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Standard Safety Practices Manual

BP Canada Energy Company


December, 2007 version 1.1

This Manual is an Uncontrolled Copy To View Most Recent Version of Contents Refer to the gHSSEr Website http://gasiso14001.bpweb.bp.com/index.asp Document Owners: gHSSEr Forum
C-7037 XGS

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


BP Canada Energy Company
December, 2007 version 1.1

This Manual is an Uncontrolled Copy To View Most Recent Version of Contents Refer to the gHSSEr Website http://gasiso14001.bpweb.bp.com/index.asp Document Owners: gHSSEr Forum
C-7037 XGS

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

BP CANADA GAS PERFORMANCE UNIT SAFETY PRACTICES MANUAL Accident prevention and efficient operations go hand in hand; therefore, incorporating safe work practices in our day-to-day operation is essential to minimize accidents, injuries and job interruptions. This manual provides safe guidelines for all employees to use in addressing the potential risks associated with each task when developing safe work methods. Guidelines specified are in accordance with governing regulations, standards, BP Canada requirements, and recommended good working practices. It will be necessary to incorporate these practices into the specific situations that will arise in each operation. The manual covers many, but by no means all, of the jobs and situations encountered in our operations. Should situations arise which are not adequately covered in the manual, please bring it to the attention of your immediate supervisor. The definition of a BP representative in this manual is taken to include employees, contractors, consultants, and service representatives who have the authority and are duly qualified to direct work on a the behalf of BP. A BP designate is an individual who has authority to direct a defined scope of work specified by the BP Representative. Safety is everyones responsibility. WORKSITES The following must be available at all BP Canada worksites: Standard Safety Practices Manual Standard Environmental Practices Manual Local Emergency Response Plan Material Safety Data Sheets Site-Specific Procedures

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Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

DEVIATIONS The Standard Safety Practices Manual is to be used as a living and working document, and as such must include provisions to handle warranted deviations. The Manual contains practices in accordance with governing regulations, standards, BP Canada Gas Performance Unit requirements and recommended or good working practices. Government Regulations and BP Canada Gas Performance Unit requirements are distinguishable throughout the document by the use of the words Shall, Will and Must, etc. Recommended or good working practices are recognized by the use of the words Should, May and Could, etc. The following outlines how to handle deviations in our day-to-day operations to ensure the safe work methods are practiced. DEVIATIONS FROM: A. Recommended or Good Working Practices (Should, May, Could) Authorized by Local Management (i.e. minimum, employee-in-charge + supervisor) Government Regulations or BP Canada Requirements (Shall, Will, Must) A uthorized by Safety Department (Performance Unit) and the applicable Government Agencies.

B.

Frequent deviations in either case should be submitted to the gHSSEr Forum for review and adoption if warranted. Procedures for submitting a suggested revision are outlined in the subsequent pages. Note: When government regulations call for additional requirements in excess of BP Canada SSPM, the government regulation will be followed.

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REVISION PROCEDURE To suggest a Revision The Standard Safety Practices Manual is intended to be a living document, and suggestions for revisions by operating personnel will be welcomed. To initiate a revision, please follow these procedures: 1. 2. F orward request to the HSSE Advisor responsible for your Department/Area. H SSE Advisor to forward to gHSSEr Forum as warranted.

The gHSSEr Forum will convene periodically to review all suggested revisions. Standard Safety Practices Manual

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Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Standard Safety Practices Manual TABLE OF CONTENTS Standards and Safe Work Practices Index Golden Rules of safety CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PRACTICE ENERGY ISOLATION PRACTICE (Lock Out - Tag Out) 16 37 43 64 87 112 136 147 147 GROUND DISTURBANCE PRACTICE LIFTING AND RIGGING PRACTICE MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE PRACTICE PERMIT TO WORK AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT PRACTICE SAFETY PRACTICE VEHICLE STANDARD AND ROAD WORKING AT HEIGHTS PRACTICE Safe Work Standards/Practices ASBESTOS ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING 1

CANADIAN NUCLEAR SAFETY COMMISSION (CNSC) REGULATED ISOTOPES 151 DRAINING AND DEPRESSURING ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL STORMS TEMPORARY BY-PASS 153 154 161 162 167 170 182 183 184 185

EQUIPMENT SHUTDOWN SYSTEMS, EYEWASH STATIONS & DELUGE SHOWERS 163 FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT FIRE RESISTANT WORKWEAR PRACTICE FIRST AID EQUIPMENT AND MEDIC GAS AND LIQUID SAMPLING GUARDS

HAND PROTECTION PRACTICE

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GUIDELINES FOR FIELD VISITS HOUSEKEEPING HOT AND ODD BOLTING PRACTICE HYDRATES, IDENTIFICATION AND REMOVAL

191 193 195 211 213 216

HYDROGEN SULFIDE (H2S) SAFETY INCIDENT/ACCIDENT REPORTING

LADDERS AND SCAFFOLDING PORTABLE 217 LADDERS, STAIRS AND PLATFORMS - FIXED 220 LINE THAWING PRACTICE HEAVY OR AWKWARD LOADS METER PROVING MOBILE STEAMERS ON BP WORKSITES CONSERVATION JEWERLY 225 229 232 234 236 239 242 245 248 249 251 262 264 267 MANUAL LIFTING AND HANDLING

MOVING HEAVY EQUIPMENT NOISE EXPOSURE & HEARING PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT PIGGING OF PIPELINES AND FLOWLINES POSITIVE AIR SHUT-OFF REQUIREMENTS (PASO) PRACTICE FOR WORKING IN A COMBUSTIBLE GAS ENVIRONMENT PRESSURE SAFETY VALVES PURGING PRESSURE AND LEAK TESTING

RADIOACTIVE OR NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS (NORM) 269 RAIL CAR LOADING RESPIRATORY PROTECTION HSSE MEETINGS 273 275 280

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SAFETY STANDBY SECURITY

283 286 288 291 297

SAND BLASTING / ABRASIVE BLASTING SERVICE RIG SAFETY SIGNS AND BARRICADES STRESS RELIEVING SWABBING TANK GAUGING TOOLS TRAINING WELDING PRACTICES GENERAL WELL SERVICING WORK PLAN WELL TESTING WIRELINE OPERATIONS TANK TRUCK LOADING /UNLOADING

SIMULTANEOUS OPERATING PROCEDURE 298 306 307 310 311 315 316 319 324 327 331 333 334

WELL WORK - HAND OVER BETWEEN OPERATIONS AND WELLS TEAMS WORKING ALONE PRACTICE

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REFERENCES A lberta Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations http://employment.alberta.ca/cps/rde/ xchg/hre/hs.xsl/307.html B ritish Columbia Occupational Health and Safety Regulations http://www2.worksafebc.com/Publications/OHSRegulation/Search.asp C odes of Practice http://gasiso14001.bpweb. bp.com/index.asp O ntario Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca Golden Rules of Safety/Practices (gHSSEr Docu ments) http://gasiso14001.bpweb.bp.com/index.asp I nternal and External HSSE Links http://canadahsse. bpweb.bp.com/home/links.html L egal and Other Matrix http://gasiso14001.bpweb. bp.com/EMS/Legal%20Requirements/ P rocess Safety Management http://psmcanada. bpweb.bp.com

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CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PRACTICE 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability This practice applies to BP Canada Gas Performance Unit (CGPU) employees, contracted employees, contractors, and other visiting personnel doing work on CGPU premises and sites. This practice provides guidelines for the development of site specific procedures to prevent injury to personnel by ensuring that an assessment of all known hazards, pre-job planning, and communications are done prior to and during work in confined spaces. Th e purpose of this practice is to ensure that all reasonable precautions will be taken to protect the safety of personnel who are or may be required to work in confined spaces. Scope of Definitions 2.1 Confined Space:

1.2

1.3

2.0

A confined space means an enclosed or partially enclosed space that is not primarily designed or intended for human occupancy, except for the purposes of performing work, having restricted access or egress and which, due to its design, construction, location, atmosphere, the materials or substances in it, or other conditions, is or may become hazardous to a worker entering it, or does not have an easy means of escape for, or rescue of, a worker entering it. Examples: 2.1.1 Tanks, vessels, towers, heaters, silos, aerial coolers, bins, hoppers, tank cars, ventilation or exhaust ducts, sewers, underground utility tunnels or pipes, scale pits, sumps, vessel skirts, mud pits and cement and chemical storage tanks.

Confined Space Entry

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Confined Space Entry

2.1.2 An excavation is considered a confined space under certain circumstances, for example if there is limited access or egress or the quality of the atmosphere cannot be guaranteed. 2.1.3 diked area could be considered a confined A space if it is more than 1.5m deep and the atmosphere cannot be guaranteed. 2.1.4 ower or vessel skirts, under trailers with T skirts, false ceilings, because of restricted access and egress must be considered as confined space. 2.1.5 Others, such as pipe racks, utility doors, compressor fan housings and hoardings.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

DETERMINATION OF CONFINED SPACE


START Does the space now have or has it previously had contents that could be harmful? YES Is the space enclosed enough to NO contain a hazardous atmosphere or other physical h d? YES Is access/egress so restricted that NO emergency exit or rescue requires extra manpower or equipment? YES

NOT A NO CONFINED SPACE

THIS IS A CONFINED SPACE


Class 1 No Hazard Class 1I Potential Hazard Class III Hazard Exists

A Confined Space in which there does not exist and is not likely to exist: A hazardous gas, vapour, dust or fumes An oxygen content less than 19.5 % or more than 23% by volume.

A Confined Space in which there has existed or was likely to exist: A hazardous gas, vapour, dust or fumes An oxygen content less than 19.5 % or more than 23% and, which has been purged, ventilated and steps taken to provide and maintain a safe

A Confined Space in which there now exists or is likely to exist: A hazardous gas, vapour, dust or fumes An oxygen content less than 19.5 % or more than 23% and which cannot be ventilated to

Class 1 No Hazard ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Class 1I Potential Hazard ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Class III Hazard Exists ENTRY REQUIMENTS

Communication with back-up Atmospheric Testing (if applicable) All PPE identified and worn Rescue plan in place Rescue Equipment readily available

Confined Space Permit Lockout/Tagout Procedure followed Isolation Procedure followed Continuous Atmospheric Testing mandatory Confined space purged & ventilated Rescue Plan in Place Rescue Equipment set up,

ALL REQUIREMENTS LISTED IN CLASS II PLUS THE FOLLOWING: Breathing Apparatus mandatory for all personnel entering

2.2

E ntry into a confined space is deemed to have occurred as soon as the plane of the entry point has been broken by a part of the body. A ll BP Canada Gas Performance Unit CGPU sites must: Identify and document all confined spaces abel all entry points. Class 1 Confined Spaces L labeled Confined Space, Class 2 & 3 Confined Spaces labeled Confined Space Permit Required dentify and control all hazards prior to entry I utilizing site specific procedures

2.3

Confined Space Entry

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Confined Space Entry

3.0 3.1

Scope of Responsibility E ach worker is responsible to recognize the hazards of a confined space and take corrective measures to work within those areas ensuring that site specific procedures and this practice are followed. Th e on-site BP representative in charge or designate must ensure that: n emergency response plan is in place specific A to the work being performed n adequate inventory of protective equipA ment is available at the work location; e.g. PPE, supplied air, gas detection, harnesses/lifelines, ventilation equipment ll workers required to wear respiratory protecA tion are medically fit to wear the associated equipment and/or perform the required duties Confined Space permit is issued laying out A the conditions upon which the work is to be performed and that this is communicated to all workers at the site e confined space work location is properly Th prepared for the work to take place; e.g. area is ventilated and isolated from external piping/ equipment dditional risk assessment beyond the scope of A the safe work permit is completed if deemed necessary based on the scope of the job (see Job Hazard Analysis form and Prejob Risk Assessment form). Documents will identify and communicate to all workers the possible hazards of working in the confined space and what controls are in place to make the job safe to proceed ll workers are trained in STOP-THINK-GO A and Time Out for Safety and understand their obligation to exercise these tools

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Standard Safety Practices Manual


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3.3

Th e Area Manager has ensured that: ll confined spaces are defined, documented and A labeled in the area sites orkers who are involved in confined space W work are adequately trained and competent

3.4 e immediate supervisor or designate overseeing Th the confined space work is responsible for: eviewing the need for a confined space entry, R ensuring all other options have been ruled out Assist in completing the rescue plan nsuring that everyone involved in the confined E space understands the hazards involved in the job scope aintaining the safe conditions on which the M permit is based uspending the permit if the permit conditions S cannot be maintained aking certain that the confined space is evacuM ated if the permit is suspended nsuring a new work permit is issued at the start E of each shift nsuring atmospheric testing and continuous E monitoring is done by qualified gas tester and ensuring he/she co-signs the permits etailed vessel diagrams must be reviewed D during the pre-job risk assessment including the following items where applicable: entry/exit points, ventilation points, blinding points, and Nitrogen vent points iling Confined Space Permit at the field site for F 13 months upon completion nsuring all workers are adequately trained and E qualified for the job at hand pproving the means of isolating the confined A space

Confined Space Entry

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Confined Space Entry

pproving the means of ventilating the confined A space nsuring tests and measurements are taken to E determine the presence of, or change in, the concentration of harmful substances or oxygen deficiencies nsuring an emergency and rescue plan is in E place, documented and communicated nsuring information on the availability and E proper use of PPE is communicated efining the maximum number of workers who D will be allowed access for the purpose of executing work within the confined space at any one time nsuring that workers entering the confined E space are familiar with the layout of the confined space e person accepting the permit (Lead Worker in Th control of the work) is responsible for: otifying Supervisor or designate in the event of N job delays or changing conditions. The work site must be re-inspected and tested by the permit issuer before the job can be allowed to resume nsuring the preparation and precautions are E acceptable, understood, and agreed to, before endorsing and accepting a Confined Space Permit nsuring all safety equipment is in good working E condition stablishing an escape plan agreed to by the E Supervisor or designate and Lead Worker Defining appropriate tools to be used for the job nsuring that any person entering the confined E space is aware of his/her responsibilities under this code, is qualified to use all the personal protective equipment required, and is aware of

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Standard Safety Practices Manual


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the conditions of the confined space entry, e.g. hazards, communications, escape plan enewing permits, obtaining new permit when R required and returning permit to issuer when permit expires or job is complete

3.6 e person(s) entering the confined space is responTh sible for: nderstanding and following the conditions U detailed in the permit eporting changing conditions to the Supervisor R or designate and confined space safety standby eporting conditions and practices that will not R allow him or her to follow the conditions of the permit sing appropriate tools for the job and ensuring U they are in good condition Reporting defective or damaged tools sing respiratory protection and other PPE U (personal protective equipment) properly (if breathing air is used, a full body harness must be worn) tool list must be checked off before and after A entry and exit of the confined space to ensure nothing is left behind

3.7 Definition of the Confined Space Safety Standby: safety standby person is an employee or A designate used as an observer and back-up, whenever the above work applications are being carried out. This person is not part of the work crew, and is only concerned with the safety of the workers. Safety standby personnel will be identified by some type of measure as identified in the pre-job risk assessment.

Confined Space Entry

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Confined Space Entry

3.8

e Confined Space Safety Standby is responTh sible for: Observing work task Monitoring atmospheric conditions nsuring ongoing communications with those is E confined space xecution of emergency rescue plan and activaE tion of rescue team aintaining entry log and tool log to ensure all M personnel and tools are accounted for nsuring unsupervised entry points are flagged E off indicating DO NOT ENTER or made inaccessible by other means nsuring that all workers involved in the task E have the proper training certification in place ther duties as specified in the pre-job safety O meeting or further guidance please check the safety F standby section of the SSPM

NOTE: Safety Standby personnel can not leave their assigned post unless personal safety is jeopardized, relieved by a competent person, or confined space is evacuated. 4.0 4.1 Scope of Training and Qualification T raining is mandatory, to ensure safety, that all personnel associated with the confined space entry are trained and competent, commensurate with the duties assigned in the confined space activity. F acilities are required to establish individual training requirements to meet the needs of the activity. reparing Confined Space Entry Permits preP entry training is required

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5.0 5.1

onfined Space Entry Class 2 or 3 - pre-entry C training and Confined Space entry is required afety Watch class 2 or 3 - pre-entry and ConS fined Space entry training is required onfined Space Rescue confined space rescue C training is required Must have first aid training Scope of Pre-entry Procedures Pre Entry Cleaning 5.1.1 All confined spaces should be made clean prior to entry, according to the nature of the product and residue, using the most practical method. Workers may only enter a confined space to clean after all other reasonable means have been exhausted. Mechanical means are the preferred method of cleaning, and should be used prior to any personnel entering the confined space. 5.1.2 If steam is used as a cleaning medium, cleaning contractors must ensure appropriate respiratory and other protective gear, and ensure the confined space is cooled to ambient temperature and adequate oxygen levels are present upon completion of cleaning.

5.1.3 yrophoric and other products capable of P spontaneous combustion require special handling methods. Please refer to site-specific procedures and MSDSs for handling these materials. 5.1.4 ludge, fluids and all spent cleaning materials S should be disposed of in accordance with applicable regulatory requirements and CGPU site specific waste handling procedures. 5.1.5 NERTING - If an inert gas is used to protect I against an explosive or flammable atmosphere

Confined Space Entry

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Confined Space Entry

the personal responsible for the confined space must: ain approval from the Operating Centre ManG ager otify BC WCB in writing 7 days prior to the N entry (BC applications) nsure all requirements for working in an inert E atmosphere are followed Pre-Entry Isolation and Lockout 5.2.1 lectrical equipment controlling or connected E in any way to the confined space or peripheral equipment shall be tagged and locked, as per BP Canada Energy Isolation practice gHSSEr MS 800. 5.2.2 ines that could allow fluids to enter the conL fined space shall be disconnected, capped, or blind flanged, as per gHSSEr MS 800 Energy Isolation (Lock out/Tag out) practice. 5.2.3 here connecting lines cannot be removed W and capped or blind flanged, slip or pancake blinds rated for full line operating pressure must be used. If a full-rated ASME blind cannot be accomplished, a safe process must be developed in close cooperation with site engineers. The ASME size and rating, as well as the MAWP (maximum allowable working pressure) must be permanently marked on the handle in such a manner that the information is visible when the blind is installed. 5.2.4 linds that do not meet engineering practices B and have not been marked accordingly will not be used. 5.2.5 A blind list will accompany the site specific job procedure for the confined space being entered. 5.2.6 isconnecting or blanking shall be performed D

5.2

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as close to the confined space as practical. It is acceptable to include a re-boiler, exchanger, etc., as part of the package for the Confined Space, providing that the entire system is tested in accordance with the following: xplosive gases or vapors: continuous monitorE ing is required where the atmosphere cannot be guaranteed. When gases lighter than air could be present, continuous monitoring of high points is required. When gases heavier than air could be present, continuous monitoring of low points is required ORM: Naturally Occurring Radioactive MateN rials should be tested for, if known to exist in the stream oise - All effort must be made to monitor, N minimize and protect against enzene: Must be monitored prior to entry and B at frequent intervals, if known to exist in the stream xcess or insufficient oxygen: a continuous oxyE gen monitor is required where the atmosphere cannot be guaranteed oxic or otherwise hazardous vapors or gases T such as hydrogen sulfide must be continuously monitored to ensure conditions on the permit have not changed 5.2.7 Rotating equipment (e.g. fan blades, pumps, agitators) must be immobilized and secured against accidental movement. 5.2.8 Atmospheric monitoring should be completed immediately prior to entry. Atmospheric monitoring must be completed within 20 minutes of entry. 5.2.9 Where monitoring is not continuous, confined spaces shall be re-tested after work breaks and shift changes before re-entry.

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Confined Space Entry

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Confined Space Entry

5.2.10 Confined spaces shall be ventilated to ensure a known working atmosphere and to prevent accumulation of any other harmful substances: 19.5% to 23.0 % oxygen (by volume) Less than 10 % LEL; Less than 10 ppm H2S enzene >0.5 ppm (half mask) or >10 ppm B (breathing air) Ventilation providing a minimum of 85m3/hr 50cfm) of clean respirable air is required for ( each person inside the confined space with exception given to a) when the atmosphere is continuously monitored and shown to contain respirable air b) the space has an internal volume greater than 1.8m3 (64ft3) per occupant, is occupied for less than 15 minutes, and the work inside generates no contaminates other than exhaled air 5.2.11 Respiratory protection must be worn while initial and re-entry atmospheric tests are being performed 5.3 Temporary Heating Devices 5.3.1 eaters that are required to maintain a suitH able thermal environment inside the confined space shall be located outside the space with the hot air supply ducted into the space (see Manufacturers instructions for setup and venting). 5.3.2 irect-fired heaters, which discharge exhaust D gases with the heated air, will not be used to heat confined spaces while they are occupied. If direct-fired heaters are used, personnel must confirm a safe working atmosphere prior to entry. 5.3.3 reassessment of the amount of ventilation A required must be made when heating confined

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spaces that may release additional toxic, explosive, or flammable materials at elevated temperatures. 5.4 Personal Protective Equipment 5.4.1 ppropriate personal protective equipA ment must be worn for the particular job as required (i.e. fire retardant clothing, gloves, boots, goggles, face shields, respiratory apparatus, safety harness and lifelines). 5.4.2 Prior to any confined space entry the con trolled products that may be encountered in the confined space must be identified and the MSDS on these materials must read and understood. 5.4.3 reathing apparatus is also required as standby B equipment outside the confined space, to be used by personnel responding to emergency.

5.5 Emergency Rescue 5.5.1 A rescue plan must be completed, reviewed, documented and a copy must be on site prior to a confined space entry. Rescue plans will be kept on file at the facility. Any equipment required to implement the plan must be in place prior to the confined space entry. New plans will be developed only where a suitable plan does not already exist.

5.5.2

5.5.3 competent safety standby person must be in A attendance at the entrance during all phases of any confined space entry unless classified as a Class 1 confined space.

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Confined Space Entry

Standard Safety Practices Manual


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Confined Space Entry

5.6

Communication 5.6.1 A system of communication must be established and maintained, between the safety standby person and the person(s) in the confined space. This method must include at least two of the following:

Simple voice Visual contact Radio equipment Alarm horn Rope attached to worker 5.6.2 A system of communication must be established and maintained between the safety standby and the rescue personnel.

5.7

Electrically Operated Equipment 5.7.1 Preference should always be given to the use of pneumatic portable tools and explosion-proof lamps.

5.7.2 lectrical equipment must be tested for E ground continuity prior to use in a confined space. 5.7.3 C electrical equipment, which is used within A the confined space, shall be used in conjunction with a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFI). GFIs are to be located outside confined spaces. Static Electricity 5.8.1 Consideration must be given to inclusion of static relief procedures where there is a potential of generating static electricity. 5.8.2 Some specific conditions that may lead to static are:

5.8

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5.9

e use of high-pressure steam, nitrogen, air Th hoses discharging to atmosphere, or vacuum hoses The use of sandblasting equipment The types of clothing worn Unsupervised Entry Points 5.9.1 All confined spaces must be made secure when left unattended. 5.9.2 Barricades, closures, signage (i.e. Confined space - Entry by permit only) or other means of warning that the confined space must not be entered by unauthorized personnel are required at all unsupervised entry points. Entry is prohibited until a new permit has been issued, all required safety checks have been completed and the area deemed safe as per the Confined Space Classification.

6.0 6.1 6.2 7.0 7.1

Scope of Forms gHSSEr MF 34004 Pre-job Risk Assessment gHSSEr MF 82001 Confined Space Entry Permit Scope of References A lberta General Safety Regulation AR 448/83 as amended B.C. Occupational Health and Safety Regulation and Guidelines 296/97 as amended g HSSEr MS 800- Energy Isolation (Lock Out-Tag Out) Practice) gHSSEr MS 840- Ground Disturbance Practice

7.2

7.3

7.4

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Confined Space Entry

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Energy Isolation

ENERGY ISOLATION PRACTICE (LOCK OUT TAG OUT) 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability This practice will be used if the unexpected energization or startup of machinery or equipment or the unexpected release of energy could result in health, safety, environmental or equipment damage losses. This practice specifies minimum requirements for the control of hazardous energy. Th is practice applies to all BP Canada Gas Performance Unit (CGPU) employees, contracted employees, contractors and other visiting personnel doing work on CGPU premises and work sites. Th is practice does not apply to hot tap operations performed on pressurized pipelines, provided it can be demonstrated that: Continuous service is essential Shutdown of the system is impractical GPU accepted documented procedures are C followed quipment is used that will provide proven, E effective protection for employees Scope of Definitions F unctional Area Manager Operating Center Manager or Wells Manager or HSSE Manager. F unctional Team Lead Area Foreman, Construction Foreman, Wellsite Leader.

1.2

1.3

1.4

2.0 2.1

2.2

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2.4

Authorized worker is a person who applies the energy isolation procedure and is deemed competent by the functional team leader or designate. Affected worker is a person who works on equipment in which energy control procedures have been implemented. Energy isolating device is a mechanical device that physically prevents the transmission or release of energy. Energy source is any electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, gravitational, chemical, nuclear, thermal, or other energy source that could cause injury. Personal Lock means a lock for use by an affected worker to ensure personal lockout protection such that each lock when applied is operable only by a key in the workers possession. Lockout means the use of a lock or locks to render the energy isolating device inoperable.

2.5

2.6

2.7

2.8

2.9

2.10 Lockbox is the control point for the key securing system which physically prevents access to keys when locks are applied in a group lockout procedure. 2.11 dentification/Warning Tag is a tag directing people I not to start or operate locked out equipment and

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Energy Isolation

2.3

A rea Authority the person who is on-site or associated with that site and is assigned single point accountability for that site. This person can be the operator in charge, a maintenance worker, a construction foreman or a wells foreman or designate.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


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Energy Isolation

indicates the name the lock is assigned to, the date of the lockout and reason for the lock out. The identification/warning tag is attached to each authorized and affected workers personal lock. 2.12 Warning Tag is a numbered tag directing people not to start or operate locked out equipment and references people back to the energy isolation log for date, name and reason for lockout. 2.13 ermanent Lockout Isolations is equipment, maP chinery or process that is indefinitely locked out from service. 3.0 Scope of Responsibilities

3.1 ach functional area manager is accountable for E ensuring that: 3.2 n energy isolation system is implemented to A control the hazards at the worksite Th e functional team lead or designate is responsible for: stablishing on site individual training programs E for authorized and affected workers that meet the sites needs for required energy isolation activities nsuring the authorized worker(s) are competent E to perform the energy isolation procedures etermining the requirement for site specific D lockout procedures for equipment being worked on within their area ere is an adequate inventory of protective Th equipment and energy isolation devices such as locks, blinds etc. for the job at hand ll workers are trained in STOP-THINK-GO A and Time Out for Safety and feel comfortable in being able to exercise these tools

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proper work permit is issued for the type A of work being undertaken and that everyone involved is aware of the hazards, controls and emergency procedures e authorized and affected workers are aware Th of the risks prior to starting work, including the hazards of the energy sources to be controlled, the methods or means to control the energy, and the prohibitions regarding attempts to restart or re-energize locked out and tagged equipment e equipment to be worked on has been Th properly isolated, locked out and tagged and is verified and documented safe to be worked on mergency response plans are in place that E addresses unplanned exposure to energy sources from the equipment being worked on at all required testing, inspection and checking Th of the work site is completed prior to the work permit being issued at the work area is inspected and checked after Th the job is completed Th e authorized worker is responsible for ensuring that all equipment and energy sources are properly isolated and locked and tagged with a personal lock prior to starting work. Th e affected workers and authorized workers are responsible for ensuring no work is performed on the equipment until it has come to a complete stop and the affected worker(s) working on the equipment has a personal lock in place at each isolating device or at the group lock box when the group lockout procedure is being used.

3.4

3.5

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Energy Isolation

3.3

Th e Area Authority in charge or designate is responsible for ensuring:

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

4.0 Energy Isolation 4.1

Scope of Expectations I f the unexpected energization or start-up of equipment or the unexpected release of an energy source could cause injury, the energy source must be isolated with an energy isolating device and effectively controlled. W hen energy isolating devices must be locked out the devices must be locked and tagged in the position that isolates the affected worker(s) from all hazardous energy when maintenance/servicing work is being performed. Each affected worker must install a personal lock to secure the isolating device in a safe position.

4.2

4.3 A work permit is issued by the Area Authority in charge or designate to each trade or group of workers on the job, communicated to all personnel involved in the work, and posted as required. 4.4 A work permit is not issued until a Pre-job Task Hazard Analysis is completed to evaluate risks for all deemed critical and non-routine jobs. W orkers servicing, maintaining or cleaning cord-connected electrical equipment; for example changing grinding wheel or repairing a drill, can lock out the equipment by applying a lock to the electrical plug or render the equipment inoperative. An acceptable approach to rendering the equipment inoperative is for the worker doing the work to: Disconnect the plug from its electrical supply eep the plug in sight and within reach so that K no else can accidentally plug in the equipment eep the plug under his or her exclusive and K

4.5

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Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

4.6 o complete maintenance, troubleshoot problems T or perform adjustments, it may be necessary to work on equipment while it is energized. This is allowed only if it is required by the manufacturer or it is not reasonably practicable (in the case where there are no manufacturer specifications) to render the equipment inoperative. For example, adjusting/tuning engines, pigging of pipelines or volt/amp checks on electrical equipment. 4.7 ite specific procedures and controls must be S developed and implemented to ensure the work is performed to an equivalent level safely. This approach cannot be used simply because it is more convenient than locking out equipment. 5.0 Scope of Energy Isolation (Lock Out/Tag Out) General Requirements The Area Authority designates an authorized worker to turnoff or shut down machinery using the site specific procedures established for an orderly shutdown in order to avoid any additional or increased hazard(s) to employees. Refer to Isolation Log gHSSEr MF 80001 A designated authorized worker will physically identify the required isolation points for isolating the equipment or machinery from the energy sources. The authorized worker positions all the energy-isolating devices and applies lock out and tag to isolate the machinery or equipment from the energy source(s). L ockout of the equipment will be done with a

5.1

5.2

5.3

21

Energy Isolation

immediate control at all times while working on the equipment

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Energy Isolation

lock and tag approved by the Area Authority or designated authorized worker(s). Areas may elect to use a group lockout where a number of workers are working on equipment or a large number of energy isolating devices must be locked out: f a group lockout is not used each authorized I worker and all affected workers will place their personal lock with an identification/warning tag showing the installers printed name, signature, date of installation and reason for installation on each energy isolating device. This is also logged on the Energy Isolation Log sheet. The number of personal locks and tags on each energy isolating device equals the number of authorized and affected workers working on the equipment For group lockout: o The authorized worker will lockout and attach a warning tag to each isolation device o e authorized worker and all affected workTh ers place their personal lock on a group lock box with an identification/warning tag with the installers printed name, signature, date of installation and reason for installation attached to it o The number of locks on the lock box securing the master key to the lock box equals the number of authorized and affected workers working on the equipment. Each energy isolating device will have the master lock from the lock box secured to it 5.4 L ockout devices must be affixed to each energy or isolating device by the worker authorized by the Area Authority. The devices must be attached in a manner that will hold the energy isolating devices in a safe or off position.

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Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

5.6

If more than one group is working on the same item (including different maintenance crafts), each trade or group will verify or test the isolation to confirm a state of zero energy. Whenever locks, blinds and tags are installed, details must be recorded in the Energy Isolation Log and be available on site for the duration of the lockout to record and track the status of the isolation. The reference number on the Energy Isolation Log must be recorded on the Permit to Work form completed for any work falling under the isolation. All potentially hazardous stored or residual energy must be relieved, disconnected, restrained, or otherwise rendered safe. If there is a possibility of re-accumulation of stored energy to a hazardous level, verification of isolation will be continued until the servicing or maintenance is completed, or until the possibility of such accumulation no longer exists.

5.7

5.8

5.9

5.10 After ensuring that all personnel are clear, the equipment must be tested to verify that it is properly de-energized, locked out and will not operate. Verification must be documented in the Energy Isolation Log. 5.11 At the beginning of each shift change, the Area Authority, authorized workers or affected workers

23

Energy Isolation

5.5

Where a tag cannot be affixed directly to the energy isolating device, the tag must be located as closely and safely as possible to the device, in a position that will be immediately obvious to anyone attempting to operate the equipment.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Energy Isolation

will verify that all equipment is safe for work and has not been returned to service during their absence. 6.0 Specific Procedures Color Identified Locks E ach affected worker must install a personal lock color-coded to their respective trade or group of workers prior to commencing work. Such locks will be operated only by the keys of the individual workers affected by the isolation. Color-coding applies to BP personnel and FTE. Contractors working on BP sites will apply their own personal locks identifiable with an attached tag. O nly the affected worker who installed the lock may remove it with exception to emergency or if the worker is not available in which site specific procedures must be followed. E ach trade will use a different color-coded lock and will use the colors as listed below: Construction: Electrical: Instrumentation: Mechanics: Operations: Permanent Lockout: Yellow B lue Red Orange Green Black

6.1

6.2

6.3

7.0

Specific Procedures Group Lockout (Lockboxes) Areas may elect to use a group lockout where a number of workers are working on equipment or a large number of energy isolating devices must be locked out.

7.1

24

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Locking out the energy isolating devices ecuring the key(s) for the locks used for locking S out energy isolating devices in a lock box by affixing a personal lock on a multiple lock hasp to the lock box ompleting, signing and posting the Energy IsoC lation Log that identifies the equipment covered by the lock out Th e energy isolation must be verified by two authorized workers. Verification must be documented in the Energy Isolation Log. Th e lockbox will contain as many keyed-alike locks as required for the energy isolation. Site specific requirements will determine the size and number of lockboxes required. Each lockbox must contain locks with a key unique only to the locks in the respective lockbox. When multiple lockboxes are used on a site each lockbox must have its own identifier corresponding to its respective locks. E ach affected worker working on the locked out equipment must apply a personal lock to the lockbox referred to in subsection (7.2) before working on the equipment. A fter each affected worker has completed their work they must remove their respective locks. W hen all affected workers personal locks are removed from the lockbox, the authorized worker must ensure that it is safe to end the group lockout. The personal lock of the authorized worker is the last lock to be removed from the lockbox.

7.3

7.4

7.5

7.6

7.7

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Energy Isolation

7.2

An authorized worker competent in the isolation of equipment is responsible for:

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

8.0 Energy Isolation

Energy Isolation Process The following steps identify the process in which the Energy Isolation Practice is to be applied: I dentify energy source(s) to be isolated electrical, pneumatic, mechanical, hydraulic, fluids and gases. Identify system and isolation points to be isolated. Isolate all sources of energy: hut down electrical equipment using the selecS tor switch followed by the master disconnect solate all inlet and outlet piping by closing block I valve(s) upstream and downstream, disconnecting, inserting blinds, or use of double block and bleed se blocks, pins, or chains to secure potential U mechanical energy

8.1

8.2

8.3 De-energize sources of energy: tored electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic and gasses S and fluids energy must be bled to obtain zero energy state n cases where zero energy state cannot be I attained control measures must be developed to prevent uncontrolled release of energy. For example, use blocks, pins or chains that are rated to restrain the potential energy when equipment cannot be brought to zero potential energy state hen working on or near exposed de-energized W electrical equipment, a qualified person will use testing equipment to ensure that all circuits are dead Install/ lockout and tag energy isolation devices: ockout energy isolation devices (e.g. block L

8.4

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Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

8.5

nstall blinds or disconnect piping as necessary I (lockout required when opening piping) ffix identifier/ warning tags to each isolation A point Record points in isolation log Verify isolation is complete: orkers verify zero energy. Ensure that the W switch or START button used to test the lockout is returned to its OFF or NEUTRAL position to prevent accidental start-up on re-energization solation points are confirmed to be secure in I safe position ersonal locks of affected workers control the P isolation Complete Isolation log: All workers applying locks sign off isolation log Workers verifying isolation sign off isolation log Confirm all isolation points are recorded solation log remains at site for duration of the I energy isolation procedure

8.6

9.0 9.1

Blinding/Blanking Guideline General: ll blinding/blanking or disconnecting and plugA ging requires a safe work permit with a master list attached identifying the isolation method and listing the isolation devices and their location. A pre-job meeting (accompanied by a Task Hazard Analysis) needs to be done with all involved

27

Energy Isolation

valves, electrical switches and breakers, mechanical devices)

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Energy Isolation

personnel prior to starting work athodic protection must be shut down and C flanges bonded prior to the installation of a blind or disconnecting of piping linding/blanking or disconnecting and plugB ging is the preferred method of isolation for pipes, pipelines, vessels and equipment f these cannot be done, the recommended I alternative is double block and bleed. After depressuring, the block valves are to be locked and tagged in the closed position and the bleed valve locked and tagged in the open position. The bleed valve venting safely to atmosphere ingle valve isolation is not recommended. If S necessary, then verification must be made that the valve is holding before the work commences. The work must be accompanied by a risk assessment and specific site procedure with approval by the Functional Team Leader in charge or designate. Valves (inlet and outlet) must be locked and closed and tagged before work begins Blinding and Blanking: o very blinding job will have a blind list that E was generated by referencing all the available P&IDs for the system. The system will also be physically inspected to make sure that all the blind locations that were identified on the P&IDs will completely isolate the system. If extra blinds are required they will be added to the blind list o All blinding jobs will use a tag system to track blind locations. These tags must be attached to the blind when the blind is installed. A record must be kept of the blinds that have been installed with their respective tag number. Blind boards or multi-part blind tags may be used to

9.2

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Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

o After equipment has been made ready to blind (depressured) the operator in charge will use the tag system to track all active blinds. If blind boards are used the tag is moved from the blind board and attached to the blind o Blind equipment as required ensuring the tags from the board and the blind list correspond with each other o ach blind location must be recorded in the E Energy Isolation Log R efer the tables in Appendix A to select proper blind thickness and Appendix B for standard practices for isolation of pipe, pipelines, equipment and vessels. Scope of Restoring Service to Equipment

9.3

10.0

10.1 fter each affected worker has completed their work, A they will remove their respective locks. Upon removing their locks they must sign off work completed in the Energy Isolation Log. 10.2 n a group lockout once all affected workers personal I locks are removed from the lockbox, the authorized worker must ensure that it is safe to end the group lockout. The personal lock of the authorized worker is the last lock to be removed from the lockbox. Once all locks have been removed from the lockbox an authorized worker may remove the locks from the energy isolation devices and return them to their respective lockbox. Refer to gHSSEr MF 80001. 10.3 pon removal of locks and blinds the Energy U isolation Log must be updated to record status of isolation. 10.4 personal lock can only be removed by the authoA

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Energy Isolation

track installed blinds

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

rized and affected workers who installed the lock. For situations where an authorized or affected worker is unavailable to remove their lock (e.g. off-shift, holidays) or an emergency involving equipment arises, then the Area Authority will complete gHSSEr MF80002 (Removal of Absent Employee Personal Lock Log) to verify that the following steps are completed: aking every reasonable effort to contact the M affected worker who installed the lock etermining conclusively the job has been comD pleted and no personnel remain in the affected area erifying that the machinery can be operated V safely before removing the lock ontacting the Functional Team for verbal C authorization to access spare key stored in designated central location or to cut the lock eturning the spare key to the designated central R location otifying the worker at the start of his or her N next shift that the personal lock was removed since the workers previous shift orwarding completed Form to Functional Team F Lead to sign off documentation and verify spare key was returned to designated central location

Energy Isolation

10.5 efore a machine or equipment is started, affected B employees must be notified that all lockout devices(s) have been removed and that all blinds have been accounted for. An authorized worker must verify the de-isolation and complete the Energy Isolation Log. Completed log sheet(s) are filed at a central location for 1 year. 10.6 The individual restoring energy to the equipment must:

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Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

nsure that the machine or equipment comE ponents are operationally intact and ready for service heck the work area to ensure all employees are C safely positioned or removed from the equipment Permanent Lockout Isolation

11.0

11.1 Prior to the installation of a permanent lock, a Management of Change (MOC) will be conducted to determine and verify the correct isolation points. 11.2 The functional team lead will designate an authorized worker to lock each of the energy isolation devices at the identified isolation points with a permanent lock (black). 11.3 e authorized worker will attach a steel tag to the Th lock which identifies the date of the lockout, group responsible and a reference number for reference to a log providing details and reference to the MOC. 11.4 e authorized worker will record the lockout on the Th energy isolation log and file it at a central location for future reference. 11.5 eys for the permanent locks must be controlled by K the Functional Team Lead. 12.0 Scope of Regulatory References lberta General Safety Regulation (Alberta A Regulation 448/83, as amended) C Occupational Health and Safety Regulation B and Guidelines (BC Regulation 296/97, as amended)

31

Energy Isolation

nspect the work to ensure that non-essential I items have been removed

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Energy Isolation

Ontario Industrial Establishments Regulation (O.Regulation 851, R.R.O. 1990, as amended) Appendix A Selection of Temporary Blinds/Blanks

Appendix A is only to be used for temporary blinds and blanks. The tables were calculated using A-285 Gr. A plate material and the formula found in clause 304.5.3 of ASME B31.3 Chemical Plant and Petroleum Refinery Piping Code. The allowable stress used was 90% of the SMYS. Zero corrosion allowance was used. These tables can only be used for process temperatures less than 100 F (38C). The following alternate materials may also be used: A-285 Gr. B and C, A-299, A-525, A-516 and A-537. If alternative material is used or a higher temperature is required, thickness requirements must be calculated using above codes and certified by a Professional Engineer. Permanent Blank sizing Requirements must be certified by Professional Engineer.

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Pipe Size (inches) Blank Thickness (inches) 0.250 0.375 0.500 0.625 0.750 0.875 1.000 1.125 1.250 1.375 1.500 1.625 1.750 1.875 2.000

10

12

Pressure (psig) 952 450 2142 1013 2048 1800 3200 2813 4608 2243 6272 3053 8192 3987 10368 5047 6230 7539 8972 10529

288 648 1152 1800 2592 2170 2835 3588 4429 5359 6378 7485 8681 9965

139 314 557 871 1254 1707 2230 1800 2222 2689 3200 3756 4356 5000 5689

85 192 341 533 768 1045 1365 1727 2132 1929 2296 2695 3125 3588 4082

56 127 225 352 506 689 900 1139 1407 1702 2025 2377 1936 2222 2528

40 91 161 252 362 493 644 815 1006 1218 1449 1700 1972 2264 1800

NOTE: The shaded area beneath the line in the above table applies to RTJ type flanges only. These tables are for selection of temporary blanks only. DO NOT USE FOR PERMANENT BLANKS!

Pipe Size (inches) Blank Thickness (inches) 0.250 0.375 0.500 0.625 0.750 0.875 1.000 1.125 1.250 1.375 1.500 1.625 1.750 1.875 2.000

14

16

18

20

24

26

30

Pressure (psig) 34 26 76 59 135 104 210 163 303 234 412 319 539 417 682 528 842 651 1018 788 1212 938 1422 1101 1649 1276 1893 1465 2154 1667

21 46 82 129 186 253 330 417 515 624 742 871 1010 1160 1320

17 38 67 105 151 206 269 341 421 509 606 711 824 946 1077

13 26 47 73 106 144 188 238 294 356 423 497 576 661 752

10 22 40 62 89 121 158 200 247 299 356 417 484 556 632

7 17 29 46 66 90 118 149 184 223 265 312 361 415 472

33

Energy Isolation

HYDROTEST BLANKS--SELECTION TABLE

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Appendix B. Energy Isolation Standard Practice For Isolation of Pipes, Pipelines, Equipment and Vessels Matrix
For Unattended, Open Ended Piping Where Equipment/ Component is Physically Cold Work Removed for Maintenance 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2, 3 For Vents and Drains on Vessels or Pipelines in Operation 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Confined Space Entry Sour Gas Gas Liquids (Propane, Butane) Sweet Gas Crude oil (Emulsion, Bitumen) Steam > 2482 kPa Steam < 2482 kPa & > 50.8mm Steam < 2482 kPa & 50.8 or less Acid/Base Amines Flammable Substances Non-Flammable Substances Produced Water Fresh Water Toxic Substances 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 1 or 2 Hot Work 1 or 2, 3

1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2,3,4,5,7,8 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2, 3,4,7,8 1 or 2,3,4,5,7,8 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2, 3,4,6 1 or 2,3,4,5,6 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2,3,4,6 1 or 2,3,4,5,6 1 or 2, 3 1 or 2,3,4,7,8 1 or 2, 3

*The isolation options in the table above are presented in the order of preference. See the Legend for an explanation of numbered references Legend 1. 2. 3. 4. Blind/Blank or plug Disconnect and plug Double Block and Bleed S ingle Block valves with Authorization (use only if #3 doesnt exist or #1 & 2 are impractical. Can only be used if approved by a Professional Engineer or Functional Team Lead, based on a documented risk assessment complete with procedures. Double Block Valves (no bleed)

5.

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7. 8.

Common tasks carried out using a standard practice certified by Professional Engineer. Unique task carried out using a site specific procedure certified by Professional Engineer.

Notes Note A: All valves must be locked out and tagged when using double block and bleed, bleed must be vented to atmosphere and consideration must be given to make sure it is vented to a safe place. Note B: or valves that are holding but the threads/nipple F are unable to accept a bull plug/cap, the bull plug/ cap will not be required until the valve is replaced. Note C: ouble block and bleed cannot be used to isolate D critical hot work in British Columbia. Refer to Provincial regulations outside Alberta. Note D: This practice needs to be used with other procedures, codes of practice and standards to provide a safe work environment (i.e. Lockout Procedures, H2S Code of Practice). Blinding/Blanking or Disconnect and plug: linding/blanking or disconnect and plug is the B preferred method for isolating equipment for work purposes blind/blank tag system must be used in all BP A Canada facilities. This tag system must also be used for identifying disconnect and plug locations. When a blind/blank is being installed the following are important: o ite-Specific blinding/blanking procedures or S guides must be followed o Gaskets must be installed on the pressure side and, where possible, on both sides to prevent damage to flange faces

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Energy Isolation

6.

Single Block valves

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Energy Isolation

o roper pressure rated blinds/blanks and P gaskets must be used. See specification table at the end of this section

Double Block and Bleed: I f installing blinds/blanks creates a hazard and disconnect and plug is impractical, the recommended alternative for isolating equipment is closing double (block) valves with a bleed valve in between. The bleed valve size between the block valves must be sufficient to handle potential upstream block valve leakage without applying pressure to the downstream block valve. Block valves must be locked and tagged in a closed position and the bleed valve must be locked and tagged in the open position. NOTE: Bleed valve outlets must be vented with consideration given to both Safety and Environmental impacts Single Block Valves with Authorization: Closing of inlet valve and outlet valve and then depressuring the equipment. Must verify that the valves hold before work commences. Valves must be locked closed and tagged. Can be used only when approved by a Professional Engineer or Functional Team Lead, based on documented risk assessment complete with site-specific procedure. Double Block Valves (No Bleed): Two valves closed on each side of the equipment without de-pressuring between the block valves. The block valve nearest to the inlet and the outlet of the isolated equipment must be locked and tagged closed. Single Block:

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Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Unique task: Task that is unique and requires the expertise of a Professional Engineer to ensure that the equipment isolation meets BP safety requirements and OH&S regulations. Reference Forms: g HSSEr MF 80001 Energy Isolation Log gHSSEr MF 88001 Permit to Work gHSSEr MF 34004 Pre-Job Risk Assessment

GROUND DISTURBANCE PRACTICE 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability Th is practice applies to all BP Canada Energy BP Canada Gas Performance Unit(CGPU) employees, contracted employees, contractors and other visiting personnel involved in ground disturbance activities on CGPU sites. The purpose of this practice is to outline the requirements for ground disturbance necessary to ensure worker safety and to avoid contact with all underground facilities. Scope of Definitions G round Disturbance is a man made cut, cavity, trench or depression in the earths surface. Examples

1.2

2.0 2.1

37

Ground Disturbance

Closing of inlet valve and outlet valve and then depressuring the equipment. Must verify that the valves hold before work commences. Valves must be locked closed and tagged.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Ground Disturbance

include excavating, digging, trenching, plowing, drilling, tunneling, aurgering, back-filling, blasting, hydrovacing, topsoil stripping, land leveling, grading, clearing, fencing, rig anchors and soil sampling. 3.0 3.1 Scope of Responsibilty E ach worker has the responsibility to recognize ground disturbance hazards and take corrective measures by ensuring this practice is followed. O n-site BP representative in charge or designate must ensure that: mergency Response Plans are in place to adE dress Ground Disturbance specific hazards as well as the area Emergency Response Plan n adequate inventory of Protective Equipment A required for hazards identified for the Ground Disturbance (shoring, cages, gas detection, barricades, harness, lifelines etc.) is available ll protective trench devices temporarily used in A an excavation are to be certified by a Professional Engineer Ground Disturbance permit and, where A required, a Confined Space Permit is issued round movement is controlled and collapse G is prevented by systematically shoring, sloping, benching and use of temporary protective devices(see section 5.5) hazard assessment of the worksite is comA pleted prior to work commencing, this includes identification, and where possible, isolation and depressurization of all underground hazards (e.g. pipelines, electric cables) within the area to be disturbed at all workers are trained in STOP-THINKTh

3.2

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ll requirements of the Ground Disturbance A Code of Practice and Permit have been met Scope Of Training And Certification A ll workers involved in the ground disturbance must be trained and competent. This training can be job specific training on site by a person who has received formalized Ground Disturbance Level II training from a recognized institute. The person supervising the job must have formalized Ground Disturbance Level II training. P rior to Ground Disturbance activity commencing, a Work Permit and Hazard Assessment Form (gHSSEr MF 88001) and Ground Disturbance permit (gHSSEr MF 84001) shall be completed. Ground Disturbance training is not required for the BP representative completing the Work Permit and Hazard Assessment Form. Any worker who issues a Ground Disturbance permit, supervises or independently creates a disturbance requires formalized Level II Ground Disturbance training. The Ground Disturbance Permit recipient is not required to have Ground Disturbance training. Permit recipient is not required to have training but person supervising the job must have training and be on-site during the disturbance. Both permits shall be filed at the field office for 13 months. T raining shall be conducted by a competent trainer. Onsite documentation of training will be entered in the VTA database. Scope of Consideration for Ground Disturbance

4.0 4.1

4.2

4.3

5.0

39

Ground Disturbance

GO and Time Out for Safety and are able to exercise these tools

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Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Ground Disturbance

5.1

A risk assessment is necessary to determine if a ground disturbance permit needs to be completed and all steps followed. This risk assessment needs to be completed by a person trained in ground disturbance by a recognized institute. A Ground Disturbance Permit is required any time powered mechanized equipment is used to disturb the ground. An exemption to this rule would be grading a lease road (see 5.3) as it is considered low risk due to extra ground cover. Certain manual penetrating hand tools can damage underground structures and this should be considered when doing risk analysis. F ollowing is a list of jobs that have been identified as low risk jobs and therefore a ground disturbance permit would not need to be issued: sing a spade to dig to a depth of less than 30 U cm Pounding in wooden survey peg Pushing in wire marker flags Grading a lease road sing hydro vac at low pressure (< 2200 p.s.i.) to U dig H ydrovacing or hand exposure is to be used on plant facilities (excluding wellsites) to locate any possible underground facilities. No mechanical excavation. A complete hazard assessment for ground disturbance needs to address the following areas which are incorporated in the Work Permit and Hazard Assessment Form (gHSSEr 88001):

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.5

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f an excavation is more than 1.5 metres deep I and closer to the wall or bank than the depth of the excavation, it must be properly shored or cut back before workers can enter the area. If this is not possible an engineered approved structure for shoring will need to be installed. Proper shoring is as follows: If the soil is considered: o hard and compact the walls are sloped to within 1.5 metres of the bottom of the excavation at an angle of not less than 30 degrees measured from the vertical o likely to crack or crumble the walls are sloped to within 1.5 metres of the bottom of the excavation at an anlgle of not less than 45 degrees measured from the veritcal o soft, sandy or loose the walls are sloped from the bottom of the excavation at an angle of not less than 45 degrees measured from the vertical

e employer must ensure the the Spoil Pile is Th piled so that: o the leading edge is at least 1 metre away from the edge of the excavation o the slope of the spoil pile adjacent to the excavation is at an angle of not more than 45 degrees from the horizontal, and o loose materials are scaled and trimmed from the spoil pile

e method of identification of underground Th facilities e method of exposure methods and pressures Th

41

Ground Disturbance

onsideration must be given to all trenches C and excavations being confined spaces.If the atmosphere in an excavation cannot be guaranteed safe, the excavation would be considered a confined space

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Ground Disturbance

involved afety and environmental procedures for dealing S with encountered or compromised underground facilities pecific excavation considerations such as soil S type, consistency, natural angle of repose, slurry disposal, contamination, preexcavated, and spoil pile placement ize of excavation, proximity to traffic, stability S of adjacent improvement, structures, vibration producing equipment, load placement distances and wieght distribution relating to the excavation (vehicles, equipment, piping, lay down areas, etc) ngineering certification and design requireE ments for excavations > 6 metres (4.6 metres BC) ethods to stabilize excavation faces, ramping M and proper access & egress points, maintain a safe atmsophere, establish degradation factors (heat, cold, water, soil fluid pressures, environmental conditions) e work to be carried out, the number of workTh ers and tools and equipment in the excavation, PPE requirements and the need for a safety standby D uring the job, in accordance with the permit, ground and atmospheric conditions must be continually monitored for changing conditions. See gHSSEr MS830. H eavy equipment (including pickup trucks) must not cross a pipeline unless it is properly ramped or there is a minimum of 1.5 metres of ground cover. The pipeline owner may have more stringent requirments therefore this should always be addressed in the pre-project meeting. Scope of Forms

5.6

5.7

6.0

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Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

6.1

g HSSEr MF 84001-BP Canada Energy Ground Disturbance Permit HSSEr MF 88001 BP Canada Work Permit and g Hazard Assessment Scope of References

6.2

7.0

7.1 lberta General Safety Regulations AR 448/83 as A amended. Part 32 7.2 B.C. Occupational Health and Safety Regulation and Guidelines 296/97 as amended Ontario Regulation 213 Construction Projects - Part III Excavations, as amended HSSEr MS820- g Confined Space Entry Practice g HSSEr MS830- Working in a Combustible Gas Environment Practice

7.3 7.4

LIFTING AND RIGGING PRACTICE 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability This practice applies to all BP Canada Gas Performance Unit (CGPU) employees, contracted employees, contractors and other visiting personnel doing lifting and rigging operations on CGPU premises and work sites. The purpose of the practice is to identify safe lifting and rigging procedures, when it is necessary to prepare a lifting plan and to make certain all neces-

1.2

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sary pre-planning has been accomplished when heavy loads and/or long booms will be in proximity of operating equipment. 1.3 Th e practice defines training and certification requirements for crane operators, crane inspection, maintenanace requirements and fundamental operating requirements used throughout the BP Canada Gas Performance Unit (CGPU). Th e practice defines circumstances and requirements that classify a lift to be Critical, and if deemed critical, requires that the Critical Lift form be completed, signed, and executed by all responsible parties associated with the lift. Scope of Responsibility E ach worker is responsible for recognizing lifting and rigging hazards and taking corrective measures to ensure that this practice is followed. The on-site BP representative in charge or designate must ensure: E mergency response plans are in place to address specific Lifting and Rigging hazards for the job at hand Th at the workers are trained and competent to operate the cranes and/or hoists or rig up for lifting as required for the work at hand A ll cranes, hoists and rigging equipment are properly labelled and inspected daily prior to work commencing Th at the safety devices installed on the lifting equipment are operational A hazard assesment is completed prior to start-

1.4

2.0 2.1

2.2

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ing work that includes identification of the loads involved and that the lifting equipment is adequate and otherwise ready for service for those loads. It will identify that the lift is clear of overhead obstacles, that workers are aware of the hazards and there is a clear understanding of communication methods and what hand signals are to be used, and how the load is to be balanced and directed throughout the various stages of the lift Th at all workers are trained in STOPTHINK-GO and Time Out for Safety and feel comfortable in being able to exercise these tools Scope of Training, Certification and Competencies O nly trained and competent authorized personnel or trainees under the direct supervision of trained and competent authorized personnel will be permitted to operate cranes and hoists or rig up for lifting. Th e employer of crane operators and riggers will coordinate the training and will maintain the training records. Crane Operators will have: ppropriate Provincial Crane Operators CertifiA cate or an Inter-Provincial Certificate e Alberta Apprenticeship has 3 defined apTh prenticeship programs for lifting and hoisting obile Crane Certification 3 year program, M capable of lifiting > 45 tons. oom Truck Certification is required when B operating:

3.0

3.1

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a) Booms (including telescoping booms and articulating booms possessing live lines) capable of swinging, hoisting and booming up and down with a lifting capacity of greater than 5 tons and less than 45 tons b) Articulation booms without live lines with a lifting capacity of greater than 8 tons and less that 45 tons ellhead Boom Truck to work in this trade W a person must be a registered apprentice or a certified journeyman or hold a recognized trade certificate. A wellhead boom truck may be used for one or more of the following: 1. Wellhead pumping operations. 2. Wireline operations 3. Perforation operations 4. Coiled tubing operations 5. Snubbing operations 6. Rig up and rig out of slant service rigs. ll operators of lifting devices rated > 2000 A kilograms shall be certified as a journeyman operator or enrolled in the Alberta Apprenticeship system. Operators of lifting equipment that is rated at < 2000 kilograms must be able to show competence to the items below: 1. Sound working knowledge and understanding of the use of hardware and equipment 2. Ability to read,understand and implement lift plans and drawings 3. Ability to recognize hazards and risks within the lift area, have a clear understanding of lift dynamics, and have previous experience or familiarity with the type of lift to be performed 3.4 Riggers will have: Knowledge of equipment

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4.0 4.1

orking knowledge of relevant practices, codes W and practices bility to prepare and interpret site and lift plans A and drawings Knowledge of hand signals Scope of Inspection and Maintenance A ll cranes, hoists and rigging equipment will be installed, erected, checked, labelled, examined, inspected, tested, operated, maintained and repaired in accordance with the appropriate practice listed in the applicable provincial regulations. A ll lifting devices (i.e. Davitt Arms) must be certified by an engineer and properly labelled for capacities. A ll cranes on CGPU sites must have the most recent appropriate inspection documentation on site as per 5.1. I f an incident occurs with lifting equipment (i.e. shock loading to the boom, sling breaks during lifts), and damage is suspected, the crane shall be taken out of service until it is recertified in safe operability. A ll cranes and hoists will receive preventative maintenance based on usage and manufacturers recommendations. A ll rigging equipment will be inspected to prior to each usage to ensure the integrity of the equipment. All damaged rigging equipment will be removed from use immediately and destroyed or discarded or repaired and certified by the manufacturer. (See Appendix 1 for guidelines regarding sling damage).

4.2

4.3

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Experience with lift procedures

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5.0 5.1

Scope of General Operation A substantial and durable rating chart with clearly legible letters and figures will be provided with each crane and securely fixed to the crane cab in a conspicious location visible to the operator while seated at the controls. Cranes will not be operated without the full amount of any ballast or counterweight in place as specified by the manufacturer. The ballast or counterweight in place that is specified by the manufacturer will not be exceeded. W hen a crane is to be operated near energized overhead electrical power lines, a clearance of 3 meters will be maintained as an absolute limit of approach with the boom, block, and load to ensure safe operation and eliminate hazards of electrocution. A crane in transport with the boom or mast lowered can come within 2 meters of an energized line. If the voltage is greater than 50kv, the clearance shall be increased 10 centimeters for every 10kv over 50kv. Th e crane operator will not lift or carry any load over or above personnel. The area of the lift over which the load is carried should be barricaded (i.e. roping, taping) and signed. All unnecessary personnel will be restricted from the barricaded area. No hoisting, lowering, swinging, or traveling will be done while personnel is on the load or the hook. All crane hooks must be equipped with a positive locking safety latch.

5.2

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5.8

Once a load is hooked up, the load is the responsibility of the crane operator. The command STOP may be given by anyone and must be obeyed by everyone including the crane or hoist operator.

5.9

5.10 Backhoes, track hoes, front-end loaders, side loaders and similar earth moving equipment may be used only for incidental lifting in which they are designed. Such use of this equipment shall comply with the equipment manufacturers requirements, specifications and designs for lifting. 5.11 While making lifts, cranes equipped with outriggers will have them fully deployed whenever possible. Wood blocks used to support outriggers must be strong enough to prevent crushing, be free of defects, and be of sufficient width and length to prevent shifting or toppling under load. 5.12 Tools, oil cans, waste, extra fuses and other necessary articles will be stored in the tool box and not be permitted to lie loose in or about the cab. 5.13 ranes will not be refueled while the engine is runC ning. 5.14 carbon dioxide, dry chemical, or equivalent fire A extinguisher will be kept in the cab or the vicinity of the crane, with easy accessibility. 5.15 se of a flag man is required to direct the lifting U operator in a blind zone. The flag man should be

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5.7

The crane operator must test the brakes each time a load approaching the rated load is handled by raising it a few inches and applying the brakes.

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competent in the use of signalling to direct the lift operator. 6.0 6.1 Scope of Rigging the Load Only competent riggers will attach a load. A competent rigger must have sufficient knowledge of hand signals and rigging loads and procedures. Prior to a lifting operation, STOP, THINK, GO and ensure communication and hand signals are reviewed. E nsure that the hoist rope is free from kinks or twists. Do not wrap the hoist rope around the load. E nsure that the load will be attached to the hook by means of slings or other approved rigging devices. T ake care to make certain that the sling clears all obstacles (i.e. sharp edges, portruding objects). Scope of Hoisting Operation Center the crane over the load before starting the hoist to avoid swinging the load as the lift is started. The crane operator must make sure the load is well secured and properly balanced in the sling or lifting device before it is lifted more than a few inches. A test lift should be performed. L oads should not be swung by the crane to reach areas not under the crane. Crane hoisting should be kept vertical. Cranes will not be used for dragging loads sideways.

6.2

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7.5

D o not make lifts beyond the rated local capacity of the crane, slings, chains, cables or any other rigging and lifting equipment. On truck mounted cranes, no loads will be lifted over the cab of the vehicle except as approved by the crane manufacturer. Scope of Holding the Load The crane operator will not be permitted to leave their position at the controls while the load is suspended. Do not leave unsupervised loads suspended. Neither the load nor the boom will be lowered below the point where less than five full wraps of cable remain on their respective drums. Scope of Moving the Load Before moving the load, ensure all slings, chains, or other load lifting devices are fully seated in the saddle of the hook. E veryone in the immediate area must be clear of the load and aware that a load is being moved. When raising, lowering, or moving loads, a horn or some other method of warning must be used to warn personnel in the area that a lift is taking place. T ag lines of sufficient length must be used to steady or guide the loads as they are being moved unless they would not be effective (e.g. extremely heavy

7.6

8.0 8.1

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7.4

D uring hoisting, care should be taken so that there is no sudden acceleration or deceleration of the moving load.

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large loads) or creating an uncontrolled hazard. Rig matting may be moved without tag lines with the load less than 1 meter from the ground and workers standing back from the load. 10.0 Scope of Travelling

10.1 When travelling without a load, the empty hook should be secured. 10.2 Speed should be kept to a minimum and should not exceed manufacturers recommendations. 10.3 efore travelling a crane with a load, the crane operaB tor will be responsible for ensuring position of the load, boom location, ground support, travel route, and speed of movement. When travelling with a suspened load, ground speed should not exceed 5kph. The crane will have a ground or vehicle guide to escort them so that travel can be conducted in the safest manner possible. 10.4 crane, with or without a load, shall not be travelled A with the boom so that it may bounce back over the cab.

11.0

Scope of Critical Lift Requirements

11.1 lift will be considered Critical and a Critical Lift A Plan will be completed when any of the following conditions or circumstances exists. 11.2 All lifts made over operating process equipment.

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11.4 wo or more cranes are required for a single piece T of equipment. Boom cats during pipeline stringing operations would not be considered a critical lift. 11.5 Utilization of poles and derricks that have been erected for a specific lift. 11.6 If power lines are within twice the maximum swing radius of the crane, plus the required voltage clearance. Minimum clearance is 3 meters for voltages up to 50 kilovolts (kV) and distances increasing by 1.5 meters for every extra 150 kV. 11.7 ifting of personnel. Manbaskets must engineered L and visually inspected before the lift is made. Lifts of personnel utilizing man baskets must conform to 29 CFR 1926.550 (g). 11.8 BP CGPU or contract employee requests a lift plan. 12.0 Scope of the Critical Lift Plan

12.1 e contractor performing the Critical Lift must Th develop a Critcal Lift Procedure and must include a Critical Lift Checklist which must reviewed by a BP CGPU representative. (see Appendix 3 for an example). 13.0 Drilling and Well Servicing

13.1 rilling and Service rigs will be maintained and D inspected in accordance with the manufacturers and American Petroleum Insitudes (API) specifications. Certification of Masts will be in accordance of CA-

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11.3 ingle crane lifts when the total load exceeds 80% of S the cranes load chart.

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DOC Recommended Practice 1.0, 2.0. 3.0 and 4.0. 13.2 rilling and Service rigs will also follow Part 37, Oil D and Gas Wells, in the OH&S code in which lifting related equipment is referenced. 14.0 15.0 Scope of Appendices APPENDIX 1- Sling Checklist APPENDIX 2- Sling Operating Practices Guidelines APPENDIX 3- xample of a Critical Lift Plan E completion/Approval Checklist APPENDIX 4- Initial Crane Inspection APPENDIX 5- Daily Crane Inspection Scope of References

15.1 lberta General Safety Regulation AR 448/83 as A amended 15.2 B.C. Occupational Health and Safety Regulation and Guidleines 296/97 as amended 15.3 CAODC Recommended Practices 15.4 Albertas OH&S Act, Regulation and Code Ontario Regulation 851 Industrial Establishments and 16.0 Regulation 213 Construction Projects, as amended Forms gHSSEr MF 34004 Pre-Job Risk Assessment HSSEr MF 88001-BP Canada Energy Comg pany Hot Work/Cold Work Permit

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Lifting and Rigging Practice - Sling Guidelines This checklist is to be referred to prior to the use of any slings for lifting and rigging procedures. If any of the following checklist items are identified as an issue, remove the sling from use immediately. 1) oes the synthetic sling(s) have a rated capacity D tag that is clearly legible? 2) re there any acid or alkalis burns on the A sling(s)? 3) s there any melting, charring, or weld spatters I on any part of the sling(s)? 4) re there any holes, tears, cuts, snags or embedA ded particles in the sling? 5) s there any broken or worn stitching in load I bearing splices? 6) Are there signs of excessive abrasive wear? 7) Are there are knots in any part of the sling? 8) s there any evidence of distortion, excessive pitI ting, corrosion or broken fittings on the sling(s)? 9) re there any conditions which cause doubt as to A the strength of the sling?

APPENDIX 2 Sling Operating Practices Guidelines 1) etermine the weight of the load. The weight of D the load shall be within the rated capacity of the sling. 2) elect the sling(s) having suitable characteristics S

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APPENDIX 1

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Lifting Opeartions

for the type of load, hitch and environment. 3) lings shall not be loaded in excess of the rated S capacity. Considerations shall be given to the sling load angle which affects rated capacity. 4) lings with fittings that are used as a choker S hitch shall be of sufficient length to assure that the choking action is on the webbing, and never on a fitting. 5) lings used in a basket hitch shall have the load S balanced to prevent slippage. 6) e opening in fittings shall be the proper shape Th and size to insure that the fitting will seat properly in the hook or other attachments. 7) lings shall always be protected from being cut S by sharp corners, sharp edges, protrusions or abrasive surfaces. 8) lings shall not be dragged on the floor or over S an abrasive surface. 9) lings shall not be twisted or tied into knots, or S joined by knotting. 10) lings shall not be pulled from under loads if the S load is resting on the sling. 11) Do not drop slings equipped with metal fittings. 12) lings that appear to be damaged shall not be S used unless inspected and accepted. 13) e sling shall be hitched in a manner providing Th control of the load. 14) ersonnel, including portions of the human P body, shall be kept from between the sling and the load, and from between the sling and the crane hook or hoist hook. 15) Personnel shall stand clear of the suspended load. 16) Personnel shall not ride the sling. 17) Shock loading shall be avoided. 18) wisting and kinking the legs (branches) shall be T avoided.

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20) uring lifting, with or without the load, personD nel shall be alert for possible snagging. 21) e slings legs (branches) shall contain or supTh port the load from the sides above the center of gravity when using a basket hitch. 22) lings shall be long enough so that the rated S capacity of the sling is adequate when the angle of the legs (branches) is taken into consideration. 23) lace blocks under load prior to setting down P the load, to allow removal of the web sling, if applicable. 24) ylon and polyester slings shall not be used at N temperatures above 90 degrees C. 25) xposure to sunlight or ultra-violet light E degrades the strength of slings. Store slings in a cool, dry and dark place when not in use.

APPENDIX 3-Example of a Critical Lift Plan Critical Lift Plan Completion/Approval Checklist Note: All applicable forms (Lift Plan, Lifting Near Electrical Hazards Safety Form, etc.) and drawings/plans (Rigging Drawing, Lifting Site Plot Plan, etc.) must be attached to this completion/approval checklist prior to the approval meeting and for the duration of the lift. Job Name: _____________________________________ Date Lift Expected To Take Place: Planned Duration Of Lift: Site/Ground Evaluation/Preparation: hrs.

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19) oad applied to the hook shall be centered in the L base (bowl) of the hook to prevent point loading on the hook.

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Answer YES or NO (if NO provide explanation and justification of in space provided after each section) A detailed site plot plan has been prepared and includes crane(s) location, all above ground hazard or obstructions, all underground hazards, and load travel paths to be utilized during the lift. Ground conditions surrounding the crane location, as indicated in the attached site plot plan; have been evaluated for underground hazards such as underground piping, conduit, and uncompacted backfill from recently filled excavations. Any potential underground hazard and the position of the crane has been noted on the site plot plan. All open excavations in the lift area have been examined for their potential effect on the lift in question. All open excavations in the lift area have been noted on the site plot plan. Ground stability has been evaluated and documented in the attached report for ability to support the bearing surface of the lifting equipment being used. All conditions that may affect the ability of the ground to support the load, such as dynamic or impact loads, swing rates and sudden load stops have been examined. Bearing mats are required if any question exist as to the grounds ability to support the lift in question. Construction details of the bearing mats,

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Cranes(s): The lift plan for each crane used to support the load has been completed, reviewed and is attached to the critical lift plan. A detailed crane configuration drawing has been completed, for each crane used to support the load, and includes, but is not limited to, boom configuration to be used, the minimum boom angle to the ground, maximum boom length, maximum operating radius, minimum jib offset angle to the ground (if applicable), to be used during the lift. The maximum allowable wind speed has been established, based on crane manufactures recommendation and load configuration, and is clearly labeled on the crane configuration drawing. The percent crane capacity, as noted on the lift plan, has been verified and the cranes load chart used to complete the lift plan has been attached to the critical lift plan. Load: A detailed drawing of the load has been completed and is attached to the critical lift plan. The detailed load drawing will show, at a minimum, information pertaining to the weight of the load, including any auxiliary

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if required, are attached and have been reviewed.

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equipment such as ladders, platforms, piping, insulation, etc. that may be attached to the load prior to the lift, lifting and tailing lugs available on the load and their orientation, anchor bolt pattern of the load, and anchor bolt pattern of the loads foundation. Any special lifting requirements will also be clearly stated on the detailed load drawing. All information on the detailed load drawing has been verified for accuracy. Rigging: A detailed rigging drawing has been completed and is attached to the critical lift plan. The detailed rigging drawing will show, at a minimum, all rigging to be utilized for the lift, including shackles, slings, I-bolts, spreader bars, chain falls, etc., the configuration of all rigging, including angles and lengths, attachment to the load and crane. All information on the detailed rigging drawing has been reviewed and verified acceptable for the lift in question. Lift Logistics: A logistics plan has been prepared and is attached to the critical lift plan. The logistics plan addressing, at a minimum, the travel path of the crane or cranes supporting the load, swing radius of the crane or cranes supporting the load, the travel path of the load, placement of Signal Person(s), communications between the Signal Person(s) and the crane operator(s), securing the load once it is

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All information in the logistics plan has been reviewed and is acceptable for the lift in question. Critical Lift Plan Approvals: Area Manager: Project/Construction Engineer: Rigging Inspector: Job Representative: The following items must be addressed on the day of the lift. Th e Emergency Response Coordinator has been notified of the lift in question.

The crane location is in accordance with the location noted on the site plot plan. The crane configuration is in accordance with the detailed crane configuration drawing. The rigging configuration is in accordance with the detailed rigging drawing. The Rigging Inspector has obtained the current wind speed and has noted the current wind speed and the maximum allowable wind speed in the spaces provided. The current wind speed is equal to or below the maximum

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in place, and access to disconnect the rigging from the load once the load is secured.

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allowable wind speed mph - Current Wind Speed mph - Maximum Allowable Wind Speed A detailed pre-lift safety meeting has been held and included ALL individuals involved or affected by the critical lift in question and covered all details associated with the lift. Critical Lift Pre-Lift Safety Meeting Attendance: By signing this form, the following individuals are indicating they have actively participated in the pre-lift safety meeting for the critical lift in question and fully understand the scope of the lift to be made and their assigned roles and responsibilities. Equipment Operator: Rigging Inspector: Signal Person/Rigger: Signal Person/Rigger: APPENDIX 4 Initial Crane Inspection Date: ____________________________ Inspection By. _____________________ _____________ Is Crane Certification Current? Please include date of certification ____________ ____________ Is Operator Certification Current? Is the size of the crane adequate for the

Operations Representative:

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____________

Is there a current log book kept with the crane? APPENDIX 5 Daily Crane Inspection

Date: ____________________________ Inspection By: _____________________ ___Lubrication (gears, pulleys, pins, wire rope) ___Log (check previous reports or logs) ___Cylinders (fittings, hoses, leaks, seals) ___Bolts/Pins ((loose, missing, damaged) ___Capacity (limitations, plate, rigging, chart, log) ___Hoses (leaks, filters, wear secure, connections) ___Manual (familiar with operator/maintenance manual) ___Controls (movement, swing, telescope) ___Brakes (functioning, limit switch) ___Outriggers (functioning, limit switch) ___Pads (large enough, strong enough, good condition) ___Hydraulic Fluid (level ok, filter ok) ___Boom (wear, dents, bolts, pins, cables, sheaves) ___Engine (belts, filters, wiring, PTO) ___Work Area (clean, access, barricades, workers) ___Obstructions (clearances, power lines, vehicles) ___Ground (firm, level, dry) ___Load (capacity, weight known) ___Cable (kinks, damage, wear, capacity) ___Rigging (capacity, fittings, hardware, clips) ___Rigger (understanding of hand signals, roles, high

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jobs anticipated?

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visibility vest) ___Hook (bent, twisted, safety catch, wear, cracks) MOC ___Sheaves (cable fits, wear) ___Track or tires (clean, free of debris, condition)

MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE PRACTICE 1.0 1.1 Purpose, Scope and Applicability M anagement of Change (MOC) is a system to evaluate, authorize and document changes before they are made and ensure proper closure after the changes are completed. Its purpose is to establish the procedures necessary to ensure that the risks arising from proposed changes are managed to an acceptable level. Th e MOC practice applies to all permanent, temporary and emergency changes to organization, staffing levels, systems, procedures, equipment, products, materials or substances. M OC practice is also an excellent communication tool to inform impacted groups or areas that a change is being considered and/or about to occur. The practice is designed to insure compliance with gHSSEr Element 7 and Group Process Safety and Integrity Management Practice Element 2. The practice covers modifications intended for implementation by BP personnel and contractors, as well as projects designed by an approved engineer-

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

1.6

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ing contractor, but does not apply to project scope changes which are managed by the engineering contractor using their internal processes. 1.7 The practice should be applied when assessing any significant change in BP operations in the (CGPU), in particular: odifications to plant facilities and equipment M Changes to the organization odifications to wells within the well integrity M envelope hanges to critical information and procedures C Changes to IT systems and softwar It is the intention of this process to highlight changes that affect the original design intent of the facility, which includes facility and equipment, organizational structures and supporting documentation, with the intention of maintaining an auditable trial from the original design through to the current status. The application of this process provides this audit trail. It is not necessary to follow this practice when: outine activities covered by practice R maintenance and operations procedures (e.g. scaffolding) are undertaken under other safety management controls, such as safe systems of work and permits arrying out replacement-in-kind work C eplacing an individual with someone having R the same competencies f you are not sure whether an MOC practice is I required, access this web link to an MOC decision tree: MOC

1.8

1.9

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Technical MOC Practice Decision Tree 1.10 A Temporary change is not intended to be permanent (e.g. 30, 60, 90 days) and will not exceed the indicated timeframe for the change without an additional authorization and review. SmartMOC can be used to record the termination/reassessment date and forward a reminder task to the SPA. 1.11 n Emergency Change is one in which personnel A assume the responsibility to make a change without invoking the full MOC practice. This type of change is justified when the following circumstances exist: Immediate danger to personnel Potential for major equipment damage Potential for major operational loss Serious environmental impact Community complaint Regulatory violation

MOC

In spite of the fact that emergency change initially by passes the formal change process, it is vital that there be at least one review with a minimum of three people, preferably from different disciplines and the change must be approved by a Technical Authority or line supervisor. Only in true life-or-death situations where minutes count can a single person assume full responsibility for making a change without reviewing that change with others. The formal application of the MOC practice must follow the emergency change as soon as possible. 1.12 Organizational Change can range from substitution of personnel to the elimination of positions. Changes to the organizations structure and responsibilities are reflected in HSSE responsibilities and accountabilities; therefore, organizational change whether permanent or temporary must formally assess and recorded.

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1.13 n Administrative Change is one that impacts a polA icy, procedure, process or form and includes changes from regulators or outside agencies. These changes stand alone and are not initiated as the consequence of a Technical or Organizational change. Policies, procedures, processes or forms affected as a result of a Technical or Organizational change are resolved as part of the original instigating change. 1.14 anaging a change to a DCS (Distributed Control M System) or a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system requires completion of specific records for assurance. Details of how to manage this type of change are available at the following web link: MOC practice for SCADA Change Worksheet 2.0 2.1 Roles and Responsibilities I n summary, the MOC practice requires competent personnel in the following three areas: nitial approval and risk assessment: Facilitator I and Approval Authorities mplementation of change: Single Person AcI countable, Gatekeeper and Assurance role erformance Unit technical authority frameP work: Engineering Authorities, Technical Authorities and Technical Reviewers

2.2 e key process roles in the MOC practice are the Th Facilitator and Approval Authorities. They have the following roles and responsibilities: 2.2.1 The Facilitator: acilitators will be appointed for each major site F

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or group of smaller sites MOC ey are typically the Management of Change or Th Process Safety Management Coordinators acilitators must be properly trained in the F change assessment methodology being used ey should have detailed knowledge of the site, Th its hazards and procedures The Facilitators are responsible for: o ogging data associated with the change into L the SmartMOC system o Selecting the appropriate method of assessment and managing the process o Identifying which Technical Authorities should be involved in the assessment of risk associated with a given change proposal o aking recommendations, including condiM tions for implementation and such monitoring requirements as deemed necessary, to the Approval Authority o nsuring that the assessment team includes all E necessary knowledge and competence for the change being assessed o aintaining a record of the status of all MOC M practice documentation o Recommending improvements to this procedure Note: The Facilitator and the Approval Authorities cannot be the same person 2.2.2 The Approval Authority: pproval Authorities should be appointed for A each major site or group of smaller sites ey will typically be the Manager, or their Th designate(s) based on their role, responsibility, accountability and delegation of authority e formal delegation of authority for MOC Th

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practice within CGPU can be accessed at the following web link: Approval Authority for MOC practice The Approval Authority is responsible for: o Initial approval or rejection, within the Performance context, of a change to proceed to assessment o Nominating a Facilitator to manage the assessment o etting the initial workflow schedule for the S change o Accepting the outcome of the assessment and approving, or not, the change to move to implementation. In this role, if appropriate, they will identify the implementation process o nsuring that any changes stay within defined E scope and that the recommendations from the assessment are fully implemented o nsuring that the roles within the MOC pracE tice are carried out by competent personnel o Feedback to the Originator or Facilitator when rejecting a proposal o nsuring appropriate financial support for the E change MOC

Note: The Facilitator and the Approval Authority cannot be the same person 2.3 e key process roles in the implementation of any Th approved change are the SPA, the Gatekeeper and the Assurance role. They have the following roles and responsibilities: 2.3.1 The Single Point Accountable role (SPA): e SPA person will be recommended as part of Th the approval process

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The SPA is responsible for: o Implementation and management of the approved change through the MOC practice o Implementing recommendations from an MOC practice, including updating documentation

MOC

o aintaining the change within the scope M assessed by the MOC practice and ensuring that any changes to the scope are adequately assessed o Completing the Pre-Startup Compliance Review when the change is managed using the MOC practice

2.3.2 The Gatekeeper role: e Gatekeeper will be recommended as part of Th the approval process if the change is managed outside the MOC practice The Gatekeeper will typically be responsible for: o The funding budget, but the Approval Authority will be responsible if the change is implemented within the MOC practice o Approving the stages of the implementation process, in particular, sanction of the scope, cost and timescale o Providing or obtaining resources for implementation of the change o Completing the Pre-Startup Compliance Review when the change is managed using an outside process

2.3.3 The Assurance role: ill be recommended as part of the approval W process and will typically be the Facilitator The Assurance role is responsible for: o Attesting that the change has addressed the risks and actions identified in the assessment

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o iaising with the Gatekeeper, during impleL men tation of the change through another process, to ensure adequate resources are available o Assisting the SPA or Gatekeeper to document the Pre-Startup Compliance Review

2.4

Th e Performance Unit Technical Authority Framework: o The key roles in the CGPU Technical Authority framework supporting MOC practice are Engineering Authorities, Technical Authorities and Technical Reviewers o The roles and responsibilities of these authorities are detailed in the CGPU Engineering and Technical Authorities Register o The Register can be accessed through the following web link: Technical Authorities Register Rev 2

2.4.1 e Engineering Authoritys responsibilities Th for MOC practice are: echnical approval authority for MOC practice T proposals defined as high risk ssures compliance with the engineering aspects A of Management of Change 2.4.2 e Technical Authoritys responsibilities for Th MOC practice are: echnical approval authority for MOC practice T proposals defined as medium risk providing: o Independent assessment of the risks associated with the proposed change o Review of the key documents related to the

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o Attesting that the change has been controlled within the scope of the original MOC assessment, or that any changes to the original scope have been adequately assessed

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proposed change o Specification of the maximum implementation period for temporary modifications o Independent technical arbitration 2.4.3 e Technical Reviewers responsibilities for Th MOC practice are: ct as the point of contact for MOC practice A requests at the facility level within their assigned discipline for changes defined as low risk rovide requested technical advice and recomP mendations within the required time frame pecify the maximum duration permitted for S temporary deviations articipate in Process Hazards Analyses as is apP propriate hair or participate in Management of Change C technical and safety reviews ct as point of contact for new projects in area of A competency valuate risk associated with each decision or E recommendation carefully and base technical recommendations on reasonable risk Supporting Technology

MOC

3.0

3.1 The SmartMOC software program developed by Dya dem International, in relationship with CGPU, is the database that supports MOC practice in the CGPU. All facilities are encouraged to utilize the SmartMOC program as it insures management of the process. A log-in name and password are required to access the software and can be obtained from your PSMC. The software can be accessed at the following website: SmartMOC Log-in Page 4.0 Process Description

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4.1 ll potential changes that are assessed by the MOC A practice are carried out through the following main process steps. SmartMOC automates this workflow so that as each step is completed, the change advances to the next step and advises the identified resource to expedite the change. 4.2 Initiation Step: ny BP employee or full time contractor in A CGPU may initiate a change proposal under the MOC practice t this stage, the Initiator has the greatest knowlA edge of the change and needs to communicate that information in sufficient detail to eliminate delays in the evaluation of the change and include any supporting or relevant documentation The Initiator should: o Identify the type of change: Technical, Administrative* or Organizational* o Identify the implementation type: Permanent, Temporary* or Emergency* o Identify the location of the change, the date initiated, their name and if they are representing others o martMOC shares the Maximo equipment S database. The database can be searched to identify the equipment affected by the change o Identify a title for the change. o A unique file number will be generated by Smart MOC efine the reason or scope of the proposed D change by including any relevant history or background of the problem or opportunity and any other pertinent information dentify the high-level risks they may be aware I

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of associated with the change during its implementation, e.g. hot work required, equipment shutdown, etc. MOC nclude the potential opportunities presented I by the proposed change to improve things like safety, integrity, production, environment, etc. uggest a high-level plan for achieving the S change. How would you make the change? Estimate the cost of the change dentify the Preliminary Approval Authority. I This will generally be the Initiators direct report supervisor, but can be whomever is appropriate to approve the change being proposed ecord the details in the Initiator Section of the R SmartMOC program and attach any supporting documentation

* NOTE: Not available in Phase 1 deployment of SmartMOC, but the type can be noted in the comments section and a task created for the removal date of a temporary change. 4.3 Preliminary Approval Step: o Based on the details presented in the Initiator section the Approval Authority assesses if the change proposal is worthwhile, taking into account Performance context, likely cost and benefits o If satisfied, the Approval Authority then endorses the change in principal, assigns a suitable Facilitator to carry out the Change Assessment, and sets the initial workflow schedule o If the Approval Authority rejects the proposal, the reason for rejection is recorded and the process terminated with the feedback being given to the Initiator

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o Record the details in the Approval Section of the SmartMOC program 4.4 Change Assessment Step - General: n acceptance of the assignment, the Facilitator O will instigate the change assessment: o nsure that the scope of the change and supE porting information is clear o nsure that all relevant information required E to assess the risks are identified and gathered o Notify the appropriate evaluation personnel and/or Technical Authorities o Carry out the risk assessment with the appropriate personnel o Select the appropriate method for risk assessment. Additional guidance on Process o Hazard Analysis is available at the following web link: http://psmcanada.bpweb.bp.com detailed record of the assessment should be atA tached to the SmartMOC file by the Facilitator. MOC

This should include: o Further clarification of the scope of the change if required o The assumptions associated with the change o Whether or not the change has been undertaken before o The rationale behind the assessment technique selected o The risks that are associated with all stages of the change o The mitigation measures required o The plan to put in place the mitigation measures and the change o Recommendations to proceed or reject the

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change o Recommendations on the way that the modification should be implemented o ecommendations for the SPA and/or the R Gatekeeper Change Assessment Step - Technical Change: nly a trained Facilitator can perform certain O types of Process Hazard Analyses. A list of trained Facilitators within CGPU is available at the following web link: BP CGPU Facilitators o ake an initial determination of the risk level M to identify the level of Technical Authority required to approve the change o Review safe process start-up, operation and shutdown in the full range of foreseeable conditions and scenarios including upsets to insure the risks are reduced to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP) o Review all activities required to maintain facility in a safe condition during the change o Identify all activities required to insure a fully functioning health, safety and environmental protection program, and vigorous process safety and integrity management systems o dentify and include effects of the change on I the Emergency Response Plan o Identify the Process Safety Information or other documentation that will need to be produced or updated as a result of the change 4.6 Change Assessment Step - Organizational Change: e key objective is to ensure that the changed Th organization has the resources (human, time, in-

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formation, etc.), competency and motivation to deliver without making unrealistic expectations of people e risk assessment should use two approaches: Th o apping of tasks and individuals from the old M to the new organization o Scenario assessments should be made where the reorganization impacts staff that may have a role in handling or responding to crises such as upsets and emergencies o A knowledge based checklist to aid in assessing organizational change are available at the following web link: Organizational Change Checklist 4.7 4.8 Change Assessment Step - Administrative Change: dentify affected documents, systems, processes I and procedures nsure ISO-14001 document requirements are E met if they are affected Change Recommendation Step: e Facilitator determines if there is a need to Th identify a different Approval Authority based on the category and ranking of the greatest risk identified in the assessment e Facilitator meets with the Approval AuthorTh ity and briefs them on the output of the assessment ased on the results of the change assessment, B the Facilitator recommends whether the risks associated with the change can be managed t this session the Approval Authority should A make a check on the quality of the assessment and documentation e implementation route for the change should Th MOC

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also be discussed at the meeting MOC e risk ranking also sets the workflow manager Th in SmartMOC. The workflow manager tracks the completion of the change and monitors subsequent steps in the process and sends reminders if critical timelines approach ecord the details in the Assessment Section R of the SmartMOC program and attach any checklists or PHA files developed Sanctioning the Change Step: ased on the review meeting, the Approval AuB thority is responsible for deciding if the change is justified f it is, then the Approval Authority decides I whether the change will be implemented using this MOC practice or another process. Other processes can include the Project Management Plan or other internal/external process y sanctioning the change, the Approval AuthorB ity is confirming that funding for the change is also sanctioned f not approved to proceed, the Approval I Authority records the decision not to implement the change and informs the Facilitator and the Initiator ecord the details in the Approval Section of R SmartMOC

4.9

4.10 Assurance Step: s part of the handover, the Approval Authority A will identify the Assurance role e Assurance Role will verify that all the Th requirements identified in the process to manage the change and its risks are completed satisfactorily and there is a clear, transparent audit trail

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through supporting documentation is assurance is defined in the Records AssurTh ance Form and the Pre-Startup Compliance Review documentation e Assurance Role will perform this verification Th step regardless of how the change is implemented ecord the details in the Assurance Section of R SmartMOC.

4.11 Handover Step: nce approval has been given for the impleO mentation the information and risks associated with the change are communicated to the person responsible for implementing the change ere are two types of handover associated with Th change management: o anding over the assessment using the MOC H practice to an Single Point Accountable (SPA) person to implement the change o Handing over the remaining change management activity to a Gatekeeper for another supporting process or procedure to manage the change ecord the details in the Handover Section of R SmartMOC

4.12 andover for Implementation Using the MOC pracH tice: hen a change has been sanctioned, and the W Approval Authority decides that it can be implemented within this MOC practice, the job will be handed over to the Single Point Accountable person to implement the change hanges that are implemented using the MOC C practice remain the responsibility of the Approval Authority e SPA is responsible for planning, organizing, Th

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leading and controlling all resources associated with completing the change: MOC o e SPA can utilize SmartMOC to manage Th tasks associated with completing the change o PHA recommendations can be uploaded and managed in SmartMOC directly from PHA Pro software if it was utilized to record the hazard analysis f at any time the SPA cannot make the change I within the defined scope, the equipment should be made safe and an additional MOC practice raised to consider the additional changes required Record the details in the SPA Section of SmartMOC

4.13 andover for Implementation by a Supporting H Process or Procedure: hen a job has been sanctioned, and the W Approval Authority decides that it will be implemented outside this MOC practice, the change will be handed over to a Gatekeeper for implementation in another supporting process or procedure e supporting process is responsible for delivery Th of the change hanges that are implemented in this way C become the responsibility of the Gatekeeper hanges to be implemented by supporting proC cesses or procedures will not be closed out in the MOC practice until signed off by the Approval Authority Record the details Gatekeeper Section of SmartMOC

4.14 Close Out Step: hanges that are sanctioned and managed within C

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hen the Assurance role has verified the change W is complete, they will inform the Approval Authority that the change has been completed within the scope of the assessment and that the associated work and documentation is complete e Approval Authority will review the change Th and confirm acceptance of the change by signing off the MOC practice file as complete e records of the MOC practice will be kept Th until the end of the facilitys life ecord the details in the Completion Section R of SmartMOC

5.0

Support for Management of Change

5.1 Training for awareness of MOC practice is manda tory for all CGPU personnel. To facilitate the training, e-Training modules have been developed and are accessed at the following web link: Management of Change Practice Training 5.2 SmartMOC also has a comprehensive Help screen system that explains the software in detail. 5.3 Super Users have been identified for each Operat ing Centre and staff department in Calgary to aid personnel with the transition to the new procedure and software. For a list of these helpful and knowledgeable individuals access the following web link: MOC practice Coordinators by Area

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the MOC practice, or another process, will be kept open until the SPA or Gatekeeper informs the Assurance Role that the change and all supporting documentation is completed

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6.0 6.1 MOC

Performance Measurement The performance of the system will be assessed using the following Key Performance Indicators: umber of MOC practices closed out in time N (e.g. all formal documentation was completed within 90 days of start-up) umber of high risk MOC practices whose N close-out is overdue Audit and Performance Review Th e Engineering Authority for CGPU (Manager, Technical Integrity Group), or delegate, will monitor compliance with the MOC practice on an annual basis to confirm: e process is being correctly applied Th ppropriate risk assessment processes are being A conducted echnical Authorities are being involved approT priately emporary and permanent MOC practices are T closed out in a timely manner Online Reference Documents HSSEr requirements of MOC g Getting HSSE Right SIM Practice Implementation Guide P Element 2 - MOC -Training Modules for MOC E Management of Change Training ngineering & Tech. Authorities Register E Technical Authorities Register Rev 2 elegation of Authority for MOC D Approval Authority for MOC

7.0 7.1

8.0

martMOC software SmartMOC Log-in Page S

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rocess Hazard Analysis Manual PSM/PHA P GPU PHA Facilitators BP CGPU Facilitators C MOC OC practice Coordinators by Area M MOC Coordinators by Area

OC practice for DCS & SCADA Changes M MOC for SCADA Change Worksheet o I need an MOC? D Technical MOC Decision Tree http://psmcanada.bpweb.bp.com Forms anagement of Organizational Change Checklist M gHSSEr MF36101 Pre-Start-up Compliance Review gHSSEr MF 36104 HSSE Review Checklist HSSEMF36102 Technical Review Checklist HSSEMF36103 ecords Assurance Checklist HSSEMF36105 R hemical Assessment & Ranking Tool C gHSSEr MF36106 hecklist for Organizational Change C Organizational Change Checklist

9.0

quipment Specific Knowledge Based Checklists E Equipment Checklists

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Figure 1 Process Safety Management Technical Integrity Group Canada Gas Performance Unit M A N A G E M E N T O F C H A N G E

MOC

Technical Management of Change Decision Tree

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Figure 2

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Figure 3

MOC

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1.0 1.1

Scope and applicability This practice applies to all BP Canada Gas Performance Unit (CGPU) employees, contracted employees, contractors and other visiting personnel doing work on CGPU premises and work sites. This practice addresses issuing and obtaining permits to work within the CGPU and requirements for completing task level hazard assessments. Th e purpose of this practice is to ensure that CGPU employees, contracted employees, and contractor staff use the proper permit to work and complete an adequate task hazard assessment for the particular job being undertaken. The types of permits covered in this Practice are: Hot work permits Cold work permits Confined space permits Ground disturbance permits The types of hazard assessments covered in this Practice are: Permit to Work and Hazard Assessment Procedure Job Safety Environmental Analysis (JSEA) Stop Think Go Time Out for Safety

1.2

1.3

1.4 1.5

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PERMIT TO WORK AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT PRACTICE

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1.6 Permit to Work

Refer to North America Gas SPU Control of Work Practice for requirements around permitted activities and risk assessment requirements. Definitions A rea Authority (AA)- The Area Authority is the person appointed by the OCM or Wells Team Leader for confirming all work activities conducted are consistent with the COW Practice and associated practices and permit requirements. In the case of major projects, the Project Manager, in consultation with the OCM or Wells Team Leader, will assign the AA. This role can be delegated to another person who is a BP Employee or contractor. I ssuing Authority (IA)- The Issuing Authority is the person appointed by the OCM or Wells Team Leader- and assigned by the AA for issuing permits consistent with all associated practice and permit requirements. In the case of major projects, the Project Manager, in consultation with the AA, will assign the IA. P erforming Authority (PA)- The PA is the person who has been assigned by the AA to be responsible for activities carried out on the work site, and is accountable to the IA/AA for the safe delivery of all work activities. Tha PA may be performing a task or may be supervising a group that is performing a task. In special cases the PA may also be the IA if competent in the practice and requirements in question. P erson in Charge (PIC)- The PIC is appointed by the AA to be responsible for coordinating among multiple PAs and IAs working at one site to confrim safe delivery of all work activities. The PIC is an onsite

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2.5

P rocedure A step by step description of how to proceed from start to finish in performing a task properly. J ob Safety Environmental Analysis/(JSEA) A document that has been approved for use by the BP representative in charge or by a contractor that details the job steps, hazards and controls. BP JSEA are documented on form gHSSEr MF34002 and BP NAG JSEAs are documented here- NA Gas JSEA Process. Scope of Responsibility and Accountability E ach Operating Center Manager, Wells Team Leader, and Major Project Manager is accountable for ensuring that: work permit and hazard assessment system A is implemented to control the hazards at the worksite orkers are appropriately trained and competent W in its use The Area Authority will: nsure that a proper permit is issued for the type E of work being undertaken and that everyone involved is aware of the hazards, controls and emergency procedures nsure appropriate permits are issued, closed, E and filed dentify a Person in Charge (PIC) for each I

2.6

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individual that has working knowledge of all work activities being performed by all groups/personnel working on location. The PIC can be the AA. IA, or one of the PAs.

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Permit to Work

worksite prior to commencement of activity and approve any replacements ssign a compenent Issuing Authority (IA) A and/or Performing Authority (PA) for each work site and/or activity onfirm with the IA that all appropriate control C measures have been, or will be, put in place prior to commencement of activity equire that the IA and site work group perform R a risk assessment and agree that needed risk mitigation has occurred and that the work can proceed safely nsure an assessment of the hazards associated E with the work being performed and control measures are identified as part of the permitting process erify that all required testing, inspection and V checking of the work site is completed prior to the work permit being issued nsure that the work area is inspected and E checked after the job is completed e Issuing Authority (IA) is accountable for ensurTh ing that: orkers are aware of STOP-THINK-GO and W Time Out for Safety from their Level 1 indoctrination and feel comfortable being able to use those tools orkers are indoctrinated/orientated prior to W work starting and have all the required tickets and certifications for the job or task ere is proper issuance and closure of permits Th in their area of competnecy, e.g cold work, hot work, confined space entry, ground disturbance, or critical lifting ey are on site for permit issuance and then as Th required as per specific task requirements

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oordinate with the PIC and maintain full C knowledge of all work in progress in the area concerned, imcluding any work that is under someone elses authority/control, i.e. SIMOPS ere is good cummunication with the AA about Th the issuance and closure of permits ll site personnel involved in a work activity are A competent and correctly oufitted for the wok they will perform. orkers have clear understanding of the scope of W work, hazards, controls, and mitigations e correct tools and equipment are available Th and appropriate certifications and/or inspections are reviewed or made as appropriate e required permits are in place and that Th work undertaken on site is consistent with, and confined to, the original scope of work The Performing Authority (PA) is responsible for: onfirming that the following have been clearly C established, communicated, and understood: a process for the transfer of Control of Work between work groups, what procedures and policies will be followed (e.g. what permit tracking system will be used), and who is in charge erifying the permit and hazard assessment is V reviewed by all workers associated with the job prior to them starting work on the job, even if they were not present while completing the permit nforming the Issuing Authority of any changes I in conditions, and for understanding and following the conditions of the permit nsuging adequate handovers take place between E ingoing and outgoing PAs at shift and crew

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ey review with all site personnel a site specific Th emergency response plan

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change periods Permit to Work ccepting and signing authorized permits for the A work activity being performed articipating in the risk assessment for the P planned activity onfirming, by including in the JSEA discusC sion, that all persons involved in the task fully understand the scope of the work, hazards, and controls for the job onfirming that all members of the work party C sign the permit onfirming that only work within the scope of C the permit takes place onfirming that the worksite is kept in a clean C and safe condition both during and upon completion of the job onfirming that appropriate lessions learned C from the job are captured, incorporated, and shared onforming all workers involved in the permitC ted work activity sign the JSEA and permits(s) acknowledging their understanding and agreement. In the event that there is more than one work team, there will be representation from each team during the risk assessment bserving work activities and if an individual O feels that he/she cannot safely manage more than one concurrent task, stop the appropriate portions is assigned work and request assistance from the IA/AA Th e Person in Charge (PIC) is responsible for ensuring that their permitting system meets this Practice and complies with the CGPU permit to work system. They must receive written authority from the Operating Center Manager, Wells Team Leader, or Major Project Manager to use their permitting

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The Person in Charge will: unction as a liason between all personnel and F groups on location oordinate any issues that could result in a C change in work scope with the AA onfirm that all people working on site have C reviewed and signed the JSEA(s)/permits and verified that the appropriate permits have been completed emain on site until work activities have R stopped, permits are closed, and appropriate equipment has been secured for the shift Scope of Expectations A ll workers will acquire the appropriate permit and conduct the appropriate hazard assessment for the type of work they are about to perform. A ll workers are instructed on work permitting and hazard assessment requirements as part of their site-specific orientation training (see gHSSEr MS312 Indoctrinations, Orientations & Monitoring). Th e work area should be inspected for all hazards by the Issuing Authority prior to issuing the permit. Items for consideration include the hazards associated with a potentially flammable atmosphere, need for isolation and/or purging, presence of combustible materials, conflicting jobs in the area and availability of fire fighting equipment. Th e Issuing Authority keeps the green and white copies of the permit and hazard assessment. The

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system at a CGPU work site. Otherwise, the CGPU permit to work system will be used.

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receiver keeps the goldenrod copy of the permit and hazard assessment when doing the work and they will return the form when the work is completed or it is the end of the shift. This expectation does not apply for work that is self-permitted. When the work is completed, the green copy of the form may be provided to the contractor for their records. See section 6.0 for more information. 4.5 A new permit is issued at the beginning of every shift. At the end of the work, the Issuing Authority indicates if the job is completed, the equipment is ready to be started and the work area is cleaned. A ll permits and hazard assessments become void if an emergency occurs at the location that may or may not be related to the scope of work covered by that specific permit and hazard assessment form. Completing the Work Permit and Hazard Assessment Th e work permit form, gHSSEr MF 88001 has four main parts. The form is completed with input from all people participating in the job. Complete the basic job information in Part 1. In Part 1, check all Golden Rules that apply to the job. If a procedure or JSEA exists that covers all or part of the job, its name or number should be referenced right after the question Procedure/JSEA available. This document must be reviewed prior to starting the job. P art 3 must be completed for all jobs that require a work permit unless the job falls into one of the two exceptions outlined in sections 5.5 or 5.8.

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5.5

I f an approved procedure or JSEA covering the scope of the entire job exists, completion of Part 3 is not required. The procedure or JSEA must be referenced in Part 1 and reviewed prior to starting the job. Review the questions in Part 2 and check each as applicable or not applicable to the job. For questions 17 28, if the answer to the question is yes than the control required to mitigate the hazard must be identified in the column to the right of the question. See appendix 1 for more information on the intent of each question. Using the hazards identified in Part 2, list the job steps, the potential hazards associated with each step and the controls needed to prevent the potential adverse effect on people and the environment in Part 3: n the first column, describe the work identified I on the Permit, list the basic tasks for the job in order and identify what is to be done, not how to do it n the second column, consider the hazards asI sociated with the job, focus on each job task and identify actual and potential hazards including hazards from the job itself, hazards from the work area, chemical hazards and physical hazards n the third column, list the controls, procedures I or actions the team will take to control the hazard associated with the job step in the third column f part 3 does not provide sufficient space for I identifying job steps, hazards and controls, use form gHSSEr MF 34002 either as a separate

5.6

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Permit to Work

document or stamped on the back of the Goldenrod copy of the form 5.8 I f the job involves any of the following, Part 3 is not to be completed and a job specific JSEA using form gHSSEr MF 34002 must be completed: obs which require a rescue plan (not a response J plan but a job where physical rescue may be required such as class 2 or 3 confined space, work at heights using fall arrest, work requiring SCBA/SABA) obs which require entry into a Class 2 or 3 J confined space Jobs which require ground disturbance Jobs which require critical lift plans obs where the BP or contractor representative J deem that an additional hazard assessment is required The required atmospheric testing must be completed as per section 7.5 and documented on Part 4 of the work permit.

5.9

5.10 ach person that participated in the permit and E hazard assessment must print their name and initial in Part 4. 5.11 At the conclusion of the job or at the end of the shift, the 3 questions (Job Completed, Work Area Cleaned, Contractor Locks Removed) located at the bottom of the work permit should be checked yes or no and the form returned to the Issuing Authority. 5.12 f the JSEA developed for the job is deemed apI propriate for future use, it should be approved for on-going use by the BP representative in charge.

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6.0 6.1

Scope of Self-Permitting M any activities conducted in the Gas Business Unit are done in isolation of other workers. Workers must follow this Practice but are allowed to issue their own permits and document their own hazard assessments for certain work. In order for a worker to issue their own permits, they must have a Level 2 Indoctrination and have demonstrated a level of competence in completing the job to the BP representative in charge or designate. S elf-permitting can be conducted by BP employees, full time equivalent contractors (FTEs) and other designated contractors. S elf-permitting cannot be conducted on a location where operating staff attend the facility for the majority of a shift. At these locations, the Issuing Authority issues the permit to the worker to ensure proper communication in the event of simultaneous operations or conflicting jobs. A self-issued permit can be prepared for any job involving cold work, hot work, energy isolation, ground disturbance (if the worker has current Level 2 ground disturbance training), lifting and work at heights where worker safety is addressed through engineering controls. Self permitting (working alone) is not allowed for any job requiring work at heights in which the fall protection plan does not address the provisions for self rescue in the event of an arresting fall. Self permitting is not allowed for any job requiring entry into a class 2 or 3 confined space. The worker requiring the permit must contact the Permit to Work

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Issuing Authority for the location prior to starting work to advise of the work being conducted and determine potential hazards to the worker. 6.7 O nce the job is complete, the worker signs off the permit and contacts the Issuing Authority to advise the status of the work and that the worker is leaving location. Arrangements are made to provide a copy of the completed permit to the Issuing Authority. Requirements 6.6 and 6.7 do not apply if the work is being done by the Issuing Authority. If the worker is visiting more than one location in a day to perform a similar task, one permit can be completed for the entire day. Each location is clearly identified on Part 1 of the form and the worker discusses each location with the Issuing Authority prior to starting work that day. When the worker arrives at each location, he or she reviews the permit to assess if all hazards have been identified and updates the form and implements the new hazard controls.

6.8

6.9

6.10 Other site specific requirements such as working alone procedures and working with H2S will also apply when self-permitting. 7.0 7.1 Scope of Hot Work Permits Hot Work means: utting, welding, burning, air gouging, riveting, c drilling, grinding, chipping, buffing the use of non-classified electrical equipment he introduction to a work process of a combust tion engine ny other work where flame is used or sparks are a

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produced Permit to Work 7.2 work on electric cables and equipment Hot Work Permits are issued where the atmosphere could become in excess of 0% LEL and/or there is a potential for a fire and/or explosion, or if electricity or static charges exists. A safety standby person may be required as per site specific procedures for any hot work to be performed. The only duty of the safety standby person is to observe the job and be able to communicate with others should assistance be required. The safety standby person must have immediate access to emergency equipment such as a fire extinguisher, gas detector and two-way radio or other means of communication. For more information, please reference Safety Standby in SSPM. U nder no circumstances will any hot work activity be permitted where LEL is greater than 10%. Work must be completed to eliminate the source of the gas release. Where atmospheric testing is required during hot work and confined space work, the employer will ensure that continuous monitoring of oxygen, H2S and LEL hazards are done and that tests are documented at regular intervals (i.e. prior to starting work and after each break as a minimum). The test results must be documented on form gHSSEr MF 88001. Scope of Cold Work Permits Cold work permits are issued for work where there is no danger for fire or explosion based on the tools

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and equipment being used for the job and the atmosphere will remain normal for human respiration. Examples include lifting, entry into a Level 1 confined space and work at heights. 8.2 The atmosphere must remain normal for human respiration. No permit is required for the following jobs: A worker taking readings worker making external adjustments to the A process (changing valve positions, equipment settings etc.) aily, weekly and monthly housekeeping activiD ties P tradesperson working in their respective B shops unless their work meets the definition of hot work worker taking other visitors on a tour of a A facility for the sole purpose of observation (i.e. SOCs, HSSE inspections, review of new facilities installation). A permit is required if photos will be taken in a potentially explosive atmosphere dditions may be made to the above list by area A management after a documented hazard assessment of the work is completed and reviewed by a team consisting of the Area Authority, the Operating Center Manager, Wells Team Leader (if applicable), Major Project Manager (if applicable), the BP safety coordinator and at least one representative of the affected workers Scope of Confined Space Permits Confined space permits are issued for entry into a Class 2 or Class 3 confined space. See Confined

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Space Practice gHSSEr MS820 for complete details. 10.0 Scope of Ground Disturbance Permits Permit to Work

10.1 Ground disturbance permits are issued for any work operation or activity that results in a disturbance of the earth. It applies to all pipeline right-of-ways, company leases, construction sites. See Ground Disturbance Practice gHSSEr MS840 for complete details. 11.0 Changing Area Authority

11.1 A work permit and hazard assessment is required when the area authority for an existing lease discharges their accountabilities to wells or construction. For example, during a workover of an existing well or when construction is taking place at an existing location. 11.2 The following components of the permit are completed to document a lease turn-over: The date, location and time nder work description, insert an expected end U date omplete Part 2 only to reflect the hazards of the C location at the time of the turn over: o Identify if multiple types of operations will need to take place at the location and the procedure for checking-in with the area authority (i.e. well work and daily operator checks) o Identify any concerns or potential hazards with permanent equipment or materials on-site and document any energy isolation applied o dentify if there are WHMIS controlled prodI

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ucts on-site as part of permanent operations Permit to Work o Identify the linkage of site activities with the emergency response plan for the area o uestions 2, 4, 7, 10, 11, 12, 13, 19, 20, 21, Q 22, 23, 24, 25, 27, 28 must be answered to reflect the status of the lease and the hazards associated with the permanent equipment on-site Part 3 does not need to be completed single atmospheric test should be completed A and documented prior to lease turn-over e issuer is the current area authority and the Th receiver is the new area authority

11.3 o discharge area authority accountabilities back to T the original area authority, the job completed box should be checked yes on the original form, and the date and initials of the person accepting the lease should be written near the check-box. This task should be completed after the condition of the site is reviewed by the two Area Authorities. 11.4 or more information, please reference SSPM Well F Work Hand over between operations and Wells Teams. 12.0 Assurance Process

12.1 People with SOC training can use the SOC process to provide assurance that the permit to work Practice is followed. An SOC can be conducted while a job is in progress to link the hazards identified in the discussion with what is documented on the permit. 12.2 All workers can use the job observation process to provide assurance that the permit to work Practice is

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13.0

Record Keeping

13.1 fter the work is completed, all work permits and A hazard assessment forms and associated documents are signed off in accordance with the permit and retained in the field office for a period 13 months. 14.0 Scope of References

14.1 lberta General Safety Regulation AR 448/83 as A amended 14.2 .C. Occupational Health and Safety Regulations B and Guidelines 296/97 as amended 14.3 gHSSEr MS820 - Confined Space Practice 14.4 gHSSEr MS840 - Ground Disturbance Practice 14.5 HSSEr MS 312 - Indoctrinations, Orientations and g Monitoring 14.6 AG SPU Control of Work (COW) Policy N http://docs.bpweb.bp.com/NAG:/content/hse/on shore/documents/K0000002586

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followed. A job observation can be conducted while a job is in progress, after the permit to work and hazard assessment form has been completed or at the conclusion of the job to verify that the steps required for completing a permit were followed.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

15.0 Permit to Work

Forms

15.1 HSSEr MF 88001 - Permit to Work and Hazard g Assessment Form 15.2 gHSSEr MF84001 - Ground Disturbance Permit 15.3 gHSSEr MF84001 - Confined Space Entry Permit 15.4 NAG JSEA Form NA Gas JSEA Process Appendix 1 Details on the Intent of Work Permit and Hazard Assessment Questions Part 2 of the work permit and hazard assessment form contains 28 questions. The questions were chosen because they represent the majority of the hazards in our various worksites and they build on learnings identified during incident investigations. Questions 1-16 are simple questions that can be answered yes, no, or not applicable to the job. In some cases, a line has been added so brief details for that question can be identified. Questions 17-28 require a yes, no, or not applicable to the job answer and for all questions answered yes, the control measures required to mitigate the hazard must be identified. The following lists each question on the form, and provides some interpretation on how to answer it. 1. Safety Stand by required? Name or jobs that require a designated safety stand-by, F this question should be checked yes. This might include entry into a class 2 or 3 confined space, work at heights or use of mobile equipment in an area with heavy foot traffic. If the question is answered as yes, the name of the safety stand-by

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2.

H ave conflicting activities/simultaneous operations been identified? List: f there are other activities in the area that this I work will be taking place or simultaneous operations in the same area, the question should be answered yes and those other activities listed in the space provided. Part 3 should identify the controls required for ensuring adequate communication between different activities. A separate SIMOPS plan may need to be developed. I s additional PPE required? Face/eyes Chemical Protection Hands/Gloves Respiratory Fall Protection

3.

e minimum required PPE is listed near the top Th of the form. This question addresses other PPE that may be required. If any boxes are checked, a space is provided to specifically identify the item or items of PPE that are required. It should be clear to all workers if additional PPE is required at all times during the job or only during specific times. A rea safe for personnel/vehicle entry? Record test below. is question is focused on air quality. Oxygen, Th LEL and H2S (if applicable) should be checked prior to work commencing and documented on Part 4 of the form. Will workers be getting down from equipment or climbing off of equipment? 3-point contact, step off dont jump off.

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should be written on the document. The roles and responsibilities for that worker need to be reviewed prior to work starting.

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significant number of recordable injuries are A related to workers getting down from equipment at various heights. If workers need to access work areas or equipment at heights, this question reinforces the need to descend using caution and maintaining a 3-point contact. Have all locations that pertain to the job been reviewed? (Secondary locations-dump sites, assembly points, permit area) ome jobs require work in multiple locations. S If materials are being transferred from one area to another or if there is a second muster point close to where the work will be taking place, this location should be noted on the form. M SDS for WHMIS Controlled products affecting job is available and understood? List WHMIS controlled products. e MSDS for all WHMIS Controlled products Th must be reviewed before handling these materials so adequate controls may be put in place such as ventilation or PPE. The MSDS does not need to be at the work site but the information must be available to workers by phone or radio. Do workers need job specific certifications? ocumented training is required for some D jobs in addition to what is asked at the Level 1 indoctrination (H2S and WHMIS). If specific certifications are required (i.e. crane operator, first aid, confined space) answer the question yes and list the training required on the space in the form. Tickets demonstrating training must be verified.

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9.

ll tools and equipment required for the job A should be identified prior to the job starting. The condition of tools and equipment should be checked by the person that will be using them. If a tool or piece of equipment is not suitable for use, it should be either repaired or destroyed. In some cases, certifications are required such as crane inspections, and the document should be reviewed prior to issuing the permit and hazard assessment. H ave all job-related cathodic protection and/or overhead/underground power lines been located and identified? ll power lines near the work area need to be A identified prior to work starting and controls put in place to ensure that power lines will not be contacted during the work. H ave all underground piping/obstructions been identified? nderground piping, tanks and lines need to be U identified for all jobs involving ground disturbance, all jobs requiring the use of heavy equipment (i.e. a crane and outriggers) and for all jobs using mobile equipment as striking or driving over an underground obstruction can lead to significant injury and/or property damage. Fire eyes/gas detectors bypassed? ire eyes and/or gas detectors may need to be byF passed for certain jobs involving hot work inside a building. Additional procedures may need to be followed to by-pass these safety devices.

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Have all tools and equipment that pertain to the job been identified and checked to be in good condition? Certifications checked if appropriate.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

13. Permit to Work

Protection of all sewer catch basins and floor drains? is question must be answered yes when doing Th welding inside a building or near any outdoor sewer catch basins that could contain hydrocarbon. H ousekeeping - cords, cables, hoses, tools, material or debris controlled and out of the path of workers. ules around housekeeping specific to the job R and the materials, tools and equipment should be reviewed so areas where people need to walk are kept free of hazards. Are additional permits required? Ground disturbance Confined space Critical lift is question is a double check of the Golden Th Rules identified in Part 1 of the form. If the answer is yes, identify using a check box which additional permit is required. The document should be completed prior to starting the job and attached to this form. Are all personnel involved with the job participating in the pre-job meeting? If no, who is responsible to update these workers? f some workers will be joining the work site at I a later time, one person needs to be designated to review the contents of this form with those workers so they understand the hazards of the jobs, the controls for those hazards and their role in promoting a safe and environmentally friendly work atmosphere. Have the risks of working alone been assessed? f a worker will be working alone, this question I must be answered yes and the control measures

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18.

Is heavy manual lifting involved? Potential of injury due to over exertion or strain by lifting, pulling, pushing or twisting. is question links too many of the recordable Th injuries that have occurred as a result of manual lifting, pulling, pushing or twisting. If this type of work is required, consider if mechanical devices can be used to reduce the chance of strain. Determine how heavy a load will be and the number of people required to lift it. Review proper lifting techniques. Are personnel at risk of slip, trip, or fall to the same level or to the area below? is question links too many of the recordable Th injuries that have occurred as a result of slips, trips and falls. The work area including any seasonal influences should be reviewed and controls put in place to maximize traction. Are there driving hazards associated with the job? is will be yes for almost all jobs to cover the Th drive to the work site or the drive home. Review any specific hazards and rules of the road for that day. Can personnel be placed in line of fire? (struck by protruding, moving objects, sharp edges, objects falling, caught in or between) ere are many considerations for this question. Th It should first consider permanent hazards of

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for ensuring that workers safety documented in the column to the right. Controls might include reviewing the local working alone procedures or establishing a communication plan with defined check-in intervals.

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the site equipment and then must consider the hazards of the job. If the job creates potential line of fire hazards, they need to be identified during the hazard assessment and controls put in place to reduce or eliminate the hazard. 22. Can personnel come in contact with an energy source or be exposed to hazardous material? onsider energy sources and hazardous materials C in and around the work area. Controls might include energy isolation, using a spotter or using additional PPE. A re personnel working in the vicinity of mobile equipment? f the answer to this question is yes, controls I should include verifying that back-up alarms are fully functioning and a spotter is designated for the job. Hand signals between the spotter and driver must be reviewed. A re there fire hazards associated with the task? Equipment needed? Identify. f the job could result in a fire, this question I should be answered as yes. Steps should be taken to execute the job to minimize the chance of a fire starting. Appropriately sized extinguishers and other fire fighting equipment needs to be available and readily accessible for workers to ensure a safe exit from the area should a fire occur. H ave environmental controls/procedures necessary for spills/atmospheric release/waste been identified due to loss of containment, failure of equipment or other form of release? f the job could result in a spill, atmospheric reI lease or will generate waste, identify if additional

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26.

I s materials/equipment required to be lifted by mechanical means? I.e. bobcat, hoist, crane. f materials will be lifted by mechanical means, I document the controls required to ensure a safe lift. The lift plan should consider equipment capabilities, tag lines, the need for spotters, etc. Is a rescue or environmental response plan required? List team and verify training. is is in addition to the local ERP and would Th be required for jobs involving confined space entry, some jobs requiring work at heights and jobs that involve handling large volumes of liquids that can have a negative impact on the environment if released. Identify what is needed at the job site to immediately address the emergency situation and ensure that equipment is available before starting the job. E nergy isolation complete? Equipment de-pressured purged blinded lock-out tag out stored energy f energy isolation is required for the job, the I type of energy isolation applied should be noted using the check boxes. The control column should be used to identify how energy was isolated and reference site-specific practices and procedures for energy isolation.

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site-specific procedures need to be reviewed. In some cases, a brief overview of waste storage areas and segregation practices or material handling techniques needs to take place.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Vehicle and Road Practice

VEHICLE STANDARD AND ROAD SAFETY PRACTICE 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability This standard applies to all drivers operating vehicles for BP CGPU and NGLBU sites. This includes employees using personal vehicles for company business. In this standard, these vehicles are referred to as company vehicles. The standard is applicable to summer and co-op students, full time equivalent contractors and office staff that may be traveling on company business. The purpose of this standard is to ensure BP CGPU and NGLBU employees, contracted employees, contractors and other visiting personnel use vehicles in a safe manner. Scope of Vehicle Standard Elements Vehicle Specifications-The vehicles must be fit for purpose and has been maintained in safe working condition with seatbelts installed and functional. Seat Belts must be worn at all times while a vehicle is in motion. C larification: http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/files/ showdocument.asp?tb=subcategory&ID=915 lways refer to the vehicle owners service A manual for the proper maintenance inspections and required service t is highly recommended that all vehicle mainI tenance be completed by the appropriate (Ford, GM, Dodge) authorized dealership while the vehicle is in the warranty period ll BP, Personal, and rented vehicles must be A equipped with Anti-Lock Brakes and Standard Air Bags

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onthly vehicle safety check sheets must be M filled out by the designated driver for that vehicle ll drivers are required to complete daily vehicle A logs, complete monthly vehicle usage reports (per local area schedule) and report all personal and commuting mileage as requested e driver will walk around their vehicle prior to Th each trip to check for potential hazards such as objects, people or other vehicles prior to driving and observe the condition of the vehicle such as tires and lights are in good working condition and that window, lights and mirrors are clean e vehicle must be equipped with tires properly Th selected and maintained for the driving conditions that could be experienced in the area. During the period of November 1 to March 31 all BP vehicles and other vehicles being used on a full time basis within the Canadian Gas Performance Unit, must be equipped with winter tires (see Appendix 2 Winter Tire Requirements in this Practice) eadlights/Driving Lights As a best practice H when driving in conditions that may include reduced visibility such as fog, smoke, snow, dust or low light; it is required that drivers turn on their headlights rather than relying on the vehicles daytime running lights. When traveling in the above conditions it is paramount to provide maximum visibility to third party drivers that may be traveling behind our vehicle it for purpose also refers to using the right F vehicle for the right purpose. An example of this would be to use a 4 wheel drive truck to access a drilling rig at a remote site. o alterations or modifications are to be made to N the vehicle that can affect the functionality of the vehicle safety equipment (E.g., a bush guard will alter the effectiveness of the air bags.)

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Additional vehicle specifications: - 4 Wheel Drive for all field service vehicles. Exceptions will be allowed based on approval of local management - A seat which provides good vibration dampening, lumbar support, and good adjustability of body position to provide ergonomically sound driving position

method of communication (cell phone A or radio) may be portable or permanently installed. NOTE: a cell phone or other two way communication device is not to be used when vehicle is in motion. An exception would be when traveling on a road which requires the use of two way communication. See section 2.6 ocal area management may determine that the L following items are appropriate based on risk assessment for that area: - Auxiliary driving lights installed according to the Alberta Highway Traffic Act and Motor Transport Act - High frequency deer whistles - Back up alarms

2.2

Passengers-The number of passengers does not exceed the manufacturers specifications for the vehicle. L oads-Loads are secure and do not exceed manufacturers specification and legal limits of the vehicle. All equipment, tools or other cargo being transported in the cargo and passenger areas of all vehicles shall be secured to prevent serious injury to occupants, in the event of a sudden stop or an incident. All vehicles should be assessed to see if headache racks are needed and if so should be installed. C larification http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/files/showdocument.asp?tb=subcategory&ID=916

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2.3.1 ecuring Of Loads (Load Binders) - BP CanS ada E&P has determined that the use of levertype load binders poses an unnecessary level of risk and shall be phased out of BP operations. Advances in equipment technology provide the opportunity for continual improvement by replacing lever-type load binders with the comparable, safer ratchet-type load binder.

- Warnings and Application Instructions: ailure to use load binders properly may result in F serious injury or even death to you or others o not operate a load binder while standing on D the load ove the handle with caution. It may whip M Keep all body parts clear eep yourself out of the path of the moving K handle and any loose chain lying on the handle ou must be familiar with state and federal Y regulations regarding size and number of chain systems required for securing loads on trucks lways consider the safety of nearby workers as A well as yourself when using load binders hile under tension, a load binder must not W bear against an object, as this will cause side load o not use a handle extender (cheater pipe) - see D instructions o not attempt to close or open the binder with D more than one person

- Instructions - Ratchet Load Binders anually unscrew the end hoods to get enough M reach osition ratchet binder so it can be operated P

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from the ground, ideal placement is between waist & chest high ttach one hook on the chain close to an anchor A point to minimize hook rotation ake up as much slack as possible and hook the T chain to the opposite end of the load binder et the pawl and start closing the load binder, S use clean gloves Keep fingers and hands away from pawl and gear aintain a buffer zone from the end of the M ratchet handle ecure footing and stroke handle until desired S tension is achieved, handle extensions are prohibited oads can shift, check the tension of the load L binder frequently, re-tighten as needed

- Maintenance of All Load Binders outinely check load binders for wear, bending, R cracks, nicks, or gouges. If bending or cracks are present - Do not use load binder outinely lubricate pivot and swivel points of R Lever Binders, and pawl part and screw threads of Ratchet Binders to extend product life and reduce friction wear D river Training-All drivers are appropriately assessed licensed, trained and medically fit to operate the vehicle. C larification:http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/files/showdocument.asp?tb=subcategory&ID=927 Operators of BP vehicles must provide proof of appropriate licence on annual basis. On an exception basis drivers may be requested to provide a copy of the Drivers Abstract (e.g. After

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a vehicle incident) It is the responsibility of the driver to inform their supervisor within the next working day of a drivers license suspension. Failure to inform is considered a severe offence, and will be subject to discipline All drivers shall have their appropriate class of drivers licence and TDG or DOT certificate (if applicable) in their possession A risk assessment must be performed at each job site to determine what type of additional driving training is needed. The following are examples of the types to consider Adverse road conditions (gravel, lease roads, snow and ice, mud, etc.): - Winter Driving - Backing - Sloped surfaces - Reverse skidding - Fatigue and Journey Management - Deer and animal avoidance - Understanding 4 X 4s All drivers shall have passed a BP approved drivers evaluation course (with skid control if available) prior to operating a BP vehicle. All professional drivers shall complete a BP approved defensive driver training course as per the HSSE training matrix All areas within the BP Canada Gas Performance Unit will assess their roads as per Local Hazard Maps to determine which areas would require chaining on tires. Areas must develop a plan for chaining requirements. Areas on roads must be identified which would be used for safe installa-

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tion of chains. Things that should be considered are: o Winter driving conditions(November 1-March 1 minimum) 2.5 o Muddy driving conditions o Grade of roads (e.g. 10% grade) D river Fatigue and Alertness-All drivers are appropriately rested and alert. C larification: http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/files/ showdocument.asp?tb=subcategory&ID=917 Fatigue and stress are two common mental factors which affect a drivers ability to perform. When a driver finds they are in this condition, they should not drive, pull over and take a break or a nap, or pull over and stretch Professional drivers as defined by the BP Global Driving Standard must have fatigue training as per HSSE raining Matrix - http://gasiso14001. bpweb.bp.com/EMS/Competency%20Training/ FIELD%20TRAINING%20MATRIX.xls

2.6

M obile Phones-Driver. Drivers must not use a mobile phone or other two way communication device while a vehicle is in motion. Only short duration calls on a radio are permitted by exception on roads which are radio controlled or required by regulation (e.g. when moving oversized loads in a convoy with escort vehicles(s)Clarification: http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/files/showdocument. asp?tb=subcategory&ID=918

Cellular phones, voice mail devices, recording pagers or other communication devices which are not intrinsically safe(explosion proof ), may not be used in classified areas where a hazardous atmosphere could exist.

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2.7

Journey RequirementsC larification: http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/files/ showdocument.asp?tb=subcategory&ID=919 - rivers will contact the local BP management D to be familiar with area specific regulations and policies and, where possible, acquire a local road hazard analysis map - riving time should be taken into consideration D as part of the hours of travel and work for that day in order to address the issues of fatigue and journey management. STOP, THINK, GO High risk road locations should be identified, communicated to all drivers, and posted in a conspicuous location All BP light vehicles within the CGPU will be equipped with VDRs (Vehicle Data Recorders)

2.8

Seatbelts-Seatbelts are worn by all occupants at all times whenever the vehicle is in motion. All people in the vehicle must be wearing a three point seat belt. Lap belts may not be used unless a hazard assessment has been completed and approved by the Area Authority. C larification: http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/files/ showdocument.asp?tb=subcategory&ID=920 A lcohol and Drugs-The driver is not under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or any other substance or medication that could impair their ability to drive. C larification: http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/files/ showdocument.asp?tb=subcategory&ID=921:

2.9

2.10 Read the label of all over-the-counter medications before considering driving. Refer to BPs Alcohol and Drug Policy. Consult your physician if questions

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arise regarding prescription medication 2.11 Safety Helmet-Safety helmets are worn by riders and passengers of motorcycles, quads, snow mobiles and similar types of vehicles. C larification: http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/files/ showdocument.asp?tb=subcategory&ID=1027 Additional Specific Requirements. R egulatory or posted speed limits shall not be exceeded and all vehicles must be driven in a manner that respects the road conditions. F irearms shall not be carried in company vehicles. Where Bear Watch or other area specific wild-life expertise is needed on site, it will be addressed in an HSSE Assurance Plan for the job and third party trained and competent experts will be used. Where flare guns are required, site-specific procedures must be developed for the transport and operation of this equipment. Shotguns must not be used for flare guns. V ehicles must be backed into parking stalls where it is allowable or where drive-through parking is not possible. Where space permits, drive-through parking is the preferred technique. N o vehicle shall encroach within 8 meters of any wellhead, piping, process vessel or tank containing combustible fluids unless required by a specific maintenance or operating function and an appropriate risk assessment and necessary hot work permit have been completed. A driver, pulling into a well/battery/drilling opera-

3.0 3.1

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tion/compressor site or pump station, must park the vehicle pointing towards the access road for a quick exit. 3.6 P ets will not be permitted in company vehicles while traveling on BP business or while on BP CGPU and NGLBU premises. I t is recommended that drivers wear their safety glasses while driving on gravel roads as there is a high risk of rocks, ice or debris to be thrown into the windshield by another vehicle. B acking - is to be avoided when practical. Drivers will park in spaces where they can legally drive forward when leaving; otherwise they will back into the parking space upon arrival. A spotter shall be used to assist the driver during backing operations of heavy vehicles, vehicles with trailers, and vehicles with limited visibility from their rear window. Scope of Towing and Tow Straps T ow trucks are to be used as the first choice for towing. STOP, THINK, GO (TOW). N ylon tow ropes or chains must not be used. Nylon braided (flat) tow straps with loop ends (no hooks) are acceptable. V ehicles should be equipped with the manufacturers specified towing hooks or properly mounted towing hitch. A Ditch Hitch is a recommended towing device which fits into the hitch receiver. P ulling force on the tow hooks must not exceed the manufacturers specifications. Th ere should be constant tension on the tow strap

3.7

3.8

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when towing, it should not be jerked. 4.6 B P vehicles are not allowed to pull a trailer device that is not company owned or leased. Scope of Boosting and Jump Starting When boosting or jump starting, both batteries must be the same voltage and the vehicles must not be touching. The vehicles must be in park or neutral with parking brakes on and both engines and all accessories shut off. P ut the booster cables on the positive battery posts first, then put the negative cable on the good battery and finally ground the last cable to the engine block of the vehicle with the dead battery. Keep clear of the vehicles during the boosting operation and use the reverse procedure to remove the cables. Always wear eye protection when boosting or jump starting a vehicle. Scope of Vehicle Incident Reporting All vehicle incidents must be reported to drivers immediate supervisor immediately if possible but no later than within 24 hours or next business day. All vehicles incidents involving a third party, public or private property must be reported to Kendal Adjusters Inc. (John Bicknell 403-256-8400) within

5.0 5.1

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24 hours. You will be required to fax a copy of the Incident Report, copy of the Police Report and any relevant cost estimates. Vehicles are not to be repaired until authorized by Kendal Adjustors or BP Fleet Management. 6.3 A ll vehicles incidents over $1000 are to be reported to the local Police authorities within 24 hours. V ehicles incidents that do not involve a third party or public or private property should be handled as follows: 1 estimate required for repair 2 estimates required for repair

6.4

< = $1000 damage $1001 - $3000 damage

$3001 - $5000 damage 3 estimates required for repair +$5000 damage 3 estimates required for repair AND contact BP Fleet Management for authorization 6.5 All vehicle incidents involving rental vehicles should be reported to rental agency (Hertz) as soon as practically possible. The claim processing will be handled by their representative.

7.0 7.1

Scope of Material Handling Site-specific materials handling and transportation procedures may be required. T ransportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) certificate, the TDG applicable permits and the OMNIBUS permit must be carried in the vehicle where applicable.

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8.0 8.1

Scope of Safety Equipment All company vehicles including rental vehicles will have safety equipment that is appropriate for local risk assessments and conditions The following is suggested minimum equipment for vehicles going to field locations. Vehicles not travelling to remote sites or in adverse conditions may not require all of the equipment listed. - Regulatory acceptable first aid kit - Reflective warning devices - Bear kits where necessary - Fire extinguisher

- Reflective clothing - xtra clothing or blankets if applicable E based on geographic location - andle and matches if applicable based on C geographic - Non-perishable high energy food - hovel. if applicable based on geographic S location - xe or a hatchet if applicable based on A geographic location - Flashlight (explosion-proof is recommended for field service vehicles)

- Extra batteries for flashlight - Booster cables - Tow strap - Water, Caution Water may freeze.

9.0

Scope of Appendices

Appendix 1- P CGPU and NGLBU All Terrain Vehicle B Practice Appendix 2- CGPU Winter Tire Reguirements

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10.0

Reference Documents

GLOBAL DRIVING STANDARD : http://HSSE.bpweb.bp.com/driving_safety/default. asp?cat=147 gHSSEr MS 430 - SSE Nonconformance and Incident H Reporting Procedure gHSSEr MF 86001 onthly Vehicle Inspection M Checklist gHSSEr MF 86002 Licence Verification Form APPENDIX 1 BP CGPU and NGLBU All-Terrain Vehicle Practice 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability This practice provides guidelines for the safe operation of All-Terrain Vehicles (ATV) defined as Quads and snowmobiles. Th is practice applies to all CGPU and NGLBU employees, contract employees and contractors who operate all-terrain vehicles (Quads and Snowmobiles) while working for the CGPU and NGLBU. Th is practice addresses the practices, conditions and behaviors that have the largest impact upon safe driving. (Driving all-terrain vehicles is one of the highest risk tasks performed by our staff.) Training All operators of all-terrain vehicles are required to pass a recognized certified all-terrain vehicles rider course. Ground Rules

1.2

1.3

2.0 2.1

3.0

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3.1 3.2 3.3

D rivers will at all times adhere to the ground rules provided in this section of the standard. No horseplay while operating all-terrain vehicles. S ite specific procedures must be developed to address communication needed to meet working alone requirements. This may involve radio/cellular contact, check in location and times, travel routes, etc. A ll-terrain vehicles must not be overloaded with personnel or equipment. Manufacturers guidelines must be followeed for load restrictions. A ll-terrain vehicles must not be operated while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Firearms will not be carried on all-terrain vehicles. C SA approved helmets must be worn at all times while operating an ATV. DOT/Snell approval in the US. A regular maintenance program following the manufacturers guidelines must be implemented to ensure the ATVs reliability and safe operating condition. Pre-trip checklists must be developed.

3.4

3.5 3.6 3.7

3.8

3.9

3.10 Operator must be familiar with the owners manual. 3.11 TVs must be operated in a manner so as to miniA mize disturbance to all wildlife. 4.0 4.1 Licensing P rovincial Regulations require that all-terrain vehicles must be licensed and insured while traveling on public lands. E very All-Terrain Vehicle being operated by CGPU and NGLBU employees, full time equivalent con-

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tractors and contractors doing work for CGPU and NGLBU must be licensed and insured. 5.0 Minimum Equipment ounted winch for appropriate load ratings M (quads) where local management deems it appropriate Regulatory acceptable first aid kit 5Ib A B C fire extinguisher Axe/Hatchet or folding pruning saw Approved tow strap Tire repair kit, air pump ( quads ) Operators manual Mounted carrying case Explosion proof flash light epper spray, bear scare, air horn ( quads ) where P local management deems it appropriate Water proof matches mall container of gas line antifreeze where apS plicable Tool kit Small tarp Emergency food source pare drive belt and spark plugs where appliS cable. Whip flag antennae Personal Protective Equipment SA approved helmet. DOT/Snell approved in US. C Goggles or safety glasses Gloves Appropriate CSA approved footwear Reflective clothing Transporting Proper procedures must be developed and followed

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BP Canada Energy Gas Performance Unit

7.0

PROCEDURE TITLE: PROCEDURE #: DATE ISSUED: PREPARED BY: LOCATION: DATE REVISED: APPROVED BY: Control Code CGPU JANUARY 21/06 gHSSEr COMMITTEE

QUAD LOAD-OFFLOAD PROCEDURE

NOV. 11TH, 2005 ATV STANDARD COMMITTEE

Job Steps

Control Statement(s)

All operators of quads MUST have certification of successfully passing a recognized all-terrain vehicle operators course.

The Components of the training must be consistent with MS-860, Appendix 1, section 2. T/S MS-860

Transporting of quad units

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while loading and off-loading ATVs, which can be a very hazardous task.

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Potential Hazards/Loss In-experienced quad operators may not have knowledge of the proper use of a quad, its limitations etc and may not know the specific site specific tools and procedures to ensure safe operation of a quad

The following procedure has been developed to provide operators of both quad and 6x6 units a safe tool to load and offload the units from a transport unit (out of the back of a truck box, from a trailer unit or from a quad deck.) First and foremost the operator of the referred quad / 6X6 unit must have successfully passed a recognized all-terrain vehicle course. Ensure that the operator of the Quad has been trained in all site specific procedures involving the proper use and operation of the unit in his specific area.

Same as above

Must have reviewed and been trained in all the site specific procedures involving quad use. Documentation of this must be in place.

The Components of the training must be consistent with MS-860, Appendix 1, section 2.

Job Steps

Potential Control Statement(s) Control Hazards/Loss Code The unit may not be The transportation unit must be of an approved type and must be T/S designed to safely approved by the Foreman of the area, before its use. This approval MS-860 transport a quad due to must be documented. its size, shape, layout The transport vehicle must meet the requirements with MS-860, etc, and could result in Appendix 1, section 9, 10, or 11. injury to the operator and or equipment. T/E

If the quad has to be loaded onto a transport unit and moved to a location prior to its use, the operator must be trained in the proper use of the transport unit, the minimum requirements of the transport unit and the procedure to load the quad onto the unit. Ensure that an adequate approved ramp is available to perform the loading task.

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T T/ E T

Due to the transportation unit design and the ramp design they may not be compatible and could lead to personal injury or equipment damage.

Position the transport unit as best possible using the profile of the terrain to decrease the angle of the ramps.

Ramps must be approved by the Area Foreman, who will ensure that all users are aware of its proper operation and that they (the ramp users) properly inspect them prior to use to ensure that they are in good repair. Document inspection on the transportation unit checklist refer to MS-860, Appendix 1, section 9.90 Recommendation is the Fulton Trifold Ramp (SR77) - refer to MS860, Appendix 1, section 12.2. Complete a site walk around prior to positioning the transport unit to load the quad (s). Ensure the ground is level and use the terrain to lessen the slope of the ramps.

Test the brakes on the quad before attempting to load to ensure adequate operation. An approved ATV helmet and work boots must be worn whenever the quad is in motion.

More angle of the ramps, the greater the risk for an incident to occur during the loading operation. Unable to stop the quad when loading.

Brakes must be in good operation condition. Ensure the Quad Pre/Post Trip Inspection Check List (CH-A-0002) is completed prior to operating the quad.

Ensure the transportation unit is clear of any debris or other equipment, prior to loading.

May cause unit to be unstable.

The load area must be free of any material, tools or supplies and the deck must be clean of any slippery surfaces.

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Job Steps

Install the ramps to the transport unit ensuring that the ramps are safely secured to the transport unit.

Potential Control Statement(s) Control Hazards/Loss Code Ramps may become de- Ensure the ramps are designed for the quad weight and size. T tached from the Ensure the ramps are in good condition with all securing mechanisms transportation unit, or in place and in good repair. not be designed for the Refer to the Quad Pre /Post Check list referred to MS-860, Appendix use that is required. 1, section 4. Drive the quads to the ramps, A loading incident Operators must wear an approved helmet - refer to MS-860, T/E/S stopping just short of ramps. could occur where the Appendix 1, section 6. Ensure that the quad is in the operator could sustain 4X4 mode and in the lowest personal injury or the Low gear and in the 4X4 mode will ensure required power and gear. Stand on the quads foot quad / ramps could be traction is available. Standing on the pegs and leaning forward, the operator will have the best control of the quad. Proceeding slowly pegs and leaning slightly damaged. reduces the risk of not being able to stop in the desired position. forward with knees bent

slightly; slowly proceed up the ramp. T

10

Once the quad has cleared the ramps and is on the transportation units deck, slowly move the quad to its desired location, stop, engage the park brake and shut off the engine. T

The unit could inadvertantly move off the transportation unit.

Park brake must be engaged and the unit left in gear and the engine shut off. Consider a cushion type device for the front of the truck.

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T

11

Secure the quad with a minimum of four nylon tiedown straps (ratchet type) to the transportation units deck.

Unit could leave the transportation unit and cause damage.

Use proper nylon tie-down straps and secure the straps to the quad and the transportation units tie-down points. The quad unit must be secured on all four corners. DO-NOT use the winch cable as a tie down.

12

Complete a walk around of the transportation device to ensure that the unit is properly secured and that the transportation unit can be safely moved.

Other hazards could impede the units movement resulting in injury or equipment damage.

Complete a unit final inspection and an area walk around. Choose an egress path free of obstructions and hazards.

Job Steps

13

Transport the quads via the transportation unit to its desired location.

Control Code T

14

Potential Control Statement(s) Hazards/Loss Driving hazards, road Complete a safe journey management plan prior to starting the trip. conditions, weather, etc. may contribute to an Take the time to safely stop and check the secured load during the incident and or injury transportation trip. due to the unfavorable conditions for the transport vehicle. Once at the desired location, Equipment damage may Prior to spotting the transportation unit, complete an area hazard choose a spot to offload the occur in spotting the assessment, choose a level location free of any hazards and with safe quad, again using the terrain as transportation unit and access and egress. an advantage to lessen the slope or during the offload of the ramp(s) and to ensure the procedure. unit is level. Complete a hazard assessment of the offload area. T T

15

Once the transportation unit is secured (park brake set on the truck), ensure the quads park brake is still engaged and prepare to offload. T

Unit could inadvertently move causing personal injury or equipment damage.

Ensure the quads park brake is engaged.

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T

16

Install the ramps transportation unit.

to

the

Ramps may become detached from transportation unit, or not be designed for the use that is required.

17

Check to see if the park brake is still engaged and shift the quad into neutral. Safely remove the tie-down straps and store the straps in an area that will not impede with the safe offload of the quad unit.

Quad unit could move resulting in personal injury or equipment damage.

Ensure the ramps are designed for the quad weight and size. Ensure the ramps are in good condition with all securing mechanisms in place and in good repair. Check the offload area and see if you require a stopping device (ensure the quad cannot free wheel into a stationary object or hazard.) A stopping device could be a small log or a 4X4 post. Re-check the park brake and ensure that there are no obstructions in the quads path that will impede a safe offload.

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Job Steps

18 Position yourself to the front of the quad and release the park brake. Plant feet firmly and slowly push the quad toward the ramps. T

Potential Control Statement(s) Control Hazards/Loss Code Worker could fall off of Ensure that you can safely get to the front of the quad (select the T the transportation unit easiest and safest route.) Ensure of good footing. resulting in a personal injury.

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19 Once the quad is partially down the ramp and wanting to move downward on its own, use the hand brakes to slow the progress. Once the quad is positioned about two thirds on the ramp and you are still standing well on the transportation unit, release the brakes and allow the quad to descend the rest of the way on its own (free wheel.)

Worker could fall off of Conduct this task slowly and if you loose control; let go of the quad the transportation unit and ensure that you prevent yourself from injury. resulting in a personal injury.

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8.0

Trailer Checks (Pre / post use) railer decking must provide adequate unobT structed surface area to provide safe load offload of the ATV unit itch safety chains and securing pin (lock, pin, H bolt) Trailer ball / reciever compatability Tire conditions Spare tire Trailer jack Lights working condition Licence plate and registration General trailer condition railer ramps must be checked for working T condition (cracks, ramp securing devices, welds, hinge joints, damage, clean free of mud / ice) Suggested manufacturer: Fulton Trifold Utility model SR77 atchet straps and securing points are in good R working condition railer must be regulary maintained to the T manufactures specifications such as (axle bearings, wheel lug torque, hitch wear, suspension) Truck Box ruck box must provide adequate unobstructed T surface area to provide safe load / offload of the ATV unit ailgate cables and attachment points must be T inspected for damage, corrosion and wear nsure that the tailgate hinges and latches are in E safe working condition atchet straps and securing points are in good R

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working condition ortable ramps must be checked for working P condition (cracks, ramp securing devices, welds, hinge joints, damage, clean free of mud / ice) Suggested manufacturer: Fulton Trifold Utility model SR77 o ATV units are to be carried on the tailgate N due to the unrated load capacity of the tailgate APPENDIX 2 BP CGPU Winter Tire Requirements 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability Th is policy applies to BP Canada Energy BP Canada Gas Performance Unit(CGPU) vehicles operated on BP business within the November 1 to March 31 timeframe. This policy provides requirements and guidance for winter tire and studded tire usage for BP vehicles. Th e purpose of this policy is to ensure that all BP vehicles are equipped with the most appropriate tires for winter driving conditions. A ll BP owned vehicles operated within the Canada Gas Performance Unit will be equipped with Winter Tires during the winter months as described above. It is also expected that long term contractors (those working on our sites in excess of 30 days) will abide by this policy. Definitions

1.2

1.3

1.4

1.5

2.0

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2.1

Snow Tire -These tires have tire tread composed of special rubber compounds and tread designs that enhance their performance in snow and ice conditions. Studless winter tires (typically Q-rated with a mountain-snowflake symbol shown below) are now available to motorists as a substitute for studded tires.

2.2

S tudded Tire These tires are designed for ice and snow conditions. They can be used alternatively to Snow Tires. Scope of Responsibility

3.0

3.1 t is the responsibility of the manager at each site to I ensure that all of the BP owned vehicles are equipped with snow or studded tires during the mandatory period of November 1 through March 31. If driving conditions deteriorate before November 1 it is recommended that snow or studded tires are installed at that time. Also it is recommended that snow or studded tires are kept on the vehicles until March 31 and until winter conditions subside. 3.2 S now tires are manufactured and supplied by a number of manufacturers. CertainTire brands can be purchased with the PHH card and these should be used if possible. Any tire that displays the mountain snowflake symbol on it is considered a snow and ice tire and is acceptable provided it meets sizing and rating requirements specified by the manufacturer. Tires not baring this symbol are not considered a snow tire. Only Snow Tires and Studded Tires are considered acceptable.

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4.0

Scope of Training and Qualification

4.1 It is the responsibility of each area manager to review the Winter Tire requirements with the working group in the fall before winter driving conditions set in. 5.0 5.1 Snow Tire requirements and guidelines. I nstall four winter tires To help maintain control and stability of your vehicle in icy conditions, Transport Canada and the Rubber Association of Canada recommend that you install winter tires in sets of four. At BP CGPU this is mandatory. Scope of References

6.0

6.1 http://www.tc.gc.ca/roadsafety/tires/wintertires/ tirelist.htm 6.2 h ttp://www.tc.gc.ca/roadsafety/tires/wintertires/ menu.htm

WORKING AT HEIGHTS PRACTICE 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability This Practice applies to BP Canada Gas Performance Unit (CGPU) employees, contract personnel conducting work for or on behalf of BP, and, all other visiting personnel who are participating in working at heights activities on BP Canada premises or work sites. The purpose of the Practice is to eliminate or mini-

1.2

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1.3

Th e Working at Heights Practice states when fall protection is required and describes the necessary expectations and responsibilities in the preparation and execution of conducting work at heights. Scope of Definitions Anchor Point: any point of attachment for the purposes of fall protection, certified by a professional engineer, commonly referred to as an anchor point. Competent Worker: One who is adequately qualified, suitably trained and with sufficient experience to safely perform work with minimal or no supervision (Alberta OH&S SR 13.3). CAN/CSA: Canadian Practices Association. Deceleration Device: Any mechanism which serves to dissipate the force of the fall which would otherwise be imposed on the worker, for example an OH&S approved energy absorber. Engineered: Designed and/or approved by a Registered Professional Engineer. Fall Arresting Device: A device that provides a means of arresting the accidental vertical or near vertical fall of an individual, and subsequent to the arrest of the fall does not, by itself, permit the release or further lowering of the individual. Fall Arrest System: The system utilized to minimize the chance for injury during a fall. It consists of

2.0 2.1

2.2

2.3 2.4

2.5

2.6

2.7

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mize fall hazards and ensure personnel are protected while conducting working at heights activities.

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Working at Heights

2.8

an engineered anchor point, connecting means and a full body harness body holding device and shock absorbing lanyard. (Harness CSA Standard Z259.1 0-M90) (Lanyard CSA Z259.11-M92) Fall Restraint System: A system of components designed to eliminate the chance of an accidental fall. This may be accomplished by use of barricades and hand railing, or may utilize an anchor point, a connecting means (such as a lanyard), and a body supporting device (such as a full body harness). Free Fall Distance: The distance a worker may fall before a fall arrest system engages and begins to slow the fall.

2.9

2.10 Personal Fall Protection Equipment: Any equip ment that is personally fitted issued and forms part of the fall protection system. It is usually composed of the safety harness. (Harness CSA Standard Z259.0-M90) 2.11 Safety Harness: A device used to transfer the forces experienced during and after a fall to the torso or upper legs of a worker. The 5 point full body harness is required. Belts or 3 point harnesses are not allowed. 2.12 Shock Absorbing Lanyard Shock Absorbing Devise used in combination with safety harness designed to limit the fall arrest forces so they do not exceed the injury threshold of the human body. (Lanyard CSA Z259.11-M92)

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3.1

E ach worker has the responsibility to recognize fall hazards and take corrective measures by ensuring this Practice and the written fall protection program are followed. Th e on-site BP representative in charge or designate must ensure that: - Workers are trained and verified competent in the hazards, use, care, and maintenance of fall protection equipment and including established procedures or practices relating to the use and care of the equipment

3.2

- mergency Response Plans are in place when fall E protection equipment is utilized - aintenance of an adequate inventory of Personal M Fall Protection Equipment meeting an OSHA, ANSI or CSA Practice - A documented fall protection plan is developed as part of the task hazard risk assessment prior to the work being performed

- ll workers are trained in STOP-THINK-GO and A Time Out for Safety and feel comfortable being able to exercise these tools Scope of Training and Certification A ll workers working at heights must be trained and competent in fall protection equipment application, care, use, maintenance, and limitations. The training shall be conducted by a qualified trainer. Recommended Fall Protection training is OSSA Certified (OIL SANDS SAFETY ASSOCIATION) as this training is currently the best industry practice training for oil and gas.

4.0 4.1

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Scope of Responsibility

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4.2

A ny worker responsible for performing rescue activities must be trained in the proper techniques for the rescue system. T raining or retraining is necessary when an employer has a reason to believe a worker does not have the necessary understanding and/or skill required. Scope of Expectations General: - All workers must ensure that a fall protection system is utilized when work is to be conducted at heights that are: o At or greater than 2 meters, or o At a height less than 2 meters if there is an unusual possibility of injury from a fall - Acceptable fall protection can be provided by permanent, temporary, or personal CAN/CSA approved fall protection equipment systems. - Fall protection system is identified as: o A personal fall arrest system

4.3

5.0 5.1

o A travel/fall restraint system o A safety net o A control zone, or

o nother system approved by a Director of A Inspection

Note: An employers first choice should require the use of adequate guardrails to protect personnel. The guardrail must meet the design requirements listed in AB OH&S section 315 or, an OH&S approved travel restraint system to prevent a worker from reaching an edge from which the worker could fall.

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5.1.2 hen Personal Fall Protection Equipment W is used, these systems must be attached properly to engineer approved anchor points with an ultimate load capacity of at least 22.2 kn. (5000 pounds) per person in any direction the load can be applied, or twice the maximum arrest force. Anchor points used for the attachment of personal fall protection equipment must be independent of any anchorage being used to support, suspend, or lift platforms or loads. 5.1.3 ll Personal Fall Protection Equipment A must be connected and used in accordance with manufacturers specifications and instructions. 5.1.4 ersonal fall arrest systems will be rigged to P minimize the free fall distance to less than 2 meters or the manufactures specification with a shock absorber and, 1.2 m without a shock absorber when added distance of an extended shock absorber creates a greater risk. The deceleration force will not exceed 8 Kn and the personal fall protection system must allow for an unobstructed fall.

5.2

Permanent & Temporary Platforms

A written fall protection plan is required as part of the risk assessment/pre-job task analysis for working at heights of 1.2 meters or greater from a permanent work platform or 2 meters and greater from a temporary work area., or if a worker could fall less than 1.2 meters and there is an unusual possibility of injury because of additional hazards.

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5.1.1 hen Personal Fall protection Equipment W is utilized, personnel must wear a CAN/ CSA approved full body harness. (CSA Standard Z259.10- M90)

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Working at Heights

5.3

Lifts

A fall restraint system is required when conducting work at heights greater than 2 meters from Scissor lifts, vertical aerial platforms, or Boomed Genie lifts if the platform being using is operated on firm, substantially level surface with the entire manufacturers guardrails and chains in place and meet Alberta OH&S Sec 315. However, if the manufacturers specifications require the use of a fall arrest system when the vertical aerial platform is being used, then the manufacturers specifications take precedence and must be followed. An effective written Emergency Response Procedure using task hazard analysis / risk assessment must be developed as part of the Fall Protection Plan as an alternate to mechanical lift equipment failure. 5.4 Boomed Lifts A worker working from a boomed Arial Platform or Genie lift shall be protected from falling by using a personal fall arrest system consisting of full body harness and shock absorbing lanyard meeting CSA requirements and a manufacturer engineered anchor point. The lanyard if at all possible should be the length to prevent the worker from being ejected from the platform but not restrict their work or compromise the function of the fall arrest system. (CSA Z259.10 M90 & CSA Z259.11-M92) 5.5 Man baskets Under normal circumstances, a worker working from a man basket shall be protected from falling by using a fall arrest system such as a vertical lifeline and rope grab combination or a self-retracting lifeline. The lifeline shall be secured to an anchor point on the boom of the crane from which the man basket is suspended. In the event that it is impracticable to provide a personal fall arrest system for one or more workers in a man basket, Alberta OH&S section 350 requires that:

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ach worker within the man basket wears a full e body harness with lanyard securely attached to the man basket The separate or secondary man basket support, in combination with worker attachment to the man basket, functions as a fall arrest system. To limit a fall distance and the arresting force experienced by a falling worker, the secondary man basket support must be as short as possible An effective written Emergency Response Pro cedure using task hazard analysis / risk assess ment must be developed as part of the Fall Protection Plan as an alternate to Man basket equipment failure Above Water or Liquids

5.6

A fall protection system in combination with a life jacket is required at any height if personnel are to conduct work above/beside cold or moving water, or other liquids that pose a drowning hazard to workers other than work from a boat. 5.7 Vertical Lifelines Vertical lifelines used in a personal fall arrest systems installed and utilized shall comply with the following: s made of wire rope or appropriate material suitI able for all relevant work site hazards and secured to an anchor point capable of withholding 27 Kn and engineer approved xtend to a least 1.2 metes from the ground or E safe work platform as only one person attached unless other wise H designed by manufacture

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A separate man basket support be attached between the suspended man basket and the hoist line above the hook assembly and

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Working at Heights

5.8

s effetely protected to prevent abrasion and I secured to minimize swing Horizontal Lifelines

Horizontal lifelines used in a personal fall arrest systems installed and utilized shall comply with the following: Is made of wire rope at 12 millimeters in thickness, splice free, capable of withholding 89 Kn and connecting hardware with a tensile strength of at least 71Kn, the system must be engineer approved The horizontal line should extend to no less than 6 meters and no greater than 18 meters and be at least 2 meters above the working surface Secured to an anchor point capable of withholding 71 Kn and engineer approved Personnels free fall distance should be no more than 1.2 meters with at least 3.5 meters of clearance between the work surface and ground No more than three personnel shall be connected to the same horizontal line at any time Scope of Emergency Procedures General: written Emergency Response Procedure as part A of the task hazard analysis / risk assessment must be developed as part of the Fall Protection Plan and identified on the Pre-Job / permit process s a minimum, the Emergency Response ProceA dure will identify: o Rescue equipment available o Trained rescue personnel o Job specific rescue procedures o Requirement for procedure to be reviewed during each Pre-job / permit issuance

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6.2

Man Baskets & Lifts

A written Emergency Response Procedure using task hazard analysis / risk assessment must be developed as part of the Fall Protection plan to retrieve personnel in case of equipment failure when utilizing Man Baskets and mechanical lifts. 7.0 7.1 Scope of Inspection and Maintenance I nspection: Fall Arrest Systems (FAS) must be inspected by a trained and competent worker before and after use in accordance with manufacturers recommendations. Storage: Fall protection equipment must be stored according to manufacturers recommended practices. Special attention must be given to temperatures, clean, dry conditions and sunlight. R emoval from service: Any component of a fall protection system that has been involved in a fall arrest must be removed from service and tagged as such or destroyed. C leaning, repairing and maintenance: The components of a fall protection system must be cleaned repaired and maintained according to manufacturers instructions. Recertification and inspections of Fall arrest equipment must be planned and conducted formally according to manufacturers specifications. Scope of Equipment Practices, Regulations and References

7.2

7.3

7.4

7.5

8.0

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8.1

All components of a fall protection system must meet the material and assembly specifications set forth in local regulations and known Practices (see Alberta OH&S Code 145 or British Columbia Occupational Health and Safety Regulation and Guidelines 296/97 as amended). or Ontario Regulation 851 Industrial Establishments and Regulation 213 Construction Projects, as amended CAN/CSA Practices include but are not limited to: Safety Harnesses, Lanyards: Z259.1-95 (R1999) Linemens Harnesses, Straps: Z259.3 M1998 Full Body Harnesses: Z259.10 M90 (R1998) Fall Arrest, Descent, Lifeline Devices: Z259.2 Shock Absorbers: Z259.11 M92 (19998) Vertical Lifeline: Z259.2.1 -98 Connecting Components: Z259.12.01 utomatic and manual decent device:: A Z259.2.3.99 Self Retracting Devices: Z259.2.298 Forms gHSSEr MF 34004- PreJob Risk Assessment Maximum Tie Off Points

8.2 9.0

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ASBESTOS For information on asbestos contact your PU Industrial Hygienist. Refer to gHSSEr MS 920 Asbestos Code of Practice (BP Guidelines for Handling Asbestos and ManMade Vitreous Fibers)http://gasiso14001.bpweb.bp.com/index.asp ATMOSPHERIC MONITORING PURPOSE: To establish guidelines for providing a safe work environment through atmospheric monitoring. APPLICATION: Any area where the work environment is, or may become hazardous due to the presence of combustible or toxic gas, or when the oxygen content is less than 19.5%, or greater than 23% by volume. DEFINITION: Atmospheric Monitoring includes: O2 Monitors H2S Detectors Combustible Gas Detectors Toxic Gas Detectors Carbon Dioxide Monitors

PRECAUTIONS: Some atmospheric monitoring equipment requires minimum oxygen content in order to perform according to manufacturer specifications. The O2 reading must be taken prior to an LEL reading to verify that the monitor can read properly.

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Atmospheric Monitoring

POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Lack of oxygen Combustible Gas Toxic Gas: H2S, benzene and other toxic Substances

PROCEDURES: Detection Equipment: ll work locations must have combustible gas, A toxic gas and oxygen detection equipment available, as required, for monitoring the atmosphere, prior to and during work procedures. ll worksite locations that have portable A and permanent atmospheric monitoring equipment must develop site specific procedures that govern instrument use, care, maintenance, function testing, calibration and documentation, repairs and training. ll survey equipment used for testing confined A spaces, hot work or any other permit required testing should be function tested prior to each use. ombustible Gas Testing: C A combustible gas test shall be taken when Hot work is performed within 8 meters of any well, process vessel, tank or related equipment, where combustible gas is, or may be present. H2S Gas Detectors: H2S gas detectors are used to measure the concentration of H2S in a work area. There are two basic types of detectors: rager and Gastec Sampling Tubes. NOTE: D When monitoring in an unknown concentration, SCBA/SABA must be worn by the individual

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[See: H2S Safety] [See: Respiratory Protection] is method is considered to be accurate Th plus or minus 25% when proper sampling procedures are used lectronic Sensor. Electronic sensors measure E the airborne concentration of H2S on an electronic circuit. The signal, which can also be used to set audible and visual alarms at specific concentrations, identifies the H2S level on a gauge. The advantage of this type of unit is that monitoring can be continuous. The unit may be carried on a belt (personal monitor), or permanently mounted in areas where H2S could accumulate Monitoring Units: A ll buildings where H2S may exceed 100 PPM should have fixed monitoring units set to give an audible and visual alarm at 10 PPM. H2S visual alarm will be a blue beacon and LEL / General visual alarm will be a red beacon. Safe operating procedures must be written and followed should circumstances preclude such installation. Confined-Space Entry: Combustible gas, toxic gas, and oxygen-deficiency tests must be performed prior to a confined-space entry and at frequent intervals during the work period. Respiratory protection must be worn while the initial tests are being performed. [See: Confined-Space Entry] [See: Respiratory Protection] Hot Work: All hot work requires monitoring of the atmosphere for combustible gas prior to and at frequent intervals during the work. If the hot work is being performed within a confined space, continuous monitoring is required for combustible gas, toxic gas, and oxygen deficiency. .If there is a potential for the atmosphere to change un-

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Atmospheric Monitoring

predictably after a worker enters the confined space, the atmosphere must be continuously monitored. Re-entry to a worksite must be accompanied by gas detection before work resumes. [See: Safe Work Permits] Precautions: Some atmospheric monitoring equipment requires minimum oxygen content in order to perform according to manufacturer specifications. The O2 reading must be taken prior to an LEL reading to verify that the monitor can read properly. Equipment specifications should be verified for equipment operating conditions prior to installation and use. Oil Spills: Additional atmospheric monitoring may be required at spill sites. [Contact Safety Coordinator or Industrial Hygienist for advice, as necessary] TRAINING: All personnel that use or are responsible for atmospheric monitoring equipment shall be properly trained in the operation and use of the equipment and the site specific procedures that were written for the particular equipment. BENZENE: For information on benzene, contact your P.U. Industrial Hygienist. Refer to the sites-specific Code of Practice and BP Guidelines for Handling Benzene.

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PURPOSE: To establish the requirements for the safe handling of CNSC isotopes. APPLICATION: All worksites where Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulated isotopes may be handled, i.e. radiographic inspection of vessels, piping and pipelines, radioactive isotope use, wireline logging, etc POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Exposure to radioactive sources. PREPARATIONS: CNSC Certification: Contractors must have a valid license issued by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission to per form all work involving CNSC regulated isotopes. See: BP Canada Welding Quality Control Manual [ for radiographic inspection requirements] Work Planning Work planning for use of CNCS licensed isotopes must include consultation with the CNCS licensed Contractor. Pre-Job Safety Meeting: Must be conducted prior to commencement of

operation. [See: Safety Meetings] [See: TDG-Packaging and Safe Transport of Radioac tive Material] [See: Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Act and regulations] PROCEDURES:

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CANADIAN NUCLEAR SAFETY COMMISSION (CNSC) REGULATED ISOTOPES

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Safe handling procedures should include: CNSC Isotopes Specific job procedures to be followed certification of the type and quantity of CNCS A licensed radioactive sources furnished and used e expected effluent concentrations and methTh ods of control if applicable e person in charge, responsible for the operaTh tion.

Equipment and worksite must be properly prepared (i.e. isolated, depressured, made accessible, etc.) The worksite should be roped off. Radiation warning signs must be posted, and unauthorized entry of personnel banned, in the area affected by the work. In no event shall a pregnant employee be allowed in the vicinity of CNSC Licensed radioactive operations. CNCS licensed radioactive source shall not be left unattended at the jobsite unless it has been isolated to prevent any accidental exposure. PRECAUTION: Radioactive isotopes may affect some LEL monitors and fire detection systems. Station shutdown could result when using a highly energetic radioactive source in the vicinity of a detector. A risk assessment must be performed to determine the scope and risk from radioactive sources. Fire detection systems sensitive to radiation may have to be by-passed when radioactive sources are in use in the immediate area. Care must be taken to reactivate the detection system when the work is completed. [See: Equipment Shutdown Systems] Radiation survey meters are not explosion proof, thus a Hot Work Permit is required. RESPONSIBILITIES:

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The BP Canada Representative is responsible for ensuring that only CNSC licensed operators are used when handling CNSC licensed radioactive sources and that all procedures are supplied and followed. The CNCS licensed Contractor performing work with licensed isotopes is responsible for ensuring that safe handling procedures and contingency plans have been developed which comply with all government regulations. He is also responsible for ensuring that all applicable protective equipment, instruments, rescue and decontamination facilities are on hand and in operable condition before the job commences. DRAINING AND DEPRESSURING PURPOSE: To provide safe precautions for the draining and depressuring of toxic or combustible materials. APPLICATION: All plant and field operations. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Static Electricity- [See: Electricity] Combustible and Toxic Fluids Environmental Impact

PRECAUTIONS: Draining and Depressuring should be carried out in a controlled fashion. Valves should be opened slowly. Depressuring: Caution should be exercised to ensure that any vessel, line, or piece of equipment to be depressured, has been completely isolated. Depressuring should be done only by qualified personnel. Valves that are blocked in should be tagged. Pressure gauges should not be relied

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on for assurance of complete depressuring. [See: Energy Isolation] Electrical Draining: When draining a vessel, certain precautions must be followed: 1. Before draining, the worker must know where the material is going, and the situation at that area (i.e., welding in the vicinity, or if it is a liquid, how it is being contained). 2. Pressured vessels should not be drained through hose. Temporary, secured piping or existing drain lines should be used. 3. hen draining, the worker should not leave W the area. If it is necessary to leave, he should close the valve.

ELECTRICAL PURPOSE: To provide a general understanding of the hazards associated with electricity. APPLICATION: All plant and field operations. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Static Electricity: Sparks resulting from the accumulation of static electricity often cause fires. A static charge can be generated from friction resulting from the passage of oil through a pipeline, the pouring of liquid from one container to another, or steam passing through a hose. Static electricity can also be caused by the flow of air, vapor, steam, water, moving belts of flywheels or rubbing clothing. The hazard is more severe in dry cold weather than in humid weather when most surfaces are coated with a film of moisture, making them

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good conductors and draining off static charges. Steam, a blast of sand, or hydrocarbons rushing through hose or pipe, or issuing from open end pipes, can generate a large static charge. The operator should refrain from opening sample lines or drains any wider than necessary. Another source of potential static electricity is the use of portable plastic flammable liquid containers (1 - 5 gallon containers used for removing, filling, storing on a plastic pickup box liner). PROCEDURES: Most power tools and portable electrical test equipment are not rated for use in hazardous areas, and are equipped with standard U-ground plugs. It is necessary, in many instances, to use a short cheater cord to adapt for explosion-proof electrical receptacles, or extension cords to the non-explosion-proof tool or test equipment. Due to the hazards of arcing electrical equipment or connections, the following procedures must be followed: ll electrical equipment not approved for use in A hazardous areas, must be treated as hot work, taking the necessary gas checks and obtaining Hot Work Permits - [See: Safe Work Permits] ll extension cords used must have explosionA proof ends (connectors) ll cheater cords must be less than 2 feet in A length with one male explosion-proof end and one female standard U-ground plug, and must be used only at the immediate location of the tool or test equipment ll connections at standard U-ground plugs A must be made and adequately taped (to prevent them from pulling apart), before plugging into the explosion-proof receptacles hen the job is completed, connections must be W Electrical

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broken at the explosion-proof receptacle first Electrical ll portable electrical equipment that is approved A for use in hazardous areas (such as some pumps and air movers driven by explosion-proof motors) must have cords equipped with explosionproof ends. This cord must be rated for extra hard usage as per the Canadian Electrical Code (re: rule 18-122) Where an electrical hazard exists because of dampness (i.e., boilers being cleaned), portable lighting units should be used. Portable lighting units must have heavy-duty extension cords with ground fault interrupter, or that permitted by local regulations. Suitable guards must be provided for portable lamps

Grounding/Bonding: The terms bonding and grounding should not be used interchangeably, because the two processes have distinctly different functions. Bonding eliminates a difference in potential between objects, but does not eliminate a difference in potential between these objects and the earth. Grounding eliminates a difference in potential between an object and ground. The usual precaution to avoid static electricity sparking is proper bonding and grounding: onding and grounding are effective only when B applied to conductive bodies. Bonding and grounding systems should be inspected regularly for good mechanical condition. efore loading or unloading any fluid/material B by hose or piping, the truck/equipment must be grounded and bonded. hen samples are taken in a container, the W operator must ensure the container is in contact with the filling nozzle or bonded by cable. When drawing samples in a glass bottle, the filling nozzle must be in contact with the liquid in the bottle.

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ll equipment and buildings must be grounded A according to the applicable electrical regulations.

Cathodic Protection: The nature of a cathodic protection system is to put an electrical charge on the pipe or equipment in question, to prevent external corrosion. As a result, the cathodic protection must be shut off or disconnected, and the equipment bonded and grounded before work is started. Work in the Vicinity of Underground Power Cable: No person shall commence excavation work until the vicinity has been checked and underground electrical power cables located. Electrical power cables should be shut-off whenever possible, prior to commencing work. All underground power cables shall be located by hand digging method or Hydrovacing methods. PRECAUTION: lectrical Grounding: E Serious harm can result from electricity with relatively low voltages if equipment is not properly grounded. Portable Lighting: Where an electrical hazard exists because of dampness (i.e., boilers being cleaned), portable lighting units should be used. Portable lighting units must have heavy-duty extension cords with ground fault interrupter, or that permitted by local regulations. Suitable guards must be provided for portable lamps.

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hen Draining or Depressuring fluid/material W into a container, the container must be bonded to the drain and depressuring valve.

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Electrical

Batteries: B atteries used and/or stored in enclosed spaces must be vented to remove hydrogen gases. Sealed, maintenance free batteries are excluded from this requirement.

Inspection: Th ermography (infra-red scan) is a recommended practice on electrical equipment to locate potential problems. This should be done on a routine basis or before any major shutdowns.

dentification: I All electrical panels should be identified as to the equipment they control. Appropriate signs should be posted on electrical switch gear cabinets, sub-stations and rooms to warn personnel of electrical danger.

D anger An Equipment Starts Automatically sign must be displayed on equipment which starts automatically.

Above Ground Clearance: PRECAUTION: Minimum clearance from an overhead power line is as follows: The employer must accurately determine the voltage of any energized electrical equipment or conductor and the minimum distance from it required by 19.24 (2) subsection (1). Safe limit of approach distances from overhead power lines for persons and equipment

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Alberta - Refer to OH & S sections 225, 226 schedule 4 for further information
Operating voltage between conductors of overhead power line 0-750 volts Insulated or polyethylene covered conductors 0-750 volts Bare, uninsulated Above 750 volts Insulated conductors 750 volts 40 kilovolts 69 kilovolts, 72 kilovolts 138 kilovolts, 144 kilovolts 230 kilovolts, 260 kilovolts 500 kilovolts Safe limit of approach distance for persons and equipment

300 millimetres

1.0 meter 1.0 meter 3.0 meters 3.5 meters 4.0 meters 5.0 meters 7.0 meters

British Columbia - Refer to OH & S Table 19-1 for further information


Voltage Phase to phase Over 750 V to 75 kV Over 75 kV to 250 kV Over 250 kV to 550 kV Minimum distance

Meters 3 4.5 6

Feet 10 15 20

Ontario: Over 750 V to 150 kV: 3m Over 150 kV to 250 kV: 4.5m Over 250 kV: 6m These clearances apply to any direction, vertical or horizontal. If it is necessary to work closer than the minimum distance, authorization shall be obtained from the utility

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Electrical

company. When utility company approval or authorization is required, the operating line voltage must be verified by a designated, competent individual from the utility company. The area directly under or adjacent to an overhead power line shall not be used for storage of material, or equipment. No excavations or similar operation shall be carried out in the vicinity of overhead power lines that would reduce the original support of the power line. Earth or other material shall not be placed under or adjacent to an overhead power line in such a manner that the minimum ground clearance would be reduced. Vehicle load clearance shall not be of a height that would be in violation of the safe limits of approach from overhead power lines. RESPONSIBILITIES: Only company-authorized personnel may work on electrical equipment. [See: Electrical Protection Branch Regulations]

TRAINING: Only the following trained and BP authorized personnel will be allowed to do Electrical work on BP Facilities and Pipelines: a) Journeyman Electricians b) Electrician Apprentice c) Refer to the Provincial Electrical regulations.

Only Journeyman Electricians or, Apprentices under the direct supervision of Journeyman Electrician, may work on equipment rated at more than 750 volts. Any person who knows of a fire of electrical origin or suspected electrical origin shall, as soon as practicable, report the accident, contact or fire to a technical Administrator for the electrical discipline or to a safety codes officer and the safety codes officer shall notify a technical Administra-

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tor for the electrical discipline. After an accident described in subsection (1), no person shall remove or interfere with anything in, on or about the place where the accident occurred until permission has been granted by a safety codes officer in the electrical discipline, unless it is necessary to do so to prevent death or injury, to protect property or to restore service. Refer to Safety Codes Act Section 16 (1-3) for further information. ELECTRICAL STORMS GUIDELINES TO STAY SAFE DURING ELECTRICAL STORMS: ach morning check local weather websites for E severe weather forecasts. Plan your day. f a potential electrical storm is approaching, I outside work must cease until safe to resume. f you can hear thunder you are still in the strikI ing distance of lighting. f possible, go indoors or as a second option into I a non convertible vehicle...Most homes, office, business and process buildings are grounded as per regulatory requirements. nce indoors, stay away from windows and O doors. o not use corded telephones except for emerD gencies. f possible unplug electronic equipment before I the storm arrives and avoid contact with electrical equipment or cords during the storm. void contact with plumbing, including sinks, A baths and faucets. f outdoors, go to a low point. Lightening hits I the tallest object. Get down if you are in an exposed area. Stay away from trees.

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Equipment Shutdown

void metal objects such as golf clubs, fishing A rods, metal tools,... f you feel a tingling sensation or your hair I stands on end, lightning may be about to strike. Crouch down and cover your ears. Stay away from all sources of water or wet grass. Dont stand close to other people - spread out. ictims of lightning strikes should be given CPR V if necessary, and seek medical attention.

EQUIPMENT SHUTDOWN SYSTEMS, TEMPORARY BY-PASS OF PURPOSE: To provide for the safe use of temporary bypasses of shutdown systems. APPLICATION: All Production Equipment DEFINITION: Equipment shutdown systems are: a) Electrical b) Pneumatic c) Mechanical

POTENTIAL HAZARDS: If equipment shutdowns are left disabled, the potential for damage to equipment or injury to personnel exists. PROCEDURES: Equipment protection devices must not be altered, tampered with, adjusted or repaired, except by qualified persons designated by the supervisor in charge.

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In all areas the potential hazards must be evaluated and a site-specific procedure developed to maintain safe operation. RESPONSIBILITIES: Responsibility lies with the Supervisor and employees installing, operating, or repairing equipment, while shutdown systems are by-passed. EYEWASH STATIONS & DELUGE SHOWERS PURPOSE: To provide guidelines for the provisions and placement of eyewash stations and deluge showers in BP Canada worksites. APPLICATION: All BP Canada worksites where personnel exposure to injurious chemicals exists. PREPARATIONS: Each worksite must be evaluated to determine the need for emergency eyewash stations and safety showers. Minimizing exposure through the use of alternative chemicals, enclosed systems or bulk storage should be the first line of defense. Where the exposure cannot be eliminated, the risk should be categorized as high, moderate or low in accordance with BC Occupational Health and Safety Regulations 5.88:

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Equipment shutdown systems, whether electrical, pneumatic, or mechanical should not be by-passed. The piece of equipment should be taken out of service to make necessary repairs. However, there are situations where it becomes impractical or impossible to work with a piece of equipment without some manner of by-passing or jumping the shutdown system temporarily.

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Equipment Shutdown

igh: risk of irreversible tissue damage to the H eyes or skin or of serious illness resulting from rapid absorption of a toxic substance through the eyes or skin, or where the risk of igniting clothing is present. oderate: risk of irritation or other reversible M harm to the eyes or skin, or of illness resulting from absorption of a toxic substance through the eyes or skin. Low: risk of mild eye or skin irritation. Emergency eyewash and shower facilities must : o e designed so that once activated, the flow of B water will continue without requiring the use of the operators hands. o Clearly identify their location and provide directions for use. o Be protected from all potential chemical contamination, freezing and from high heat exposure. o Where specified, provide tempered water (15 30C) unless non-tempered water is recommended by a Doctor to reduce the risk of worker injury.

Personal protective equipment must be supplied. The use of this equipment is mandatory. Note: Special care must be exercised in the selection of personal protective equipment at worksites where large volumes of water are not readily available. PROCEDURES: Location: High Risk Tempered continuous flow eyewash stations and deluge showers must be placed within 5 seconds walking distance

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Showers may be located further than 6m if: non-tempered drench hose is within 5 seconds A walking distance but no greater than 6 m. tempered shower facility can be reached within A 5 minutes of the accident.

Moderate Risk Tempered emergency eyewash and shower equipment must be within 10 seconds walking distance but no further than 30 m (100 ft) unless: irst aid services are maintained to start treatF ment within 5 minutes of an accident. drench hose is located with 10 seconds walkA ing distance but no greater than 30 m.

Low Risk Effective means to flush the eyes and skin within 10 seconds walking distance but no further than 30 m (100 ft). Volume of Water Required: afety showers and/or emergency eyewash S stations must meet the requirements of ANSI standard Z358.1-1981. afety showers, emergency eyewash stations and S portable self-contained units must be capable of delivering sufficient water for not less than 15 minutes (or more if required by the nature of the material). yewash stations must be capable of delivering a E minimum of 1.5 L/min of water with a pressure not exceeding 175 kPa (24psi) and with a spray pattern designed to effectively flush both eyes. rench hoses must be capable of delivering a D

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but no greater than 6 m (20 ft) from high-risk areas. For high risk corrosive gases such as ammonia or chlorine, the facilities must not be located in the gas storage or use area, but rather adjacent to it.

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Eyewash Stations

minimum of 11.4 L/min. If potable water systems are available, eyewash and showers should be permanently installed. Where potable water systems are not available, approved portable or self-contained safety showers and/or eyewash units are recommended. Eyewash Bottles: As a minimum, emergency eyewash bottles, one liter size, should be available at all worksites. This may require a bottle in each vehicle. Upon opening or breaking the seal of the one liter eyewash bottle, the entire contents must be used or disposed. Only bottles with an identified expiration date are approved for use at BP Canada worksites. Employees should immediately go to the nearest available source of potable water to continue flushing for a minimum of 15 minutes, and to obtain medical help as soon as possible. PRECAUTIONS: Alarm devices should be considered for remote or large worksites. This precaution will signal others that the shower or eyewash unit has been activated. Back-up personnel can then proceed to the location. Eyewash and shower stations should be: ested upon initial installation in accordance T with manufacturers instructions. hecked weekly to ensure access is not blocked C by material or equipment. Permanently plumbed eyewash stations should: Use only potable water. e flushed weekly (note BC requires monthly) B for a minimum of 5 minutes to completely flush the branch of water line supplying the unit. This will verify they are operational, and ensure a

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clean supply of water. Fire Protection ortable or self-contained eyewash or shower P units should: se only potable water or an isotonic saline U flushing solution. ave the water replaced regularly or as per H manufacturers specifications, to ensure a clean supply of water.

All operational checks and flushes should be recorded. RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of the BP Canada Supervisor in charge, and all employees, to assess the need and provide emergency eyewash or safety shower units where required. TRAINING: Employees in charge of handling or working with injurious chemicals must be instructed in the proper use and location of all emergency eyewash and safety shower units. FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT PURPOSE: To provide information on reliable fire suppression equipment, specific work areas with the proper type of protection relative to classification, and a method of inspection and training to ensure that equipment is properly maintained and functional at all times. APPLICATION: All BP Canada field locations. PROCEDURES: Classification of Fires: Class A Fires Occur in ordinary combustible

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Fire Protection

materials such as wood, cloth, and paper. Extinguishing agents most commonly used are water and type ABC dry chemical agent (Ansul Foray). Class B Fires Occur in the vapor-air mixture over the surface of a flammable liquid such as grease, gasoline, or oil. BC type dry chemical (Ansul Purple- K), foam, carbon dioxide, and water fog may be used as extinguishing agents. lass C Fires Occur in electrical equipment. C Non-conducting extinguishing agents must be used. Carbon dioxide is the most suitable extinguishing agent. Dry chemical agents can be used, but require extensive clean-up of equipment after the fire. Class D Fires Occur in combustible materials such as magnesium, titanium, zirconium, and sodium. Specialized techniques, extinguishing agents, and extinguishing equipment have been developed to control and extinguish fires of this class. The most commonly used agent is MET-LX.

Location and Placement of Extinguishers: Fire extinguishers must be placed in accordance with local fire regulations, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) guidelines, and the guidelines included in the chart later in this section. Recharge: All fire extinguishers must be recharged with the proper chemical immediately after use. Only a certified technician can recharge a fire extinguisher in non emergency situations. Chemicals must never be mixed, as the resulting chemical reactions may damage the extinguisher, as well as create a safety hazard. Fire extinguishers that are of the external cartridge type or wheeled units must be recharged by personnel trained in recharging. Chemicals used for

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ABC Extinguishers Foray BC Extinguishers Purple-K

LOCATION AND PLACEMENT OF FIRE EXTINGUISHERS RECOMMENDED Inspection and Maintenance: All maintenance must be performed by a competent person in accordance with the manufacturers specifications. (A competent person is one who has been trained in the required maintenance procedure.) The following inspections are the minimum requirement. The findings of inspections must be documented and retained on file at each BP Canada location. Monthly Inspection Requirements: 1. All units must be in the designated location and visible. 2. All units must be checked to ensure operational reliability (i.e., seals in place, nozzle and hoses unobstructed, easy access to units). Annual Inspections must be performed as per manufacturers specifications and applicable government regulations. TRAINING: The effectiveness of fire-fighting equipment may increase by as much as 40% when it is used by a trained employee. Regular fire training is a requirement under occupational health and safety legislation, and is also in the companys best interest to prevent loss to people, property, and process. [See: Training] RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of BP Canada to ensure that

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recharging must be of the type used by the manufacturer of the extinguisher.

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Fire Res. Workwear

adequate, properly maintained fire protection is available at each worksite. The contractor is responsible for the proper operation, inspection and maintenance of their fire protection equipment according to Government Regulations. FIRE RESISTANT WORKWEAR PRACTICE 1.0 Scope

1.1 This practice applies to all BP Canada Gas Performance Unit (CGPU) and Canadian Natural Gas Liquids BU employees, contracters, and other visiting personnel doing work on BP premises and work sites. 2.0 Purpose

2.1 e fire resistant workwear (FRW) program is designed Th to emphasize and enhance employee safety, through ensuring the use of appropriate personal protective workwear in potentially hazardous areas, by reducing the risk of thermal burns. 3.0 3.1 General Provisions F ire resistant work wear must not be used as a substitute for proper job planning or minimizing potential hazards. Th is policy is based on material contained within the Canadian General Standards Board, **CGSB 155.20, Work Wear for Protection Against Hydrocarbon Flash Fire and **CGSB 155.21, Recommended practices for the Provision and Use of Work Wear for Protection Against Flash Fire, and the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers

3.2

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3.3

Th e outermost garments must be fire resistant and shall have reflective striping as per the specifications outlined in Appendix IV of this policy. BP Canada requires that all employees, contractors wear fire resistant/retardant outerwear with reflective striping while working on BP worksites. Visibility is a safety requirement. See Alberta OH&S GSR Section 18, or B.C. WCB OH&S regulations section 8.24, 8.31., and Saskatchewan and Ontario Applicable Regulations. FRW coveralls are prone to damage from sparks, welders and welders helpers may wear FRW CarHarts or Leathers but the recommended garment for welders is FRW Excel Brown Duck. Regulation 851 Industrial Establishments section 84, and Regulation 213 Construction Projects, sections 21 and 25 Limitations of Fire Resistant Work Wear:

4.0

4.1 e protective garments addressed in **CGSB 155.20, Th and outlined in Appendix II of this policy, provide a measure of protection against unplanned exposure to hydrocarbon flash fire (approximately 84 kw/m2) for relatively short periods of time, typically three seconds or less. Protective garments may serve to reduce the severity of burn injury as a result of a flash fire and may not completely prevent an injury. Garments that continue to burn after a flash fire incident are hazardous. 5.0 5.1 Use of Protective Work Wear The protective work wear should provide a good functional fit for maximum protection and comfort

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(CAPP), Consumer Guideline for the Selection of Fire Resistant Work Wear for Protection Against Hydrocarbon Flash fires.

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Fire Res. Workwear

on the job. Users should be aware that the fit of the garment could have a direct influence on how much protection can be provided by a particular garment. For example, a garment that is too loose or too tight will not offer maximum FR protection. 5.2 The protective work wear must be worn properly. The zipper must be worn closed and sleeves and cuffs worn down and secured. For maximum protection collar should be worn closed.

5.3 ingle layer protective garments are more effective S when worn over an additional layer of clothing (See Appendix I) 5.4 rotective neck, head, hand and foot coverings P should be worn if the occupational hazard warrants their use. 5.5 Certain synthetics or synthetic blends worn as undergarments may not be appropriate for use under fire resistant work wear, as the transferred heat from a flash fire may cause them to melt. Undergarments with melt resistant properties are required (e.g. cotton, aramid, wool). See Appendix I. Rainwear, high visibility vests and garments shall be in accordance with applicable sections of **CGSB155.20. Applications where disposable garments could be used are to protect regular FRW from extremely dirty jobs (e.g., tank cleaning, equipment tear down), or other fabric degrading jobs (e.g., painting).

5.6

5.7

WARNING: Disposable garments shall only be worn over fire resistant garments and must meet the flame resistant

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NOTE: The outer most primary garment in any protective ensemble shall not be made of any fabric that burns, melts, or drips. The use of a garment that burns, melts, or drips that is worn over a Fire Resistant garment may contribute to the severity of a burn injury. 6.0 6.1 Where Fire Resistant Workwear Is Required Fire resistant work wear shall be worn whenever an employee enters a BP worksite where there is foreseeable exposure for a hydrocarbon flash fire or an explosion from combustible gas or natural gas liquids is present. These foreseeable hazardous areas include but are not limited to: Service rig operations Gas plants Pipelines, pump stations Oil batteries Natural gas liquids facilities Aircraft refueling operations Laboratories Wellheads Construction sites Drilling rig operations

6.2

6.3 If, following a documented (e.g. MOC) site specific hazard evaluation, by the BP representative or designate in charge, it is determined that there is no foreseeable exposure to an accidental release of explosive, or flammable mixtures, (e.g. an office setting or while driving company vehicles), these areas

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test and be approved as outlined in**CGSB 155.20. They are not intended to be the primary garment for workers.

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Fire Res. Workwear

or tasks of exception where fire resistant work wear is not required, will be exempt. 7.0 Fire Resistant Work Wear Material Selection and Ordering BP Canada identifies the preferred material and garment selection for its workers, through contractual agreements with a garment manufacturer. (See Appendix II). All fire resistant work wear selected for use must meet or exceed the requirements established in the Canadian General Standards Board, **CGSB 155.20, Work wear for Protection Against Hydrocarbon Flash Fire. U se form GHSSER MF 90001 to order work wear. Obtain appropriate approval prior to faxing to supplier. Fire Resistant Work Wear Provisions

7.1

7.2

7.3

8.0

8.1 anagement, either local or within a Performance M Unit, must develop a site specific policy that addresses the following points: Employee eligibility for FRW Type of garments (See Appendix II) Quantity of garments requency of replacement and process for handling F Approval process for purchasing FRW garment(s) How garments will be repaired in their area Handling of garment maintenance, and Other sections of this policy as applicable

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9.1 nsures that all work is conducted in accordance with E approved procedures, equipment and training. 9.2 aintains assigned fire resistant work wear in a proper M manner, e.g. sleeves rolled down, to ensure maximum protection. 10.0 Employee Training 10.1 As an important part of using personal protective equipment employees must be familiar with: When and why FRW is required to be worn The capabilities and limitations of FRW use Proper garment care The proper wearing of the garments e potential hazards associated with the use of Th non-fire resistant work wear in a flash fire sit tion As with all employees training, this should be documented on individual training records or safety meeting attendance minutes. Contractor and Visitor Requirements

10.2

11.0

11.1 Contractors are required to wear fire resistant work wear at all times and under the same conditions as that of BP staff. 11.2 Fire resistant work wear worn by contractors must meet or exceed the requirements of **CGSB 155.20, or as outlined in local area site-specific requirements for contractors. 11.3 nless prior contractual arrangements are made with U BP, contractors are required to have a fire resistant

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9.0

Employee Responsibilities

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work wear policy that complies with the applicable safety regulations as detailed in Operating Policy. 11.4 nless defined in the site-specific fire resistant work U wear policy, a visitor is defined as a person who normally is not employed at the specific work location. 11.5 Visitors unless otherwise instructed by a local area site specific fire resistant work wear guideline, must wear fire resistant work wear at all times. 12.0 Maintenance of Protective Work Wear

12.1 To ensure proper repair and maximum garment longevity, repairs and approved alterations to fire resistant work wear will be handled on a local basis, as required, at company expense. 12.2 Repairs should only be made with components, which comply with the original garments specifications and construction. 12.3 dequate decontamination of protective work wear, A according to the manufacturers recommendations, by laundering or dry-cleaning is imperative in order to maintain flame resistance and thermal protection. Where oily soil is present, periodic dry cleaning of garments may be necessary in order to remove flammable contaminants or contaminants which may impair the flame resistance. The site-specific FRW policy should also address this item. 12.4 hen laundering protective garments, launder sufW ficiently to prevent build up of hard to remove stains, which could reduce flame resistance. Pre-treat oily stains by either rubbing liquid detergent or powdered detergent mixed with water into the stain or use a

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12.5 Follow all laundry precautions on the garment. There are products which will lessen the effectiveness of the flame resistance, in particular: a) hether the use of chlorine bleach is advised W or should be avoided b) hether a heavy-duty soap can be used or W laundering must be limited to a heavy-duty synthetic detergent

12.6 Unless otherwise decided by local management, the responsibility for keeping issued FRW reasonably clean and free of flammable or combustible materials that could degrade the fire resistant characteristics of the clothing will remain with the employee. All cleaning must be done in accordance with manufacturers specifications. 12.7 ee Static Electricity section for additional mainteS nance recommendations. 13.0 Static Electricity

13.1 e major static hazard is the body which can store a Th large static charge. It is imperative that in situations where static electricity poses a significant hazard that the body be grounded regardless of the type of clothing worn. Clothing can generate static electricity of sufficient energy to ignite combustible atmospheres. It is important to minimize the build up of static electricity on workwear in order to prevent the

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pre-wash product recommended for oil stains. Use a heavy-duty liquid or powdered laundry detergent and the hottest water recommended on the garment label. It is harder to remove oily soil with cool wash water

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clothing from becoming a source of ignition for a flash fire. 13.2 orkers should be grounded before entering a W high-risk area to minimize the possibility of static build-up and discharge. 13.3 orkers should also avoid removing any garments W while in the high-risk area. Friction of one fabric against another may contribute to the generation of electrical charge. 13.4 ne approach to reduce the static build up on O garments is to use an antistatic treatment during laundering. This treatment works by trapping water on the fabric to distribute the static charge through conductivity. The antistatic treatment must be added during each laundering according to the manufacturers directions. 13.5 ver drying in the dryer should be avoided to miniO mize static build up. Appendix I Clothing Worn Underneath Fire Resistant Work Wear Other material worn in conjunction with fire resistant work wear (e.g. clothing worn underneath) should not contribute to the injury of a worker in a hydrocarbon flash fire situation. While the outermost layer of work wear worn must be of fire resistant material clothing worn underneath shall be of a nonfusible type. That is, clothing that does not melt. Examples of acceptable nonfusible materials that can be worn underneath fire resistant outerwear include:

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Cotton Kermel Nomex

Linen Viscose Proban Appendix II

Wool Leather

Fire Resistant Work Wear Supplier Bulwark Protective Apparel Inc., located in Edmonton, Alberta supplies all Fire Resistant Work Wear to BP Canada Gas PU and NGL BU employees. Use form gHSSEr MF 90001 to order work wear. The material garment selection (see below) and contractual arrangements have been approved by BPs Fire Resistant Work Wear Committee (see Appendix III). Approved Material and Garments Listed below are the Blue colored garments that can be purchased as standard issue garments. Any other garments purchased must have management approval.

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Product One Gas Monitor Pocket Unlined Coverall Unlined Coverall Insulated Coverall Insulated Bib Coverall Button Front Shirt Button Front Shirt Button Front Shirt Button Front Shirt Pant Jean Style Pant Jean Style Pant Jean Style Insulated Parka Insulated Bomber Jacket Insulated Bomber Jacket Lined Bomber Jacket Lined Bomber Jacket Mens Navy Fleece Hooded Jacket Insulated Vest Shopcoat Hard Hat Hood Hard Hat Liner Hard Hat Face Mask Balaclava Brown Duck Unlined Bib Overall Brown Duck Lined Bib Overall Brown Duck Linemans Coat Traffic (orange) or Visitor (blue) vest Mock styled neck long sleeved FRW shirt Regular Style Neck Long Sleeved FRW Shirt.

Fire Res. Workwear

Style CLB6RB CNB6RB CLC8RB BLC8RB SLU2LB SLU2NV SND6RB SND6NV PLJ8NV PNJ8NV PNJ8RB JLP8RB JLR8RB JNR8RB JLJ8RB JNJ8RB SEH6NV LNS2NV KEL2LB HLH2RB HNL2NV HNM2NV HNB2NA BLF8BD BLN4BD JLC2BD KNV20RB SEL2NV SEK2NV

Fabric Mesh or Solid Excel FR Royal Nomex IIIA Royal Excel FR Royal Excel FR Royal Excel FR Light Blue Excel FR Navy Nomex IIIA Royal Nomex IIIA Navy Excel FR Navy Nomex IIIA Navy Nomex IIIA Royal Excel FR Royal Excel FR Royal Nomex IIIA Royal Excel FR Royal Nomex IIIA Royal Excel FR Navy Nomex IIA Navy Excel FR Light Blue Excel FR Royal Nomex IIIA Navy Nomex IIIA Navy Nomex IIIA Natural Excel FR Brown Duck Excel FR Brown Duck Excel FR Brown Duck Nomex IIIA Royal Excel FR Navy Excel FR Navy

Appendix III BP Canadas Fire Resistant Work Wear Committee: Chairman Dennis Steciw Office Cell Office Cell Office Cell 403-233-1292 403-803-3085 403-233-1981 403-815-7215 403-233-1426 403-874-4375

Members - Jason Groot Bill Adam

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Type of Worker: Alberta BP Employee Alberta Full Time Equivalent Contractor working in BC Contractor working in AB

Minimum Striping Requirements based on legislation below: Workers Compensation Board of British Columbia Workers Compensation Board of British Columbia Workers Compensation Board of British Columbia Occupational Health and Safety

Worker in Ontario: Regulation 213 Construction Projects, section 69.1 BC WCB Standard Protective Equipment Standard 2-1997 High Visibility Garment - http://www2.worksafebc.com/Publications/OHSRegulation/WCBStandards.asp?ReportID=30947 AB OH&S Personal Protective Equipment Flame Resistant Clothing Part 18http://employment.alberta.ca/documents/WHS/WHSLEG_ohsc_2006.pdf Welders Ontario Regulation 213 Construction Projects, section 69.1 - Retro-reflective and fluorescent garment requirements http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca Due to the fact that welders wear leathers on the upper portion of the chest, their garments will need to have an additional band of striping around the waist of their garments. This will ensure that the minimum required amount of striping shows when they are wearing leathers.

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Appendix IV Refer to the table below for the minimum configuration for reflective striping on outermost garments for use by workers working for BP or on behalf of BP.

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First Aid Equipment

FIRST AID EQUIPMENT AND MEDIC PURPOSE: To establish practices and provide equipment and emergency conveyance to ensure that adequate medical first aid treatment is available at all BP worksites. APPLICATION: All BP Canada worksites where employees or other workers are present on a temporary or permanent basis. PROCEDURES: Equipment: tandard first aid equipment requirements must S be available and maintained for each worksite in accordance with provincial regulations mergency conveyance must follow provincial E regulations ach worksite should have access to occupational E medical advice, i.e., off-site communications e attendant must not be assigned or undertake Th activities that will interfere with the attendants ability to receive and respond to a request for first aid e attendant should be present in the area Th served, during all working hours e service and attendant should be accessible Th where the attendant can reach injured workers within 10 minutes walking time or driving time to render first aid. (BC First Aid Regulation G3.18(2))

RESPONSIBILITY: It is the responsibility of the BP Employee in charge to ensure that adequate First Aid Equipment is available, and strategically located for ease of availability. As per provincial regulations employees must be familiar with their location

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and adequately trained as per provincial regulations to render first aid. In Ontario, minimum requirements are set out in Regulation 1101 First Aid, under the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act. GAS AND LIQUID SAMPLING PURPOSE: To provide a guide for the safe sampling and handling of gas and liquids samples. APPLICATION: All facility and field operations. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: The sampling of gases and liquids represents a danger to personnel and equipment due to the nature of the fluids and the conditions of temperature and pressure present. Static Electricity [See: Electrical] PRECAUTIONS: rior to sampling, the approved container P must be checked to ensure that it is of suitable construction for the gas or liquid being handled, and has a pressure rating sufficient to handle the working pressure. pecific procedures are necessary when sampling S propane and butane in special sampling bombs. They must not be completely liquidfilled, as they are not designed to withstand the extreme pressures of liquid expansion. All sample containers must be properly labeled. pplicable personal protective equipment shall A be worn while sampling. hen sampling or checking is being done at a W bleed valve, the valve should be opened slowly.

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Guards

If no flow occurs, a blockage could blow loose when the valve is opened wide, resulting in a sudden release of energy. This could result in fire and/or injury due to the escape of gas at high pressure. ite-specific procedures shall be developed to S identify the hazards associated with sampling. (i.e., sour gas) [See: Respiratory Protection] [See: Personal Protective Equipment] [See: Permits] [See: Safety Standby] Transportation and Handling: e handling and transportation of samples must Th comply with Government regulations for the transportation of dangerous goods (TDG) and the requirements of WHMIS.

TRAINING: Only properly trained personnel should be taking samples. GUARDS PURPOSE: To provide safe work practices for protection of personnel from rotating equipment and heat sources. APPLICATION: All plant/field activities and equipment. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: All rotating equipment, belts, pulleys, grinder, etc., that present a hazard to personnel must be guarded. Any openings that could present a hazard to personnel must be guarded.

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PREPARATIONS: Before any guards are removed from rotating equipment, the equipment must be locked out and tagged. [See: Energy Isolation] PROCEDURES: The guarding requirements and design for various aspects of oil and gas operations are covered in Provincial OH&S Regulations. Guards should be re-installed prior to start-up. PRECAUTIONS: Under some maintenance circumstances, equipment may have to be operated without guards in place. In this case, the equipment must be marked and suitably illuminated to identify and minimize the hazard. Guards must be replaced as soon as possible. HAND PROTECTION PRACTICE 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability This practice is applicable to all Canada Gas Performance Unit employees, contractors, sub-contractors and visitors to CGPU work sites. The purpose of this practice is to ensure that all reasonable precautions will be taken to protect the safety of personnel who are or may be required to work with their hands. The requirement set forth in this practice will act as the minimum requirements. Specific contractors,

1.2

1.3

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All piping and equipment operated at a temperature that could cause personnel injury, must be insulated, clad, guarded or otherwise protected.

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Hand Protection

manufacturers or plants may have more stringent requirements. In event of any discrepancies, the more stringent requirements will prevail. 2.0 Purpose

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is intended to protect, shield or isolate personnel from chemical and physical hazards. This practice outlines the type of gloves that personnel must wear when performing jobs that expose the hands to absorption of harmful substances, cuts or lacerations, abrasions, punctures, chemical or thermal burns and harmful temperature extremes. Other types of PPE for hands include barrier creams, finger guards, thimbles, cots and palm pad mitts alone or in combination with Gloves. This practice addresses the proper selection of gloves for activities. Selection of hand protection is based on evaluation of the task being performed, conditions present, and duration of exposure, potential hazards identified and performance characteristics of glove material. 3.0 Glove Selection eneral Purpose - Leather Palm Gloves G For general construction work, not including any hot work (i.e. welding), chemical handling, sheet metal handling and electrical work, leather palm gloves will serve as the minimum requirement for all (BP Canada) employees, contractors, subcontractors and visitors on any (BP Canada) controlled sites. Leather palm gloves will provide protection against abrasions, scrapes and cuts associated with the day-to-day activities on construction sites. Drilling and Well Service activities are granted an exception to use cotton Green King gloves. Chemical Resistant - Neoprene/Nitrile Gloves/ atural Rubber/Polyvinyl Alcohol PVA / Polyvi N nyl Chloride PVC/Viton

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When working with chemicals, ensure that the applicable Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is available, has been read, understood and the protective measures as prescribed by the Manufacturer is followed. Important things to keep in mind when selecting gloves are cuff style, length, lined vs. unlined, chemical compatibility and gauge. Additional information on the proper selection and use of chemical resistant gloves is available from the chemical manufacturer, glove manufacturer and occupational hygiene. brasion/Cut Resistant - Kevlar/Kevlar- ComA posite Gloves In applications where the potential for cuts and abrasions to the hands are high, i.e. sheet metal handling and insulating, use of utility, banana, or lock blade knives, abrasion and cut resistant gloves shall be worn. (jack knife blades that do not use a lock blade mechanism are not allowed). Electrical Work - Rubber Gloves Important to ensure the gloves being used has the correct voltage rating for the specific task. Heat/Temperature Resistant - Welding Gloves Important considerations when selecting welding gloves are not only the heat protection it provides, but also the dexterity and sensitivity that the gloves provide. NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) When working in areas where NORM could be present gloves should provide protection from physical hazards not chemical and most importantly must be disposable. Other Some specific tasks might require special and specific protection i.e. jack hammering, requires gel padded antivibration gloves.

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Table 1 gives examples of job tasks and the proper selection of gloves for that task
Table 1 Example Job Tasks / Work Activities Requiring Hand Protection Abrasive Blasting Biological Substances Chemical Handling (e.g., paints, solvents, additives, lubricants, engine oils, hydrocarbons, & fuels) Compressor / Pump / Engine / Crane Maintenance Chipping, Chiseling, Grinding, Hammering, Scraping Electrical Work on Energized Equipment Heaters / Reboilers Lighting of Housekeeping (moving equipment & debris) Ladders Use of NORM Exposure to Pigging - Launching / Retrieving Pipe / Tubing Handling, Cutting, Threading Pressure Washing Process Equipment Modifications Pressuring / de-pressuring lines & line breaking Inserting / removing blinds, sight glasses, & gauges Operating valves, orifice meters & controllers If using chemical additives - If retrieving or Glove Selection Chemical Resistant Leather (per MSDS)1 Welders / Thermall y Insulated Cut Resistant (e.g., Kevlar) Voltage Rated (per NFPA 70E)2

4.0

Tasks not normally requiring hand protection

While this practice requires the use of hand protection while conducting work it is recognized that some job tasks must be performed without an individual wearing hand protection. Although a thorough evaluation of the types of hand protection available should be carried out prior to making this decision.

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Table 1 Example Job Tasks / Work Activities Requiring Hand Protection Respirable Fibers Handling of Rigging Scaffolding Erection and use of Sharp Objects / Materials Exposure to Tank Gauging Temperature Extremes Exposure to Tool Use (non-powered and powered) Welding / Cutting / Brazing

Voltage Rated (per NFPA 70E)2

or

or

Fitters & Helpers

Welders

The justification is two fold. First the task being performed is considered low risk with respect to hand/finger injury potential. Second the task being performed requires micro/ precise movement of hands fingers and the use of gloves cause a loss of dexterity. In order to comply with this practice, the minimum required hand protection defined in this practice must be worn by all employees, contractors and visitors to (CGPU) sites unless a properly performed and documented hazard assessment shows that hand injury hazards can be eliminated or controlled. Examples of job tasks that may not require the use of gloves are listed in Table 2
Table 2: Example Job Tasks / Work Activities Not Normally Requiring Hand Protection Activities conducted inside of living quarter, control room and break room settings Specific Examples office work, eating, smoking, etc.

Working with small hardware and equipment

bolts/nuts/screws/pins, tube fittings and ferrules, Teflon tape, wiring connections, adjusting programmable flow meters, etc. multi-meters, Pride Route meters, gas meters, cameras, two-way radios, computers etc. hearing protection, fall protection, cleaning safety glasses, SCBA's, respirators, etc.

Using fine instruments and electronics

Donning PPE

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Glove Selection Chemical Resistant Leather (per MSDS)1

Welders / Thermall y Insulated

Cut Resistant (e.g., Kevlar)

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5.0 Hand Protection

Hazard Assessments

OH&S Regulations require that an employer shall ensure that a known hazard which cannot be readily controlled or eliminated and that has the potential for causing serious injury be identified and brought to the attention of workers who may be exposed to the hazard. Hazard Assessments may be performed on tasks to determine if hazards may be present that necessitates the use of specific hand protection. For individual jobs the hazard assessment may be approved by the permit issuer. For repetitive jobs the hazard assessment will be approved by the plant/facility supervisor. Step 1 - Determine what specific job tasks hazards are present. Step 2 - Develop procedures that will eliminate or control identified hazards to the hands. If identified hazards cannot be adequately addressed, the minimum required hand protection must be worn by all affected personnel. Step 3 - Document and maintain the hazard assessment at the work site (Attachment 1 or similar forms may be used for the assessment). Complete hazard assessment below and maintain document on site
Location: List the tasks to be performed: Identify and list the hazards associated with the task: List the control measures (if any) taken to reduce the risk of hand injuries: List the hand protection required: List of personnel performing task(s), attach a list if necessary: Name, signature and title of personnel conducting assessment: Reviewed by BP Project Manager or Designate: Date: Approved Not Approved Date:

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6.0

Key Responsibilities Field Visits

Operating supervisors are responsible for implementing and enforcing this practice, whereas all personnel are responsible for complying with it. It is the responsibility of the job team lead to reference this practice while developing and reviewing Job Safety and Environmental Analyses. 7.0 Scope of Forms

7.1 gHSSEr MF34004 Pre-job Risk Assessment GUIDELINES FOR FIELD VISITS 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability This procedure identifies the steps needed to promote HSSE issues during field visits by CGPU staff. This procedure applies to all Gas Performance Unit activities. Responsibility I t is the responsibility of each team leader or his/ her designate to review this procedure as part of employee training and awareness. It is the responsibility of each employee to follow this procedure when preparing for a field visit. General Procedures H SSE issues at a site location will vary based on the daily activities. Communication topics should be adjusted to focus on the scope of work for the day and the site specific HSSE issues associated with the project.

1.2 2.0 2.1

2.2

3.0 3.1

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3.2 Field Visits

P rior to the visit, contact the relevant HSSE coordinator and/or project manager and/or OCM and/ or foreman to identify any functional group HSSE issues, site specific gHSSEr notifications or alerts and any current HSSE. P rior to the site visit ensure all people traveling to the site have the appropriate PPE, HSSE tools (SOC cards if trained in SOC, HSSE opportunity cards), safety training tickets as required (e.g.H2S alive) and proof of indoctrination. Take time to ensure familiarity with HSSE awareness programs (e.g. stop, think, go; green hand; ISO 14001). I t is recommended to review the 8 golden rules of safety and identify relevant issues for the scope of work at the location before proceeding to the location. W hile at the site, dont stop the regular flow of work. If you wish to participate in a meeting with the work group, consult the person in charge of the site prior to your visit to determine what time pre-job operations or HSSE meetings are held. T ogether with the foreman or the site supervisor, conduct a site walk around that can include any of the following components: Evaluate housekeeping Talk to workers about their activities Carry out Safety Observation Conversations (SOCs) eview compliance with one or two practices or R relevant HSSE issues as identified by the group HSSE coordinator eview status on follow up of actions on gHSSEr R notifications and alerts for that location

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

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3.7

H old a debrief meeting with the foreman or site supervisor to discuss your findings and suggestions before leaving the site. L eave completed HSSE opportunity cards and SOC cards with the foreman or site supervisor or provide to the HSSE representative in Calgary to ensure inclusion in the monthly HSSE statistics.

3.8

3.10 resent your findings to the functional group manP ager or OCM as appropriate upon returning to the office. 4.0 Documentation

4.1 afety Observation Conversation (SOC) cards S (C-15) and HSSE Opportunity cards (C-1518) should be utilized during field visits. They are available through all HSSE representatives in Calgary.

HOUSEKEEPING PURPOSE: To outline the requirements for housekeeping from the point of view of safety of workers. APPLICATION: All BP Canada employees, contractors and facilities POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Slipping

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eview compliance with applicable permit R conditions

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Housekeeping

Tripping Fire Falls Crushing Caught Between (Pinned)

PROCEDURES: P oor housekeeping practices are responsible for many accidents in the work place. With a little effort, this problem is easily eliminated G ood housekeeping practices include keeping tools, materials, equipment, buildings, and properties clean and in good order G ood housekeeping is the day-to-day responsibility of all employees and is a continual process. Periodic cleanups, or cleanups when time permits, is not considered to be adequate T ools and materials shall not be scattered around the walking or working surfaces while the job is in progress. Haphazardly scattered tools, equipment and materials are an invitation to an accident N o job is complete until tools have been cleaned and properly stored, scrap and waste materials disposed of, and the equipment and work location is in good orderly condition, and approved for continued operation S harp and pointed tools shall be stored properly. Leaving such tools lying around loose creates an unnecessary hazard S lick spots on the walking surface caused by water, oil or other substances shall be cleaned up immediately. Allowing this condition to exist, even for a short period of time, is dangerous W aste rags, trash, etc., must not be permitted to accumulate. All of it should be properly disposed of as soon as possible

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P rotruding nails, straps, or wire shall not be permitted to exist in the work place. They shall be removed immediately when found M aterial which is to be stacked, shall be cross-tied or otherwise secured so it will not fall over. Rolling stock such as pipe should be secured so it cannot roll onto an employee A isleways and walking surfaces shall always be kept clear of materials and equipment I t is each workers responsibility to take action and manage slipping hazards including that of mud, ice and snow build up. Workers must use caution in these conditions and apply immediate mitigating hazard controls such as: keeping walkways and stairs clean, spreading de-icer / sand / nut plug to improve traction and or barricading off unsafe areas to prevent workers from entry.

HOT AND ODD BOLTING PRACTICE 1.0 Purpose/Scope

The purpose of this document is to describe the requirements and limitations for hot bolting and odd bolting in E&P operations for the North American Gas SPU. 1.1 General The removal and replacement of flange bolts on live equipment is practiced for several reasons including: Repairing corroded or damaged bolts pgrading the material specification/grades of U bolts inimizing time spent freeing bolts during plant M shutdowns

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M aterials or equipment delivered to the job site shall be kept well away from the working area until needed

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Hot & Odd Bolting

Note: Hot and Odd bolting can be performed safely if planned, engineered, and executed properly. The risk associated with performing Hot and Odd bolting should be evaluated against the risks associated with the start-up and shut-down of process equipment that would be required to depressure the flange in question and the lower risk option selected. 1.2 Potential Hazards 1.2.1 Hot Bolting In hot bolting there is a potential risk of leakage caused by: educed gasket compression during bolt R removal asket failure from over-tightening of bolts G on replacement ailure of bolts due to the increased stress F resulting from adjacent bolt removal 1.2.2 Odd Bolting In odd bolting there is a potential risk of leakage caused by: educed gasket compression during bolt R removal Inadequate tightening on bolt replacement nadvertent re-pressurization of the equipment I during and subsequent to odd bolting.

Note: The scope of application is covered in Section 3.0 of this document. Warning: Removing, replacing or retightening bolts on live piping and equipment is potentially hazardous but can be performed safely. Extreme caution needs to be exercised when assessing, planning, and carrying out these operations. Due to the potential risk, Performance Unit Leaders should carefully consider whether to allow Hot and Odd Bolting in their operating areas and retain the right to prohibit Hot and Odd Bolting. 2.0 Definitions ccountable Person is the person in the organizaA

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ompetent Person (CP) is the on-site BP C representative that is competent to supervise the Hot/Odd Bolting operation. The CP shall have a demonstrated knowledge and understanding of the process system that is to be Hot/Odd Bolted. The CP shall be designated by the Accountable Person ocument Control Management System is an D established means of controlling the issue, use and updating of documents used in the management of a site ot bolting is the sequential removal, cleaning, H lubrication and refitting, or replacement of one bolt at a time in a flanged joint, when the system is pressurized or if the flange acts as secondary containment dd bolting is the sequential removal of alterO nate bolts from a flanged joint when the system is shut down, isolated and at low pressure or depressurized but not necessarily gas-free e words bolt(s) or bolting includes bolts, stud Th bolts, studs, nuts and washers, as appropriate esponsible Person is a suitably trained and R experienced individual who has been formally assessed as competent in Hot/Odd Bolting and has been given specific actions or areas of responsibility by an Accountable Person ubject Matter Expert is an acknowledged expert S in mechanical engineering. This person is usually the SPU Mechanical Engineering Technical Authority echnical Reviewer is a facility engineer or T subject matter expert competent in the design, maintenance, and operation of mechanical pressure systems

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tion that has the ultimate responsibility. This person is usually the Operations Center Manager or the Decommissioning Manager

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3.0

Applicability

3.1 Applicability This procedure applies to hot and odd bolting activities on piping systems and piping connections at vessels that: re standard joint types on weld neck flanges A such as raised face (RF) or ring type (RT) joints in accordance to Tables 1 and 2 ave steel flanges meeting the applicable H ANSI or API specifications eet the pipe size, pressure rating, flange M type, and bolt count specified in the Tables 1 and 2. Older flanges may have a lower rating than those in Tables 1 and 2, and for these flanges the lower rating shall be used ave an operating temperature greater than H 0F(-18C) and less than 140F(60C) Contain hydrocarbon liquids, sweet natural gas, produced water, glycol, or other nontoxic gases

3.2 Specific Exclusions This procedure specifically excludes hot and odd bolting activities on piping systems and piping connections at vessels that: ontain steam, toxic oil or gas (sour gas), C toxic chemicals, or asphyxiates Are in cryogenic service nvolve clamped flanges (e.g. Grayloc, VictauI lic, etc.) re non-standard flanged joints and/or all A those found on heat exchanger head, tube sheet or shell joints. These joints shall be subjected to a full engineering assessment re associated with transmission pipelines or A

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3.3

Restrictions nly one hot bolting operation may take O place in a facility at a time unless approved by the Accountable Person or his designee. An approved SIMOPS plan and MoC system must be in place f the flange has an insulating kit, a replaceI ment kit must be available onsite prior to the commencement of work, in the event of an insulation washer / sleeve failure langes that have been sealed or patched shall F not be hot or odd bolted o hot bolting shall be done at pressures N higher than those listed in Tables 1 and 2 Control of Work and Exception Process

4.0

4.1 ontrol of Hot Bolting Work that Conforms to the C Allowable Guidelines within this Practice The overall practice of Hot and Odd Bolting is prohibited in a PU until approved by the Performance Unit Leader (PUL) using the Management of Change process. A PUL may decide to prohibit Hot and Odd Bolting in their area. Th e Hot / Odd Bolting Work Form in Attachment 1 shall be used to verify and approve work in conformance with this practice.

4.2 pproval for Hot Bolting Outside of the Guidelines A or any Odd Bolting In circumstances where the Accountable Person believes that hot bolting might be safely performed

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regulated gathering lines due to regulatory restrictions and the potential for high external loadings

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outside of the applicability criteria in Section 3.0 and/or outside of the requirements specified within Section 5.0 and where there is no other practicable alternative, an MoC is required that includes: full engineering assessment of the flange A Risk Assessment outlining rigorous control A measures must be conducted (i.e. SIMOPS plan, mitigation measures, drains, emergency response plan, fire hoses etc.) recommendation from the Subject Matter A Expert and approval from the Accountable Person Procedure/Process

5.0

Hot Bolting allows for the replacement of one stud at a time until all the studs have been replaced on a weld neck flange. Prior to removing any studs, all existing studs shall be checked for tightness by torquing the flanged joint to the manufacturer specifications. Bolts should then be removed and replaced one at a time in accordance with a specified cross bolting sequence/pattern. All new studs and nuts shall be torqued according to the manufacturer specifications. Careful consideration must be given to corroded studs, nuts, and flanges. Degradation due to corrosion must be assessed by the Subject Matter Expert before the procedure is allowed to continue. Hot bolting of corroded nuts and studs is prohibited. Hot bolting and hot work are not allowed within 100 ft (30 m) of each other. A BP Competent Person shall be present during all hot bolting activities. Working on live piping and equipment should normally only be contemplated when the advantages have been assessed against the risk. The risk assessment should include: a) s-built design of the flanged joint including A

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b) ontents of the piping or equipment (e.g. the C flammability and/or toxicity of the process fluid). c) esign and actual operating pressures and D temperature conditions - check that the pressure in the piping/equipment will be at the specified reduced value and that the process conditions can be held stable for the duration of the hot bolting operation. d) e possibility of process upsets occurring, the Th consequences of the upset and control measures that can be put in place to minimize/eliminate process upsets. e) e location and condition of the nearest upTh stream and downstream isolation valves relative to the joint should be identified, documented and discussed with all involved personnel prior to commencing the work. f ) osition and functionality of pipe supports P relative to the flanged joint - From a mechanical standpoint, it must be established that there are no unacceptably high external loads and/or bending moments acting on the joint. There should be no significant vibration of the piping at the joint. g) osition and type of flexible expansion joint P affecting the flanged joint. h) Maintenance history of the joint. i) ersonnel access and egress as part of a comP pleted Emergency Response Plan for this work activity. j) ethod of removing seized nuts - Hot work M cutting or burning of seized bolts is prohibited on flanges in hydrocarbon service due to the flammability hazard and/or the toxic fumes hazard when cadmium or zinc coated fastenings are burned. Cold cutting is permissible with the

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bolting and gasket specifications.

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appropriate permit to work. k) ossible degradation of the bolts, e.g. corrosion, P stress corrosion cracking, fatigue. l) Possible degradation of the gasket. m) idden or unseen anomalies or corrosion. H P otential Hazards In hot bolting there is a potential risk of leakage caused by: educed gasket compression during bolt R removal Inadequate tightening on bolt replacement asket failure from over-tightening of bolts G on replacement

The practice of hot bolting shall only be allowed for those flanges indicated in Table 1 (ANSI class flanges) and Table 2 (API class flanges). NOTE: Some flanges require a decreased pressure rating during hot bolting (from 9% to 72% less than normal pressure rating) or are not allowed at all (ANSI 150 class flanges). Use Table 1 and Table 2 in conjunction with local hot-bolting safety practices to enhance personnel safety and insure code compliance. 5.1 Hot Bolting Procedure Cold cutting of bolts on non-hydrocarbon lines can be used, but the blowout potential of the gasket and its ability to be retightened should be considered and included in the work plan. Bolt removal, examination, and replacement shall be as follows: (1) efore the work starts, authorized personnel shall B check that: a. All necessary materials, equipment, and personnel are onsite b. All relevant procedural requirements have been met including all relevant HSSE requirements.

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d. The pressure in the piping and equipment is at the specified pressure and that process conditions are stable. e. e work form for Hot /Odd Bolting is Th prepared (see Attachment 1). (2) The authorized personnel shall check that: a. ach of the existing bolts is tight to the correct E torque to ensure that bolts have not relaxed in service. b. Any abnormal conditions, such as loose bolts, shall be reported to the Competent Person. (3) ot bolting shall be carried out on only one bolt H at a time, in a sequence specified in Figure 1, or by other approved job-specific instructions. (4) Each bolt complete with nuts will be removed and examined. Nuts and bolts found to be in reusable condition shall be cleaned and lubricated prior to reuse. Damaged bolts and nuts will be disposed of and replaced by new items of the correct specification. If there is any doubt as to the integrity of the bolting, it shall be replaced. Exposed flange surfaces must be cleaned and the area under the nuts thoroughly lubricated. (5) e bolt shall be correctly tightened and Th tensioned to specified torque figures obtained prior to starting the task. The torque figures shall be consistent with the flange design, bolt type, material, and condition. Initial retightening of the bolts shall not introduce additional local compression of the gasket. (6) fter all the bolts have been replaced, a final A tightness check will be carried out in the sequence specified in Figure 1. (7) e Competent Person shall inspect the comTh pleted job and sign the Hot/Odd Bolting form and other required permits. Any comments shall

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c. Appropriate safeguards are in place

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be attached to the form. (8) n completion of work, the completed Hot/ O Odd Bolting form should be filed within the Document Control Management System. Odd Bolting Procedure Bolt removal, examination, and replacement shall be as follows: (1) efore the work starts, authorized personnel shall B check that: a. All necessary materials, equipment, and personnel are onsite b. All relevant procedural requirements have been met including all relevant HSSE requirements. c. Appropriate safeguards are in place (2) ormally, odd bolting is preceded by hot bolting N (to ensure that bolts to be removed are in good condition and reasonably free to move). The Competent Person should check the signed Hot/ Odd Bolting form for any comments that could be relevant to the odd bolting activity. (3) The Competent Person shall ensure that: 3.8.1 e pressure in the piping and equipment Th is at the specified pressure and that process conditions are stable. 3.8.2 ach of the existing bolts is tight to the E correct torque to ensure that bolts have not relaxed in service. 3.8.3 ny abnormal conditions, such as loose A bolts, shall be reported to the Competent Person. (4) B olt removal shall be carried out according to the methods specified in the approved job procedure. Th e sequence of bolt removal will be specified

5.2

(5)

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(6)

Th e Competent Person shall inspect the completed job and sign the Hot/Odd Bolting form. Any comments should be attached to the Hot/Odd Bolting form. O n completion of work, the completed Hot/Odd Bolting form should be filed within the Document Control Management System.

(7)

Table 1 (ANSI Class Flanges) Flange Pressure Ratings During Hot Bolting (1) (Temporary Removal (2) of Only One Bolt at a Time (3) Under Operating Pressure)
Normal Pipe Size 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 10 10 10 10 12 12 12 12 ANSI Class 150 300 600 600 900 1500 2500 150 300 600 600 900 1500 2500 150 300 600 600 900 1500 150 300 600 600 900 1500 150 300 600 600 900 1500 150 300 600 600 150 300 600 600 Flange Type
(4)

Normal Bolt Count 4 8 8 8 8 8 4 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 12 12 12 12 12 8 12 12 12 12 12 12 16 16 16 12 16 20 20

Normal PSI Max 285 740 1480 1480 3705 6170 285 740 1480 1480 2220 3705 6170 285 740 1480 1480 2220 3705 285 740 1480 1480 2220 3705 285 740 1480 1480 2220 3705 285 740 1480 1480 285 740 1480 1480

RF RF RF RJ RJ RJ RJ RF RF RF RJ RJ RJ RJ RF RF RF RJ RJ RJ RF RF RF RJ RJ RJ RF RF RF RJ RJ RJ RF RF RF RJ RF RF RF RJ

740 1480 1480 2850 3700 740 1325 1325 1975 575 3680 740 1350 1350 2220 3705 740 1480 1480 2220 3705 740 1325 1325 2220 3705 740 1480 1480 740 1480 1480

Hot Bolt PSI Max

Hot Bolt Allowed No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes

Comments

Insufficient gasket-seating force Not available. Use 2ANSI 1500 23% pressure reduction 40% pressure reduction Insufficient gasket-seating force 10% pressure reduction 10% pressure reduction 10% pressure reduction 30% pressure reduction 40% pressure reduction Insufficient gasket-seating force 9% pressure reduction 9% pressure reduction Insufficient gasket-seating force

Insufficient gasket-seating force 10% pressure reduction 10% pressure reduction Insufficient gasket-seating force

Insufficient gasket-seating force

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as in Figure 2 or other job specific instructions.

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Table 1 (ANSI Class Flanges) -Continued Flange Pressure Ratings During Hot Bolting (1) (Temporary Removal (2) of Only One Bolt at a Time (3) Under Operating Pressure)
Normal Pipe Size 16 16 16 16 18 18 18 18 20 20 20 20 24 24 24 24 ANSI Class 150 300 600 600 150 300 600 600 150 300 600 600 150 300 600 600 Flange Type
(4)

Normal Bolt Count 16 20 20 20 16 24 20 20 20 24 24 24 20 24 24 24

Normal PSI Max 285 740 1480 1480 285 740 1480 1480 285 740 1480 1480 285 740 1480 1480

RF RF RF RJ RF RF RF RJ RF RF RF RJ RF RF RF RJ

740 1350 1480 740 1250 1480 740 1300 1480 740 1300 1480

Hot Bolt PSI Max

Hot Bolt Allowed No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes

Comments

Insufficient gasket-seating force 9% pressure reduction Insufficient gasket-seating force 16% pressure reduction Insufficient gasket-seating force 12% pressure reduction Insufficient gasket-seating force 12% pressure reduction

1. atings are for ANSI B16.5 flanges made of R American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) A-105 material at -20 F to 200 F, and with A193 Grade. B7 bolts. Calculations are in accordance with ANSI B31.3. 2. Temporary is defined as no more than 10 hours at any one time and no more than 100 hours per year, per ANSI

B31.3 code for Occasional Variations. 3. nly a single flange bolt can be removed at a O time. 4. F is raised face type and RJ is ring joint type. R All flanges are weld neck.

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Flange Pressure Ratings During Hot Bolting (1) (Temporary Removal (2) of Only One Bolt at a Time (3) Under Operating Pressure)
Normal Pipe Size 1-13/16 1-13/16 2-1/16 2-1/16 2-1/16 2-9/16 2-9/16 2-9/16 3-1/8 3-1/8 3-1/8 4-1/16 4-1/16 4-1/16 5-1/8 5-1/8 7-1/16 7-1/16 7-1/16 API Class 10K 10K 5K 10K 15K 5K 10K 15K 5K 10K 15K 5K 10K 15K 5K 10K 5K 10K 15K Flange Type
(4)

Normal Bolt Count 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 12 12 12 16

Normal PSI Max 10000 15000 5000 10000 15000 5000 10000 15000 5000 10000 15000 5000 10000 15000 5000 10000 5000 10000 15000

RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ RJ

Hot Bolt PSI Max 4100 5700 2900 3350 4650 3150 3350 4400 2850 3300 4400 2750 2800 4400 3075 3100 3300 3400 4650

Hot Bolt Allowed Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Comments

59% pressure reduction 62% pressure reduction 42% pressure reduction 67% pressure reduction 69% pressure reduction 37% pressure reduction 67% pressure reduction 71% pressure reduction 43% pressure reduction 67% pressure reduction 71% pressure reduction 45% pressure reduction 72% pressure reduction 71% pressure reduction 39% pressure reduction 69% pressure reduction 34% pressure reduction 66% pressure reduction 69% pressure reduction

1. atings are for API 6B & 6BX flanges made of R American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) A-105 material (for API 6B flanges 5K rating or less) or AIS 4130 (for API 6BX flanges 10K & 15K rating) at -20 F to 200 F, and with A193 Grade B7 bolts. Calculations are in accordance with ANSI B31.3. 2. Temporary is defined as no more than 10 hours at any one time and no more than 100 hours per year, per ANSI

6.0

B31.3 code for Occasional Variations. 3. nly a single flange bolt can be removed at a time. O 4. RJ is ring joint type. All flanges are weld neck. Key Documents, Tools, References

BP GoM Safe Practices Manual UKCS-SOP-075, Hot and Odd Bolting Procedure (April 2005, Issue 2) D/UTG/054/00, BP Amoco Piping Joints handbook

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Table 2 (API Class Flanges)

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Figure 1: Hot bolting removal and tightening sequence.

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Figure 2: Odd bolting removal and tightening sequence.

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Attachment 1

HOT / ODD BOLTING WORK FORM

HOT / ODD BOLTING WORK FORM

(1) DESIGN CONDITIONS (from P&IDs, Piping Specs, Maintenance History, Current Operations) Line/Vessel Number Normal Operating Pressure (psig) Line/Vessel Service/Fluid Joint Location(s) Gasket Type/Specification Number of Joints to be Hot Bolted Number of Bolts in Flange Bolt Diameter Line/Vessel Contents Normal Operating Temperature (C/F) Flange Standard/Rating Piping Specification Location Sketch Attached: YES / NO Grade of Bolt Material Torque Loading (max/min

(2) SITE INSPECTION (If NO is the correct answer (condition status) of any of the below items, then a full Engineering Assessment shall be completed as per Section 4.1 of the Procedure with the appropriate approvals prior to proceeding. The BU Management of Change Procedure shall be followed to document the exception process required by Section 4.1.

Number of bolts as per Table in Section 5.0 Joint inspected and found satisfactory and free from leaks. (No visual damage or signs of bending stress in joint) Joint free from vibration Operating Temperature <140F (60C) Flange type as per Section 5.0 Flange rated as per Section 5.0 Applicability requirements in Section 3.1 are met

YES

NO

Pipe supports inspected and found satisfactory Adequate access for safe work Pressure of system at or below specified value as per Section 5.0 Operating Temperature > 0F (-18C) Ambient Temperature > 0F (-18C) Risk assessment completed as required by Section 5.0 Applicability exclusions in Section 3.2 are not violated

YES

NO

3) PREPARATION CHECKLIST (If NO is the correct answer (condition status) of any of the below items, the work shall NOT proceed) YES NO YES NO Bolt removal sequence issued Provision for bolt cutting (if allowed) Hot cutting is NOT permitted on hydrocarbon service. Bolt removal methods issued Bolt tightening procedure issued All requirements of Procedure met (4) CONDITION CONFORMANCE TO SPU HOT / ODD BOLTING PROCEDURE TECHNICAL REVIEW COMPLETE: TECHNICAL REVIEWER APPROVAL TO PROCEED: RESPONSIBLE
PERSON FINAL INSPECTION: COMPETENT PERSON

Emergency Response Plan prepared Equipment/materials available at site

Signature

Date

Signature Signature

Date Date

213

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Attachment 1

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HYDRATES, IDENTIFICATION AND REMOVAL PURPOSE: To provide guidelines for the proper identification and safe removal of gas hydrates. APPLICATION: All BP plant and field facilities. DEFINITION: Gas hydrates are solid compounds formed by the reaction of a gas with water. Some of the light hydrocarbons that are components of natural gas, form hydrates under pressure at temperatures above 0 degrees Celsius. These hydrates form as crystals and look like snow. In pipelines, they can pack solidly to form a restriction resulting in partial or no flow. This is referred to as line freezing. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Caution must be exercised when a line where hydrates are suspected, is being de-pressured and opened; the hydrates may plug the line and trap pressure as well as dissolve and release hydrocarbons and toxic gases after de-pressuring: High pressure Propelled solids Explosive forces Flammable fluids Toxic products Hydrates

NOTE: 1. Hydrates may occur as single or multiple plugs. 2. Hydrated lines should never be totally depressured. Pressure should only be reduced to a point below the hydrate curve.

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PROCEDURES: Identification: Hydrates Static pressure spiking on pipeline systems is the first indication that hydrates are beginning to form. A drop in flow should not be solely attributed to liquid hold-up; hydrates must be considered as the possible cause. The same applies to flowing wells, particularly if the wellhead temperature and pressure are dropping. A pipeline system should not be run when hydrates are forming, unless methanol is being injected or the flowing temperature is being increased over a short period of time. Removal: Prior to removal, a site specific procedure must be developed following the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers guidelines for the safe handling of hydrates. Site specific procedure must include, but not be limited to the following: 1. All hydrates must be considered to be safety hazards. 2. Supervisor or designate must be notified when a hydrate is identified. 3. ll piping/equipment used for de-pressuring A will meet BP Process Piping specifications; all threaded piping is to be no more than 1/2 NPT. Depressuring valves must be needle or globe valves. 4. hen de-pressuring, the hydrate must be deW pressured from both ends with the differential pressure on both sides of the hydrate not to exceed 10%. If pressure is relieved on only one side of the hydrate, a potential exists for sudden rapid movement of the hydrate which may result in damage to piping or vessels.

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PURPOSE: To set out safe work practices for the safe handling of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas by identifying the potential sources, training of employees, and developing and applying special work procedures. APPLICATION: All personnel who may be exposed to Hydrogen Sulfide gas. PROCEDURES: Properties and Toxicity of Hydrogen Sulfide: ll personnel entering a facility where H2S may A be present must be aware of the properties and toxicity of hydrogen sulfide gas. They must be able to recognize its presence, and know how to protect themselves from its lethal effects. The two tables on the following pages show the properties and toxicity of hydrogen sulfide

Identification of Sour Sites: t each BP Canada work lease, all sources and A concentrations of H2S must be identified. All areas where concentrations may exceed 10 PPM must have a sign posted at the lease entrance showing the poisonous gas symbol. A sign stating the legal description of the surface location, name and telephone number of the licensee or operator must also be posted. The lease must be fenced in accordance with the applicable government regulations. Entrance roads to the lease must be considered part of the lease for posting purposes. ll leases where H2S exists must have a form of A wind direction indication.

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HYDROGEN SULFIDE (H2S) SAFETY

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Hydrogen Sulfide

PROPERTIES: Color - Colorless dor - Very offensive, similar to rotten eggs in O small quantities apor - Density .189 (air 1.0) H2S is heavier V 1 than air (thus low-lying areas may be more severely contaminated) Boiling Point -60 Degrees C xplosive Limits: 4.3 46.0 percent by volume E in air Auto Ignition Temp 260 Degrees C ater Soluble Yes (4 volumes gas in 1 volume W water at 0 Degrees C) lammability Forms explosive mixture with air F or oxygen

TOXICITY

Indoctrination Requirements for Work on Sour Sites: t locations where H2S is present, H2S Alive A certification is required.

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efore any person enters the immediate area B where a system contains H2S in sufficient concentration such that the occupational exposure limits could be exceeded, all of the following conditions must be satisfied: 1. The atmosphere in and around all buildings and equipment located on a worksite must be controlled within the occupational exposure limits. The exposure limits are as follows:

1 5 PPM ceiling exposure limit. This limit cannot be exceeded at any time without respiratory protection

2. All employees who work in operations where they may come in contact with hydrogen sulfide gas in excess of the occupational exposure limits should be equipped with a personal hydrogen sulfide gas detector that is capable of alarming at 10 PPM unless continuous atmospheric monitoring is conducted or checked according to a site-specific procedure. 3. ontinuous monitoring equipment is present C in all buildings to be accessed, or it has been checked according to a site-specific procedure. 4. ny duties other than routine shall be accordA ing to a site-specific procedure. 5. Communication monitoring, entry and work procedures are in place. Complete risk assessment to determine if respiratory protection and emergency back-up personnel are required. [See: Respiratory Protection] [See: Safety Standby] H2S TRAINING DEVIATION Workers that are required to perform work in potential

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Entry to Sour Work Sites:

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Incident/Accident

H2S atmospheres require current H2S Alive training. Workers that are part of tours / inspections that want to enter potentially low risk conditions for H2S exposures and are not expected to engage in physical work activities may be provided with a temporary deviation to enter the site without having H2S Alive Training. A completed hazard and risk assessment with deviation form must be filled out in its entirety and signed by the OCM or his / her designate prior to entry. The worker being provided with the deviation is required to be accompanied with a BP representative for the duration of time on lease. The deviation must also be supported with the individual being escorted 100% of the time on site with a worker with valid H2S training. Refer to Form MF 91001 Deviation from Standard/ Practice Form INCIDENT/ACCIDENT REPORTING PURPOSE: To provide incident/accident reporting requirements. (Refer to BU specific reporting guidelines) APPLICATION: All employees involved in, or witness to, an incident resulting in, or having the potential to result in injury or property damage. PROCEDURES: When an incident occurs, the employees involved in, or witness to the incident, are responsible to: revent further injury and property damage if P this can be accomplished without endangering their safety

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og all pertinent data for inclusion in inci L dent/accident report Secure evidence

If the BP Canada Supervisor or designate in charge of the worksite believes further action is needed to prevent loss of life or property, he/she will initiate the Emergency Response Plan. Site-Specific Procedure: ach Performance Unit/Service Unit shall have a E written incident/accident reporting procedure.

[See: gHSSEr MS 430] Note: Contact your HSSE representative for assistance with incident investigation and report preparation. LADDERS AND SCAFFOLDING PORTABLE PURPOSE: To outline precautions for the safe usage of portable ladders and scaffolding. APPLICATION: All plants, field, pipelines facilities or work locations where work is being conducted on behalf of BP Canada. PROCEDURES: Storage: adders must be removed and properly stored L after each use. Leaving ladders leaning against equipment, vessels, etc., is not acceptable.

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Inspection: adders and scaffolding shall be inspected prior L to each use. Defective ladders or scaffolding in need of repair must be removed from service, tagged and replaced.

Maintenance: adders and scaffolding must be properly mainL tained to allow safe and trouble-free use.

PRECAUTIONS: Portable Ladders: n employer must ensure that a portable ladder A complies with: o SA Standard CAN3-Z11-M81 (R2001), C Portable Ladders o NSI Standard A14.1-2000, American NaA tional Standard for Ladders Wood Safety Requirements o NSI Standard A14.2-2000, American NaA tional Standard for Ladders Portable Metal Safety Requirements, or o NSI Standard A14.5-2000, American A National Standard for Ladders Portable Reinforced Plastic Safety Requirements o adders must be equipped with non-slip feet L and be secured against movement o xtension ladders must be equipped with suitE able extension locks o Wooden and fiberglass ladders may be used only when working near or with electrical circuits. Metal ladders must not be used in this application o When in use, the ladder must extend 1 meter past any platform or landing, and be secured from movement. It must be positioned so that

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o The ladder should be moved as the work progresses o When on ladder the worker muster ensure three-point contact while climbing or stationary o When working from a ladder at a height over 2 meters, the top must be secured, and the worker must have fall protection o Both hands should be free when climbing up or down ladders. If material must be transported, it should be handled with a rope o Only one person shall be on a ladder at a time or heights over 6.5 meters, a ladder must not be F used; scaffolding must be in place worker may not work from the top 2 rungs, A steps or treads of a stepladder unless: (a) e stepladder has a railed platform at the Th top, or (b) e manufacturers specifications for the Th stepladder permit constructed portable/temporary ladder will A meet all material and construction specifications outlined in the Alberta OH&S Code Section 134

Scaffolding: Standards and Applications: o AN/CSA S269: approved scaffolding must C be used when constructing and erecting scaffolding structures to work from. o In applications between 2 and 6.5 meters, scaffolding is recommended as an alternative

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it is no more than one quarter of its height away from the well or structure against which it stands, and is secured and placed on a base that is level and stable

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to a ladder. o caffolding must be constructed/installed in S accordance with all applicable regulations and as outlined in OH&S Code Part 23. o caffolds must be constructed in accordance S with the manufacturers specifications. o caffolds must be tagged appropriate to the S current inspected usable condition, with appropriate documentation and time of inspection o o person shall utilize a scaffolding unit that N does not indicate by tagging safe for use or, tagging has expired, or there is no tagging present. o caffold must be equipped with acceptable S access and egress. o ll Work conducted from scaffolding will A require Toe boards, top rails, midrails and ladder well protection specifications prior to work commencing. o caffold erection and construction will be S conducted by a certifier competent person. [See: Working from heights] [See: BP Golden Rule Working at Heights]

LADDERS, STAIRS AND PLATFORMS - FIXED PURPOSE: To provide direction for the design and installation of fixed ladders, stairs and platforms. APPLICATION: All plant, pipeline, rigs and field facilities. PROCEDURES:

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and BP Engineering Specifications. Prior to the design of a permanent installation these documents should be consulted. [See: Canadian Standards Association] [Occupational, Health and Safety Regulations] [See: BP Engineering Specifications] Lease Spacing Requirements (Reference only) PURPOSE: To outline the guidelines for working with fixed ladders and platforms on all facilities. SPECIFICATIONS: Stairways: o Facilities with Stairways utilized for access must ensure: a. The width of the treads and the height of the rise of a stairway are uniform throughout its length, and b. The treads of a stairway are level. c. A stairway with 5 or more risers has the appropriate handrail required by this Code, and d. A stairway with open sides has a handrail and an intermediate rail or equivalent safeguard to each open side. o Facilities utilizing stairs with 5 of more risers must ensure the stairway is equipped with a handrail that : a. Extends the entire length of the stairway b. Is between 800 millimeters and 920 millimeters above the front edge of the treads, and c. Is substantial and constructed of material with

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The design and usage of fixed ladders, stairs and platforms shall comply with government regulations.

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properties the same as or better of lumber 38 millimeters by 89 millimeters d. Post supporting a railing are spaced not more than 3 meters apart at their vertical centers. A fixed walkway, service stair or stile shall be at least 55 cm in width. Fixed Ladders: o Design criteria: a. Fixed ladder shall meet the requirements of PIP Standard STF05501 (February 2002), Fixed Ladders and Cages, published by the Construction Industry Institute. b. If a fixed ladder is made of a material other than steel, the facilities must ensure that the design is certified by a professional engineer as being as strong as or stronger than that required by PIP Standard STF05501. c. Facilities shall ensure that a self-closing double bar safety gate, or equally effective means, is provided at ladder way floor openings and platforms of fixed ladders, this does not apply at landings. Work Platforms: o Covering Openings : a. When working on a platform with an opening or hole through which a worker can fall personnel shall be protected by: a. A securely attached cover designed to support an anticipated load, or b. Guardrails and toes boards. b. If personnel remove a cover, guardrail or toe board, or part of them, protecting an opening or hole for any reason, then they must ensure a temporary cover or other means of protec-

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c. If a temporary cover is used to protect an opening or hole, an employer must ensure a warning sign or marking clearly indicating the nature of the hazard: a. Is posted near or fixed on the cover, and b. s not removed unless effective means of I protection is immediately provided.

Guardrails: o Facilities must ensure that a guardrail required by this Code has: (a) horizontal top member installed between A 920 millimeters and 1070 millimeters above the base of the guardrail, (b) horizontal intermediate member spaced A mid-way between the top member and the base, (c) ertical members at both ends of the horiV zontal members with intermediate vertical supports that are not more than 3 meters apart at their centers, and (d) espite subsection (1), a temporary guardrail D does not require a horizontal intermediate member if it has a substantial barrier positioned within the space bounded by the horizontal top member, toe board and vertical members that prevents a workers falling through the space. (e) guardrail is secured so that it cannot move A in any direction if it is struck or any point comes into contact with a worker, materials or equipment. o An facility must ensure that: (a) toe board required by this Code is not less A

Toe boards:

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tion replaces it immediately.

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Ladders/Scaffolding

than 140 millimeters in height above the surface of the work area, and (b) e space between the bottom of the toe Th board and the surface of the work area is not more than 6 meters high. o An facility must ensure that toe boards are installed at the outer edge above the work area if a worker may be under a permanent floor, mezzanine, walkway, ramp, runway or other permanent surface where guardrails are installed, or materials can fall more than 1.8 meters A facility must ensure that toe boards are installed at the outer edge above the work area of temporary scaffolding or a temporary work platform if materials can fall more than 3.5 meters A facility must ensure that toe boards are installed around the top of a pit containing a machine with exposed rotating parts if workers may be working in the pit This section does not apply to the entrance of a loading or unloading area if the employer takes other precautions to ensure that materials do not fall from the permanent surface while loading.

Rest platform exemption: o If each worker working on a drilling rig or service rig on a fixed double ladder is equipped with and wears a climb assist device that complies with the manufacturers specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, an employer is not required to: a) Provide the ladder with rest platforms, or b) o have the side rails extend not less than T 1050 millimeters above the point at which the workers go on or off.

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LINE THAWING PRACTICE 1.0 Scope and Applicability Line Thawing

1.1 The purpose of this practice is to establish a safe means to provide a sufficient heat source to thaw frozen liquids inside of steel piping. 1.2 This practice is applicable to all Canada Gas Performance Unit employees, contractors, sub-contractors and visitors to CGPU work sites. 1.3 The purpose of this practice is to ensure that all rea sonable precautions will be taken to protect the safety of personnel who are or may be required to participate in these types of activities. 1.4 e requirement set forth in this practice will act as the Th minimum requirements. Specific contractors, manufacturers or plants may have more stringent requirements. In event of any discrepancies, the more stringent requirements will prevail.

2.0

Purpose

Thawing of frozen liquids in steel pipe is a high risk task that should never include the use of an open flame such as a tiger torch to transfer direct heat to the steel pipe. Frozen hydrocarbon lines may have reduced pipe wall integrity and when the frozen hydrocarbon is heated and changes state to a gas; may provide a most dangerous fuel source for an open flame. This practice outlines the types of safer heat mediums available to assist in thawing lines and the hazards associated with each application. Also included in the practice are considerations to prevent freezing in steel piping as

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Line Thawing

well as options to consider during construction to assist in thawing lines once the lines are put into winter service. 3.0 Pre-work required prior to heating of frozen steel lines rior to applying a heat medium to a frozen P line; workers must ensure that the line does not have a differential pressure greater then 2800 kpa(g) perations should attempt to carefully depresO surize both sides of the frozen section of the line sing methanol carefully pressurize (manually U operated Baker pump) the upstream side of the ice plug without exceeding the MOWP of the line or 2800 kpa(g) differential across the ice plug. Consult the methanol MSDS to verify proper PPE onsideration must be made to allow for liqC uid and vapor expansion as the ice plug begins to change state. If at all possible the upstream product feed valve should be isolated e work area must be flagged off to prevent Th unauthorized workers from entry ensitive instrumentation and non steel fitS tings must be protected prior to applying heat to a steel line Type of heat mediums available for thawing frozen lines

4.0

Electrical Heat Trace Portable generator or purchased power A good option is to strip insulation off of the frozen line and install electrical heat tracing. The heat trace

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must be installed as per both CSA and the Electrical Code requirements. There are different options with the types of electrical heat trace being that it is available in both AC and DC supplies. After the installation of the electrical heat trace the line is wrapped with insulation to maintain the heat to the pipe wall. Hazards include electrical energy, sharp or damaged insulation, insulation fibers (glass foam, fiberglass or silicate), and if using a portable generator maintaining to the hot work permit and 8 meter rule for potential ignition sources. When utilizing purchased power the electrical connections must be explosion proof for a Class 1 Division 1 area. Prior to construction, selective piping should be evaluated during the HAZOP study to consider installing electrical heat trace lines before to the insulation is installed. If the heat trace is installed it does not have to be put into service and will provide an excellent option for assisting in thawing the line in the event of future freezing. There is minimal cost of doing this at the time of construction versus having to remove the insulation to apply a heat source. Saturated steam utility low pressure With the availability of mobile steamer units (field operations / well servicing) and onsite low pressure boilers (drilling rigs / large service rig operations) provide a good option to provide heat for the thawing of frozen lines. The frozen line must have the insulation removed prior to applying steam to the bare pipe. Caution must be used if applying steam vapor near insulation as moisture directed inside the insulation may in fact lead to external pipe corrosion. A recommendation rather then applying steam directly to the pipe is to use heat conduction by strapping stainless steel tubing to the suspected section of frozen pipe, re-bundle the coupled lines with quick-wrap insulation, and connect the stainless tubing to the steam supply and then carefully controlling the discharge out of the tubing with a control valve. Caution with regards to hot burner surfaces

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Line Thawing

and steam burns must always be controlled in addition to the hazard of the open flame ignition source of the boiler (hot work permit and adhering to the 8 meter rule.) Hot air - supplied by a Herman Nelson type of heater Another option for heat medium is using hot air directed from a gas fired heater unit. The hot air is directed off of the discharge of the heater with the utilization of a series of flexible heater ducts. With this option it is more challenging to direct heat directly to the surface of the pipe without wasting heat. Hazards include: hot surfaces of the heater and open flame ignition sources as well as refueling requirements. The heater unit must again be positioned a minimum 10 meters from any process piping or building. Operations must maintain a continuous LEL monitor upstream of the unit (when the heater is in operation.) Hot engine exhaust Internal combustion engine Another option that may be available is using the hot exhaust off of an internal combustion engine such as a field technicians truck. A flexible rubber exhaust hose is connected to the tailpipe and directed to the frozen line. This type of application is dangerous and can only be used in open spaces and never used inside buildings due to the carbon monoxide concern. An additional hazard is ensuring that the vehicle is safely parked outside of the 8 meter minimum. 5.0 Hazard Assessments

OH&S Regulations require that an employer shall ensure that a known hazard which cannot be readily controlled or eliminated and that has the potential for causing serious injury be identified and brought to the attention of workers who may be exposed to the hazard. Step 1 - etermine what specific job tasks D

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hazards are present. Manual Lifting Step 2 - evelop procedures that will D eliminate or control identified hazards when required to thaw frozen lines. Step 3 - ocument and maintain the hazard D assessment at the work site. Key Responsibilities

6.0

Operating supervisors are responsible for implementing and enforcing this practice, whereas all personnel are responsible for complying with it. It is the responsibility of the Area Authority to reference this practice while developing and reviewing Job Safety and Environmental Analysis. 7.0 Scope of Forms

7.1 gHSSEr MF34004 Pre-job Risk Assessment

MANUAL LIFTING AND HANDLING HEAVY OR AWKWARD LOADS PURPOSE: To establish guidelines for lifting, moving or handling of any item. APPLICATION: This policy applies to all BP employees, contractors and third parties who have a responsibility for ordering or carrying out manual handling activities. DEFINITION: The identification of manual handling activities that pose a risk to health and safety and the development of workplace

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Manual Lifting

modifications are achieved through implementation of the procedure Identifying and Assessing Manual Handling Risk. Manual Lifting and moving forces should not exceed 20 kg or 4.5 kg during seated work. However, this maximum force limit standard may be lowered to account for individual physical characteristics. These weight restrictions only apply to ideal lifting conditions such as smooth lifts, weight held close to the body, unrestricted lifting posture and a good grip. PREPARATIONS: All work involving manual lifting or moving must be evaluated before work begins. The evaluation should include identifying any manual lift or carrying tasks that have a potential to injure, perform a risk assessment and identify risk control measures that includes considering job redesign, mechanical lifting equipment and/or training. PPE should also be considered such as gloves, protection from chemicals, etc. For help on identification, risk assessments and risk mitigation, refer to Guidance for Assessors Manual Handling Programme: HSSE Group Resource Occupational Hygiene and Environmental Health Team. PROCEDURES: SOCs and/or Critical Task Analysis should have been completed for common and routine manual lifting and moving tasks. Examples of common, routine tasks are: barrel moving, small pump lifting, valve replacements, furniture moving, shipping and receiving goods on pallets. Refer to the site specific procedure, if available. If it is not a routine task and procedures are not available, perform a risk assessment before commencing work and detail risk reduction methods on the Safe Work Permit.

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Answer the following questions: s it an awkward shape or have rough or sharp I edges? oes it have to be carried greater than 10 meD ters? Does it involve twisting of the body? o you have to bend down or reach for it when D picking it up or putting it down? Manual Lifting Is the item to be moved greater than 20 kg?

If the answer is yes to any of the questions, consider using the proper moving equipment. If circumstances are such that is not possible to use equipment to lift heavy or awkward loads, then an alternative documented plan using a hazard assessment and site specific procedure must be developed to ensure an adequate level of safety to prevent injuries. PROPER LIFTING TECHNIQUES: All workers should use mechanical means to lift objects heavier than 20 kg. Safe manual lifting requires the following steps: 1. Plan the lift. Get help for difficult loads. 2. Check your path is clear to where the object will rest. 3. Bend your legs half way, as if to sit. 4. eep your back straight but inclined forward far K enough so that your arms can lift vertically. 5. eep your feet flat and 30-40 cm apart for a K solid stance. 6. Grasp the object firmly. 7. Take a deep breath. 8. To lift, straighten legs and body, moving arms to a comfortable position. Do not twist your back while lifting the load. 9. eep the object close to your body. Know your K limits.

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NOTE: Meter Proving ll manual lifts should be planned to elimiA nate any twisting of the back during the lift. hen in doubt, use mechanical means to W make the lift or move.

METER PROVING PURPOSE: To provide guidelines for safe Meter Proving operations. APPLICATION: All BP Canada Plant and Field locations. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Static Electricity [See: Electricity] Combustible/Toxic Fluids afe work Permits should be issued for all meter S proving ttention should be paid to lease lay-out to proA vide safe and accessible prover connections.[See: Lease Design] nder most conditions, respiratory protection U will not be required. However, the meter prover operator must wear breathing apparatus when crude or products containing poisonous gases are handled, if tests indicate such protection is needed. A safety standby may be required.[See: Respiratory Protection Equipment], [See: Safety Standby] ppropriate personal protective equipment must A be worn. [See: Personal Protective Equipment] roving lines and connections must be properly P identified according to government regulations,

PREPARATIONS:

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i.e., WHMIS. TDG PROCEDURES: 1. ach portable meter prover must be equipped E with a minimum of 1 30# LTK B.C. dry chemical fire extinguisher. When proving meters, the fire extinguisher should be removed from its holder and placed on the upwind side, and in position for immediate use. 2. A bonding and grounding cable shall be provided for each meter prover. In order to protect against the build-up of static electricity, the bonding and grounding cable shall be properly placed so that the meters and prover are bonded together and grounded. This shall be the first thing hooked up at the beginning of a proving and the last thing disconnected at the end of the proving operation. 3. hen using flexible hoses to connect the prover W to the meter unit, be sure the hoses are rated to stand the operating pressure. They must be visually inspected prior to use and replaced if their condition indicates a possibility of failure. 4. t is recommended that the vehicle should not be I left idling while proving operations are underway. Also the wheels shall be chalked with park brake set. 5. Always open the proper valves to relieve the pressure on dust covers before attempting to remove these covers. Extreme care should be used when breaking connections or purging hoses and piping. [See: Draining and Depressuring] 6. Connections should not be drained on the ground. Catch all drainings in a suitable container for proper disposal. 7. In all cases, when using a prover that employs an electronic counter system, all electrical connecManual Lifting

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Mobile Steamers

tions shall be made before the power is turned on. After the meters have been proved, the power shall be turned off before the electrical connections are disconnected. PRECAUTIONS: When meter prover leveling jacks are used, they should be supported with blocks or firm footing, so that the additional weight of the liquid will not unbalance the trailer frame, making it a possible hazard to the operator. RESPONSIBILITY: 1. 2. 3. The BP Canada employee in charge is responsible for ensuring that safe meter proving operations are conducted. For BP Canada-owned proving units, the prover operator is responsible for the safe operation of the meter proving unit. Th e Service contractor is responsible for ensuring that equipment, personnel, and job procedures adhere to all applicable government and BP Canada regulations and practices.

TRAINING: Meter Prover Unit operators must be properly trained in the safe operation of their equipment. MOBILE STEAMERS PURPOSE: To provide guidelines for safe use of mobile steaming equipment. APPLICATION: All BP Field facilities and leases. POTENTIAL HAZARDS:

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Steam Burns hemicals Hazards: Any chemicals used with the C water must have the applicable MSDS available on-site and the appropriate labeling requirements must be met, i.e., WHMIS. Static Electricity [See: Electrical]

PREPARATIONS: Where steaming could generate a hazard to personnel or equipment, an authorized BP Canada Representative must be on-site. He must conduct and document a pre-job safety meeting, and an appropriate work permit must be obtained. [See: Permits] PROCEDURES: 1. The steamer must be positioned a minimum of 25 meters from any wellhead, tank, or process vessel, and pointed towards the access road for quick exit. Any operation within 25 meters must be treated as Hot Work.[See: Service Rig Safety] 2. The Steamer should be upwind of any potential source of combustible gas, where possible. Caution must be exercised with respect to the expansion of metals and trapped fluid. PRECAUTIONS: 1. All protective equipment required by government regulations and BP Safety Requirements must be worn during all steaming operations. [See: Personal Protective Equipment] 2. Caution must be exercised to ensure that catalytic heaters, gas, fire and H2S detection heads, instrument recorders, instrumentation panels, and electrical or sensitive equipment are not steamed. This equipment should be protected prior to steaming to prevent damage.

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Combustible Fluids

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Moving Heavy Equip.

MOVING HEAVY EQUIPMENT ON BP WORKSITES PURPOSE: This safety practice provides guidelines for the safe moving of heavy equipment on BP Canada worksites. APPLICATION: BP Canada Plants, Field Operations, Construction Sites and areas of heavy traffic. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: erious injury or death [See: Personal Protective S Equipment] ontact with piping or stationary equipment C [See: Ground Disturbance] ontact overhead power lines [See: Electrical C Equipment] ack of co-ordination with other operations [See: L Permit to Work] 1. eavy Equipment includes pump trucks, rig H trucks, pickers, tracked equipment (i.e. Dozers), graders, etc. 2. Heavy traffic areas include highways and secondary roads and construction sites. PREPARATIONS: All routine job procedures and practices must be followed before the heavy equipment is moved on to BP property. PROCEDURES: 1. Face to face communication with the person in charge of the site must occur before the pick up or unloading of equipment on the job site. If no one is at the site, the supervisor in charge or

DEFINITION:

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2. The pre-job meeting and a safe work permit must detail the specific instructions of where the equipment is to be loaded or unloaded on the job site and the potential hazards on the job site i.e. power lines, pipelines, wellhead, etc. 3. e right of way or lease boundary must be Th well flagged or otherwise defined such that the equipment operator will not enter into a trespass situation. 4. f unloading or picking up equipment in I darkness, all lights on the equipment must be operational or there is an alternate light source available. 5. Before operating powered mobile equipment, the equipment operator must complete a visual inspection of the equipment and the surrounding area to ensure that the powered mobile equipment is in safe operating condition and perform inspections periodically in order to ensure the continued safe operation of the equipment. 6. quipment operators must wear provided seatE belts in equipment when equipment is in motion or engaged in an operation where the equipment may become unstable. 7. If the equipment operator is using a ground guide, the communication hand signals at the end of this section should be used (See: Heavy Equipment Hand Signals at the end of this section.) and the ground guide must be visible at all times. 8. All employees must establish eye contact and have conformation of contact from the equipment operator (i.e. nod, hand wave, call on a radio) prior to entering the hazard area 9. very piece of moving equipment shall have only E ONE individual directing it on the work site. This person will be wearing distinguishable PPE

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Moving Heavy Equip.

PRECAUTIONS: 1. orkers on the worksite must wear reflective W striping on the FRC that are visible day and night while working around heavy equipment. 2. Heavy equipment operators should be able to prove their competency operating the equipment. 3. quipment must maintain 8 meters separation E form wellheads and facilities, unless under the direction of a ground guide.

RESPONSIBILITIES: Responsibility lies with the BP supervisor on site to ensure the above procedures are followed. Heavy Equipment Hand Signals
1. Raise Attachment (bowl, blade) 2.Lower Attachment (bowl, blade)

Fingers Curled with Thumb Pointing Up.

Fingers Curled with Thumb Pointing Down. Both Fists Clenched Together Initially. Move Fists Apart in a Lateral Motion. Elbow at 90 Index Finger Pointing Up Making Circular Motion. Quick Motion of the Arm with Fingers Curled and Thumb Extended. Hands Sideways. Spread

3. Push

First of One Hand Smacking into the palm of the Other. Elbow at 90 Index Finger Pointing Down Making Circular Motion. Palms of Hands Turned Down with a slight Up and Down Motion Raise Hand to Head Heights with the Palm of Hand Towards the Machine.

4. Pull

5. Lower the Load

6. Raise the Load

7. Slow Down

8. Unload

9. Stop

10. Emergency Stop

Note: These signals are Intended for All Heavy Equipment Other Than Cranes. Standard Riggers Signals are to be Used for Cranes.

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NOISE EXPOSURE & HEARING CONSERVATION PURPOSE: To prevent the occurrence of occupational noise induced hearing loss. All employees whose noise exposures equal or exceed the allowable exposure levels shall be included in the Hearing Conservation Program. Refer to the BP Canadian Gas Hearing Conservation Code of Practice for more details. APPLICATION: ll BP operating facilities and associated personnel A elected contractors may be included in audioS metric testing and noise exposure monitoring ll other contractors are expected to comply A with provincial regulations regarding Hearing Conservations Programs Noise Exposure

POTENTIAL HAZARDS: oise levels in excess of the allowable 85 dBA N time-weighted average (TWA) for an 8-hour shift or 82 dBA TWA for a 12-hour shift Key Performance Indicators e hearing loss rate target for each work group Th is zero confirmed abnormal shifts and 7% confirmed early warning shifts

PROCEDURES: 1. Area Sound Surveys: (Format Section) ll facilities will have an initial sound level A survey conducted to establish a baseline. The sound level data shall be plotted on a diagram to generate the noise map of the surveyed area which includes buildings and outdoor areas. This noise map must be reviewed with onsite personnel and be posted at a prominent loca-

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tion and accessible for worker review. Noise Exposure reas shall be re-surveyed at a minimum of A every five years or shortly after a change in production process, equipment or controls which may increase/decrease the noise levels. 2. Employee Dosimetry Monitoring: representative sample of employees, whose A work tasks may be exposed regularly to high noise sources, may be monitored to determine the time-weighted average (TWA) noise exposure of a work shift. f the employees exposure equal or exceed the I 8-hour TWA of 85 dBA or 12-hour TWA of 82 dBA, the employee shall be included in the Hearing Conservation Program. osimetry monitoring shall be repeated D whenever a change in production, process, equipment or controls increases the noise exposures. 3. Identification of High Noise Sources: here noise level in any location (buildings, W units, etc.) or outdoor areas that exceeds 82 dBA, must be marked with signs that identify it as a high noise area and requiring the use of appropriate hearing protection. ll employees or contractors who enter areas A where the sound levels are 82 dBA or greater shall wear appropriate hearing protection. Areas where sound levels equal or exceed 100 dBA, appropriate double hearing protection devices (earmuffs over earplugs) are required. 4. Temporary Worksites: t is the responsibility of the BP Canada suI pervisor in charge, or his designate, to ensure adequatehearing protection is worn on all temporary worksites where noise levels exceed

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82 dBA, i.e. rig operations. oise Reduction Reviews:A formal, docuN mented Noise Reduction Review must be conducted for all existing areas where noise levels exceed 100 dBA. A formal review must be completed for all new facilities expected to have noise levels exceed 100 dBA in the facility design phase. This review must include representatives from operations, engineering and HSSE. An acoustical engineer must also be included. 5. Hearing Protection Equipment: ar plugs and/or ear muffs must be made E available at all worksites. Contact Safety Coordinator or Industrial Hygienist to ensure appropriate hearing protectors are selected, fitted and used. Noise Exposure

Audiometric Testing: ll new employees must have a baseline A audiogram (hearing test) in conjunction with their pre-employment medical or, at the latest, within six months of their hiring date. ll employees who are included in the HearA ing Conservation Program and are exposed to noise levels equal to or exceed 82 dBA TWA for a 12-hour shift or 85 dBA TWA for an 8-hour shift must have an audiometric testing every two years, or as per jurisdiction regulations.

RESPONSIBILITIES: t is the responsibility of each supervisor and I site Safety Coordinator to ensure that noise controls and hearing conservation are implemented and enforced ontractors are required to comply with these C

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Personal Protective Equip.

noise controls and hearing conservation measures with the exception of the Audiometric testing and noise monitoring. These should be part of their Safety Program

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT PURPOSE: To outline the requirements for the selection, care, and use of personal protective equipment. APPLICATION: All personnel working on BP Canada worksite. POTENTIAL HAZARD: xposure to physical and chemical hazards E can occur through contact of the skin, eyes, inhalation, and ingestion ll workers on BP Canada worksite must wear A approved personal protective equipment as identified as needed in the hazard assessment that is appropriate to the work being done, and the nature of the hazards involved. [See: MSDS for hazardous material requirements.]

PREPARATIONS: The Local Area Manager may exempt certain offices, control rooms, vehicles, other non-hazardous areas, field tours, and casual visitors from some provisions of this section. These exemptions must be communicated to all applicable worksites, as required and a deviation from standard completed. PROCEDURES:

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Head Protection: Approved industrial protective headgear must be worn by all personnel on field worksites. For further information see applicable provincial regulations. NOTE: Metal hard hats must not be worn f hair is deemed to be of excessive length and I may constitute a safety hazard, a hair net or other means of confinement for the hair must be used

Eye Protection: .S.A.-approved safety glasses with C.S.A C approved side shields must be worn by all personnel at BP worksites where required. When the nature of the work might result in an eye or facial injury, additional protection, such as a face shield or goggles, is required. Prescription glasses must meet C.S.A. specifications. Types of eye protectors are shown in the table at the end of this section mployees wearing contact lenses must E wear all applicable safety eye protection. An employer must ensure that, if wearing contact lenses poses a hazard to the workers eyes during work, the worker is advised of the hazards and the alternatives to wearing contact lenses. Permeable contact lenses are recommended over non-permeable An employer must determine the degree of danger to a worker at a work site and whether the worker needs to wear respiratory protective equipment if: (a) worker is or may be exposed to an airborne a contaminant or a mixture of airborne

Respiratory Protection:

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Personal Protective Equip.

contaminants in a centration exceeding their occupation exposure limits, or (b) he atmosphere has or may have an oxygen t concentration of less than 19.5 percent by volume.[See: BP Canada Respiratory Protection Program] Whenever noise hazards exist at BP Canada worksites, all personnel entering will be provided with and must wear appropriate hearing protection. [See: Noise Exposure and Hearing Conservation] Fire Resistant Clothing: Fire resistant work wear shall be worn on all BP worksites. See FRW Practice. Whenever special clothing is required for handling dangerous chemicals or for fire-fighting, it will be provided by BP Canada and worn only by trained and competent personnel. Hand Protection: See Hand Protection Practice. Chemical Protective Clothing: hemical Protective Clothing (CPC) includes C chemically resistant gloves, aprons, boots and suits (both partially and fully encapsulating). CPC shall be selected specifically to provide protection for the particular chemical or chemical material in use. Refer to Material Safety Data Sheet for recommended CPC n situations where CPC is required, deconI tamination procedures must be utilized that enhances the removal of the particular chemical rocedures should reflect the type of CPC needed P orksites should determine, in consultation W with the CPC manufacturer, when CPC

Hearing Protection:

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should be replaced Foot Protection: .S.A.-Grade 1 (green triangle) approved C footwear must be worn by all workers entering field worksites. oot style is recommended minimum 150mm B (6) high, from the bottom of the heel to the top of the boot to provide ankle support. A n aggressive tread designed for snow/ice or the use of boot grippers are required in winter conditions to reduce the risk of slipping on ice or snow pack. The use of boot grippers is only required for Operations. Drilling and Completions move onto and off of metal surfaces very frequently and are permitted to use sanding. Sole puncture protection is required afety footwear must be maintained in good S safe working condition. (i.e. no holes in upper material or soles, no steel toes exposed)

JEWELRY Wearing exposed jewelry on BP worksites is prohibited with the exception of office buildings. Rings, bracelets, watches, neck chains and exposed body piercing are considered jewelry. Medic Alert devices are not considered jewelry. Personal Floatation Device: ll personnel working from a boat, barge, or A in an area where a fall into water could result in drowning must wear a personal floatation device, i.e. life jacket that meets the Canadian General Standards Board Specifications 65.7-M88 or 5.11-M88. Additional safety equipment such 6 as safety harnesses and lifelines should be used when working on ice or near cold, fast moving water

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Task Thin glove (4-5 mil)

Chemicals

Glove Material

Type of Glove

Lube oil Glycol Condensate Gasoline/Diesel Fuel MIDEA/DEA Frac Oil/Inver Muds Methanol Ansell Edmont Duratouch Sheer (latex) (ANL 34-525)

1. 2. 3.

Vilton Nitrile Viton/Neoprene

Brand Name Acklands Order Number Best N-Dex Gloves(Nitrile) (BEM 723) Ansell Edmont Touch and Tuff (Nitrille powder free)(ANL 92-600-10)

1. 2.

Lube oil Glycol Condensate Gasoline/Diesel Fuel MDEA/DEA Frac Oil/Invert Muds Winter

Fine work requiring light gloves Engine overhauls Head changes Piston/liner replacement Seal changes/pump repairs Sample collection Orifice plate changes Rough or abrasive work requiring heave gloves Manual material handling Pulling or stringing joints Line pigging Vac trucking Frac or will completions Best Answer Nitrile laminated (BEM 2735) Best Nitri-Pro Nitrile coated (BEM 7166) Ansell Edmont Hycron General Purpose gloves Nitrile coated (ANL 24-805-10) Ansell Edmont Hycron Nitrile coated jersey lining Winter (ANL 52-590-10) Best Nitty Gritty natural rubber coated (BEM 65NFW)

1. 2. 3.

Vilton Thin Glove Butyl Natural (5 mils) Rubber (latex) Vilton Summer Nitrile Viton/Neoprene

Chemical Protective Glove Selection Chart

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RESPONSIBILITY: It is the responsibility of all BP Canada employees to ensure potential exposure hazards are identified, and the appropriate protective equipments are worn by all (i.e. employees, contractors and visitors).

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1. 2.

Vilton Summer Butyl Natural Rubber (latex)

Submersion of hands into chemical Filter changes Parts washing Piston/liner replacement Vilton Nitrile Viton/Neoprene Fluid at hot/cold temp

Lube oil Glycol Condensate MDEA/DEA Frac Oil/Invert Muds Varsol Gasoline/Diesel

Fluid at room temp

Personal Protective Equip.

Chemical Protective Glove Selection Chart

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1. Vilton Fluid at 2. Butyl Natural hot/cold temp Rubber (latex)

Ansell Edmont Solvex Soft Lined Chemical Resistant Gloves Nitrile (ANL 37-175) MAPA Stansolv Nitrile Heavy Weight Z Grip (PIP 480420) (good for solvent wash) MAPA Stansolv Knit Lined Nitrile Gloves cold/hot temp (PIP 381410) Ansell Edmont Lined Natural Latex Chemical resistant Gloves (ANL 208-10)

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Pigging of Pipelines

PIGGING OF PIPELINES AND FLOWLINES PURPOSE: To provide safe practices for pigging operations of pipes, pipelines, and flowlines for the removal of wax, other solid deposits, and trapped fluids. APPLICATION: All BP Canada Field operations are affected. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Combustible/Toxic Fluids ay have Toxic Vapour [See: Benzene, HydroM gen Sulphide] ay have NORM, depending on product line M [See: Radioactive or Normal Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)] High Pressure Static Electricity [See: Grounding and Bonding] Hydrates [See: Hydrates]

PROCEDURES: 1. A safe work permit must be issued before pigging begins. 2. Pigging operations in gas and oilfield operations represent a serious hazard. 3. n all areas a site-specific procedure must be used I and it must address the following: 4. Characteristics of the fluid to be pigged. 5. Proper isolation and depressurization. 6. Draining and ventilation. 7. e hazard of potential plugging of the bleed-off Th valves and gauges. 8. Proper receiving and launching techniques,

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9. Routine inspection of the cap, barrel and seals. 10. Individual marking or identification of pigs and logging with respect to launching and receiving times. 11. Purging [See: Purging]

NOTE: Proper disposal methods must be used for pigging wax and fluids. [See: BP Environmental Guidelines] PRECAUTION: a. Where the receiver is vented to a proper drain or flare system, the barrel must be vented to atmosphere prior to opening the receiver or launcher. Ensure vent valve is free and clear by some means. b. No worker shall position themselves in front of the pig launchers or receiver at any time during the pigging operation. All quick opening closures on pig launchers and receivers must be equipped with a pressure interlocking warning device with a safety catch.[See: ASME Code VIII, Paragraph UG .35] POSITIVE AIR SHUT-OFF REQUIREMENTS (PASO) PURPOSE: To provide guidelines for the requirement of positive air shut-offs on diesel powered equipment. APPLICATION: ll diesel powered equipment, Contractor or BP A owned, including those used to load or unload flammable liquids or gases at all BP Canada sites. ll diesel powered equipment includes pick up A

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stressing potential hydraulic shock.

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Positive Air Shut-off

trucks, and diesel powered heavy machinery used within 25m of a wellhead OR where there are piping, process vessels or tanks containing combustible fluids or gasses that may release hydrocarbons to atmosphere within 25 m of diesel powered equipment. (E.g. they are open or being worked on or with) POTENTIAL HAZARDS: ncontrolled engine operation resulting in an U explosion. ersonal injury from exploding engines or P exploding hydrocarbon mixtures. Equipment damage because of engine overspeed.

DEFINITION: A positive air shut off (PASO) is a device that cuts the air supply to diesel engines resulting in immediate engine shut down. PROCEDURES: hen loading or unloading flammable liquid W or gas products at all BP facilities using dieselpowered equipment, this equipment must be equipped with a PASO. ll positive air shut offs must be in good workA ing condition and tested monthly. ASO operation may be either automatic or P manual. anual PASOs must have the capability to be M operated from normal workstations around the vehicle, e.g. pump control panels. equirements for PASOs should be included in R pre job meetings.

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RESPONSIBILITIES: esponsibility for installation, maintenance and R testing of PASOs lies with the owner of the equipment with a PASO. ccountability for verification is with the BP site A supervisor or designate.

PRACTICE FOR WORKING IN A COMBUSTIBLE GAS ENVIRONMENT 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability Th is practice applies to all BP Canada Energy Canada Gas Performance Unit (CGPU) employees, contracted employees, contractors and other visiting personnel doing work on CGPU premises and work sites. This practice applies to any work area where personnel have the potential to be exposed to combustible gas. The purpose of this practice is to: 1.3.1 o establish practices for providing a safe work T environment while working with or around combustible gas. 1.3.2 rovide requirements for the training and P qualifications of personnel conducting combustible gas tests, as well as regulatory requirements for the maintenance and calibration of portable gas test equipment. Scope of Definitions Competent person - one who has completed training, as per manufacturer specifications and site specific procedures. Function (Bump) Test - A test conducted by

1.2

1.3

2.0 2.1

2.2

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Combustible Gas Envir.

introducing a known concentration of gas (Pentane) to the sensor of the combustible gas detector. The detector must read within +or-20% of known concentration and to ensure that the 10% LEL alarm on the detector is functioning properly. 2.3 LEL - The Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) is the lowest concentration of combustible gas in air at which an explosion could occur. The percentage of LEL represents the amount of combustible gas present between 0 and 100, 100% being the Lower Explosive limit. With Methane approximately 5% in air is equal to 100% of the LEL. Atmospheric Release - For the purpose of this Practice an atmospheric release is defined as 20 % LEL 8 inches (20 cm) from the source as per the GCBU Reporting Practice gHSSEr MS430. Scope of Responsibility A proper functioning approved combustible gas detector will be used for every task being performed on a BP CGPU site that has potential exposure to a combustible gas environment. Th e on-site BP representative in charge or designate must ensure that: egular documented surveys (sweeps) are R conducted annually of all facilities including wells and pipeline risers to detect excessive LEL levels and meet EUB Directive 60 LDAR requirements. ny excessive atmospheric release greater than A or equal to 10% is detected, roped off and will be repaired as soon as possible following a proper risk assessment or any LEL reading greater than or equal F to 20%, the equipment should be shutdown until repaired

2.4

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ny LEL reading exceeding 20% LEL is an A incident classified as an Atmospheric Release under CGPU Reporting Practice gHSSEr MS430 and followed up with an incident investigation to prevent re-occurence. Otherwise, any gas release exceeding 10% LEL is reported as an HSSE opportunity ll workers have read and follow a safe buildA ing\lease entry procedure. (See Sample Lease entry procedure) All workers have received instruction in the use of combustible gas detection equipment and understand the hazards associated with combustible gases. (Appendix 2 Training and Exposure sections of this document) Scope of General Expectations O nly personnel who are trained or have received instruction may conduct gas tests. Th e person conducting the gas testing for permiting must sign or initial the permit and the results must be kept on file for a minimum of 1year (see Permit to Work Practice gHSSEr MS 880). O nly CSA approved combustible gas detection equipment (see appendix 1) shall be used. C ontinous gas tests will be conducted where ever CGPU employees, contracted personnel, contractors and other visiting personnel will be entering an area that has the potential for the atmosphere to contain combustible gas. Th e gas detection devices must have a documented Function (Bump) Test at the beginning of each shift. If the detector fails the bump test, the detector must be taken out of service, tagged as defective and sent for calibration. The detector must have a current calibration sticker to be in use. Detectors must be

4.0 4.1 4.2

4.3 4.4

4.5

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calibrated as per manufacturers specifications. 4.6 C ombustible Gas Monitoring must be conducted before any work taking place within 8 meters of any well, process buildings, vessel, tank or related equipment, where combustible gas is, or may be present. P ortable Combustible Gas Detector alarms must be set at: Low alarm 10% LEL and High Alarm 20% LEL. Fixed combustible gas detectors should alarm at 10% LEL and shutdown at greater than or equal to 20% LEL. If while working, the combustible gas detector alarms, personnel must leave the area immediately to determine the appropriate action. B efore entering a lease where combustible gas may be present, a gas test must be done (see attached lease entry procedures). The test must also be done before and during entry into lease buildings. The detector is to be kept in the work area while personnel are conducting their work to ensure that personnel are not exposed to over 10%

4.7

4.8

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5.0

Scope of Occupational Exposure Limits

LEL (Lower Explosive Limit) Hazards

% of Lower Explosive Limit LEL 0% LEL >0 - <10% LEL>10%

Guidelines Area may be entered. Other toxic contaminates such as benzene or H2S may exist in concentrations above the exposure limits Entry into these areas is permitted. A risk assessment must be conducted to determine appropriate action. Evacuation of personnel, no entry into area permitted.

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ombustible gas containing light hydrocarC bons may cause symptoms such as dizziness, headaches, and errors in judgment and in some cases loss of consciousness. These symptoms known as a narcotic effect may occur at 10 % of the LEL ombustible gas concentrations may contain C other potentially harmful substances such as hydrogen sulfide H2S and benzene. If the stream concentration is greater than 0.2 0.4 % H2S the greater health risk is H2S as the exposure limit will be exceeded before the LEL concentrations reaches 10%. If the stream concentration is greater than 0.1% benzene the greater health risk is benzene as the exposure limit will be exceeded before the LEL concentration reaches 10% EL detection equipment must not be used to L try to determine H2S or benzene concentrations Scope of Appendices APPENDIX 1- Equipment Type and Care APPENDIX 2- Training APPENDIX 3- Lease Entry Procedure Scope of References A lberta General Safety Regulations AR 448/83 as amended B.C. Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and Guidelines 296/97 as amended gHSSEr MS880- Permit to Work Practice Forms gHSSEr MF 34004- Pre-job Risk Assessment HSSEr MF 88001- BP Canada Energy Company- g Cold Work Permit/Hot Work Permit

6.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 8.0

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Appendix 1 Equipment Type and Care Approved Equipment Gas detection equipment must include a LEL detector and oxygen sensor and should include a carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide sensor. All gas detection equipment must be CSA approved. Equipment Testing and Care Each area must ensure that an inspection and testing program is implemented whereby all combustible gas detection equipment is inspected by a qualified technician on a frequency consistent with manufacturers requirements and with prevailing regulation requirements (minimum every three (3) months. A tag must be attached to the gas detectors showing the latest inspection/due date. Records of all calibrations must be maintained. Gas detection devices must be Bump Tested before each daily use and documented in a bump test log, and after 12 hours of continuous use. A test would also be required if the detector comes in contact with water is over ranged or suffers trauma ie: dropping the detector. Precautions: The bump test must be conducted by introducing a known concentration of gas (Pentane) to the sensor of the combustible gas detector. The detector must read within +or-20% of known concentration and to ensure that the 10% LEL alarm on the detector is functioning properly All gas detection equipment requires a minimum oxygen content in order to perform according to manufacturers specifications. The oxygen reading must be taken prior to an LEL reading to verify that the monitor can read properly

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Appendix 2 Training All employees and contractors must be knowledgable on the hazards of combustible gas and the use of detection equipment being used. Each area in the CGPU is responsible to ensure that all BP and Full Time Equivalence workers have a satifactory course available to teach the proper methods in the use of combustible gas detection equipment including: Operation Calibration Storage Limitations Alarm settings Site specific procedures

Personnel training records will be maintained on site. Training is to be conducted every (3) years and is expected to include passing a documented test to ensure personnel are qualified.

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LEASE ENTRY PROCEDURE

Combustible Gas Envir.

Step

Hazard

Control

Lease Entry Procedure

1. Verify personal monitoring equipment is operational once per shift.

H2S or hydrocarbon exposure.

- Bump test personal monitoring equipment prior to the beginning of the shift. - Calibrate multi-head gas monitor as per manufactures instructions

2. Stop at lease entry and conduct a visual inspection of area

High H2S or LEL concentrations, oxygen deficiency, explosions, fire or spills

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3. Register personnel entering the site though the use of an automated system (VMS) or by notifying the control room.

H2S or hydrocarbon exposure

Before entering lease: 1. Visual inspection 2. Check wind direction 3. Check for H2S and LEL alarm and flashing beacon - Ensure that system accepts the input or that control room staff records the time of entry in the log. STOP-THINK-GO

4. If safe for vehicle entry, proceed High H2S or LEL to the MCC / RTU (Scada) building. concentrations, fire, explosions (IF NO RTU OR MCC IS PRESENT or spills GO TO STEP 6.)

Before entering lease: 1. Visual inspection 2. Check wind direction 3. Check for H2S alarm beacon

and flashing

LEASE ENTRY PROCEDURE


Control

Step

Hazard

Lease Entry Procedure

5. Use multi-head gas detector to check for high LEL or H2S gas levels in the vicinity of MCC/RTU. Evaluate risk of other atmospheric hazards such as benzene, sulfur dioxide or carbon monoxide.

H2S or LEL exposure, oxygen deficiency, explosions or fire. H2S > 10 ppm LEL > 10% 19.5 % > O2 > 23% SO2 > 2 ppm CO > 25 ppm Benzene > 1 ppm - Personal monitor - Multi-head Gas Monitor - Continuous Gas Monitor (if applicable) - park vehicle facing the lease exit for ease of egress - the vehicle can be driven directly off the site - comply with the 8 meter rule from process equipment and piping - Check wind direction and park upwind - Check beacons or alarms

- Personal monitor - Multi-head Gas Monitor - Continuous Gas Monitor (if applicable) - Benzene, SO2, CO monitoring equipment (if applicable)

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6. If H2S or LEL gas limits are within H2S or LEL exposure, oxygen Practices, vehicles may now deficiency, explosions or fire proceed onto the lease and park appropriately.

Combustible Gas Envir.

LEASE ENTRY PROCEDURE


Hazard Control

Combustible Gas Envir.

Step

Lease Entry Procedure

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7. When exiting vehicle, static High levels of H2S or LEL's - Ground bare hand to metal surface to electricity should be considered and resulting in explosion discharge static electricity. person should ground themselves to metal object before opening buildings. 8. Open building door while using Oxygen deficiency, LEL or H2S, - Approach building using caution & take multi-head monitor. exposure explosions or fire hesitation step after opening doors - check entrance area using Multi-head head monitor to ensure required O2, H2S & LEL limits - Personal monitor - Continuous Gas Monitor (if applicable) 9. If H2S or LEL limits are exceeded H2S or LEL exposure, oxygen - Personal monitor - DO NOT ENTER. deficiency, explosions or fire - Multi-head Gas Monitor - Continuous Gas Monitor (if applicable) - open doors and vents using caution 10. If levels do not clear contact H2S or LEL exposure, oxygen - Personal monitor back up personnel and notify deficiency, explosions or fire - Multi-head Gas Monitor supervisor. - Continuous Gas Monitor (if applicable) 11. Once backup has arrived on H2S or LEL exposure, oxygen - breathing air equipment donned location, gas leak can be deficiency, explosions or fire - Personal monitor investigated and/or repaired - Multi-head Gas Monitor - Continuous Gas Monitor (if applicable)

LEASE ENTRY PROCEDURE


Control

Step

Hazard

Lease Entry Procedure

12. If gas levels can not meet Practice requirements after investigation and/or repair, equipment should be shut-in.

H2S or LEL exposure, oxygen deficiency, explosions or fire

H2S or LEL exposure, oxygen deficiency, explosions or fire

13. If no gas level present proceed into building using caution, while monitoring gas levels with multihead gas monitor. Proceed through the entire building sweeping for gas before commencing work.

- Personal monitor - Multi-head Gas Monitor - Continuous Gas Monitor (if applicable) - shut in using site specific shut down procedures. - Personal monitor - Multi-head Gas Monitor - Continuous Gas Monitor (if applicable)

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14. When leaving lease notify BP H2S or LEL exposure, oxygen personal and log out of automated or deficiency, explosions or fire off vms system. Register personnel exiting the site though the use of an automated system (VMS) or by notifying the control room.

- ensure VMS or manual login system clears personnel for site

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Pressure Safety valves

PRESSURE SAFETY VALVES PURPOSE: To provide instructions for adequately protecting all pressure systems. APPLICATION: All pressure systems. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: System Overpressure. Toxic/Combustible fluids. Pressure on flare system (where applicable). Explosion: Air in flare system and/or piping.

PREPARATIONS: ite-specific procedures are required for S removal and installation of all PSVs. The procedures must be discussed and documented prior to carrying out the work, and before the applicable work permit is issued. [See: Permits and BP PSV handling and servicing procedure (Part of owner inspection program)] ll block valves on the upstream and/or A downstream side of a PSV must be sealed or padlocked in the open position. ll pressure safety valves (PSVs) must be A maintained in operable condition, in accordance with Provincial Regulations (Ref: Quality management system for Boilers, Pressure Vessels and pressure piping Section 6). ll PSVs will be checked as per provincial A regulations.

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PROCEDURES: Pressure safety valve repair shops require certification approval from applicable government agency per CSA B51. All PSVs are to remain in service while the equipment that they are protecting is in service, except for repair as noted in ASME Code. PRECAUTIONS: Taking a PSV out of Service for Repair on equipment in operation: 1. No PSV may be taken out of service at any time without approval from the Supervisor responsible for that facility. 2. No PSV may be taken out of service unless adequate protection is maintained by adjacent equipment, or by being continuously manned by a designated Operator to control the working pressure of the equipment as per ASME Section VIII Div.1 Appendix M. 3. ll PSVs removed from service must be imA mediately logged and documented on the PSV handling and servicing procedure tracking sheet. 4. epairs to the PSV must be made as quickly as R possible with an emergency priority designation. 5. The PSV must be replaced immediately after the repair is complete. 6. When transporting a PSV for service or returning it to the facility the PSV must be transported in the vertical position. [See: Energy Isolation] 7. Returning a Pressure Safety Valve to Service 8. After Repair on Operating Equipment: 9. All block valves must be opened, sealed or padlocked. 10. The Supervisor in charge, or his designate, must witness the installation of the seals or padlocks on the block valves connected to the pressure safety valve. 11. It is then to be logged that the PSV is in service.

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Pressure Safety valves

RESPONSIBILITY: The BP Canada Representative in charge of the job is responsible for ensuring that safe work procedures are developed and followed. REFERENCE: P Quality management system for Boilers B and Pressure Vessels and process piping. ASME Code Section VIII, latest edition. SA B51 Boiler, Pressure Vessel and Pressure C Piping Code. BP PSV Handling and servicing Procedure.

PRESSURE AND LEAK TESTING PURPOSE: To establish pressure and leak testing safe work practices for vessels, piping, and pipelines. APPLICATION: New installations, repairs and replacements of vessels, piping, and pipelines. DEFINITION: There are two types of pressure tests of which hydrostatic is the preferred method. Pneumatic testing is only permitted under special conditions, Engineering Authority (EA) and Regulatory Approval is Required. PREPARATIONS: [See: Purging] POTENTIAL HAZARDS:[See purging] verpressure operating above the system O MAWP.

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eaks Test medium leaking during test, enviL ronmental, stored energy and combustible issues. xplosion Through overpressure or ignition of E flammable gas.

Methods: Hydrostatic: This is the preferred method because energy release causes minimal concern: ater/glycol preferred hydrostatic test medium W (minimum danger). ydrocarbon based fluid the potential for H explosion, fire, toxicity, environment damage must be assessed and documented.

Pneumatic: When leaks or ruptures occur energy release can be extremely dangerous and prolonged: nert gas preferred pneumatic test medium I ir/Flammable Gas mixing these two test A mediums can result in explosion and fire. Pneumatic testing is not recommended

Leak Check: Combustible Gas can be used for Leak Check test on piping, equipment or vessels only after the system has been properly purged. PROCEDURES: 1. ll mechanical/integrity work on the system A should be complete before the system pressure test commences. 2. When pressure testing, a low pressure test must be performed before the high pressure test to prevent failure of a component at high pressure and the resultant danger of this situation. The

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Pressure Safety valves

pressure set points for these tests should be stated in the procedure along with the systems MAWP. 3. ite-specific procedures should be developed for S all hydrostatic pressure tests. 4. n approved site-specific procedure must be A developed for all pneumatic pressure tests.

SIGNS: Warning signs must be positioned prohibiting the presence of workers in the immediate area of the vessel or lines while pressure testing. Consideration of the following sections may be required: WHMIS Purging Blinding and Blanking (Energy Isolation) Draining and Depressuring Pre-job Safety Meeting Permit to Work 1. All non essential personnel should be removed from the area being tested. 2. Pressures intended for hydrostatic test must not be used for pneumatic tests. When changing from hydrostatic to pneumatic testing, the test pressure must be recalculated. 3. isposal of test mediums should be in accorD dance with environmental guidelines.

PRECAUTIONS:

RESPONSIBILITIES: The BP Canada Representative in-charge is responsible for ensuring that safe pressure testing practices are followed. NOTE: For pressure test design, [See: Applicable Government Regulations:] ASME Pressure Vessel Code Provincial Boilers Branch or equivalent EUB or equivalent

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PURGING Purging PURPOSE: To provide guidelines for safely removing combustible, chemical, toxic or other hazardous materials from vessels and piping systems. APPLICATION: Any vessels or piping systems being prepared for inspection, construction, repair, or returning to service. DEFINITION: Purging is the removal of any undesirable medium from vessels or piping systems. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Leaks from uncontrolled points. oxic vapor /Inert gas oxygen deficiency: T simple/chemical asphyxiation ombustible material: explosion the system C contents could be in the zone between the LEL and UEL isplaced fluids D xplosion due to combustible material being E vented to atmosphere perating the system outside its design condiO tions (Pressure/Temperature/Combustible gas in inert systems) a. ll mechanical/integrity work should be comA plete before the purging operation commences. b. Steam, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, or water or combustible gas may be used as a purging medium. If using combustible purge medium, the explosive risk associated with the transition zone

Static Electricity:

PREPARATIONS:

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Purging

of incomplete purge must be recognized, and all potential ignition sources must be eliminated. If combustible gases are used for the purge medium the Engineering Authority (EA) must approve the procedure. c. The worker must know where the displaced fluids (i.e., combustible, toxic) are going, and the condition area is suitable to receive the fluids. d. A site-specific procedure must be developed for each purging operation. Safety Equipment: a. The necessary safety equipment must be on hand (e.g. breathing apparatus, fire extinguishers, etc.) b. Purge warning signs should be posted as required. Isolating: a. Vessels or piping must be isolated before purging.[See: Energy Isolation, Golden Rule] b. Associated instrumentation must also be isolated. c. Flare pilots/igniters might have to be isolated.

PROCEDURES: a. Purge gas should be introduced into the system very slowly. Inert gas should be used where possible. Velocities should be kept very low to sweep the undesirable medium out of the system with as little mixing as possible, and should be done at atmospheric pressure. Low point drains should be checked periodically for water removal. When purging for start-up, air must be completely displaced from the system to a level that the system is no longer operating in the flammable/ explosive zone, before attempting to pressure up the system. b. If the hydrocarbon is heavier than the purge medium, purging should be from top to bottom. If it is lighter, from bottom to top.

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a. All non-essential personnel should be removed from the purge area. b. Some combustible gas detectors require oxygen for analysis of the sample, and therefore will not give a true indication when a vessel or piping is checked for the removal of hydrocarbons, if the detector is inserted in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere. c. Creating or pulling a vacuum on piping or vessel (i.e., introducing air), when using steam. d. ake sure there are no dead legs in the vessel or M piping to be purged. e. Tests must always be made to determine if purging has eliminated the undesirable medium from the vessel or piping system. SCBA/SABA must be worn when performing atmospheric monitoring prior and during Confined Space Entry.[See: Confined Space Entry], [See: Atmospheric Monitoring] f. essels or equipment may still contain toxic and/ V or combustible sludge or scales after purging. Consideration should be given to the removal of this material to maintain and ensure a safe atmosphere. g. Purge medium temperatures must be considered for affect on the system to be purged. RADIOACTIVE OR NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS (NORM) PURPOSE: To establish the requirements for the safe handling of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Contact your PU Industrial Hygienist.

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PRECAUTIONS:

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Radioactive (NORM)

APPLICATION: All worksites where NORM contamination may occur. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Exposure to NORM. PREPARATIONS: a. n ENFORM trained and qualified NORM A Control Coordinator must be assigned for all worksites where there is or likely to be NORM contamination. b. All personnel performing work that involves NORM contaminated equipment must be trained in personal protection and safe handling. Refer to the Code of Practice and contact your NORM Control Coordinator, Safety Coordinator or Industrial Hygienist for advice on training, specific monitoring and PPE. Survey: All sites that may have NORM contamination must have completed a NORM survey of the applicable equipment performed before work planning commences to ensure all hazards are identified. Work Planning: ork Planning for NORM contaminated W equipment must include provisions to ensure the personnel are trained the necessary equipment and PPE is available the need for personnel decontamination facilities possible facilities for equipment decontamination ventilation filtering exhausted air or waste water and aste storage, recordkeeping, analysis and w disposal of NORM materials and/or NORM contaminated equipment and PPE

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ust be conducted prior to commencement M of operation. The NORM Control Coordinator must attend all pre-job safety meetings. [See: Safety Meetings], [See: TDG-Packaging and Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, [See: Canadian Guidelines for the Management of NORM; Guidelines for the Handling of NORM in Western Canada] ontact the NORM Control Coordinator, C Safety Coordinator or Industrial Hygienist for advice before any work proceeds.

PROCEDURES: Safe handling procedures should include: Specific job procedures to be followed e expected effluent concentrations and Th methods of control if applicable e person in charge, responsible for the Th operation torage, testing and disposal of NORM wastes S quipment and worksite must be properly E prepared (i.e. isolated, depressured, made accessible, etc.) The worksite should be roped off. Radiation warning signs must be posted, and unauthorized entry of personnel banned, in the area affected by the work ll women who are pregnant or are conA sidering pregnancy must declare this to the Occupational Health Centre prior to work commencing so that an exposure risk assessment can be completed. The risk assessment may include restricted work with NORM contaminated materials.

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Radioactive (NORM)

Pre-Job Safety Meeting:

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Radioactive (NORM)

PRECAUTION: ighly energetic NORM may affect some H LEL monitors and fire detection systems. Station shutdown could result when using a highly energetic radioactive source in the vicinity of a detector. A risk assessment must be performed to determine the scope and risk from NORM and radioactive sources. Fire detection systems sensitive to radiation may have to be by-passed when radioactive sources are in use in the immediate area. Care must be taken to reactivate the detection system when the work is completed.[See: Equipment Shutdown Systems] ORM survey meters are not explosion N proof, thus a Hot Work Permit is required.

RESPONSIBILITIES: e BP Canada Representative is responsible Th for ensuring that all procedures are supplied and followed. e BP NORM Control Coordinator is reTh sponsible for ensuring that all NORM control procedures meet regulations, the BP Codes of Practice and that all procedures are followed. e Contractor performing work on NORM Th contaminated equipment and waste is responsible for ensuring that safe handling procedures and contingency plans have been developed which comply with all government regulations. He is also responsible for ensuring that all applicable protective equipment, instruments, rescue and decontamination facilities are on hand and in operable condition before the job commences.

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PURPOSE: To provide procedures for the safe loading of tank cars. APPLICATION: Tank car loading at plant and field locations. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Static Electricity Combustible Fluids Tank Car Movement

PREPARATIONS: a. oading racks and loading rack trackage must be L securely and adequately grounded and bonded. All ground and bond connections should be frequently inspected.[See: Electrical] b. Before loading tank cars, the loader shall check the derail, ensure that it is in a closed position, and erect the required warning signs. PROCEDURES: a. Tank car loading encompasses similar concerns and problems as transferring fluids by truck. However, a site-specific procedure is required, and the following general guidelines apply. [See: Tank Truck Loading/Unloading] b. Car wheels must be chocked to prevent the car from accidentally rolling. c. The loader must attach the ground cable to each car before connecting the loading hoses. d. Tank cars must be inspected prior to loading.Tank cars found in bad order must be reported to the supervisor immediately, and must not be loaded

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RAIL CAR LOADING

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Rail Car Loading

until repairs have been made. e. The loader must label loaded cars with the proper placards designated for this purpose and required by regulations. Proper documentation is also required.[See: TDG] f. eaking valves or loading hoses must be repaired L or replaced immediately. g. The loading rack must never be left unattended while loading or offloading a tank car. h. When using a top loading spout, the spout must be chained to the tank car during loading. i. Tank cars must be filled to the proper level as instructed, and the loader should stand by to shut off the loading valves when this level is approached. When loading is complete, the block valve on loading hose and tank car must be closed, and liquid petroleum gas vented to the vent stack before loading hoses are disconnected.

j.

k. The loading hoses must be hooked back to the loading rack when loading has been completed. PRECAUTIONS: a. No part of the body shall be positioned over the slip tube gauge. b. Walkways and platforms must be inspected frequently and kept in good condition. c. Workmen must refrain from jumping from the loading rack to the tank car or from car to car. d. Company employees must stay away from tank cars when the train crew is coupling, switching, and spotting cars. e. All loaders must be familiar with the location of fire-fighting equipment and must be trained in its use. f. xtension cords with lights attached must not E be used at the loading rack. Only approved flashlights for hazardous locations are permitted.

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RESPONSIBILITIES: t is the responsibility of the BP Canada I employee in-charge of the operation; to ensure that safe loading procedures are followed. e train crew is responsible for ensuring that Th safe tank car coupling, switching and spotting procedures meet applicable government regulations.

RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PURPOSE: To provide safe work practices for workers in areas where there is a respiratory hazard. APPLICATION: All personnel who are required to or may use respiratory protection to mitigate inhalation risks. This also applies to visitors to field locations who may use respiratory protection. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Toxic atmospheres Oxygen deficient atmosphere

DEFINITION: *IDLH Immediately dangerous to life or health. Any atmosphere where the concentration of oxygen, flammable or toxic air contaminants would cause a person without respiratory protection to be fatally injured, or cause irreversible and incapacitating effects to that persons health. PROCEDURES: [See: BP Canada Respiratory Protection Program] Equipment for IDLH* Environment:

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Respiratory Protection

Self-contained or supplied-air breathing apparatus (SCBA/SABA) must be worn. where danger exists from reduced oxygen content of the air (less than 19.5% oxygen), or toxic contaminants exceed the allowable exposure limits, The limitation and use of SCBA/SABA are outlined in the BP Canada Respiratory Protection Program and the Canadian Standards Association CSA Z94.4-02 (Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators), and CSA Z180.1-00 (Compressed Breathing Air and Systems). Equipment for Non-IDLH Environment: Air-purifying respirators filter and remove specific contaminants from the air. These respirators are never to be used in oxygen-deficient IDLH atmospheres. There are two main types of air-purifying respirators: 1. articulates filters (P100 or HEPA High EfP ficiency Particulate Air filters) 2. Chemical cartridge These respirators are limited to the uses outlined in the BP Canada Respiratory Protection Program and the Canadian Standards Association CSA Z94.4-02 (Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators), and CSA Z180.1-00 (Compressed Breathing Air and Systems). The BP Canada Respiratory Protection Program also includes a selection chart for the type of respiratory equipment required for specific hazards. Fitness to Wear Respirators: All personnel required to wear respirators must be evaluated by a Health Professional to ensure pre-existing health conditions are not affected by respirator use. BP Occupational Health Centre will perform the assessment on BP employees and full time contactors. Contract companies must provide documentation that demonstrates contract employees are fit to wear respirators.

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Fit Testing: All BP Canada employees, contracted employees, contractors, and visitors doing work on BP premises or operating sites who are required to wear appropriate respiratory protective equipment must have quantitative or qualitative fit testing records available for review. A quantitative or qualitative fit test shall be performed on new employees and long-term contractors within the first three months of commencing work. Repeat testing is recommended annually thereafter, or not to exceed 2 years. Individuals who are required to wear respiratory equipment must be clean-shaven where the face piece of the respirator seals with the skin of the face. Conditions such as unusual face contours, scars, skin eruptions, eyeglasses, facial surgery, injury or missing dentures might interfere with the seal. For this reason, the seal must be positive and negative tested and a satisfactory fit obtained prior to each use. Most manufacturers provide instructions for fit testing; if these are unavailable, refer to BPs Respiratory Protection Program or contact your Safety Advisor or Industrial Hygienist for guidance on how these tests should be performed and documented. Maintenance, Cleaning, and Storage of Respiratory Protection Equipment: Immediately after use, the equipment must be cleaned, the face piece sanitized, and the equipment stored in the proper location. The maintenance, cleaning, and storage of respiratory protection must be consistent with the BP Canada Respiratory Protection Program. The user of the equipment should perform this task. Inspection: A competent worker must inspect respiratory protective equipment that is not used routinely, but is kept ready for emergency use, at least monthly. The inspection must

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ensure that the equipment is in satisfactory working condition, clean, and in its proper location. Written documentation of this inspection must be retained at the worksite and must include the name of the inspector and the date the inspection was performed. The supervisor in charge of the work location must designate a trained worker to complete the monthly inspection. The inspection must follow those established in the BP Canada Respiratory Protection Program. Contractors using their own respiratory equipment on BP sites must have documentation available regarding the testing, inspection and maintenance of respirators. PRECAUTIONS: ompressed breathing air must meet quality C specifications for breathing air specified by CSA Standard Z180.1-00. ir from respiratory air compressors must A be tested annually by a qualified person to ensure analysis includes particulate and oil mists. This analysis must be performed on site. Taking an air sample in a bomb and the sending the sample to a laboratory for analysis is prohibited.

TRAINING: All workers entering a BP Canada field worksite where a respiratory hazard may exist must be: 1 Educated on the hazards present. 2 ducated on the reason a particular piece of E respiratory equipment was chosen, and its capabilities and limitations. 3 rained in the proper use, care, maintenance, T and fitting of the respirators they will be using.

The frequency of training will be determined by the particular job requirement. Repeat training is recommended annually, or not to exceed 3 years (see BP Respiratory Protection Guidelines). Documentation of training frequency,

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type, and session attendance must be retained on file at each area office. For each confined-space entry, training in the use of selfcontained, supplied-air respiratory protective equipment will be a requirement of each site-specific pre-entry safety meeting. Task Hazard Assessment: All tasks requiring respiratory equipment must be identified and assessed to ensure all hazards have been identified and mitigated. The mitigation measures should be documented in Work Orders and Safe Work Permits. RESPONSIBILITY: The Supervisor in charge of the work location must ensure that: mployees and full time Contractors have E been deemed fit to wear respirators by the Occupational Health Centre; ontractors have performed fit testing and C fitness to wear respirators medical assessment has taken place; ll tasks which have respiratory hazards A are identified, evaluated, documented and included in work orders or Safe Work Permits; ersonnel are trained in the use, maintenance p and inspection of the respiratory equipment,

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: 1. Industrial Hygiene Manual 2. Respiratory Protection Program 3. Site specific code of practice

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HSSE MEETINGS HSSE Meetings PURPOSE: To describe the composition, responsibilities, and meetings of the Joint Worksite Safety, Health and Environment Committee; describe meetings; and identify the requirements of the pre-job meetings, to be attended by both contractor and BP Canada personnel before any potentially hazardous activity is started. APPLICATION: Worksites and workers within a Department/Area as designated by the Department/Area Manager. PROCEDURES: Joint Worksite Health, Safety, Security and Environment Committee: 1. Joint Worksite Safety, Health and EnvironA ment Committee is a group of worker employee representatives working together to identify and solve safety, occupational health, and environmental problems at the worksite. The Operating Centre Manager is responsible for the formation of the committee at each worksite. The committees will hold regular meetings. 2. The committee shall consist of an adequate number of members to provide representation for all workers, and shall include at least one supervisor or equal numbers of workers and supervisors. The term of a committee member will usually be a minimum of one year. 3. e committee will address the safety, occupaTh tional health and environmental concerns of both management and workers. The committee members will either address these concerns immediately or bring them to the attention of the committee at a meeting. Members of the

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4. ommittee concerns and recommendations C must be documented and filed.

Committee Meetings: The committee will hold meetings on a regular basis, at least once a month. A suggested meeting format is included at the end of this section. General Meetings: The BP Canada Supervisor in-charge of the work area is responsible for ensuring safety, health and environment meetings are held. In most areas, there will be one meeting per month. Employees should attend all health, safety, security and environment meetings but must attend a minimum of four meetings a year. An attendance record must be signed by the attendants and retained at the worksite with the minutes of the meeting. The agenda will follow that of a regular business meeting: 1. iscussion of all incidents and near misses D within the area. 2. iscussion of incidents, and near misses D throughout company and industry. 3. ealth, Safety, Security and Environment comH mittee concerns and recommendations. 4. Discussion of all bulletins and safety information.

Education programs such as: Review of regulations eview of safety practices and site-specific R procedures Seminars on new equipment azard identification and training. H (e.g. WHMIS)

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committee will inspect the worksites regularly and report their findings to the committee.

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The minutes of the meetings must be recorded and distributed, as follows: A copy posted at the facility A copy sent to appropriate personnel Copy posted on the gHSSEr web site

Pre-Job risk assessment: 1. Where any personnel are to undertake an activity deemed to be potentially hazardous, a pre-job risk assessment shall be held. 2. The BP Canada representative in charge of the pre-job risk assessment must review general HSSE requirements emphasizing checks, procedures and hazards. These include the requirements for personnel protective equipment, site hazards, emergency procedures and job-specific safety requirements. Where the job is complex or involves hot work, a detailed site-specific procedure must be prepared prior to, and reviewed at this meeting. The minutes of the pre-job risk assessment must be recorded. All personnel involved in the work task must sign the minutes of the meeting. This documentation must be retained on file at the worksite office for a minimum of one year. 3. here the pre-job risk assessment is being held W as part of ongoing rig operations, the pre-job safety meeting will involve all personnel on the lease and be noted in the morning report, and tower report.

HSSE Opportunity/Near Miss Reporting: When a worker has reason to believe that an unsafe condition or practice may exist, he/she shall take immediate corrective action where practical, and report the condition/ practice to his supervisor. HSSE Opportunity/Near Miss reports will be filled out and returned to the onsite HSSE representative.

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1. Date, time, and location of meeting. 2. Chairperson of Meeting. 3. List of attendees. 4. Consecutive days since last Lost Time Accident. 5. Consecutive days since last Preventable Vehicle Accident. 6. Old safety concerns reported but not corrected (including specific details). 7. Old safety concerns reported and corrected. 8. New safety concerns and recommendations. 9. Safety concerns corrected but not reported.

10. iscussion of accidents, incidents and near D accidents (in area, throughout the company and the industry). 11. afety topics discussed and/or education S program. 12. Distribution list for minutes. 13. ust complete a full work place level one M inspection per year. 14. This can be split into smaller monthly ones.

SAFETY STANDBY PURPOSE: To provide procedures for a safety standby person to be used as an observer and back-up during specific work procedures. APPLICATION: Confined-space entry, and other work tasks as specified by site-specific procedures.

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Suggested format for recording the minutes of joint worksite Health, Safety, Security and Environment committee meetings:

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DEFINITION: Safety Standby A safety standby person is an employee or designate used as an observer and back-up, whenever the above work applications are being carried out. This person is not part of the work crew, and is only concerned with the safety of the workers. Safety standby personal will be identified by some type of measure as identified in the pre-job risk assessment. PROCEDURES: Qualifications: The safety standby person must have up-to-date knowledge of the following: Site-specific job procedures perating procedures for the safety equipO ment required for the job in progress e location of the Operator and Supervisor Th in charge and be able to communicate with either Potential hazards. Training First Aid CPR H2S, if applicable Fire extinguisher use, if applicable Rescue procedures Applicable Golden Rule of Safety BP Indoctrination Confined Space if applicable Pre-entry or rescue Atmospheric monitoring if applicable

Duties of the Safety Standby: 1. A safety standby is a person who observes a work task for the purpose of: Fire suppression 2. onitoring atmospheric conditions from outside M the confined space Ensuring the air supply to supplied-air units that are being used. [See Section: Atmospheric Monitoring]

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4. xecution of emergency rescue plan and activation E of rescue team 5. aintaining entry log and tool log to ensure all M personnel and tools are accounted for. 6. nsuring unsupervised entry points are flagged E off indicating DO NOT ENTER or made inaccessible by other means. 7. nsuring that all workers involved in the task E have the proper training certification in place. 8. Other duties as identified in the pre-job safety meeting.

Note: Safety standby personnel can not leave their assigned post unless personal safety is jeopardized.

Equipment Required: The safety standby equipment must be designated in the site-specific job procedure. Emergency Actions: In the event of any emergency, the safety standby must perform the following: (a) ommunicate the emergency to the appropriate C back-up support. The call shall give the lease location, shall be concise and specific: e.g., Man Down, Fire, Explosion. (b) f there is no immediate response, repeat the I message, and proceed with appropriate action. Example: In the case of a Man down: all for help from a safe area and confirm call C

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3. roviding communication between workers and P other operation or rescue personnel in the event of an emergency

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has been acknowledged Sand Blasting Assess the hazard ut on (don) respiratory protective equipment P (SCBA) as per provincial requirements Remove the victim to a safe area Perform emergency first aid as appropriate eport all incidents immediately and arrange R for the victim to be transported to the nearest medical support

Entry to Sour Worksites: [See: Hydrogen Sulfide Safety] [See: Respiratory Protection] RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of the BP Canada Employee in charge and/or contractor to address the need for a Safety Standby during specific work procedures, and to ensure that a properly trained person is used where required. SAND BLASTING / ABRASIVE BLASTING PURPOSE: Provide general guidelines for safe sand blasting operations. APPLICATION: All BP Canada Plant and Field sites. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: ust created by blasting operations (i.e., silica D sand, walnut shells) ust from material removed D (i.e., lead base paints) Sparks caused by the blasting operation

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Static electricity build-up Sand Blasting ossibility of physical injury from the blasting P operation Noise exposure Heat stress

PREPARATIONS: ork area should be checked for combustible W gas prior to commencing operation and as required throughout. Safe Work Permit and Pre-Job Safety A Meeting may be required, depending on the proximity to the production facilities and the complexity of the job.

[See: Working in a Combustible Atmosphere Standard]

[See: Safe Work Permits] [See: HSSE Meetings] [See: Personal Protective Equipment] [See: Confined Space Entry] [See: Noise and Hearing Conservation] PROCEDURES: The compressor, hose, nozzle and operator must be properly grounded to prevent build-up of static electricity. Ventilation requirements for the work area must be considered. The equipment operator must be able to stop the flow of material immediately, i.e., shut-off device located at nozzle. PRECAUTIONS: f conducting abrasive blasting ensure that I crystalline silica is replaced with a less harmful substance. inimize any release of dust (nuisance particuM lates, silica, lead, etc.). pproved respiratory protection must be used to A

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guard against inhalation of air borne contaminants. [See: Respiratory Protection] Security afe handling requirements for sand blasting S material, or material removed from surfaces must be addressed. onsult Safety Coordinator or Industrial HyC gienist for advice on working with silica, lead or other toxic fumes, vapors or particulates. pproved personal protective equipment must be A used to guard against injury to the operator.

[See: MSDS]

[See: Personal Protective Equipment] RESPONSIBILITIES: The BP Canada Representative, or his designate, is responsible for ensuring that safe sand blasting procedures are followed. The Contractor is responsible for ensuring: at all personnel are properly trained in the safe Th use of the equipment That the material hazards are identified at approved respiratory protection and perTh sonal protective equipment are used.

SECURITY PURPOSE: To protect the public, BP Canada, and contractor personnel, property and assets from injury, loss or damage. APPLICATION: All BP Canada locations, including plants, compressor stations, offices, warehouses, batteries, wellsites, pipelines etc.

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DEFINITION: Security included: Unmanned 8 hr. daily operation Security Manned 24 hr. daily operation

Assets included: Product Equipment Legal Liability

PROCEDURES: Physical Security: 1. Properly maintained public protection security systems contribute to visitor safety, and minimize exposure to possible litigation resulting from incidents/accidents involving non-employees on locations. 2. Where the possibility exists for theft, vandalism or unauthorized entry, facilities shall be evaluated and secured as required. Livestock entry shall be a consideration. The following are general physical security practices: Perimeter Protection: 1. Control access to company facilities. Post appropriate signs at ALL entrances to guide legitimate visitors and warn-off potential trespassers. Utilize gates and barriers to prevent the casual and/or curious from wandering or driving into facilities. [For appropriate signs, See: Lease Design] 2. here locks are required, approved heavy-duty/ W industrial shackle padlocks (7/16 inch diameter) and chains will be used. (For approved padlocks,

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contact Corporate Security.) Security 3. encing, for security purposes, BP standards are F 2.4 meters high, chain linked and topped with three strands of barbed wire angled outward. 4. encing requirements for sour facilities or faciliF ties near populated areas can be found in Alberta Oil & Gas Regulations - 8.170, 8.180 & EUB IL 90-19.

(If other than Alberta, see applicable government regulations.) Building Protection: 1. Install approved heavy-duty, deadbolt locks on the doors and heavy security screening (mesh) or bars over the windows of buildings containing vital controls and sensitive or valuable equipment. Overhead doors may require additional protection. 2. Buildings, offices, etc. containing vital controls, large quantities of valuable equipment and/or supplies may, in addition, require electronic fire and intrusion detection systems. Corporate Security can provide recommendations and assistance as required. Lighting: Areas should have sufficient illumination for security purposes, and be in accordance with BP Canada General Specifications and applicable government regulations. Identification: Valuable equipment and other theft-prone items should be engraved or stamped with a company-issued, computerregistered, identification number. (Corporate Security shall issue numbers specific to each operating facility/area during

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RESPONSIBILITIES: All employees must report incidents involving criminal action or loss to Corporate Security, Local Management and Police (if required). EMERGENCY PLANS: Refer to Emergency Response Plan Guide. Forms: 48-220 Security Incident Report C1121 Bomb Threat/Anonymous Telephone Call Record

SERVICE RIG SAFETY PURPOSE: To review the major areas of concern in regard to service rig safety to ensure compliance of service rigs with all applicable government and BP Canada regulations and practices. APPLICATION: All BP Canada operated service rig operations. PREPARATIONS: Pre-employment Meeting: A Pre-employment meeting should be held with the service rig contractor to ensure compliance with Service Rig Safety requirements. [See: Contractor Safety Program] Controlled Areas: Where service rig operations are required in a controlled

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security surveys and/or on management request.)

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Service Rig Safety

area, that is, adjacent to airports or populated areas, additional equipment and/or procedures may be required to meet government regulations. [See: Applicable Government Agency, E.U.B. in Alberta] Notification: The applicable government agency should be notified of all rig moves. Signs: Post appropriate signs at the lease entrance advising H2S, hard-hat area, overhead power lines, restricted access, etc. PROCEDURES: Detailed Rig Inspection Report: Form C-79 (88-08) Must be filled out and sent to the appropriate supervisor according to the following schedule: hen using a service rig that has not worked for W BP Canada before, or hen a service rig has not worked for BP W Canada for a significant length of time (several jobs), or nce every three months during continuous O operation for BP Canada, or hen it is deemed necessary by BP Canada W Wellsite Leader is inspection must be reported on the daily Th report and service rig tour sheets or critical wells, this inspection should be F completed within the 24 hour period prior to initiating operations

Note:

Weekly Rig Inspection Report:

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In addition to the detailed Rig Inspection, service rig inspections must be carried out each week, or once per well, whichever is more frequent. The report must be filled out and sent to the appropriate supervisor, and must be reported on the daily report and service rig tour sheets. Daily Inspections: A walk around inspection must be done on a daily basis with the contractor representative. This should be done first thing in the morning and reported on the daily report and service rig tour sheets. Ideally this inspection could be carried out in conjunction with the daily mechanical testing of the BOP equipment. Service Rig Blow-Out Prevention Drill Report: Form C-125 (88-08) Blow-out drills must be performed by each rig crew every 7 days, or once per well, whichever is more frequent. Performance and certification of the rig crew and supervisors must be recorded on the form. Drills should be done at various stages of activity (i.e. tripping, drilling, out of hole, etc.) Blow-out Preventers: 1. When BOPs require winterizing, the heat source must be suitable for the electrical area classification in which it is used. [See: Electrical Protection Regulations] 2. henever bolts are loosened or flanges broken, W that section of the BOP system must be pressuretested as if it had just been hooked up.

Accumulator: Lines shall be tested to the maximum operating pressure of the accumulator for 5 minutes prior to commencing operations. Hose couplers within 7.0 meters of the wellbore must

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Form C-125 (88-08)

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be lock-type or Hammer Union type. BOP Remote: Must be shielded from the wellhead and may be located at the accumulator. Kill and Bleed Off System: Wellhead casing valves must not be used as part of this system. These valves are reserved for emergency use only. Threaded BOP ports are not acceptable because of potential thread damage. If fire sheathed hoses are used, they shall be shop serviced in three year cycles and service reports made available. Rig Savers/Shut-Offs: All diesel engines within 25 meters of a wellhead or a tank must be equipped with a positive air shut-off valve (PASO), either automatically or manually operated. This valve must be function tested prior to commencing operations and at least once a week thereafter. Tests shall be recorded on daily reports. Vehicles, without air intake shut-offs, essential to operations may operate within this distance, provided the BP Canada Representative in-charge or his designate assesses the on-site safety, i.e. Gas detection. This does not apply to where a vehicle is performing an operation on the well. Lighting: All rig lights must be enclosed in vapor-proof glass covers and should be controlled by an explosion-proof switch within reach of the driller while at the brake. Rig Cleaning: The rig should be kept clean using rigwash chemicals and water. Gasoline must not be used.

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Monitors: Ensure Drager or Gastec H2S sampling devices are available with an adequate range of dated sampling tubes. H2S electronic monitors, complete with audible and visual alarms, are required on critical sour wells. The monitor must be capable of detecting H2S at 10 PPM. The monitor should provide alarms as follows: Low Alarm 10 PPM H2S High Alarm 20 PPM H2S

Monitors must be routinely calibrated and tested by a qualified person. A minimum of two detectors are required; one located as close to the return line in the rig/mud tank as possible, and the other placed under the rig floor. [See: Standard for Working in a Combustible Gas Environment] Equipment Placement: On initial set-up, the rig should be upwind of the wellhead, based on the prevailing wind direction. The line from the tank to the wellhead should run at 90 degrees to the wind, and the pump must be upwind of the tank. [See: E.U.B. Equipment Spacing Diagram included at the end of this section.] NOTE: If the lease is too small to position equipment according to the applicable regulations, approval for exemption must be obtained from the appropriate regulatory agencies prior to performing the work. (e.g. EUB and/or OH&S). Power Line Spacing: Guy lines must not cross under or over any existing power line. For minimum clearances from overhead power lines, [See: Electricity].

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Hydrogen Sulfide and Combustible Gas (L.E.L.)

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Service Rig Safety

Wind Direction: A method of determining wind direction shall be used. This should be supplemented by streamers in the derrick, guy wires and rig tank to ensure that a correct wind direction is always available. Access and Parking: The parking area should be as far away from the wellhead as possible, but in no case closer than 25 meters. Access to and from this area should be outside the 25 meter radius. Sump, Swab Tank and Flare Stack: The sump, swab tank and flare stack must be located 50 meters downwind of the rig based on the prevailing wind direction. On sour wells, the flare stack must be equipped with a continuous Pilot. For critical sour wells, continuous ignition is suggested as a back-up to the continuous pilot. Anchors: All underground piping, cable and cathodic protection beds must be located prior to driving in anchors. [See: Ground Disturbance Practice] Anchors must be properly spaced and pull tested according to the rig manufacturers specifications. [See: BPs Completion Operations Manual for further details] Safety Trailer Requirements: Safety trailers are required where the H2S concentration in the vapor phase is equal to or greater than 1 percent. A safety trailer and safety supervisor is required on all wells where the H2S concentration in the vapor phase is equal to or greater than 5 percent. For wells where the H2S concentration is low and risk to personnel associated with an H2S release is minimal, the non-requirement for a safety trailer can be addressed in the work plan.

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All electrical systems must be properly grounded. Ground electrodes must have a resistance of no more than 10 ohms. Ground the service rig, pumps, pump trucks and rig tanks, etc. The electrode resistance should not exceed 7 ohms. Cathodic protection must be shut off and the pipeline properly bonded to the wellhead and service rig before it is disconnected. [See: Electricity] When ground electrodes are to be used, these will be driven rods or pipes. RESPONSIBILITIES: The BP Canada representative in-charge is responsible for ensuring that all personnel on-site fully understand the safety considerations and service rig safety requirements. He is also responsible for ensuring that service rig inspections are performed, and that all service rigs that work for BP meet the applicable requirements. The service contractor is responsible for ensuring that his equipment and personnel comply with the applicable government regulations and BP HSSE Policies. SIGNS AND BARRICADES PURPOSE: To provide safe work practices to reduce hazards by the use of signs or barricades. APPLICATION: All BP plant and field roads and facilities. PROCEDURES: Road Hazards: Where a hazard exists on a road, e.g., closure, bridge out, or culvert out, proper signs and barricades must be

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Electrical Grounding/Bonding:

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used to ensure public safety. Road signs addressing dust hazards, ice, curves, hills, speed limits, etc. should also be considered. Local management should assess the need on all company roads. Road Maintenance: Whenever road maintenance (i.e., sanding, grading, gravelling, etc.) is being conducted on BP Canada roads, all signs required by Provincial Transportation must be used. BP Canada roads are open to public use and must be treated as such. Temporary Hazards: Wherever a temporary hazard exists during maintenance or operating activities, (i.e. open ditches, spills, wet floors, etc.) the necessary signs or barricades must be in place to ensure the safety of uninvolved personnel. RESPONSIBILITIES: All employees and contractors are responsible to identify hazards and ensure that proper and adequate signs and barricades are used as required. Use of reflective vests are required for people involved in setting, manning signs and barricades on roadways. SIMULTANEOUS OPERATING PROCEDURE 1.0 1.1 Purpose/Scope The intent of this document is to provide procedures to facilitate safe operations during simultaneous Well, Operations, and Construction activities. The Canada Gas BU team is committed to maintaining a safe and environmentally sound workplace. Pre-job planning, cooperation and communication between all groups and departments during

1.2

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simultaneous operations are crucial to ensuring safe operations. Simultaneous operations (SIMOPS) referenced herein apply to interactions between Operations, Wells, and Construction activities. Federal, provincial, and local regulations are to be followed during all operations and activities. 2.0 2.1 Key Responsibilities The following is a list of the key Canada Gas PU Field based positions and their roles with respect to Simultaneous Operations planning. As the project develops, roles and responsibilities will change. These changes will be clearly identified and communicated at the daily coordination meetings. O perating Centre Manager (or designee such as Plant or Field Foreman for a site within the OC) is responsible for the overall safety of personnel on site. On a continuous basis they will communicate with the operating groups to learn of the days activities. They will decide which activities take precedence after assessing the priorities associated with each operation. The OCM (or designee) has the obligation and authority to shutdown any or all activities necessary to ensure the safety of personnel and the facility. He is responsible for organizing communications meetings with the respective Person in Charge from Wells, Construction and Operations for SIMOPS activities. P erson in Charge (PIC) will be a designated Contractor, Alliance partner, or BP employee who is singularly accountable for compliance with this SIMOPS Procedure at a given work location. Their accountabilities under this procedure will include notification/training of the work location department staff outlined in this procedure, develop-

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ment of any location specific notification lists, and ongoing reporting of any HSSE incidents or near miss incidents. There shall be a PIC identified for each major work group on the site (e.g. Construction, Wells, and Operations) wherever simultaneous operations can occur. As the project progresses, the PIC role may be transferred to different personnel. As these roles change, it is important that the PICs are clearly identified to all personnel onsite through training/orientations and posting on the SIMOPS Notice Board. 2.4 W ells Representative is the BP Wellsite Leader and is accountable for all drilling and rig related activities and operations. He/she is the Wells PIC and reports to the Wells Team Leader in Calgary. S pecial Projects / Construction Foreman - this can be any person who has responsibilities for construction or special project activities including WARTHOG. He/she is accountable for all project-associated contractors to provide a SIMOPS Work Plan for all construction projects that involve SIMOPS (concurrent activity among Projects, Wells, and Operations). O perations Lead/or Area Authority is accountable for facility operations and all non-drilling remedial well operations as well as all activities on the site outside of the drilling rig after Production Operations begin. He/she is the Operations PIC and is accountable for Operations SIMOPS Work Plans that involve activities that impact drilling operations or project/construction activities. Depending on the particular OC / Site organization this may be a Foreman, Senior Operator or Plant / Field Operator. Issuing Authority is accountable for the overall

2.5

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control of work on the work site. He / she will issue Work Permits. In cases where the Issuing Authority has been transferred from existing operations the Issuing Authority must ensure the requirements for handing over a lease and changing Issuing authority have been met. On larger sites it may be appropriate to designate more than one Issuing Authority. In that case the designated areas for each Issuing Authority must be clearly defined with a marked up plot plan and on site (e.g. snow fencing). Note in many cases the Issuing Authority will also be a PIC. 2.8 S ite HSSE Coordinator will be responsible for site safety programs. The Site HSSE Coordinator will assist the PIC in the facilitation of SIMOPS communication meetings and provide support to all departments in the preparation of SIMOPS Plans and hazards analysis reviews. Definitions S imultaneous operations referenced herein apply to interactions between Operations, Wells, and Construction activities. Federal, provincial, and local regulations are to be followed during all operations and activities. These activities as well as other terminology are defined as follows: perations: facilities operation and maintenance, O well production and maintenance, pipeline operation and maintenance ells: drilling rig, workover rig, and/or compleW tion rig operations including abandonments, and rig maintenance onstruction: civil/gravel work, facilities installaC tion and construction, pipeline construction, site decommissioning and abandonment and general construction

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Simultaneous Operating

imultaneous Operations (SIMOPS): concurrent S activities of producing, processing, or injection of hydrocarbons (and associated water); drilling; completion; remedial operations; well maintenance/service; or any construction activity ite Control: Ultimate control and accountS ability for a development work site by one of the three departments shall be established for each phase of the individual program development Procedure Communications C ommunications is the key to excellent HSSE performance and safe Simultaneous Operations. Every group must be keenly aware of what the other groups are doing to avoid conflicts. Coordination meetings will be held daily through the various phases of construction, drilling, and operations activities. A representative from each major work group will attend these meetings and exchange information about their respective groups activities for the day. Potential work conflicts will be resolved between the various groups before any work will commence. SIMOPS activities planned for the next day will be discussed in detail and the various PICs will pass on SIMOPS information to affected supervisors, foreman and workers at the following days HSSE meetings. At this meeting, information relative to future work will also be shared to allow adequate planning for all affected departments. A SIMOPS Notice Board shall be established at a designated location on the work site. It is critically important during Simultaneous Operations that all personnel involved know how to communicate an emergency situation.

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This SIMOPS Notice Board will display, as a minimum: Site specific Emergency Notification Number(s) Site specific Emergency Notification Procedure uthority or Department in charge of the locaA tion (Site control), name of Issuing Authority (IA), and contact information for Work Permits SIMOPS Work Plans Emergency Response Plan (ERP) N ame and contact information for the site specific Person in Charge (PIC) for Construction, Wells, and Operations D ate of last Notice Board information change or review

The location of the notice board and the minimum information above shall be part of the initial site specific HSSE orientation. As part of the site orientation, the site specific emergency notification procedure and the muster location(s) will be reviewed. Crew supervisors are accountable for reviewing the SIMOPS Notice Board and ensuring that any operation which affects another groups activity be discussed at the next appropriate tour or shift change tool box safety meeting, pre-tour safety meeting, or pre-job safety meeting. Th e SIMOPS Notice Board shall be updated as conditions or development phases change. It must be reviewed weekly for accuracy. The Issuing Authority in charge of the site shall be accountable for reviewing and updating the SIMOPS Notice Board.

4.2 Work Permits Th e Canada Gas PU Permit to Work (PTW) Practice (MS880) will be used. Work Permits will be issued by the Issuing Authority and posted on the SIMOPS Notice Board.

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Simultaneous Operating

4.3 Simultaneous Operations (SIMOPS) Work Plans S IMOPS Work Plans shall be developed for any work groups activity that directly or indirectly affects the safe performance of another work groups activity or operation. (i.e., a SIMOPS Work Plan is required of all activities that may impact wells, production operations or construction operations.) Responsibility for SIMOPS Work Plan preparation lies with the work group initiating the activity. The Site HSSE Coordinator will assist each department in the development of SIMOPS Plans and hazards analysis and will facilitate SIMOPS interface meetings between departments. Th e work activity requiring the SIMOPS Plan should be clearly identified on the SIMOPS Plan form, gHSSEr MF36201.

The plan must include but is not limited to the following key points: description of the job, project, operation, or A activity to be conducted including the number of personnel involved, equipment involved, site resources required, etc. esignated PIC for the job and the communicaD tion plan for contacting the PIC by radio and/or phone Expected duration of the work Hazard Analysis profile for the job Work Permit Plan for that given job larity on which activities cannot occur simulC taneously or what special controls are required if the activities are to take place simultaneously E very SIMOPS Work Plan must be approved and signed by the PIC for the operation(s) impacted.

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For example, when a construction activity impacts a Wells operation by proximity to the wells operation, the PIC for Construction is accountable for communication with the Wells PIC, reviewing the SIMOPS Work Plan, and obtaining the Wells PICs approval before the work begins. However work can only begin when a Permit to Work has been issued by the Issuing Authority who has also reviewed the SIMOPS Work Plan. Examples of work requiring SIMOPS Work Plans include but are not limited to the following: n a well site, Construction work adjacent to a O drilling or well service rig n a plant site, Construction work adjacent to O live operating plant Th e Issuing Authority or PIC can require a SIMOPS Work Plan before the new job, project, operation, or activity can begin. A copy of every approved SIMOPS Work Plan shall be posted on the SIMOPS Notice Board. Upon completion of the SIMOPS activity, the Plan may be removed from the SIMOPS Notice Board. Reference Documents Project Management Plan gHSSEr MS 363 HSSEr MS 880 - Permit to Work and Hazard g Assessment Practice AG SPU Control of Work Policy http://docs. N bpweb.bp.com/NAG:/content/hse/onshore/ documents/K0000002586 Forms HSSEr MF36201 SIMOPS Work Plan Form

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Stress Relieving

STRESS RELIEVING PURPOSE: To provide guidelines for safe stress relieving practices. APPLICATION: All BP Canada Facilities. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Fire, Explosion, Electrical Shock, Burns PREPARATIONS: The stress relieving unit and associated equipment are both potential ignition sources, and therefore necessitates the need for extreme caution and proper procedures to eliminate the safety hazards. [See: Permit to work] [See: HSSE Meetings] PROCEDURES: Whenever stress relieving is performed on piping or vessels in place, site-specific procedures must be developed. [See: Welding Practices - General] Refer to BPs Welding Quality Control Manual for stress relieving requirements and techniques. Signs: Appropriate signs should be erected around the work area to warn of the hazard and to keep out non-essential personnel. RESPONSIBILITIES: e BP Canada Representative in charge of the Th operation is responsible for ensuring that safe stress relieving procedures are followed t is the responsibility of the qualified engineer I

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in charge to ensure that the appropriate stress relieving requirements and techniques are met e contractor is responsible for the safe operaTh tion and use of his equipment while on an BP Canada worksite Swabbing

SWABBING PURPOSE: To provide a general guide for safe swabbing operations. APPLICATION: All swabbing operations conducted by service rigs, swabbing units and wireline units. DEFINITION: Routine Work: Frequently performed swabbing operations on wells of similar set-up. Does not include swabbing operations on sour wells. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Combustible Fluids: As excessive gas becomes evident, production must be switched through testers and gas flared. Wind indicators must be present at all locations. Toxic return fluids: [See: WHMIS for Fluid Handling Requirements] [See: H2S Safety] [See: Static Electricity] Swabbing Unit, wireline unit, service rig and associated piping and equipment must be properly bonded to wellhead and grounded.

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[See: Bonding and grounding] PREPARATIONS: Swabbing Non-Routine Work: A Work Permit must be issued and a pre-job safety meeting conducted, prior to commencing operation. If swabbing is part of service rig operations, only a pre-job safety meeting needs to be conducted. [See: Permits To Work] [See: HSSE Meetings] Routine Work: Swabbing procedures must be developed for all routine swabbing operations where a work permit and pre-job safety meeting are not issued or conducted. The procedure must cover all pertinent safety and operation considerations and emergency plans. This procedure must be reviewed with all pertinent contract personnel. Procedures reviewed and individuals trained must be documented. PROCEDURES: Company Representative: A properly trained BP Canada Representative, or his designate, must be on-site for all swabbing operations. An BP Canada Representative must be on-site when swabbing operations involve sour wells. Cathodic Protection: If flowline is to be disconnected, or swab return line is to be connected to flowline, cathodic protection must be shut off. The wellhead, swabbing unit and swab return line must then be electrically bonded to the flowline to eliminate any electrical potential before disconnecting. Fluids should be swabbed through a poorboy degasser into a rig tank, only if the Hydrogen Sulfide concentrations are less than the occupational exposure limit.

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[See: H2S Safety] If the H2S concentrations exceed the occupational exposure limit, all fluid should be swabbed through proper testing equipment, which may include a separator, flare stack, continuous flare pit, gas boot, and vented tanks. Two qualified personnel should supervise the equipment, configured appropriately for the specific well. [See: BPs Completion Operations Manual] Swab Return Vent Lines: Must be equipped with block valves, which are closed when running in the hole with the swab mandrel. Swabbing Unit: Must be securely anchored according to manufacturers specifications. Swab Tank: Must be spaced as per rig tank spacing requirements. Swabbing with service rig or swabbing unit must not be done after dark. A wireline truck equipped with adequate lighting and a meterage wheel may be used with the approval of the supervisor, or his designate and the appropriate government agency. Diesel Engine Shut-Offs: [See: PASO] Oil Savers: Lubricator oil savers must be equipped with controls which can be readily operated. Tank Trucks: If swabbing to a tank truck, the engine must be shut off, and the driver must not be in the cab. Swab Cable: Swabbing

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Should be flagged and well maintained. Tank Gauging PRECAUTIONS: Swab tank should be externally gauged. If external gauging is not possible, suspend swabbing operations and ensure that the swab return line block valve is closed prior to any personnel going up on the tanks. Fluid must not be unloaded from the swab tank while a swab is being pulled. [See: Tank Gauging] RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of the BP Canada Representative in charge of the operation to ensure that safe swabbing procedures are followed. The service contractor is responsible for the safe operation of his equipment, and for the adherence to all applicable government and BP Canada regulations and practices. TRAINING: [See: Training] TANK GAUGING PURPOSE: To provide a guide for safe gauging of tanks. APPLICATION: All plant and field operations. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Gauging operations present a hazard to the worker due to the presence of toxic or flammable gases and the tank height. PRECAUTIONS: anks installed on a permanent basis should have T gauge boards or an external gauging mechanism.

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[See: Ladders Fixed] No person should stand on a tank roof. here tanks are handling toxic fluids, the W worker may require breathing apparatus and a safety standby person.

[See: Respiratory Protection] [See: Tank Truck Loading/Unloading] onsult Safety Coordinator or Industrial C Hygienist for advice on specific respiratory protection. hen gauging a tank from a ladder at a height W greater than 2.0 meters, where a hoop, guardrail, platform or cage has not been supplied, a fall arresting device must be worn.

[See: Working at Heights Standard and Golden Rule] TANK TRUCK LOADING /UNLOADING PURPOSE: To provide guidelines for loading and unloading products and fluids safely. APPLICATION: Movement of fluids at plant and field operations via bulk truck transport. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: Combustible/Toxic Fluids [See: WHMIS] [See: MSDS] [See: Hydrogen Sulphur Safety] [See: Atmospheric Monitoring] [See: Respiratory Protection]

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Tank Truck Loading

ll tank ladders shall conform to applicable A government regulations and BP Specifications.

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Tank Truck Loading

Static Electricity Elevated Worksite Top of Tank Fluid temperature, i.e., Sulfur, LPG.

[See: Electrical Bonding and Grounding] [See: Working at Heights]

PREPARATIONS: Where caustic, acids, or extremely volatile, corrosive, or sour fluids are being transported, site-specific procedures must be followed. These will address the unique hazards and safeguards required. PROCEDURES: Before loading or unloading, all trucks must be suitably grounded. The grounding cable connection should be made at the Tank Truck to eliminate any possible spark at the ignitable source. All trucks must be parked at least 25 meters from any combustible source, and pointed off the lease for quick exit. All diesel engine vehicles working within 25 meters must be equipped with a positive inlet air shut-off. While loading or unloading, the truck must be located a minimum of 8 meters from the production tanks and outside of any tank dykes. In areas where spacing relaxation has been approved by the necessary government agencies, the distances so approved shall be maintained. [See: Service Rig Safety for Spacing Diagrams] All trucks must be equipped to allow determination of levels in the tank without the driver being on top of the tanks. When loading has started the driver must walk around the unit to ensure that the product is not leaking from hoses, connections, valves, or pump seals. If a leak is spotted, the driver will immediately stop the activity, and if safe to do so, correct the problem. Unless specific safety related considerations require otherwise, the driver will remain outside the vehicle at all times during loading and unload-

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The appropriate personal protection must be worn. [See: Personal Protective Equipment] Tank trucks must be equipped with at least 1-30# LTK Fire extinguisher, placed ready to use, during loading and unloading operations. Special Precautions for Handling Sour Fluids: When handling fluids containing H2S, where the potential exists for H2S to exceed the occupational exposure limits, truck operators must wear breathing equipment while connecting or disconnecting load lines, gauging tanks, and checking truck compartments during loading or unloading operations. This equipment must be supplied and maintained by the contractor. A safety standby should also be considered. In systems with low H2S content and/or the risk to worker exposure is minimal, the non-requirement for a safety standby can be addressed by a site-specific procedure. [See: Hydrogen Sulfide Safety] [See: Respiratory Protection] [See: Safety Standby] RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of the BP Canada employee in-charge to ensure that safe loading and unloading procedures are conveyed and followed. The service contractor is responsible for ensuring that safe loading/unloading procedures are followed While loading or unloading, the truck must be located a minimum of 8 meters from the production tanks and outside of any tank dykes. In areas where spacing relaxation has been approved by the necessary government agencies,

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Tank Truck Loading

ing operations to continuously monitor tank levels and connections. No truck maintenance shall take place during these operations. Prior to loading and unloading a vehicle, the wheels must be chocked.

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the distances so approved shall be maintained. [See: Service Rig Safety for Spacing Diagrams] Swabbing All trucks must be equipped to allow determination of levels in the tank without the driver being on top of the tanks. When loading has started the driver must walk around the unit to ensure that the product is not leaking from hoses, connections, valves, or pump seals. If a leak is spotted, the driver will immediately stop the activity, and if safe to do so, correct the problem. Unless specific safety related considerations require otherwise, the driver will remain outside the vehicle at all times during loading and unloading operations to continuously monitor tank levels. No truck maintenance shall take place during these operations. Prior to loading and unloading a vehicle, the wheels must be chocked. The appropriate personal protection must be worn. [See: Personal Protective Equipment] Tank trucks must be equipped with at least 1-30# LTK Fire extinguisher, placed ready to use, during loading and unloading operations. Special Precautions for Handling Sour Fluids: When handling fluids containing H2S, where the potential exists for H2S to exceed the occupational exposure limits, truck operators must wear breathing equipment while connecting or disconnecting load lines, gauging tanks, and checking truck compartments during loading or unloading operations. This equipment must be supplied and maintained by the contractor. A safety standby should also be considered. In systems with low H2S content and/or the risk to personnel associated with an H2S release is minimal, the non-requirement for a safety standby can be addressed by a site-specific procedure. [See: Hydrogen Sulfide Safety] [See: Respiratory Protection] [See: Safety Standby]

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RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of the Canada employee in-charge to ensure that safe loading and unloading procedures are conveyed and followed. The service contractor is responsible for ensuring that safe loading/unloading procedures are followed. TOOLS All tools must be inspected prior to use and only used if in safe working condition. Tools must be used as per manufacturers recommendation. This means all guards must be in place and no modifications made to the tool. Studs and nuts must be tightened as per manufacturers recommendation (i.e. torque wrenches to be used vs. impact wrenches). Inspection of Hand Tools prior to use: erform a complete inspection of all equipment P and job related tools prior to starting any job. All tools and equipment used must be clean and in good working condition prior and during use. nsure wooden or fiberglass handles used on E hammers and similar tools are not damaged or have been modified (i.e. taped wooden handles may hide damage to the handle.) Damaged handles on hammers, axes and similar equipment shall be immediately taken out of service and replaced promptly. nsure hand tools such as hammers, chisels and E punches, which develop mushroomed heads during use, are reconditioned or replaced as necessary. heck to ensure that tool handles are wedged C tightly in the head of all tools. Check for tight-

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ness at head/handle connection point. Training eplace worn or bent wrenches, pliers, etc. R regularly. tore tools in dry secure locations where they will S not be tampered with. ever attempt to repair damaged or modified N tools. tilize appropriate eye face and hand protection U while using hand tools or equipment which might produce flying materials or be subject to breakage? (See Personal Protection Equipment for further information) reference is to select a tool that will keep your P wrist in neutral position.

TRAINING PURPOSE: To describe the safety training courses and certification required by employees and contractors to ensure safe and productive on-site operations. APPLICATION: Employees and Contractors as required by job function and/or designated by the Department/Area Manager. PREPARATIONS: Pre-Job risk assessment Meeting: Should provide details of the job and all safety considerations related to the job could include but not limited to; required training and certification. This on-site communication will provide informal training and open channels for encouraging awareness and information flow as the operation progresses. [See: Safety Meetings]

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Contractor Safety: Training All contractors should have a Safety Program in place which meets the training requirements of the applicable government regulations and BP Canada requirements. This should be reviewed prior to awarding work. PROCEDURES: Safety is a function of every job task, however, in several special safety training areas, certification is a requirement. Safety training will be instituted to comply with mandatory requirements and other safety training as deemed necessary by Management. Training Courses: Employees will be trained to a competent level on job tasks, operating procedures, and mandatory safety training. Safety Training Records: A complete record of all safety training must be maintained by the Local VTA Administration section in the Department/Area, and should be retained in the VTA database. The Safety and Industrial Hygiene section provides for the required safety training in-house or through recommended outside agencies. It also promotes the compliance of all employees with safety training requirements, by monitoring changes in regulations and advising the Operating Management of the requirements. Wellsite Training: The On-Site BP Representative in charge of any rig operation must have the following qualifications: econd Line B.O.P. certification (for Drilling S Operations) ell Service B.O.P. certification (for Service Rig W Operations) H2S Alive certification (as applicable)

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Training

espiratory Protection Training certification (as R applicable) First Aid & C.P.R. (in accordance with appli- cable government regulations) orksite Hazardous Materials Information W System (WHMIS) Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Confined Space (as applicable) pecific Training in the type of Operations being S performed. e Service Rig/Drilling Contractor/Service Th Company personnel must have the following qualifications: irst Line B.O.P. certification for Drillers (for F drilling operations) econd Line B.O.P. certification for Toolpush/ S Rig Manager (for drilling operations) ell Service B.O.P. certification for Toolpush W and Driller (for service rig operations) Boiler Tickets certification (as applicable) asic specific training in the operation or service B they are to perform.

RESPONSIBILITIES: The BP Canada Supervisor/Representative in charge is responsible for verifying that the required training and certification requirements are met as per the CGPU HSSE Required Training Matrix. This matrix must provide for, at a minimum, all legislated training requirements. The Field Contractor is responsible for ensuring that all workers are properly trained or under the direct supervision of a worker who is, in accordance with the applicable government regulations and BP Canada requirements. BP and FTE Employees within Operations refer to the CGPU Field Required Training Matrix for training requirements and renewal frequencies located on the gHSSEr

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CONTRACTOR REQUIRED SAFETY TRAINING: Contractors working on behalf of BP Canada are required to have the minimum training requirements listed below. The Contractor shall be able to provide valid training certificates to the BP Representative on site prior to work commencing: 2S Alive if working in potential H2S atmospheres H WHMIS Standard First Aid to meet the minimum first aider requirements in provincial regulations TDG if transporting dangerous goods Level One Indoctrination

References: Skills Development Web Links: - AG SPU: https://wss2.bp.com/EP3/Skills_ N Development/default.aspx - ANADA: https://wss2.bp.com/EP3/Skills_ C Development/Canada/Forms/AllItems.aspx AG Control of Work Practice Web Link: N http://docs.bpweb.bp.com/NAG:/content/hse/ onshore/documents/K0000002586?docbase=NA G&ticket=vlinkpass&username=bp_vlink&root paths=%2Fcontent%2Fhse%2Fonshore%2Fdoc uments%0A%0D.

WELDING PRACTICES GENERAL PURPOSE: To provide safe procedures for welding. APPLICATION: All BP Canada Facilities and pipelines. DEFINITION:

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website - http://gasiso14001.bpweb.bp.com/index.asp

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Welding Practices

Welding includes: Arc Welding MIG TIG Hot cutting CAD Welding Stoppling Explosion welding and cutting

A pressure piping system includes the pipe, tubes, conduits, fittings, gaskets, bolting, and other components making up a system. The sole purpose of this system is the conveyance of a fluid under pressure, and the control of the flow of a fluid under pressure between two or more A pipeline is a gas line, oil line, fluid line, multiphase line, solids line, secondary line, distribution line or flowline. Other jurisdictions may have definitions that vary. The appropriate regulations should be checked for their definitions. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: elding within a production area is an activity W which requires extreme caution and proper procedures elding and hot work are not to be considered W routine operations, particularly when the work involves cutting into, or welding onto, production lines Fire and Explosion Welding Burns, Radiation and electric shock Toxic welding fumes, and gases Compressed fuel cylinders Noise Vibration

PREPARATIONS:

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[See: Permit to work] [See: HSSE Meetings] [See: MSDS] NOTE: esignated welding shops are exempt. D Complete risk assessment to determine if respiratory protection and emergency back-up personnel are required, prior to commencing any welding operation. [See: Safety Standby] [See: Respiratory Protection] The needs for warning signs, to isolate or restrict entry to the work area to authorized personnel wearing suitable protection should take into consideration. Government Regulations: Before any additions or changes are made to pressure piping that are classified under the provincial inspection jurisdictions, proper notification must be made and approval secured. The BP Canada welding quality manual and specification must be consulted. PROCEDURES: Site-specific procedure must be developed. This may include, but is not limited, to the following: Blinding Purging Depressuring Excavations X-Ray Stress Relieving Non-Destructive Testing

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All welding and hot work must be done with the permission of the BP Canada Representative in-charge. Welding in any production facility requires a Hot Work Permit and shall require a pre-job safety meeting depending on the complexity and hazard associated with work.

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Welding Practices

Site-Specific Procedure: A detailed work plan for any procedure that involves the use of a cutting torch, welding, or tie-in to existing operating equipment must be prepared. The procedure must list all the activities in sequence required to complete the job. For each activity, the following areas must be covered: 1. ctivity: Describe what has to be done and how A the activity will be carried out. 2. azards: Describe the safety hazards present H and how each hazard will be eliminated or minimized. 3. ersonnel: Describe who is responsible for the P activity and who will carry it out. 4. ire Protection Equipment: Must be located at F the work site, ready to use.

[See: Fire Protection Equipment] PRECAUTIONS: Ventilation: Adequate mechanical ventilation, local fume extraction equipment or respiratory protection must be used where: Natural ventilation is obstructed Toxic metals or fluxes are used Toxic fumes, gases and ozone are generated.

[See: Confined Space Entry] [See: Respiratory Equipment] Note: Consult Industrial Hygienist for advice on appropriate worker exposure controls and respiratory protection. Respiratory: Exposure to hazardous fumes, dusts, gases and vapors may occur in the welding process. To reduce exposure to hexavalent chromium, beryllium and other metal fumes or dusts the following respiratory protection guidelines must be followed:

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Half Mask respirator with P100 filters Powered air-purifying or full-face respirator with P100 filters

Protective Equipment: Welder and Welders helpers must wear approved protective equipment. Welding helmet and safety glasses must be worn when welding, grinding and buffing. If a welder is performing non-welding related tasks, the Practice PPE requirements shall be followed. [See: Personal Protective Equipment, FRW Practice and Hand Protection Practice] Flash protection screens should be used to protect the uninvolved workers. Gas Monitoring: Work area, equipment and lines shall be checked for combustible and/or toxic gas prior to starting job. Work area may require continuous monitoring throughout the job. Re-entry to work area must be accompanied by re-check for combustible and/or toxic gas. RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of the BP Canada supervisor in charge, or his designate, to ensure that safe welding procedures are in place and followed. Welders are responsible for the proper maintenance and safe operation of their equipment. TRAINING: Only welders ticketed for the applicable weld procedure shall be used.

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Task Welding, cutting, gouging & grinding on stainless steel inside a vessel or in a shop Welding on carbon steel with chromium or beryllium containing rods (in shop or outside) Welding & grinding on stainless steel using Inconel rod inside vessels

Respiratory Protection Half Mask respirator with P100 filters

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Well Servicing Work Plan

All workers must be properly trained and competent to carry out their required task. For welding rules and regulations consult the provincial occupational health and safety references listed below: lberta OH & S Manual Part 10 Section A 171.1 (1) 174 (1) ritish Columbia OH & S Manual Section B 12.112 12.124

WELL SERVICING WORK PLAN PURPOSE: To provide a guide for developing work plans for well servicing work. APPLICATION: All BP Canada operated wells.

DEFINITION: A site-specific procedure of the well servicing operations to be undertaken. PROCEDURES: Each well servicing job should have a work plan. Analysis of the operation and safety conditions will dictate the detail required. All well workovers must have an approved work plan. The following outlines the information and procedures that should be included in any approved work plan. Pertinent Well Data: Well name and location

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Perforations Zone Elevations: KB, Ground or CF TD PBTD asing details: Surface, intermediate and producC tion size, weight, grade, setting depth, cement type, cement volume roduction tubing details, listed from top to P bottom, including all dimensions (IDs, ODs), weights, grades, thread size, and accessories (packers, tubing anchors, etc.) Bottom hole pressure Bottomhole temperature 2S concentration (Is a safety company reH quired? Is this a critical sour well as defined by the EUB?) Hole capacities ellhead description including details of size, W pressure ratings, flanges, hangers, and manufacturers name ucker rod and bottomhole pump details includS ing polish rod dimensions Pumping unit details.

[See: H2S Safety]

Well History: An outline of the initial completion and a summary of all previous workovers should be included. Any problems previously encountered should be referenced and detailed, particularly those which could lead to further trouble, e.g., lost circulation, cementing difficulties, pressure test failures, collapsed casing, etc. Job Procedure:

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Well Servicing Work Plan

A detailed, step-by step procedure must be written. It cannot be assumed that the wellsite supervisor will perform any operation, therefore, every job to be done must be included in the procedure. It should begin with the statement of notification, which details the various regulatory bodies, and the BP Canada personnel that must be notified before any equipment is moved on a location. Applicable Emergency Response Plan should be referenced and included in work plan package as required. [See: Emergency Response Plan] All equipment to be used (packers, profiles, etc.), should be fully identified by manufacturers name, part number, ID, OD, and thread connection. All fluids to be used must be fully detailed, including all safe handling precautions (Include MSDS), where the fluid is to be obtained and how it is to be disposed of. [See: TDG Regulations] Service Companies: If specific companies are to be used, they should be named, and a copy of their program attached. The service to be provided and the contact must be listed. If it is necessary to substitute service companies during the course of the job, the program must be discussed with a representative of the substitute company before they arrive at the lease. Contact List: This should include BP Canada personnel as well as essential contract personnel contacts. Approvals: All well workover work plans or programs must be approved according to the Department/Area policy. EUB approval is required for critical sour wells. Down-hole Schematic-Log Sections:

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Pertinent open hole and cased hole log sections must be attached and referenced in the main body of the program, noting which log is to be used for correlating purposes. Material Requirements: Any materials that are not readily available, or must be specially manufactured, must be listed and the supplier identified. All special handling tools must be listed. Other Requirements: Copies of the following documents or permits must be attached to the program package where appropriate: 1. Flaring Permit 2. ineral Surface Lease or Landowner Contact M Sheet

RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of the BP Canada Representative onsite to ensure that a work plan is developed and provided. WELL TESTING PURPOSE: To provide a general guide to safe well testing operations. APPLICATION: All BP Canada operated well testing operations. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: xplosion: Improper Purging procedures, i.e. E entrained air High Pressure oxic and/or Combustible fluids T

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Down-hole drawings which show present and proposed down-hole details must be attached. Use Form C-238.

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[See: WHMIS, H2S Safety] Well Testing tatic Electricity: All equipment rigged in must S be electrically bonded and grounded. High Noise:

[See: Electricity] [See: Noise Exposure & Hearing Conservation] PREPARATIONS: Well Test Program: A work plan must be developed which meets the applicable regulatory requirements. Procedures may be part of the well servicing work plan, or may stand alone. [See: Work Plan] A work plan should address the following: Safety Hazards and Considerations Purpose of the test Type of reservoir Test Equipment required otential operating difficulties and preventative P measures.

When testing wells containing H2S in excess of 5 percent, prior approval from the EUB, if in Alberta, must be obtained. [See: EUB IL 91-2] The requirements under IL 91-2 must also be addressed when flaring wells containing 1-5% H2S and should be followed for wells containing less than 1% H2S. An Emergency Response Plan must be in place when testing wells containing H2S in excess of 1%. Where the well is part of an approved Emergency Response Plan for an existing sour facility, no additional response plan is required for testing. Otherwise a site-specific Emergency Response

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Plan is required. Well Testing [See: Emergency Response Plan] Pre-Job Safety Meeting: Must be held before commencing operations to discuss testing procedures and potential hazards. [See: HSSE Meetings] Signs: Warning of the presence of H2S must be posted at the lease entrance when testing wells with H2S content exceeding 10 PPM. PROCEDURES: The BP Canada representative in charge must be aware of the regulatory requirements as laid out in the following: Well Testing Minimum Guidelines for Safety Enhanced Field Operations, available from most testing companies in Alberta, or Alberta Occupational Health and Safety. Equipment Spacing: [See: Service Rig Safety] NOTE: In British Columbia, the flare stack must be 50 meters from the separator. All testing lines must be staked or secured First Aid Equipment: Must be available on-site along with means for transportation off-site. [See: First Aid Equipment] Testing Personnel: A minimum of two (working) qualified test personnel are required on-site at all times. Three (working) qualified test personnel are required on-site at all times when the H2S content of the well is known to be greater than 1%

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Well Testing

(10,000PPM). It is the responsibility of the BP Canada representative in charge, to assess the need for additional personnel and ensure that fully trained and competent contractor employees are used. Well site illumination must be adequate to safely perform any job, and must be approved for use in the hazardous locations. [See: Electrical Protection Regulations] Communications: Off lease communications and an Emergency Contact List must be on location at all times. Breathing: A minimum of two self-contained breathing apparatus must be on location at all times. If working on a sour well, adequate breathing apparatus must be supplied for the full crew. Fire Protection: A minimum of 2 30# LTK BC fire extinguishers must be on location in accessible areas ready to use. Purging: System must be purged of all air with pilot out prior to commencing operations. The use of a non-combustible purge medium is desirable. If using a combustible purge medium, ignition sources must be eliminated, and specifically the flare must not be lit. [See: Purging] Pressure Testing: All equipment upstream of the choke should be pressure tested to 1.2 times the maximum working pressure, or to the wellhead pressure rating, whichever is the lesser. Once

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PRECAUTIONS: Safety standby must be utilized for tank gauging when working with toxic fluids, or when working with fired equipment. [See: H2S Safety] [See: Respiratory Protection] [See: Safety Standby] Sour and/or Critical Wells: Additional safety procedures are required. [See: OH&S Well Testing guide] [See: BPs Completion Operations Manual] RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of the BP Canada Representative in-charge to ensure that safe well testing operations are carried out. The contractor is responsible for ensuring that all equipment and personnel meet the applicable Government regulations, BP Canada requirements, and possess sufficient experience to perform the work with minimal supervision. TRAINING: All personnel must possess valid First Aid, CPR and WHMIS and should have an H2S certificate. Where H2S is expected, all personnel must possess a H2S certificate. [See: Training]

WIRELINE OPERATIONS PURPOSE: To provide a general guideline for safe wireline operations.

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the flow test has started, check the entire system for leaks.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

Wireline Operations

APPLICATION: All BP Canada operated wells where wireline is run for remedial and/or maintenance requirements (i.e. dewaxing, pressure survey, fishing, running or pulling plugs/chokes, and opening or closing sliding sleeves). DEFINITION: Routine Work: Frequently performed wireline operations (i.e. dewaxing) on wells of similar set-up. Does not include wireline operations on sour wells. POTENTIAL HAZARDS: igh Pressure: Well pressure must be checked to H ensure that wireline equipment is rated for the working pressure. tatic Electricity: The Wireline and Picker/Mast S unit must be properly bonded and grounded to the rig and/or wellhead. Combustible/Toxic Fluids:

[See: Electricity] [See: H2S Safety] [See: Respiratory Protection] PROCEDURES: All equipment attached to the wellhead must be adequately supported to prevent lateral movement. Climbing on the lubricator is not allowed. [See: Safety Harnesses, Lanyards and Lifelines] Wireline Unit and Picker/Mast Unit must have wheels chocked. Lubricator & B.O.P.s: At least one line-B.O.P. located between the lubricator and wellhead must be used. B.O.P.s for sweet wells can be either

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manually or hydraulically operated. Well Work Lubricator and B.O.P.s must be pressure tested to the lesser of 1.2 times the maximum working pressure or the wellhead pressure rating, prior to use. Stuffing Box: Rubber/Packing must be maintained in good condition. At least 2 30# LTK fire extinguishers must be on-site and ready to use. PRECAUTIONS: Critical Wells: Additional safety procedures are required. [See: Alberta Recommended Practices Volume 2] [See: BP Completion Operations Manual] Equipment approved for use in sour service must be used (i.e. line, lubricator, B.O.P.s, running tools). RESPONSIBILITIES: It is the responsibility of the BP Representative in-charge to ensure that safe wireline procedures are followed. The contractor is responsible for ensuring that all equipment meets all applicable government regulations and BP requirements, and all personnel are properly trained in safe wireline procedures. TRAINING: (See: Training) WELL WORK - HAND OVER BETWEEN OPERATIONS AND WELLS TEAMS PURPOSE: To provide standards of safe well turnover between Operations and the Wells group.

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APPLICATION: Working Alone All BP Canada operated wells. PROCEDURE: 1) ere will be a minimum of 36 hr notice (longer Th if required by either Operations or the Wells teams) between the time the program for the well work is received in the field and the well work operation begins. This is required to give the appropriate time to plan for the required resources, and properly co-ordinate activities between Wells and Operations teams in the field. 2) ny deviation from the agreed upon time period A requires joint written approval by both Operations and Wells teams. 3) rior to starting work on the well bore, the Wells P team will take steps to ensure seal integrity; e.g. no leaking of the master valves. 4) perations will take responsibility for the turn O over of the well bore to the Wells team. The surface facilities downstream of the master valves shall be fully de pressured with all process connections; e.g. chemical lines; removed. 5) e well bore will be locked and tagged by Th the Operator until such time as it is ready to turn over to the Wells team as per BP Canadas Energy Isolation Golden Rule Practice. 6) teps 2 and 3 will be documented as part of S BP Canadas Permit to Work Golden Rule Practice.

WORKING ALONE PRACTICE 1.0 1.1 Scope and Applicability The purpose of this practice is to provide safe work

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1.2

This practice applies to all CGPU employees, contracted employees and contractors performing potentially hazardous work alone or traveling alone. Definitions

2.0

2.1 orking Alone To work alone means to work W or travel alone at a site in circumstances when they cannot be seen or heard by another worker, they cannot expect a visit from another worker for some time and when assistance is not readily available in the event of an injury, illness or emergency. 2.2 eadily Available Three assessment factors must be R considered when determining if assistance is readily available: wareness Will other workers capable of proA viding assistance be aware of the workers needs? illingness Is it reasonable to expect those W other workers will provide helpful assistance? imeliness Will assistance be provided within a T reasonable period of time? This assessment must consider the level of risk associated with the circumstances of the work; for example, type of work, location and hazards. If the hazards the worker faces poses a high risk of injury, readily available may mean immediately available. The availability of assistance increases as the level of risk associated with the work increases. 2.3 ffective Means of Communication Radio, teleE phone or other electronic communication device.

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requirements for employees, contracted employees and contractors working or traveling alone on Canada Gas Performance Unit (CGPU) business, premises and work sites.

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

2.4 Working Alone

E ffective Contact System An alternative to an effective means of communication that is appropriate to the hazard. Examples of a contact system include visiting the worker, scheduling check-ins with other workers or designated persons, reporting to an office or particular person upon completion of a task, and visual or audible contact with other persons who can offer assistance when needed. The frequency of the contact is based on a hazard assessment. A worker is not working alone if all the following conditions are met: wareness The worker can get the attention of A someone capable of providing helpful assistance when the worker requires it; for example, by maintaining visual contact, staying within hearing range of others, being continuously monitored by a remote surveillance camera, sounding an alarm, making frequent contact with other workers or persons throughout the work period illingness Persons expected to provide W assistance must be capable and willing to do so when required. There should be a reasonable expectation that the persons being relied on to provide assistance can and actually will provide that assistance. Depending on circumstances, those persons may need access to communication devices to trigger emergency response plans or telephone to call Emergency Services (9-1-1) imeliness The required assistance will be T provided in a reasonable period of time. What is reasonable depends on factors such as the nature of the illness, injury or emergency, the physical location of the work and workers and the type and level of risk of the work being performed Scope of Responsibility

2.5

3.0

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3.1

onducting a hazard assessment to identify existC ing or potential safety hazards in the work place associated with working alone eveloping and implementing a written proD cedure for checking the well-being of a worker assigned to work alone mplementing safety measures to reduce the risk I to workers from the identified hazards nsuring workers have an effective means of E communicating with their immediate supervisor or other designated person in case of an emergency nsuring workers have an effective contact E system for checking the well-being of a worker in the event the worker may not be able to signal for assistance in the event of an injury or illness while working alone; and nsuring workers are trained and educated so E they can perform their work safely Th e functional team lead (Area Foreman, Construction Foreman, Wells Supervisor) is responsible for: eveloping and implementing the site specific D working alone requirements; and roviding the required training to allow workers P to perform work safely A ll workers and contractors are responsible for following the working alone procedures developed for a specific area. Requirements for Working Alone while Performing Potentially Hazardous Work

3.2

3.3

4.0

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E ach functional area manager (Operating Centre Manager, Wells Manager or HSSE Manager) is accountable for:

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

4.1 Working Alone

H igh risk activities such as working at heights, energy isolation, confined space entry, working in hazardous atmosphere where a safety stand-by is required (e.g. H2S), or working with hazardous equipment such as chainsaws must never be conducted alone. P rior to commencing work, a work site hazard assessment to identify existing hazards for employees working alone is required. I mplement and develop a working alone safe work procedure that contains: n effective means of communication to A provide workers with a method of signaling their need for assistance. The effective means of communication is not limited to verbal communication. Common devices that meet the intent include: telephones, cellular telephones, satellite telephones, portable two-way radios, personal alarms and computer-based systems that achieve the same results. The key point is that the communication system must permit the worker requiring assistance to send a message or signal to someone capable of providing assistance to them s an alternative to an effective means of comA munication, an effective contact system that is appropriate to the hazard can be developed. The contact system will: o efine the time interval between scheduled D checks and procedures to follow in case the worker cannot be contacted, including provisions for emergency rescue. The frequency of contact for checking the workers well-being must be based on a hazard assessment and developed in consultation with the worker assigned to work alone o etermine the type of contact required D visual or verbal (e.g. call-in) o Identify a designated person to establish

4.2

4.3

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o nsure a worker checks-in at the end of the E work shift Examples of contact systems include: o Visiting the work at pre-determined intervals o Scheduling check-ins with other workers or designated persons o Reporting to an office or particular person upon completion of a task; and o Visual or audible contact with other persons who can offer assistance when required

4.4

A worker required to work alone and any person assigned to check on the well-being of a worker must be trained in the written site-specific working alone procedure. Th e procedure and system for checking a workers well-being must be reviewed at least annually. The procedure and system must be reviewed more frequently if there is a change in work arrangements which could adversely affect a workers well-being or a report that the system is not working effectively. Requirements for Traveling Alone People traveling alone require a traveling alone plan that contains the following: estination and schedule for arriving at the D destination Mode of transportation to destination ontact person for communicating travel plans; C

4.5

5.0 5.1

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contact with the worker at pre-determined intervals and the results of this contact recorded by that person; and

Standard Safety Practices Manual


Everyone has an obligation to stop work that is unsafe.

and Working Alone stablish scheduled check-in times with contact E to indicate: o When starting the journey o Arrival at pre-determined check points if deemed necessary o Arrival at destination o Changes to travel plans; and o Procedures and response plan in case the person traveling does not check-in at predetermined times or cannot be contacted 5.2 A ll aspects of the journey will comply with gHSSEr MS860 Vehicle Standard including training, vehicle fit for purpose and adequate emergencies supplies for the trip.

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Date gHSSEr Forum

Revision Type/Comment

Revised By:

Revision Authority:

Details:

Dec 10, 2007

Minor - New Version Number 1.1 Online Controlled Copy Revised and Books Printed After October 1, 2007

Joanne Dezall

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Moved Jewerly section under PPE, Added to table of contents. Replaced Working at Heights Practice to include the boom lift section. Added the Eye Hazard Assessment Chart under PPE. Updates to Ground Disturbance and Practice for Working in a Combustible Gas environment.

Revisions