G LD NUGGETS is a blog for and by GPOC members.

Gold Nuggets is an informational
hub for members to keep up-to-date with GPOC news and events. We encourage you to email
your news items and information to the webmaster at www.gpoc.com.
Join GPOC on FACEBOOK! You need your own Facebook account.
Access GPOC on FACEBOOK through a link on the GPOC website. 2011
october
q
u
i
l
l
THE
PROSPECTOR’S
official publication of The Gold Prospectors of Colorado volume 38 no.10
PO Box 1593, Colorado Springs, Colorado 80901
inside
Over The River, continued! 2
Contacts! 2
October Calendar! 3
Membership Meeting Minutes! 4
GeoCommunicator! 4
Metal Detecting Tips! 5
Selecting a Metal Detector! 6
Where is it legal to metal detect?! 7
Where is it legal to metal detect?,
continued! 8
BLM NW Co Releases! 8
Prospecting The Internet! 9
clicking on blue highlighted web
sites will give you a direct link
www.gpoc.com
Over The River Final Environmental
Impact Statement for Public Review
The following information does pertain
to GPOC members, as part of this
project will be on the GPOCʼs claims
on the Arkansas River.
Cañon City, Colo. – Today the Bureau
of Land Management (BLM) Royal
Gorge Field Office released the Over
The River (OTR) Final Environmental
Impact Statement (FEIS).
The preferred alternative identifies
eight panel segments totaling 5.9 miles
within a 42-mile stretch of the Arkansas
River corridor between Canon City and
Salida. The OTR Corp has projected a
cost $50 million to build. The FEIS
projects that OTR will generate $121
million in economic output and draw
400,000 visitors during construction
and display. Construction is anticipated
to begin in 2012, culminating in a two-
week display in August 2014.
A Record of Decision approving or
rejecting the OTR application will be
prepared by the BLM based on the
FEIS, with a final decision anticipated
for fall of 2011.
continued on page 2
Although a large rambling, log and wood frame building on the approximately 8½-acre site dates from
earlier ranching operations, the property primarily reflects its association with the mining activities occurring
there from 1906 to 1923.  The circa 1916 log cabins were constructed to house workers hired in
conjunction with the operation of the Derry Dredge.  This large "mountain boat" was assembled at the site in
1915 to operate along Corske Creek.  In Circa 1923, it was relocated to Box Creek.  These and later
operations along Box Creek yielded about 39,000 ounces of gold. The dredge was dismantled in 1926 and
shipped to South America. photo by Lin
Derry Ranch
GPOC The Prospector’s Quill Vol. 38 No.10 WE ARE ELECTRONIC at www.gpoc.com 2
President
Ben Higley
president@gpoc.com
Vice President
Wayne Wittkopp
vicepresident@gpoc.
com
Secretary
Elise Pearce
secretary@gpoc.com
Treasurer
Bill Smith
treasure@gpoc.com
Webmaster
Stacey Smith
webmaster@gpoc.com
Editor
Lin Smith
quill@gpoc.com
Contact Info
for all club activities
Bob Hale
(719)213-3383
Membership
membership@gpoc.com
Claims
Marty Witcher
claims@gpoc.com
Trustees
One Year
Gary Beaderstadt
Two Year
Diane Anderson
Three Year
Jim Blakenship
GPOC
contacts

Gold Prospectors of Colorado
P.O. Box 1593
Colorado Springs, Colorado 80901
The Prospector’s Quill is the official newsletter of
the Gold Prospectors of Colorado. The opinions
are those of the authors and do not necessarily
reflect those of the club or its members. The
editor, club, officers, and contributors do not
assume any liability for damages resulting from
use of information in the Prospector’s Quill.
Articles of interest are welcomed. All articles
submitted for publication are subject to editing.
Submission of articles must be received before
the 20th of the month. Unless noted, non-profits
may reprint or quote from articles, provided
credit is given to the author’s and publication
and a copy of the newsletter the article appears
in is sent to the editor of The Prospectorʼs Quill at
PO Box 1593, CS CO 80913. All pictures are the
property of the photographer and are not to be
copied or reproduced.
The information is provided solely for the readerʼs
gener al knowl edge.  GPOC assumes no
responsibility for its completeness or accuracy. 
Although care has been taken to produce the
information in the Quill, information is provided
without warranty of any kind, either express or
i mpl i ed, wi th respect to the accuracy or
completeness of the information.  I want to thank
you in advance for pointing out my mistakes!
However, it is YOUR responsibility to research
resources and make sure that you are in
compliance with all laws and regulations, as well as
following the GPOC CODE of ETHICS.
The GPOC is a 501(c) charitable organization
www.gpoc.com
Prospector’s Quill
Editor
Lin Smith
quill@gpoc.com
The preferred alternative in the FEIS includes mitigation to address a variety of
impacts, including wildlife, transportation, traffic, recreation and local communities:

A bighorn sheep adaptive management program, funded by OTR Corp, will
allow Colorado Parks and  Wildlife and the BLM to implement future wildlife
mitigation identified during the project.

A bighorn sheep habitat treatment project will improve sheep access to
suitable habitat. OTR would pay for the project.

Bare cables will be marked with avian flight diverters to minimize impacts to
birds.

No more than a 15 minute delay time per vehicle would be allowed at each
work zone at any one time. One lane of U.S. Highway 50 would remain open
at all times. All Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Areas and developed
recreation sites would remain open for recreational access during exhibition.
BLMʼs authorization to proceed with the OTR project will be contingent upon
cooperating agency permit approvals.
$ The FEIS, prepared by a third party contractor paid for by OTR, is the
result of collaboration between cooperating agencies, including: Colorado
Department of Natural Resources, Colorado State Parks, the Colorado Division of
Wildlife, the Colorado State Land Board, Chaffee County, Fremont County,
Colorado State Patrol and Department of Transportation.
The Colorado State Parks Board approved OTR in June 2011. Colorado State
Parks and the BLM jointly manage the Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area.
$ “The BLM is committed to involving the public, local, state and tribal
governments, and federal agencies throughout this planning effort.  Itʼs this level of
involvement that will help us reach a final decision,” BLM Royal Gorge Field
Manager Keith Berger said.
$ The Arkansas River is nationally recognized as one of the nationʼs most
popular locations for commercial and private whitewater rafting and kayaking, and
for its premier fishing opportunities.  The Riverʼs scenic corridor features abundant
wildlife, including a large population of bighorn sheep.  The area attracts over
740,000 visitors per year.
$ Notice of the availability of the FEIS will appear July 29 in the Federal
Register. The FEIS will be available for public review through August 29, 2011. 
Although this is not a formal comment period, comments related to the Final EIS
may still be submitted.
$ The FEIS identifies seven alternatives, including a no-action alternative,
and alternatives that vary by panel length, transportation, visitor management and
timing considerations. 
The FEIS is available at http://www.blm.gov/co/st/en/fo/rgfo/planning/otr/
otr_final_eis.html.

Online (view or download) at www.blm.gov/co/st/en/fo/rgfo/planning/
otr.html.
Written comments on the FEIS may be submitted by any of the following methods:

Web site comment form:  www.blm.gov/co/st/en/fo/rgfo/planning/otr.html

E-mail:  co_otr_comments@blm.gov 

Fax:  719-269-8599 

Mail:  BLM Royal Gorge Field Office, Over the River Comments, 3028 E.
Main St., Cañon City, CO 81212.
Please include “OTR Comments” in the subject line of comments that are e-mailed
or faxed. Comments and personal identifying information may be publicly available
at any time. We cannot guarantee withholding personal identifying information.
GPOC The Prospector’s Quill Vol. 38 No.10 WE ARE ELECTRONIC at www.gpoc.com 3
October
calendar
For further information contact:
www.gpoc.com
Please refer to the information
below for further events.

Elections
The annual elections for the
GPOC Board of Directors will
be hel d at t he Gener al
Member shi p Meet i ng t hi s
month. All members may
nomi nat e t hemsel ves or
another member upon their
consent, for a Board position.
Claims Committee
Meeting
All members are welcome
to participate in the
meetings. Current and
future claims will be
discussed as well as
developing plans of
operations. This can be a
great opportunity to learn
the process and
resources for filling and
maintaining a claim.
meetings meetings events events October
calendar
For further information contact:
www.gpoc.com
Please refer to the information
below for further events.

Elections
The annual elections for the
GPOC Board of Directors will
be hel d at t he Gener al
Member shi p Meet i ng t hi s
month. All members may
nomi nat e t hemsel ves or
another member upon their
consent, for a Board position.
Claims Committee
Meeting
All members are welcome
to participate in the
meetings. Current and
future claims will be
discussed as well as
developing plans of
operations. This can be a
great opportunity to learn
the process and
resources for filling and
maintaining a claim.
6th
Board Meeting
Gold Hill Police Station
7:00 PM
955 Moreno Avenue,
CS, CO
president@gpoc.com
15th
Claims Committee
Western Museum of
Mining and Industry
225 Northgate Blvd.
Colorado Springs,
CO
10 AM-12PM
volunteers
welcome
22nd
Denver's First
Cemetery, a
Haunted Tour
6:00PM - 8:00PM
$25 general public;
$20 members
Reservations:
Required. Call
303-866-4686
http://
www.historycolorado
.org/events/denvers-
first-cemetery-
haunted-tour
30th-31st
Evergreen
Cemetery
Leadville, CO
Judge Reynolds
Halloween Tours
8 PM $10 space is
limited Reservations
are required through
the Leadville/Lake
County Chamber of
Commerce
719-486-3900 or
888-532-3845
October
calendar
For further information contact:
www.gpoc.com
Please refer to the information
below for further events.

Elections
The annual elections for the
GPOC Board of Directors will
be hel d at t he Gener al
Member shi p Meet i ng t hi s
month. All members may
nomi nat e t hemsel ves or
another member upon their
consent, for a Board position.
Claims Committee
Meeting
All members are welcome
to participate in the
meetings. Current and
future claims will be
discussed as well as
developing plans of
operations. This can be a
great opportunity to learn
the process and
resources for filling and
maintaining a claim.
12th
General Membership Meeting
Board ELECTIONS for 2011
President, Vice President, Secretary,
Treasure, Web Master and Three-year
Trustee
Submit your nominations or anyone whom
you have talked with and has accepted
either to your Trustees listed on page 2 or at
the meeting.
7:00 PM
3400 N.Nevada
CS, CO
12th
General Membership Meeting
Board ELECTIONS for 2011
President, Vice President, Secretary,
Treasure, Web Master and Three-year
Trustee
Submit your nominations or anyone whom
you have talked with and has accepted
either to your Trustees listed on page 2 or at
the meeting.
7:00 PM
3400 N.Nevada
CS, CO
24th
Capitol Hill Horror
Stories 5pm-9pm
Halloween tales in a
historic and haunted
mansion. 
Storytellers include
Augusta Tabor,
"Unsinkable" Brown,
and other exhumed
eccentrics http://
www.historycolorado
.org/events/capitol-
hill-horror-stories-
tom-noel
All Month
Western Museum
of Mining and
Industry
225 Northgate Blvd.
Colorado Springs,
CO
Halloween
Scavenger Hunt
Haunted Mines
see info below
Haunted Mines Western Museum of Mining & Industry
Looking for some thrills and chills in October? Check out the
Haunted Mines on the grounds of the Western Museum of Mining
& Industry. By night, our grounds transform into the area's most
thrilling and terrifying haunted attraction. Victims, er..., guests will
experience Total Terror and much more!
Prices are $15 or $20 for VIP.
Additional information may be obtained at the Haunted Mines
website at www.hauntedmines.org.
For more information about the Museum visit www.wmmi.org or
call 719-488-0880.
Our haunted house is recommended for ages 13 and up.
Halloween Scavenger Hunt WMMI
Kids age 6-12 will have a fun time building a minerʼs skeleton as
they answer mining trivia questions throughout the museum.
Science is Fun, Fascinating and FREE throughout the
Pikes Peak area! October 15 - 22, 2011
 
Please join us for an exciting weeklong FESTIVAL of science-
related events at multiple venues throughout Colorado Springs.
Including hands-on activities, exploding demonstrations, open
laboratories, a Rubikʼs Cube competition, high-tech tours, beer-
brewing science and a science scavenger hunt.
http://www.pikes-peak.com/DisplayMedia.aspx?id=262
Ghost Walk Glenwood's Pioneer Cemetery Oct. 14, 15,
21, 22 28, 29, 30 Tours at 7:00, 7:45, 8:30 and 9:15 on Fridays
and Saturdays 7:00, 7:45 and 8:30 on Sundays             
You may meet "Doc" Holliday and Kid Curry as well as many other
Glenwood Springs pioneers and hear their stories. Tickets are $15
per person. Tickets are available for purchase with Visa or
MasterCard by calling the museum (970) 945-4448 or in person at
the Frontier Historical Museum. Bring a flashlight or lantern and
dress appropriately for the weather. The trail to the cemetery is a
moderately strenuous hike. Kerosene lanterns are also available
for purchase at the trailhead for $10.
Elk Fest
Bond Park Downtown Estes Park 10/01/11 - 10/02/11
10 am – 5 pm; Sunday 10 am to 4 pm
A celebration of all things Wapiti, the American elk that calls Estes
Park and Rocky Mountain National Park its home. The festival
offers seminars, bugling contests, elk tours, a Mountain Man
encampment, Native American music and dancing, and edible
products from elk. Free http://www.estesnet.com/Events/
elkfest.aspx
Leadville October Activities
h t t p : / / www. l e a d v i l l e . c o m/ c a l _ e v e n t _ d e t a i l s . a s p ?
i=2550&m=10&y=2011&c=Leadville+Colorado&t=MONTH
GPOC The Prospector’s Quill Vol. 38 No.10 WE ARE ELECTRONIC at www.gpoc.com 4
Get supplies for
PRIME PROSPECTING SEASON
Let us help you:
* convert your high banker to a dredge
* replace worn parts and hoses
* stock up on needed supplies
* or just get some new stuff
The Rock Doc
17897 US Hwy. 285 | Nathrop, Colorado 
Highway 285
Between Buena Vista and Salida
719.539.2019
Open 5 days a week
Club permits sold HERE – one stop
Hours 
Off Season
Monday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday 10 - 5
Sunday 12 - 4
closed Tuesday and Wednesday
GPOC General Membership Meeting
September 14, 2011
•President Ben Higley opened the meeting at 7:11 PM
•Pledge of Allegiance
•President Ben asked if anyone knows the price of gold. It was
$1,820.00 an ounce.
•President Ben asked if there were any new members, there were 2
new members.
•President Ben asked if any one went out prospecting, several
members stood and told their stories of their finds.
•Webmaster Stacey Smith came up and discussed the upcoming
Championship Committee meeting that will be held at the Denver Gem
& Mineral Show on 16Sep11.
•Claims committee chairman Marty Witcher talked about upcoming
Claims Committee meetings that will be held 1
st
Saturday of each
month, at WMMI.
•President Ben talked about the Point Bar reclamation that was just
recently completed. Also, the new Plan of Operation for the Leadville
claims will be worked on over the winter hopefully to be approved
before next season.
•Public Lands Day at Cache Creek 24 Sep. 11. Volunteers needed to
help in reclamation.
•Current active memberships in GPOC now stands at 810.
•Treasurers report from Treasurer Bill Smith.
•President Ben discussed that GPOC is looking into finding a new
secured storage area for the truck & trailer that is closer to Colorado
Springs.
•President Ben talked about the upcoming GPOC Board elections that
will be held at next monthʼs General Meeting.
•Webmaster Stacy Smith talked about the new additional GPOC logo
that was just completed. Invited all to come up and check it out.
Special thanks to all who worked on the logo.
•President Ben mentioned that the Outfitterʼs Store will be at the
November meeting.
•Trustee Gary Beaderstadt came up and gave away 3 volunteer
nuggets for volunteers. The winners were: Tom Jent, Dermit Haley &
Pat Oakes.
•Trustee Gary re-opened the meeting after break and had drawing for
white ticket drawing and the winner was Dale Gould. They then did the
red tickets. There were 16 winners.
•President Ben introduced guest speaker, Vice-President Wayne
Wittkopp who gave a video presentation on CPR & choking.
•Meeting was adjourned at 9:00 PM
What's New - Changes to GeoCommunicator
BLM is providing updated downloadable PLSS
datasets called Cadastral National Spatial Data
Infrastructure (CadNSDI) PLSS that complies with
the latest Federal Geographic Data Committee
(FGDC) guideline for PLSS data. The CadNSDI
PLSS dat a i s di rect l y downl oadabl e f rom
GeoCommunicator as File Geodatabases. As new
data becomes available it will be posted to
GeoCommunicator. The legacy PLSS data is
available until further notice.
To download the PLSS data and for more
information see the Land Survey Information
Section.
GPOC The Prospector’s Quill Vol. 38 No.10 WE ARE ELECTRONIC at www.gpoc.com 5
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Bob Butler
Buena Vista,
Colorado
719-395-2003
I would like to sincerely thank the
GPOC and its General Mem
bership for
all of their support and contributions
during the past year.
I look forward to working with all
of you in the com
ing year.
Sincerely
Bob Butler
MDHTALK Metal Detecting Weekly Tip:  Air Travel with a Detector
Author:     Lee Wiese
Tip:   When traveling with one or more detectors the detector control electronics must never be check. The reason to
carry the electronics on the aircraft is that it's very delicate and expensive and it should not be out of your sight. Put
all of the metal detector's electronics in a carry-on regulation sized bag. Optional items that could also be put in the
carry-on bag are detector coils, detector integrated electronic probes (not metal probes), and headphones. Hand-
carry the detector's manual to answer any TSA questions.
The other metal detecting gear such handle assemblies, target recovery digging tools, metal probing tools, sand
scoops, batteries and any other tools or parts for emergency repairs should be secured and wrapped well in a
checked bag. The suggestion is to also place a sheet of paper describing what the items are in the checked bag.
If questioned by a TSA agent, stand your grounds and firmly answer their questions providing prove if required by
using the detector manuals. If this doesn't work ask for a supervisor and keep pushing back. There are no regulations
against carrying the detector control electronics on an aircraft.
Metal Detector Travel Repair Kit
Author:     Lee Wiese MDHTalk
Tip:      Traveling and using metal
detectors in a remote location from
your primary residences requires
some planning. Putting together a
metal detector repair kit to take on
your travels can turn a potentially
disastrous broken metal detector
situation into a great trip. The
contents of the kit are:  
 1) Two Lower Rods (different types)
 2) Tie Wraps: four & eight inch
 3) Roll of Black Tape
 4) Pack of Batteries
 5) Spare Headphones
 6) Lower Rod Bolts and Bushings
 7) Two Stainless Arm Cup Bolts
 8) Multi-Purpose Tool
  9) Screw Driver (Common &
Phillips)
  10) Knife and Set of Small Allen
Wrenches
  11) Spare Knob and Rubber Seal
Lubricate
 12) Two Rod Stainless Steel Spring
Clips
Any kit should model your detectors
hardware and may have slightly
different content; however it needs
to be equipped well enough to
handle emergency detector repairs
in the field. If traveling by plane
always keep the kit in your checked
baggage. Put the kit's small items
into a heavy duty zip-lock bag for
transportation. Use zip-lock bags to
hold down the air travel weight
factor.
GPOC The Prospector’s Quill Vol. 38 No.10 WE ARE ELECTRONIC at www.gpoc.com 6
Provided by Metal Detecting Hobby Talk
!"#"$#%&'(&)$)*+',-./"'
Metal Detecting Hobby Talk http://www.mdhtalk.org

GPOC The Prospector’s Quill Vol. 38 No.10 WE ARE ELECTRONIC at www.gpoc.com 7
Where Is It Legal to Metal Detect? by
Lee Wiese
This question should be easy to answer
but that is not the case. There are no
uniform state laws or regulations across
the fifty states or are there uniform
municipal codes for the many thousands
of cities and counties in the U.S. One way
to get a handle on laws and regulations
for your area is to join a local metal
detecting or gold prospecting club. These
clubs will usually know what the local law
and regulation situation is for the hobby.
So lets take one section of the U.S. at a
time and try to find the answer.
National. There are a number of federal
act that control what can or can not be
done on federal properties. These acts
are the:
 1906 American Antiquities Act
 1 9 6 6 Na t i o n a l Hi s t o r i c
Preservation Act As amended
through 2000
 1997 Archaeological Resources
Protection Act
 1990 Native American Graves
Protection and Repatriation Act
Each of these acts places protection for
America's antiquities plus use restrictions
on federal lands, historical sites and
Native American Indian burial grounds.
The 1906 and the 1997 acts have an
impact on the National Park System,
National Monuments, National Sea Shore
Beaches, Civil & Revolutionary War
Battlefields, and to some extend on
Native American lands. These acts
indirectly make metal detecting illegal in
any of these places. If caught metal
detecting or have a detector in your
possession while on any of these
protected places it can be a felony with
tough penalties.
A typical statement on a National
Monuments websites is: Metal detectors
are strictly prohibited on park grounds.
Relic hunting by the use of metal
detectors or other means is prohibited
and violators will be prosecuted.
The 1966 act is the mechanism by which
historical sites can be preserved by
adding them to the National Register of
Historic Places. Once a site is added to
the National Register three acts above
(1966,1997,1990 acts) can be applied to
protect the properties. The 1966 act also
provides for the setup of historical sites at
the state level. Once historical sites are
placed on the national or state historical
register; them the sites are no longer
available for metal detecting of any kind.
The 1990 act covers just about everything
that has anything to do with, native
American remains, burial sites, and
associated culture items.
National Forests. The Forest Service
does permits the use of recreational metal
detecting and the collection of rocks and
mineral samples. Generally, most of the
National Forests are open to recreational
mineral and rock collecting, gold panning
and metal detecting. This activity usually
does not require any authorization. It is
always wise to check with the local district
ranger to ensure that the land you are
goi ng t o det ect does not cont ai n
archaeological or historical resource.
National Forest Regulation.
U.S. Army Corp of Engineers metal
detector use. The use of metal detectors
is permitted on designated beaches or
other previously disturbed lands unless
prohibited by the district commander to
protect archaeological, historical and
paleontological resources.
States. Each state has laws that are
modeled after the national acts making
state lands regulated similarly to national
lands. Generally, all state historical sites,
state Native American burial grounds, and
other state archaeological sites are off
limits to metal detecting.
- State Parks. However, most states have
regulations that determine the legality of
metal detecting in their state park system.
These regulations usually either allow or
disallow metal detects or provide specific
information as to where metal detecting
can take place. Check this web-link for
specific state regulations.
Some states require permits, while eight
or more states simply make it unlawful to
detect state parks and some states allow
only specific areas like beaches or
disturbed lands.
If there are no metal detecting regulations
in a state the state usually defaults to
thei r archaeol ogy l aws that forbi d
diggings for targets or the state may use
regulations dealing with the disturbance
of vegetation or the removal of rocks, etc.
In the latter case you may detect but not
recover or remove any targets.
- State Beaches. Generally salt water
state beaches are ok to metal detect.
There may be restrictions, such as, you
can detect only from the low tide mark to
the high tide mark. Never metal detect in
sand dunes that are roped off, have
vegetation growing on them, or any beach
park grassy area.
State fresh water beaches are sometimes
locally ranger controlled. Even if the state
has tough regulations against metal
detecting it may still be ok in some
instants to detect certain state fresh water
beaches.
- Counties. Of all the public entities,
counties may have the least restrictions
placed on their county parks system when
it comes to metal detecting. Usually fresh
water beaches are open to metal
detecting although in some county park
systems it may be forbidden to metal
detect in the water. Other county public
lands may have similar restrictions on
archaeol ogy, hi stori cal and Nati ve
American burial sites. Some counties
require a permit to metal detect in county
parks, others do not.
- Cities. Many cities have municipal
ordinances that cover park usage.
Frequently there are short statements in
an ordinance that may made it unlawful to
metal detect, or a permit may be required,
or metal detecting is allowed but no
digging. In many cities there may be no
metal detecting ordinance but other
aspects of the park ordinance and
regulation may indirectly make detecting
unlawful. City properties usually fall under
the states archaeology, historical and
Native American burial laws.
- College & School Districts. School
districts are starting to make school
properties off-limits after school hours
except by special use permission. In
many cases school properti es are
secured by putting up chain link fences
and posted with no trespassing signs. In
some cases school di st r i ct s ar e
establishing property rules and often
metal detecting is on the do not list.
- Cemeteries. Metal detecting in a
cemetery is not a good hobby image.
Regardless of the law never metal detect
inside of any cemetery boundary. I would
even question metal detecting outside of
the physical boundaries of a cemetery
since this could still provide the public
with a very bad image of a detectorist.
GPOC The Prospector’s Quill Vol. 38 No.10 WE ARE ELECTRONIC at www.gpoc.com 8
Where is it legal, continued
Private Lands. To use private lands for
metal detecting, one should secure
permission from the property owner or
caretaker. Private lands can have many
older public sites on them such as:
 Defunct Amusement Parks
 Defunct Outdoor Theaters
 Resort Areas
 Railroad Lands
 Ghost Towns
 Civil & Revolutionary Battlefields
 Homesteads
 Private Lakes and Beaches
 etc
Private lands are an excellent choice to
metal detect. There are usually no direct
laws against the hobby except for
property trespass laws. Therefore, gaining
permission to enter the private property to
metal detect is a must. Permission can be
either verbal or in a written form. One
thing to keep in mind for private property
is that if there is a know or registered
archaeology, historical or Native American
burial site on the private land they will be
off-limits to metal detecting.
In a few states there are laws on the
books that prohi bi t anyone except
archaeologists to recover artifacts from
private lands.
In Summary - Where is it legal to metal
detect? From this short article you may
draw the conclusion that there are very
few places to metal detect in the U.S. That
is not really the case. Many county and
city properties are available to metal
detect as well as fresh and salt water
beaches. The only catch is that there are
many local and state regulations that can
cause a beach or a portion of a beach to
be off limits. The ability to know where it is
lawful or unlawful falls on the individual
detectorist to seek out the answer.
There is information on the web, but it is
not comprehensive and will not cover all
counties, cities and school districts. The
best approach is to join or establish a
metal detecting club and have a few of the
members become experts on the laws,
regulations and city ordinances in your
area.
You may say to yourself my own yard is
safe to metal detect, well yes and no. If
your property is on the historical register,
is part of a archaeology site, or may have
Native American burial grounds your
property will be off limits to metal
detecting.
Provided by Metal Detecting Hobby
Talk by Lee Wiese
BLM Releases Two Draft Land Use Plans for Northwestern
Colorado http://www.blm.gov/co/st/en/BLM_Information/newsroom/
2011/blm_releases_two_draft.html
The Bureau of Land Management recently released for public review two Draft
Resource Management Plan Revisions for more than 900,000 acres of BLM lands
and minerals in northwestern Colorado.
These land use plans will provide the management direction for the next two
decades covering all aspects of BLM land and mineral management within the
Colorado River Valley Field Office and Kremmling Field Office boundaries, including
recreation, travel management, energy development, resource protection, wildlife
habitat, urban interface, special designations, grazing, and realty actions.
The draft plans each analyze four alternatives detailing a wide range of possible
management direction. Public comments on the draft plans will be used as BLM
develops the final plans for these Field Offices, which are scheduled to be released
in 2012.
“Weʼve worked hard with our partners to craft a wide range of alternatives for public
review and comment,” said Steve Bennett, Field Manager for the Colorado River
Valley Field Office. “We welcome all thoughts and comments, but specific
comments will be particularly useful in helping us refine the draft into its final form.”
“We only revise these resource management plans about every 20 years, so we
really want to hear from the public and get feedback on these alternatives,” said
Dave Stout, Field Manager for the Kremmling Field Office.
Both plans and information about providing comments are available at:
http://www.blm.gov/co/st/en/BLM_Programs/land_use_planning/rmp/kfo-gsfo.html
The draft plan for the Colorado River Valley Field Office covers 505,000 surface
acres and 707,000 acres of subsurface mineral estate administered in Eagle,
Garfield, Mesa, Pitkin, and Routt counties, with a small amount of acreage in Rio
Blanco County.
BLM will host three public open houses to provide information and an opportunity to
comment on the Colorado River Valley draft. The public can stop by anytime
between 3-7 p.m. at the following locations:
• Oct. 6 in Silt at the BLM Colorado River Valley Office, 2300 River Frontage Road
• Oct. 11 in Eagle at the Eagle Public Library, 600 Broadway St.
• Oct. 12 in Carbondale at Town Hall, 511 Colorado Ave.
BLM will accept public comment on the Colorado River Valley draft through Dec.
15, 2011.
The draft plan for the Kremmling Field Office covers 377,900 surface acres and
653,000 acres of subsurface mineral estate in Grand, Jackson, Routt, Summit,
Larimer and Eagle counties.
BLM will be hosting several public open house meetings on the Kremmling draft
plan in October, although specific locations, dates and times are not yet set. While
Kremmlingʼs draft plan is available on-line, printed copies are not anticipated to
arrive until October. The public comment period for Kremmlingʼs draft is open now
and will close 90 days following the availability of printed paper copies. Updated
information about this plan will be maintained on-line and through future news
releases.
The two field offices have been working on these draft Resource Management
Plans concurrently because they share a common border and many common
issues. The alternatives for each field office are detailed in separate draft
documents, and the final proposed plan for each office will be developed
separately.
The BLM manages more land - over 245 million acres - than any other Federal
agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily
located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The Bureau, with a budget of about
$1 billion, also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate
throughout the nation. The BLM's multiple-use mission is to sustain the health and
productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future
generations. The Bureau accomplishes this by managing such activities as outdoor
recreation, livestock grazing, mineral development, and energy production, and by
conserving natural, historical, cultural, and other resources on public lands.
--BLM--
  2815 H Road      Grand Junction, CO 81506  
GPOC The Prospector’s Quill Vol. 38 No.10 WE ARE ELECTRONIC at www.gpoc.com 9
PROSPECTING THE INTERNET
HOW TO??, HINTs and TIPs SITES:
Metal Detectors provided by Metal
Detecting Hobby Talk
The list of sites below have many good
hints, how to?? and tips on metal
detecting - check them out.

Beginner Metal Detecting Beginner
Metal Detecting is an informational site
for both beginners and veteran metal
detecting fans. Here you will find metals
detecting tips, metal detecting tools,
beach metal detecting and gold metal detecting.
http://www.beginnermetaldetecting.com/

Bob Bailey's Metal Detecting Country code, NCMD
Code, Detecting Grass, Metal Detecting tips,
Detecting Guide, Eagle Programs, XLT Programs
DFX Programs , Cleaning finds, Detector Programs,
Metal detecting Holiday's, etc. http://vzone.virgin.net/
bob.bailey/index.html

Go Metal Detecting Metal detecting and treasure
hunting stories, tips, reviews, tutorials and popular
forum. A great outdoor hobby, see pictures of our
finds. http://gometaldetecting.com/

Gold Fever Prospecting Metal Detecting Tips and
Tricks Tip #1 Always use headphones when metal
detecting. Small variations in tone will go unnoticed
when drowned out by background noise. http://
www.goldfeverprospecting.com/medetitr.html

Have Detector Will Travel Stories and tips about metal
detecting and treasure hunting from Have Detector
Will Travel. Also features articles, pictures and forums
about metal detecting, treasure hunting and coin
shooting. http://www.hdwt.net/

JB's Metal Detecting Resource A metal detecting
resource site with an Online Metal Detecting Game,
Spectrum XLT programs, 100's of forums, even more
links and lots of hints and tips. http://66.51.97.78/jb/

Jeff's Metal Detecting This is my hobby, metal
detecting, Metal detecting to me is a very fun hobby.
It is a hobby that you can do alone or with a friend,
and the best part of it is that you never know what's
going to come out of the ground. That's the thrill of
metal detecting, and you can learn a lot about the
past too. http://jefferyvmckenzie.tripod.com/

Jim Vokes' Detecting' Pages I have been metal
detecting for many years. I primarily hunt land sites,
i .e.. school s, parks, house yards, si dewal k
construction, farm fields, cellar holes etc. http://
www.frontiernet.net/~jvokes/detecting.htm
• Learn Metal Detecting Secrets Metal Detecting
Secrets, Tips, Resources & Information. http://
www.metaldetectingsecrets.com/

Metal Detecting Beaches Metal Detecting Beaches -
Metal Detector Finds - Tips on hunting the beach.
http://www.metaldetectingbeaches.com/

Metal Detectors Gold To let you know everything
about metal detectors and treasure hunting. Have
filled Metal Detectors Gold with many metal detector
articles to aid you find as many gold treasures as
possible. Additionally, I made a full list of tips. http://
www.metaldetectorsgold.com/

Metal Detecting Hobby On this site, you'll learn more
about the hobby of metal detecting. You'll find tips and
techniques on using metal detectors, coin collecting
discussions, a guide on metal detecting, and more.
Use the links below to browse this site. http://
www.metaldetectinghobby.com/

Metal Detector Secrets Metal Detector Tips: Find
metal detecting tips and information. We offer a wide
range of metal detector tips, including metal detector
buying guides and info on caring and maintaining your
metal detector. http://www.metaldetectors.com/metal-
detector-tips.cfm

Metal Detecting Ghost Towns of the East The Metal
Detecting Insider Blog page is all about controversy,
fraud, archaeology, laws, and updates to metal-
detecting-ghost-towns-of-the-east. http://www.metal-
det ect i ng-ghost -t owns-of -t he-east . com/ Met al -
detecting-blog.html

Metal Detecting World A good site for metal detecting.
In every region, such areas as transportation,
entertainment, merchandising, lumbering, mining,
agriculture, industry, natural and manmade disasters,
wars, fires, floods and famines. One should not forget
about criminal activities such as bank robbery, moon
shining, embezzlement and smuggling. These areas
can offer lots of good metal detecting locations, but
pin-pointing them and unearthing their treasures will
be up to you. http://metaldetectingworld.com/
how_to_metal_detect_p5.shtml

Metal Detector Reviews 68 Metal Detecting Sites That
Can Get You Started. http://metaldetectorreviews.net/

Recreational Mining / Metal Detecting Tutorials
Recreational gold prospecting and metal detecting
tutorials. How to gold prospect. http://www.gpex.ca/
gold-prospecting-tutorials.php

Tom's Treasure Island An Article on Where Can I
Metal Detect? or Finding Good Metal Detecting Sites.
h t t p : / / w w w . t h o m a s a t h o m a s . c o m /
Where_Can_I_Metal_Detect.htm

UK Metal Detecting This site about metal detecting.
Included links, dowsing, finds, the CS5MX and much
more. http://relic-hunter.50megs.com
In this newsletter, GPOC provides links and references to other websites.  GPOC has no control over information at such sites
hyperlinked or referred to.  These links and references are being provided for the convenience of the readers, and GPOC does not
endorse and is not responsible or liable for the content, nature, or reliability of any linked or referenced website or any link contained in
a linked or referenced website.    GPOC takes no responsibility for monitoring, updating, supplementing, or correcting any information
on any linked or referenced website and makes no representation or warranties regarding such information.
GPOC The Prospector’s Quill Vol. 38 No.10 WE ARE ELECTRONIC at www.gpoc.com 10
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GOLD PROSPECTORS OF COLORADO
PO BOX 1593
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Gold Panning & Prospecting For Fun
GPOC Meets the 2nd Wednesday
of every Month at the Elk’s Club
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FREE Gold Panning Tips Informative!
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Site changes weekly! Visit often!
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THE PROSPECTOR’S QUILL Mailed
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Prospector’s Quill in print your yearly subscription fee will be $15.00 for a mailed copy. Look at your mailing
label and it will have when you need to renew your membership. Take the number of months left on your
membership and multiply it by $1.25. That will be your cost for the rest of your CURRENT membership.
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GPOC VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES for October 2011 GPOC VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES for October 2011
October 12th General Membership Meeting Elections Elections for President, Vice President,
Secretary, Treasure, Web Master and Three-year Trustee
October 15th Claims Committee Meeting Western Museum of Mining and Industry

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