2011-2012 CAP Booklet

Table of Contents
Letter to Parents and Students ..........................................................................................................2 Grading System ......................................................................................................................................2 Smart Core / Core Curriculum ...........................................................................................................3 Honor Graduate Definition ................................................................................................................4 What is CAP?...........................................................................................................................................4

MHS Course Descriptions
English ...................................................................................................................................................5 Language Arts Electives ......................................................................................................................6 Foreign Languages ...............................................................................................................................7 Social Studies...........................................................................................................................................9 Mathematics ......................................................................................................................................... 10 Science ................................................................................................................................................ 12 Health Science Technology ............................................................................................................. 13 Business & Computer Technology ................................................................................................ 14 Family & Consumer Sciences .......................................................................................................... 16 Construction Technology ................................................................................................................ 17 Jobs for Arkansas’ Graduates (JAG) ............................................................................................. 17 Driver’s Education/Strength, Conditioning and Fitness ......................................................... 18 Fine Arts ................................................................................................................................................ 19 Athletics ................................................................................................................................................ 20 Mid-South Community College Technical Center .................................................................... 22 Mid-South Community College Concurrent Credit .................................................................. 26

Marion High School CAP Book
Volume 9 Spring 2011

Published annually by Marion High School #1 Patriot Drive Marion, AR 72364 (870) 739-5130 FAX (870) 739-5135 http://msd3.org

MHS Student Organizations
Nationally Chartered Honor Societies.......................................................................................... 28 Student Organizations ...................................................................................................................... 29

Cover Art: Samantha Butcher, Senior 2011

MJHS Course Descriptions
General Information .......................................................................................................................... 32 MJHS Course Offerings ..................................................................................................................... 35 MJHS Extracurricular Activities ....................................................................................................... 39

Course offerings are subject to change.

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Marion High School 2011-2012

Marion High School 2011-2012 CAP Booklet
Dear Parents and Students: The Career Action Plan (CAP) was developed and implemented at Marion High School in an attempt to better prepare students for success after high school. The goal is to develop a collaborative approach involving students, teachers, and parents in the selection of courses from the 8th through the 12th grade. This helps to ensure that students take classes that are geared toward and tailored for their personal goals. Whether the student goes to college, work, or the military, he or she should select courses that are personally beneficial. As the school year progresses, CAP advisors meet with their groups in an attempt to develop skills that will be needed to prepare for future success. In addition to course selection, advisors help with resumes, college and work requirements, budgeting and credit, and goal setting. We strongly recommend that students and their parents work together in planning the courses to be taken during the entire four years of high school, not just those for the coming year. Within this book you will find information about every course offered at Marion High School and Marion Junior High School. Additionally, you will find general information about a variety of topics pertinent to high school. We hope that you will find the information useful and the experience rewarding. Sincerely, MHS Administrators, Faculty and Staff
Grade Points A=4 B=3 C=2 D=1 F=0 AP Grade Points A=5 B=4 C=3 D=2 F=0 Grade Scale 90 - 100 = A 80 - 89 = B 70 - 79 = C 60 - 69 = D Below 59 = F

Credit Recovery
Credit recovery for those who have failed a course(s) may be available during the school day and during the summer. A nonrefundable fee will be charged for those students who enroll in the summer credit recovery program. The program will consist of computer-based instruction with additional outside assignments. Failure to complete all expectations may be cause to drop a student from the program or may cause the student to fail the credit recovery class taken.

District Equity Statement
The Marion School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, or veteran status.

Course Load
All students will carry a class load of at least six (6) subjects, and will remain in school for the full 7-period day.

Exceptions to the above:
Juniors and seniors who are enrolled in the JAG program must be in attendance a minimum of five periods per day. MHS seniors enrolled at Mid-South Community College, or in another post-secondary educational institution must be in attendance at MHS for a minimum of three (3) periods per day. Juniors must be in attendance at MHS for a minimum of five (5) periods per day. Summer school courses may be taken for make-up purposes only.

Early Graduation Policy
Act 274 of 1997 permits students who have accumulated the requisite number of credits for graduation to graduate, regardless of the grade level attained. Any underclassman at Marion High School planning to graduate early, who will be in attendance the entire year must notify the principal of his/her intent by October 1 of the graduating year. Transcripts of concurrent credit or approved correspondence courses must be in the principal’s office at MHS one week prior to graduation.

Grading System
Credit is based on Carnegie Units as per North Central Association guidelines. Therefore, a semester course is valued as a half Carnegie Unit. A year-long course is valued as one (1) Carnegie Unit.

Local Credit Explanations
The State of Arkansas requires 22 credits for graduation while Marion High School requires 24 credits. Local Credit is not recognized as part of Arkansas graduation requirement but does count as credits towards Marion High School’s requirement of 24 credits to graduate.

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For Graduating Classes of 2011, 2012, and 2013

SMART CORE
English – 4 units Mathematics – 4 units Algebra I or Algebra A/B in grades 7-8 or 8-9 Geometry Algebra II (or Adv.) Choice of Algebra III, Trigonometry, Calculus, AP Statistics Science – 3 units chosen from Physical Science Biology (or Adv.) Chemistry (or Adv. Physics Social Studies – 3 units American Government World History (or Adv.) US History (or AP) PE/Heath – ½ unit of each Oral Communication – ½ unit Fine Art – ½ unit Electives (in career focus) -6 units

CORE
English – 4 units Mathematics – 4 units Algebra or its equivalent* Geometry Algebra II, Algebraic Connections

*A two-year algebra equivalent (Algebra A and B) may each be counted as two units of the four unit requirement.
Science - 3 units must have one physical science must have a biology Social Studies – 3 units American Government – ½ unit World History (or Adv.) US History (or AP) PE/Health – ½ unit of each Oral Communication – ½ unit Fine Art – ½ unit Electives (in career focus) – 6 units

NOTE: All high school students participate in the designated Smart Core curriculum unless the parent or guardian waives the student’s right to participate by signing an official document. If a student opts out of the Smart Core curriculum with their parent’s written permission, they will follow the Core curriculum choices.

For Graduating Classes of 2014 and After

SMART CORE
English– 4 units Mathematics– 4 units Algebra I or Algebra A& B Geometry Algebra II Fourth Math Natural Sci.– 3 units with lab chosen from Physical Science Biology Chemistry Physics Social Studies– 3 units Civics– 1/2 unit Work History– 1 unit U.S. history– 1 unit Oral Communications- 1/2 unit Physical Education– 1/2 unit Health and Safety– 1/2 unit Economics– 1/2unit (count for Soc. St. or Career Focus) Fine Arts– 1/2 unit Career Focus– 6 units English– 4 units Mathematics– 4 units

CORE
Algebra I or its equibalent Geomtery or its equivalent All math units must build on the base of algebra and geometry A two-year algebra equivalent or a two-year geometry equivalent may each be counted as two units of the four-unit requirement. Science– 3 units At least one unit of biology At least one unit of a physical science Social Studies– 3 units Civics– 1/2 unit World History– 1 unit U.S. History– 1 unit Oral Communications– 1/2 unit Physical Education– 1/2 unit Health and Safety– 1/2 unit Economics– 1/2 unit (count for Soc. St. or Career Focus) Fine Arts– 1/2 unit Career Focus– 6 units

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What is Career Action Planning?
The administration, faculty and staff of the Marion Schools face the challenge of responding to the needs of a diverse student population. In order to respond to the career advisement needs of this large number of students, Career Action Planning (CAP), a teacher/advisor system, has been developed. The aim of the CAP program is to assist students and their parents in exploring educational and occupational possibilities and in making appropriate career decisions based on a solid base of information. Thorough training and locally-designed career curriculum materials are provided to the teacher/advisor annually as part of the school’s in-service program. Marion students will begin to receive intensive career guidance and counseling beginning in grade eight. In Career Orientation classes, students begin to build their career portfolio which includes scores on standardized tests, learning styles, and career interests, as well as a record of the student’s previous grades. At this point, students get a better grasp of what they want to do by understanding and analyzing their individual strengths and weaknesses. The annual CAP conference in grades 8-11, usually held in March, gives students and parents the opportunity to sit down with a trained teacher/ advisor and review the career portfolio, select courses and set career goals. Special monthly ―Senior Seminars‖ expose the high school seniors to local employment, military and post secondary educational opportunities. Monthly CAP sessions for advisors and their sophomore and junior students are built around curriculum that helps students make the most of high school and prepare for the future. Students keep accompanying materials and test results in their portfolios for future reference as they continue the career development process. The commitment to career development for all students is shown through the district’s support of the CAP program, parental support and the many opportunities provided for students by the faculty and administration of Marion Schools.

Honor Graduate Definition
To earn the distinction of Honor Graduate at Marion High School, a student must have achieved a 3.5 GPA and successfully completed the following course work. 3 of 4 English ..................... Must be Pre-AP, AP English Literature or AP English Language 2 of 3 Social Studies.......... Must be Advanced World History and AP American History 2 of 3 Sciences................... Must be Advanced Chemistry, AP Environmental Science, or Physics 2 of 4 Mathematics ............ Must be Advanced Algebra II, Trigonometry, Calculus, or AP Statistics 2 Foreign Language .......... Must be the same Foreign Language ½ unit each ......................... Oral Communication, PE, Health and Fine Arts 6 units ................................. Student selected electives

Valedictorian & Salutatorian:
The valedictorian will be the student who has completed the requisite honor graduate courses, accumulated the highest number of credits, and has the highest GPA. A mathematical weight of .01 for every credit earned will be added to the GPA of the top students vying for valedictorian and salutatorian honors. The student with the highest resulting GPA will be valedictorian. The student with the second highest resulting GPA will be salutatorian.

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English
English 10
10TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH 9 Studying texts drawn from world literature sources, students develop and express their thinking through reader response and analytical approaches to literature while enhancing their awareness of genre, style, and voice. Students improve their writing skills through regular composition and conferences with teachers and peers, writing for a variety of purposes and audiences. Communication skills are developed in class discussions and group work. Students sharpen their information-gathering skills and synthesize various opinions into an informed conclusion during a major research project that culminates in a word processed paper. sages in order to extend their critical thinking skills and to expand their own writing practice. This course introduces students to English as a scholarly discipline featuring critical analysis and careful attention to language. Oral communication skills are developed in class discussions and group work, and students write for a variety of purposes, using excellent writers as patterns. Personal and reflective writing are also expected. Students sharpen information-gathering skills and synthesize various opinions into an informed conclusion during a major research project that culminates in a word processed paper documented in MLA style. Summer work is assigned in connection with this course. In addition, a nationally administered exam at the end of this course can provide students with college credit.

Pre AP English 10
10 GRADE PREREQUISITE: 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT CONTRACT PRE AP ENGLISH 9 / ENGLISH 9 This course is designed for students with a notably strong interest in literary study and writing, who have demonstrated that interest through commitment to intensive, independent, and accelerated work. The course introduces students to English as a scholarly discipline featuring critical analysis and careful attention to language. As readers and writers, Pre-AP students consider and analyze fiction and non-fiction texts from a variety of perspectives while developing their own writing techniques. Students sharpen their analytical skills, synthesizing provided or researched materials with their own insight and opinion into informed conclusions during various writing assignments, including a research project culminating in a formal, MLA-style research paper. Communication skills are developed through class discussions, Socratic seminar, and group work. Note: Summer work is assigned in connection with this course. Turnitin.com is also utilized for every major writing assignment.
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English 12
12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH 9, 10, 11 The regular English course includes the study of grammar, composition, and literature and provides both vocational and college entry-level skills. Students receive instruction in grammar, mechanics, and usage. Writing instruction is based on a step-by-step process and proceeds from sentence structure to paragraph development to the multi-paragraph composition. In addition, students participate in library research which culminates in written projects. This combined instruction results in students’ developing an understanding of sound English grammar and the ability to speak and write English correctly. The study of literature focuses on written and oral analysis of literary selections in a variety of genres. Students study a combination of British and World literature.

AP English Literature
12TH GRADE PREREQUISITE: 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT CONTRACT PRE AP ENGLISH 9 / ENGLISH 9 PRE AP ENGLISH 10 / ENGLISH 10 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE / ENGLISH 11 An upper-level course which engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature, AP English Literature includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods with an emphasis on major British writers. Group discussions and background research reinforce students’ active reading of selected texts, and writing not only assesses learning but also enhances students’ ability to critically analyze works. Proficient writing ability is a must to begin this course as its focus is not on basic skills but rather on higher order thinking and reasoning, which must be showcased in student responses to text. Summer assignments and continued outside reading require students to budget several hours of time each week for homework. A research paper in MLA style is required once during the year. In addition, a nationally administered exam at the end of this course can provide students with college credit.

English 11
11TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH 10 Having multiple tasks to accomplish, students in English 11 can expect to expand their vocabulary, sharpen grammar and usage skills, develop and/or improve analytical, communication, interpretation and application skills through reading and the discussing of American short stories, novels, poems, essays, and dramas. Students will be reacquainted with various writing styles with emphasis on preparation for the End of Course Literacy Exam. These students will also increase and apply information and word processing skills through the writing of research papers.

AP English Language
11TH GRADE PREREQUISITE: 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT CONTRACT PRE AP ENGLISH 9 / ENGLISH 9 PRE AP ENGLISH 10 / ENGLISH 10 Juniors who are proficient in the use of Standard English grammar may select this course for an in-depth study of rhetorical strategies and stylistic choices in writing. With an emphasis on American novelists, students analyze a variety of prose pas-

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Language Arts Electives
Journalism I
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE RECOMMENDED QUALIFICATIONS:

1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT A OR B IN PREVIOUS ENGLISH COURSES

Journalism III (Yearbook Staff)
11TH AND 12TH GRADE RECOMMENDED QUALIFICATIONS: 1 YEAR, 1 LOCAL CREDIT C OR BETTER IN ENGLISH 10 APPLICATION AND TEACHER RECOMMENDATION Journalism III, yearbook, is an elective course for students in their senior year. Selection for the class is from studentsubmitted applications. Students enrolled in this course expand on the foundation they received in Journalism II as juniors, but in Level III they take an active role in the decision-making and planning of the yearbook. Level III concentrates on overseeing the work of the less-experienced staffers. They expand on the foundation they received in Level II in the use of computer design programs. Level III students also form the editorial board for the yearbook and are responsible for designing, editing, and photographing the yearbook for Marion High School. Students enrolled in Level III are expected to become more analytical consumers of media and technology to enhance communication skills. They will also learn journalistic ethics and standards.

TEACHER RECOMMENDATION This introductory course educates students as media consumers as well as preparing them for possible careers in journalism. Students study the history of the American media, ethics, interviewing, advertising, photography (composition, no darkroom), page design, news judgment, copy editing and news, feature, editorial, and sports writing. Developed writing skills, reflected in an A or B in previous English courses, are strongly recommended before enrolling in this course. Some articles written, especially during the second semester, may appear in the Patriot Expressions newspaper.

Journalism II (Newspaper Staff)
11TH, 12TH GRADE RECOMMENDED QUALIFICATIONS: 1 YEAR, 1 LOCAL CREDIT APPLICATION AND TEACHER RECOMMENDATION Newspaper staff members, selected through an application process during the previous spring, produce the Patriot Expressions newspaper under the direction and assistance of the teacher/advisor. The class is a practical lab experience using a computer desktop publishing program to write and edit stories and to design and produce pages. Preference is given to students who have completed journalism I and keyboarding/desktop publishing courses and to those who have special skills in writing, photography or computer technology. Some offcampus and after-school work is required to gather information and sell advertising. Assessment is performance based.

Oral Communication
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT Speech is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop listening and speaking skills needed to meet the challenges of life beyond home and school. Students study the basic elements of communication, different types of communication, and public speaking. Through group discussions, presentations, and informal and formal individual speaking opportunities, students learn to think clearly and express themselves before an audience. The Language Arts Department recommends a foreign language as a minimum preparation for college; however, it is not required for high school graduation. The University of Arkansas requires two years of foreign language for all students who are enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences. Fields such as geology, history, mathematics, English, chemistry, architecture, and music are examples of majors in the College of Arts and sciences. All Tennessee Board of Regents colleges and universities (closest to Marion is the University of Memphis) require two years of the same foreign language for enrollment.

Journalism III (Newspaper Staff)
12TH GRADE RECOMMENDED QUALIFICATIONS: 1 YEAR, 1 LOCAL CREDIT APPLICATION AND TEACHER RECOMMENDATION This course is a practical hands-on lab which allows second year newspaper staff members to hone the basic fundamental skills they acquired serving on staff the previous year. They are assigned more complicated, in-depth news and feature stories and editorials. They also serve in editorial leadership roles in which they mentor first-year staff members. They offer peer instruction in developing interview questions, writing and editing various kinds of stories, taking, storing and adjusting digital photographs, and completing computer-assisted page and ad design. The content and direction of each issue is steered by these seniors who must exhibit self-discipline and time management skills. They are also largely responsible for the financial support of the paper through advertising sales and design.

Journalism II (Yearbook Staff)
11TH AND 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 LOCAL CREDIT RECOMMENDED QUALIFICATIONS: C OR BETTER IN ENGLISH 10 APPLICATION AND TEACHER RECOMMENDATION Selection of staff is by faculty committee. Online design and photo editing programs are the bases for yearbook page creations, and students become proficient in layout and design using these programs. Other skills necessary for yearbook production are photography, ad sales, computer knowledge, writing, and organization. Journalism is not a prerequisite, but good writing skills are.

Marion High School ACT School Code 041-560

Marion High School 2011-2012

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Foreign Language
French I
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT “C” OR BETTER IN ENGLISH French Level I offers students opportunities to experience listening, reading, writing, speaking and culture at a novice level. Students learn basic communication skills. Topics covered in firstyear French include family, day and date information, food and meals, people and possessions, buying clothing, and leisure time activities. Students explore the culture of the Francophone world through projects, reading, and discussion of historical and current events. Unannounced quizzes, writing and speaking tests are used to assess student progress.

Spanish I
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT “C” OR BETTER IN ENGLISH In Spanish I, students will learn the basics of the language through music, movement, sign language and gestures, and storytelling. Students will learn basic communication skills with an early emphasis on listening. Reading, speaking, and writing are also developed throughout the year. Students will explore Hispanic cultures from many countries through projects, reading, and discussion of historical and current events. Unannounced quizzes, writing and speaking tests are used to assess students’ progress. There are no prerequisites for Spanish I, but a strong English background is beneficial.

French II
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: FRENCH I In French II, students continue to build vocabulary and begin to communicate in the past and future tenses. Reading and writing continue to be important for input and assessment. Research projects utilize technology to help students share what they have learned about French culture in the Francophone world. Discussions of current events help students understand the connection between themselves and the French-speaking world.

Spanish II
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITES: SPANISH I HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: “C” OR BETTER IN SPANISH I Spanish II students continue to improve speaking and listening skills. Students continue to build vocabulary and begin to communicate in past and future tenses. Reading and writing continue to be important for input and assessment. Research projects utilize technology to help students share what they have learned about Hispanic cultures. Discussion of current events helps students understand the connections between themselves and the Spanish-speaking world. Quizzes, writing, and speaking tests are used to assess student progress.

French III
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITES: FRENCH I, II For students who are motivated to move beyond the standard levels of language study, French III provides the opportunity to expand knowledge of vocabulary and explore advanced grammar structures. Further emphasis is placed on the development of the four basic skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The focus of this class is on the continued development of French language skills through the study and discussion of authentic reading in French literature. In class, students are expected to communicate in French when possible.

Spanish III
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITES: SPANISH I, II HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: “B” OR BETTER IN SPANISH I, II For students who are motivated to move beyond the standard levels of language study, Spanish III provides the opportunity to expand knowledge of vocabulary and explore advanced grammar structures through oral storytelling and reading. Further emphasis is placed on the development of the four basic skillsreading, writing, listening, and speaking. The focus of this class is on the continued development of Spanish language skills through the study and discussion of authentic readings in Hispanic literature. Research projects may be required. In class, students are expected to communicate in Spanish when possible. Quizzes, writing and speaking tests are used to assess student progress.

French IV
12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITES: FRENCH I, II, III French Level IV builds on the communication skills developed in French III. Language and cultural proficiencies are the goals. The course emphasizes extensive self expression, both in speech and writing. Selections from authentic materials are used for reading and listening comprehension. Discussions, projects, compositions, and other writings are used to demonstrate understanding of the culture and language. Much of the class is conducted in French, and stresses application of language skills, problem solving, and higher-order thinking skills.

Parents may contact district teachers and administrators via email by using the person’s first name initial and last name and the district’s web address. Example: mjones@msd3.org

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Arkansas Next Magazine — College Countdown
Freshman Year
Keep your grades up. They qualify you for scholarships as well as admission into college. Schedule an appointment with your guidance counselor. Discuss your post-graduation options. Create an education plan that suits your goals. Map out your classes for all four years of high school. Ask about AP and dual-credit courses, which can earn you college credit. Get involved with extracurricular and volunteer activities you're passionate about. Plan to stick with them. Keep a list of all of your activities and volunteer experiences. You'll need this to compile a resume later. Begin thinking about careers that interest you. Talk to your parents about the cost of college. Create a plan of action and start saving. Request or download a real application from a university so you can get a feel for admission requirements.

Senior Year First Semester
Take the ACT or SAT again if you're unhappy with your scores. Get letters of recommendation. Request them in the first few weeks of school. Choose teachers, advisers or employers who know you and your work well. No family friends. Assemble a packet for each recommender with a copy of your resume, examples of your work such as graded papers, a list of schools you need letters for and stamped envelopes. Apply to your top three to five schools. Make sure your application contain all the requested material. Proofread everything. Twice. Send in a neat, clean application. Make copies of everything you send in the mail. Keep your receipt or make a note of your check number just in case. Your grades and involvement still matter. Continue looking for scholarships Keep up with your checklists of places you've applied and application deadlines.

Sophomore Year
Sign up and take the PSAT (pre-SAT) or the PLAN (preACT). Your test scores on the PSAT can qualify you for a National Merit Scholarship, and both tests highlight areas where you can improve. Start researching potential careers. Talking to people who work in these fields is especially helpful. Compile a list of schools that interest you. Consider things like area of study, strength of department, distance from your hometown and campus size. Keep up with: Your grades, your guidance counselor, your extracurricular activities.

Senior Year Second Semester
Pick a school. Choose a school that fits your needs best. Remember to consider the university as a whole. Notify your chosen school of your decision to attend. Inform all your other choices that, although you appreciate the consideration, you will not be attending in the fall. Send transcripts of the first semester of your senior year if your college has requested it. Fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid as close to January 1 as you can to qualify for government grants and loans. Make sure all of your paperwork required by the university and its departments has been filled out and sent by the dates specified. Check to make sure all fees have been paid. Check on housing. Many schools begin housing assignments in May.

Junior Year
Take the ACT and/or SAT. Check with your prospective schools to see which test they prefer. Plan to take both - most students do better on one than the other. Keep your grades up. Consider getting involved in an academic club. Narrow down your school choices. Start in-depth school research. Consider majors, housing options, financial aid and scholarship availability, tuition costs, and admission requirements. Begin campus visits. Talk to admissions representatives as well as real students. Look for scholarships. Look online, check your school database and check Next magazine. Write your scholarship essay. Get it critiqued and proofread by a teacher. Compile a resume. Begin making a list of deadlines for things such as financial aid, admissions and scholarships.

SOURCE: Arkansas NEXT magazine 2010 ed.

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Social Studies
United States History
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT US History is a required two semester course designed to focus on periods of United States history from the earliest Native Americans to the Viet Nam era. The course has two purposes: (1) To gain broad knowledge of the nation by focusing on political, cultural, and economic factors that have influenced events over the past 500 years in North America and (2) To acquire investigative skills necessary to evaluate a wide range of circumstances, synthesize effective solutions to problems and evaluate outcomes. skills. Students are expected take responsibility for their own learning with a considerable amount of outside reading and writing and class time devoted to discussion and debate of outside reading assignments. Critical thinking (evaluation of facts and synthesis of new ideas) is key to this course and will be demonstrated in a variety of ways.

Sociology
10th, 11th 12th grade 1 year, 1 credit Sociology is the study of human society and the social activities of human beings. This course offers an objective view of culture, the process of "socialization," and social structure. Additional topics of study include stratification, group interaction, ethnicity, and the institutions of society. Major problems in American society are discussed and examined for causes, effects, and solutions. This is a scientific study of the obvious and not so obvious, facts of social life!

AP United States History
11 , 12 GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: CONTRACT AP US History is a college-level course designed to challenge students to look at events in American history from a deeper level. This course is designed for students with a strong interest in United States history and who have demonstrated that interest through commitment to intense, accelerated work. Students will examine events from early colonization through present-day issues, using inference and reasoning skills to analyze the major issues. Students will be expected to read college-level material, to take college level multiple choice exams and to complete college-level writing assignments through out the year. In addition, a nationally administered exam at the end of this course can provide students with college credit. Students should expect to budget several hours of time for homework each week. NOTE: A summer assignment is given, which is expected to be completed before the first day of school.
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American Government
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT American Government is designed to give students an understanding of the background, creation, and subsequent history of the unique system of government brought into being by the Constitution of the United States of America. At the same time, this course helps students understand the principles and ideas that underlie and give meaning to the constitution .

Contemporary United States History
10th, 11th, 12th grades 1 SEMESTER, 1/2 CREDIT Contemporary United States History takes an in-depth look at the key people, events, and cultural phenomena that have helped shape the world since the end of World War II and their social, political, religious, intellectual, technological and economic impact. By making connections from the 1950s to today, students will analyze social political patterns, understand the diversity of modern America, and form opinions on the issue facing the world today through the study of current events.

Economics
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT Students in Economics study basic economic principles and the way various economic systems act upon these principles. Instruction focuses on the relationship between scarce productive resources and human needs with emphasis on the American economic system, especially in regard to decision making, labor, money, the market system, government, and business.

Geography
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, 1/2 CREDIT Geography is designed to bring together the physical and human dimensions of the world in the study of people, places, and environments. Its subject matter is the earth’s surface and the processes that shape it, the relationships between people and environments, and the connections between people and places. Students will study the spatial aspects of human existence in accordance with the National Geography Standards by analyzing maps, charts, graphs, other tools of geographic discovery.

World History
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT World History is a chronological study of the events and forces which have shaped the human race. It is an interpretation of the influences of time, cause and effect, geography, and the human experience. Concepts such as continuity, leadership, location, environment, nationalism, and interdependence are discussed. As an accent for this information, specific examples in literature and the arts are investigated by the student.

Psychology
10th, 11th, 12th grades 1 semester, 1/2 credit Psychology introduces student to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals, the history of the practice of psychology, and the philosophical debate behind the discipline. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields of psychology. They

Advanced World History
10 GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: CONTRACT Advanced World History differs from the standard World History course through additional focus on thesis writing, the formation and support of hypotheses, and individual reading and thinking
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Mathematics
Integrated Algebra B
10 , 11 , 12 GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: INTEGRATED ALGEBRA A Algebra A is the first part of a two-credit algebra course. Algebra B is the second part of a two- credit algebra course. Students who successfully complete Algebra A and Algebra B will meet the Algebra I requirement for graduation. Students should be able to describe and translate among graphic, algebraic, numeric, tabular, and verbal representations of relations and use those representations to solve problems. The process of collecting and analyzing data should be embedded throughout this course. Appropriate technology and manipulative should be used regularly for instruction and assessment. Students should be able to judge the meaning, utility, and reasonableness of the results of symbol manipulations, including those carried out by technology.
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Advanced Algebra II
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE PREREQUISITE: CO-REQUISITE: 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT ALGEBRA I GEOMETRY CONTRACT Advanced Algebra II is a college preparatory course designed for the strong math student. The curriculum in this course is differentiated from that of Algebra II through curriculum compacting and the level of questioning required. Students integrate basic algebra and geometry skills to strengthen their problemsolving, critical thinking, and decision-making skills. Manipulatives, graphing calculators, and cooperative learning groups are used to study linear equations and inequalities, matrices, quadratic equations, functions, radicals and exponential and logarithmic functions.

Geometry
10 , 11 , 12 GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA I Geometry provides students a foundation in proof and deductive reasoning. Instruction includes the traditional Euclidean concepts such as undefined terms, postulates, and the development of theorems, congruency, perpendicular and parallel relationships, Pythagorean Theorem, circles, perimeter, area, volume, two and three dimensional constructions, similarity, right triangles and trigonometry, and coordinate geometry. Students strengthen their basic algebraic skills through practical applications and develop an appreciation for the need for clarity and precision of language.
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Algebra III
12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA I, GEOMETRY, ALGEBRA II Algebra III is designed for students who have successfully completed Algebra II. This course will enhance the higher level thinking skills developed in Algebra II through a more in-depth study of those concepts and exploration of some pre-calculus concepts. Students in Algebra III will be challenged to increase their understanding of algebraic, graphical and numerical methods to analyze, translate and solve quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Modeling real world situations is an important part of this course. Sequences and series will be used to represent and analyze real world problems and mathematical situations. Algebra III will also include a study of trigonometric functions, right triangles, and oblique triangles. Arkansas teachers are responsible for integrating appropriate technology for Algebra III.

Algebraic Connections
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA I, GEOMETRY Algebraic Connections is designed for students who have successfully completed Algebra I (or its equivalent) and Geometry (or its equivalent). Algebraic Connections will build on a foundation of previously taught Algebra and Geometry concepts, enlarge upon the development of each concept, and introduce new concepts. Students will be expected to evaluate data, interpret data, analyze linear functions, write and solve equations and inequalities and their systems, and use algebraic, graphical, and numerical methods for analysis.

Trigonometry/Advanced Math
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITES: ALGEBRA I, GEOMETRY, ALGEBRA II Trigonometry is a college preparatory course which gives students an in-depth study of the six trigonometric functions and how they can be used to solve right triangles. Students learn basic definitions and formulas, solve all types of triangles and real-world application of trigonometry. Opportunities are given to students to demonstrate their understanding by writing and solving their own application problems using graphing calculators and working in cooperative learning groups. Students are encouraged to become problem-solvers, critical thinkers, and decision-makers. Topics also covered include polar coordinates, complex numbers, conic sections, sequences and series, and probability. The TI-83 graphing calculator is used extensively in solving problems.

Algebra II
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA I CO-REQUISITE: GEOMETRY Algebra II is a college preparatory course designed to develop proficiency in learning mathematics by expanding the understanding of mathematical concepts, by strengthening problemsolving skills with real-world applications, and by studying the skills needed to prepare for future math courses. With use of manipulative, graphing calculators, and cooperative learning groups, students are encouraged to become problem solvers, critical thinkers, and decision-makers.

Calculus
12TH GRADE PREREQUISITE: 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT ALGEBRA I, GEOMETRY ALGEBRA II, AND TRIGONOMETRY Calculus is a college preparatory course designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of functions, limits, differentiation, and integration. Instruction begins with a review of functions taught in Algebra I; students then learn to identify continuous functions, find limits, and differentiate functions. Practical appli-

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cations include the use of derivatives in finding velocities and related rates, such as changes in area and volume. Students also learn to find anti-derivatives in order to integrate and use integration to find area and volume of solids.

independent level, through authentic and relevant application of statistics principles.

AP Statistics
11th and 12th grade 1 year, 1 credit PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA I, GEOMETRY, ALGEBRA II, CONTRACT This two-semester fourth-year course is for students who have completed Algebra II and may be taken before, in place of, or concurrently with another fourth-year mathematics course. Statistics provides students with an understanding of the concepts of mathematics analysis, normal curve distribution and measures of variability. Basic statistical topics such as percentiles, normal distribution, standard deviation, and fitting curves to data will be studied. Students will develop a critical sense in reading numerical information through learning the ways of expressing quantitative data numerically, via percentages and proportions, and visually with tables, graphs, and charts. Assessments will require students to perform higher order thinking skills at an

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Marion High School 2011-2012

Science
The Science Department strongly recommends that college-bound students consider taking at least Biology, Chemistry I, and Physics in their High School curriculum. Students should also consider taking at least one or two additional science courses as electives.

Biology
10TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT Biology is the standard entry-level science course for sophomores. The course is laboratory centered and investigates the major themes of biological science, including the nature of the cell, the chemistry of living systems, inheritance and a study of DNA, plant and animal anatomy and physiology, and classification of living things. The course requires reading and writing assignments, dissections, projects, and group activities.

Chemistry I

Advanced Biology
10TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE CONTRACT Pre-AP Biology differs from standard Biology in that it is more independently laboratory centered and investigates in depth the major themes of Biological Science. The course will require writing assignments, online lab and investigations, as well as dissections and projects. Critical thinking is key to this course and will be assessed in a variety of ways.

11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITES: ALGEBRA I Chemistry I provides students with basic understanding of the composition, properties, and changes associated with matter. Emphasis is placed on the scientific method, the basic laws and theories on matter, atomic structure, molecular bonding, the study of solutions, reactions and their rates, equilibrium, acids/bases, and introduction to organic chemistry. Students are also involved in laboratory experiences that emphasize and demonstrate chemical properties. Small-scale chemistry procedures are used in laboratory exercises.

Advanced Chemistry
11TH GRADE PRE/CO-REQUISITES: 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT ALGEBRA II
CONTRACT

Human Anatomy and Physiology
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE BIOLOGY Human Anatomy and Physiology is an in depth study of the components of the human body. Students will gain an understanding of the structure and function of the body systems including skeletal, muscular, nervous, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, reproductive, integumentary, urinary, lymphatic and endocrine. In addition, students will study diseases, immune complications, and human metabolism. Detailed dissection of an advanced mammals is included. This course is recognized as part of the Medical Professions Education tract. .

Advanced Chemistry differs from standard Chemistry in that it is more independent laboratory centered and includes in-depth investigation of the major themes of Chemistry. The course requires writing assignments, online labs and investigations, as well as independent projects. Critical thinking is key to this course and will be assessed in a variety of ways.

Ecology

11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITES BIOLOGY I This course is a laboratory investigative approach on ecological interactions and man’s use of the earth and its resources. This class will identify ecosystems and their current condition with regards to human impact, both now and in the future. Water and soil analyses will be conducted in the lab.

Physics

11TH, 12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES:

1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT ALGEBRA 1 & 2, GEOMETRY, CURRENTLY TAKING / ALREADY TAKEN TRIGONOMETRY Physics is a Physical Science course investigating the relationships (through rigorous calculations) between matter and energy. The ultimate goal of Physics is to explain the physical universe in terms of basic interactions and single particles. The areas studied are classic mechanics (forces of Newton’s Laws of motion), gravity, energy and thermodynamics (energy, work, power and thermal energy), fluids, waves and sound, optics (light and reflection) the atom and nuclear energy. The course strongly emphasis student master of critical thinking skills and Algebra II. The course provides and atmosphere which fosters guided inquiry and student-centered learning.

AP Environmental Science
11TH, 12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT BIOLOGY CONTRACT CURRENTLY TAKING / ALREADY TAKEN CHEMISTRY I The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester introductory college course in environmental science. The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine solutions for resolving these problems. Field trips and labs are an important part of the course, and participation is required. All students must take the AP exam in order to receive weighted credit for the course.

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Health Science Technology
The Medical Professions Education tract is designed to provide students who are interested in any medical profession with a foundation towards completion of an associate degree in a variety of medical fields. Students who meet designated criteria may receive college credit. A student can be a completer earning a gold seal on their diploma. See Vocational Programs of Study/Career Majors on page 15 for more information on requirements to being a completer.

Introduction to Medical Professions
10 GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT This course is designed to provide students with basic information and skills needed for a career in the health care field. In this comprehensive course, emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to select student vocational organizations (ours is Health Occupations Students of America), study skills, and personal qualities of the health care worker. An overview of medical history and events, health care systems, health care careers, medical ethics and legal responsibilities, and professionalism is also covered.
TH

Medical Professions II
12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES: 1 YEAR, 2 CREDITS TEACHER RECOMMENDATION INTO TO MEDICAL PROFESSIONS MEDICAL PROFESSIONS I

NOTE: This course meets for two class periods.
The Medical Clinical Internship course is designed to provide students with job-shadowing experiences within various areas of health care. There are several job-shadowing settings that may be utilized, i.e., hospitals, health clinics, physicians’ offices, dental clinics, nursing homes, and any other healthcare-related job site. HOSA membership ($20 dues) is required for this class. Students must also have their own transportation.

Medical Professions I
11TH GRADE PREREQUISITE:
COREREQUISITE:

1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT INTRO TO MEDICAL PROFESSIONS HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

The Medical Terminology course assists students in developing the language used for communication in the health care profession. Areas of study include fundamental word structures, terminology for diagnostic and imaging procedures, and general medical terms for the body systems. In Medical Procedures, students develop specific skills needed in health professions. Emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to the following areas: safety, infection control, vital signs, CPR and first aid, medical math, abbreviations, and charting.

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Business and Computer Technology
Business
Accounting I—Computerized
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT This course provides students with the basic principles necessary for planning, controlling, analyzing, and interpreting financial records as they relate to business. Instruction integrates both manual and computerized accounting systems. Students learn concepts necessary for success in college accounting as well as entry-level work related skills.

Computer Applications II
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT PREREQUISITE: KEYBOARDING AND CA I Computer Applications II is a semester course designed to provide students with the intermediate computer skills necessary to do well in high school and in virtually all jobs today. Students will learn techniques that will allow them to create fairly complex word processing and spreadsheet documents. They will continue to learn Internet research skills. They will create a webpage in Word. In addition, students will continue to develop their PowerPoint skills.

Accounting II—Computerized
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING I Students enrolled in Accounting II gain further entry-level skills in the accounting profession and/or develop a foundation for college study. Partnership as well as departmental, corporate and cost accounting systems are components of the course. Emphasis is given to the computerized/automated functions of accounting.

Computer Applications III
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT PREREQUISITE: KEYBOARDING, CA I, AND CA II Computer Applications III is a semester course designed to provide students with the computer skills necessary to do well in college and skills needed in most jobs today. Students will learn techniques that will allow them to create simple to intermediate desktop publishing documents; create, access and edit databases; use email efficiently and ethically; create advanced electronic presentations; and create web pages using web-page design software. They will continue to improve their Internet research skills.

Management
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: ACCOUNTING I OR CONCURRENTLY ENROLLED Management is a course that assists the student in understanding basic management functions. Students study the management process, decision making, environmental factors, basic ethics, and social responsibility. Planning, organizing, leading, and controlling are emphasized as well as basic concepts of staffing, leadership, communications, entrepreneurship, and international management.

Desktop Publishing I
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT PRE OR CO REQUISITE: CA II Desktop Publishing I is a one semester course designed to meet the needs of the creative computer student. In Desktop Publishing I, students will use InDesign and Microsoft Publisher to create, edit, and print professional looking documents that include text and graphics. Students will participate in extensive hands-on experiences using appropriate design principles; page layout, design, editing and final productions are emphasized. Students will learn the vocabulary used in publishing as well as create several publications such as flyers, brochures, business cards, letterheads, pamphlets, forms, newsletters, and calendars.

Computer Technology
Computer Applications I
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT PREREQUISITE: KEYBOARDING Computer Applications I is a semester course designed to provide students with the fundamental computer skills necessary to do well in high school and in virtually all jobs today. In the area of word processing, students will learn the fundamental skills necessary to create and edit the most widely used documents and use the most commonly used features of a word processor, such as bullets, numbered lists, borders; shading,; and fonts. The fundamentals in use of scanners, graphics and WordArt are applied to documents. Internet searching skills and citing Internet sources are stressed. In the area of spreadsheets, students will be expected to create and edit simple spreadsheets using basic formulas and functions, and create a simple graph or chart. Microsoft Publisher is introduced.

Desktop Publishing II
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT PREREQUISITE: DTP I Desktop Publishing II is a one semester course. In Desktop Publishing II, students will use InDesign, Microsoft Publisher, and PowerPoint to create publications, and presentations. Students will be expected to apply skills they have been taught in DTP I to create graphical images and apply images and text in several formats. Students will expand on their creations from DTP I in addition to creating at least two personalized projects.

ACCOUNTING is the language of business and is a very important aspect of all business activities. TECHNOLOGY and COMPUTERS are essential for all students and are used in most every career.

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Multimedia Applications I
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT PREREQUISITES: COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I & II Students will study the fundamentals (graphics, audio, text, animation and video) of multimedia production and multimedia applications in business. Students will learn about the nature and scope of multimedia in today’s world, data compression, and editing photos as well as using presentation software. Students will participate in such hands-on activities as creating radio commercials, creating web pages, ripping music and burning CD’s, creating photo stories, editing videos, building applications with authoring tools, incorporating design principles, and implementing multimedia in presentations. A multimedia development project, or media portfolio, is required as a major project.

Multimedia Applications II
11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT PREREQUISITES: MULTIMEDIA I Multimedia Applications II is a continuation of Multimedia Applications I. Students work exclusively on project-oriented curriculum. Projects include animation and morphing assignments, webpage projects, video editing and video production. The Senior Slide Show is created in this class.

Vocational Programs of Study/Career Majors
Marion High School students may elect to study a wide variety of vocational courses which are governed by the Arkansas Department of WorkForce Education. A total of eight elective credits are needed to meet the 24 credit graduation requirement. A student can be a completer earning a gold seal on their diploma. A program of study emphasizes a career major, by (1) successfully completing three units of credit in a program of study area by passing the required courses, and (2) graduating from Marion High School. These programs of study are sequential and could prepare the student for immediate employment upon graduation. Program of Study
Business / Marketing Technology Finance Cluster

Pathway
Accounting

Career Focus Electives
Computer Applications I, II Computerized Accounting I Computerized Accounting II Computer Applications I, II Computerized Accounting I Business Management Computer Applications I, II Desktop Publishing I, II Elective Computer Applications I, II Multimedia I, II Elective Construction Technology Fundamentals Construction Technology I Construction Technology II Introduction to Medical Professions Medical Professionals I - Human Anatomy and Physiology - Medical Procedures - Medical Terminology Family & Consumer Science 2 credits from the following: Nutrition and Wellness (semester) Foods and Nutrition (semester) Personal and Family Finance (semester) Parenting (semester) Child Development (semester) Family Dynamics

Business / Marketing Technology Business, Management, & Administration

Management

Business / Marketing Technology Information Technology Cluster

Digital Communication Desktop Publishing

Business / Marketing Technology Information Technology Cluster

Digital Communication Multimedia

Skilled and Technical Science Architecture & Construction

Construction Technology

Skilled and Technical Science Health Science

Health Science Technology

Family and Consumer Science Human Services

Family & Consumer Sciences Education

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Family and Consumer Sciences
Family and Consumer Science
10 , 11 , 12 GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT Family and Consumer Science is designed to provide students with basic information and skills needed to function effectively within the family and within a changing, complex society. Emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to Family, Career, an Community Leaders of America; individual and family relationships; housing and interior design; wardrobe planning and selection; garment care and construction; the physical, emotional, social and intellectual development of children; nutrition and food selection; healthy lifestyle choices; meal planning, preparation and service; home management; money management; the application of current technology in the home and workplace. Upon completion of this course, the student should have developed life skills that promote a positive influence on the quality of life.
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Nutrition and Wellness
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT Nutrition and Wellness enables students to analyze the interaction of nutrition, foods, and fitness for overall wellness of individuals and families through the lifespan. In this course students will develop nutrition and fitness habits to make wise decisions regarding healthy living and prevention of disease through these practices. As active learners, students develop higher order thinking skills and academic skills in the areas of math, science, language arts and social studies through the evaluation of relevant nutrition and wellness information. This course is recommended for all students regardless of their career cluster or pathway, in order to build basic nutrition and wellness knowledge and skills, and is especially appropriate for students with interest in human services, wellness / fitness, health, or food and nutrition - related career pathways.

Family Dynamics
10 , 11 , 12 GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT Family Dynamics focuses on the role of the family in helping individuals reach their highest potential by addressing concerns of the community and global society through national FCCLA programs. Emphasis is given to dynamics of family life, individual development, life relationships, responsible parenting, crisis management, resource management, civic responsibility, healthy living, house decisions, career planning, and trends affecting families. Upon completion of this course, the student should have an understanding of the impact of the family on an individuals ability to function successfully in an increasingly complex society.
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Child Development
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT Child Development focuses on skills needed to guide the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of children. Emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to the study of children, pregnancy and prenatal development, birth and the newborn, types of growth and development, stages of growth and development, rights and responsibilities of parents and children, needs of children, factors influencing the behavior of children, selection of child—care services, health and safety of children, children with special needs, coping with crises, the effects of technology on child development, and careers related to the area of child development. Upon completion of these course, the student should be prepared to care for and guide the development of a child through all stages of growth— within a family, as a child-care professional, or in other experiences with children.

Personal and Family Finance
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT This course is designed to increase financial literacy among high school students and prepare them to successfully manage their personal and family financial resources. Students learn to manage resources through hands-on applications that are relevant to their lives. Examples include employment related forms, spending plans, cost analysis, comparison shopping, individual and family scenarios, and the use of FCCLA Financial Fitness projects. Emphasis is given to the development of competencies related to life goals and decisions, preparing to earn understanding your paycheck, financial planning and banking, insurance, credit, consumer skills, and housing and transportation costs. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the ability to handle financial responsibilities effectively now and in their future.

Parenting
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT Experiences in the Parenting courses are designed to assist students in developing an understanding of the parenting process and of parenting skills. Competencies developed in this course will be useful to anyone who lives with, associates with, or works with children. Emphasis in this course is given to the development of competencies related to the parenthood decision, costs of having and raising a child, child growth and development, effects of heredity and environment on development, rights and responsibilities of parents and children, providing nurturance, guidance techniques for promoting positive behavior, prevention of child abuse and neglect, promoting health and safety of children, caring for the sick or injured child, parenting a ―special needs‖ child, helping children cope with crises, choosing professionals to help with parenting problems, selection of child-care services, jobs and careers related to parenting, and effects of technology on careers related to parenting. Upon completion of this course, a student should possess skills necessary to provide quality care for children — as a parent, as one employed to care for children, or as one who interacts with children in other settings.

Foods and Nutrition
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT Experiences in the Food and Nutrition course focus on the development of skills needed to select, prepare, and serve food which meets nutritional needs of individuals and families. Emphasis in this course is given to the development of competencies related to nutrition, weight control, the food consumer, the effect of technology on food and nutrition, kitchen organization and equipment, safety and sanitation, menu planning, serving and eating food, food preparation, eating away from home, and jobs and career opportunities in the filed of food and nutrition. Upon completion of these course, students should be able to apply sound nutritional practices which will have a positive effect on their health.

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Construction Technology
This program is designed to equip students who desire employment in the construction industry with the necessary entry level skills they need. The curriculum was developed by the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) and addresses worker safety, OSHA, carpentry, plumbing, and electrical skills.

Construction Technology Core
10TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT Students in this introductory course investigate methods, techniques, and principles used in the construction trades. This course provides training in basic safety skills, construction math, hand tools, power tools, reading blueprints, basic rigging skills, communication, and employability skills. This course is the foundation for all NCCER courses. Students completing this course are elected to continue the program through their senior year with the Instructor’s approval.

Construction Technology II
12TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 3 PERIODS, 3 CREDITS PREREQUISITES: CT I AND TEACHER RECOMMENDATION Senior students begin their first semester studying the electrical trade. Their curriculum consists of electrical safety, bending and installing conduit, electrical theory, electrical materials, and wiring systems. Students will engage in electrical studies and individual practice in installation and connecting electrical circuits. The last semester is a practical lab in which students will be involved in designated projects and possibly a few of their own design. Students may take field trips to observe the quality craftsmanship of those in the trade. Students may participate in the construction of projects on and off campus throughout the year as time allows. CT II is a three period block course in which students regularly complete off-campus projects within the Marion community.

Construction Technology I
11TH GRADE 1 YEAR, 2 PERIODS, 2 CREDITS PREREQUISITES: CT CORE AND TEACHER RECOMMENDATION First semester students familiarize with carpentry skills, such as flooring systems, framing, concrete and reinforcing, doors, windows, and stair layout. The second semester students examine plumbing materials and techniques, plumbing drawings, supply and waste systems, and attain skills in assembling and repairing plumbing fixtures and systems. Students may on occasion take field trips to industry and construction sites for observation of trade craftsmanship. Students may also participate in the construction of projects on and off campus throughout the year as time allows.

Jobs for Arkansas’ Graduates (JAG)
JAG I
11TH GRADE PREREQUISITES: 1 YEAR; 1 CREDIT APPLICATION MUST MEET JAG CRITERIA JAG I will be the beginning phase of this 36 month employability skills/career preparation curriculum. During the junior year, students will master 25 employment competencies focusing on career development, basic skills and leadership - self-development.

JAG Senior
12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES 1 YEAR; 1 CREDIT APPLICATION MUST MEET JAG CRITERIA Senior JAG students will master 50 employability competencies. This class focuses on career development skills, job attainment, leadership and personal development and survival skills. In addition, the JAG specialist will help prepare students for graduation and transition into the adult world by using a 21month intervention during the senior year of high school and 12 months of follow-up services.

JAG II
12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES: 1 YEAR; 1 CREDIT JAG I APPLICATION MUST MEET JAG CRITERIA JAG II students will master 25 more employment competencies which focus and job attainment and survival, and personal skills. In addition specialists help prepare the student for graduation and transition into the adult world.

JAG Apprenticeship/Work -Based Learning
11TH, 12TH GRADE 2 PERIODS, 2 CREDITS YEAR PREREQUISITES ENROLLED IN JAG I, II OR SENIOR JAG This is the cooperative work-study element of the JAG program. Students must be employed at an acceptable training station and complete a minimum of 270 work hours each semester. JAG specialist will assist the JAG student in finding employment if necessary. The specialist will visit the training station monthly in addition to securing a written evaluation by the employer each grading period.

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More Opportunities
Driver’s Education
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE 1 SEMESTER, ½ LOCAL CREDIT PREREQUISITES: 2.0 FROM PREVIOUS GRADING SEMESTER, REQUIRED BEFORE ENROLLING VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE OR PERMIT This course will prepare students to drive safely, learn rules of the road, apply basic driving skills, learn vehicle systems and maintenance, and teach students what to do in emergencies. This course will also teach the students how to read road maps, plan trips, recognize hazardous road conditions, and deal with social pressures such as drinking and driving.

Strength Conditioning and Fitness
10TH 11TH 12TH
ONLY 1 YEAR, ½ CREDIT AND ½ LOCAL CREDIT PREREQUISITE: HEALTH PRE/CO-REQUISITE NUTRITION AND WELLNESS The course is designed to provide students with a broad background in the principles of fitness, conditioning, and lifelong activity. There will be exposure to various types of fitness activities. Instruction will be given in procedures for self evaluation as well as the development of an individualized exercise program. Health issues, nutrition, and BMI (Body Mass Index) will be integral parts of the class. This course is open to all students; however, preference will be given to seniors.

Edline

http://www.edline.net

Edline.net is a great online communication tool used by the Marion School District. Parents and students may check classroom progress by using the secure log in provided by the school district. To set up a private Edline account, parents and/or students must obtain an activation access code from the school guidance counselors and then personalize their own account with a private password. Parents only have access to their student’s grades and assignments. It is a very simple, straight forward process. If a parent has an Edline account and password for another student in the district, they must still obtain an activation code for their junior high or high school student. Advantages of having an Edline account include the development of a new accountability and motivation for students as parents may check student grades between progress reports and report cards. Another advantage of Edline is that students may check class assignments in the event the assignments were left at school or before returning to school after an absence. Teachers in the Marion School District post grades and assignments weekly to Edline; some update grades and assignments more often.

Launch Internet Explorer Brow ser.lnk

NOTE: Course offerings are subject to change.

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Fine Arts
Music
Choir is a year long course. Grades are based on participation, attendance, singing exams, rehearsals, and performance.

Art
Art I
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADES 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT A brief introduction into Principles and Elements of Art in studio experiences such as drawing, painting and sculpture. Students will learn the basic foundation and appreciation of Art.

Select Choir
10TH, 11TH,12TH 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: AUDITION Emphasis is on the study of music through performance of choral literature from all historical periods. This is an auditioned ensemble which performs advanced choral literature. The choir participates in concerts, clinics, contests, regional and state events. Attendance at concerts and contests is required.

Art II
11TH, 12TH GRADES 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE ART I Art II is intended for students seeking to expand their knowledge and skills in Art. Subject matter in all media will begin to reflect the students’ feelings and be original work. Studio experiences will expand to different color schemes, printmaking, and mixed media. Sketch books will be kept.

Women's Choir
10TH, 11TH,12TH 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: TEACHER APPROVAL Emphasis is on performance and individual student improvement. This ensemble is active in the same concerts and events as Select Choir. Attendance at concerts and contests is required.

Art III
11TH, 12TH GRADES PREREQUISITES 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT ART I AND II TEACHER APPROVAL Students will develop their own style, with emphasis on expressing themselves in all art media. This individual emphasis will allow each student to gain creative insight and to solve and create visually.

Male Choir
10TH, 11TH,12TH 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE: TEACHER APPROVAL Emphasis is on performance and individual student improvement. This ensemble is active in the same concerts and events as Select Choir. Attendance at concerts and contests is required.

Art IV
12TH GRADE PREREQUISITE: 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT ART I, II AND III TEACHER APPROVAL Students will work independently on the college level, concentrating on a specific discipline of Studio Art. They will use problem solving strategies from previously learned elements and principles of art. Senior Art Show will be required.

Band
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADES 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT PREREQUISITE BAND DIRECTOR APPROVAL OR TRYOUT Emphasis is on playing and marching fundamentals. This ensemble will perform at football games, marching contests, concerts, parades, and the region concert festival. Each student will have the opportunity to audition for all-region band and participate in solos and ensembles. During the fall or spring semester there will be auditions for Symphonic Band and Concert Band. Each student will audition for the bands by playing selections from the all-region music. The Symphonic Band will be required to audition for all-region band, all-state band, and attend additional music sectionals and rehearsals. Attendance at all rehearsals and performances is required. Band is a year long course. Grades are based on participation, attendance, playing exams, rehearsals, and performances.

Drama
Drama I
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADES 1 YEAR, 1 CREDIT (FINE ARTS) Drama I is both an academic and performance class for student interested in the performing arts. Academic instruction focuses on the history of drama, the basic elements of a play, vocabulary of theater, and reading of selected plays. Students will also participate in production of a play in at least one of the following areas: set design and construction; costuming, props, and make up; directing and/or acting; and publicity/advertising.

Survey of Music
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADES 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT The purpose of the fine arts-music course is to increase the students’ sensitivity and knowledge of music and its history. Instruction includes elements of music; music history, including baroque, medieval, classical, romantic, impressionist, and twentieth century; characteristics of music from specific historical periods; and music production.

Drama II/III
11TH, 12TH GRADES 1 YEAR, 1 LOCAL CREDIT (FINE ARTS) PREREQUISITES AUDITION AND INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL Drama II/III is designed for students with a serious interest in theater. Students will develop their talents in acting and their skills in stagecraft and play production. Students will actively participate in several major productions for audiences. Grades are based on attendance, participation, and completion of assigned tasks. Drama II/III may be taken two years for two separate credits.

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Athletics
Marion High School is a member of 6A East Athletic Conference and competes for the 6A East Conference and 6A State Championships. Marion High School is a member of the Arkansas Activities Association. All athletes participating in interscholastic sports at MHS must meet all eligibility guidelines of the Arkansas Activities Association.
Marion School activities that must comply with these requirements are: ATHLETICS, BAND, CHOIR, CHEERLEADING AND ALL INTERSCHOLASTIC COMPETITIVE EVENTS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. To be eligible for the fall semester, a student must have passed all four academic subjects the previous semester and earned a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or better. A student may continue to participate PROVIDED the student participates in an academic improvement program in accordance with Arkansas Activities Association & ADE guidelines.

Football
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES: 1 YEAR, *1 LOCAL CREDIT PHYSICAL EXAM COACH’S RECOMMENDATION All interested young men should sign up for seventh period athletics. The junior varsity plays an abbreviated schedule of area teams. The varsity plays a ten-game schedule and competes for the 6A East Conference Championship and State Championship. Athletes must complete the following requirements in order to qualify for the fall football season. Off-season program prior to and including spring football practice in May. Each athlete must participate in spring practice drills for a 2-week period as designated by the AAA. Each athlete must complete a pre-designed lifting/running schedule during the summer months.

Boys’ Baseball
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADES PREREQUISITES: 1 SEMESTER, *1 LOCAL CREDIT PHYSICAL EXAM COACH’S RECOMMENDATION All interested boys should sign up for baseball second semester. Try-outs for the team are held in late January. All practices are held after school hours.

Boys Basketball
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES: 1 YEAR, *1 LOCAL CREDIT PHYSICAL EXAM COACH’S RECOMMENDATION All interested students should sign up for seventh period basketball. A full schedule of competition will be established for junior varsity and varsity teams. The varsity teams compete for the 6A East Conference Championship and 6A State Championship. Summer workouts are required and tryouts held as needed.

Girls Basketball
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES: 1 YEAR, *1 LOCAL CREDIT PHYSICAL EXAM COACH’S RECOMMENDATION All interested students should sign up for seventh period basketball. A full schedule of competition will be established for junior varsity and varsity teams. The varsity teams compete for the 6A East Conference Championship and 6A State Championship. Summer workouts are required and tryouts held as needed.

After School Sports
See note on page 21

Track
10 , 11 , 12 GRADES PREREQUISITES:
TH TH TH

(Male and Female)
1SEMESTER PHYSICAL EXAM

Girls’ Volleyball
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES: 1 YEAR, *1 LOCAL CREDIT PHYSICAL EXAM COACH’S RECOMMENDATION This is a competitive sport that is open to all girls in grades 1012. There will be a try-out period held in the spring of each school year. The varsity team will play a full schedule and compete for the 6A East Conference Championship and 6A State Championship.

COACH’S RECOMMENDATION Track is a spring sport that is open to both male and female students. Practices are held after school and will consist of running and training for different events. A full schedule of meets will be developed. Participation in these meets is mandatory. Tryouts will be held if needed.

Cross Country
9 , 10 , 11 , 12 GRADES PREREQUISITES:
TH TH TH TH

(Male and Female)

Girls’ Fastpitch Softball
10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADE PREREQUISITES: 1 SEMESTER, *1 LOCAL CREDIT PHYSICAL EXAM COACH’S RECOMMENDATION This is a competitive sport that is open to all girls in grades 9-12. A tryout period is held in January. The top 20-25 players are chosen for the varsity and junior varsity team. All try-outs, games and practices are after school. The softball team plays a full schedule and competes for the 6A East Conference Championship and the 6A State Championship.

1 SEMESTER PHYSICAL EXAMINATION COACH’S RECOMMENDATION Cross Country involves endurance running which consists of a 4K (2.5 miles) for females and a 5K (3.2 miles) for males. This is a fall sport which will involve training during the summer months. Most XC meets will be held on Saturdays and will involve some overnight trips. Cross Country meets are run over scenic routes in various locations throughout Arkansas and Tennessee.

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Cheerleading
10 , 11 , 12 GRADES 1 YEAR, *1 LOCAL CREDIT PREREQUISITES: TRY-OUT BASED Any student trying out for the cheerleading squad must meet the guidelines set forth by the Arkansas Activities Association (grades, age, residence, etc.) and policy set forth by the Marion School Board. If chosen to be on the squad, all cheerleaders are expected to attend all games, activities, practices, etc. set forth by the sponsor and administration. Uniforms are provided for cheerleaders, but there are costs involved for shoes, accessories, camp, etc.
TH TH TH

Golf (Male and Female)
9TH, 10TH, 11TH, 12TH GRADES PREREQUISITES: PHYSICAL EXAM TRY-OUT Golf is a fall competitive sport for both male and female athletes at MHS. A full schedule of matches will be played with area schools, along with, conference and state matches. Practice is held after school. Golf competes for 6A East Conference Championship and 6A State Championship. Tryouts held as needed.

Tennis
TH TH TH

(Male and Female)
TH

Soccer
9 , 10 , 11 , 12 GRADES PREREQUISITES:
TH TH TH TH

(Male and Female)

9 , 10 , 11 , 12 GRADES PREREQUISITES:

PHYSICAL EXAM TRY-OUT Tennis is offered for both male and female students at MHS. A full schedule of matches will be established for competition in the fall. Practice is held after school. Tennis competes for 6A East Conference Championship and 6A State Championship. Tryouts held as needed.

PHYSICAL EXAM TRY-OUT Soccer is a spring sport with a full schedule of matches that will be established including competition for the 6A East Conference and 6A State Titles. Tryouts are held if needed. Practice is after school. Matches are played predominantly on weekdays

For NAIA Academic Eligibility Requirements for Athletes, go to www. playnaia.org.

NCAA Academic Eligibility Requirements for Athletes
For students entering any college or university on or after August 1, 2008, your NCAA initial eligibility will be evaluated under the core-course rules as described here. Division I 16 Core-Course Rule requirements: Division II 14 Core-Course Rule requirements (16 will be required beginning Aug. 1, 2013): Successfully complete a core curriculum of at least 14 academic course units as follows: English ....................................................... 3 years Mathematics (Algebra I or above) .............. 2 years Natural or physical science (one laboratory course, if offered by the high school) .......................... 2 years Additional English, mathematics, or natural or physical science ......................................... 2 year Social science ............................................... 2 years Additional academic courses (in any of the above areas or foreign language or nondoctrinal religion / philosophy courses) .............................................. 3 years NOTE: In Division II, there is no sliding scale. The minimum core grade-point average is 2.00. The minimum SAT score is 820 (Verbal and Math sections only) and the minimum ACT sum score is 68. All SAT and ACT scores must be reported directly to the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse by the testing agency. Test scores that appear on transcripts will no longer be used. When registering for the SAT or ACT, use the clearinghouse code of 9999 to make sure the score is reported to the clearinghouse. For more information on eligibility see the high school counselors, call the NCAA toll free at 877/262-1492 or at 317/917-6222 or go to: www.eligibilitycenter.org

Graduate from high school; Successfully complete a core curriculum of at least 16 academic course units as follows: English.................................................................. 4 years Mathematics (Algebra I or above) ....................... 3 years Natural or physical science (one laboratory course, if offered by the high school) ............................. 2 years Additional English, mathematics, or natural or physical science ............................................................ 1 year Social science ...................................................... 2 years Additional academic courses (in any of the above areas or foreign language or nondoctrinal religion / philosophy courses) ..........................................................4 years Have a core-course grade-point average (based on a maximum of 4.0) and a combined score on the SAT verbal and math sections or a sum score on the ACT based on the qualifier index scale. NOTE: Division 1 has a siding scale for test score and grade point average. For more information, see the NCAA website at www.ncaa.org

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MSCC Technical Center
The Mid-South Community College Technical Center (MSCCTC) is a workforce education center that offers college credit in technical programs to juniors and seniors in high schools in the Crittenden County area. The Center’s curriculum serves as an extension of high school curricular offerings by providing students with hands-on training in technical fields. Services are offered at NO COST to the students. Books, tuition and fees are provided through the Center and funded by the local school districts and the Arkansas Department of Workforce Education.

Admission Policy
Prospective students apply for admission to MSCCTC programs through the MHS counselor. Admission is based on student grade point average; ASSET, ACT, PLAN or COMPASS test scores; school attendance; citizenship; motivation; ability; and aptitude. All students are required to submit the following:  Written recommendation from the high school principal and counselor  Completed application for admission form  Current high school transcript for each semester of enrollment  ASSET, COMPASS, PLAN or ACT test scores  Signed student/parent agreement  Proof of immunization against mumps, measles, and rubella if born on or before January 1, 1957.

Programs of Study
NOTE:
MSCCTC programs are two-year programs designed for students to begin their junior year of high school and complete their senior year of high school. Beginning in the junior year allows students to earn the maximum benefit from a program. However, a senior may enroll in the first year of a two-year program and still earn valuable job skills and college credit.

Career Pathways
ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY DIESEL TECHNOLOGY COMPUTER ENGINEERING

All students must meet the Ability to Benefit admissions criteria for admission to MSCCTC Ability to Benefit Criteria ACT/PLAN English/Writing Reading Numerical 14 14 15 ASSET 35 35 33 COMPASS 32 62 25

CERTIFIED INTERNET WEB PROFESSIONAL (CIW) MACHINING TECHNOLOGY WELDING TECHNOLOGY RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

MHS students may only enroll in the MSCCTC for two class periods which meet during morning OR afternoon periods.

NOTICE A 2.5 GPA is required for Unconditional Admission to all MSCCTC programs. A 2.25 GPA is required for Conditional Admission to all MSCCTC programs.

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
The Advanced Manufacturing Technology Program provides students with foundation-level skills and knowledge in preparation for sustained careers in manufacturing. Courses are project-based, providing students with hands-on learning experi-

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MSCCTC Course Descriptions
ences and understanding of the integration of processes, materials, tools, techniques, relationships, and interpersonal skills in the manufacturing environment. Upon successful completion of all program requirements, students will have earned an MSCC Certificate of Proficiency in Advanced Manufacturing Technology. Courses will also apply toward the Technical Certificate and AAS Degree in Advanced Manufacturing Technology at Mid-South Community College. (4 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) -

Prerequisite: HTDM 1054 Diesel Engines I grade of ―C‖ or better.

with a

COMPUTER ENGINEERING
The Computer Engineering Program prepares students for the A+Certification examination, as well as entry-level positions as a computer technician in microcomputer repair. Upon successful completion of all programs requirements, students will obtain a Certificate of Proficiency in Microcomputer Upgrade and Repair from Mid-South Community College. Certain courses will also apply toward completion of the AAS Degree at MSCC.

Courses: Design for manufacturing – Year 1 Fall (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) Manufacturing Production Processes – Year 1 Spring (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) Manufacturing Power & Equipment Systems – Year 2 Fall (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) Manufacturing Materials – Year 2 Spring

Courses: IT Principles and Practices – Year 1 Fall (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) IT Essentials I: PC Hardware/Software – Year 1 Fall (3 Credit, .5 High School Credit) A+ Certification Prep Course – Year 1 Spring (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) IT Essentials II: Network Operating Systems Software – Year 1

(3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit)

DIESEL TECHNOLOGY
The Diesel Technology Program prepares students to apply technical knowledge and skills needed to execute comprehensive diesel technology principles and maintenance. College credit earned in this program will apply toward the Technical Certificate in Heavy Truck Diesel Maintenance and the AAS Degree in General Technology at MSCC.

Spring

(3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit
Networking Basics - Cisco Network Fundamentals – Year 2 Fall

(Cisco® CCNA I) (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit)
Fundamentals of UNIX – Year 2 Fall

Courses: Preventive Maintenance – Year 1 Fall (4 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) Brake Systems – Year 1 Spring (4 College Credits, 1 High School Credit Diesel Engines I – Year 2 Fall (4 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) Diesel Engines II – Year 2 Spring

(3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit)
Router Basics - Routing Protocols and Concepts – Year 2 Spring (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) UNIX System Administration I – Year 2 Spring (3 College, Credits, .5 High School Credit)

http://www.midsouthcc.edu/

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CERTIFIED INTERNET WEB PROFESSIONAL (CIW)
The CIW Program provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to design functional Web sites for ecommerce. Upon successful completion of all program requirements, students will be able to attain certification in Internet Web Professional Technology and will have earned an MSCC Certificate of Proficiency in Website Design. Course will also apply toward completion if the AAS Degree in Information Systems Technology at MSCC.

MACHINING TECHNOLOGY
This program is designed to prepare the student for employment in the area of Machining Technology. Students will acquire basic skills in Computer Numerical Control (CNC), blueprint reading, computer aided drafting, metallurgy and manual machining.

Courses: Courses: Internet Business Fundamentals – Year 1 Fall (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) Introduction to Blueprint Reading – Year 1 Fall Introduction to Web Page Design - Year 1 Fall (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) Introduction to Metallurgy – Year 1 Spring CIW Site Design and Methodology – Year 1 Spring (6 College, 1 High School Credit Inspection and Testing Year 1 Spring CIW Networking Fundamentals – Year 2 Fall (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit Introduction to Manual Machining – Year 2 Fall Digital Graphics for the Web – Year 2 Fall (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credits) Introduction to CNC Machining – Year 2 Spring IT Principles and Practices – Year 2 Spring (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) Flash for the Web – Year 2 Spring (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) Shop Essentials – Year 1 Fall (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit)

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WELDING TECHNOLOGY
This program is focused on the skills and knowledge necessary to prepare a student for employment in industry as a welder. The courses in the program will provide required knowledge and learning experiences for the student to enter the work force with established basic skills in shop safety, shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding and gas tungsten arc welding.

RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY
The Renewable Energy Technology (RET) program is designed for students interested in careers in renewable energy technology. Focusing on the practices, skills, and knowledge necessary for employment in the numerous industries associated with the emerging field of renewable energy, RET provides learning experiences through the implementation of an engaged and applied curriculum delivery system that addresses the various processes and services which constitute the industry. Students will explore the RET industries and the integrated roles played by producers, managers, laborers, regulators, planners, and others in the field. Educational experiences will include a basic introduction to renewable energy technology as well as basic courses in safety instruction, basic electricity, technical thinking, and a basic mechanics course as well as more advanced courses like biomass and feedstock, biofuels and bioprocess practices, and process instrumentation. Accordingly, the curriculum and its interaction with professionals in the industry provide students with the knowledge, skills and experience to be successful in the rapidly expanding field.

Courses: Bench Work - Year 1 Fall (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credits) Introduction to Welding – Year 1 Fall (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) Intermediate Welding: SMAW – Year 1 Spring (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit) -

Prerequisites: Introduction to Welding or proof of introductory level experience and pass an Introductory welding skills test.
Introduction to Metallurgy – Year 1 Spring (3 College Credits, .5 High School Credit)

Courses Introduction to Renewable Energy Technology - Year 1 Fall (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) Biofuels – Year 1 Spring (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit)

Advanced Welding I: GMAW – Year 2 Fall (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) Industrial Safety– Year 2 Fall (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) Manufacturing Production Processes– Year 2 Spring (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit)

Prerequisites: Introduction to Welding.
Advanced Welding II: GTAW – Year 2 Spring (3 College Credits, 1 High School Credit) -

Prerequisites: Advanced Welding I: GMAW.

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Mid-South Community College
General Education Concurrent Credit Classes
The concurrent enrollment program provides enrichment and program acceleration opportunities to outstanding high school students who have demonstrated the ability to do satisfactory college level work while still enrolled at MHS. Courses in the 35-hour general education core transfer to all Arkansas public institutions and many other public and private institutions as well. Students should confirm transferability with the institutions of choice and verify the number of concurrent enrollment hours accepted by each.

TENTATIVE Schedule for General Education Concurrent Courses
High School/College Concurrent courses will be scheduled in a ―block‖ format. There will be two, two-hour ―blocks‖ offered. The tentative class rotation will be as follows: FALL: English Comp I, Intro to Sociology, English Comp II, College Algebra, Calculus I, Psychology, Oral Communications, World Civ I, Music Appreciation, US History Before 1877. SPRING: English Comp I, Intro to Sociology, English Comp II, College Alg, Calculus II, Psychology, Oral Communications, World Civ II, American Gov., Health and Safety, US History After 1877.

Course Tuition and Fees
In- County Tuition Assessment Fee: Technology Fee: $65 per semester hour $2 per semester hour $8 per semester hour

Goldsby Scholarship
This scholarship supports increased access to higher education by providing funds to support the enrollment of qualified high school students from Crittenden and surrounding Arkansas counties in MSCC courses, which will also be counted as credits toward high school graduation. The scholarship may be applied to two courses each fall and spring semester for qualified high school juniors and seniors. Students may choose from MSCC courses approved by their high school principal that will count toward high school graduation requirements. Equal access to the Goldsby High School Scholarship will be provided to all students without regard to financial ability. Recipients must reapply for the scholarship each semester.

Requirements
Students must maintain an overall high school GPA of 3.0. Students who have previously completed college courses must have a college GPA of 3.0 as well. Students must have qualifying minimum scores on accepted placement tests:

Application Process
1. Present ACT ( or equivalent SAT, ASSET or COMPASS) scores consistent with college-level placement in the subject area in which they wish to enroll. Students enrolling in English or mathematics or courses which have college English or math prerequisities must also have a high school GPA of 3.0 in the related subject area. Complete the Goldsby Scholarship Application, which must be signed by the student, his/her parent or legal guardian. Submit all documents to MHS counselors.

To take any English or Social Science class: ACT 19+ 19+ 19+ 19+ COMPASS 82+ 75+ 66+ 82+ ASSET 43+ 45+ 3. 52+ 43+ 2.

Reading English To take College Algebra Math Reading

English Composition I
12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS EN 1113 - English Composition I gives attention to critical reading and thinking skills applicable to all college courses. The course stresses writing as a process and uses the essay as the vehicle while stressing invention, drafting, revising, and rewriting. This course utilizes computers and requires keyboarding skills of 20 words per minute or better.

English Composition II
12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS PREREQUISITE: “C” OR BETTER IN EN 1113 EN 1123 – English Composition II continues to develop the student’s writing skills though practice in different kinds of rhetorical development while emphasizing quality and forms of writing. Students learn to research, document, and format papers using MLA or APA documentation. This course utilizes computers and requires keyboarding skills of 20 WPM or better.

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Oral Communication
11 , 12 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS EN 2303 – This course investigates the components of oral communication through study and practice in dyadic, small group, and speaker-audience situations.
TH TH

US History After 1877
11TH, 12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS SS 2133 – A continuation of SS 2123, this course begins after Reconstruction and ends with the present era. Major topics include industrial growth, the emergence of the US as a world power, the Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and international developments.

Introduction to Psychology
11TH, 12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS SS 1403 – Designed to introduce the basic concepts of psychology and applications of principles and theories as they relate to daily living and human behavior, this course includes biological, environmental, and hereditary influences on behavior; theories of personality, learning, and cognition; assessment of personality and intellectual ability; and causes of and treatments for psychological problems.

College Algebra
11TH, 12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS MA 1113 – This course includes methods of solving various types of equations and inequalities and graphing different kinds of functions as well as functional operations and mathematical modeling. Word problems are integrated within various topics.

Introduction to Sociology
11 , 12 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS SS 1303 – This introductory course provides an overview of the field of sociology and covers methods of sociological research, the organization of social life, social inequality, and social institution. Specific topics include culture, socialization, social interaction, social structure, groups and organizations. Attention is also given to social stratification by age, gender, and ethnicity and to the social institutions of family, religion, government, economy, health, and education.
TH TH

Calculus
11TH, 12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 5 SEMESTER HOURS, 5 CREDITS Prerequisite: MA 1144 Precalculus with a grade of “C” or better or MA 1113 College Algebra with a grade of “C” or better and successful completion of trigonometry in high school, or ACT math score of 24 or better. MA 2115 - Course content includes limits, derivatives, implicit differentiation, definite and indefinite integrals, substitution, and applications of the derivative and integral. This course uses a graphing software package and requires a fee.

World Civilization I
11TH, 12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS SS 1153 – With emphasis on development of world civilizations, this course stresses cultural developments, the growth of institutions, and the expansion of world civilization to 1000 C.E.

Music Appreciation
11TH, 12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS MU 1103 – Designed for the student who has little or no formal music training or experience, this course appeals to all students who are interested in acquiring an understanding and appreciation of the relationships between music and culture as well as of the development of society. Students learn to appreciate music through an introduction to the major composers and to analyze the relationships between music and culture.

World Civilization II
11TH, 12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS SS 1163 – With emphasis on development of world civilizations, this course stresses cultural developments, the growth of institutions, and the expansion of world civilization from 1000 C.E.

Introduction to Sociology
11TH, 12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS SOCI 1303 – This introductory course provides an overview of the field of sociology and covers methods of sociological research, the organization of social life, social inequality, and social institutions. Specific topics include culture, socialization, social interaction, social structure, groups and organizations. Attention is also given to social stratification by age, gender, and ethnicity and to the social institutions of family, religion, government, economy, health, and education.

US History Before 1877
11TH, 12TH 1 SEMESTER, ½ HS CREDIT 3 SEMESTER HOURS, 3 CREDITS SS 2123 – Major topics in this course include discovery and development of America, the Colonial settlement, the Revolutionary War, the new government, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. The course emphasizes ideals, attitudes, and values of Americans in development of politics, culture, society, and economics.

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Nationally Chartered Honor Societies
National Honor Society
FOCUS: The components of National Honor Society are character, leadership, scholarship and service. MEMBERSHIP: Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.3 or above at the end of their sophomore year are invited to join National Honor Society. To maintain membership, students must pay dues, be in regular attendance at monthly meetings and maintain a 3.3 GPA or higher. ACTIVITIES: NHS is involved in frequent service projects, such as sending eye glasses to 3rd world countries, collecting and donating books, collecting Yoplait pink foil lids, and sponsoring a family at Easter with a food basket and goodies for the children. SPONSORS: JANE CLOUD AND KAREN BREWER DUES: $5.00

Société Honoraire de Français / French Honor Society
MEMBERSHIP: Prerequisite: 4 semesters of ―A‖ in French; a ―B‖ average in all other subjects. No ―U’s‖ in conduct. Seniors may have 3 semesters of ―A‖ and 1 semester of ―B‖ in French, with a ―B‖ average in all other subjects. INITIATION: Second semester ACTIVITIES SHF members participate in Homecoming Activities, collect cans for the 8 th Street Mission and other altruistic activities. Opportunities for teaching French materials in lower grades for short periods are also available. RECOGNITION: Graduating senior members wear a blue/white/red honor cord and receive a special insignia on their diplomas. SPONSOR: AMANDA RICH DUES: UNDERCLASSMEN: $5.00; SENIORS: $10.00

Sociedad Honoraria Hispánica / Spanish Honor Society
MEMBERSHIP: 2 A’s and 1 B or better in 3 semesters of Spanish, no Spanish semester grade lower than a B and an over-all GPA of 3.0 or better. INDUCTION: SHH is an academic honor organization. Inductions are held in the spring. All inductees receive a certificate when they are inducted. RECOGNITION: Students Graduating senior members wear a red and gold honor cord at graduation and receive a special insignia on their diplomas. Although the two groups are separate and students do not have to belong to Spanish Club to be inducted into SHH, SHH members are often invited to participate in activities along with the Spanish Club throughout the year. Field trips are taken whenever there are events that are of special interest to the members. SPONSOR: JANENE BROWN DUES: $15.00

Mu Alpha Theta
FOCUS: Mu Alpha Theta is an honorary math club for high school and junior college students. The purpose of the club is to promote enjoyment, scholarship and understanding of mathematics, while giving students community service opportunities. MEMBERSHIP: Students must have a cummulative gpa of 3.0 or higher, must have completed Adv. Alg. II, and must have a B minimum in all mathematics courses. RECOGNITION: To be eligible to wear the gold honor cord, diploma seal, and a scholarship upon graduation if they have met chapter requirements. ACTIVITIES: Mu Alpha Theta participates in altruistic activities throughout the year. Students also participate in fundraisers to provide scholarships for senior members. SPONSORS: SEAN GRAY AND JEANNETTE SKIPPER DUES: $20 INITIALLY, $10 THEREAFTER

NOTE: Course offerings are subject to change.

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Student Organizations
Ultimate Frisbee Club (UFC)
Focus: To spread the word about the game of Ultimate Frisbee and to involve MHS students in a fun physical activity. MEMBERSHIP: Open to Marion High School students only Activities: SPONSOR: Spring Ultimate Frisbee tournament SEAN GRAY DUES: $5 FOR MEMBERSHIP; $10 FOR CLUB T-SHIRT

SkillsUSA
FOCUS: SkillsUSA is a partnership of students, teachers, and industry working together to ensure America has a skilled work force. SkillsUSA helps each student excel. SkillsUSA is a national nonprofit organization serving teachers and high school and college students who are preparing for careers in trade, technical and skilled service occupations, including health occupations. It was formerly known as VICA (Vocational Industrial Clubs of America). MISSION: SkillsUSA’s mission is to help its members become world-class workers and leaders, and responsible American citizens. ACTIVITIES: The SkillsUSA Championships showcase the best career and technical students in the nation. Contests begin locally and continue through the state and national levels. The philosophy of the Championships is to reward students for excellence, to involve industry in directly evaluating student performance and to keep training relevant to employers’ needs. MEMBERSHIP: SkillsUSA membership is open to all students currently enrolled in Construction Technology courses at MHS. SPONSOR: PATRICK DAVIS DUES: $15 LOCAL, STATE, AND NATIONAL LEVELS

Family, Careers, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
FOCUS: FCCLA is a national student organization with its central focus on the family. MEMBERSHIP: FCCLA membership is open to all students who are presently enrolled or have been previously enrolled in any of the Family and Consumer Science courses. Mission: The FCCLA mission is to promote personal growth and leadership development through Family and Consumer Sciences education. Focusing on the multiple roles of family member, wage earner and community leader, members develop skills for life through character development; creative and critical thinking; interpersonal communications; practical knowledge; and career preparation. SPONSORS: BARBARA FAGGETT AND TOYA WHITE DUES: $12.00 AFFILIATES THE STUDENT AT LOCAL, STATE, NATIONAL LEVELS

Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA)
FOCUS: Health Occupations Students of America (H.O.S.A.) is a national student organization that provides a unique program of leadership development, motivation and recognition exclusively for secondary, post-secondary, collegiate and adult students enrolled in health occupations education courses or instructional programs. MEMBERSHIP H.O.S.A. membership is open to all MHS students currently enrolled in MedPro Ed. These students are also eligible for membership in state and national HOSA MISSION The mission of H.O.S.A. is to enhance the delivery of compassionate, quality health care by providing opportunities for knowledge, skill and leadership development of all health occupations education students, therefore helping the students to meet the needs of the health care industry. SPONSOR: JANA BLACKFORD DUES: $20: AFFILIATES THE STUDENT LOCAL, STATE AND NATIONAL LEVELS.

Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA)
FOCUS: Future Business Leaders of America-Phi Beta Lambda (FBLA-PBL) is a nonprofit educational association of students preparing for careers in business and business-related fields. MEMBERSHIP: The MHS chapter is open to all students who have taken or are taking a class in the Business Department. ACTIVITIES: Major projects include Fall Leadership Conference, the annual Christmas can food drive, Spring competition and State competitions. FBLA also provides several scholarships for Senior members. Annual dues are required and vary from year to year depending on the national organization’s dues requirements. SPONSOR: CAROLYN REYNOLDS, RUTH HEGWOOD DUES: $12.00 LOCAL, STATE AND NATIONAL LEVELS.

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Student Organizations
Teachers of Tomorrow (TOT)
FOCUS: Teachers of Tomorrow is a nationally recognized organization that is a branch of Phi Delta Kappa International’s Future Educators of America. The local chapter of TOT was organized in the fall of 2002 to provide MHS students with opportunities to explore teaching as a career and to help students gain a realistic understanding of the nature of education and the role of the teacher. The organization coordinates information about teaching as a profession, employment opportunities, financial assistance options, and educational issues such as professional mobility, diversity, job security, and other matters. MEMBERSHIP: Membership is open to any MHS student interested in the field of education as a career choice. ACTIVITIES: Members volunteer in classrooms as teachers’ aids and tutors, they participate in MHS campus activities, and they act as a support group for the MHS faculty and staff. Members also have opportunities to shadow teachers and to visit college campuses to learn about educational programs and licensure. SPONSORS: SHANNON GINN AND JESSICA CREEKMORE DUES: MINIMAL DUES WILL BE ASSESSED TO SUPPORT CLUB ACTIVITIES

Minority Student Association
FOCUS: Expanding cultural awareness at MHS MEMBERSHIP: Open to all students ACTIVITIES: Students develop and participate in a wide variety of service projects and takes an active part in homecoming activities. MSA sponsors Cultural Awareness events at MHS. MOTTO: Diversity among Cultures SPONSORS: GREG HODGES DUES: $5.00

Student Council (StuCo)
FOCUS: Student Council is designed to provide a democratic form in which students can address those school-related issues which affect their lives, maintain a communication channel between students and administrators, offer a program of social functions and community involvement projects, and train students in the duties and responsibilities of good citizenship, using the school environment as the primary training ground. MEMBERSHIP: Student Council is a nationally recognized organization which is made up of 7 officers as well as 5 representatives from each grade. In order to become an officer or representative, a student must be elected to office by his/her peers. He/she must also maintain above average grades and an excellent behavior record as well as receive teacher recommendations to run for an elected position. ACTIVITIES: Students elected to StuCo participate in bi-monthly meetings and sponsor such events as sophomore orientation, football homecoming, club drives, Christmas events and community service projects, as well as various other activities to promote school spirit and pride. StuCo officers also attend summer leadership training activities as well as state conventions in conjunction with the Arkansas Association of Student Councils. SPONSOR: RENEE RAINEY AND TOYA WHITE

Interact
FOCUS: Interact is an international community service organization affiliated with Rotary International that is sponsored jointly by Marion High School and the Marion Rotary Club. The emphasis is on community service and leadership. MEMBERSHIP: To be accepted into membership, students must apply at either the spring or the fall membership drive. Membership is based on a point system that takes into account grade-point average, teacher recommendations, and executive board recommendations. ACTIVITIES: Students who participate in Interact do a variety of activities including monthly meetings, fundraising activities, and community service activities. Interact members may participate in such events as volunteering at the local nursing home, tutoring, Relay for Life, St. Jude's fundraisers, clean up projects, and other similar projects. SPONSOR: COURTNEY RAWLS AND PATRICIA REBICK

Marion High School 2011-2012 CAP Booklet

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Student Organizations
Chess Club
FOCUS: TEACH STUDENTS FOCUS AND HIGHER LEVEL THINKING STRATEGIES. CHESS CAN BE A LIFELONG ACTIVITY AND CAN BUILD RELATIONSHIPS. MEMBERSHIP: Open to any MHS student who wants to learn or who already enjoys playing chess. ACTIVITIES: Students participate by practicing the game and by playing in tournaments. Some are for members only, while others are open to the student body and faculty. SPONSOR: KENNETH GILLESPIE AND BRIAN WEBB DUES: $5.00

French Club
MEMBERSHIP: Any student who is presently taking or who has taken any level of French is eligible for membership. ACTIVITIES: French Club members participate in Homecoming Activities; the can drive for the 8th Street Mission. Students may also compete in several foreign language competitions. SPONSOR: AMANDA RICH DUES: $ 10.00

Spanish Club
FOCUS: The purpose of Spanish Club is for students with a common interest in the Spanish language and culture to get together and explore their interest. MEMBERSHIP: The student must be currently enrolled in Spanish or have completed three years of Spanish. ACTIVITIES: Club members are eligible for field trips to see plays, concerts and dance performances, to attend foreign language festivals, as well as meals at authentic restaurants and other activities to explore the Hispanic culture. Spanish Club participates in school-based activities such as Homecoming, the FBLA canned food drive and more. SPONSOR: JANENE BROWN AND JESSICA CREEKMORE

El Curculo de Espanol Avanzado
FOCUS: Continued development of foreign language skills for upper level Spanish students MEMBERSHIP: Students who are currently enrolled in or have completed Spanish III ACTIVITIES: Monthly meetings at various Mexican restaurants, during which only Spanish may be spoken. Members participate in canned food drives and other charitable activities. SPONSOR: Janene Brown DUES: NONE REQUIRED

Art Club
MEMBERSHIP: Membership is open to any current or former art student ACTIVITIES: Students donate their time and talent to area pre schools, nursing homes and needy families. A calendar is produced annually as a fund raiser and to showcase student art work. In addition, the art club sponsors and exhibits artwork in the annual MHS Art Show. Students prepare portfolio’s for college interviews and participate in Homecoming Activities. SPONSOR: MIRANDA RIPPARD DUES: $5.00

Disciples Club
MEMBERSHIP: Disciples Bible Study is a student-initiated organization open to every MHS student. ACTIVITIES: Students lead Bible study, prayer, and worship times after school and welcome everyone to attend any meeting. Disciples sponsor See You At the Pole, a nationwide emphasis on prayer for schools every September and are an active club on campus. SPONSOR: SHANNON GINN DUES: NONE REQUIRED

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Marion High School 2011-2012

801 Carter Drive, Marion, Arkansas 72364 Phone: (870) 739-5140 FAX: (870) 739-5142

School Profile 2010-2011
Administration Elmer West, Principal Natalie Rooney, Asst. Principal Melvin Brown, Dean of Students Guidance Debbie Jackson, Counselor Catherine White, Counselor Staff Certified ................................... 51 Doctorate ................................... 1 Ed. S ......................................... 2 M. Ed. ..................................... 18
Bachelor’s ..................................... 30 Support ......................................... 17

School 712 Students 50% Caucasian 47% African American 3% Asian and other

Grades: 8,9 178 Instructional Days 50 minute periods 7 period day 6A East Athletic Conference Mascot: Patriot Colors: Red, White, Blue Marion Junior High School serves students in the 8 th and 9th grades. It is located on Carter Drive across from Marion High School.

Accreditation Arkansas Department of Education North Central Association of Secondary Schools

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MJHS General Information
Placement in Advanced Classes
So that both parents and students will have a clear understanding of the caliber of work required in all advanced classes, a meeting will be held during the first week of school for parents whose children are registered in these classes. It is STRONGLY recommended that only students who meet 3 of the following 4 criteria be registered in Advanced or Pre-AP classes. Parent recommendation Teacher recommendation Standardized test score of 80% or higher in subject area that request is made A or B in requested subject area Ninth graders who have successfully completed eighthgrade Pre-Algebra will be placed in Algebra I. Those who show math deficiencies will be placed in Integrated Algebra (which is a year-long two-hour course of Algebra I ). Ninth graders who have successfully completed Algebra I will be placed in Geometry. Students in ninth grade may attend summer school at MHS if there is room. Priority is given to upper class students. Students can take a total of 2 semesters per summer for a total of one credit. Fees will be charged. Parents will be notified if their child needs to attend

Attendance
All students under the age of 18 must be enrolled in school and be in regular attendance. Any student who does not comply with the district attendance policy (see Student Handbook) must be reported to the appropriate parties. A minimum number of periods of required instruction in which the student must attend school has been established by the school district.

Grading System
Grading Points are computed as follows:* A = 4 points B = 3 points C = 2 points D = 1 point F = 0 points *pluses and minuses will not be considered in computing grade points. The grading scale is as follows: 90 – 100 = A 80 – 89 = B 70 – 79 = C 60 – 69 = D 59 and below = F

8th Grade Sample Schedule
English World History Math Science Keyboarding/Computer Applications I, P.E./Career Orientation Open Elective (Band, Athletics, Choir, Study Hall, or AIP)

Graduation Requirements:
English ............................................................. 4 Social Studies ................................................... 3 Mathematics .................................................... 4 Science ............................................................. 3 Health ........................................................... 1/2 Phys. Ed. ....................................................... 1/2 Fine Arts ....................................................... 1/2 Oral Comm. ................................................ 1/2 Electives/Career Major ................................ 8

9 Grade Sample Schedule
English Math Science Civics and Economics P.E./Health Open Elective (Spanish, Art, Family Consumer Science; Nutrition and Wellness, Food and Nutrition, Clothing and Textiles, Computer Applications II and III, Drivers Ed., Athletics, Band, Choir) Open Elective

th

Summer School
Marion Junior High offers summer school for students who had academic difficulty in Math during the school year. The 4th nine weeks portion of Math is available. This is the only course offered at MJHS during the summer. This course is of no cost to the students and parents will be notified if their child needs to attend.

Website Address for Marion School District:

www.msd3.org

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Marion High School 2011-2012

Calculating GPA
All courses are included in computing the GPA and class rank, except those classes listed as non-credit.

Honor Graduate Requirements
To earn the distinction of Honor Graduate at Marion High School, a student must have achieved a 3.5 GPA and successfully completed the following course work: 3 of 4 English – Must be Pre-AP, AP English Literature or AP English Language 2 of 4 Mathematics – Must be either Advanced Algebra II, Trigonometry, Calculus, or AP Statistics 2 of 3 Sciences – Must be AP Chemistry , AP Environmental Science, or Physics, 2 of 3 Social Studies – Must be AP American History and Advanced World History 2 Foreign Language – Must be the same foreign language 1/2 credit each – PE, Health, Oral Communication, Fine Arts 6 credits— Student selected electives

Clubs & Organizations
The Christian Club, National Junior Honor Society, Peer Helpers, TONE, Quiz Bowl, and FCCLA are clubs available to students at MJHS. Some of clubs require certain criteria to be met before becoming a member.

Concurrent Enrollment
The Marion School District allows concurrent enrollment with Mid-South Community College. Students must obtain a letter of recommendation from their principal, have at least a 19 in reading and math or reading and English on the ACT (or an equivalent college-ready score on the SAT or ASSET – the ASSET is given at MSCC), and maintain a 3.5 GPA for concurrent enrollment at Mid-South Community College. Expenses incurred could include transportation, books, and tuition. Students must complete and pass course(s) to obtain college credit. College credit in this program is accepted at post-secondary institutions in Arkansas. Students who plan to attend a university outside the state are encouraged to check with their prospective university’s registrar to determine if they will accept the credits. Contact MSCC for more information.

Interest Inventory/Aptitude Testing
Eighth grade students will be required to take an Interest Inventory/Aptitude test during the school year. Once completed this test will be placed in a student’s CAP folder and will be reviewed on CAP days with the student by their CAP advisor.

Definitions
Credit - earned for passing with a D or better, a class which meets for two semesters. Semester - a school term of approximately 90 days, beginning at the start of the school year or ending at the conclusion of the school year.

Non-Traditional Courses
With prior approval from the principal, students may enroll in correspondence courses, summer school, and independent study courses for remediation or enrichment.

For Advanced Classes Grading
Grades received in Advanced classes are on the same grade point scale as other classes at the junior high: A = 4 points B = 3 points C = 2 points D = 1 point F = 0 points

Schedule Changes
Students will have a limited opportunity to make adjustments in their schedules at the beginning of each semester. Students and parents need to be aware that the choices made on the pre-registration form and at CAP conferences are binding because scheduling is based on these pre-registration choices.

Edline
MJHS has added Edline, a program used to keep parents involved in their child’s educational process and informed of the latest activities going on in the Junior High School. Parents need to request Edline directions and account set-up information from the guidance office and then log-on to www.edline.net to see teachers calendars, school news, and their child’s grades.

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Marion Junior High Course Offerings
Language Arts
8
th

Math
1 year 8
th

8th Grade English

8th Grade Pre-Algebra
1 year

Most students in eighth grade will enroll in regular eighth-grade English. This course will place strong emphasis on reading and writing as well as on the 8th grade Benchmark literacy test.

All eighth grade students are enrolled in Pre-Algebra unless they have applied to and meet qualifications for Algebra I.

8th

8 Grade Pre-AP English
1 year

th

8th, 9th

8th and 9th Grade Algebra I
1 year: 1 credit

Strongly Recommended: grade of A or B in subject, teacher recommendation, parent recommendation, and standardized test score of 80% or higher. Students in the 8th grade have an opportunity to take PreAdvanced Placement English by meeting established prerequisites. A summer assignment is given.

9th

9th Grade English
1 year: 1 credit

The 9th grade curriculum is designed to prepare the student for high school. Units on grammar and literature will include an emphasis on the writing process. If a student does not pass either semester with a 60% or above, he/she will be required to repeat the course.

8th Grade Strongly Recommended: Teacher recommendation, parent recommendation, A or B in seventh grade PreAlgebra, or 80% or higher on the standardized test score in Math. Algebra I is the traditional Algebra program that is completed in 1 year. It is highly recommended that the above criteria be met. Students must have an average of C or better in 7 th grade Pre-algebra to be placed in this program. The grade earned in Algebra I will be recorded on the student’s high school transcript and the student will earn a high school credit if the course is passed. Occasionally, ninth grade students will need to be placed in an appropriate module of Algebra according to their success of previously taught material.

9

th

9th Grade Integrated Algebra A
1 semester: 1 credit

9th

9 Pre-AP English
year: 1 credit

th

Strongly Recommended: grade of A or B in subject, teacher recommendation, parent recommendation, and standardized test score of 80% or higher. Pre-Advanced Placement English 9 is very demanding and students are expected to devote more time and energy to assignments given in this class. In order to be placed in the course, students and their parents must sign a contract and agree to the workload and commitment of the class. The focus of the course is literature and writing; therefore a firm grasp of grammar and composition is expected of the student. A summer assignment is given.

Integrated Algebra A is the first half of the Algebra I program spread over two periods during one semester instead of one period over two semesters. This course is based on content traditionally taught in the first half of Algebra I. Integrated Algebra A consists of one two-hour module the first nine weeks and one two-hour module the second nine weeks. Mastery of the material is required in each module before proceeding to the next one. Students will be placed in an appropriate module according to their success of previously taught material.

9

th

9th Grade Integrated Algebra B
1 semester: 1 credit

9th

Spanish I
1 year: 1 credit

Spanish I introduces the sound system, basic syntax, basic vocabulary, and elementary inflectional endings of general American Spanish. These elements are used in speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Hispanic cultural heritage is emphasized with special attention given to Hispanic influences in the United States.

Integrated Algebra B is the second half of the Algebra I program spread over two periods during one semester instead of one period over two semesters. This course is based on content traditionally taught in the second half of Algebra I. Integrated Algebra B consists of one two-hour module the third nine weeks and one two-hour module the fourth nine weeks. Mastery of the material is required in each module before proceeding to the next one. Students who successfully complete these two courses (A and B) will earn a total of two math credits for the year.

9th

9th Grade Geometry
1 year: 1 credit

Geometry is for the students who have passed Algebra I.

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Marion High School 2011-2012

Social Studies
8th

8th Grade World History
1 year

Students study basic economic principles and the impact of various economic systems on these principles. Higher order thinking is required of students as they analyze the relationship between scarce productive resources and human needs with emphasis on the American economic system.

Students in eighth grade World History will begin their study with the Middle Ages and continue through the study of World History up to and including World War II.

Science
8
th

8th

8th Grade Advanced World History
1 year

8th Grade Science
1 year

Strongly Recommended: Teacher recommendation, parent recommendation, 80% or above on standardized test scores, and A or B in subject that request is made.

This course encompasses a survey of World History from the Middle Ages to World War II. In addition to exposing students to content, Advanced World History will also train students to analyze and interpret primary and secondary source material, evaluate historical documents, interpret charts, graphs, tables, maps, cartoons, summarize text material, take accurate lecture notes, develop a working vocabulary, and show their ability to write an analytical essay. Advanced World History will require more time and work on the part of the student. Students taking this course must meet the required prerequisites.

Eighth grade science is the study of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. Students will explore science topics using a variety of hands-on activities as well as traditional methods that progress logically from the concrete to the abstract. All eighth grade students are enrolled in Science unless they have applied to and met qualifications for Advanced Science.

8th

8th Grade Advanced Science
1 year

Strongly Recommended: Teacher recommendation, parent recommendation, 80% or above on standardized test scores, and A or B in subject that request is made.

9th

9 Grade Civics
1 semester; 1/2 credit

th

Students taking this course must meet the above prerequisites. Labs and projects are a major part of this course.

Students will study the foundations and processes of American government. This study will provide the students with the necessary skills to understand and participate in a democratic society. Students must take/pass this particular course as a requirement for graduation.

9

th

9th Grade Physical Science
1 year: 1 credit

Economics
9th 1 semester, ½ credit Students in Economics study basic economic principles and the way various economic systems act upon these principles. Instruction focuses on the relationship between scarce productive resources and human needs with emphasis on the American economic system, especially in regard to decision making, labor, money, the market system, government, and business. 9th

Physical Science is an introduction to Chemistry and Physics. In this course students will explore science topics using a variety of hands-on activities and traditional methods that progress logically from the concrete to the abstract.

9th

9th Grade Advanced Physical Science
1 year: 1 credit

Strongly Recommended: Teacher recommendation, parent recommendation, A or B in seventh grade Earth Science, or 80% or higher on the S.A.T 9 in Science.

9th Grade Advanced Civics
1 semester: 1/2 credit

Advanced Physical Science is an intensive introduction of the concepts of physics and chemistry that will prepare students for success in Advanced Placement classes in High School. Placement is by three of the following; teacher recommendation, parent recommendation, grades, and test scores.

Strongly Recommended: Teacher recommendation, parent recommendation, 80% or above on standardized test scores, and A or B in subject that request is made.

Business Education
8th

This course encompasses a survey of American Government, including an in-depth study of the United States Constitution. In addition to exposing students to content, Advanced Civics will also train students to analyze and interpret primary and secondary source material, interpret charts, graphs, tables, political cartoons, summarize text material, take accurate lecture notes, develop a working vocabulary, and show their ability to write an analytical essay. Advanced Civics will require more time and work on the part of the students. Students taking this course must meet the required prerequisites.

Keyboarding
1 semester

9th Grade Advanced Economics
9th 1 semester: 1/2 credit
Strongly Recommended: Teacher recommendation, parent recommendation, 80% or above on standardized test scores, and A or B in subject that request is made.

Keyboarding is a one-semester course designed to help students develop speed and accuracy by learning the touch operation of alphanumeric/keyboard characters. Emphasis is placed on the following: mastery of the keyboard with desirable keyboarding techniques; development of speed and accuracy; basic problem-solving applications of centering and arranging reports, letters, and tables; proofreading formatting; and proper care of the equipment. Keyboarding is the foundation for developing entry-level skills for business (and other) careers.

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8th 9th

Computer Applications I
1 semester 1 semester: 1/2 credit

Driver's Education
9th grade

Driver's Education
1semester: 1/2 local credit

Prerequisite:

Keyboarding

Computer Applications I is a semester course designed to provide students with the fundamental computer skills necessary to do well in high school and in virtually all jobs today. In the area of word processing, students will learn the fundamental skills necessary to create and edit the most widely used documents and use the most commonly used features of a word processor, such as bullets, numbered lists, special characters, borders and shading, fonts, and paragraph and line searching. The fundamentals in use of scanners, graphics and WordArt are applied to documents. Internet searching skills and citing Internet sources are stressed with these applied to a simple PowerPoint presentation. In the area of spreadsheets, students will be expected to create and edit simple spreadsheets using basic formulas and functions, and create a simple graph or chart.

Prerequisites: 2.0 from previous grading period and permit
This semester course is designed to prepare students to drive safely and learn rules of the road.

Family & Consumer Sciences
9th

Family and Consumer Science
1 year: 1 credit

9 -12

th

th

Computer Applications II
1 semester: 1/2 credit

Prerequisite:

Keyboarding and CA I

Computer Applications II is a half-unit course designed to provide students with the intermediate computer skills necessary to do well in high school and in virtually all jobs today. Students will learn techniques that will allow them to create fairly complex word processing and spreadsheet documents. The will continue their Internet research, applying it to spreadsheets, charts and graphs, and web pages. In addition, students will continue to develop their PowerPoint skills.

Family and Consumer Science is a course that teaches the basics of essential life skills. Topics such as child development, housing and interiors, clothing, food preparation, nutrition, health and wellness, decision -making, relationships, and exploring careers are taught during the year. The students participate in hands on activities related to foods and clothing.

9th

Nutrition and Wellness
1 semester: 1/2 credit

9th-12th

Computer Applications III
1 semester: 1/2 credit

Prerequisite:

Keyboarding, CA I, and CA II

Computer Applications III is a half-unit course designed to provide students with the computer skills necessary to do well in college and needed in most jobs today. Students will learn techniques that will allow them to create simple to intermediate desktop publishing documents; create, access and edit databases; use email efficiently and ethically; create advanced electronic presentations; and create web pages using web-page design software. They will continue their Internet research, applying it to advanced electronic presentations and the web pages they create.

This semester course focuses on food, sports, nutrition, and exercise for lifelong fitness and wellbeing of individuals and families. This course teaches responsible eating and exercise habits to help students make wise decisions about a healthy lifestyle. This course is a prerequisite for Strength, Conditioning and Fitness.

9th

Foods and Nutrition
1 semester: 1/2 credit

Career Orientation
Required Courses Career Orientation
1 semester

Experiences in the Food and Nutrition course focus on the development of skills needed to select, prepare, and serve food which meets nutritional needs of individuals and families. Emphasis in this course is given to the development of competencies related to nutrition, weight control, the food consumer, the effect of technology on food and nutrition, kitchen organization and equipment, safety and sanitation, menu planning, serving and eating food, food preparation, eating away from home, and jobs and career opportunities in the field of food and nutrition. 9th

Clothing Management
1 semester: 1/2 credit

8th

This is a hands-on, activity-based, career exploration course that provides students the opportunity to explore the world of work in relation to their own interests and abilities. Students are provided the opportunity to develop successful employability skills such as decision making, job application, interviewing, and on-the-job relations. Business leaders, community leaders, and parents are encouraged to participate as guest speakers by sharing their experiences and expertise in the work force. Career Orientation is the mainstay for the Career Action Plan developed for students as they enter their high school years.

Experiences in the Clothing Management course are designed to assist students in management of individual and family wardrobes, for decision making as a clothing consumer, and for understanding the role of the clothing and textile industry in the economy. Emphasis is given to clothing selection, clothing needs of family members; wardrobe planning, clothing care, characteristics of natural and synthetic fibers, types of fabrics and fabric finishes, laws and regulations relate to the clothing and textiles industry, use and care of basic sewing supplies and equipment, fabric selection, clothing construction techniques, jobs and careers in clothing and textiles, computer use in clothing and textile, and effects of technology on the clothing and textiles industry.

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Marion High School 2011-2012

Fine Arts
8
th

Electives Band
1 year 1 year: 1 credit

9th

Health
1 semester: 1/2 credit

9th

Prerequisites: 6th & 7th grade band
Band is primarily a comprehensive course of study in instrumental music geared toward the 2nd and 3rd year player. Instruments played include the flute, oboe, bassoon, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, French horn, trombone, baritone, tuba, and percussion. The band participates in some concerts in the area plus school and community events. Group ensemble skills and individual improvement are emphasized. Ninth grade students receive one credit for this course.

Health is a course which offers information for healthy living. The curriculum includes wellness, mental health, stress management and suicide prevention, physiology of exercise, information on diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, training in CPR, family life education, and information on the effects of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs on the body. This course is a requirement and students earn 1/2 credit for passing.

Electives
8th, 9th

8th 9
th

Chorus
1 year 1 year: 1 credit

Athletics Boys/Girls
1 year

Prerequisites: Try-outs
Chorus participates in regional festivals annually. Choir is available for 8th and 9th grade students. Try-outs are held for choir. Ninth grade students receive one credit for this course.

Prerequisites: Try-outs, physical exam, under the age of 16, must maintain a 2.0 GPA, and pass 3 of the 4 core subjects.
Athletics is a course where students will compete on an interschool basis. The following sports are offered at Marion Junior High: baseball, tennis, golf, football, basketball, track, volleyball, and softball. Students must undergo physicals yearly. Students must also be willing to spend extra time after school on a daily basis to practice. Some practices will also be scheduled when school is not in session. Football practice begins in the summer months before the start of school. Students must participate in these sports or activities related to these sports the ENTIRE semester in order to receive the Athletics credit. If the sport is only done part-time after school or for part of a semester then P.E. will have to be taken to satisfy their Physical Education requirement. Students will earn 1/2 credit for each FULL semester of Athletics taken during the 9th grade only. This credit will substitute for the P.E. requirement. Do NOT take both Athletics and P.E. for credit. Only 1/2 credit can count toward the state-required number of credits (22).

9th

Art I
1 year: 1 credit

This course is intended to allow interested students an opportunity to further develop their skills and understanding in art. Students will learn about composition and expression in art as they experience a variety of new genres.

Physical Education
8th 9
th

Required Course Physical Education
1 semester 1 semester: 1/2 credit

Physical education is designed to allow students to participate in team building activities and learn the importance of physical fitness. Activities include: softball, soccer, basketball, flag- football, volleyball, tumbling, and badminton. Appropriate clothing is required. Ninth grade students earn 1/2 credit for passing this course.

NOTE: Course offerings are subject to change.

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MJHS Extracurricular Activities
THE CHRISTIAN CLUB
FOCUS: This club is for students who desire to express their Christian faith at school. We share a short non-denominational devotion and prayer one day a week. MEMBERSHIP: All students are welcome. ACTIVITIES: "See You At the Pole" and weekly devotional times. MEETINGS: Wednesday mornings @ 7:40 A.M. SPONSOR: Dawn Smith DUES: none

NATIONAL JUNIOR HONOR SOCIETY
FOCUS: The purpose of NJHS is to create an enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate a desire to render service, to promote leadership and citizenship, and to develop the character of students at Marion Junior High School. MEMBERSHIP: In order to be considered as a member, students must have a GPA of 3.00 as a semester average with no grade below a "B". Students must not have a conduct grade below "S". Additionally, a student must be enrolled in at least one Honors-level or Pre-advanced placement course. ACTIVITIES: supply and run the bookstore, produce the school newspaper, various community and school outreach projects. MEETINGS: twice a month SPONSOR: Sandy Cook DUES: $5

PEER TUTORS
FOCUS: This service is designed for students who want to provide academic help to other students. Peer tutors assist other students with math, science, English, and history assignments. Tutors can help students organize material and provide study tips or be a "study-buddy". MEMBERSHIP: Any student who has "A" and "B" grades and satisfactory conduct can apply to become a tutor. These grades and conduct must be maintained throughout the school year. ACTIVITIES: Provide daily tutoring for 8th and 9th grade students during the 25-minute homeroom period. MEETINGS: announced throughout the year SPONSOR: Debbie Jackson DUES: None

THE QUIZ BOWL
FOCUS: Students use quickness and knowledge of trivia facts from all content areas to participate in academic challenges with other schools. MEMBERSHIP: Students are chosen in a 2-round process. (a) Students take a 100 question written test that spans 10 content and knowledge areas. (b) The students who do best on the written test are called back to participate in a scrimmage match using buzzers and actual questions. ACTIVITIES: weekly practice, matches with area schools, regional and state tournaments held in February and March. MEETINGS: weekly SPONSOR: Joan Daniel DUES: none

The T.O.N.E. Club
FOCUS: Teens of Northeast Arkansas is a club that focuses on teenagers having a positive influence on their peers. Members should be school leaders who advocate for a drug/alcohol/tobacco-free school and community. MEMBERSHIP: Any student who signs a pledge to be drug/alcohol/tobacco-free is eligible to join. Members must get a teacher recommendation and not have any negative comments from the MJHS staff. ACTIVITIES: RED RIBBON WEEK is a mandatory activity that we plan and implement. Additionally, club members will choose from a variety of other activities such as: Junior High Heroes, Fatal Vision Goggles, Operation Prom Night, candy grams, a "ghost out,‖ door decorating contest, TCK or teens coaching kids, mentoring program, etc. MEETINGS: during homeroom on the first Tuesday of each month SPONSOR: Catherine White DUES: $10

Family, Careers, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
FOCUS: FCCLA is a national non-profit student organization that helps young men and women become strong leaders in families, careers, and communities through Family and Consumer Science Education. These young people organize in local chapters to develop and lead projects that address important personal, family, career, and societal issues. MEMBERSHIP: All students who are presently enrolled or have been enrolled in a Family and Consumer Science course are eligible to participate in FCCLA. ACTIVITIES: Field trip to the Mid-South Fair, STAR Events, and Power of One. Projects are determined by the club members. MEETINGS: announced throughout the year. SPONSORS: Judy Jones DUES: none

Marion High School Four Year Plan
Name:____________________________________________ Career Interest:____________________________________

Plan Your Schedule for the Next Four Years
Grade/Subject English Mathematics Social Studies Science PE/Health Foreign Language Fine Arts/Oral Elective Elective Elective Elective Total Credits

9

10

11

12

The school day at MHS is 7 periods
Five years after I graduate from Marion High School, I plan to be…

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