Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Report of an Audit of Caledonian College of Engineering

(A University College in Oman)

April 2011

HEI Quality Audit Report

Caledonian College of Engineering

Audit Report Number 019 ©2011 Oman Academic Accreditation Authority P.O. Box 1255 P.C. 133 Al-Khuwair Sultanate of Oman Ph +968 24614361/2 Fax +968 2461 4364 http://www.oac.gov.om

© Oman Academic Accreditation Authority

Caledonian College of Engineering

HEI Quality Audit Report

CONTENTS Overview of the Quality Audit Process .....................................................................................................4 How to Read This Report ...........................................................................................................................5 Conclusions ..................................................................................................................................................6 Executive Summary of Findings ..............................................................................................................6 Summary of Commendations...................................................................................................................8 Summary of Affirmations ........................................................................................................................9 Summary of Recommendations .............................................................................................................10 1 Governance and Management ............................................................................................................12 1.1 Mission, Vision and Values .........................................................................................................12 1.2 Governance .................................................................................................................................12 1.3 Management................................................................................................................................13 1.4 Institutional Affiliations for Programmes and Quality Assurance ..............................................14 1.5 Strategic Plan ..............................................................................................................................15 1.6 Operational Planning...................................................................................................................15 1.7 Financial Management ................................................................................................................15 1.8 Risk Management .......................................................................................................................15 1.9 Policy Management.....................................................................................................................16 1.10 Entity and Activity Review Systems...........................................................................................16 1.11 Student Grievance Process..........................................................................................................17 1.12 Health and Safety ........................................................................................................................17 1.13 Oversight of Associated Entities (e.g. owned companies) ..........................................................18 2 Student Learning by Coursework Programmes................................................................................19 2.1 Graduate Attributes and Student Learning Objectives ................................................................19 2.2 Curriculum ..................................................................................................................................20 2.3 Student Entry Standards..............................................................................................................20 2.4 Foundation Programme...............................................................................................................21 2.5 Teaching Quality .........................................................................................................................21 2.6 Plagiarism ...................................................................................................................................22 2.7 Student Placements .....................................................................................................................23 2.8 Assessment Methods, Standards and Moderation.......................................................................23 2.9 Academic Security and Invigilation............................................................................................24 2.10 Student Retention and Progression .............................................................................................24 2.11 Graduate Destinations and Employability ..................................................................................24 3 Student Learning by Research Programmes .....................................................................................26 3.1 Research Programme Design ......................................................................................................26 3.2 Project Supervision .....................................................................................................................27 3.3 Postgraduate Supervision............................................................................................................27 3.4 Student Research Support ...........................................................................................................27 3.5 Thesis Examination.....................................................................................................................28 3.6 Retention, Graduate Destinations and Employability .................................................................28 4 Staff Research and Consultancy .........................................................................................................30 4.1 Research Planning & Management.............................................................................................30 4.2 Research Performance.................................................................................................................30

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HEI Quality Audit Report

Caledonian College of Engineering

4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9

Research Funding Schemes.........................................................................................................31 Consultancy Activities ................................................................................................................31 Ethics and Biosafety....................................................................................................................31 Intellectual Property ....................................................................................................................32 Professional Development for Research .....................................................................................32 Research Commercialisation.......................................................................................................32 Research – Teaching Nexus ........................................................................................................32

5 Industry and Community Engagement ..............................................................................................33 5.1 Industry and Community Engagement Planning & Management...............................................33 5.2 Relationships with Industry and Employers................................................................................33 5.3 Relationships with Professions....................................................................................................34 5.4 Relationships with Other Education Providers ...........................................................................34 5.5 Relationships with Alumni ..........................................................................................................35 5.6 Relationships with the Community at Large ...............................................................................35 6 Academic Support Services .................................................................................................................36 6.1 Academic Support Services Planning & Management ...............................................................36 6.2 Registry (Enrolment and Student Records).................................................................................36 6.3 Library.........................................................................................................................................37 6.4 Information and Learning Technology Services .........................................................................38 6.5 Academic Advising .....................................................................................................................38 6.6 Student Learning Support............................................................................................................39 6.7 Teaching Resources.....................................................................................................................39 7 Students and Student Support Services .............................................................................................41 7.1 Students and Student Support Services Planning & Management ..............................................41 7.2 Student Profile.............................................................................................................................41 7.3 Student Satisfaction and Climate ................................................................................................42 7.4 Student Behaviour .......................................................................................................................42 7.5 Career and Employment Services ...............................................................................................43 7.6 Student Finances .........................................................................................................................43 7.7 Accommodation, Catering and Transport ...................................................................................43 7.8 Medical and Counselling Facilities .............................................................................................44 7.9 International Student Services.....................................................................................................44 7.10 Social and Recreational Services and Facilities ..........................................................................45 8 Staff and Staff Support Services .........................................................................................................46 8.1 Human Resources Planning & Management...............................................................................46 8.2 Staff Profile .................................................................................................................................46 8.3 Recruitment and Selection ..........................................................................................................46 8.4 Staff Induction.............................................................................................................................47 8.5 Professional Development and Training .....................................................................................47 8.6 Performance Planning and Review .............................................................................................48 8.7 Promotion and Other Incentives..................................................................................................48 8.8 Severance ....................................................................................................................................48 8.9 Staff Organisational Climate and Retention................................................................................49 8.10 Omanisation ................................................................................................................................49 9 General Support Services and Facilities.............................................................................................50

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Caledonian College of Engineering

HEI Quality Audit Report

9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5

General Support Services and Facilities Planning and Management..........................................50 Campus Planning, Infrastructure and Facilities Development and Maintenance .......................50 Public Relations and Marketing..................................................................................................51 Communication Services ............................................................................................................51 Facilities Management ................................................................................................................52 Audit Panel ......................................................................................................................53 Abbreviations, Acronyms and Terms ............................................................................54

Appendix A. Appendix B.

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Prior to the audit visit. request additional information and make arrangements for the Panel’s audit visit. This document was submitted to the OAAA by the due date of 30 December 2009. the Panel spoke with approximately 115 people. including governing authorities. No documents created after 30 March (being the last day of the audit visit) were taken into consideration for the purposes of this audit. and constructive feedback to CCE to assist with its ongoing improvement efforts. and the appropriateness and effectiveness of its systems for achieving that Mission and Vision. For further information. The Report provides a balanced set of observations. Vision and systems. 54/2010 to replace the Oman Accreditation Council. Quality Audit is the first stage in Oman’s institutional accreditation process.gov. students and external stakeholders. This Report was approved for release by the OAAA Board on 25 April 2011. The Panel’s audit activities and preparation of this Report were governed by regulations set by the OAAA Board. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 4 of 57 . The results were summarized in their Quality Audit Portfolio (the ‘Portfolio’). a Panel Member acting on behalf of the Audit Panel Chairperson and the Executive Officer undertook a planning visit on behalf of the Panel to CCE on 2 March 2010 to clarify certain matters.om). but does not comment on every system in place at CCE. During this time. The audit visit took place over 28-30 March 2010.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering OVERVIEW OF THE QUALITY AUDIT PROCESS This Quality Audit Report (the ‘Report’) documents the findings of a Quality Audit by the Oman Academic Accreditation Authority (OAAA) of Caledonian College of Engineering (CCE). The Report contains a summary of the Panel’s findings. The OAAA appointed an external Audit Panel (the ‘Panel’). together with formal Commendations where good practices have been confirmed. The OAAA was established by Royal Decree No. The quality audit commenced with CCE undertaking a self study of its Mission. and Recommendations where there are significant opportunities for improvement not yet being adequately addressed. comprising suitably qualified and experienced local and international reviewers. Following this. staff. to conduct the Quality Audit.oac. The Panel met (international members by telephone) on 15 February 2010 to consider CCE’s Portfolio.gov.om/qa/HEI/). Full details of the quality audit process are available in OAAA’s HEI Quality Audit Manual (available from http://www.oac. For membership of the Panel see Appendix A. It comments on CCE’s Mission and Vision. the Panel invited submissions from the public about the quality of CCE’s activities. It is designed to provide a level of assurance to the public about the quality of CCE’s activities. visit the OAAA website (http://www. Three valid submissions were received and considered. Its responsibilities include conducting quality audits of higher education institutions (HEIs) in the Sultanate of Oman. Affirmations where CCE’s ongoing quality improvement efforts merit support. They also visited a selection of venues and examined additional documents.

and other audiences. is clearly less critical. Unlike the Quality Audit. Students. For these reasons. whereas others may focus on issues such as the maintenance of teaching equipment in classrooms which. In most cases this evidence is not in the public domain. some Recommendations may focus on critical issues such as assessment of student learning. Its focus is formative (developmental) rather than summative. although the audit addresses nine areas of activity which are common to all institutions. nor does it provide any sort of grade or score. In other words. government.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report HOW TO READ THIS REPORT Each OAAA Audit Report is written primarily for the institution being audited. For example. It should be noted that Oman also operates a system of accreditation/recognition for academic programmes. it does not measure the institution against externally set standards of performance in those nine areas. a Quality Audit does not result in a pass or fail. may find this Report interesting because it provides some independent comment on the learning environment at this institution (particularly Chapters 2. Instead. does provide a summative assessment against external standards in the same nine areas of activity. Page 5 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . 6 and 7). employers.om. It should also be noted that the precise number of Commendations. prospective students should still undertake their own investigations when deciding which higher education institution will best serve their particular learning needs. Affirmations and Recommendations that an institution receives in its Audit Report is not as important as the substance of those conclusions. Quality Audit recognises that each institution has a unique purpose and profile. in particular. which will take place about four years after the Quality Audit. Affirmations and Recommendations. These references are for the HEI’s benefit in further addressing the issues raised. or as informal suggestions. it does not directly compare one institution with all the other institutions in Oman. it considers how well the institution is attending to those areas in accordance with its own Mission and Vision and in the context of relevant legal regulations. each accompanied with explanatory paragraphs. For more information on Oman’s System of Quality Assurance in Higher Education please visit www. this stage. This Report contains a number of references to source evidence considered by the Audit Panel. other higher education institutions in Oman and abroad.gov. while important. their families. However. The second stage in the institutional accreditation process is Standards Assessment. Therefore. Therefore. The feedback is structured according to nine broad areas of activity and presented as formal Commendations. Quality Audit is the first stage in Oman’s two-stage process for institutional accreditation.oac. The Report is specifically designed to provide feedback to help that institution better understand its own strengths and opportunities for improvement. Affirmations and Recommendations. It is expected that the institution will act upon this feedback as part of its continuous efforts to provide the best possible education to students. separately from the institutional accreditation process. The Report is made public because it also may be of interest to students and potential students. it is neither significant nor appropriate to compare the Audit Reports of different HEIs solely on the numbers of Commendations.

Executive Summary of Findings Caledonian College of Engineering (CCE) is in its 13th year of operation as a private college in Muscat. However. There has been limited engagement of the College community in the development of this plan and operational planning to support it remains underdeveloped. is well-served by the culture of team work of the College Executive. The College currently offers one Bachelors degree and one Masters degree that lead to VITU awards. The focus of CCE’s Vision is to serve the community through the development of human resources. around 2. Mission and values are clearly articulated throughout its documentation although aspects of these have yet to be fully embedded in its culture and operations. The College has revised its Foundation Programme to align with the national standards. Development of this programme has also been informed by feedback from various stakeholders. However. The College was established in association with Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU. In 2008-2009. including employers. CCE submitted a Portfolio representing a self-study based on the ADRI approach (see Appendix B). also leading to GCU awards. Many of these systems are derived from GCU and represent recognised good practice in higher education. which is strongly led by the Dean. there appeared to have been an excessive level of coaching of interviewees in preparation for interview sessions held during the audit visit. The College’s 2009-2014 Strategic Plan states the College’s intent to undergo significant expansion and to transition to a status whereby it awards its own degrees. UK) and this university remains its main academic affiliate. Affirmations and Recommendations. It should be noted that other favourable comments and suggestions for improvement are mentioned throughout the text of the Report. The College has a well-established history of strategic planning. the role of College’s Governing Council (which serves as the Board of Trustees) is at present compromised by its lack of independence from the Board of Directors. At the time of the audit visit.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering CONCLUSIONS This section summarises the main findings and lists the Commendations.400 students were enrolled in the College. Scotland. the Executive comprised the Dean. of which around 420 (approximately 17%) were enrolled in the Foundation Programme. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 6 of 57 . India). two Deputy Deans and three Associate Deans. English Language proficiency and general transferable/employability skills. Management of the College. Development of the current (2009-2014) Strategic Plan has taken into account the status of an initiative to form a new university in Muscat and as such provides sufficient flexibility for the College to become an independent entity or part of a larger entity should circumstances make this possible. In 2002 it was granted University College status. The College has well established and rigorous systems in place relating to the development. In 2008 the College entered into a second academic affiliation agreement with Vellore Institute of Technology University (VITU. Engagement of College staff in the preparation of this and an overall effort to embrace quality were evident to the Panel. the College has an increasing number of ‘direct entry’ students who are enrolled directly into academic programmes and the College needs to ensure that these students are adequately prepared for and supported in their studies in areas not directly addressed by the entry tests taken by these students. monitoring and review of its full-time undergraduate programmes. as the College Chairman is the Chair of both groups. In terms of governance. They are listed in the order in which they appear in the Report. The College’s Vision. The College runs a suite of undergraduate programmes in Engineering and technological subjects for which GCU is the awarding body and in 2007 it offered its first two Masters degrees. A number of significant initiatives have been implemented at the Foundation level to address areas identified as requiring attention such as academic integrity. and are not prioritised.

particularly in the area of renewable energy and sustainable technologies.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report The College has identified the need to provide strong leadership in the area of learning and teaching and to implement institutional-wide initiatives to embed a culture and methodologies that are appropriate for higher education and which embrace modern technologies. The College monitors student retention and progression conscientiously. Effective engagement with industry is fundamental to CCE’s Mission and Vision and the College has established a number of formal mechanisms to support this. There is a general requirement for an improved system of survey management in the College and most surveys conducted in relation to student support services are new. Page 7 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . Detailed strategic and operational planning in the area of staff research and consultancy is now required to ensure that the College’s efforts are aligned. The Panel concurs with this need to ensure that a diversity of perspectives contributes to the development of the College and to ensure the staffing profile reflects the intended student profile more closely. dealing with programme research components at this level. there is evidence of increasing support. The College is encouraged in its efforts to develop clear and transparent grading scales and promotions criteria for all College staffing levels. CCE provides a wide range of academic support services which in a number of cases are monitored through evaluation against key performance indicators using data derived from different feedback mechanisms. postgraduate provision and. It is important for CCE to ensure that it establishes comprehensive evaluation mechanisms for its Masters level provision. This includes intensive delivery of Masters programme modules by visiting GCU staff and provision of targeted staff development sessions. Specifically. The College has recognised that it needs to review the effectiveness of its Omanisation strategy. The recent appointment of the Omani Senior Deputy Dean is a good step towards authentic Omanisation across all strata of the College. The College offers a creditable range of extracurricular activities for students and is working hard to increase participation in these. The College has ambitious strategic intent in relation to research. its systems for following up on graduate destinations and employability need to be enhanced to allow comprehensive evaluation of its success in this strategically critical area and to inform review of activities the College has in place to assist students in finding jobs. the College inducts new staff effectively and provide a range of professional development opportunities. These include industry representation on the Governing Council and Programme Boards and operation of a Corporate Training and Continuing Education Division as well as an Industrial Interaction Group. GCU is currently providing an enhanced level of support in this area. The College has identified the need to diversify the staffing profile. supported and evaluated against its highest level researchrelated strategic goals. With the introduction of the first Masters programmes in 2007. It is currently working to develop research capacity and capability. student representation and input into decision making concerning non-academic student support services is limited. and the number of respondents in many has been relatively small. specifically. There is a need for comprehensive evaluation of the intensive mode of delivery used on Masters programmes and for delivery of undergraduate programmes to ‘special part-time’ students (see Appendix B). CCE academic programmes are predominantly staffed by academics from the Indian sub-continent. CCE is planning to implement a more coordinated approach to managing both its academic and student support services. For new and existing staff. Enhanced evaluation of the College’s increasing use of e-learning methodologies is also required. These initiatives need to target development of student-centred teaching approaches and support enhanced practical laboratory and field-based learning. Accurate and reliable data that informs change and allows trends to be monitored is required in these areas. The College has embarked on a major initiative to support staff in gaining PhD qualifications and is beginning to develop a research culture within the College. However. is a relatively new area of activity for the College. There is a newly formed Student Council which should assist the College in enhancing student representation. However. An overarching industry and community engagement plan that includes targets. resources and review mechanisms needs to be developed. The College has recently introduced a merit-based professorial promotion system. The College has also developed its own comprehensive electronic data management system which supports these areas.

.....................36 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for having established a comprehensive staff induction programme which is systematically delivered and well-received.... The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for establishing a culture of team work at Executive level that impacts positively on the management of the College. 3............47 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for its establishment of a College wide professional development programme that is in line with its strategic objectives and responsive to feedback from staff........... The College may have already responded to several of the Recommendations and Affirmations listed below... which include its intent to gain independence as an awarding institution..................... Rather.............18 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for having established robust programme development and review systems which provide assurance on the standards of its undergraduate programmes......... ...................................14 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for developing an ongoing sustainable relationship with its main academic affiliate to establish institutional processes and standards that should enable it to progress its ambition to award its own degrees.................. ................................................................ 4.................................. 6...................... 5............. Summary of Commendations A formal Commendation recognises an instance of particularly good practice......14 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for having established health... CCE has benefited from its UK roots and has many systems in place to maintain quality and standards.48 2........ .................20 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for having successfully developed and implemented a comprehensive ‘Enterprise Resource Planning System’ which provides information for a range of stakeholders and data which informs strategic planning and decision making...HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering The College is currently engaged in major local and remote campus and infrastructure developments aligned with the requirements of its 2009-2014 Strategic Plan................. 7................................................................... are nevertheless ambitious and the major challenge for the College will be to maintain a rigorous approach to quality as it engages with these......... The College’s future plans.... A summary of Commendations. Safety and the Environment) is well attended to in the College.... © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 8 of 57 ..................... 1......................... Affirmations and Recommendations follows... ............................. It is acknowledged that over a year has elapsed since the audit visit in March 2010. CCE’s existing campus and facilities are managed efficiently and effectively by the College’s Department of Central Services although current provision of parking and indoor rest/recreational space for students remain pressing issues for the existing College community.... As has already been mentioned. these are not prioritised by the Panel.......................... HSE (Health.......................... embraced throughout the organization and subject to review. safety and environment measures through the development and implementation of effective policies and procedures that are well understood............ they are listed in the order in which they appear in the Report............................................................

.............................................. ................ 11................................................................. 3.. 5.................................................................... Page 9 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority ...............Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report Summary of Affirmations A formal Affirmation recognizes an instance in which CCE has accurately identified a significant opportunity for improvement and has demonstrated appropriate commitment to addressing the matter....................................................16 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that the general employability skills of its graduates need to be enhanced and.......... 6... ............................................................. The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that its strategic planning would be strengthened by effective consideration and integration of strategic risk management and supports the College’s efforts to implement this.......................... as a matter of priority................................................................................................ analysed and acted upon and supports the steps taken by the College towards ensuring this........................................ 7..............................42 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority supports Caledonian College of Engineering in its efforts towards providing clear and transparent grading scales for both academic and non-academic staff............................................50 2.........28 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that enhancement of its Library resources and their effective use is required and supports its efforts towards improving user satisfaction............16 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that its policy management system needs to be enhanced and supports its plans to develop a more comprehensive system that includes timely review................................... encourages it to progress and build on the strategies it has implemented to address this.................................................... .......... ...48 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that it needs to review its Omanisation strategy and the implementation of this towards ensuring an appropriate level of Omani representation across all levels of the organization in line with its Omanisation targets.................... 10..................... 8.......................................................49 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that further development of its campus and infrastructure is essential in order for it to achieve its strategic goals and appreciates and supports its ongoing efforts to achieve this...............21 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority supports the efforts of Caledonian College of Engineering to further develop and implement feedback mechanisms to evaluate and improve its support of students engaged in research................................................................................................ .................. 9........... 4..........38 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that its facilities and resources that support self-directed learning need to be comprehensively evaluated in terms of how they impact on academic performance in order to inform improvement strategies.......20 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that it needs to continue to develop strategies that ensure the implementation of appropriate and effective teaching approaches on higher education programmes....... 1......39 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that feedback on student support services needs to be systematically collected..........

.....22 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering comprehensively evaluate the delivery arrangements for Masters and ‘special part-time’ students to ensure that student learning................................................................................33 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop and implement an overall alumni engagement plan that ensures coordination of its activities in this area and evaluation of these in relation to goals and targets....... The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering ensure that both the theme of ‘innovation’ that is articulated through its Mission............................................................... ..................................25 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop and implement comprehensive mechanisms to monitor and review student research and overall provision of postgraduate programmes in relation to its strategic intent........................................................... ............................................................. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 10 of 57 ................ 4........... mentoring. 8......................................35 2........HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering Summary of Recommendations A Recommendation draws attention to a significant opportunity for improvement that CCE has either not yet accurately identified or to which it is not yet adequately attending.......... Key Performance Indicators.................................30 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop an overarching industry and community engagement plan that includes targets...............................................15 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop an improved system of survey management...... ........ 5...................................... 13........ general academic support and the overall student experience is not compromised................. Vision and values and its value of ‘ethics’ are fully understood by the College community and genuinely embedded in its organisational culture and operations................... administration....23 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering review and enhance its systems for monitoring and supporting employment of graduates............ analysis and feedback to relevant stakeholders on action taken.... 9..................... 11............................ 12.... which includes effective development...13 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering take steps to ensure effective engagement of all stakeholders in institutional level planning........... 6........ ................ 3.. .. 10.............. . sufficient resources and review mechanisms....27 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop detailed operational plans which support its strategic planning in the area of research and consultancy against which it can evaluate its performance....................................23 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop a clear policy and procedures relating to student placements................................... 7.........17 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering establish means to enhance practical laboratory and field-based learning...........12 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering review and revise the structure and operation of the Governing Council to ensure that it can fulfill its role independently and effectively...................................... ................22 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering consolidate its approach to plagiarism practiced in different parts of the College in a single policy to help ensure consistency of application...................... ......................... 1................

................. ................................39 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop and implement a system to ensure that its Staff Handbook is kept up to date................................................ particularly in relation to its increasing population of part-time and special part-time students.46 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering give urgent consideration to strategies that diversify the profile of its academic staff..................................................................................... ......46 15................ 16................................................................................ The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of its academic advising system...... Page 11 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority .....................................Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report 14..................................................................................................................

Vision and values and its value of ‘ethics’ are fully understood by the College community and genuinely embedded in its organisational culture and operations. This chapter reports on the Panel’s findings in relation to CCE’s Mission. Recommendation 1 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering ensure that both the theme of ‘innovation’ that is articulated through its Mission. Integrity. The College’s Vision is: To be the premier institute in the region for human resource development through innovation. Social Responsibility and Ethics.11). Vision and value statements are prominent in College documentation. The values are: Quality. risk and policy management. creative and environmentally-aware learning experience for those who seek technological education. The BoD devolves certain responsibilities to the Governing Council which includes membership from the BoD and external members from industry. student grievances. Vision and Values CCE’s current Mission. the Governing Council. p. Innovation. each represented on the BoD (Portfolio. While the College’s Mission. the Panel had concerns that there had been insufficient thought given as to how the College might achieve the desired outcomes relating to innovation and also ethics included within these statements and how it would know whether it had been successful or not. The Mission is: To provide an innovative. Vision and values. 1. 1. The Panel noted the theme relating to ‘innovation’ articulated through these statements and investigated the extent to which the value of innovation and the Mission of providing an innovative and creative learning experience were developed across the College. The focus of the BoD is the overall strategic © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 12 of 57 . In 2002 it was granted University College status.2 Governance The College governance structure includes the Board of Directors (BoD). the Academic Council and the Dean. strategic and operational planning. the Panel found only a rudimentary appreciation of these elements as guiding statements to College operations and very limited identification of how the College actively developed these elements. as articulated in the Portfolio (p. financial.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering 1 GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT Caledonian College of Engineering (CCE) is in its 13th year of operation as a private college in Muscat. research and technological advancement so as to serve the community. academia and government. However. Vision and values.11). and health and safety. The Panel noted that the College Quality Assurance Manual had not been updated since 2004 and that an earlier Mission statement was included in this document.1 Mission. governance and management. were endorsed by the Governing Council in 2009. The Panel also explored how the value of ‘ethics’ was developed at CCE. The College needs to address this (also see Affirmation 2). Leadership. and visible in signage. The College is a limited liability company owned by three shareholding groups. entity and activity review systems. institutional affiliations for programmes and quality assurance.

Page 13 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority .14). As the College Chairman is the chair of both. Learning and Teaching Committee. Research Development Committee. The Panel was. Industry Interaction Group. Recommendation 2 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering review and revise the structure and operation of the Governing Council to ensure that it can fulfill its role independently and effectively.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report direction and development of the College. however. the Panel had significant concerns regarding the ability of the Governing Council to discharge its responsibilities both effectively and independently of the BoD. pleased to note that the College has identified the need to revise the scheduling of meetings of the BoD. The Panel learned that the College Chairman meets regularly with the Dean to discuss both operational and strategic issues affecting the College. annual reports and capital projects. the monitoring and approval of budgets. meets infrequently. communication and formal decision making processes (Portfolio. The Governing Council. Governance is therefore primarily vested in the Governing Council and academic governance is devolved to the Academic Council and the Dean. the Governing Council and the Academic Council to facilitate information exchange.14). The Panel noted that the College Chairman is the Chair of both the BoD and the Governing Council. From these meetings. The Academic Council has several subcommittees: Programme Boards. The Panel was advised that divergence of opinions had not occurred between the BoD and the Governing Council. it has only met six times since it was established in 2005. The Dean chairs the Academic Council. The Panel noted that the Executive holds weekly meetings which aim to provide a forum for members to seek input. The Panel was concerned that the College risks conflict of interest between the BoD and the Governing Council. and the Quality Committee. By the time of the audit visit. and academic standards (delegated to the Academic Council) (Portfolio. p.3 Management Management at CCE is devolved from the BoD and the Governing Council to the College Executive (Portfolio. The Council views its role as advisory (to both the BoD and the Dean) and also ambassadorial/ceremonial in nature. Staff Student Consultative Group. an Omani Senior Deputy Dean had been appointed by CCE and had joined the Executive. The College reports that the Governing Council has the ultimate responsibility for the affairs of the College with the exception of the legal and financial matters (managed at the BoD level). which assumes the role of a Board of Trustees. p. The Panel was concerned that the extent of this interaction may put at risk clarity around governance and management and risk exclusion of individuals and diversity of opinions in decision making processes. 1. The Panel was pleased to see evidence of a culture of team work at Executive level that impacts positively on its operations but ensures all decisions are owned and implemented in a consistent way across the campus. p. strategies are operationalised through heads and managers. the Executive comprised the Dean together with the Deputy Dean and three Associate Deans.12). Assessment Board. comment and advice from fellow members on areas of specific responsibility that they hold as individuals. At the time that the Portfolio was submitted. which has responsibility for quality and standards.

Whilst the intention to award its own degrees implies that CCE may become increasingly independent from the GCU and VITU.4 Institutional Affiliations for Programmes and Quality Assurance CCE is affiliated with two institutions. is with Vellore Institution of Technology University (VITU) in India. GCU is the awarding institution for the majority of awards at CCE. The Panel considers CCE’s ambition in this area worthy and notes that it will require CCE to pay due attention to strategies to ensure external benchmarking of standards and quality assurance (see Section 1. the Panel concluded that a sound. awards of CCE and. until recently. Commendation 2 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for developing an ongoing sustainable relationship with its main academic affiliate to establish institutional processes and standards that should enable it to progress its ambition to award its own degrees. the portfolio will include diversified multidisciplinary areas integrating business. developed from existing provision. a UK Quality Assurance Agency audit of the affiliation in 2005 and the external validation and review of programmes (ibid). 1. Academic quality assurance arrangements at CCE are primarily based on those at GCU and the affiliation has provided such features as liaison officers at each institution. The College asserts that this affiliation has been established in programme areas not available through GCU (Portfolio. The College has benefited by adopting many GCU processes and. p. The second affiliation. The Panel considers the recent Senior Deputy Dean appointment to be a strong step forward by the College (also see Section 8.18). the College advises that “The involvement of affiliates in this development is essential. The College was founded on an affiliate relationship with Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) and GCU has. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 14 of 57 . p.10). joint awards” (Portfolio. and environmental and social impact.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering Commendation 1 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for establishing a culture of team work at Executive level that impacts positively on the management of the College. been the sole partner institution for CCE. established in 2008. One of four strategic goals in CCE’s 2009-2014 Strategic Plan is: CCE. joint assessment boards and systems of annual reporting and periodic review (Portfolio. as appropriate. in its current form and future role. moreover. will be an institution with an expanded portfolio of programmes.19). a climate of genuine learning and partnership has been fostered between CCE and its affiliates. CCE advises that examples of good practice in international cooperation characterise its affiliation with GCU as evidenced by GCU reviews and audits. extensive relationship has been developed. p. leading to partnership agreements. with the added dimension of self-awarding degrees according to the Oman Qualifications Framework.10) and encourages the College to ensure that the current work to clarify responsibilities and authority at Executive level extends to this new position. Following consideration of the relevant documentation and interviews with representatives of CCE’s affiliates. economics.18).

Risks are then prioritised and a risk register is submitted to the Governing Council and BoD. The budget is refined by the Dean and Deputy Dean and subsequently approved by the BoD. p. p. it is important that roles and responsibilities are clarified and that it is provided with an appropriate level of financial data. the Panel found limited explicit connection between strategic plans and the allocation of resources and responsibilities within business plans. and audit and review processes” (ibid).2. The College advises that during the life of the 2006-2010 Strategic Plan. 1. As noted in Section 1. the Panel formed the view that further development of the operational planning processes is required to ensure the effective engagement of all stakeholders. As indicated in Section 1. The BoD receives quarterly reports on operational expenditure.6 Operational Planning CCE’s strategic plans cascade into a sequence of business plans with Key Results Areas (KRAs) (Portfolio. the implementation process was not as consistent as desirable due to an intervening proposal by CCE to form a new university in Muscat (Portfolio. The Panel noted in positive terms that the College has identified the development of a devolved budget system as a way to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of its operational planning (Portfolio. The College advises that “risk management is embedded in many of the practices and procedures of the planning. Recommendation 3 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering take steps to ensure effective engagement of all stakeholders in institutional level planning. The Panel supports CCE’s ongoing strategic planning and review activities.20). As noted above in relation to strategic planning.8 Risk Management The College approaches risk management by examining likelihood and consequence of risks and their mitigation (Portfolio. for the Governing Council to be able to discharge its duties effectively.2. The Panel established that the 2009-2014 Strategic Plan had been revised during 2009 in response to the status of this initiative in order to establish strategic direction for the College as an independent entity but to provide sufficient flexibility for it to have the option of becoming part of a larger entity should circumstances make this possible. committee and operational structures.19). and all approvals and monitoring of both capital budgets and operational budgets are managed between the Executive team and the BoD.19). The Panel was informed that the development of strategic plans commences with the Executive team and is followed by consultation with faculty members and support staff. However. but considers further effort is required to ensure effective stakeholder involvement. p. organisational.5 Strategic Plan The Panel confirmed that the College has developed and implemented a sequence of strategic plans over its history.7 Financial Management The Panel confirmed that a yearly operational budgetary planning process is managed through the College Finance Department. The Panel tested this statement but found a Page 15 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . 1. p. The Panel nevertheless formed the view that to date there had been little involvement of the College community in the development of strategic plans although the College did engage faculty members and support staff in an authentic and comprehensive SWOT analysis (see Appendix B) which informed revision of the current strategic plan. 1. This initiative was still underway at the time of the audit.22).Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report 1. the Governing Council does not have responsibility for financial arrangements.

The College advises that effectiveness of policies is monitored through the various Academic Council committees and by the Executive team (Portfolio. the Panel considers that there is also a need to ensure sufficient development of organisational culture to enable active engagement with policy. advises that there is a need for the College to better articulate strategic risk alongside operational risk. Affirmation 2 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that its policy management system needs to be enhanced and supports its plans to develop a more comprehensive system that includes timely review. The College has identified this and has made progress towards its stated intention of strengthening its process of policy making and monitoring. The Panel agrees with CCE that there is a need to improve the capacity of the organisation to update polices as well as to inform and educate faculty and staff on these changes (ibid). However. The Panel noted in particular the way that CCE has adopted advice from GCU to ensure that systems and policies relating to academic programmes are effectively developed (also see Commendation 2).24). 1.15).23). Further. the Panel noted that some policies are still in draft form and that policy review needs to be more systematic.24). p. The Panel was informed that risk management was a relatively new concept in Oman and that the intention of the College was to ensure that its new risk management strategy would inform strategic planning and implementation processes across all levels of the College. pp. The Quality Office incorporates policies approved by various College bodies in a database. further. There was some evidence that the link between the Strategic Plan and operational risk management was understood at senior levels although this was not evidenced throughout the College as a whole.10 Entity and Activity Review Systems The College states that the Quality Management System aims to integrate quality and standards with planning and operations (Portfolio. p. 1. Affirmation 1 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that its strategic planning would be strengthened by effective consideration and integration of strategic risk management and supports the College’s efforts to implement this.25-26). the Panel agreed with CCE that there was a long standing culture of reviews at the College. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 16 of 57 . p. Various internal and external review mechanisms operate in relation to this.9 Policy Management CCE reports that an integrated policy framework established at the College has been based on practices at GCU (Portfolio. These primarily comprise internal quality audits conducted according to an annual schedule and reviews conducted by GCU in relation to the academic programmes for which it is the awarding body (Portfolio. A comprehensive list of policies has been developed and a policy handbook was developed at the end of 2009. The Panel considered the policy framework to be strong. After examination of review documentation. p. The Panel supports this intention but.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering varied understanding of risk management and strategic risk within the institution. The College expresses the view that it demonstrates good management in part through the thoroughness of institutional and programme reviews involving panels external to the College (Portfolio.

p. However.27). the College advises that it works to ensure that all management levels are responsible for health. A policy and a comprehensive manual of procedures were developed in 2004 and have been targeted for review. The Panel noted that the College has used surveys as a tool to collect feedback on different areas of activity from a variety of stakeholders.12 Health and Safety The College states that “Health. p. which includes effective development. the results of a performance review for HSE planned for December 2009 were not available.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report The Panel was pleased to learn that CCE is also preparing for external professional body review and accreditation of a number of its Engineering programmes (Portfolio. safety and the environment (ibid). Although the College notes that occasionally grievances form the basis of direct communication by students with the Ministry of Higher Education (Portfolio. effective design. The Panel supports the College’s efforts towards training staff to ensure effective investigation. surveys to determine satisfaction with the Library. the quality overall was variable. and surveys were not always administered in a way that would generate reliable data. validity and strategic value.26). The Panel was pleased to find a strong culture and awareness of health and safety issues around the College and that staff and students appeared fully engaged with compliance on policy and process. Further. In addition. This framework should include a schedule of surveys. the overall system of survey management needs to include effective communication back to participants. p. interviews and observations by the Panel provided evidence of a preventative culture and widespread ownership of HSE issues. piloting and administration of surveys. At the time of the audit visit. administration.11 Student Grievance Process The College advises that it has a formal and informal grievance process for students who wish to make complaints (Portfolio. The Panel concluded that there is a need to develop an improved system of survey management to ensure validity and reliability (also see Section 7. the Panel found students to be aware of the opportunity to lodge a grievance and the College-based process that this involved. and others (such as staff surveys) were robust. Examples include: alumni and employer surveys. and comprehensive analysis and critical interpretation of results and actions taken. Recommendation 4 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop an improved system of survey management. The Panel confirmed that these processes are clearly detailed in relevant College documentation. Finally. Safety and Environment (HSE) is given paramount importance at CCE and is considered as an integral part in achieving corporate College goals and objectives” (Portfolio.73) and the Panel strongly supports this international benchmarking initiative. analysis and feedback to relevant stakeholders on action taken.3). p. 1. 1. It was felt that surveys should be conducted in an overarching framework to ensure more consistency. It was clear that the planned approach to HSE was being deployed and that awareness was comprehensive. survey development was not always rigorous.27). Page 17 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . examination of methodology used during the development and administration of these surveys identified issues of concern for the Panel: there was no clear overarching survey plan. While some of the surveys were adequate to allow for some conclusions to be drawn. and surveys to determine student views on the College’s corporate social responsibility activities. However. it was not clear that data was always analysed in a sufficiently comprehensive manner that took into account available benchmarks. conciliation and mediation of student grievances (ibid).

1.13 Oversight of Associated Entities (e. embraced throughout the organization and subject to review.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering Commendation 3 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for having established health.g. safety and environment measures through the development and implementation of effective policies and procedures that are well understood. owned companies) CCE has no associated entities. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 18 of 57 .

8). practical skills. It also offers a BSc degree in Chemical Engineering awarded by VITU. With respect to communication skills. This has identified a number of areas where there is scope for improvement. The College advises that these align with recommendations of the Engineering Council UK benchmark statements and are cross-mapped and applied to all Engineering programmes in the College (ibid). Although the Panel noted that only 12 employers responded to the survey conducted in March 2009. with the input of all relevant stakeholders.1). When the College surveyed employers for feedback on graduate attributes in 2009. intellectual abilities. the questionnaire included focus on a number of general transferable skills but did not align exactly with the list of graduate attributes presented in the Portfolio. the offering of supplementary courses to students and the introduction of a ‘Graduate Orientation Programme’. particularly at Foundation level. These primarily relate to practical and transferable skills rather than technical know-how and include: practical and laboratory skills. the Panel observed considerable overlap between the programme-specific learning outcomes and the graduate attribute list. This list mirrors the programme-specific learning outcomes in that it is divided into: knowledge and understanding. and communication skills (Portfolio. CCE advises that in response to the feedback it has received. the poor language skills of some graduates was also raised as an area of concern to the Panel during the audit visit.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report 2 STUDENT LEARNING BY COURSEWORK PROGRAMMES CCE offers a range of four-year BSc (Honours) degree programmes in Engineering and technological subjects that lead to GCU awards. 2. The Panel’s view of CCE’s Foundation Programme is also included. a discrete set of graduate attributes that can be applied across all CCE’s current and planned undergraduate programmes (particularly as it follows through on its plans to diversify its portfolio of programmes). The College plans to expand and diversify its provision of academic programmes and also to transition to awarding its own degrees (2009-2014 Strategic Plan). p. problem solving.48) and it has sought feedback on its graduates from employers and through the Industrial Interaction Group (IIG) (see Section 5. These include curriculum changes. This would allow more systematic monitoring and analysis of performance and achievement across the different academic departments and programmes. interfacing with workplace culture. It has also revised the Professional Development modules that are embedded in all the undergraduate programmes which aim to develop independent learning skills. it has initiated institutional wide strategies for improvement (ibid). p. The College states: “The mission. particularly with respect to the general transferable skills lists. CCE reports that at the time of Portfolio submission it provided 55% of the Engineering student study places in private HEIs in Oman (Portfolio. The Panel suggests that the College may be better served to develop.1 Graduate Attributes and Student Learning Objectives CCE presents a list of 30 ‘Graduate Attributes for Engineering’ (Portfolio. CCE has been thorough in its analysis of the feedback it has received. vision and values of CCE are those of a college that regards employability of graduates as a top priority” (Portfolio. and general transferable skills. On examining sample Programme Specification documents. This chapter reports on the Panel’s findings concerning CCE’s provision of undergraduate programmes.33). language skills and a variety of other generic skills. The Panel acknowledges these efforts but remains concerned over the current work-readiness of graduates and believes that still more work is required to ensure that the development of specific soft/transferable skills is addressed effectively. p. p.32). Page 19 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . particularly beyond the Foundation Programme.

review and minor/major change processes that are applied to these programmes (Portfolio. 2. p. rather. the Panel observed that whilst the 4-year GCU Honours degree programmes includes exit awards at Level 2 (Diploma) and Level 3 (BSc degree without honours). monitoring. as a requirement of the quality assurance processes applied to CCE’s programmes. for example. the documents state that a satisfactory performance in all the sections of the College entrance examination is required.38) and the Panel confirmed that samples of Foundation level students are sent periodically for IELTS tests for benchmarking purposes. encourages it to progress and build on the strategies it has implemented to address this. An explicit IELTS level or equivalent was not specified in the undergraduate Programme Specification documents examined by the Panel.123-128) mirror those in place at GCU and reflect what is widely recognized as good practice in higher education. In addition. The Panel confirmed that. as a matter of priority. The Panel was.38). learning outcomes are explicitly identified and benchmarked. This is verified during the quality assurance processes applied to assessment (see Section 2. The College states that the English language entry and placement test is benchmarked against IELTS (Portfolio. pp. These processes have ensured that the programmes are in line with the Oman Qualifications Framework. Maths. 2. however. validation/approval. the Panel was pleased to learn. The Panel was advised by VITU that its regulations do not permit it to make these awards and that this has been communicated to the students. The Panel found evidence that similar processes are applied to the two more recently approved programmes that lead to VITU awards (BSc Chemical Engineering and MSc Process Engineering). Commendation 4 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for having established robust programme development and review systems which provide assurance on the standards of its undergraduate programmes.2 Curriculum The majority of CCE’s academic programmes lead to GCU awards. Nevertheless. told that an IELTS © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 20 of 57 .HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering Affirmation 3 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that the general employability skills of its graduates need to be enhanced and.8). The Panel was concerned that this may cause confusion and inequitable treatment of students but found no evidence of this being the case. The Panel noted that the development. However. exit awards at these levels on the VITU-linked Chemical Engineering have been discontinued. that the College’s BSc (Hons) Process Operations and Maintenance and BSc Electrical Power Engineering have been developed specifically in response to local needs (and are not offered by GCU itself). The College will need to ensure the rigour of these processes is maintained as it transitions to a self-awarding institution. The majority of CCE’s programmes are adapted from programmes that run at the respective affiliates and share common modules with these programmes.3 Student Entry Standards CCE advises that its process for admissions to its Foundation and undergraduate programmes involves an entry and placement test that covers English. This may be an area that the College chooses to review in its plans to make its own awards. cross-mapping of these is carried out to identify where and how they are covered in the curriculum and where and how they are assessed. Science and IT and also includes an interview (Portfolio. p.

soft skills and IT skills and also that the Mathematics and Science subjects have been strengthened (Portfolio. is being updated and also that a Teaching and Learning Committee has been established.4 Foundation Programme CCE advises that it has revised its Foundation Programme to conform to the National Standards for Foundation Programmes (Portfolio. 2. The Panel. These include module delivery details given in module handbooks. p. after speaking to a range of stakeholders. Teaching and Assessment Strategy.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report equivalent level of 5. staff professional development activities and feedback systems that include systematic administration of module evaluation questionnaires. Affirmation 4 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that it needs to continue to develop strategies that Page 21 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . The Panel supports this initiative. which dates from 2002. however. although the Panel noted that not all students go through the Foundation Programme. urges the College to develop strategies to ensure that its significant population of ‘direct entry’ students (evidenced in APA reports) are also adequately prepared for their studies. p.0 is required for students to progress from the Foundation level to an undergraduate programme and that progression decisions are made at formal Assessment Boards attended by Foundation Programme external examiners. 2.5 Teaching Quality The College states that the quality of teaching and learning is fundamental to the College’s Mission (Portfolio. teaching by visiting faculty from affiliates. The College believes that the new programme will impact positively on undergraduate programme entry standards (ibid). the Panel nevertheless formed the view that classroom teaching of technical subjects in academic programmes needs to be more student-centered.39). p. the College advises that its Learning. How effective CCE’s systems relating to teaching quality are in actually achieving desired results is an area that the College recognizes as requiring ongoing attention. The Panel viewed the comprehensive framework that has been developed to guide the work of this committee which has membership from across the College and includes a student representative. The College is also making increased use of computer based technology tools such as ‘Blackboard’ to support student learning (see Section 6). The Panel found the process for admitting students from the Foundation Programme to the academic programmes to be comprehensive and well-established. Annual Programme Analysis (APA) reports show that over recent years both the number and the percentage of students being admitted directly to a number of academic programmes has increased. The College states that the programme now encompasses enhanced critical thinking skills. The Panel welcomes CCE’s efforts to better prepare its student for degree level work and subsequent development of graduate attributes by beginning to address identified areas of weakness.33). The Panel was therefore pleased to note that CCE has identified further staff development in teaching methodologies as an opportunity for improvement (Portfolio.50).39) and identifies “review of learning and teaching strategies with focus on technology and electronic content” as an intended measure of achievement in relation to its strategic goals (2009-2014 Strategic Plan). The Panel confirmed that the CCE has in place wellembedded systems to support the quality of teaching. p. The College states that this initiative was also informed by feedback from employers and the IIG on the need for CCE graduates to have enhanced skills in different areas including communication. CCE has held a number of workshops focusing on learning and teaching but. Towards this. The College anticipates that this committee will play an important role in transforming teaching and learning strategies in the College (ibid) and in ensuring the systems achieve the desired effectiveness and outcomes. academic writing skills.

The Panel remained concerned that this mode of delivery has yet to be comprehensively evaluated within CCE’s specific context and considers that CCE needs to give consideration to elements such as the impact of the scheduling and delivery mode on student learning and students’ capacity to utilize the mentoring system and general academic support services (also see Recommendation 14). mentoring.41-42). A block/intensive delivery model is also employed for delivery of CCE’s Masters programmes (see Chapter 3). Recommendation 6 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering comprehensively evaluate the delivery arrangements for Masters and ‘special part-time’ students to ensure that student learning.78). 2. p. Recommendation 5 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering establish means to enhance practical laboratory and field-based learning. The Panel found limited evidence of plans in place to address these in the immediate future but believes that both the IIG and the newly established Learning and Teaching Committee are well placed to support the College’s efforts in these areas. pp. which allow a maximum of only 15 contact days a month with the College (and that 12 semesters (6 years) is required to complete a BSc Honors Degree in Engineering via this mode).6 Plagiarism The College reports on a comprehensive approach to addressing plagiarism in the School of Foundation Studies and within the Educational and Professional Development Department which runs the Professional Development modules that are included on all degree programmes. general academic support and the overall student experience is not compromised.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering ensure the implementation of appropriate and effective teaching approaches on higher education programmes. student engagement in carrying out practical laboratory work. The Panel also came to the conclusion that there is a general need for the College to examine ways to enhance field-based work completed by students and.40) and has identified enhancement of work experience within programmes as an opportunity for improvement (Portfolio. The Panel confirmed that the undergraduate programmes for ‘special part-time’ students follow a block/intensive delivery model. The Panel considers that the College’s efforts to address plagiarism need to be supported by consistently articulated rules and regulations regarding plagiarism and a single clear procedure © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 22 of 57 . The College notes that feedback from students through Staff Student Consultative Groups indicates that more hands-on experience is required (Portfolio. There is some indication that attention to this area has been informed by discussion with external assessors: APA reports viewed by the Panel indicate that in 2007-2008 these assessors perceived plagiarism to be a widespread issue and it was suggested that implementation of a uniform approach across all departments was required. The College suggests that the newly formed Learning and Teaching Committee will facilitate continued institutional initiatives to address plagiarism (Portfolio. in particular. The College’s Policy on Special Part-time Programmes advises that this mode of study is aimed at professional employees with work commitments in the interior regions of Oman. External assessor reports from 2008-2009 reiterate these observations. p. The College will need to give due consideration to the comparability of the student experience and outcomes between the special part-time students and other students as part of that comprehensive evaluation.

The Panel considers that procedures relating to student placements should ensure that placements undertaken are structured. 343 students applied for training but only 144 of them received training and states that this low conversion resulted from students not taking up placements offered to them (Portfolio. 2. Recommendation 7 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering consolidate its approach to plagiarism practiced in different parts of the College in a single policy to help ensure consistency of application. p. The Panel supports this and recognizes the College’s efforts to date in this area. The Panel is aware that the relevant regulations from the academic affiliates apply to CCE students and acknowledges that these are referred to in Student Handbooks. who will not benefit from the initiatives to promote good academic conduct on the Foundation Programme.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report for dealing with plagiarism incidents that is communicated and implemented across the College. The College reports that in its Engineering courses there was a drop in progression rates at Levels 1-3 in 2008-2009 in comparison to the preceding year which it attributes to ‘tighter marking and assessment criteria’ (Portfolio. The Panel confirmed that in relation to the GCU programmes in particular.7 Student Placements CCE states that “work experience or placement is regarded as a very valuable component of student learning at degree level” (Portfolio. The College states that “the Executive is actively seeking ways to introduce assessed work experience into programmes. p.95). double blind marking. The Panel learned that GCU Page 23 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . and use of external examiners who have an extensive remit which includes the review students’ work (particularly in relation to relevant benchmarks). supervised. but greater consistency and clarity is required. Standards and Moderation CCE advises that it operates an assessment regime that is closely allied to that used in the UK (Portfolio. The Panel encourages the College to continue its efforts to ensure that the systems in place are implemented effectively such that academic standards are maintained in this way. The College advises that it has designated departmental Placement Officers who liaise with the Caledonian Student Support Services to secure placements for students who apply for them. meeting students and staff. attending formal assessment boards and formally reporting on their findings. 2. the College reports that in 2008-2009. p.96). It is significant that work placements at present are not a compulsory or credit bearing component of CCE’s academic programmes and the College confirms that “placement is therefore not assessed. The Panel also spoke to some students who secured placements themselves. monitored and evaluated effectively. Recommendation 8 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop a clear policy and procedures relating to student placements.47). the Panel considers it important for the College to establish a clear position on student placements such that its efforts are better aligned and evaluated. Further. However. assessment practices that mirror those of the affiliate are well embedded at CCE. are adequately prepared and supported in this respect.43). p.8 Assessment Methods. p.42) and further affirms that it regards placements as “fundamental to the attainment of prescribed graduate attributes” (Portfolio. while providing for those who cannot or do not wish to engage in placement” (Portfolio. This includes verification of examination papers by the affiliates.43). monitored or reviewed in a formal way” (ibid). the College needs to ensure that its significant population of direct entry students. However. p.

However. p. The Panel suggests that formal evaluation of the trends and reasons behind recorded numbers of cases inform this initiative.11 Graduate Destinations and Employability CCE indicates that it regards employability of graduates as a top priority and states that it is essential that effort is made to follow graduate success as one means of verifying achievement of its Mission (Portfolio.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering has. At present. over time. The Panel confirmed that the APA reports are particularly comprehensive and critically evaluative and that they include annual programme improvement plans. development of the College’s own scheme would support its efforts in this area. 2.10 Student Retention and Progression The College maintains student retention and progression data on its ‘Enterprise Resource Planning System’(ERPS) and. The Panel found no evidence of institutional level targets or analysis in this area but noted the College’s intention to conduct analyses of this data in relation to enhancing teaching and assessment strategies across the institution (Portfolio. CCE states that it wishes to specifically reduce the number of academic malpractice incidents in examinations (these showed an increase in the 2008-2009) by changing the attitude of students from studying for examinations to concentrating on learning (Portfolio. The Panel encourages the College to maximise use of ERPS data relevant to student retention and progression to inform decision making.48). uses its APA reports as a vehicle for reporting. 2.45). for its GCU programmes. 2. p. devolved responsibilities (such as setting examinations for all undergraduate levels) to CCE as the College has matured. The College indicates that it is considering both teaching methodologies and assessment regimes in relation to this. p. standards and moderation will be approached should the College progress to awarding its own degrees as at present the role of the affiliates is integral to this function at the College. These three sets of procedures clearly detail activities and responsibilities starting with the development of examination papers and following through to the confirmation of marks following the assessment boards. pp.47-48). p. The procedures for the academic programmes are closely aligned with those of the relevant academic affiliates and reflect practices that appear well embedded in the College. This aligns with the College’s 2009-2014 Strategic Plan which identifies ‘enhancement of the employability of CCE graduates’ as a measure of success with © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 24 of 57 . these documents do not include a detailed procedure for how the actual invigilation of examinations is conducted at CCE which aligns with. analysing and acting on student retention and progression for particular courses (Portfolio.48).46) and the Panel confirmed that CCE has newly developed College Examination Policy and Procedure documents (dating from 2009) for both its GCU and VITU academic programmes and also the Foundation Programme. Further the Panel strongly supports the College’s stated intention to conduct a detailed audit to determine how assessment methods. for example. the College is well-placed to monitor student retention and progression. The Panel was advised that approaches to assessment on the Foundation Programme align with those used on the academic programmes.47). The College’s ERPS provides for effective data management (see Commendation 5) and with the support of this.9 Academic Security and Invigilation CCE states that it has established a clear policy and procedure for examinations (Portfolio. all students on GCU Masters programmes sit GCU examinations. the detailed ‘Scheme of Invigilation’ given in GCU assessment regulations. The Panel was pleased to note the College’s awareness of the need to monitor and address students’ tendency to be driven by assessment marks rather than learning per se (Portfolio. Although CCE indicates that the GCU scheme is followed in the College. p.

the Panel formed the view that the existing feedback systems are limited and have yet to be well embedded. The Panel urges the College to monitor this function closely. Improvements to systems to enhance the monitoring and support of graduate employability need to be informed by comprehensive analysis of appropriately extensive data and monitored for effectiveness in contributing to achievement of strategic goals. To date. Whilst the College indicates that Caledonian Student Support Services follow up on graduates employment status as a matter of course. CCE has sought feedback from both employers and from graduates themselves concerning their employability. The Panel concluded that more work is needed in this area. Page 25 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . following review of relevant documents and discussion with employers and other stakeholders. the 2007-2008 APA reports indicate consistently high percentages of students whose status is ‘unknown’ and identify alumni follow up as a key issue to be addressed. Nevertheless. Recommendation 9 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering review and enhance its systems for monitoring and supporting employment of graduates. including the introduction in 2009 of a Graduate Orientation Programme. employers have identified limited general transferable skills among graduates as problematic and the College has embarked on a number of initiatives to address this.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report respect to it provision of academic programmes.

Examination of relevant documentation revealed that enrolment on. the Panel’s findings in relation to this are given in Chapters 4 and 8 of this Report. Stated measures for achievement of this goal include extended provision of postgraduate programmes and development of a Masters programme in renewable energy resources and allied areas. delivery mode and entry requirements. graduate rate and employability. for example. internal review. p. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 26 of 57 . The College states that “The institutional quality mechanism of students learning by research includes a supervisory system. Documentation provided by the College indicates that a further two Masters programmes were formally approved in 2007 by VITU to run at CCE. the College also reported on faculty members undertaking part time PhD studies. external assessors. The GCU programmes commenced in 2006-2007 and the VITU programme commenced in 2008-2009. MSc Maintenance Management awarded by GCU. Although some review of the College’s postgraduate provision has taken place. the Panel found the extent of critical evaluation of its current provision in this area to be limited. student research project. in terms of overall planning and management the Panel found a current lack of comprehensive evaluation of the College’s work in this area. project supervision. strategic and applied research and development. encompassing a Centre of Excellence in renewable energy and sustainable technologies. consultancy and corporate training. p51). thesis examination. All students currently enrolled on Masters programmes study part-time and the Panel noted that the College identified its flexible study modes as a strength in the SWOT analysis that informed its current Strategic Plan. co-ordination and student-staff meetings” (ibid). retention.51).HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering 3 STUDENT LEARNING BY RESEARCH PROGRAMMES The College advises that the final year project of its undergraduate honours degree programmes and the dissertation component of its Masters programmes both involve substantial research (Portfolio. the MSc Process Engineering has been lower than anticipated. and MSc Process Engineering awarded by VITU. however. The Panel found that entry criteria for the Process Engineering programme in particular appeared to be a grey area and noted that this issue has been a subject of discussion between the College.1 Research Programme Design One of CCE’s four current strategic goals in its 2009-2014 Strategic Plan relates specifically to research: CCE will be a gateway to industry in terms of innovative. this chapter reports on the Panel’s findings in the following areas: research programme design. 3. At present. the Panel found a number of areas that appear to warrant careful evaluation such as programme demand. VITU and the Ministry of Higher Education (MoHE). of which three are running (Portfolio. Given the strategic importance to CCE of developing its provision at postgraduate level. The College reports that in June 2009. CCE currently runs three Masters programmes: MSc Management of Information Systems awarded by GCU. postgraduate supervision. The College advises that it has approval for four programmes at Masters level. intensive blocks of tuition are delivered by GCU/VITU staff and this is supported by local tutors and web support materials. CCE does not run any PhD programmes for its students. In the section of the Portfolio relating to Student Learning by Research Programmes. Within this context. a total of 38 students were enrolled on these programmes (ibid).

The project handbook details the role and responsibilities of the project supervisors and coordinators. or if necessary. Nevertheless. CCE states that faculty have been supported by regular teaching visits and workshops organised by senior faculty members from GCU (ibid). The College and GCU are aware that there are general issues about student engagement and independent learning that remain a challenge.8) and the Panel viewed contructive feedback from external examiners on the project component of CCE’s undergraduate progammes. At the time of the audit visit only a relatively small number of MSc students had completed their major projects / disserations and so CCE had not been in a position to conduct a comprehensive ADRI analysis of its supervision of these. The College indicates that it intends to recruit senior research faculty to support this (ibid). 3. These are reflected in the student project handbooks which are provided to students on the GCU and the VITU Masters programmes. delays in commencement of projects by students and student time-management during their honours year have been identified as an issue (Portfolio. a personal tutor/mentor. an external supervisor (Portfolio.3 Postgraduate Supervision MSc students are required to complete a major project/ dissertation under the guidance of both the affiliate-based supervisor and the CCE-based supervisor. p. p. However. pp. The Panel did not find evidence of a system in place to evaluate student research supervisors. The Panel confirmed that both GCU and VITU are Page 27 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . p. a student guide/project handbook.53). CCE advises that “An effective supervision system is in place to follow project activities and monitor progress” (Portfolio.54). 3.4 Student Research Support CCE advises that students engaged in undergraduate and Masters level research are supported in a number of ways including provision of the following: appropriate orientation/induction. GCU and VITU. The College may wish to consider measures to address this. and GCU confirmed to the Panel that it believes it has been successful in impacting postively on CCE’s abilty to supervise projects.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report Recommendation 10 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop and implement comprehensive mechanisms to monitor and review student research and overall provision of postgraduate programmes in relation to its strategic intent.52-53). access to e-journals and library resources. The College advises that staff development training is provided for new supervisors although it has also identified the need for further staff development in order to provide better understanding of the role of supervisors of Master’s level work. 3. The College currently follows guidelines on supervision practiced by its affiliates. The Panel learned that the system involves direct supervison by academic staff members (and possible supervision from industry where appropriate) supported by departmental project coordinators and an honours project handbook based on a similar handbook in use at GCU. Therefore the Collge has two sets of guidelines from the two different affiliates. A weekly formal meeting between students and their supervisor is scheduled in the timetable.2 Project Supervision In relation to undergraduate honours level research projects. particularly in relation to project work. and engagement with specific Student Staff Consultative Groups (Portfolio. the Panel encourages the College to monitor this important area of activity closely.55). targeted workshops and lectures. and that continued effort is required to address this. The College’s has a well-established external examiner system (see Section 2.

3. Affirmation 5 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority supports the efforts of Caledonian College of Engineering to further develop and implement feedback mechanisms to evaluate and improve its support of students engaged in research. The College states that a pilot survey relating to MSc programme module evaluation has been carried out (Portfolio. it is premature for the College to assert this in the case of Masters dissertations.57).56).55) and the Panel supports this initiative. scrutiny by external examiners plus moderation and marking by affiliates” (Portfolio. only ten students had graduated from CCE with Masters degrees (Portfolio.6 Retention. In addition to leading workshops. As the number of students engaging with and completing Masters dissertations increases. The Panel found the mechanisms at CCE for evaluating its support of students engaged in research to be limited and believes that these should be enhanced to inform the College’s efforts and future plans. The College offered no detailed evaluation of the examination of the dissertation or the results of this programme in the Portfolio but did state that “the marks awarded by the CCE marker are comparable with those given by the GCU supervisor” (ibid). the College and respective affiliates need to ensure that a high level of rigour is applied to the implementation of its dissertation assessment process. all were graduates of the GCU MSc Management of Information Systems programme. Whilst the Panel was able to verify that this is the case with respect to undergraduate project modules run in association with GCU. p. the minutes of VITU Programme Board meetings that recorded decisions taken in response to issues raised at Student Staff Consultative Group meetings such as the request for MSc Process Engineering students to have a permanent classroom and a concise guide to assessment regulations. The Panel notes that the College is aware that continued benchmarking is required to ensure that marking is not too generous and that academic standards are maintained (Portfolio.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering actively engaged with supporting CCE and its students in this area. p. p. the Panel viewed. for example. Evaluation of this area has led GCU to reduce its earlier requirement to examine all project reports (rather than just the sample that it scrutinises now) and led CCE to conclude that the execution of project work has improved. only the first cohort of students on the GCU MSc Management of Information Systems students had submitted their dissertation for assessment (13 students in total – ibid). Graduate Destinations and Employability CCE advises that at the time of writing the Portfolio. p. From this first cohort. The College advises that “A dedicated space for research administration and support is beign provided in the new campus plan” (ibid) and the Panel was pleased to see documented plans to establish a Centre for Research and Graduate Studies. two students graduated with Postgraduate Certificates. one student graduated with a Postgraduate Diploma. and subsequent evaluation of results.5 Thesis Examination The College states: “CCE follows a well-established system for the examination of technical projects and Master dissertations. MSc students interviewed by the Panel indicated that they found the intensive module delivery mode challenging (see Recommendation 6) and also that library resources were very limited for these new programmes. The assessment system that has been established with the honours level projects is well documented and involves an internal double marking process and scrutiny of samples by GCU and external examiners. at the time of the Portfolio submission. 3. and two students © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 28 of 57 . This includes internal scrutiny and assessment systems.56) and urges the College to maintain its efforts in this area.

the College reports that all students initially enrolled on the GCU MSc Maintenance Management programme were completing their programme and that one student on the VITU MSc Process Engineering had dropped out. at the time of writing the Portfolio. and that it will evaluate this in due course (ibid). the College states that it expects these students to enhance their career prospects by successfully completing their studies. At the time of the audit visit. retention of Masters students appeared good. all the current MSc students were already employed and studying on a part-time basis. However. In terms of employability. the Panel recommends the College conduct a more thorough evaluation of its Masters programmes (see Recommendation 10). Further. In due course.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report had a resit in the dissertation module. Page 29 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority .

External stakeholders associated with CCE’s research initiatives interviewed by the Panel expressed enthusiasm and support for the College’s efforts in this area. The Panel noted that a draft Research Strategic Plan has been developed but is of the view that this is insufficiently detailed at present to support the College well in progressing towards its ambitious goals in this area. intellectual property. The Panel recognises this significant achievement. research commercialisation. 4. and the link between research and teaching at CCE.1 Research Planning & Management Research does not feature explicitly in CCE’s Mission but the College’s Vision (see Section 1. the Panel formed the view that more rigorous operational planning in the area of research is required to ensure that the College’s efforts in this area are effectively directed and coordinated. The Panel confirmed that CCE has established its Caledonian Journal of Engineering as an ISSN recognised peer reviewed international journal. the College now produces an in-house bi-annual research bulletin. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 30 of 57 . ethics and bio-safety. one of CCE’s four strategic goals identified in its 2009-2014 Strategic Plan focuses directly on research. Further. the College appointed an Associate Dean for Post Graduate Studies and Research who heads a reformed Research Committee. The College has identified fifteen indicators of achievement of this goal to guide its development in this area. consultancy and corporate training. Further. In 2009. The Panel noted that the College has been successful in establishing research collaboration teams with members from other higher education institutions both within Oman and overseas and also that the College has been awarded four research projects funded by external organisations. research funding schemes. Recommendation 11 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop detailed operational plans which support its strategic planning in the area of research and consultancy against which it can evaluate its performance. 61-62).HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering 4 STAFF RESEARCH AND CONSULTANCY This chapter reports on the planning and management of staff research at CCE and then details the Panel’s findings with respect to: research performance. pp. The Panel recognises that the College is actively building a research capacity by encouraging staff to undertake higher degrees (see Section 4. This goal states: CCE will be a gateway to industry in terms of innovative.2 Research Performance The College reports an ongoing overall improvement in research performance as measured by indicators which include research publications and conference and workshop attendance by staff supported by the College (Portfolio.1) identifies research as a key element. encompassing a Centre of Excellence in renewable energy and sustainable technologies. consultancy activities. professional development for research. Broad terms of reference and an extensive list of activities have been identified to guide the work of this committee which reports to the Academic Council. Nevertheless. 4.7) and beginning to form a research culture across the College. strategic and applied research and development.

p.1).59) that are represented on the Research Committee. the Panel considers it important for the College to review and build on the elements that it has in place to establish a comprehensive framework and associated systems which cover the planning.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report The Panel considers that the College now needs to engage in greater and more systematic ongoing critical evaluation of its research performance and achievements in relation to its goals (see Recommendation 11). Page 31 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . 4. p. The College has health and safety systems in place and is well-placed to develop policies in this area as required in relation to the types of research it chooses to engage in.64). most recently in 2006 (Portfolio. The Panel encourages the College to engage in ongoing evaluation of its research funding model in line with the development of research within the College and progress towards achievement of goals (see Recommendation 11).64). CCE also has a Corporate Training and Continuing Education Division that was established in 2006 (Portfolio. p.3 Research Funding Schemes It was clear to the Panel that College funding to support staff to undertake PhD studies is currently a high profile initiative within the College (see Section 4. p. the College states that it is considering conducting staff development training and workshops in this area in order to evolve a policy on ethics (ibid). 4. The College indicates that attention is to be given to encouraging research groups to make use of internal research grants (Portfolio.62. The College has a number of established elements that have the potential to support an enhanced consultancy function. and which appeared to the Panel to be active and successful in running a range of short courses for external stakeholders. In support of the College developing its research and consultancy function. The research budget covers this staff development initiative and other research related costs.63). The Panel was informed that there is a formal process through which the Research Committee considers research and consultancy proposals.63).7). p. The Panel confirmed that the Division interacts with industry and is well-placed to support the College in identifying opportunities for research and consultancy.) 4. For example. Further. the Division states that to ‘seek out research opportunities’ is an area that could be strengthened. the Panel confirmed that the College is in the process of expanding the number of industrial organisations with which it has formal collaborative agreements.). management and evaluation of its consultancy function (also see Recommendation 11. In its 2009-2010 Business Plan. the Panel encourages the College to follow through on this.5 Ethics and Biosafety The College states that it “advises its research staff to follow the principles of human research ethics to develop and conduct research in a safe and responsible manner” (Portfolio. The College advises that the Research Committee provides assistance to staff to apply for external grants and the College reports some success in this area (Portfolio. In view of this. Further.4 Consultancy Activities CCE has undertaken three formal consultancy projects with industry to date. p. core research groups have been set up within departments (Portfolio. CCE has clear strategic intent to excel in its interaction with industry and has identified consultancy as integral to this (see Section 4.

The Panel formed the view that these initiatives are starting to take hold but have yet to impact significantly and consistently across all programmes. 4.6 Intellectual Property The Panel confirmed that CCE’s academic affiliation agreements contain articles relating to confidentiality and intellectual property rights.7 Professional Development for Research CCE states that it is striving to improve its research capacity and capability (Portfolio.63). The College states that “The Research Committee provides clear guidelines and advice to staff members in this respect as cooperation with industry necessitates regulations on data protection. The College advises that its budget provision for supporting PhD candidates covers up to 80% of travel.66). The College advises that it recognizes the importance of conducting more awareness seminars on intellectual property rights amongst staff and students (ibid). p. accommodation and subsistence costs (Portfolio. 4. property rights and confidentiality” (Portfolio.9 Research – Teaching Nexus CCE states that “learning processes are aligned to enable students to benefit from ongoing research projects both at UG and at PG levels” (Portfolio. The Panel supports the College’s efforts in this area and encourages it to refine its evaluation of these in relation to its strategic goals. The Panel suggests that such activities would support effective implementation of a College policy once this is developed. p. One strategy in place is College support of staff to attain PhD qualifications.65).8 Research Commercialisation CCE advises that it has established a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Public Establishment for Industrial Estates (PEIE). The Panel confirmed that another strategy involves workshops and seminars led by visiting experts. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 32 of 57 . The College advises that mechanisms to achieve this include student projects being linked to research investigations and curricula delivery and review being informed by research outcomes (ibid).HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering 4. 4. p. the Panel encourages the College to consider developing its own intellectual property policy. established to facilitate technology incubation (Portfolio. p. The Panel considers that to support initiatives such as this it is important for the College to include the area of research commercialisation in its Strategic Plan and to develop a formal research commercialisation policy.65). The Panel noted that GCU staff in particular have conducted a number of professional development activities including sessions devoted to research supervision (in relation to the project supervision of students on GCU masters programmes). The Panel is of the view that focussed effort informed by systematic evaluation is required to sustain development of this area of activity. p.69). The Panel was informed that at the time of the audit visit more than 20 staff were enrolled in PhD programmes. However.

Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report 5 INDUSTRY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT CCE’s Mission and Vision reflect the importance of industry and community engagement to the College. other education providers. The College needs to ensure that such feedback is collected systematically and that subsequent analysis informs change that contributes effectively to quality improvement. The Panel found that engagement with the industry and the community is evidenced by many activities but found little evidence that this is supported by comprehensive planning. 5. p. and the community at large.68). Key Performance Indicators. This is reflected in one of the College’s strategic objectives reviewed in 2009 (Portfolio.68): … to promote interaction between industry. questionnaires and formal and informal discussions (Portfolio. The College advises that the Associate Dean for Postgraduate Studies and Research has responsibility in this area in relation to academic matters and that the Associate Dean for Professional Development has responsibility in relation to professional and personal development and industrial and community relationships (Portfolio. The Panel concluded that the College needs to develop a comprehensive and overarching industry and community engagement plan that is explicitly linked to institutional goals and which provides for effective feedback from all relevant stakeholders. commerce and the college for fostering innovative and creative engineering education so as to serve the community. p. In support of this. CCE has also signed Memoranda of Understanding with educational and industrial organizations to support interaction and has ensured industrial representation on the College’s Governing Council. p.68).69). The College reports that that feedback from industry informed a major revision of curricula within the School of Foundation Studies and Educational and Professional Development and led to consideration of changes to degree programmes (ibid). 5. It also aims at serving the community through this engagement. p. the College developed its Industrial Advisory Group in 1999 which it reformed in 2009 as the Industrial Interaction Group (IIG) (Portfolio.1 Industry and Community Engagement Planning & Management The College sees industry and community engagement as essential for innovative Engineering education. professions. This will support implementation of a full quality cycle (such as ADRI) that can lead to continuous improvement. industry led guest lectures and industrial Page 33 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . CCE advises that it regularly tests its relationship with industry and the community through means such as needs analysis.2 Relationships with Industry and Employers CCE has several mechanisms for interacting with industry which include: having industry representation on the Governing Council and on Programme Boards. This chapter reports on CCE’s planning and management of its engagement with industry and the community and comments specifically on the College’s relationships with the following: industry and employers. Recommendation 12 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop an overarching industry and community engagement plan that includes targets. students undertaking work placements in industry and industry based projects. alumni. sufficient resources and review mechanisms.

from about 130 in 2007 to about 150 in 2008. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 34 of 57 .71). and that it “continues to encourage and source industry placements for students” (Portfolio. CCE organizes industrial visits for its students and reports that the number of industrial visits has increased over recent years.72). The first survey of employers was conducted in 2009 and is to become an annual activity (Portfolio. In addition to the College’s relationships with its overseas academic affiliates. 5. The Panel recognizes that this aligns with a commitment to more industry collaboration but noted that during the audit visit some students expressed dissatisfaction with the number of visits they participated in. pp.73). The Panel suggests that in addition CCE conduct relevant reviews which determine the extent to which students and staff value and benefit from their memberships and which inform future action. CCE has to maintain close and mutually supportive relationships with other HEIs” (Portfolio. The Panel observed that CCE encourages its staff and students to associate with professional bodies and confirmed that it has established student chapters of professional organizations. p. and establishment of a Corporate Training and Continuing Education Division (Portfolio. The Panel considers it important for the College to establish a clear policy on student placements to guide its efforts (see Recommendation 8). Currently. The Panel supports CCE’s initiatives in this area. a UK-based professional accreditation body (Portfolio. This is supported by the involvement and contribution of internal and external panels to the review of learning outcomes and curricula (also see Commendation 4).4 Relationships with Other Education Providers CCE states that “In order to achieve the College’s vision to be the premier institute in the region for human resource development. the College states that a mechanism will be designed to ensure that the results of this survey are systematically considered.3 Relationships with Professions CCE seeks international recognition of its Engineering programmes (Portfolio. examples include joint research projects such as a project on signal processing with Sultan Qaboos University and also staff from CCE working for other higher education institutions as external assessors and vice-versa. Further. The College also reports that the number of CCE students undertaking work placements has increased. p.73). The College has recorded an increase in both staff and student professional body membership and the Panel noted that the College supports these memberships financially. p.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering visits for students.70). The Panel supports this initiative. CCE has plans to obtain accreditation of seven of its Engineering programmes from the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). Members of the IIG interviewed by the Panel were enthusiastic about their role as a ‘bridge’ between the College and industry and who confirmed that feedback that had been given by their group in their first meeting had been acted on. Two other mechanisms are the IIG and a survey to gain feedback from employers on CCE graduates. The small increase in the number of students undertaking placements between 2007 and 2008 indicates however that the College faces challenges in this area. The Panel supports this initiative as one component of a comprehensive approach to addressing this area (see Recommendation 12). The Panel recognizes the potential of this group to impact positively on CCE’s efforts in this area and supports the College’s plans for this group to meet twice a year rather than yearly.73). p. p.71-72). 5. the Panel confirmed that CCE has established some relationships with other higher education providers in Oman. p. The College states that it will develop a policy and associated mechanisms to encourage more students and staff to become members of professional bodies (Portfolio.

The College encourages its students to assist in organising these activities and reports that it is has developed a culture of Corporate Social Responsibility amongst its students (Portfolio. CCE has developed an alumni database which is accessible through the College website. the Panel spoke to a number of the College’s alumni and formed the overall view that the extent to which the College’s alumni systematically engage with the College and provide feedback is nevertheless still limited. general knowledge quizzes. To encourage more interaction with its alumni. Page 35 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority .76). 5. The Panel acknowledges that the College interacts with its alumni through an increasing range of mechanisms and activities. p. However.5 Relationships with Alumni CCE advises that it considers feedback from its alumni as invaluable to the development of programmes and professional development activities within the College (Portfolio. cultural. The Panel acknowledges that the College has identified both a need to provide a more systematic approach towards extracurricular activities and a need for a much higher percentage of students to be involved with community engagement activities (Portfolio. the College advises that it has introduced a number of initiatives since 2009 to address these areas. sporting and recreational activities to increase interaction of the student body with the community.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report 5. CCE advises that alumni have free access to the College Library. Recommendation 13 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop and implement an overall alumni engagement plan that ensures coordination of its activities in this area and evaluation of these in relation to goals and targets. poetry recitation. p. The College also advises that various groups from the community make use of College facilities. and charity events (Portfolio. the Panel did not find evidence of clear goals or a comprehensive plan for extracurricular activities and community involvement. blood donation campaigns. The Panel believes that CCE understands the importance of the College alumni and notes that the College identified its growing alumni as a strength in its most recent SWOT analysis.75). p. religious talks.74). despite the many activities that take place. that communication between GCU and CCE alumni is being facilitated and that an alumni mentoring scheme has been launched (ibid). The College has implemented a number of new initiatives to strengthen the link between the College and its graduates. The Panel encourages the College’s to align these efforts as part of a comprehensive plan and quality cycle (see Recommendation 12). Examples of these activities include an annual College National Day Celebration. Interviews with students revealed that some students did not know about the extracurricular activities whilst others thought they were not important. p.6 Relationships with the Community at Large CCE organises various social. However. particularly the College Assembly Hall and the sports facilities. This planning should align with an overarching plan concerning the College’s external stakeholders (see Recommendation 12).77). The Panel considers it important for the College to develop a specific plan for engagement with its alumni in order to coordinate and evaluate its efforts in this area in relation to its strategic intent. Further.

examinations. Examinations and Records. particularly concerning human and physical resource management in relation to student enrolments. the Library. information and learning technology services. academic advising. Target and Actions Plans as well as Key Performance Indicators for the department. student learning support and teaching resources. The College advises that management of the academics support services is through delegation from the Executive to senior staff in each department (Portfolio. Objectives. academic advising.1 Academic Support Services Planning & Management CCE provides a wide range of academic support services. In addition to this. the roles and responsibilities of each staff member are clearly defined. The planning for these support services is determined by the College’s 2009-2014 Strategic Plan.79). 6. IT Services) and Associate Dean Professional Development (Library and Learning Resources Centre. most departments have developed a Handbook that lists Mission. p. Where departmental Handbooks are available. library.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering 6 ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES This chapter reports on the Panel’s findings on the overall planning and management of academic support services at CCE and on the following specific areas: the registry.2 Registry (Enrolment and Student Records) The College’s Admissions and Registry Section together with the Examination and Records Section are responsible for activities ranging from marketing of programmes. student learning support. departmental Targets and Action Plans. the Panel was particularly pleased to see the effectiveness of the College ERPS system to manage data in a way that provides useful information for strategic planning and decision making. While the Panel considers that alignment of College-wide Key Result Areas. The Panel agrees with this and was pleased to note that this area has been targeted for review by the College (Portfolio. Registry and Marketing. Although different types of feedback tools are implemented to assess the effectiveness of the services offered (e. In the context of this. The ERPS holds a high level of acceptance among users (both staff and students). including services related to registry. through to fulfilling internal and external reporting requirements. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 36 of 57 .79). information and learning technology. the College has identified that there remains room for improvement in the coordination between academic departments and departments providing academic support services. although additional effort seems to be required to encourage students to make use of the system’s online registration facility. CCE has developed its own Enterprise Resource Planning System (ERPS) which allows for these tasks to be managed with efficiency and accuracy. and teaching resources. p. Caledonian Student Support Services). which is supplemented by annually defined ‘Key Result Areas’. surveys. staff-student consultative groups). and departmental Key Performance Indicators could be improved. These services fall under the areas of responsibility of the Deputy Dean and Registrar (Departments of Admissions.g. 6. the departmental Handbooks provide evidence of a helpful planning framework. Commendation 5 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for having successfully developed and implemented a comprehensive ‘Enterprise Resource Planning System’ which provides information for a range of stakeholders and data which informs strategic planning and decision making. admissions of students.

Also.3 Library The operations of the CCE Library are guided by a five year plan (2009-2014) focussing on four goals. In view of this. e-journals and ebooks. p. CCE might wish to consider embedding the library usage of students into its Teaching and Learning Plan to support its efforts in this area. p. Registry and Marketing and its departmental Handbook shows a strong marketing focus. which dates from 2009. gives the target number of students for 2014 as 5000 rather than the 3. advertising. This is in contradiction with the perception of staff in relevant Sections of the College. the Library has grown to offer a range of titles. application. Based on survey results and interviews. there is a need to address the fact that the Library is currently used as a social gathering place. this Section is shown as Admissions. open days. in the morning. 83) as well as the significant reduction of the usage of the Ebrary (an online digital library) from 2007/08 to 2008/09. registration and admission to achieve the targets set in the business plan of the College through marketing. careers fair and through participation in industrial advisory group and working in line with the marketing plan [sic]. CCE’s Library plan has identified the need to train students to use the library more effectively as one of its goals in the coming years. who claimed to the Panel that the admissions are capped every year and that these projections are used for infrastructure and human resources planning. followed by relevant actions. books.38). parttime and special part-time students who attend classes in the late afternoons and evenings have limited access to the Library. 6. Portfolio p. It seeks feedback from its users through surveys and also by embedding one of its staff members in the College’s Foundation Programme. Portfolio. The Panel has some reservations concerning the embedding of the College’s marketing function within the Admissions and Registry Section and urges CCE to take steps to ensure that admission numbers are effectively embedded in the College’s planning framework. CCE’s plans to increase both student numbers and research-oriented activities will require further growth of its Library. The plan recognises the need to support the teaching. the first departmental objective stated is: “to increase the number of enquiries. CCE’s Library is encouraging the use of its facilities through induction programmes and various support services (Portfolio. However. The College advises that the Admissions and Registry Section is responsible for admitting students and conducts the admissions process in cooperation with the School of Foundation Studies (Portfolio. the Panel was pleased to note the inclusion of social spaces in CCE’s campus development plans (see Affirmation 11). For instance.500 stated in the Strategic Plan. there is still need for improvement with respect to the satisfaction of Library users and the College has recognised some of these areas. school visits. It also lends weight to the concerns expressed by students about class sizes being too large. 48% of Engineering students felt that the journals in the library were not relevant to their subjects. This concern was reinforced by the fact that. in a survey carried out in 2007. Another area that requires CCE’s attention is the opening hours of the Library.82). the Library opens one hour after the arrival of the first buses on campus. learning and research activities within the College. This has been recognised in the plan for the Library.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report The Panel was pleased to see that that the Admission and Registry Section has identified KPIs to evaluate its performance. 81). Page 37 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . Over the past years. For example. An area of concern for the Panel is the limited usage reported for both books (approximately one book borrowed per student per year in 2008/09. On the College Organisational Structure. the Panel was concerned about seeing the target ‘Admissions Achieved’ exceeded by 24% in the academic year 2008-2009 (target: 750. achieved: 928.” The Handbook. In particular. milestones and KPIs. p. due to a lack of alternative space.

HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering Affirmation 6 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that enhancement of its Library resources and their effective use is required and supports its efforts towards improving user satisfaction. p. network infrastructure management. central storage and backup protection and validation evaluations” (Portfolio p. This is a software tool linked to College’s ERPS which supports a comprehensive and systematic approach to the mentoring of its students. is combined with an audit of licenses. Students must collect their grade reports (mid-term and end-of-term) from their mentors and this helps to ensure that at least two meetings per semester take place. The Panel learned that each student is allocated a mentor during registration. The requirement for CCE to enhance its formal evaluation of these in terms of learning is discussed in Section 6. In addition. 6. The Panel was informed that CCE has also attempted a scheme to facilitate the purchase of laptops. The Panel found both staff and students at CCE to be very supportive of the College’s shift to online resources and activities and the resulting increased usage of electronic platforms in their daily work. This function makes use of the College’s Student Performance Monitoring System (SPMS). The Panel noted that important data is backed up on a daily basis and one set of backup files is stored off-site. it is also concerned about the potentially negative impact this might have on students who cannot afford their own laptop. 6. While the Panel welcomes this increased availability of online learning opportunities. CCE is aware of this problem and is providing computer access oncampus both in the Library and in selected laboratories. The College is also aware of the need to increase internet bandwidth. and performance monitoring combined with mentoring (Portfolio. Further. p.86) and the Panel considers that this should be given high priority. The Panel considers the ADRI approach used by the Centre to be strong and evidence based. maintenance of hardware and software is scheduled regularly and.5 Academic Advising The academic advice provided by CCE to its students ranges from pre-admission guidance on course selection. ITSC provides support with software. although CCE has identified this as an area where further improvement is possible. deploys and reviews the College’s increasing IT requirements.4 Information and Learning Technology Services The Information Technology Support Centre (ITSC) at CCE plans. The Centre provides support with “network systems and information security. in the context of increasing student numbers and the College’s shift towards blended learning. in the case of software. The College states that it aims at providing a personal desktop to all its academic staff (Portfolio. fast and comprehensive computer.6. Service requests are resolved promptly. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 38 of 57 . multimedia and e-learning services (e. The Panel encourages CCE in its effort to provide reliable. Students meet their mentor during their induction days and are thereafter expected to meet with their mentor at least twice per semester (ibid). The success of the scheme is being evaluated prior to introducing it across the entire College. Blackboard) and has developed dedicated software such as the College’s ERPS and the College Portal. through to registration. Students the Panel spoke to confirmed that they routinely use either Blackboard or the College’s Portal. CCE is aware of the need to provide increased computer access to its students and staff. The Panel learned that approximately 500 students have registered their private laptops on the College’s wireless network.86).g.84). internet and intranet access to all its staff and students.

Over the last couple of years. The College recognizes that the correlation between facilities. and a range of industrial and site visits as well as guest lectures. 6. It also ensures continuity of mentorship.88). Recommendation 14 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering comprehensively evaluate the effectiveness of its academic advising system. CCE has complemented its physical resources with the access to the electronic learning platform Blackboard (Portfolio. including referrals to the Caledonian Student Support Services for counseling on non-academic matters. in case a staff member leaves the College. p. p. and the Panel supports the College in undertaking this exercise. the Learning Resources Centre (LRC). p. However. the Panel considers it important for this to be addressed. The College has yet to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the effectiveness of its academic advising system. but indicates that it appears to be working well for full-time students (Portfolio. although students commented to the Panel about the occasional large number of students in a classroom. The Panel found no indication that students are progressively taught to use the available Learning Support in a self-directed manner and consider that it is important for the impact of the existing learning support facilities on student performance to be evaluated. Page 39 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . utilization and performance now needs to be formally studied to inform improvement strategies (Portfolio. 6. By providing this support.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report The Panel was advised that all academic staff are mentors and they typically mentor between 20 and 40 students. This systematic documentation allows the College to identify potential issues and problems at an early stage and prepare remedial measures. particularly in relation to its increasing population of part-time and special part-time students. the availability of online materials through the College’s Wi-Fi network.7 Teaching Resources The Panel formed the view that the College engages in ongoing development and maintenance of its physical teaching resources. the College acknowledges that the system still requires improvement for parttime and special-part time students (ibid) and given the relatively large number of students that these groups represent (together making up approximately 30% of the student population in 20082009). the College aims at making students more independent as learners (Portfolio p.87).7% responded that they ‘strongly agree’ or ‘agree’ with the statement “I know the name of my mentor and his responsibilities”.88). CCE acknowledges that current utilization of its learning support facilities by part-time students is low. 87). Affirmation 7 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that its facilities and resources that support selfdirected learning need to be comprehensively evaluated in terms of how they impact on academic performance in order to inform improvement strategies.6 Student Learning Support The initiatives that CCE lists under Student Learning Support include a Mathematics Learning Support Centre (MLSC). The Panel also noted that in a Student Satisfaction Questionnaire only 67. Staff confirmed that they receive training through workshops and keep a record a mentor-mentee meeting on SPSM.

in particular special part-time students (Portfolio. p. the Panel learned of an apparent ‘overreliance’ on Blackbaord among some students interviewed during the audit visit. CCE needs to address the fact that students who do not own a laptop have a limited access to Blackboard and other online tools.4). © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 40 of 57 . these students felt that there was no need to search for literature in the Library because all important papers where uploaded by the lecturer onto Blackboard. As mentioned earlier (Section 6. Smartboards and computer-assisted learning. The College advises that this has resulted in an improvement in the availability and access to lecture notes and presentations.89). The introduction of new teaching technologies also carries certain risks. which is of advantage to students. This highlights a potential challenge to the College’s efforts to educate self-directed learners.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering The Panel learned that increasing numbers of staff are adopting new teaching technologies such as Blackboard. Also.

student behaviour and student satisfaction and climate.1 Students and Student Support Services Planning & Management CCE established the Caledonian Student Support Services (CSSS) Department in 2001 (Portfolio. 7.99). parttime.99). establishing a Student Council. The College lists a number of initiatives introduced in 2009 to improve its student support and indicates its intention to formally evaluate these (Portfolio. p. The target student population for 2015 is 3. The College advises that the department provides different student services at pre-entry. p. as discussed earlier in this Report. involving staff from other departments. and identification of students’ nonacademic competencies and interests. The initiatives include developing an annual calendar of events. College records also show a steady increase in both male and female. The Panel did not explore the College’s future planning with respect to other aspects of its student profile. 7. The College acknowledges that many of the student support services have previously been carried out without proper planning or budgeting but that it is now endeavoring to provide a more coordinated approach to its work in this area (ibid). during student life and after graduation. This chapter also comments on the Panel’s findings in relation to the profile of students at CCE. The Panel noted that the College has conducted surveys to determine student satisfaction of it support services. The Panel supports these initiatives and agrees with CCE that the evaluation of these is an important element in supporting improvement. the services are focused around counseling whilst during study time they include social and recreational activities and work placement support. The services after graduation include career guidance and alumni interaction. Its Mission is “to enhance the academic.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report 7 STUDENTS AND STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES This chapter reports on the general planning and management of student support services at CCE and specifically comments on the following: career and employment services student finances. synchronizing extracurricular activities. p. At the time of the audit visit in March 2010. personal and overall development of the students and equip them with the skills required for professional and social life” (ibid). accommodation catering and transport. but noted that CCE’s comprehensive student profile data collection allows for effective critical analysis.94).91). Page 41 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority .500 and towards this the College is marketing its programmes in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries as well as Oman (Portfolio. and social and recreational services and facilities.400 students.2 Student Profile In the academic year 2008-2009 the College had approximately 2. 26 other nationalities were also represented (Portfolio. special part-time and sponsored students. CCE has a system for storage and backup of student profile data and the Panel examined a number of reports generated by this system. however. p. international student services. the Panel believes that there is a need for CCE to adopt an enhanced system of survey management (see Recommendation 4). At pre-entry. CCE’s student population had increased to approximately 2700. Whilst most students were Omani (approximately 93% in 2008-2009). The majority (approximately 79%) of CCE’s students are male. medical and counselling facilities.

CCE is planning to conduct a student satisfaction survey on an annual basis and the College also notes that it expects the newly formed Student Council to facilitate systematic feedback from students (Portfolio. Issues that may need disciplinary action are forwarded to the Head of Department or the Disciplinary Committee depending on the degree of the offence. they expressed dissatisfaction with the facilities available in laboratories and workshops.94) and in the Student Guide. analysed and acted upon and supports the steps taken by the College towards ensuring this.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering 7. The Panel found that survey results were presented briefly and inconsistently. These included arranged interviews and random interviews.3 Student Satisfaction and Climate CCE reports that it conducts ad-hoc surveys to assess the level of satisfaction of students (Portfolio. a survey on counselling services involving 65 students. Affirmation 8 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that feedback on student support services needs to be systematically collected. p. Some of these are further explained during the compulsory student induction programme. the way the surveys were conducted and analysed differed from one survey to another. p. and a survey on medical facilities involving 65 students. Most students in the random interviews showed low satisfaction with the services provided to them. The Panel members conducted several interviews with students. Also. p. Module Evaluation Questionnaires with the number of participants varying between 4 and 321 depending on the module being evaluated. These included: a survey of the canteen with 65 participants. Further. The College advises that all College staff take responsibility for monitoring and maintaining appropriate standards of student behaviour and cases of inappropriate behaviour are logged. The Panel scrutinised the details of some of these surveys. The Panel suggests that records of disciplinary cases are formally analysed to best target preventative strategies. Rather.93). a student satisfaction survey with 36 participants.93). The Panel has concerns that some of the surveys cannot be used to represent the student population as the number of participants was very small. Also. CCE summarised the responses to the last two of these surveys and the Panel noted some inconsistency and inaccuracy when comparing the items/questions presented in the summary table and those of the survey itself. Examples of statements that students were asked to agree or disagree with include “the accommodation has facilities for sports and recreation” and “the college provides parking area for students”.4 Student Behaviour CCE publicises its rules and regulations relating to student behaviour on the College intranet (Portfolio. they investigated awareness of the existence of certain services or facilities. a survey of the Library with 354 participants. 7. It was also noted that most of the surveys were recent and had been conducted for the first time. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 42 of 57 . It is necessary for CCE to enhance its evaluation systems in order to gain a valid measure of student satisfaction and to act on area identified as requiring improvement. the Panel noted that some of the survey items did not assess student satisfaction. The College’s efforts in this area need to be supported by development and implementation of a system for conducting comprehensive and robust surveys that provide feedback from the student body on all non-academic matters and generate valid data that can feed into planned improvements (also see Recommendation 4).

p.5 Career and Employment Services The College states that “The mission. p.7). p. 7. the Panel formed the overall view that more work is needed in this area. A report of a survey covering 410 students who attended the new induction programme in September 2009 was examined by the Panel and shows increased student satisfaction.6 Student Finances Student finances are dealt with by the Finance and Accounts Department. 96). However. assisted around 470 students in 2008-2009 (ibid). CCE indicates that maintaining the participation of companies is becoming a challenge as the number of careers fairs being held within the sector increases (Portfolio. workshops on self-motivation and confidence building and a presentation and workshop on rules and regulations (Portfolio. pp. vision and values of CCE are those of a College that regards employability of graduates as a top priority” and that in support of this the CSSS Department provides placement services and acts as a conduit for graduate employment (Portfolio. student placements are currently not compulsory or credit bearing and are not formally monitored or evaluated (see Section 2. p.95). There is a need for the College to develop a clear policy to guide initiatives in this area (see Recommendation 8). The Panel appreciates the review and apparent improvement of the induction process and supports the College’s plans of further improvements which include the addition of a specific induction for international students. according to CCE. conduct various activities to support students in developing.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report Based on a survey conducted in January 2009. a freshers’ fair. Transport between the hostels and the College is provided and additional provision for female Page 43 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . p. interview and CV writing skills (Portfolio.94). The department implements strict policies on the payment of study fees and also provides guidance to students on receiving educational loans from banks and sponsorship from employers (Portfolio.48-49). The need for enhanced follow up of graduate employment is discussed in Section 2. As discussed earlier in this Report. Relevant information on student finances is set out clearly and in detail in the Student Guide and there is supportive information on the College intranet (ibid). Catering and Transport CCE provides accommodation for male and female full-time and international students in furnished. The Panel learned that this is a well-established event which is also open to other Colleges. 7. self-catering hostels rented by the College. for example. training programmes. students sponsored by their employers and students who benefit from full or partial sponsorship by the College.95). CCE conducts an Annual Career Fair. Similarly.11 (also see Recommendation 9). The College identifies “Facilitation of career development through placement.103). The new induction programme includes a self-guided campus tour.7 Accommodation. this includes students sponsored by the government. employment opportunities and the annual Careers Fair” as an area of strength (Portfolio. Individual and shared rooms are available. The Panel is supportive of the College’s stated intention to formalise its scholarship and hardship schemes which. The CSSS Department. 7. the Panel was pleased to note that CCE intends to revise its Student Guide having identified that it lacks clarity in some areas. together with the EPD Department. The Panel considers that enhanced evaluation and coordination of these activities would support these efforts. the students’ induction programme was reviewed. In order to increase students’ chances of getting jobs. The Panel learned that the number of students receiving some form of sponsorship has increased over the years.

The College reports that in 2008/2009 it had 171 foreign national students in total representing 26 countries with the strongest representation being from the Kingdom of Bahrain and the Republic of Iraq (Portfolio p. The Panel noted that a total of 65 students participated in the survey showing low representation of the population and the survey summary report shows low satisfaction with the canteen services.9 International Student Services The number of non-Omani students at CCE has increased steadily since it was established. The College states that this has been addressed in part through the new induction programme (also see Section 7. p. an on-call driver and an emergency vehicle available at all times and also full-time hostel wardens (Portfolio. availability and use of services available and the College concluded that better communication of these was required. The Student Guide states that hostels are managed by the Accommodation and Transport Coordinator and the hostel wardens. Safety and Environmental (HSE) Protection Manual which is supported by a series of procedures for dealing with specific events such as fire and incidents requiring first aid. the Panel was concerned to find no evidence of a formal mechanism in place for collecting feedback from students about their satisfaction with the hostel accommodation. The Student Guide states that the cafeteria is run by an external authority and that it operation is keenly monitored by the Estates and Maintenance Department but the Panel did not find evidence of systematic mechanisms in place to capture student feedback. p. a nurse and staff who are trained as first aiders. 7. travel and accommodation (Portfolio. A Hostel Committee has also been appointed to monitor and manage the hostels. CCE also provides personal.97). 7. the relevant commentary in the Portfolio is based on “informal feedback from hostel students and one-to-one interviews” (ibid). 99). The Panel noted that all these documents were dated 2004 (also see Section 1. The College has a first aid room. The College is pursuing an international marketing strategy in line with its aim to increase its student population to 3.98). © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 44 of 57 . financial and academic counselling services to students.). In 2009. however. The College claims to be proactive in taking measures to reduce work-related health risks and absenteeism (ibid) and the Panel noted that relevant information from the Quality and HSE Office is given in the Student Guide. This is contained in a detailed Health. The Panel encourages the College to continue to evaluate its medical and counselling facilities so that a specific and effective quality cycle is established in this area. The Panel urges the College to develop and implement an effective evaluation mechanism that will also support management of the new female hostel accommodation the College has plans to build (see Chapter 9).97). it is important for CCE to ensure that student feedback is systematically collected and considered (see Affirmation 8). The results from the 65 students who took part in the survey showed that not all students were well informed about the existence. p.12.4) although no specific evaluation of this has taken place. CCE indicates that it provides a variety of support services foreign national students that include assisting non-resident non-Omani students with visas.500 by 2014. p. The College states that it aims to provide within its hostels “a comfortable and healthy environment for accommodation and study”. The College conducted a ‘canteen survey’ in 2009 and reports general satisfaction with the service provided (Portfolio. CCE conducted a survey about its health and safety and counselling services.97). The Panel considers that in relation to both the cafeteria and to the provision of hostel accommodation. The College states that this committee takes feedback from wardens and students and suggests recommendations to the Executive (Portfolio.8 Medical and Counselling Facilities CCE has a health policy (Portfolio.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering hostel residents includes transportation for scheduled shopping trips.

p. Page 45 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . Its aim is to provide synchronized cultural and social activities within the College through establishing an annual theme for the College and then facilitating a number of activities to explore the theme through staff and student interaction. TOSCA has resulted in the establishment of fifteen clubs and societies (Portfolio. 7.99). Data collected from these activities needs to be analysed and fed to the quality cycle related to this area.102). pp. the College also indicates that despite increasing general levels of participation. regular meetings with international students. finding students willing to participate in non-academic activities remains a challenge.99).Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report p. The College currently lacks indoor areas where students can meet (see Section 6. The Panel was pleased to note that in support of its efforts to increase participation.99). a multipurpose volleyball/basketball court and table-tennis and badminton facilities. CCE clearly provides a range of social. recreational and other extracurricular services and facilities as part of a system through which students have the opportunity to apply transferable skills which are developed through their formal studies. However. CCE organises a variety of social and sports activities within the College and in participation with other institutions. recreational and extracurricular services and facilities as part of its Strategic Plan to equip graduates with leadership and entrepreneurship skills (Portfolio. The College reports that informal feedback from students indicates high satisfaction and general increased levels of participation. p. Although to date CCE has not formally assessed the needs or satisfaction of international students specifically. the Panel was pleased to note its stated intentions to implement a number of initiatives in this regard. The College has a grass football ground.10 Social and Recreational Services and Facilities CCE advises that it supports social. although provision for social/recreational space is included in the development of the existing campus that is currently underway (see Affirmation 11). These include: a needs analysis survey. Students’ opinions expressed to the Panel aligned with these observations.101-102). a specific induction for international students. the College now also records non-academic competencies and interests of new students during registration. CCE introduced a mechanism called Themed Occasion Society for College Activities (TOSCA).3). The Panel was pleased to learn that the College also has plans to provide more sports facilities at the new campus at Airport Heights which will include more facilities for female students and a full-length swimming pool (Portfolio. The Panel encourages the College to formalise its evaluation of this encouraging area. p. In March 2009. and the development of an international student guide (Portfolio.

HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering 8 STAFF AND STAFF SUPPORT SERVICES This chapter considers the planning and management of human resources at CCE and reports on the Panel’s findings in areas such as recruitment and selection. of academic staff with PhDs is a positive development at CCE. However. Relevant policies and procedures related to Human Resources are documented in CCE’s Staff Handbook. performance planning review.106). they include detailed © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 46 of 57 . and shows alignment with the institution’s goal of increasing its research profile.1 Human Resources Planning & Management The College Executive is responsible for Human Resources planning and management. To ensure that the regional focus of CCE’s vision is able to be achieved. department meetings and also made available on the College’s intranet. The increase.2 Staff Profile The College advises that its staff members (270 in 2008/2009) represent 17 different nationalities (Portfolio. p. the Panel observed that the overwhelming majority of academic staff are from the Indian sub-continent. staff planning and recruitment in new disciplines. CCE’s 2009-2014 Strategic Plan identifies several Human Resources measures required to achieve its Strategic Goals. Where departmental handbooks are available. 8. These include staff development. the College should give urgent consideration to strategies that diversify the profile of the academic staff to include staff from a wider range of nationalities. 8. Although the Staff Handbook examined by the Panel is comprehensive in scope. The Panel noted that new policies and procedures are communicated to staff through memos. Requirements in terms of academic and non-academic staff are linked to the institution’s planned growth in strategic areas. the Panel did not find convincing evidence that efforts to diversify the staff profile have been initiated. staff organizational climate and retention. Although CCE has recognised this as an area for improvement for reasons which include increasing diversity with respect to experience of different teaching practices (ibid). both in absolute and relative terms. Recommendation 15 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering develop and implement a system to ensure that its Staff Handbook is kept up to date. and Omanisation.3 Recruitment and Selection Staff recruitment processes at CCE appear solid and well documented. internationalisation and Omanisation. professional development and training. Job descriptions are available for most positions. as well as measures aimed at enhancing the research capacity at CCE. 8. Recommendation 16 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority recommends that Caledonian College of Engineering give urgent consideration to strategies that diversify the profile of its academic staff. it dates from 2004 and requires updating in most of the sections covered.

administrative and support staff. Staff satisfaction with the induction programme is evaluated on a regular basis and this feedback has been used to improve its structure by shifting from a “presentation-based format to an activity-based workshop” (ibid). as indicated in feedback from surveys and interviews conducted by the Panel. which is set out in the Staff Handbook encourages staff to upgrade their expertise and qualifications. CCE has identified the timeline for recruitment.5 Professional Development and Training CCE’s Staff Development Policy. CCE also supports participation in professional conferences. Participation in staff development activities was evident. The new format was well received by new staff. The Panel found CCE’s staff induction programme to be comprehensive. As mentioned in Section 8. p. The Panel learned that CVs of all academic staff teaching GCU programmes are reviewed by GCU and only staff meeting GCU’s criteria for GCU Associate Lecturers are allowed to teach in the respective programmes.4 Staff Induction The Panel confirmed that staff induction is conducted by the College Executive twice a year. The Panel confirmed that CCE has developed an annual calendar of in-house staff development workshops. which relate to the training needs of academic. Commendation 6 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for having established a comprehensive staff induction programme which is systematically delivered and well-received. provide the approach and subsequent framework for the College’s Professional Development and Training activities. vision and values” (Portfolio. including advertisement of vacancies. The Panel considers that these. Job descriptions for academic positions are also available and issued to staff during Staff Induction (Portfolio. 8. short-listing and interviewing. academic policies used at CCE and information on regional educational climate and culture (although the College advises that this last point is to be given more emphasis in future) (ibid). p.2.107). The College states that the aim of the staff induction programme is to “welcome new staff and introduce them to important aspects of college culture such as mission. an area for improvement in the recruitment and selection process is related to the diversification of origin of newly recruited staff. together with the College’s Guidelines for Faculty Development. The Panel considers that the transformation of CCE’s staff induction programme provides an example of effective use of the ADRI approach to improve quality. The Panel confirmed that in addition to in-house workshops. Page 47 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . and CCE uses feedback obtained from the annual Staff Satisfaction Survey to inform assessment of training needs. It also focuses on introducing academic quality systems. This is supplemented by departmental induction carried out within each department.107). and in particular the timeline for labour clearance. CCE should consider addressing this at all stages of the recruitment process. systematically delivered and well received.107). 8. as an area for improvement and is therefore planning to allocate more time for this (Portfolio.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report job descriptions and responsibilities for each position. p.

a lack of comprehensive job descriptions has hindered the process. 8. but CCE has recently addressed this issue (see also Section 8.6 Performance Planning and Review CCE’s advises that its performance management system is based on an annual self-appraisal followed by an evaluation by the respective line manager (Portfolio. p. In some cases. CCE implemented a merit-based professorial system in January 2009 (Portfolio. p.8 Severance The College advises that severance of staff is either through completion of the contract period. for example. The framework for the award of merit-based professorial titles is described in the College’s ‘Professorial Titles’ document. 8. or staff termination based reasons stated in the staff contract or the Omani Labour Law (Portfolio. as described in Section 4 of this Report.7 Promotion and Other Incentives The College advises that it is in the process of refining its employee position/grading scales for both academic and non-academic staff to ensure greater clarity and transparency (Portfolio. the Panel supports consideration of this and notes that clear benchmarked criteria and transparent procedures would be required to implement this promotion scheme effectively. p109). The Panel agrees that this is required to support the College’s efforts to encourage staff in their career development.2). The Panel was told that academic staff are also encouraged to develop teaching portfolios to document their work and achievements. constitutes ‘excellence’ leading to a professorial title. Performance planning and review appears to the Panel to be carried out in a systematic way across the institution. Affirmation 9 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority supports Caledonian College of Engineering in its efforts towards providing clear and transparent grading scales for both academic and non-academic staff.110). staff resignation. p.110).110). The College states that it is considering introducing merit-based promotion at the level of associate professors (Portfolio. 8. CCE needs to introduce benchmarked criteria about what.110). CCE is also encouraging academic staff to complete their PhD studies with GCU.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering Commendation 7 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority commends Caledonian College of Engineering for its establishment of a College wide professional development programme that is in line with its strategic objectives and responsive to feedback from staff. This document and its appendix explain in detail the application process for the award of a professorial title yet remains vague on the outcomes that an applicant needs to demonstrate in order to be considered for promotion. The Panel found the performance management process to be well documented and confirmed that CCE has published ‘Guidelines for Effective Performance Management’ which provide guidance to both appraisers and appraisees. p. The Panel welcomes this step as it encourages outcomes that are aligned with the institution’s Mission and consistent with CCE not applying longevity-based promotion. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 48 of 57 .

Overall 58% of respondents described their overall job satisfaction as good or excellent. and the Panel was concerned by the apparent lack of Omani representation across the levels of the organisation. There is a need to review the effectiveness of CCE’s current Omanisation strategy. Despite this. the Panel witnessed a high level of staff commitment. Disciplinary Committee. CCE states that the attrition rate for staff is below 10% but that because of the contractual nature of employment in the country. The Staff Handbook also fails to list what the College considers to be ‘misconduct’ and ‘serious misconduct’ in the context of Omani Labour Law. Page 49 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . written warning.10 Omanisation CCE has progressed steadily towards achieving its Omanisation targets and a significant step in achieving an increased Omani engagement in the College management is the recent appointment of CCE’s Senior Deputy Dean (see Section 1. Evidence examined by the Panel indicates that important factors that seem to affect staff satisfaction across the College include the lack of opportunities for promotion and the lack of transparency in the current remuneration system. 8. The College also expects its calendar of staff development workshops and enhanced induction process to impact positively on staff satisfaction and climate (Portfolio. While CCE conducts exit interviews. As noted earlier (see Recommendation 15) there is a requirement for CCE to update its Staff Handbook.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report CCE’s Staff Handbook addresses ‘Code of Conduct and Disciplinary Matters’ but fails to describe the process followed by CCE in case of misconduct (verbal warning. Regular data collection (for example from continued use of surveys) will assist the College to monitor trends over time.115). pride and loyalty to the College.104). The Panel noted that staff morale is described as low in the SWOT analysis included in the Strategic Plan and urges the College to continue to monitor this area closely. enthusiasm.111). The Panel is of the opinion that a comprehensive operational plan for Omanisation is required to support the College’s efforts in this area. p. the Panel considers that this could represent a first step in addressing job dissatisfaction issues. More comprehensive information on Staff Organisational Climate was made available through a detailed staff satisfaction survey. 8. a fact that has been recognised by CCE (Portfolio. carried out in March 2009 as a preparation for the College’s self-assessment. p. it has yet to achieve its targets. they appear not be carried out systematically across all departments and the College has identified this as an area for improvement (ibid).9 Staff Organisational Climate and Retention During its visit to CCE.112). In its analysis.3). The College is taking steps to address these (see Affirmation 9). the turnover is perceived to be higher (Portfolio. while 29% expressed indifference and 12% expressed dissatisfaction. appeals) as explained in the Portfolio (p. CCE identifies that the polarisation in job satisfaction correlates with departmental categories. p. The Panel examined the outcomes of the survey which was completed by approximately half the staff members. Affirmation 10 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that it needs to review its Omanisation strategy and the implementation of this towards ensuring an appropriate level of Omani representation across all levels of the organization in line with its Omanisation targets.

The College advises that it also utilizes a Space Planning System which provides the basis for the budgeting allocation of facilities (Portfolio. a female hostel. 9. and comments specifically on the following: campus planning.2).. The new campus development activities are in addition to the development of facilities (including © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 50 of 57 . Infrastructure and Facilities Development and Maintenance The Panel noted that CCE has a comprehensive infrastructure development plan that aligns with its 2009-2014 Strategic Plan. infrastructure and facilities development and maintenance. This new site is at Airport Heights. and communication services. and enthusiastic about. The Panel therefore welcomes the College’s stated intention to elicit more feedback from staff and students in this area (ibid). the College’s campus development plans. purchase and marketing.”. p. This department provides planning and management support in the areas of estates and maintenance. Campus III is planned to include teaching facilities. indoor sports and recreation amenities.HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering 9 GENERAL SUPPORT SERVICES AND FACILITIES This chapter reports on CCE’s planning and management of its general support services. some 15 minutes drive from the existing campus. development of the Campus II which is directly adjacent to this and development of its new site. Development of the College campus and infrastructure is a major feature of CCE’s 2009-2014 Strategic Plan.117). stores and reprography (Portfolio. public relations and marketing. the College needs to be mindful of ensuring effective engagement of all stakeholders in this broad area.117). to achieve the overall mission ……. The Panel considers the College’s systems for planning and managing its general support services and facilities to be appropriate and also adequately set to deal with the challenges that the expanded campus will present. granted by the government to form Campus III. one of its four strategic goals states that by 2014 the College will be “A larger physical entity with an infrastructure and facilities development plan. The Panel found most staff and students they interviewed to be aware of. Affirmation 11 The Oman Academic Accreditation Authority agrees with Caledonian College of Engineering that further development of its campus and infrastructure is essential in order for it to achieve its strategic goals and appreciates and supports its ongoing efforts to achieve this.2 Campus Planning. However. The Panel viewed plans that include further development of the original campus in Al Hail (Campus I). p.116).1 General Support Services and Facilities Planning and Management Campus planning and infrastructure management at CCE is carried out through the Executive with responsibility for general support services delegated to the Deputy Dean and Registrar who oversees the Department of Central Services. although the Panel is of the view that input from the wider College community has been limited to date. p. This goal aligns with the College’s planned increase in student numbers (up to 3500 in 2014-2015) and its other three strategic goals which relate to enhanced and expanded provision of technological education and engagement with industry. The Panel recognizes that a great deal of effort has already gone into this major development and was reassured by the College’s awareness of the need “for reinforcement and synchronization of the infrastructure plan to be interfaced more closely with the five-year strategic plan” (Portfolio. The Panel noted that the department works from a comprehensive up-to-date departmental handbook (see Section 9. integrated with realistic business plans and financial feasibility. and a conference hall. 9.

The Department of Central Services is made up of a number of sections: Estates Division.4 Communication Services CCE indicates that it considers effective communication to be essential for the operation of the College (Portfolio. The Panel believes that the location of the marketing function within the Department of Admissions and Registration needs to be reconsidered (see Section 6. 9. The Panel believes that the College’s efforts in this area need to be enhanced by targeted formal feedback from staff and students on their satisfaction with the specific services provided. to find a section in the 2009 staff satisfaction survey devoted to communication. Maintenance Department. The Panel is of the view that the College should give consideration to broaden its concept of marketing as the College develops. alumni and other interested parties (Portfolio.117) and its current Strategic Plan that it is reviewing its corporate identity in line with its strategic intentions for the College to have an established identity as a ‘gateway to industry’ and ‘a centre for strategic and applied research’. The College has a document entitled ‘Procedure for Internal and External Communications’. The Panel formed the impression that the maintenance systems in place work effectively and noted that information technology is used to increase the operational efficiency of support services. The comprehensive departmental handbook viewed by the Panel provides a clear framework for the work of all these units in alignment with the Strategic Plan. the College now has a computerized Asset Register System.118) and the Panel urges the College to give priority to considering strategies to address the concern of all stakeholders in this area. The Panel acknowledges the College’s efforts in this area but found no evidence of strategies having yet been developed to help the College revise its corporate identity. The College advises that its marketing plans are reviewed and revised on a regular basis and it has identified a number of planned promotional activities (Portfolio. The Panel was pleased.119). The College advises that it has provided more parking spaces in recent years but that it is restricted by the space available. laboratories and sports facilities) that have taken place to date to cater for the College community of approximately 2.121). staff. The Panel also learned that full service maintenance agreements are in place for much of the electronic and laboratory equipment. and Reprography and Photocopy Office.120). During the audit visit the Panel formed the view that the way CCE has approached infrastructure planning and maintenance is a very positive aspect of College life.700 students and 260 staff at the time of the audit visit. The results indicate a broad level of staff satisfaction in this Page 51 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . rather it appeared to be a document in draft form. although the Panel found no evidence of this being reviewed and revised on a regular basis as indicated in the Portfolio (p. It was clear to the Panel that car parking is an issue for CCE. p. Achievement of recruitment targets (particularly of students) and media coverage targets are reported as indicators of success in this area. p. p. This needs to be addressed. the College advises through the Portfolio (p. The Panel found high regard for the ‘CCE brand’ amongst a range of stakeholders interviewed during the audit visit.2). Purchase Section.120). In addition. 9. p. The College also has a number of its own publications which include a quarterly staff newsletter (ibid). The College has itself identified this as an area of concern (Portfolio. and to interact and communicate with ministries.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report classrooms.3 Public Relations and Marketing CCE states that it operates a targeted and focused marketing and public relations campaign designed to recruit both high quality students and staff. The College advises that this communication is primarily dependent on various electronic mechanisms (including the College intranet and Portal). however. Store.

HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering area. effective implementation. and critical review of activities well established.5 Facilities Management As described earlier in this chapter. the College has plans to develop an ‘ideas database’ as a mechanism to allow staff to put forward suggestions more easily. 9. Moreover. The Panel found evidence of facilities management being a well developed function at CCE with conscientious planning. the survey report made available to all staff shows evidence of the College acting on feedback. The Colleges Department of Central Services is playing a key role in this development in addition to its management of the existing College facilities. CCE is currently engaged with a major infrastructure development project. The Panel would like to see the College’s facilities management efforts enhanced by greater involvement of the wider College community through systematic consultative and feedback mechanisms. This includes the development of a new campus at a nearby location. © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 52 of 57 .

AUDIT PANEL Professor Jan Thomas (Panel Chairperson) Former Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic) Murdoch University Australia Professor Hassan Diab Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Vice President for Regional External Programs American University of Beirut Lebanon Professor Mehmet A Hastaoglu Vice Dean Department of Chemical Engineering Gebze Institute of Technology. Muscat Oman Dr Ahmed Al Ghassani Dean Higher College of Technology. Ali R. Turkey Professor Barbara Stäuble Deputy Rector for Academic Affairs German University of Technology in Oman. Nizwa College of Technology Oman Dr. Al-Hassnawi (Observer) Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Susan Trevor-Roper (Executive Officer) Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 53 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority . Kocaeli.Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report APPENDIX A. Oman Former Dean.

.....HEI Quality Audit Report Caledonian College of Engineering APPENDIX B........ APA ……………………………. BoD …………………………….................. acronyms and terms are used in this Report. Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET)....................... Board of Directors CCE ……………………………......An OAAA staff member assigned to an Audit Panel to provide professional guidance and support. ADRI ... As necessary....... Caledonian College of Engineering College Executive……………… A CCE group comprising the Dean. cyclical model for analysing a topic.. KRAs …………………………… Key Result Areas LRC ………………………………Learning Resources Centre MLSC ....... External Reviewer .. Industrial Advisory Group ITSC ……………………………......... Health.. Mathematics Learning Support Centre MoHE ...om) © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority Page 54 of 57 .............. Annual Programme Analysis Approach ...................gov.. and if not............... which focuses on evaluating what a HEI aims to achieve for a given topic and how it proposes to achieve it.......... ACRONYMS AND TERMS The following abbreviations.............. Safety and the Environment Ibid ……………………………… indicates the reference cited immediately before IELTS …………………………… International English Language Testing System IET ……………………………….............................Ministry of Higher Education (www. Deputy and Associate Deans CSSS …………………………….... URLs are provided to facilitate further enquiries about these acronyms and terms.....mohe......... Executive Officer....... Enterprise Resource Planning System...........................The fourth dimension of the ADRI cycle........... a data management system developed by CCE Improvement......... UK) HEI ....... a UK-based accreditation body IIG ……………………………….... which focuses on how effectively an organisation is improving its approach and deployment for any given topic in order to achieve better results......... In some cases..................... why not.... they are explained in context. GCC …………………………… Gulf Cooperation Council GCU ……………………………. ABBREVIATIONS....... Caledonian Student Support Services Deployment . Glasgow Caledonian University (Scotland.. comprising: Approach → Deployment → Results → Improvement.... Information Technology Support Centre ERPS ……………………………...A Member of the OAAA Register of External Reviewers... a person approved by the OAAA Board to participate as a member of the OAAA’s various external review panels..............Higher Education Institution (also known as HEP – Higher Education Provider) HSE …………………………….A four step........................The second dimension of the ADRI cycle... which focuses on whether a HEI’s plans for a given topic are being followed in practice..The first dimension of the ADRI cycle...........

The combination of policies and processes for ensuring that stated intentions are met... Twelve semesters (6 years) is required to complete a BSc Honors Degree in Engineering via this mode..........The combination of policies and processes for improving upon existing approach.... TOSCA .A public report published by the OAAA which presents the findings and conclusions of the Audit Panel’s External Review of a HEI............................. SPMS ……………………………............. Results . which focuses on the evidence of the outputs and outcomes of a topic’s approach and deployment. Quality Enhancement .........Caledonian College of Engineering HEI Quality Audit Report MoU . system refers to plans............................................. deployment and results.. Quality Assurance ......... Panel Member ................... pursues and achieves its mission and vision...........................In this Report. Memorandum of Understanding OAAA ....................... Quality Audit Report .......An interview conducted in situ by individual Panel Members during the Audit but separately from the main interview sessions.......................................see Quality Audit Portfolio.........Oman Academic Accreditation Authority (www.... PEIE …………………………….. Student Performance Monitoring System SWOT Analysis ………………… A strategic planning tool used to evaluate Strengths........The third dimension of the ADRI cycle.................Vellore Institute of Technology University (India) Page 55 of 57 © Oman Academic Accreditation Authority ...................An independent evaluation of the effectiveness of the system and processes by which a HEI sets...... Themed Occasion Society for College Activities VITU ........................Oman Qualifications Framework....... policies........................ Weaknesses..... Also forms the main submission made to the OAAA by the HEI being audited.............. Random Interview ............................... Opportunities and Threats System ................om) OAAA Board... Public Establishment for Industrial Estates Portfolio............... Special Part-time Student…………A student following a mode of study aimed at professional employees with work commitments in the interior regions of Oman which allow a maximum of only 15 contact days a month with the College.................... processes and results that are integrated towards the fulfilment of a common purpose.................... Panel Chairperson ........................................The report produced as the result of a self study.........The governing body of the Oman Academic Accreditation Authority OQF....................................gov...oac..........The Chairperson of the Audit Panel................ Quality Audit ..An OAAA External Reviewer who is a member of an Audit Panel... Quality Audit Portfolio..................

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