in Course Completion Authorization for participants at the end of each course. Certificates not only recognize achievements but provide documentation of training until participants receive their completion cards. Double check that all information is complete and correct before sending Course Completion Authorization into Emergency First Response. present participants with Emergency First Response Completion Certificates at the end of each program. For Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses offered together. Send envelopes in as soon as possible for processing and return to participants. Write clearly or type information – double check Note AED training Use Completion Certificates for immediate recognition 13 Organizing a Course 14 Organizing a Course 2 72 . a. How can you recognize Emergency Responders for using their skills? u [Have candidates refer to the end of Section One – Emergency Responders in Action in their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. You can send in two Course Completion Authorizations if participants request separate cards for Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR). a.

] 2. Start by reviewing the required and recommended materials list in your Emergency First Response Instructor Guide and gather or replenish supplies. b. 73 . A chalkboard. Have extra barriers. What should you consider when organizing and preparing training materials and supplies for an Emergency First Response course? 1. What should you consider when organizing and preparing training materials and supplies for an Emergency First Response course? [Refer to EFR Instructor Guide] Review Required and Recommended Materials list Check mannequins – clean and working Organizing a Course 15 u [Have instructor candidates refer to the materials lists in their Emergency First Response and Care for Children Guides. Think about the scenarios in advance and have the props you need to give them realism. 5.] 3. etc. tell candidates that they’ll go through cleaning procedures in detail soon. a. etc. This makes it easier to quickly check supplies and organize materials for a course. container. Check that mannequins are clean and functioning. If you don’t want to position them around the room at the class start. dressings and bandages ready to use. closet. c. Phones. whiteboard or flip chart for notes and key points. 4. If possible. pillows. Extra paper. pencils and pens. u [If conducting the Mannequin Cleaning Workshop. Have disinfecting sprays or wipes for use with each mannequin. 6. Consider other classroom needs.Section Two – Presentations IV.. have backup or additional units available just in case something malfunctions. Briefly read through lists. spares will keep the class moving. If teaching AED use and/or oxygen use. For example: a. supplies or props that may enhance learning. and have both adult and child pads available. It’s a good idea to store all your Emergency First Response teaching equipment and supplies in one place – room. If participants damage or forget to bring their First Aid Packs. check that units are complete with all necessary supplies and function as required for the demonstration. a steering wheel. Supplies Supplies A. for scenarios. b. have them readily accessible for efficient distribution.

Curriculum and Attitude 4.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Summary Motivating Independent Study 1. What are the educational and logistical advantages of independent study? 2. How should you prepare yourself and your staff to teach an Emergency First Response course? Paperwork and Recognition 6. How can you get materials to participants before class? 16 Summary Motivating Independent Study Class Preparation — Logistics. How can you prepare logistically for an Emergency First Response program? 5. How can you motivate participants to study independently before class? 3. What should you consider when organizing and preparing training materials and supplies for an Emergency First Response course? 4 74 . How can you recognize Emergency Responders for using their skills? Supplies 9. What forms help you organize and document your Emergency First Response courses? 7. How do you request a completion card for Emergency Responders and recognize them for completing a course? 8. Curriculum and Attitude Paperwork and Recognition Supplies Organizing a Course Class Preparation – Logistics.

Also. This workshop teaches instructor candidates techniques for proper care and cleaning of CPR mannequins. Rinse mannequin parts again. have a variety of mannequin types available (different brands and adult.] 5. if appropriate.] 3. child and infant) to familiarize candidates with differences in cleaning techniques. have candidates wash and rinse appropriate parts – most often this includes scrubbing with soap and water. Review cleaning solutions for use during class and after for mannequin cleaning u [Describe (and show if possible) disinfectants that may be used on mannequins – commercial wipes. reassemble and store mannequins u [Have candidates dry and reassemble mannequins. 4. have manufacturer instructions available for mannequin care. 3. Instruct candidates to look for cracks or tears that require special attention during cleaning. 2. Discuss proper storage techniques. talk about care and cleaning. If mannequin has clothing.] 75 . Leave solution on for 10 minutes or as appropriate according to directions. Wash mannequin parts u [Following manufacturer directions. You need to have proper cleaning solutions on hand. Procedures 1.Section Two – Presentations Presentation 8 Mannequin Cleaning Workshop [Optional] DURATION: 30 minutes Notes to Presenter 1. Disassemble and inspect mannequins u [Have candidates don gloves and follow manufacturer directions to disassemble mannequins for cleaning. etc. Dry. have candidates use disinfecting solution to wipe down mannequin parts. 1:10 bleach solution (one part household bleach mixed with ten parts water). keep in mind that most mannequin cleaning procedures require running water – plan accordingly. sprays. Answer candidates’ other questions about mannequin care. Also. If possible.] 2. Keep candidate cleaning groups as small as possible so that everyone takes an active part in handling mannequins. Disinfect mannequin parts u [Following manufacturer directions.] 4.

This presentation is designed to spark creative thinking on ways to market Emergency First Response courses and to identify potential target markets for CPR and first aid training. you’re encouraged to create your own contact and stylize the presentation as appropriate. 5. You need to decide who your potential participants are and carefully craft your marketing message to appeal to them. and also provides sample marketing tools. However. The way to keep your Emergency First Response courses full involves good marketing. 76 6 . explains how to identify potential target markets and how to focus marketing efforts. you need to figure out how to make your courses stand out. to being required to take a course by an employer. The sample contact is for your consideration and use.5 hours “Creating Confidence to Care” Marketing Notes to Presenter 1. You also need to arrange your courses in a way that is convenient and attractive to potential participants.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Presentation 9 Marketing Emergency First Response® DURATION: 1. 2. This could range from wanting to know how to care for an ill family member. people have a wide variety of reasons for wanting to learn CPR and first aid procedures. Contact Think back to your first CPR or first aid course and answer these three questions: 1) What made you enroll? 2) What made you choose that particular course? 3) Did you take any other courses or go back for a refresher course from the same instructor or facility? Chances are your answers are all very different. which makes a couple of important points. It’s recommended that you provide candidates with an Emergency First Response marketing kit. 4. 3. First. Most people don’t have to look too hard to find a course that fits their schedule and budget. Adapt and supplement this presentation to instructor candidate needs based on particular teaching situations. When training is easy to find. The presentation highlights the relative size of the CPR/ First Aid market. The second point is that in many areas there are a lot of training choices. Use the included interactive workshop to help candidates practice overcoming objections that are often encountered during the sales process.

Your marketing plan is a good way to find your niche and grow from there. This workshop will outline some potential objections you may encounter when marketing EFR and ways to overcome them. Overview The CPR / First Aid Training Market To truly understand the marketing opportunities for CPR and first aid training.Section Two – Presentations The good news is that almost everyone is a potential participant – the total market is huge. We’ll look at ways you can spread the word about your Emergency First Response programs. we’ll discuss marketing and help you start to expand your marketing plan by sharing ideas. incentives. reputation. How to Market EFR Once a target market is identified. promotions and general communication. it’s also about image. we’ll explore the size of the CPR and first aid training market to identify areas of potential growth. it is just as important to make sure that your courses are worthwhile and enjoyable because you want participants to refer people to you and return for emergency first response refreshers or other courses. During this segment we’ll work together to identify potential participants in the local marketplace. 77 . you need to use specific marketing techniques to get you message out. Keep in mind that besides a solid marketing plan. you need to have an understanding of the relative size of the market. Marketing Emergency First Response 2 During this session. During this segment we’ll identify who to contact and what information you need to include in your marketing package. Sales Techniques Overcoming objection is a critical part of the sale process. Overview CPR / First Aid Training Market Potential Participants How to Market EFR Sales Techniques Workshop Getting the Word Out 3 Marketing Potential Participants Targeting your marketing efforts is an important part of your marketing plan. During this segment. Getting the Word Out Marketing is not only advertising.

Every year. EFR First Aid at Work is designed for this need. that in some areas CPR and first aid training may be restricted by government regulations. if any. state. Make it a point to research who needs and wants CPR and first aid training in your local area. Who are your potential Emergency First Response course participants? 1. CPR and First Aid Industry A. 5 Potential Participants Potential course participants…… Potential is huge! Research local needs Be aware of local government regulations List YOUR potential participants Marketing b. u [Provide instructor candidates with information regarding local restrictions. CPR and First Aid training market 1. Potential Participants A. emergency care training may be required before obtaining a driver’s license. however. b. u 2. Thus. etc… In some areas. especially when licensure issues exist. a. child care worker’s permit. Emergency care training is often a requirement for recreational and public permits or certifications. Note: [Present information regarding the size of the market in your area. Keep in mind. your potential market may be huge. anyone with an interest in training may enroll in an Emergency First Response course. Make sure that you understand the regulations in your area and abide by local laws. for a scuba diving rescue certification. millions of people around the world seek CPR and first aid training. This is often the case when emergency medical training is required to meet specific licensure or workplace requirements. As mentioned. lifeguard certification. province or country. a.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Outline I. This will help you focus on specific groups.] 4 CPR and First Aid Industry Who are your potential Emergency First Response course participants? Employers who must meet regulatory compliance standards Government entities Schools Community Groups Childcare workers Dive students Marketing II. Encourage candidates to research guidelines and requirements before targeting new markets. For example. 3. 2.] 8 78 .

79 . Professional organizations III. plant engineer or fitness manager For organizations — club president. 5. etc. For businesses. Businesses – employees. 7 How to Market EFR How do you develop a contact? Call on the business or organization either by phone or in person to identify a point of contact For businesses — human resources. This list may include: 1. Have instructor candidates brainstorm and list potential participants. or are your employees or members required to be trained in CPR/first aid? What specific safety training is required? Who in the company or organization is responsible for training? Who conducts your training? In-house staff or is it by bid? Who can I send an information package to? Marketing 4. 4. students. safety officer. or are your employees (or members) required to be trained in CPR/First Aid? 2. clubs. a. How do you develop a contact? 1. organizations. In your area. What specific safety training is required? 3. For organizations. If you’re not able to speak directly to the person responsible for training. Potential Participants In your area. B. member or participant training. 2. Who in the company or organization is responsible for employee training? 8 How to Market EFR What questions should you ask? Do you offer. plant engineer or fitness manager. management. One way is to make a direct call to the business or organization either by phone or in person to identify a point of contact. friends. Do you offer. ask who you can send an information package to. 3. Schools and universities – teachers. coworkers and associates. child-care workers. safety officer or activities director Marketing b. safety officer or activities director. Is the training done by in-house staff or is it by bid? 6. What questions should I ask? 1. who do you plan to offer your Emergency First Response courses to and why is this your target market? u Ask the question – Who are your potential Emergency First Response course participants? Conduct as a discussion. this may be a club president. What you want to find out is who is in charge of employee. Who conducts your training? 5. How to Market EFR A. etc. etc. this is often the human resources department. who do you plan to offer your Emergency First Response courses to and why is this your target market? Start YOUR marketing plan [Refer to EFR Instructor Guide Appendix] 6 Marketing 2. Civic and community groups. Family. administrators.Section Two – Presentations B. associations. safety officer.

Leverage international approvals and acceptances OSHA (U. 12 11 10 How to Market EFR Features. How to Market EFR What features. Leverage EFR’s international approvals or acceptances when marketing to general industry. EFR meets workplace safety program requirements. Automated External Defibrillator (AED) module Oxygen administration module Marketing How to Market EFR Features. .): Meets intent of OSHA guidelines. Employees spend less time away from job. 8. and DVD.S. This includes independent study to increase knowledge retention. State of the art self-study materials including participant manual. Workplace courses to meet specific regional guidelines (Great Britain. . 6.emergencyfirstresponse. advantages and benefits. 10. EFR incorporates a flexible learning method to meet individual needs. It allows focused instruction time on skill development which reduces time employees are away from their jobs. 7. advantages and benefits should you point out about EFR? Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses can be taught in tandem or stand alone Specific course for Care for Children Workplace course to meet specific regional guidelines Program is based on internationally recognized medical guidelines 9 Marketing 3. Asia Pacific). .com for the most recent list of acceptances globally Marketing c. The EFR Primary Care and Secondary Care program offers two courses (CPR and First Aid) that can be taught in tandem or stand alone. 9.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide C. b. . .) — Meets guidelines intent HSE (Great Britain) — Meets appointed person in the workplace requirements WorkCover NSW (Australia) — Meets regulations that govern workplace requirements Check www. advantages and benefits. Specific course for Care for Children that focuses on techniques for providing CPR and first aid to infants and young children. Highlight cost savings of independent study method. a. or CPR and AED (Americas). No need for a separate course. advantages and benefits. 0 80 . 2. 5. 4. Program is based on internationally recognized medical guidelines. Oxygen administration module can be included in training. advantages and benefits should you point out about EFR? 1. HSE: (Great Britain) Meets appointed person in the workplace requirements.S. Work Cover NSW (Australia): Meets regulations that govern workplace requirements in Australia. Flexible learning method to meet individual needs State of the art self-study materials to reduce traditional classroom time Participant manual DVD Learning takes place in a nonstressful environment Marketing How to Market EFR Features. Automated External Defibrillator (AED) that includes the latest recommendation for pediatric defibrillation. Learning takes place in a non-stressful environment. OSHA (U. What features. .

How do you overcome objections? u [This workshop is designed to spark thinking on how to overcome objections with implementing Emergency First Response in the workplace or marketing to large organizations. job site requirements or time constraints Cost breakdown – materials and instructor fee 13 Marketing 2. Continuing your professional education as an EFR Instructor will increase your marketability. Your marketing kit needs to include a proposal letter. What should you include in a marketing presentation? 1. Highlight regional specific programs like First Aid at Work or CPR and AED.] 14 Marketing presentation. u [Provide candidates with sample EFR corporate acquisition brochure. When preparing your letter try to keep it to no more than two pages. job site requirements or time constraints. There is no wrong answer. How can you increase your marketability? 1. Conduct this workshop as a group discussion. . Sales Techniques Workshop A. EFR corporate acquisition brochure Information on your business with customers testimonials Follow up date Marketing How to Market EFR How can you increase your marketability? Continue your education First Aid at Work CPR & AED Bloodborne Pathogens 15 Marketing IV. [Refer candidates to sample proposal letter in appendix section of the EFR Instructor Guide].] Sales Techniques How do you overcome objections? Workshop 16 Marketing 81 . How to Market EFR 4. information on your business with customer testimonial’s and set a date to follow up on your information package.Section Two – Presentations D. 3. List responses on board.] E. How to Market EFR What should you include in a marketing presentation? Proposal letter – keep it to no more than two pages Information on how EFR meets the clients specific needs – local regulations. Also include EFR program brochure with detailed information on how EFR meets their workplace needs. Include cost breakdown (Material and Instructor fee). . u [Provide candidates with information on instructor level continuing education programs. Include information on how EFR meets the clients specific needs including local regulations. Encourage creative thinking and innovative ways of overcoming challenges.

Objection 4: Your program costs more than other programs on the market. What should you do or say? Marketing Sales Techniques Objection 4: Your program costs more than other programs on the market. u What should you do or say? [Have candidates 3 to 5 minutes brainstorm to overcome objection and list answers on board. Your next step may be to expand your program to local community organizations. Other instructors must build their Emergency First Response programs from scratch. V. Whether you fall into either of these categories or somewhere in between. 20 What should you do or say? Marketing Getting the Word Out How can you begin to establish yourself as an Emergency First Response Instructor? Gain experience and build a solid reputation Teach those close to you – family. clubs and schools. You learn from them while they learn from you in a mutually supportive environment. As a new instructor.] 3.] 2. One suggestion is to start by teaching those close to you – family. Objection 3: We don’t offer training or require our employees to be CPR/First Aid trained. friends. What should you do or say? Marketing Sales Techniques Objection 3: We don’t offer training or require our employees to be CPR/first aid trained. How can you begin to establish yourself as an Emergency First Response Instructor? 1. Expand to local community organizations. this allows you to work your way through the program and fine-tune your teaching skills in front of people who already value you. Some instructors are fortunate enough to have ready-made classes – for example. As you teach more courses within 82 2 .] 19 18 Sales Techniques Objection 1: You call the company and are unable to speak to or find out who is in charge of employee training. coworkers. clubs and schools 21 Marketing 2. etc.] 4. etc. u What should you do or say? [Have candidates 3 to 5 minutes brainstorm to overcome objection and list answers on board. u What should you do or say? [Have candidates 3 to 5 minutes brainstorm to overcome objection and list answers on board. Objection 2: We already offer CPR/First Aid training to our employees. Getting the Word Out A. What should you do or say? 17 Marketing Sales Techniques Objection 2: We already offer CPR/first aid training to our employees. Objection 1: You call the company and are unable to speak to or find out who is in charge of employee training. all Emergency First Response Instructors must gain experience and build a solid reputation. u What should you do or say? [Have candidates 3 to 5 minutes brainstorm to overcome objection and list answers on board. mandatory employee training programs. 3.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 1. friends.

Getting the Word Out Establish yourself as an instructor. B. As an established Emergency First Response Instructor. etc. because people are likely to spread the word about a poor class. This list may include: 1. your ability to grow your programs is limited only by your own goals and desires. Have instructor candidates brainstorm and list possible advertising options and promotions. Advertising: • • • • • • • • • Community calendars and bulletin boards Newspapers. .] 83 . etc. magazines and other publications Flyers and direct mail Emails and websites Soliciting local businesses and organizations Incentives for participants to refer others to you In conjunction with other training – babysitting courses. you further establish yourself as an Emergency First Response Instructor and the person to go to for training. Promotions: Have candidates write down ideas that fit into their marketing plans. Offer quality programs People spread the word about poor programs You want a positive image to circulate throughout the community Your ability to grow your program is limited only by your goals and desires 22 Marketing 5. . You want only a positive image of your programs to circulate throughout the community. 4. Encourage them to expand and use these plans after this course. first aid kits. In conjunction with equipment purchases – AEDs. In conjunction with at-work programs offered in occupational settings such as safety and manual handling courses. teacher training.Section Two – Presentations the community. scuba diving courses. 23 Getting the Word Out How can you advertise and promote your Emergency First Response courses? Continue your marketing plan [Refer to EFR Instructor Guide Appendix] Marketing 2. oxygen units. Be sure to offer quality programs. How can you advertise and promote your Emergency First Response courses? u [Conduct as a discussion.

Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Summary The CPR / First Aid Training Market 1. How big is the CPR and First Aid training market? Summary CPR / First Aid Training Market Potential Participants How to Market EFR Sales Techniques Workshop Getting the Word Out 24 Potential Participants 2. How do you overcome sales objections? Getting the Word Out 7. What should you include in a marketing kit? Sales Techniques Workshop 6. Who are your potential Emergency First Response course participants? Marketing How to Market EFR 3. How do you develop contact? 4. How can you begin to establish yourself as an Emergency First Response Instructor? 8. What questions should I ask? 5. How can you advertise and promote your Emergency First Response courses? 4 84 .

3. 5.) 4. Keep instructor candidate exam answer sheets with copies of their instructor applications for your records. You must review any missed questions with candidates to assure understanding. Administer the Emergency First Response Instructor Exam after instructor candidates complete all required Emergency First Response Instructor course presentations. Instructor candidates are allowed to use their Emergency First Response Instructor Guide and Care for Children Instructor Guide for reference during the exam. ® 85 . (Most candidates will take less than an hour. There is no time limit for the exam. Instructor candidates must score 75 percent or higher on the exam. Scores less than 75 percent require a retest. No other Emergency First Response materials are allowed.Section Two – Presentations Emergency First Response Instructor Exam Procedures DURATION: 1 hour Notes 1. 2.

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. . . . . .A-23 Emergency First Response Instructor Course Exam Answer Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-29 Emergency First Response Course Evaluation Survey . . . . . . .A-11 Emergency First Response Instructor Course Enrollment Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-25 Emergency First Response Instructor Application. . .A-35 A-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-16 Completion Form Emergency First Response Instructor Course Exam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-33 Bid Proposal Letter (Sample) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-7 Human Body Systems Knowledge Review Answer Key . . . .A-3 Care for Children Knowledge Review Answer Key . . .A-15 Emergency First Response Care for Children Instructor Skills . . . . . . . . . .A-14 Emergency First Response Instructor Skills Completion Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-28 Instructor Application Sample Problems for Positive Coaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-9 Medical Emergencies Knowledge Review Answer Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appendix Appendix Contents Program Standards Knowledge Review Answer Key . . . . . . . .A-27 Emergency First Response Care for Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-17 Emergency First Response Instructor Course Exam Answer Sheet. . . .

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A-3 . Establishing retention through repetition and practice. The Emergency First Response Secondary Care (First Aid) course covers secondary patient assessment assuming that Emergency Medical Services personnel are immediately available. 3. nonlife threatening/ABCD’S critical/ABCs most life threatening/ABCD’S nonbreathing/BLS 4. Goals for both the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses include: (Choose all that apply. while maximizing lectures. b. – it assumes that EMS personnel will be delayed. a. 2. c. Creating an encouraging atmosphere that focuses on positive reinforcement. Increasing knowledge retention through content simplification and independent study. Combine CPR and first aid into one simple Emergency Responder protocol that promotes long-term memory retention. Provide a learning environment that reduces participant anxiety. guilt and fear of imperfect performance. Key features of the Emergency First Response Program learning philosophy include: (Choose all that apply. Teach an internationally consistent course flexible enough to accommodate regional CPR and first aid protocols and cultural differences. True or False. The Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) course focuses on emergency care for __________ situations and teaches Emergency Responders to monitor a patient using the __________ of primary care. d. c. b. Providing a low-stress educational environment.) a. d. Three and Four.) a. Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses are medically based. answer the following questions (circle or write in your response): 1.Appendix Emergency First Response® Instructor Course Knowledge Review Answer Key Program Standards After reading the Emergency First Response Primary and Secondary Care Instructor Guide – Section One and the introductions to Sections Two. True or False. c. e. b. d. 5. Increase the percentage of CPR and first aid-trained laypersons who use their skills without hesitation to assist those in need. following the same priorities of care used by professional emergency care providers. Minimize skill development and practice time.

e. Anyone eight years of age or older. Who may enroll in an Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) course? a. Less need to establish base concepts in the classroom. your instructional approach can be very flexible and may include one (or a combination) of these approaches – Independent Study. Splint suspected skeletal injuries. Explain the importance and timeliness of defibrillation within the CPR protocol. d. Only people who have proof of previous CPR training.) a. 10. 12. skill development and scenario practice c. Having participants study independently with the Emergency First Response Participant Manual and Video results in: (Choose all that apply. laws or requirements. allowing more time for skill development and scenario practice c. Participants who are better prepared for skill development. After successfully completing the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) course. After successfully completing the Emergency First Response Secondary Care (First Aid) course. Knowledge development. True or False. b. Adult CPR. of any age. d. 8.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 6. c. participants should be able to: (Choose all that apply. Emergency First Response program standards may need modification based on regional guidelines. d. True or False. Adults (18 years of age or older). True or False.) a. Shock Management and Spinal Injury Management. Anyone. 7. A-4 . Because teaching situations differ. Determine when CPR is appropriate and perform One Rescuer. participants should be able to perform initial and ongoing assessments of an injured or ill person when Emergency Medical Services personnel will be delayed. Video Guided and Instructor Led. 11. More time to focus on regional CPR and first aid differences. performance requirements and skill evaluation 9. b. with an interest. True or False. skill demonstration and skill practice b. Perform a scene assessment and use barriers appropriately. The Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses are divided into what three segments? a. Better use of instructor and participant time. Perform a patient responsiveness check and alert Emergency Medical Services at the appropriate time within the primary care sequence. Instructor lectures. Independent study. 13. video review and skill practice d. Learning objectives. People who enroll in an Emergency First Response Secondary Care (First Aid) course having taken CPR training through another organization need an orientation to these three primary care course subjects – Serious Bleeding Management. c. b.

Appendix 14. Instructor Led Knowledge Development presentations c. A current CPR/first aid instructor with another regionally recognized organization. A qualified assistant is defined as: a. The participant-to-Emergency First Response Instructor ratio is: a. All of the above. b. d. Splints d. 17. 6 months 12 months 24 months 36 months 16. All of the above. The participant-toEmergency First Response Instructor ratio increases to a maximum of 20:1 when using two qualified assistants. b. 8:1 c. Which of the following items must Emergency First Response Instructors have when teaching the Emergency First Response Secondary Care (First Aid) course? (Choose all that apply. c. To keep completion cards current. 4:1 b. EMT. True or False. A current Emergency First Response Instructor. 4:1 b. 23. Emergency First Response Primary and Secondary Care Instructor Guide c. A trained medical professional such as a paramedic. 16:1 15. A-5 . Emergency Responders need to refresh their skills at least every: a. 12:1 d. c. 8:1 c. Skill Development portion of the Primary Care (CPR) course. Emergency First Response Instructors must submit a Course Completion Authorization to Emergency First Response for each participant successfully completing the course. 20. b. A written exam is required for successful completion. d. 21. Review of any new developments or changes to primary care techniques d. 16:1 18. – review of the Knowledge Review is recommended. It’s recommended that CPR mannequins used for Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) courses be capable of simulating an airway obstruction if the airway is not positioned properly. – the ratio increases to a maximum of 24:1 with the use of one or more qualified assistants. The maximum participant-to-mannequin ratio is: a.) a. 19.) a. but not required. True or False. An Emergency First Response Refresher for the Primary Care (CPR) course should include: (Choose all that apply. nurse practitioner. Gloves and barriers 22. Participants must complete and turn in the Knowledge Review from their Emergency First Response Participant Manuals and take the written exam to successfully complete the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) course. True or False. 12:1 d. etc. True or False. Roller and triangle bandages b.

providing positive reinforcement and suggestions for improvement. 2/Emergency Responder and patient. 1 Introduce the skill – cover performance requirements. value and briefly go over key points. a 2 next to the second. – Scenario practice is an opportunity to apply skills to realistic situations while encouraging discovery and building confidence. place the following steps in the proper sequence (place a 1 next to the first step. 26. 4/Emergency Responder. guide and qualified assistant 25.) 4 Divide participants into practice groups and have them practice the skill by referring to their Emergency First Response Participant Manual. 3 Demonstrate the skill by reviewing the critical steps. During skill development and scenario practice. 2 Show appropriate skill portion of the video. True or False. A-6 . 3/Emergency Responder. patient and guide c.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 24. When using the Video Guided Approach for skill development. the ideal practice group is made up of __________ participants playing the roles of _______________ . recall critical steps and take appropriate action. 3/Emergency Responder. patient. etc. 5 Debrief the skill. b. a. bystander and victim d. Scenario practice allows each participant to demonstrate the ability to evaluate the scene.

True or False. Anyone interested in learning emergency care specific to children and infants may take this course because there are no certification or licensure prerequisites and no minimum age limit. Emergency First Response Care for Children Instructor Guide b. 6.) a. Bag marked biohazard for disposal of barriers h. d. a. c. b. Ventilation barrier f. The participant-to-Care for Children Instructor ratio is: a. Emergency First Response Care for Children course is based on emergency considerations and protocols from the consensus view of the Basic Life Support (BLS) Working Group and the Pediatric Working Group of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). Blankets or towels g. 8:1 c. requires participants to have previous CPR or first aid training d. The Emergency First Response Care for Children course only covers primary care procedures for aiding children ages 1 through 8/puberty. c. answer the following questions: 1. Triangle bandages A-7 . b. True or False. 4:1 b. follows the same priorities of care used by professional emergency care providers. True or False. The Care for Children course: (Choose all that apply.) a. follows consistent international guidelines. yet is flexible enough to accommodate regional CPR and first aid protocols and cultural differences. CPR Mannequin – child or adult e. – it covers primary and secondary care procedures for infants and children 4. 12:1 d.Appendix Emergency First Response® Instructor Course Knowledge Review Answer Key Care for Children After reading the Emergency First Response Care for Children Instructor Guide. CPR Infant Mannequin d. 3. assumes that an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) is available to support Emergency Responder care. Which of the following are you required to have as a Care for Children Instructor when teaching the course? (Choose all that apply. 16:1 7. 5. Emergency First Response Care for Children Participant Manual c. 8/3 12 / 1 13 / 2 12 / 3 2. The Care for Children course includes __________ primary and secondary care skills and _______ recommended skill.

A written final exam is required for successful completion. however. a. During CPR. child or infant CPR is: a. you should teach participants the protocols appropriate for your area based on the three variations (Americas. Definitions and Explanations Medical Emergencies and Children Helping Others in Need Leading a Healthy Lifestyle The Emotional Aspects of Caring for Children f. 16. 12. – Using the Knowledge Review is a good learning tool. 6 months 12 months 24 months 36 months 13. 3 4 1 2 10. e. True or False. Rescue breaths with a child or infant should last no more than _____ second(s). b. it’s a good idea to protect yourself and the child against disease transmission especially when helping a child unknown to you. Participants must complete and turn in the Care for Children Knowledge Review from their Emergency First Response Care for Children Participant Manuals and take the written exam to successfully complete course. d. 9. 14. The ratio of chest compressions to rescue breaths during one rescuer. b.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 8.) a. b. d. True or False. True or False. an Emergency Responder needs to refresh skills every: a. d. but is not required. c. A-8 . c. Asia Pacific and Europe) provided in the Care for Children Instructor Guide and Participant Manual. c. You may integrate the Care for Children course content with the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and/or Secondary Care (First Aid) courses. The Care for Children course takes the approach that barrier use is a matter of personal choice when assisting a child. True or False. b. d. True or False. To keep a Care for Children completion card current. Preventing Common Injuries or Illness 15. 15:2 3:1 30:2 5:2 11. Because procedures for handling choking in children vary internationally. c. chest compressions for a child or infant should be at a rate of 100 compressions per minute. Which of the following are knowledge development topics from the Care for Children course? (Choose all that apply.

The air we breathe contains about ______ __ oxygen. b. 12.) a. skeletal.Appendix Emergency First Response® Instructor Course Knowledge Review Answer Key Human Body Systems After reading the section on Human Body Systems in the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. answer the following questions (circle or write in your response): 1. d. d. a. respiratory Circulatory. a. c. d. True or False. Help the body defend against disease d. Circulatory. That force is called: a. d. Seconds Minutes Hours None of the above 7. A healthy. Pulse Ventricular fibrillation Artery stretching Blood pressure 5. True or False. a. lymphatic 6. 8. the brain begins to die within a few __________. b. respiratory. Carry carbon dioxide and other waste products away from cells c. Contraction of the heart propels blood through the arteries with considerable force. b. b. epiglottis/esophagus esophagus/trachea trachea/epiglottis trachea/bronchi 4. average size adult’s body has about _____________ of blood. nervous Circulatory. c. What three systems of the human body are most involved in life-threatening emergencies? (Choose one. musculatory. 3 litres/quarts 6 litres/quarts 10 litres/quarts 12 litres/quarts 2. c. Red blood cells White blood cells Plasma Platelets 3. a. d. The purpose of blood is to: (Check all that apply): a. Ventricular fibrillation is the term used for normal heart rhythm. b. Without oxygen. c. c. d. Rescue breaths do not contain enough oxygen to support a nonbreathing patient. Transport oxygen and nutrients to cells b.) a. The pharynx divides into two passageways. Help regulate body temperature 10. respiratory. nervous Circulatory. What is the general purpose of the respiratory system? (Check all that apply. The circulatory system transports both blood and lymph. b. b. A-9 . d. 21 percent 30 percent 50 percent 72 percent 11. the ___________ and the ___________. c. b. True or False. c. c. To supply the body with oxygen To remove oxygen from the body To supply the body with carbon dioxide To remove carbon dioxide from the body 9. Which blood component is the largest? a. d.

d. b. c. Tissue layers surrounding the spinal cord b. What types of information are transmitted to and from the brain? (Check all that apply. through the body is one of the primary purposes of the ______________ system. d. Neck Armpits Groin Spleen 16. d.) a. When an artery is cut. The skull and vertebrae c. The primary purposes of the lymphatic system are to return fluids that have collected in tissues. Muscles need a rich supply of carbon dioxide and nutrients delivered by the blood to accomplish their specific jobs within the body.) a. Eliminate waste products 22. Blood vessels d. c. d. Digestive Musculatory Nervous Lymphatic 18. Two arteries used as pressure points to reduce serious bleeding are the _________ _____ and the ____________________. 21. b.) a. c. a. Which areas of the body contain lymph nodes? (Check all that apply. How is the central nervous system protected from injury? (Check all that apply. Pushing bodily substances.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 13. Brachial in the arm/femoral in the leg Carotid in the neck/brachial in the arm Carotid in the neck/radial in the wrist Brachial in the arm/radial in the wrist 15. d. Flows steadily/dark red Clots easily/bright red Spurts rhythmically/bright red Oozes slowly/dark red 19. The digestive and urinary systems provide the body with essential nutrients and remove waste product. to the bloodstream. such as food and blood. Support and protect internal organs b. bleeding ________ _____ and is _______________ in color. True or False. a. b.) a. Heart and brain Brain and spinal cord Heart and spinal cord Spleen and brain 23. c. c. Injuries to bones include (Check all that apply. Sensory information Motor functions Involuntary functions Levels of consciousness 24. d. c. b. 17. c. Sprains Dislocations Fractures Breaks or cracks 14. and to filter foreign particles. What purpose(s) does the skeletal system have? (Check all that apply. b.) a. A-10 . Cerebrospinal fluid 20. b. True or False. Store minerals c. Produce red blood cells and certain types of white blood cells d. d. b. The two main organs of the central nervous system are: a. a. True or False. microorganisms and other tissue debris from the body.

c.) a. a. Minor cuts. apply ___________ compresses. Dislocations occur when a great deal of pressure is placed on a joint.) a. 1 minute 5 minutes 10 minutes 15 minutes A-11 . b. A limb is unusable c. d. There is rapid swelling or bruising d.) a. Signs of wound infection include: (Check all that apply. Patient care for a chemical splash in the eye includes flushing the eye with water for _____________. cold/splint the joints above and below the bruise c. There is extreme pain at a specific point 2. and _________ __________________. hot/splint the joints above and below the bruise 6. c. Drowsiness 8. b. the following signs or symptoms are present: (Check all that apply. a. True or False. Strains and sprains are _______________ muscles. 9. scrapes and bruises are non life-threatening wounds which include which of the following? (Check all that apply. Keep it submerged in saline solution. d. or until EMS arrives. Presence of yellowish/greenish fluid at the wound site d. It’s best to avoid using an area of the body that has been strained or sprained. a. Redness b. Tenderness c. Keep it frozen c. b.Appendix Emergency First Response® Instructor Course Knowledge Review Answer Key Medical Emergencies After reading the section on Medical Emergencies in the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. d. if possible. 3. When transporting a dislodged tooth to the dentist: a. tendons and ligaments: (Check all that apply. True or False. Keep it submerged in alcohol b. hot/elevate about the heart d. milk or water d. c. Injured Fractured Stretched Torn 4. To administer first aid for bruises. You should suspect a fracture if. cold/elevate above the heart b. Allow it to dry out 7. Lacerations Scratches Deep cuts Bumps 5. answer the following questions (circle or write in your response): 1. after a fall or a blow. A limb appears to be in an unnatural position b.

Contact with electricity can cause life threatening injuries such as: (Check all that apply.) a. b. Choking Cardiopulmonary arrest Deep burns Internal tissue damage 16. Superficial frostbite/Deep frostbite Frostnip/Superficial frostbite Deep frostbite/Superficial frostbite Frostnip/Deep frostbite 19. c. tendons. ____________________ affects surface skin. including muscles. d. d. result from __________________________. Looking for a medical alert tag 20. Ice A moist. blood vessels and nerves. True or False. if the patient is responsive d. b. Heat stroke _______________________: (Check all that apply. c. forcing too much blood into the brain. a. True or False. Illness assessment.) a. Patient care for a responsive heart attack patient includes: (Check all that apply. b. Attempt to cushion patient’s head Restrain the patient Move objects out of the way Protect the patient 14. _______________ affects entire tissue layers. soda or candy b. juice. sugar. Patients have cool and clammy skin Is life-threatening Is a temperature-related injury Is when the body temperature rises dangerously high 15. True or False. Never put ______________ on a burn. A-12 . Giving the conscious/responsive patient a small snack. d. Strokes occur when the heart fibrillates. insulin reaction or hypoglycemia. (Check all that apply. Help patient into a comfortable position d. d.) a. c. c. High blood pressure High blood sugar Low blood proteins Low blood sugar 11. sterile bandage Butter Ointment 12. c.) a. d. d. Administer CPR 17. A severely hypothermic patient will likely be conscious and alert. b. Helping the patient take a prescribed medication for diabetes (such as insulin) c. yet shivering and displaying slightly impaired coordination. Diabetic problems. c. 18. When caring for a patient having a seizure: (Check all that apply. b. Heart attack patients may deny that chest discomfort is serious enough for emergency medical care. Help patient take any prescribed medication for chest pain c. Illness assessment b.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 10. a.) a. such as insulin shock. b.) a. 13. Patient Care for diabetic emergencies includes: (Check all that apply.

contact a local Poison Control Center and _________________________________: (Check all that apply. b. inhalation or absorption through the skin. Reaction to venomous bites and stings depends on the location of the bite or sting and how much venom was injected. Save vomitus and the poison container for EMS personnel 24. d. Size Current health Body chemistry Age A-13 . The patient’s reaction to the venom will also depend on the patient’s ___________ __________________. If available. d.) a. c. b. In the event of suspected poisoning. c. when and how much poison was ingested b. Poisoning can occur through ingestion. 23. If available.Appendix 21. a. Antihistamines Epinephrine Antibiotics Ibuprofen 22. Mild allergic reactions are usually not life threatening and usually controlled by ____________________________. Offer the patient food d. explain what. a. read the label on substance for poisoning instructions c. True or False.

Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 10.0 © Emergency First Response. 2006 A-14 . Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 12. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 8. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 3. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 11. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 6. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 7. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 4.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Emergency First Response Instructor Course ® Instructor Course Enrollment Form Instructor Crossover Course Instructor Retraining Course PARTICIPANTS 1. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 2. Corp. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ Product No. 10/06) Version 2. 10233 (Rev. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 9. Name __________________________________________________________________ Date of Birth ______________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone _________________________ Email ___________________________________ Completion Date___________________ 5.

Splinting for Dislocations and Fractures Participants S3 S4 1. Barrier Use 3. © Emergency First Response Corp.Instructor Name _______________________________________________________ Emergency First Response ® Instructor Skills Completion Form 7. 10/06) Version 2. Primary Assessment 4. Emergency Oxygen Use Orientation S1 S2 Secondary Care Skills S1. Serious Bleeding Management Recommended Skills R1. Illness Assessment S3. 4. Bandaging S4. One Rescuer. Shock Management 8. 8. 12. Injury Assessment S2. Adult CPR 5. AED (Automated External Defibrillator) Use R2. 10235 (Rev. 2006 Appendix Product No. 9. 11. 2.0 A-15 . 10. Scene Assessment 2. 5. 6. Conscious/Unconscious Choking Adult 6. 7. Spinal Injury Management Course Date ___________ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 R1 R2 Primary Care Skills 1. 3.

Conscious Choking Child C-6. 7. 6.CPR One Rescuer Infant . 12. 10. Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 4. 10/06) Version 2.Infant CPR PARTICIPANTS 1. 9. 8.0 . 5. 2006 Product No. One Rescuer .CPR Conscious Choking Child Conscious Choking Infant Instructor Skills Completion Form AED (Automated External Defibrillator) Use with Children C-6 AED Automated External Defibrillator Use with Children Course Date Required Skills ___________ C-4 C-5 C-3. Conscious Choking Infant C-3 One Rescuer Child . One Rescuer . 11. 2. 3. 10275 (Rev. © Emergency First Response Corp.A-16 ® Instructor Name _______________________________________________________ Emergency First Response Care for Children Recommended Skill C-5.Child CPR C-4.

Avoid stimuli such as caffeine. Stop. 1. 2006 2 Product No. Of the four links in the Chain of Survival. All of the above. Only offer aid if someone more qualified is not present. 7. which involve Emergency Responders? a. Slow down and try to relax after the incident. If a patient’s heart has stopped you may make the person’s condition worse by performing CPR that is not precise and. 5. In general. nicotine or alcohol. Chain of Survival 4. True or False. HIV and pneumonia. 8. The first three – emergency recognition and rapid EMS activation. Guilt and fear of imperfection c. even when they’ve had CPR and first aid training? a. Corp. you should: a. b. c. on-scene primary care and early AED use combined with CPR d. 3. When encountering an adult who is unresponsive. Viruses. bacteria and macroorganisms. d. 6. thus. d. You may reference your Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. Spend time with family and friends and talk about the experience. to answer questions regarding Emergency First Response programs standards and course structure. Carry proof of CPR/first aid training with you at all times. as necessary. c. provide one minute of CPR/call for help d. The three bloodborne pathogens of greatest concern to Emergency Responders are: a. All of the above. True or False. True or False. complete primary assessment/begin CPR 9.0 A-17 . c. To avoid or minimize physical and emotional stress after providing emergency care. Why do people hesitate to provide emergency care. and then _______. CPR is only a temporary measure that extends the window of opportunity to revive a patient by forcing oxygen rich blood from the heart to vital body organs. a. inefficient. 2. think and act b.Appendix Emergency First Response Primary/Secondary Care ® Instructor Course Examination Directions: Select the best answer from the choices provided. HIV virus. to be protected by a Good Samaritan law. Hepatitis. b. you should ______ first. Emergency recognition and rapid EMS activation c. b. All links. Providing immediate care to a person who has no heartbeat and is not breathing is critical because irreversible brain damage can occur within minutes. Hepatitis C virus and HIV virus. All of the above. Emergency Responders should: a. d. Anxiety and nervousness b. meningitis and staphylococcus. Hepatitis B virus. © Emergency First Response. Act in good faith as a prudent person would to provide care that is within the scope of your training. Fear of infection d. provide rescue breathing/alert EMS b. or choose the statement that best completes the sentence. 71806 (Rev. alert EMS/continue with primary assessment c. 10/06) Version 3.

All of the above 16. you _________ the patient’s chest while ______________________ a. 11. d. tap/looking. All of the above. and defibrillation d. True or False. emergency medical care/monitoring 12. Breathing. Barriers. d. checks and ventilation device Monitor a Patient’s Lifeline . 18. you should assume that all blood or body fluids that contain blood may be infectious and always place a barrier between you and any moist or wet substance originating from a patient. Manual chest compressions delivered during CPR provide no more than one-third of normal blood flow to the body. Electrocution and drug overdose d. circulation and defibrillation c. 17. Spinal injury management d. it’s important for the breaths to: a. cardiac arrest and deep puncture wound b. C and D in ABCD’S of the lifeline involve: a. To check for breathing. near drowning or suffocation b. While giving rescue breaths.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 10. A D S C 19. As a general rule. circulation and chest compressions. listen and feel for normal breathing. There is nearly 10 percent unused oxygen in an Emergency Responder’s expired breath that helps support a nonbreathing patient during rescue breathing. emergency recognition/response b. All of the above. Heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest c. 3 A-18 . Primary assessment refers to the ___________ of a patient and primary ________ is the aid provided using the ABCD’S of the patient’s lifeline. make the patient’s chest rise. 20. Serious bleeding management b. c. True or False. b. Barotrauma. The B. Look. All of the above. True or False. Shock management c. The S in ABCD’S of the Lifeline refers to: a. The A in ABCD’S of the lifeline refers to: a. d. be delivered no more than 2 seconds apart. Submersion. What is the recommended method for an Emergency Responder to determine if a patient’s heart is not beating during a primary assessment? a. a. c. monitoring/CPR d. look at/listening and feeling for breaths with your ear. Assess the scene and Apply personal barriers b. last at least 5 seconds each. This means that CPR can only artificially sustain a patient for a short time. first evaluation/care c. Airway open d. Check for a pulse at the wrist b. All of the above. 13. What may cause a person to stop breathing? a. b.The ABCD’S B 15. Check the carotid artery on both sides of the patient’s neck for at least 15 seconds c. Bleeding. 14. listen to/feeling for a rise and fall. Alert Emergency Medical Service (EMS) c. feel/looking for any movement. listening and feeling for breathing.

b. Use the log roll to turn the patient – stabilizing the patient’s head to keep it from moving while you roll the patient as one unit toward you. Pressing down on the sternum with enough force to depress it between 2-3 centimetres/ . You can recognize arterial bleeding by the way: a. Correct technique for delivering chest compressions includes: a. b. serious or minor. c. All of the above. d. Quickly deal with all life threatening conditions. then turn the patient. Elevate the limb to slow. d. Direct pressure with clean cloth or a sterile dressing. b. All of the above. Performing CPR on a patient with no heartbeat. True or False. Providing a patient with advanced life support including emergency oxygen. 29. True or False. 24. Elevate the patient’s legs if it won’t aggravate another injury. 26. Never turn a patient alone – wait for help to arrive. 4 A-19 . Turn the patient using the quickest means possible.5-1 inches. Positioning the heel of your hand near the top of the patient’s breastbone – closer to the head. b. d. Ventricular fibrillation describes the consistent rhythm found in a normal heartbeat. 27. Keeping your shoulders directly over your hands with your arms straight. Blood pools under the skin causing severe swelling. d. Automatically detecting an erratic heartbeat or quivering heart. All of the above. Defibrillation is the process of: a. If CPR is required for a patient with a suspected spinal injury and the patient is not positioned on the back. c. Shock may result from any injury or illness. c. 28. 22. d. the recommended technique is to: a. True or False. c. that stresses the body. Secure the patient on a stretcher. but not restrict flow.Appendix 21. forcing the compression straight down. What is the recommended method for an Emergency Responder to control serious bleeding? a. You should only suspect a spinal injury when an accident involves a serious impact or a fall from greater than the patient’s own height. Apply a tourniquet to the wounded limb. 23. Dark red blood steadily flows from a wound. Keep the patient still and maintain body temperature. Delivering an electrical shock to the heart that disrupts abnormal twitching and allows the heart’s normal beat to return. What is the recommended method for an Emergency Responder to manage shock? a. c. Bright red blood spurts from a wound in rhythm with the heartbeat. 25. Blood slowly oozes from a wound. b. d. b. c.

EMT. People who enroll in an Emergency First Response Secondary Care (First Aid) course having taken CPR training through another organization need an orientation to which primary care skills? a. d. b. eases pain and reduces the risk of further harm when there is time and distance between the patient and professional medical care. Instructor lectures. 4:1:1 b. The participant-to-Emergency First Response Instructor-to-CPR mannequin ratio is: a. Emergency Responders need to refresh their skills every: a. etc. 39. a. The participant-to-Emergency First Response Instructor ratio increases to a maximum of 24:1 when using one or more qualified assistant. Determine the relative temperature. conscious choking adult and emergency oxygen use. 34. True or False. 36 months b. skill demonstration and skill practice c. 36. A current Emergency First Response Instructor. c. Ask about the patient’s medical history. stated/a clue c. 12:1:1 d. 16:1:2 38. To enroll in an Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) course. nurse practitioner. Which of the following items must you have when teaching the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) course? a. 42. d. True or False. an individual must be at least 8 years old. skill development and scenario practice d. All of the above. Both b and c 41. Scene assessment. To increase the ratio for an Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) or Secondary Care (First Aid) course. 40. To keep completion cards current. 35.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 30. Check the patient’s respiration and pulse rate c. Learning objectives. Emergency Responders learn to provide basic care that reassures. 24 months c. Emergency First Response Primary and Secondary Care Instructor Guide c. Knowledge development. True or False. triangle bandages and splints b. During the Secondary Care (First Aid) course. shock management and spinal injury management. The Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (First Aid) courses are divided into what three segments? a. Independent study. A current CPR/first aid instructor with another regionally recognized organization. All of the above. Roller bandages. Emergency First Response Participant Manual and Video d. something the patient tells you/something you observe 33. Enrolling in an Emergency First Response Secondary Care (First Aid) course is only allowed after completing an entire Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) course. b. A trained medical professional such as a paramedic. performance requirements and skill evaluation 37. b. True or False. a qualified assistant is defined as: a. True or False. d. a clue/something directly observed b. the Emergency Responder should: a. A sign is _________ and a symptom is _________. 8:1:1 c. 31. Serious bleeding management. During an illness assessment. felt or heard/something the patient tells you d. directly seen. You must submit a Completion Card envelope for each participant who meets performance requirements for either the Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) or Secondary Care (First Aid) course. 6 months 5 A-20 . video review and skill practice b. 32. 12 months d. skin moisture level and skin color. barrier use and primary assessment c. AED orientation. An injury is defined as an unhealthy condition of the body and an illness is any physical harm to the body.

1 d. An infant mannequin and a child mannequin. A child mannequin only. 3 c. 51. 50. chest compressions for a child or infant should be at a rate of 100 compressions per minute. To remain current as an Emergency First Response Instructor. d. Keep to the course time schedule. Instructor led d. All of the above. True or False. Engages participants in repetitive skill practice which reinforces skill steps and increases overall confidence. Independent study b. Appropriately modify the course curriculum to meet regional guidelines. What is the mannequin requirement for the Care for Children course skills practice? a. d. An infant mannequin only. If Emergency First Response educational materials are not available in a language participants’ understand. Rescue breaths with a child or infant should last ______ second(s)? a. Video guided c. 45. b. requirements or laws. During CPR. d. b. 6 A-21 . you must: a.Appendix 43. True or False. True or False. b. especially during CPR. 4 b. Renew your rating every two years by submitting a current renewal application along with your dues to Emergency First Response. 54. True or False. Having participants study independently shortens conventional classroom time which may provide better business opportunities with respect to competitive pricing and scheduling flexibility. c. c. b. The performance-based structure of Emergency First Response courses means that participants must meet measurable learning objectives so that they build upon previous learning as they progress. Demonstrate role model skills only if participants have not seen the video. Your Care for Children teaching credential is renewed when you renew your EFR Instructor credential. Scenario practice allows each participant to demonstrate the ability to evaluate the scene. your role is to: a. The Emergency First Response program is based on the philosophy that presenting skills in simple steps along with conducting training in a low-stress educational environment allows participants to comfortably focus on learning primary care and CPR skills. you may conduct the Emergency First Response programs using the __________________ instructional approach: a. Stay up-to-date with Emergency First Response course standards and implement any changes announced in The Responder (Emergency First Response Newsletter). True or False. All of the above. Lecture and practice 47. Emphasize the need for perfection. 52. 49. d. Allows each participant to see. Lowers stress and increases the opportunity for self-correction and discovery. As an Emergency First Response Instructor. Having participants work in practice groups during skill development: a. hear. 44. 46. An infant mannequin and a child (or adult) mannequin. Submit at least one Course Completion Authorization. feel and perform the skill which fosters learning from different perspectives. 48. True or False. recall critical steps and take appropriate action. c. 2 53. c.

d. for infants. Why is it important to emphasize the emotional aspects of offering emergency care to a child during the Care for Children course? (Check all that apply. 7 A-22 . child CPR is: a. All of the above. so it’s responsible to address child injury prevention. d. Addressing injury prevention and encouraging participants to share steps they can take to minimize risk of injury help to make it safer for children. 5:2 57. Two fingers/one hand. Asia Pacific and Europe) provided in the Care for Children Instructor Guide and Participant Manual. 15:2 b. 59. b. Two hands/one hand. c. Emotions may be intensified when a child is involved. If available. Never use AEDs on children as children rarely suffer from sudden cardiac arrest. 3:1 c. For children. 5:2 58. 3:1 c. The Emergency Responder’s acceptance that the outcome of care provided might be beyond the responder’s personal influence can be more difficult when a child is involved. use ____________ for chest compressions.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide 55.) a. If the Emergency Responder feels that the task is too overwhelming due to additional variables with a child. The ratio of chest compressions to rescue breaths during one rescuer. b. None of the above. Because procedures for handling choking in children vary internationally. Many injuries in children are preventable with a little knowledge and awareness. c. d. 61. The ratio of chest compressions to rescue breaths during one rescuer. Why does the Care for Children Participant Manual include A Few Facts about child injuries? a. there may be hesitation to help. b. 30:2 d. 60. One or two hands/two fingers. Many Care for Children course participants will be parents or people who regularly interact with children. d. c. you should teach participants the protocols appropriate for your area based on the three variations (Americas. a. Use adult AED pads on children when no child pads are available. 30:2 d. b. injured child as well as frantic parents helps you focus on assisting the child. True or False. 15:2 b. infant CPR is: a. c. Knowing how to deal with a frightened. use child AED pads on children to deliver a shock appropriate for a childsized body. Which statement(s) most applies to use of Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) on children? a. Never use adult AED pads on children. 56. use ______________ for chest compressions.

10247 (Rev. 49. 3.2 B True C False D 26. True False True False True False 42. 9.. 7. 2006 A-23 . True True False False True False 45. 41. 13. A True B C False D True False True True False False True True False False 31. 15. 16. If you want to change your answer. 44. 39. 46. 5. 14. 28. 29. 50. 6. 33. 18. 4. 30. True False 47. 19. 25. 10. 40. True False True False ©Emergency First Response. 22. 17. Product No. 36. 48. True False True False 35. 37. 2. erase your selection or place a dark X through your first answer. 8. 38. 21. A 1. 24. 32. 20. 34. 11. Corp. 23. 27. 6/04) Ver 1. 43.Appendix Name ________________________________________________________ Date __________________________________ Emergency First Response Instructor Course Examination ® Answer Sheet Directions: COMPLETELY fill in the space below the proper letter or next to the True/False answers. 12.

55. 56. True True True B C D False False False A-24 . 58. 57. 61. 59. 60. 53. 54. 52.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide A 51.

6. If you want to change your answer. A 1. 13. 12. 18. 28. 33. 24. 25.1 B True C False D 26. 32. True False True False 35. 8. 71809 (Rev. 16. 36. 10. 34. 2006 A-25 . erase your selection or place a dark X through your first answer. 40. 37. 11. 27. 17. 22. 3. 41. True False True False True False 42. 39. 30. Corp. 48. 38. 49. 19. 4. True True False False True False 45. 23. 46. 50. 5. True False 47. 7.Appendix Name ________________________________________________________ Date __________________________________ Emergency First Response Instructor Course Examination ® Answer Key Directions: COMPLETELY fill in the space below the proper letter or next to the True/False answers. 6/04) Ver 1. 20. 21. 15. A True B C False D True False True True False False True True False False 31. 9. True False True False ©Emergency First Response. 2. 43. 29. 14.. 44. Product No.

61. 53. 56. 58. True True True B C D False False False A-26 .Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide A 51. 60. 57. 59. 55. 52. 54.

I further affirm that I have read and will abide with the EFR License Agreement found in the Appendix Section of the EFR Instructor Guide. ______________________ Day/Month/Year Instructor Trainer Name ________________________________________________________________________________ Instructor No.Appendix Emergency First Response Primary/Secondary Care & Care for Children ® Instructor Application PADI Member No. Corp. 10/06) Version 2. A-27 .04 © Emergency First Response. or Completed EFR Instructor Course Presentations 5 and 6 CERTIFICATION INFORMATION (To be completed by the Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer. ___________________ (Please Print) Instructor Trainer Signature _______________________________________________________________________________ Date Signed ___________________ Day/Month/Year INSTRUCTOR AGREEMENT I understand I cannot conduct an Emergency First Response Primary/Secondary Care Course and Care for Children Course until I receive authorization from Emergency First Response. including revisions to existing materials and the introduction of new materials. 2006 MAIL TO: Your local Emergency First Response Office Visit emergencyfirstresponse.com for office locations. Applicant Signature _____________________________________________________________________ Date Signed_____________________________ Day/Month/Year PAYMENT METHOD (See current price list for processing fee) Check Switch / Solo issue no _________ (UK only) Master Card Visa American Express ____________ (please print) CHECKLIST Application filled out completely Signatures – Trainer and Applicant Fee enclosed JCB Discover Card ____________ ____________ Card Number ____________ Copy of certifications (for Crossovers only) Cardholder Name ______________________________________________________ Expiration Date _______________________________________________________ Authorized Signature ______________________________________________ Product No.) Course Location ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ (City) (State or Province) (Country) Date Course Completed ________________________ If applicable: Store/Resort Name ____________________________________ S/R No. 10245 (Rev. I further agree to abide by all EFR Standards and Procedures as published in the Emergency First Response Instructor Guide. or _____ Medical Professional _____ Current CPR/First Aid Instructor Pediatric CPR/First Aid Instructor. I will maintain familiarity with EFR educational materials. or _____ Emergency First Response Instructor Current EFR Care for Children. ________________________ APPLICANT INFORMATION – PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY First Last Non-PADI Member Gender: Male Female Name ____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________________ State/Province ___________________________________________________ Country ___________________________________________________________ Zip/Postal Code __________________________________________________ Home Phone ( _______ ) _____________________________________________ Business Phone ( _______ ) _________________________________________ Fax ( _______ ) _____________________________________________________ Email Address ____________________________________________________ Birthdate __________________________________________________________ Preferred Language ________________________________________________ Day/Month/Year COURSE INFORMATION AND PREREQUISITES (To be completed and initialed by Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer) Instructor Course Instructor Crossover and Check One: Retraining Course _____ Current EFR Primary/Secondary Care and Care for Children. The Responder and other updates when conducting EFR programs.

10270 (Rev.__________________________ First Last Mailing Address ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________________ State/Province ___________________________________________________ Country ___________________________________________________________ Zip/Postal Code __________________________________________________ Home Phone ( _______ ) _____________________________________________ Business Phone ( _______ ) _________________________________________ Fax ( _______ ) _____________________________________________________ Email Address ____________________________________________________ CERTIFICATION INFORMATION Method 1: Emergency First Response Care for Children Instructor Course Course Location ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ (City) (State or Province) (Country) Instructor Trainer Name _______________________________________________________________ EFR No. 2006 A-28 . Complete the Instructor Knowledge Review and attach to this application.05 © Emergency First Response. Applicant Signature _____________________________________________________________________ Date Signed_____________________________ Day/Month/Year PAYMENT METHOD (See current price list for processing fee) Check Switch / Solo issue no ____________________________ (UK only) Master Card Visa American Express Discover Card CHECKLIST Application filled out completely Signatures Photo – head & shoulders Fee enclosed Knowledge review (if Method 2 or 3) Certification Documentation (if Method 3) Card Number ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ Cardholder Name ____________________________________________ (please print) Expiration Date ______________________________________________ Authorized Signature _________________________________________ MAIL TO: Your local Emergency First Response Office Product No. Corp.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Emergency First Response Care for Children ® Instructor Application Use this application for EFR Instructors who were certified prior to July 1. 2005 who have not yet earned the Care for Children Instructor rating. – OFFICE USE ONLY– CFCA CFCI APPLICANT SIGNATURE I have obtained the required Care for Children Instructor materials and have made myself familiar with the contents. OR – Method 3: Other Qualifying Credentials Attach certification documentation confirming you are a current instructor with another organization and are authorized to teach a pediatric emergency care course. ________________________________________ Instructor Trainer Signature _____________________________________________________________ Date Signed ____________________________________ Day/Month/Year OR – Method 2: Emergency First Response Care for Children Course (provider-level) EFR Care for Children certification number # ___________________________ or attach copy of temporary card. I understand I cannot conduct an Emergency First Response Care for Children Course until I receive authorization from Emergency First Response. 10/06) Version 1. Complete the Instructor Knowledge Review and attach to this application. APPLICANT INFORMATION – PLEASE PRINT OR TYPE Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ EFR Instructor No.

Appendix

Emergency First Response® Instructor Course

Learning and Instruction Teaching Skills Workshop
Sample Problems for Positive Coaching
Primary Care Skill 1 – Scene Assessment
This can be done using the scene assessment illustrations, so it’s not really a skills practice; no problems assigned.

PC Skill 2 – Barrier Use
Sample Problems: 1. Snap the glove during removal 2. Touches ungloved portion of hand when removing gloves 3. Position ventilation barrier in an ineffective manner

PC Skill 3 – Primary Assessment
Sample Problems: 1. Forcefully shake the patient’s shoulders (or other inappropriate consciousness assessment) to determine responsiveness 2. Don’t use barriers 3. Do not place head near enough to the patient’s head to perform a proper breathing check 4. Look, listen and feel for breathing for much less than 10 seconds. 5. Push fingertips into the fleshy part of the jaw instead of placing them on the jawbone

PC Skill 4 – Adult CPR
Sample Problems: 1. Do not perform breathing check 2. [Americas and Asia Pacific] Do not perform two initial rescue breaths 3. [Europe] Do not perform initial 30 chest compressions 4. Push with fingers (instead of the heel of your hand) during compressions 5. Do not use barriers 6. Give 15 (instead of 30) compressions 7. Bend your arms during compressions 8. Rock forward and back when giving compressions 9. Snap compressions (instead of smooth, continuous up-and-down motion) 10. Compress slowly (less than 100-per-minute rate)

A-29

Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide

PC Skill 5 – Conscious/Unconscious Choking Adult
Sample Problems: For Abdominal Thrusts 1. Place your hand flat at the thrust site (instead of formed into a fist) 2. Place your fist just below the navel 3. Use one hand to perform thrusts For Chest Thrusts 1. Place your fist at the abdominal thrust site (just above the navel) instead of on the sternum 2. Do not reassure patient 3. Link fingers together rather than making a fist and placing the other hand over the fist For Back Blows 1. Do not lean patient forward when standing 2. Do not check for breathing 3. Give only 1 back blow

PC Skill 6 – Serious Bleeding Management
Sample Problems: 1. Do not use barriers 2. Do not conduct primary assessment 3. Bandage ineffectively (too tightly, or pull roller bandages to thin strips rather than broad, flat bandaging)

PC Skill 7 – Shock Management
Sample Problems: 1. 2. 3. 4. Do not conduct primary assessment Tell the patient to get up and move to a chair or somewhere else Do not hold the patient’s head Do not elevate legs (even if there is no suspected spinal injuries or leg fractures)

A-30

Appendix

PC Skill 8 – Spinal Injury Management
Sample Problems: 1. Do not cradle or stabilize the head when performing the log roll 2. Do not straighten or properly position arms and legs prior to performing the log roll 3. Roll the patient away from you instead of toward you

PC Skill AED Use
Sample Problems: 1. Start placing pads on mannequin, etc., before turning on AED unit and listening for prompts 2. Do not place pads in proper placement areas 3. Position AED unit so that you have to reach across the mannequin to turn it on and to administer shock 4. Maintain contact with the patient (or have other items/equipment touching the patient) when delivering shock 5. Do not wait for, or follow prompts 6. If CPR is needed, remove AED pads before administering CPR

PC Skill Emergency Oxygen Use Orientation
Sample Problems: 1. 2. 3. 4. Do not ask the patient for permission to administer oxygen or explain what it is Do not test the mask to see if O2 is working Position the mask upside down on the patient’s face Do not monitor the oxygen unit pressure gauge

SC Skill 1 – Injury Assessment
Sample Problems: 1. Do not use barriers 2. Do not give the Responder statement, ask for permission to assess nor explain what you are doing 3. Move the patient 4. Speaking to the patient from a position that causes the patient to move to see rescuer 5. When assessing eye tracking, ask the patient to follow your finger movement by moving his head 6. If the patient complains of neck, head or back pain do not stop and stabilize head— instead continue with the assessment 7. When assessing for broken bones or other injury sites, squeeze the arms and legs from point to point rather than maintaining a smooth, firm pressure following the limb

A-31

Do not use barriers Wrap roller bandages too loosely When bandaging a limb. 2. 4. 9. 3. Do not give the Responder statement Do not conduct primary assessment Do not record patient responses to questions Have difficulty locating pulse Do not reassure patient Use thumb when taking radial pulse SC Skill 3 – Bandaging Sample Problems 1. 5. also bandage fingers (or toes) to prevent circulation checking Do not secure the end of the bandage Do not stabilize joint injuries (do not bandage below and above the joint) Have difficulty with triangular bandage placement Do not tie off the triangular bandage at the elbow Dropping the roller bandage Wrapping the bandage too tight SC Skill 4 – Splinting for Dislocations and Fractures Sample Problems: 1. 8. 5. 4.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide SC Skill 2 – Illness Assessment Sample Problems: 1. 6. Use a splint too short to immobilize joints above and below injury Bandage too loosely (it does not immobilize the injury) Do not check circulation Do not reassure patient Splint an arm fracture. 6. 2. but do not put it in a sling A-32 . 2. 7. 4. 5. 3. 3.

10/06) Version 2. Please take a few minutes to answer the questions below. Questions 1.13) Secondary Care – First Aid (Complete Part I & III Only. Brad Smith. Our scanning software can’t read checks or Xs. If you did receive a course completion card. Did you take a final exam? No Please continue on other side. Did you receive a course completion card? 2. Director Business Development and Education No No Which Emergency First Response course(s) did you complete? Primary Care – CPR (Complete Part I & II Only. PLEASE shade answer squares.0 © Emergency First Response Corp. Congratulations on completing the Emergency First Response course! We are proud of our educational system and constantly strive to improve the quality of our programs. Like this Select only one answer G. Did you use gloves and other barrier devices during skill practice sessions? 6. Questions 1-6 and 14-18) Combined Primary and Secondary Care (Complete all Questions 1-18) Unsure or N/A Yes 1. does the Instructor’s name on your completion card match the name of the person who conducted your course? 3. Thank you very much for your help! DIRECTIONS for each question.Appendix Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) / Secondary Care (First Aid) ® Course Evaluation Survey Dear. Your information can help us maintain the high quality of our educational programs. That’s why we are interested in the course you just completed. Product Number 10254 (Rev. 2006 A-33 . Did you use the Emergency First Response Participant Manual during your course? 5. Did you watch the Emergency First Response Video? 4.

Did you practice Illness Assessment on a person? 16. Did you practice Splinting for Dislocations and Fractures on a person? 18.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide Yes No Unsure or N/A PART II: To be completed by Primary Care (CPR) participants. Did you practice Spinal Injury Management on a person? 13. Did you practice Shock Management on a person? 12. 14. 7. Did you practice Injury Assessment on a person? 15. Did you complete Scenario Practice (acting. Did you practice Bandaging on a person? 17. Did you complete Scenario Practice (acting. role modeling accidents and injuries)? PART III: To be completed by Secondary Care (First Aid) participants. Did you practice Serious Bleeding Management on a person? 11. A-34 . Did you practice Primary Assessment on a person? 10. role modeling accidents and injuries) We welcome any additional comments you would like to add separately. Was there at least one mannequin available during the course? 8. Did you practice CPR on a mannequin? 9.

Appendix Emergency First Response® <Date> <Company Name> <Address> <City> <State> <Zip Attention <Contact Name> Dear <Contact Name>. At <your company name> we are committed to providing the utmost in customer service and can customize Emergency First Response courses to meet your specific emergency response/workplace safety requirements. offer training during times specified by <company name>. conform to all <company name> policies regarding breaks and lunches. The following is a list of services and a proposal to train <number of employees> for <company name>. notify <company name> in writing within a minimum of ninety days of any participant approaching the recommended retaining date. Thank you for your interest in <your company name> and the Emergency First Response training program. assist in class scheduling and logistical support. the instructor will provide training in automated external defibrillator (AED) use. The training provided by the instructor will include Emergency First Response Primary Care (CPR) and Secondary Care (first aid). Additionally. provide a class roster and any other information pertaining to the training required by <company name>. OSHA)> workplace safety program requirements for CPR and first aid training. Emergency First Response courses are solidly grounded in state-of-the-art educational material that provides program flexibility to meet your scheduling needs. • • • • • • • offer Emergency First Response training in specific locations designated by <company name>. Upon entering into contract. I’ve enclosed a sample of the participant materials for your review. provide an Emergency First Response instructor for all training. A-35 . Please see enclosed program brochure for complete course content. conscious choking adult management and emergency oxygen use. Additionally. the courses meet or exceed <state authority (Ex. <your company name> will.

In the event that class size exceeds twelve participants. Each participant will receive a personal copy of the EFR student manual and video and will retain this material after completion of training. additional participants will be bill at <$$$>. This fee includes all training supplies and participant materials. in the event of class cancellation by <company name> a cancellation fee of <$$$> per scheduled class will be assessed. <Your Name> <Title> Emergency First Response A-36 . Sincerely. <Your company name> will invoice <company name> upon completion of each class. Thank you for considering <your company name>for your workplace CPR and first aid training needs. please contact me at <your contact information>. in the event of cancellation by <your company name>. I look forward to receiving your reply by <date>. any deposit will be refunded in full. Maximum class size will be limited to twelve participants to one instructor. If you have any questions.Primary and Secondary Care – Care for Children Instructor Trainer Guide • • • invoice <company name> at <$$$> per class. Payment is due upon receipt of invoice.

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